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  1. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  2. Los ojos de la NASA sobre la Tierra

    NASA Video Gallery

    La NASA cuenta con más de una decena de satélites que estudian la Tierra. Conoce la información que recaban los satélites, junto con Gilberto Colón, asistente especial del subdirector del Centro de...

  3. Tissue effects of glutamine in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Hernando-Martín, Mercedes; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro; Cordido, Fernando; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: El objetivo fue evaluar los efectos de la administración de glutamina sobre la regresión tumoral y sobre el tejido sano en pacientes con cáncer rectal que recibieron quimiorradioterapia. Material y métodos: Se incluyó 10 pacientes con cáncer rectal operado después de quimiorradioterapia, un subgrupo de un ensayo clínico que comparó glutamina con placebo en la prevención de enteritis aguda. Un patólogo experto analizó las muestras de tumor y tejido sano, buscando datos de regresión tumoral, mucífagos y daño por radiación. Resultados: No hubo diferencias entre placebo y glutamina en el grado de regresión tumoral. Todos los pacientes con glutamina presentaron mucífagos, frente al 28,6% con placebo (p = 0,038). El daño sobre tejido sano fue similar en los pacientes con glutamina y placebo, y entre aquellos con y sin enteritis. Conclusión: La glutamina no ejerce un efecto protector frente a la quimiorradioterapia sobre el tumor o el tejido rectal sano.

  4. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  5. Commercial lubricant use among HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Los Angeles: implications for the development of rectal microbicides for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Pines, Heather A; Gorbach, Pamina M; Reback, Cathy J; Landovitz, Raphael J; Mutchler, Matt G; Mitsuyasu, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    To inform the development and assess potential use of rectal microbicide gels for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men (MSM), we examined the dynamics and contexts of commercial lubricant use during receptive anal intercourse (RAI) within this population. From 2007 to 2010, 168 HIV-negative MSM living in Los Angeles who practice RAI completed computer-assisted self-interviews, which collected information on their last sexual event with ≤3 recent partners, at baseline, three months, and one-year study visits. Logistic generalized linear mixed models were used to identify individual- and sexual event-level characteristics associated with commercial lubricant use during RAI at the last sexual event within 421 partnerships reported by participants over the course of follow-up. During RAI at their last sexual event, 57% of partnerships used a condom and 69% used commercial lubricant. Among partnerships that used commercial lubricant, 56% reported lubricant application by both members of the partnership, 66% first applied lubricant during sex, but before penetration, and 98% applied lubricant at multiple locations. The relationship between substance use and commercial lubricant use varied by condom use (interaction p-value = 0.01). Substance use was positively associated with commercial lubricant use within partnerships that did not use condoms during RAI at their last sexual event (AOR = 4.47, 95% [corrected] [CI]: 1.63-12.28), but no association was observed within partnerships that did use condoms (AOR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.23-1.85). Commercial lubricant use during RAI was also positively associated with reporting more sexual partners (AOR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.05-1.31), while older age (units = 5 years; AOR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.61-0.94), homelessness (past year; AOR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.13-0.76), and having sex with an older (>10 years) partner (AOR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.95) were negatively associated with commercial lubricant use. These factors should be considered

  6. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  7. La utilizacion de los mapas conceptuales en la ensenanza de biologia y su efecto sobre el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis en los estudiantes universitarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Rivera, Maria M.

    Se investigo el efecto de los mapas conceptuales sobre el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis en estudiantes universitarios. La investigacion utilizo dos estrategias: mapas conceptuales individuales y mapas conceptuales colaborativos, con el fin de investigar si existen diferencias significativas en el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis. El analisis de los datos incluyo aspectos cualitativos y cuantitativos. Se desprende del estudio que el 80% de los estudiantes describen la utilizacion de los mapas conceptuales como una experiencia beneficiosa. El 70% de los estudiantes expreso que los mapas conceptuales son utiles en el aprendizaje del proceso de fotosintesis y el 61% indico que facilitan la comprension de los conceptos. Los hallazgos mas importantes del analisis cuantitativo indican que los estudiantes que utilizaron los mapas conceptuales mejoraron significativamente su desempeno en la posprueba global. Se utilizo la prueba Mann-Whitney para investigar si existian diferencias significativas en la posprueba y preprueba global, el valor de W = 1945.0, para un valor p de 0.00, lo cual establece diferencias significativas. Para determinar si existian diferencias significativas entre la posprueba y preprueba del grupo individual, se realizo la prueba nuevamente. El valor de W correspondio a 490.5, que es significativo, con un valor p de 0.00. Se concluye que existen diferencias significativas entre la ejecucion de la posprueba y preprueba del grupo individual. Los datos proveen suficiente evidencia para sostener que los estudiantes que utilizaron la estrategia de mapas conceptuales individuales mejoraron el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis significativamente. Se realizo nuevamente la prueba para los resultados de posprueba y preprueba del grupo colaborativo. El valor de W correspondio a 446 con un valor p de 0.00. Se concluyo que existen diferencias significativas entre la ejecucion de la posprueba y preprueba del grupo colaborativo. Finalmente, se efectuo una

  8. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  9. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  10. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  11. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  12. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  13. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  14. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  15. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  16. Local management of rectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Touzios, John; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of rectal neoplasia, whether benign or malignant, challenges the surgeon. The challenge in treating rectal cancer is selecting the proper approach for the appropriate patient. In a small number of rectal cancer patients local excision may be the best approach. In an attempt to achieve two goals-cure of disease with a low rate of local failure and maintenance of function and quality of life-multiple approaches can be utilized. The key to obtaining a good outcome for any one patient is balancing the competing factors that impact on these goals. Any effective treatment aimed at controlling rectal cancer in the pelvis must take into account the disease in the bowel wall itself and the disease, or potential disease, in the mesorectum. The major downside of local excision techniques is the potential of leaving untreated disease in the mesorectum. Local management techniques avoid the potential morbidity, mortality, and functional consequences of a major abdominal radical resection and are thus quite effective in achieving the maintenance of function and quality of life goal. The issue for the transanal techniques is how they fare in achieving the first goal-cure of the cancer while keeping local recurrence rates to an absolute minimum. Without removing both the rectum and the mesorectum there is no completely accurate way to determine whether a rectal cancer has moved outside the bowel wall, so any decision on local management of a rectal neoplasm is a calculated risk. For benign neoplasia, the challenge is removing the lesion without having to resort to a major abdominal procedure.

  17. Rectal dose to prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy with or without rectal spacer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Polf, Jerimy; Badiyan, Shahed; Biagioli, Matthew; Fernandez, Daniel; Latifi, Kujtim; Wilder, Richard; Mehta, Minesh; Chuong, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a spacer inserted in the prerectal space could reduce modeled rectal dose and toxicity rates for patients with prostate cancer treated in silico with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. A total of 20 patients were included in this study who received photon therapy (12 with rectal spacer (DuraSeal™ gel) and 8 without). Two PBS treatment plans were retrospectively created for each patient using the following beam arrangements: (1) lateral-opposed (LAT) fields and (2) left and right anterior oblique (LAO/RAO) fields. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the prostate, rectum, bladder, and right and left femoral heads. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model and compared between patients with and without the rectal spacer. A significantly lower mean rectal DVH was achieved in patients with rectal spacer compared to those without. For LAT plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 4.19 and 13.5%, respectively. For LAO/RAO plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 5.07 and 13.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found in any rectal dosimetric parameters between the LAT and the LAO/RAO plans generated with the rectal spacers. We found that ≥ 9 mm space resulted in a significant decrease in NTCP modeled for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity. Rectal spacers can significantly decrease modeled rectal dose and predicted ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated in silico with PBS. A minimum of 9 mm separation between the prostate and anterior rectal wall yields the largest benefit.

  18. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  19. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  20. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  1. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  2. Estudio de la estructura logica utilizada en la ensenanza y el aprendizaje de los conceptos sobre el comportamiento de gases en el curso introductorio de quimica a nivel universitario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Diaz, Agnes

    El estudio que se presenta es de caracter cualitativo, un estudio multicasos donde se estudia la estructura logica utilizada por cuatro (4) profesores universitarios que ensenan el curso introductorio de quimica, en la planificacion, presentacion y evaluacion del tema sobre el comportamiento de los gases. Se utilizaron varias fuentes de informacion como: cuestionarios de profesores y estudiantes, entrevistas, grabaciones videomagnetofonicas, materiales didacticos y una prueba conceptual, entre otros. La informacion recopilada fue analizada de acuerdo al orden logico del contenido presentado, el estilo de ensenanza del profesor, las tecnicas y estrategias utilizadas para el desarrollo de destrezas de pensamiento, el ambiente fisico en el salon de clase y los instrumentos de evaluacion y avaluo. El estudio demuestra que lo que los profesores piensan y planifican para hacer sus presentaciones no necesariamente es lo que ocurre en el salon de clases. El desarrollo de destrezas de pensamiento, que constituye una prioridad de los profesores, no se elaboran efectivamente. El uso de las estrategias de resolucion de problemas numericos predomino. La participacion del estudiante en el salon de clases fue limitada y no se logro demostrar el desarrollo de las destrezas de pensamiento deseadas. Aunque los profesores tienen su propio estilo de ensenanza, el orden logico del contenido presentado en clase fue el mismo o siguio muy de cerca el orden establecido por el libro de texto. Los profesores utilizaron preferentemente la tiza y la pizarra para sus presentaciones y la dinamica en el salon de clases fue esencialmente tradicional. Los profesores hicieron su presentacion y los estudiantes copiaron pasivamente la informacion. Las evaluaciones de los estudiantes fueron esencialmente, pruebas escritas de seleccion multiple de acuerdo con el estilo en que se les enseno. El avaluo fue casi inexistente. La prueba conceptual administrada revela un aprendizaje pobre en los conceptos mas

  3. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors.

  4. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  6. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  7. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  8. Future of therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-06-01

    Since 2004, the standard of care for patients with cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer has been preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. A number of advances have occurred and are defining the future of rectal cancer therapy. Among these are short course radiation, the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, selective radiation and selective surgery, and new chemoradiation regimens with novel agents. This review will examine these developments and assess their impact on the future therapy of rectal cancer.

  9. A rare cause of chronic rectal bleeding in children; solitary rectal ulcer: case report.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Abdulkerim; Tander, Burak; Temiz, Muhyittin; Barış, Sancar; Arıtürk, Ender

    2011-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding is extremely rare in children. Rare presentation, non-specific symptoms, insufficient experience, and characteristics mimicking other rectal diseases may cause misdiagnosis or delay of diagnosis in some pediatric patients. Here, we report a 10-year-old boy with solitary rectal ulcer diagnosed two years after onset of the symptoms who responded well to the conservative therapy, including high-fiber diet, laxatives, defecation training, and sucralfate enema.

  10. Paediatric rectal prolapse in Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Duckett, J; Lewin, J

    1996-01-01

    During the 1994 crisis in Rwanda, a high incidence of full-thickness rectal prolapse was noted among the refugee children in the south-west of the country. The prolapses arose as a result of acute diarrhoeal illness superimposed on malnutrition and worm infestation. We used a modification of the Thiersch wire technique in 40 of these cases during two months working in a refugee camp. A catgut pursestring was tied around the anal margin under local, regional or general anaesthesia. This was effective in achieving short-term control of full-thickness prolapse until the underlying illness was corrected. Under the circumstances, no formal follow-up could be arranged; however, no complications were reported and only one patient presented with recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9014879

  11. How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lubricate the suppository tip with a water-soluble lubricant such as K-Y Jelly, not petroleum jelly (Vaseline). If you do not have this lubricant, moisten your rectal area with cool tap water. ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  13. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  14. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resource Library Brochures and Product Store Career Center DC&R Journal Access Member Directory Educational Resources American ... Care After Colon and Rectal Cancer Crohn’s Disease DC&R Journal Diseases and Conditions Find A Surgeon ...

  15. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-11-15

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words "rectum", "rectal", "cancer", "laparoscopy", "robot". After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients.

  16. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  17. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  18. Differences in microbial signatures between rectal mucosal biopsies and rectal swabs.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Pérez, Félix; McCoy, Amber N; Okechukwu, Charles; Carroll, Ian M; Smith, Kevin M; Jeremiah, Kim; Sandler, Robert S; Asher, Gary N; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence the microbiota of the large bowel may influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other diseases including type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome. Current sampling methods to obtain microbial specimens, such as feces and mucosal biopsies, are inconvenient and unappealing to patients. Obtaining samples through rectal swabs could prove to be a quicker and relatively easier method, but it is unclear if swabs are an adequate substitute. We compared bacterial diversity and composition from rectal swabs and rectal mucosal biopsies in order to examine the viability of rectal swabs as an alternative to biopsies. Paired rectal swabs and mucosal biopsy samples were collected in un-prepped participants (n = 11) and microbial diversity was characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial community composition from swab samples was different from rectal mucosal biopsies (p = 0.001). Overall the bacterial diversity was higher in swab samples than in biopsies as assessed by diversity indexes such as: richness (p = 0.01), evenness (p = 0.06) and Shannon's diversity (p = 0.04). Analysis of specific bacterial groups by qPCR showed higher copy number of Lactobacillus (p < 0.0001) and Eubacteria (p = 0.0003) in swab samples compared with biopsies. Our findings suggest that rectal swabs and rectal mucosal samples provide different views of the microbiota in the large intestine.

  19. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words “rectum”, “rectal”, “cancer”, “laparoscopy”, “robot”. After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients. PMID:27895814

  20. Novel radiation techniques for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concepts for management of rectal cancer have changed drastically over the past few years. Through national bowel cancer screening programmes in the Western countries and the increasing use of endoscopic procedures as diagnostic tool, there is increase in detection of rectal cancer in early stages. There is increase in ageing population worldwide but more so in Western countries. In addition, there is realisation of harm from extirpative surgical procedures which are directed towards managing advanced rectal cancer in the past. Increase in cost of health care burden has also led the investigators to seek alternative treatment options which are effective, safe and cost effective. There are several modern radiation techniques which fits this bill and we need to be aware of newer novel radiation techniques to fulfil this gap. PMID:24982769

  1. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  2. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route.

  3. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  4. Transanal Approach to Rectal Polyps and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Mishra, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    A transanal approach to rectal polyp and cancer excision is often an appropriate alternative to conventional rectal resection, and has a lower associated morbidity. There has been a steady evolution in the techniques of transanal surgery over the past 30 years. It started with traditional transanal excision and was revolutionized by introduction of transanal endoscopic microsurgery in early 1980s. Introduction of transanal minimally invasive surgery made it more accessible to surgeons around the world. Now robotic platforms are being tried in certain institutions. Concerns have been raised about recurrence rates of cancers with transanal approach and success of subsequent salvage operations. PMID:26929754

  5. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  6. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  7. Rectal bezoars due to pumpkin seeds.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Mohammad Salman; Al-Wahibi, Khalifa; Baloch, Shafiq; Al-Qadhi, Hani

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bezoars commonly occur due to seeds, especially in children living in countries south of the Mediterranean and in the Middle-East. Dried seeds are considered a delicacy and consumed widely. Inadequate chewing or hastily eating without removing the hull may lead to their impaction as bezoars, which may require manual removal under general anaesthesia.

  8. Do Older Americans Undergo Stoma Reversal Following Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hu, Yue-Yung; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective For low-lying rectal cancers, proximal diversion can reduce anastomotic leak after sphincter preserving surgery; however, evidence suggests that such temporary diversions are often not reversed. We aimed to evaluate non-reversal and delayed stoma reversal in elderly patients undergoing low anterior resection (LAR). Design SEER-Medicare linked analysis from 1991-2007. Settings and Participants 1,179 primary stage I-III rectal cancer patients over age 66 who underwent LAR with synchronous diverting stoma. Main Outcome Measures 1) Stoma creation and reversal rates. 2) Time to reversal. 3) Characteristics associated with reversal and shorter time to reversal. Results Within 18 months of LAR, 51% (603/1179) of patients underwent stoma reversal. Stoma reversal was associated with age < 80 years (p<0.0001), male gender (p=0.018), less comorbidities (p=0.017), higher income [quartile 4 vs. 1, (p=0.002)], early tumor stage [1 vs. 3; (p<0.001)], neoadjuvant radiation (p<0.0001), rectal tumor location [vs. rectosigmoid, (p=0.001)], more recent diagnosis (p=0.021), and shorter length of stay on LAR admission (p=0.021). Median time to reversal was 126 days (IQR: 79-249). Longer time to reversal was associated with older age (p=0.031), presence of comorbidities (p=0.014), more advanced tumor stage (p=0.007), positive lymph nodes (p=0.009), receipt of adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.008), more recent diagnosis (p=0.004) and longer LOS on LAR admission (p <0.0001). Conclusions Half of elderly rectal cancer patients who undergo LAR with temporary stoma have not undergone stoma reversal by 18 months. Identifiable risk factors predict both non-reversal and longer time to reversal. These results help inform pre-operative discussions and promote realistic expectations for elderly rectal cancer patients. PMID:23298948

  9. Evidence and research in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Josep M; Krivokapić, Zoran; Leer, Jan Willem; Påhlman, Lars; Rödel, Claus; Schmoll, Hans Joachim; Scott, Nigel; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Verfaillie, Christine

    2008-06-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists involved in the design and management of the multidisciplinary ESTRO Teaching Course on Rectal Cancer. The scenario of ongoing research is also addressed. In this time of changing treatments, it clearly appears that a common standard for large heterogeneous patient groups have to be substituted by more individualised therapies based on clinical-pathological features and very soon on molecular and genetic markers. Only trained multidisciplinary teams can face this new challenge and tailor the treatments according to the best scientific evidence for each patient.

  10. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  11. Altemeier operation for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Abdelhedi, Cherif; Frikha, F; Bardaa, S; Kchaw, A; Mzali, R

    2014-08-08

    A stranguled rectal prolapse is a rare cause of intestinal occlusion. It requires emergency surgery. A patient who underwent emergency perineal proctectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy is described. The postoperative course was uneventful, with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual scenario of bowel incarceration.

  12. Increasing trend in retained rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Unluer, Zynep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To highlight the rising trend in hospital presentation of foreign bodies retained in the rectum over a 5-year period. METHODS Retrospective review of the cases of retained rectal foreign bodies between 2008 and 2012 was performed. Patients’ clinical data and yearly case presentation with data relating to hospital episodes were collected. Data analysis was by SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, United States. RESULTS Twenty-five patients presented over a 5-year period with a mean age of 39 (17-62) years and M: F ratio of 2:1. A progressive rise in cases was noted from 2008 to 2012 with 3, 4, 4, 6, 8 recorded patients per year respectively. The majority of the impacted rectal objects were used for self-/partner-eroticism. The commonest retained foreign bodies were sex vibrators and dildos. Ninty-six percent of the patients required extraction while one passed spontaneously. Two and three patients had retrieval in the Emergency Department and on the ward respectively while 19 patients needed examination under anaesthesia for extraction. The mean hospital stay was 19 (2-38) h. Associated psychosocial issues included depression, deliberate self-harm, illicit drug abuse, anxiety and alcoholism. There were no psychosocial problems identified in 15 patients. CONCLUSION There is a progressive rise in hospital presentation of impacted rectal foreign bodies with increasing use of different objects for sexual arousal. PMID:27830039

  13. Giant rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Alder, L.S.; Elver, G.; Foo, F.J.; Dobson, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST are the most common mesenchymal tumours; however, rectal GISTs account for <5%. In the pelvis they represent a diagnostic challenge with giant GISTs likely to be malignant. They may present with urological, gynaecological or rectal symptoms. Sphincter-preserving surgery can be aided by neoadjuvant therapy. We present an uncommon case of giant rectal GIST masquerading as acute urinary retention. PMID:24968434

  14. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  16. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  17. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  18. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  19. Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?

    PubMed

    Andersson, Nirina; Boman, Jens; Nylander, Elisabet

    2017-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Europe and has large impacts on patients' physical and emotional health. Unidentified asymptomatic rectal Chlamydia trachomatis could be a partial explanation for the high Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence. In this study, we evaluated rectal Chlamydia trachomatis testing in relation to symptoms and sexual habits in women and men who have sex with men. Rectal Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was 9.1% in women and 0.9% in men who have sex with men. None of the patients reported any rectal symptoms; 59.0% of the women with a rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection denied anal intercourse and 18.8% did not have a urogenital infection; 9.4% did neither have a urogenital infection nor reported anal sex. We suggest that rectal sampling should be considered in women visiting sexually transmitted infection clinics regardless of rectal symptoms and irrespective of anal intercourse, since our data suggest that several cases of rectal Chlamydia trachomatis otherwise would be missed, thus enabling further disease transmission.

  20. Combined modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Röedel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients and whether the type of surgery after chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  1. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  2. Rectal and appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Sanae, Shahram; Nikkhoo, Bahram

    2006-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are neoplasms characterized by spindle cell proliferation and a fiboinflammatory vascular stroma. Herein, we presented the successful treatment of a rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an 11-year-old boy who presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain of 1(1/2) months duration and an appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a 29-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain of two months duration with associated tenderness and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Histologically, our cases had inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors very similar to that of other sites; the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and muscle-specific actin.

  3. A new 'enterocompressor' to facilitate rectal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Barraza, R P

    1990-02-01

    A newly devised enterocompressor facilitates low rectal anastomosis in children with Hirschsprung's disease. This simple surgical instrument, composed of two semicylindrical valves, a hinge, and a regulating screw, maintains intestinal anastomoses properly placed and produces spur crushing. In addition, it is inexpensive and reusable. The enterocompressor, used in 33 primary and 15 secondary Duhamel operations, and applied to normalize intestinal transit in 10 colectomies, provided adequate anastomosis and prevented leakage of intestinal contents. This enterocompressor can be used safely in children as young as six months of age.

  4. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  5. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  6. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  7. Focusing the management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dbeis, Rachel; Smart, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer treatment has undergone major changes over the last 15 years with a focus on individualized care based around MRI assessment of the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia, improved surgical techniques and targeted use of pre-operative oncological therapies in patients with locally advanced disease. The recognition that some tumours responded completely to pre-operative chemoradiotherapy, and the selective use of a non-operative policy has led to a quest to further identify those patients and their tumour in whom this approach could be used, irrespective of MRI stage. With no clear patient factors identified, the tumour and its gene expression has become a target for research to identify individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which may indicate a response to specific treatment, or not. To date some agents have been identified and trialed, such as cetuximab, with individual tumours being assessed for response allowing directed treatment. The reviewed paper by Sebio and colleagues report a study that links polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 with response to neoadjuvant 5-Fluorouracil treatment in rectal cancer patients. However, genetic heterogeneity alone may not explain the variations of drug response and environmental factors may lead to epigenetic effects and therefore alter responses. Therefore whilst this study demonstrates the impact of different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is only one step forward, but perhaps a step in the right direction. PMID:28149883

  8. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-02-20

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  9. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  10. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings.

  11. Postembryonic development of rectal pads in bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina Gonçalves; Neves, Clóvis Andrade; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2009-10-01

    The morphology and development of the digestive tract of insects has been extensively studied, but little attention has been given to the development of the rectal pads. These organs are responsible for absorption of water and salts. In insects where they occur, there are usually six ovoid rectal pads located in the medial-anterior portion of the rectum. The rectal pad has three types of cells: principal, basal, and junctional. The arrangement of these three cell types delimits an intrapapillary lumen. The aim of the current study is to describe the development of the rectal pads during postembryonic development of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides and Melipona scutellaris. Specimens were analyzed at the following developmental stages: white-, pink-, brown-, and black-eyed pupae, and adult workers. The development of the rectal pad begins as a thickening of the epithelium in white-eyed pupae at 54 hr. At this stage, there is neither a basal cell layer nor intrapapillary lumen. The basal layers begin to form in the pink-eyed pupa and are completely formed at the end of the development of the brown-eyed pupa. In the brown-eyed pupal stage, the intrapapillary lumen is formed and the junctional cells are positioned and completely differentiated. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death were detected along with cell proliferation in the whole rectum during pupal development, suggesting that the development of the rectal pads involves cell proliferation, death, and differentiation. The rectal pads originate only from the ectoderm.

  12. Microscopy detection of rectal gonorrhoea in asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Forni, J; Miles, K; Hamill, M

    2009-11-01

    This audit aimed to determine the usefulness of microscopy to detect presumptive rectal gonorrhoea (GC) infection in asymptomatic men. We retrospectively audited more than 400 male patients attending a London genitourinary medicine clinic from January 2005 to March 2007 who tested rectal culture positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and compared this with the microscopy detection rate. In total, 123/423 (29%) of culture positive samples were microscopy positive. Of those that tested microscopy negative (300/423), 64 (21%) were symptomatic and 236 (79%) asymptomatic. In addition, a time and motion study examined 81 rectal slides over a two-week period to identify microscopy reading time required to make a presumptive diagnosis of GC. Three slides were positive, resulting in six hours and 45 minutes to detect one positive sample. Given the low sensitivity for rectal microscopy coupled with the length of time required to obtain a presumptive positive rectal GC result, we believe rectal microscopy is no longer a cost-effective tool screening for asymptomatic men, and this report supports the BASHH guideline that it is not recommended in the management of asymptomatic rectal infection.

  13. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  14. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  15. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  16. Perineal Rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier Procedure) as Treatment of Strangulated Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cernuda, Ricardo Baldonedo; Ángel, Janet Pagnozzi; Fernández, Nuria Truan; Sánchez-Farpón, José Herminio; Pérez, Jose Antonio Álvarez

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration of a rectal prolapse is an unusual entity that represents a surgical emergency. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, requiring emergency surgery. When surgery becomes inevitable, the choice of procedure varies. A 57-year-old man who presented with strangulated rectal prolapse is described. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. After a 6-month follow-up, there was no recurrence, but the patient continued with fecal incontinence. This case underlines the importance of the Altemeier procedure as treatment in the patient with a strangulated prolapsed rectal segment.

  17. Death by Disimpaction: A Bradycardic Arrest Secondary to Rectal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal examination and fecal disimpaction are common procedures performed in the Emergency Department on a daily basis. Here, we report a rare case of a patient suffering a cardiac arrest and ultimately death likely due to rectal manipulation. A 66-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a complaint of abdominal distention and constipation. A rectal exam was performed. During the examination the patient became apneic. On the cardiac monitor the patient was found to be in pulseless electrical activity with a bradycardic rate. Our recommendation would be to provide adequate analgesia and close patient monitoring of those undergoing this procedure especially patients with significant stool burdens. PMID:28116179

  18. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  19. [Strangled rectal prolapse in young adults: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bayar, Rached; Djebbi, Achref; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Talbi, Ghofrane; Gharbi, Lassaad; Arfa, Nafaa; Mestiri, Hafedh; Khalfallah, Mohamed Taher

    2016-01-01

    Rectal prolapse is a rectal static disorder which involves rectal wall intussusception inducing its externalization through the anus. It usually affects children and the elderly. Its occurrence in young adults is rare. Strangulated rectal prolapse is also a rare complication. We report the case of a 30-year old patient who underwent emergency surgery for strangulated rectal prolapse. Emergency perineal rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier repair) was performed with simple outcome.

  20. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  1. [Parenting Information: Teenagers. Informacion Para los Padres: Sobre los Jovenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Steve

    These four booklets are devoted specifically to the concerns of parents and their teenage children and are part of a series of 22 booklets designed specifically to help parents understand their children and help them to learn. "Parents--Learn about Your Teenager" (booklet #6) explains the changes which occur during the teen years and the…

  2. Tailoring treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma: immunohistochemistry for predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Payal

    2011-04-01

    Over the past couple of decades, multimodality treatment for the management of resectable rectal cancer has substantially improved the outcome of affected patients. However, the broad and unpredictable response to tumor of patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapeutic interventions shows that our understanding of the molecular events leading to radioresistance in patients affected with this malignancy remains sparse. Multiple attempts by individual molecular markers in gene array and tissue microarray studies have emerged with the goal of identifying predictors of a response to chemoradiation in patients with rectal cancer. In this report, we discuss the status of the markers currently available in an attempt to tailor specific targeted therapies for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant setting.

  3. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  4. Combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer using irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative or postoperative pelvic radiation plus concurrent fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is standard adjuvant treatment for patients with T3 and/or N1/2 rectal cancer. Newer chemotherapeutic regimens have been developed for the treatment of patients with metastatic disease. Irinotecan (CPT-11, Camptosar)-based regimens have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease and are being actively investigated in combination with pelvic radiation therapy for patients with rectal cancer.

  5. A crunching colon: rectal bezoar caused by pumpkin seed consumption.

    PubMed

    Manne, Janaki R; Rangu, Venu M; Motapothula, Uma Maheswara R; Hall, Matthew C

    2012-05-01

    Rectal seed bezoars are an uncommon cause of fecal impaction, particularly in the United States. Although the literature has reported several cases of phytobezoars composed of various types of seeds, bezoars formed of pumpkin seeds have rarely been reported. We report a case of a man, aged 62 years, with a rectal bezoar composed of pumpkin seeds with complications necessitating extensive treatment, including manual disimpaction and colonoscopy.

  6. Excretory transport of xenobiotics by dogfish shark rectal gland tubules.

    PubMed

    Miller, D S; Masereeuw, R; Henson, J; Karnaky, K J

    1998-09-01

    Marine elasmobranch rectal gland is a specialized, osmoregulatory organ composed of numerous blind-ended, branched tubules emptying into a central duct. To date, NaCl excretion has been its only described function. Here we use isolated rectal gland tubule fragments from dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), fluorescent xenobiotics, and confocal microscopy to describe a second function, xenobiotic excretion. Isolated rectal gland tubules rapidly transported the fluorescent organic anion sulforhodamine 101 from bath to lumen. Luminal accumulation was concentrative, saturable, and inhibited by cyclosporin A (CSA), chlorodinitrobenzene, leukotriene C4, and KCN. Inhibitors of renal organic anion transport (probenecid, p-aminohippurate), organic cation transport (tetraethylammonium and verapamil), and P-glycoprotein (verapamil) were without effect. Cellular accumulation of sulforhodamine 101 was not concentrative, saturable, or inhibitable. Rectal gland tubules did not secrete fluorescein, daunomycin, or a fluorescent CSA derivative. Finally, frozen rectal gland sections stained with an antibody to a hepatic canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT or MRP2) showed heavy and specific staining on the luminal membrane of the epithelial cells. We conclude that rectal gland is capable of active and specific excretion of xenobiotics and that such transport is mediated by a shark analog of MRP2, an ATP-driven xenobiotic transporter, but not by P-glycoprotein.

  7. The accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in rectal cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    COTE, ADRIAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; LEBOVICI, ANDREI; MOIS, EMIL; AL HAJJAR, NADIM; MARE, CODRUTA; BADEA, RADU; IANCU, CORNEL

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of rectal cancer in the European Union is about 35% of the total colorectal cancer incidence. Staging rectal cancer is important for planning treatment. It is essential for the management of rectal cancer to have adequate preoperative imaging, because accurate staging can influence the therapeutic strategy, type of resection, and candidacy for neoadjuvant therapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) in rectal cancer staging. Methods A retrospective study was performed to assess the accuracy of ERUS by analyzing patients discharged from Regional Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (IRGH) Cluj-Napoca, Romania, diagnosed with rectal cancer between 01 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Patients who were preoperatively staged by other imaging methods and those who had ERUS performed in another service were excluded from the analysis. As inclusion criteria remained ERUS performed for patients with rectal cancer in IRGH Cluj-Napoca where they were also operated. We analyzed preoperative T stage obtained by ERUS and it was compared with the histopathology findings. Results The number of patients discharged with a diagnosis of rectal cancer were 200 (operated – 157) in 2011, 193 (operated – 151) in 2012, and 198 (operated – 142) in 2013. We analyzed a total of 51 cases diagnosed with rectal cancer who performed ERUS in IRGH Cluj-Napoca. The results according to the T stage obtained by ERUS and histopathology test were: Under-stage T2= 25.0%, T3=7.9% of cases; Over-stage T2=25.0%, T3=31.6% and T4=60.0% of cases. Less than 20% of patients underwent preoperative radio-chemotherapy. Conclusions ERUS is a method of staging rectal cancer which is human dependent. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of stenotic tumours, but the accuracy may still be within acceptable limits. Surgeons use ERUS to adopt a treatment protocol, knowing the risk of under-staging and over-staging of this method

  8. Outcome of young patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A.; Ruiz-García, Erika B.; León-Takahashi, Alberto M.; García-Pérez, Leticia

    2017-01-01

    Background There is an increase in the incidence of rectal carcinoma (RC) in young patients. Methods We analyzed 175 patients with sporadic RC which were divided in two groups according their age: 24 patients ≤40 years and 151 patients >40 years and the two groups were compared in order to determine if the outcomes (especially overall 5-year survival) were different. Results Overall 5-year survival was similar between groups (67.1% for patients over 40 years and 70.4% for those under 40 years, P=0.803). The only differences found were in some clinicopathologic features: patients <40 years showed more dissected lymph nodes (LNs) (21 vs. 15, P=0.035) and more LN metastasis (54.2% vs. 39.1%, P=0.048). In multivariate analysis factors associated with worse survival were incomplete resection and no use of neoadjuvant therapy. Age did not demonstrate prognostic value (P=0.077). Conclusions RC in people ≤40 years demonstrated greater number of LN harvested and LN metastases but oncologic outcomes, especially 5-year overall survival, were similar between groups. PMID:28280614

  9. [Peri-operative treatments for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Doyen, Jerome; Bénézery, Karen; Borens, Bruno; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; François, Éric

    2015-06-01

    Depending on its location or stage, rectal cancer may differ significantly. Before any treatment decision a careful work up is mandatory relying mainly on endoscopy and imaging (MRI). Surgery according to the TME principle is the cornerstone of treatment. Most of the time surgery is associated with external beam radiotherapy often combined with concurrent chemotherapy (capecitabine) according to the neoadjuvant regimen CAP 50 (5 weeks long). It is sometimes possible to escalate safely the dose of irradiation using contact X-ray brachytherapy 50 Kv or Iridium 192 interstitial brachytherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be given in case of pejorative pathological findings but its benefit is not yet proven in contrast with colon cancer. Local recurrences are becoming unusual as is permanent APE surgery with permanent stoma. To reduce the risk of distant metastasis clinical trials are testing first line chemotherapy in T3-4 lesions. For early stage (T2-"small" T3) clinical trials try to achieve organ preservation. Intensification of CAP 50 either with more chemotherapy or radiation dose escalation using contact X-ray aim at achieving a clinical complete response followed by local excision or close surveillance.

  10. [Quality standards in rectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Pera, M; Pascual, M

    2005-01-01

    The results of surgery for rectal cancer have classically been measured through indicators such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. In the last few years other parameters have been included that evaluate healthcare quality such as the functional results of the surgical technique employed and quality of life. Total resection of the mesorectum, performed by experienced surgeons, is the surgical technique of choice. Currently, the sphincter can be preserved in 70% of patients. Anastomotic dehiscence after anterior resection of the rectum is the most serious complication and the most important risk factor is the height of the anastomosis. The overall dehiscence rate should be less than 15% and operative mortality should be between 2% and 3%. The colonic reservoir improves functional outcome and consequently it is the procedure of choice to reconstruct transit after low anterior resection. Local recurrence should be less than 10% and 5-year survival should be between 70% and 80%. In general, quality of life is better after anterior resection of the rectum than after abdominoperineal amputation, despite the functional deterioration presented by some patients.

  11. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards.

  12. 'Objective' assessment of rectal sensation: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Shafik, Ahmed; El-Sibai, Olfat; Shafik, Ali A; Ahmed, Ismail

    2004-01-01

    Rectal sensation is used as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of anorectal pathology. However, the data obtained are subjective depending on the patient's perception of the sensation. We investigated the hypothesis that sympathetic skin response (SSR) can be used as a tool for objective assessment of the rectal sensation. The SSR was recorded in 24 healthy volunteers (age 37.2 years, 14 men) using a surface electrode applied to the skin of the palmar surface of the subject's hand and a reference electrode to the dorsum of the same hand. The EMG activity of the pelvic floor muscles was registered by a surface electrode fixed to the perineal skin. The subject was asked before and after individual anesthetization of the rectum and palm to report the first rectal and urge sensations during balloon filling of the rectum in increments of 10 ml of saline. Low volume rectal distension effected no sympathetic skin or pelvic floor responses, while larger volumes produced the response. The skin and pelvic floor responses occurred with every rectal sensation and corresponded with the volunteers' subjective perception. Urge suppression was associated with synchronous decrease of skin and pelvic floor responses which disappeared on balloon expulsion. Rectal balloon distension, 20 minutes after individual anesthetization of the rectum or palm produced no palm skin response, which returned however 3 hours later. A novel approach which can objectively define subjective perceptions arising from the rectum has been identified. Rectal sensations produce coordinated sympathetic skin response and pelvic floor activity which seem to be mediated through a reflex which we term the "recto-palmar reflex". Further studies are required to investigate the role of this reflex in defection and sympathetic disorders.

  13. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  14. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  15. Bladder and rectal complications following radiotherapy for cervix cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.; Velkley, D.E.; Cunningham, D.E.; Mortel, R.; Craycraft, G.; Shafer, J.

    1988-01-01

    One-hundred and thirty-two patients with cervix carcinoma who were treated with whole pelvis irradiation and two intracavitary applications had bladder and rectal dosimetry during brachytherapy with contrast agents placed into the bladder and rectum prior to orthogonal simulator radiographs. Doses were computer calculated at points A and B, F (bladder), R1 (rectum), and R2 (rectosigmoid). Late occurring bladder and rectal complications were graded on a severity scale of 1 to 3, and 14% had grade 2 or 3 injuries (9% developed fistulas). Statistical evaluation of the data showed that severe bladder and rectal injuries occur more commonly in stage IIIA and IIIB disease and in those receiving high external beam doses (5000 rad +). Analysis of variance tests revealed a significant correlation of brachytherapy dose to points R1 and R2 with severe rectal injuries but there was not a correlation of dose to F with bladder injuries. Nor was there correlation of injuries with dose to point A or the milligram-hour dose. We conclude that our technique for rectal dosimetry is adequate but that an improved technique of bladder dosimetry is needed. Also, when combining whole pelvis irradiation with two intracavitary applications (4000 rad to point A), the whole pelvis dose should probably not exceed 4000-4500 rad.

  16. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors.

  17. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology.

  18. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  19. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  20. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of human rectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kheng-Seong; Brookes, Simon J.; Montes-Adrian, Noemi A.; Mahns, David A.

    2016-01-01

    It is presumed that extrinsic afferent nerves link the rectum to the central nervous system. However, the anatomical/functional existence of such nerves has never previously been demonstrated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to identify and make electrophysiological recordings in vitro from extrinsic afferents, comparing human rectum to colon. Sections of normal rectum and colon were procured from anterior resection and right hemicolectomy specimens, respectively. Sections were pinned and extrinsic nerves dissected. Extracellular visceral afferent nerve activity was recorded. Neuronal responses to chemical [capsaicin and “inflammatory soup” (IS)] and mechanical (Von Frey probing) stimuli were recorded and quantified as peak firing rate (range) in 1-s intervals. Twenty-eight separate nerve trunks from eight rectums were studied. Of these, spontaneous multiunit afferent activity was recorded in 24 nerves. Peak firing rates increased significantly following capsaicin [median 6 (range 3–25) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001] and IS [median 5 (range 2–18) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001]. Mechanosensitive “hot spots” were identified in 16 nerves [median threshold 2.0 g (range 1.4–6.0 g)]. In eight of these, the threshold decreased after IS [1.0 g (0.4–1.4 g)]. By comparison, spontaneous activity was recorded in only 3/30 nerves studied from 10 colons, and only one hot spot (threshold 60 g) was identified. This study confirms the anatomical/functional existence of extrinsic rectal afferent nerves and characterizes their chemo- and mechanosensitivity for the first time in humans. They have different electrophysiological properties to colonic afferents and warrant further investigation in disease states. PMID:27789454

  2. Results of radical surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Heald, R J; Karanjia, N D

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the hypothesis that a reduction in the distal mural margin during anterior resection for sphincter conservation in rectal cancer excision is safe, provided total mesorectal excision is undertaken with wash-out of the clamped rectum. One hundred ninety-two patients underwent anterior resection and 21 (less than 10%) patients underwent abdomino-perineal excision (APE) by one surgeon (RJH). Anterior resections were classified as "curative" (79%) and "non-curative" (21%); in the "curative" sub-group less than 4% of patients developed local recurrence. The series was retrospectively analyzed for the effect of mural margins on local recurrence with 152 patients undergoing "curative" anterior resections and 40 patients undergoing "non-curative" resections. In the 152 specimens from curative resections, 110 had a resection margin greater than 1 cm and 42 had a resection margin less than 1 cm. Four patients developed local recurrence in the greater than 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0.8%-7.8%) and no patients developed local recurrence in the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0%-5.9%). In each patient with local recurrence a cause for failure was apparent. There was no statistically significant difference in local recurrence rate between the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group and the greater than 1 cm margin group. A reduction in resection margin therefore did not compromise survival after anterior resection. The significance of lateral resection margins is discussed. The role of deep radiotherapy and cytotoxics are considered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  4. Unique considerations in the patient with rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-08-01

    In the past two decades, substantial progress has been made in the adjuvant management of colorectal cancer. Chemotherapy has improved overall survival in patients with node-positive (N+) disease. In contrast with colon cancer, which has a low incidence of local recurrence, patients with rectal cancer have a higher incidence requiring the addition of pelvic radiation therapy (chemoradiation). Patients with rectal cancer have a number of unique management considerations: for example, the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? This review will address these and other controversies specific to patients with rectal cancer.

  5. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Shida, Dai; Nasu, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Warabi, Masahiro; Inoue, Satoru

    2012-10-14

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, metastases to the penis are a rare event. A 57-year-old male, who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier, demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia. No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile lesion. Total penectomy was performed as a curative resection based on a diagnosis of isolated penile metastasis from rectal cancer. A histopathological examination revealed an increase of well differentiated adenocarcinoma in the corpus spongiosum consistent with his primary rectal tumor. The immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and negative staining for cytokeratin 7, which strongly supported a diagnosis of penile metastasis from the rectum. The patient is alive more than two years without any recurrence.

  6. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  7. Emerging and Evolving Technology in Colon and Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bosio, Raul M.; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has changed the way we manage many colon and rectal pathologies. Multiple techniques, from straight laparoscopic procedures, to hand-assisted and single-port techniques are available, requiring surgeons to go through various learning curves. Robotic surgery is a relatively novel technique in general surgery which appears to hold most promise for rectal resection. Laparoscopic rectal procedures are difficult, and even in experienced hands, conversion rates are around 17%. Robotic surgery may be a point of difference in these cases, despite a long learning curve and higher costs. This article will describe the role of robotics in colorectal surgery. Room set up, port placement, and docking strategies will be described for common procedures, with emphasis on a hybrid robotic low anterior resection. PMID:26491407

  8. Rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases: Do we have a clear direction?

    PubMed

    Pathak, S; Nunes, Q M; Daniels, I R; Smart, N J; Poston, G J; Påhlman, L

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a common entity and often presents with synchronous liver metastases. There are discrepancies in management guidelines throughout the world regarding the treatment of advanced rectal cancer, which are further compounded when it presents with synchronous liver metastases. The following article examines the evidence regarding treatment options for patients with synchronous rectal liver metastases and suggests potential treatment algorithms.

  9. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  10. Reproducibility with repeat CT in radiomics study for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Panpan; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhong, Haoyu; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Lijun; Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Results Volume normalized features are much more reproducible than unnormalized features. The average value of all slices is the most reproducible feature type in rectal cancer. Different filters have little effect for the reproducibility of radiomics features. For the average type features, 496 out of 775 features showed high reproducibility (ICC ≥ 0.8), 225 out of 775 features showed medium reproducibility (0.8 > ICC ≥ 0.5) and 54 out of 775 features showed low reproducibility (ICC < 0.5). Methods 40 rectal cancer patients with stage II were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days. 775 radiomics features were defined in this study. For each features, five different values (value from the largest slice, maximum value, minimum value, average value of all slices and value from superposed intermediate matrix) were extracted. Meanwhile a LOG filter with different parameters was applied to these images to find stable filter value. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) of two CT scans were calculated to assess the reproducibility, based on original features and volume normalized features. Conclusions Features are recommended to be normalized to volume in radiomics analysis. The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and prognosis prediction. PMID:27669756

  11. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, William R.; Hosford, Charles C.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  12. Rectal fist insertion. An unusual form of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Shook, L L; Whittle, R; Rose, E F

    1985-12-01

    Rectal fist insertion (fist fucking) is an uncommon and potentially dangerous sexual practice. This is usually a homosexual activity, but can also be a heterosexual or an autoerotic practice. One known death has been reported associated with rectal fist insertion, in which the complications of anal and colonic tears and bleeding had occurred (see Editor's note). The possibility of drug overdose is also probable, as drugs and alcohol are commonly introduced into the rectum to promote sphincter relaxation and to ease the discomfort of anal dilatation.

  13. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  14. Total mesorectal excision and management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Ilia; Phang, P Terry

    2007-10-01

    Treatment of rectal cancer over the last two decades has evolved with changes in techniques of surgery and radiation based on national and international trials. Preoperative adjuvant radiation is now preferred over postoperative adjuvant radiation, and total mesorectal excision with preservation of pelvic nerves is the gold standard for surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Preservation of the anal sphincter without compromising oncological outcome is an additional benefit for patients with carcinoma in the distal rectum. Further progress in imaging and a multidisciplinary team approach will facilitate individualization of treatment strategy with more focus on quality of life.

  15. Gene Expression Analysis of Sporadic Early-Onset Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nfonsam, V; Xu, W; Koblinski, J; Jandova, J

    2016-01-01

    Background Overall declines in incidence of rectal cancer (RC) in patients older than 50 years have been mostly attributed to improvement in treatment modalities and introduction of age-based screening. Recent studies, however, have shown a rise in the incidence of RC in patients younger than 50 years. The etiology of early-onset (EO) RC is not well understood. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular features of (EO) RC and show its uniqueness compared to late-onset (LO) disease. Methods Two cohorts of patients with sporadic RC were identified. Tumors and matching non-involved tissues from six (EO) RC patients (< 50 years) and six (LO) RC patients (>65 years) were obtained from Pathology archives. Deparaffinized tissues were macro-dissected from FFPE sections, RNA isolated and used for expression profiling of 770 cancer related genes representing 13 canonical pathways. Statistical analysis was performed using the Gene Expression R-script module within the nCounter software v2.6. A gene was considered to be above background if the average count for the target gene was greater than the average counts for the eight negative control genes and if the P value of the t-test was less than 0.05. Results When we compared rectal tumors to non-involved rectal tissues, changes in expression levels of 171 genes were statistically significant in early-onset group and 151 genes in late-onset group. Further comparative gene expression analysis between early- and late-onset rectal tumors normalized to their matching non-involved tissues revealed that changes in expression of 65 genes were unique to early-onset rectal tumors with 16 genes being up- and 49 genes down-regulated using the cutoff criteria of expression levels difference >2 fold and p-value <0.01. At the pathway level, MAPK signaling was the most deregulated pathway in early-onset rectal tumors compared to PI3K-AKT signaling pathway being the most deregulated in late-onset rectal tumors. Conclusions Results of

  16. Fatal cerebral air embolism following endoscopic evaluation of rectal stump

    PubMed Central

    Baban, Chwanrow Karim; Murphy, Michael; Hennessy, Tony; O'Hanlon, Deirdre

    2013-01-01

    A 63-year-old man underwent endoscopic evaluation of the rectal stump for rectal bleeding and suffered a massive cerebral air embolism with severe neurological impairment and subsequent death. The patient underwent a Hartmann's procedure 9 month previously for ischaemic bowel and was noted to have portal hypertension at laparotomy. We hypothesise that air entered the venous plexus around rectum and entered the azygos vein via a porto-systemic shunt and travelled retrogradely via the superior vena cava to the venous sinuses of the brain. PMID:23704447

  17. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  18. Pre-referral rectal artesunate for severe malaria

    PubMed Central

    Okebe, Joseph; Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe or complicated malaria is a medical emergency and people die as a result of delays in starting treatment. Most patients need parenteral treatment, and in primary healthcare facilities, where intravenous therapy is not available but intramuscular injections can be given, intramuscular quinine, artesunate, and artemether have been used before transporting patients to hospital. However, in rural settings with limited access to health care, intramuscular injections may also be unavailable. In these situations, rectal artesunate given prior to transfer to hospital by volunteers with little medical training, may be a feasible option. Objectives To evaluate the effects of pre-referral treatment with rectal artesunate on mortality and morbidity in people with severe malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE and LILACS up to 21 May 2014. We also searched the WHO clinical trial registry platform and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Individual or cluster-randomized controlled trials comparing pre-referral rectal artesunate with placebo or injectable antimalarials in children and children with severe malaria. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for potentially eligible trials, and extracted data from the included trials. Dichotomous outcomes were summarized using risk ratios (RR) and presented with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Where data allowed, we conducted subgroup analyses by age, trial region and whether participants were included in the trial analysis. We assessed the quality of evidence for the most important outcomes using the GRADE approach. Main results One trial met the inclusion criteria; a placebo-controlled trial of 17,826 children and adults living in rural villages in Ghana and Tanzania (Africa) and Bangladesh (Asia). Villagers with no

  19. Genomic evaluation of rectal temperature in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress negatively impacts the production, fertility, and health of dairy cattle. Rectal temperature (RT) has unfavorable genetic correlations with production, longevity, economic merit, and somatic cell score in Holstein cows. The objectives of the current study were to perform a genome-wide as...

  20. Rectal Blue Nevus: Distinguishing Features of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neena; McCue, Peter; Quirk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old African American man with a history of depression and tuberculosis presented to the gastroenterology department after several months of rectal pain with bowel movements. Colonoscopy revealed hyperpigmentation in the distal rectum and internal hemorrhoids, which resulted in a diagnosis of blue nevi. This is only the third known description of a blue nevus involving the gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:28008401

  1. Multidisciplinary management of resectable rectal cancer. New developments and controversies.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Guillem, Jose G

    2008-11-15

    Until 2004, initial surgery and, in cases of pT3 and/or node-positive disease, postoperative chemoradiotherapy (radiation plus concurrent chemotherapy) was the conventional approach for patients with clinical T3 and/or node-positive rectal cancer. The German CAO/ARO/AIO 94 trial confirmed that, compared with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, postoperative chemoradiotherapy is associated with significantly higher local failure and toxicity rates as well as a decrease in the incidence of sphincter preservation. These data resulted in a change from postoperative to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This shift to preoperative therapy has prompted a series of new questions regarding the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, including: What is the ideal neoadjuvant approach (short-course vs. combined-modality therapy)? Is postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients following preoperative chemoradiotherapy? Do patients with node-negative rectal cancer require pelvic radiation? What is the ideal combined-modality regimen? Does an increase in response rate translate into improved local control and survival? And lastly, what is the benefit of novel radiation sensitization and delivery techniques? This review will address these and other questions surrounding the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer.

  2. [Fecal incontinence and rectal prolapse. Clinico-functional assessment].

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Pezzullo, L; Caracò, C; Candela, G; Esposito, B

    1995-09-01

    Rectal Prolapse is a rare and distressing condition, with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Often, this pathology is associated with fecal incontinence. The recommended approach to the patient with rectal prolapse and fecal incontinence is to repair the prolapse first, then deal particularly with fecal incontinence at a second operation. A retrospective, clinical and manometric study has varying degrees of fecal incontinence. Clinically five of their operation, and a further three patients improved, in two patients the degree of fecal incontinence remained invariable. One patient was worsened after surgery. Manometrically resting and pressure (RAP) was significantly higher in continent patients than in voluntary contraction pressure (MVCP) (p < 0.05) in preoperative testing. Postoperatively, there was a significant increase in the resting anal pressure as well as in maximum voluntary contraction pressure. Patients who remained incontinent had a significantly lower RAP and MVCP than patients who improved our regained continence. In conclusion this study shows an alteration of internal and external sphincteric function in patients with rectal prolapse. The surgical treatment of this disease improves sphincteric function. Incontinent patients with RAP < 10 mmHg and MCVP < 20 mmHg, probably they would be better treated simultaneously either for rectal prolapsus and incontinence. In this kind of patients the perianal proctectomy with total sphincteroplasty could be the elective treatment.

  3. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  4. Acute rectal ischaemia following emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Frances R.; Akhtar, Sobia; George, Rina; Pillay, Woolagasen R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of isolated rectal ischaemia, a rare complication after emergency surgery for a ruptured abdominal aneurysm. We discuss the possible aetiology of this condition and how this rare condition may be missed unless care is taken at the time of reoperation. PMID:28344761

  5. Prototype of a rectal wall ultrasound image analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Ng, Wan S.; Abeyratne, Udantha R.; Tsang, Charles B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a software system prototype for rectal wall ultrasound image processing, image display and 3D reconstruction and visualization of the rectal wall structure, which is aimed to help surgeons cope with large quantities of rectal wall ultrasound images. On the core image processing algorithm part, a novel multigradient field active contour model proposed by authors is used to complete the multi-layer boundary detection of the rectal wall. A novel unifying active contour model, which combines region information, gradient information and contour's internal constraint, is developed for tumor boundary detection. The region statistical information is described accurately by Gaussian Mixture Model, whose parameter solution is computed by Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The whole system is set up on Java platform. Java JAI technology is used for 2D image display, Java3D technology is employed for 3D reconstruction and visualization. The system prototype is currently composed of three main modules: image processing, image display and 3D visualization.

  6. Pre-slaughter rectal temperature as an indicator of pork meat quality.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, L; Van de Perre, V; Permentier, L; De Bie, S; Geers, R

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates whether rectal temperature of pigs, prior to slaughter, can give an indication of the risk of developing pork with PSE characteristics. A total of 1203 pigs were examined, measuring the rectal temperature just before stunning, of which 794 rectal temperatures were measured immediately after stunning. pH30LT (M. Longissimus thoracis) and temperature of the ham (Temp30Ham) were collected from about 530 carcasses, 30 min after sticking. The results present a significant positive linear correlation between rectal temperature just before and after slaughter, and Temp30Ham. Moreover, pH30LT is negatively correlated with rectal temperature and Temp30Ham. Finally, a linear mixed model for pH30LT was established with the rectal temperature of the pigs just before stunning and the lairage time. This model defines that measuring rectal temperature of pigs just before slaughter allows discovery of pork with PSE traits, taking into account pre-slaughter conditions.

  7. Gastric heterotopia of rectum in a child: a mimicker of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; Lone, Khurram; Al-Sofyani, Medhat; El Bagir, Asim

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is an uncommon presentation in pediatric patients. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is a rare cause of rectal bleeding. Here, we report a 3-year-old child with a bleeding rectal ulcer that was initially diagnosed and managed as a solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. After 1 month, the patient persisted to have intermittent rectal bleed and severe anal pain. Repeat colonoscopy showed the worsening of the rectal ulcer in size. Pediatric surgeon excised the ulcer, and histopathological examination revealed a gastric fundic-type mucosa consistent with the diagnosis of gastric heterotopia of the rectum. Over the following 18 months, our patient had experienced no rectal bleeding and remained entirely asymptomatic. In conclusion, heterotopic gastric mucosa of the rectum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a bleeding rectal ulcer.

  8. Can endobronchial or endotracheal metastases appear from rectal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Serbanescu, GL; Anghel, RM

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial and endotracheal metastases from extra-pulmonary solid tumors are rare. Patients and methods: We reported the case of a patient diagnosed with endobronchial and endotracheal metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma. Case report: Patient P.G., 62 years old, was diagnosed with a rectal tumor in 2011, for which, a surgical intervention was performed (pT3 pN2a M0, stage IIIB). Afterwards, she underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and concomitant radiochemotherapy. In September 2013, the chest CT showed 2 nodules for which, an incomplete surgical resection was done and which were histopathologically diagnosed as metastases from rectal cancer. The patient continued the treatment with chemotherapy associated with Bevacizumab and after 6 months only Bevacizumab for maintenance. In June 2015, the chest CT pointed out a nodule in the right upper lobe and the bronchoscopy highlighted a 4-5 mm lesion at the level of the right primary bronchus, whose biopsy proved the rectal origin. Afterwards, another surgical intervention was performed. Unfortunately, the postoperative chest CT revealed an intratracheal tissue mass (11/ 7mm) and multiple metastases in the right lung. The bronchoscopy showed 2 endotracheal lesions, out of which one was biopsied (histopathological result of metastasis from rectal cancer). Despite the fact that chemotherapy was continued, other endobronchial lesions appeared. All of them were removed and the patient started radiotherapy on the tracheal area. Afterwards, she refused to continue chemotherapy. The last bronchoscopy highlighted one endobronchial and two endotracheal secondary malignant lesions. Conclusion: Endobronchial and endotracheal metastases must be taken into consideration in all the patients with a history of extra-pulmonary cancer. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, IMRT = intensity-modulated radiotherapy, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, NCCN = National Comprehensive

  9. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically.

  10. [Rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sierra-Montenegro, Ernesto; Sierra-Luzuriaga, Gastón; Calle-Loffredo, Daniel; Rodríguez Quinde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: el síndrome de Trousseau se describió por primera vez en 1865; es la relación entre tromboembolismo venoso y cáncer. Objetivo: informar el caso de una paciente con cáncer de recto y síndrome de Trousseau. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 40 años de edad que acudió al servicio de Coloproctología por rectorragia indolora. La TAC reportó un tumor de 5 por 6cm y del margen anal a 5cm. Se efectuó resección anterior ultrabaja, con reservorio colónico e ileostomía de protección. El reporte de patología fue de: adenocarcinoma semidiferenciado del recto, con clasificación T3N0M0. A las 72 horas del postoperatorio tuvo hipotensión arterial súbita y distensión abdominal dolorosa. En la reintervención quirúrgica se encontró: necrosis del colon desde el ángulo esplénico hasta el reservorio colónico, con trombos en meso, signos de isquemia en el útero, trompa de Falopio y ovarios, piso pélvico y 40 cm de intestino delgado, antes de la ileostomía e íleon. Se realizó hemicolectomía izquierda y colostomía. Se trasladó a la unidad de terapia intensiva donde continuó con la administración de heparina; falleció a los cinco días por insuficiencia multiorgánica. Conclusiones: el mecanismo de este síndrome se desconoce pero existen varias hipótesis: se ha sugerido que los cánceres hematológicos son los que tienen mayor riesgo de trombosis venosa profunda. El cáncer de páncreas se relaciona con este síndrome en 50% de los casos. Se sugiere continuar con las normas de prevención del tromboembolismo.

  11. Rectal Dose and Source Strength of the High-Dose-Rate Iridium-192 Both Affect Late Rectal Bleeding After Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reconfirm our previous findings that the rectal dose and source strength both affect late rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT), by using a rectal dose calculated in accordance with the definitions of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 (ICRU{sub RP}) or of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICBT and were followed up for 1 year or more were studied. The rectal dose for ICBT was calculated by using the ICRP{sub RP} based on orthogonal radiographs or the DVH parameters based on computed tomography (CT). The total dose was calculated as the biologically equivalent dose expressed in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). The relationship between averaged source strength or the EQD{sub 2} and late rectal bleeding was then analyzed. Results: When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal EQD{sub 2} ({>=} or =} or <2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}), the group with both a high EQD{sub 2} and a high source strength showed a significantly greater probability of rectal bleeding for ICRU{sub RP}, D{sub 2cc}, and D{sub 1cc}. The patients with a median rectal dose above the threshold level did not show a greater frequency of rectal bleeding unless the source strength exceeded 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}. Conclusions: Our results obtained with data based on ICRU{sub RP} and CT-based DVH parameters indicate that rectal dose and source strength both affect rectal bleeding after HDR-ICBT.

  12. Avisos de salud sobre el PFOA y PFOS en el agua potable

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La EPA estableció avisos de salud sobre el ácido perfluorooctanoico (PFOA) y el sulfonato de perfluorooctano (PFOS) para proporcionar información a los operadores de sistemas de agua potable y funcionarios estatales, tribales y locales sobre los riesgos de

  13. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  14. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yasuyuki Kariya, Shuji Nakatani, Miyuki Yoshida, Rie Kono, Yumiko Kan, Naoki Ueno, Yutaka Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  15. A case of anaphylaxis to chlorhexidine during digital rectal examination.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yun-Jeong; Park, Chan Sun; Lee, Jae Keun; Jeong, Eunheui; Kim, Tae-Bum; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2008-06-01

    Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic and disinfectant in medical and nonmedical environments. Although the sensitization rate seems to be low, its ubiquitous use raises the possibility of sensitization in many patients and medical care workers. We describe a patient with anaphylaxis during digital rectal examination with chlorhexidine jelly. Urticaria, angioedema, dyspnea, and hypotension developed within a few minutes of the rectal examination. The patient fully recovered after treatment with epinephrine and corticosteroids. Skin tests for chlorhexidine were undertaken 5 weeks later, showing positive prick and intradermal skin tests. Within 30 min of the skin test, the patient complained of febrile sensation, chest tightness, angioedema, and urticaria on the face and trunk. An enzyme allergosorbent test for latex was negative. We present this case to alert clinicians about hypersensitivity to chlorhexidine that could potentially be life-threatening. We suggest that chlorhexidine should be recognized as a causative agent of anaphylaxis during procedural interventions.

  16. Treatment and prognosis of rectal prolapse in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Izant, R J; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-04-01

    Rectal prolapse occurred in 112 (18.5%) of 605 cystic fibrosis patients. In 48 patients prolapse preceded diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, but physicians (pediatricians, pediatric and general surgeons, and proctologists) rarely appreciated its importance as a symptom of this disease. Prolapses frequently cease with institution of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy following diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. However, even when the disease remains undiagnosed, the symptom is often transient and frequently resolves at 3-5 yr of age. Prolapse occurring initially after cystic fibrosis is diagnosed rarely responds to manipulation of diet or enzyme doses. Many patients develop a method of reduction which involves voluntary abdominal, perineal, and gluteal muscles and does not require manual pressure on the prolapsed segment. Most patients do not need specific treatment for the prolapse. Surgery is rarely necessary. A sweat test should be obtained on any child who has had even a single episode of rectal prolapse.

  17. Rare case of breast tumor secondary to rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lisette Delgado; Chelliah, Thandavababu; Meisher, Irina; Niranjan, Selvanayagam

    2008-10-01

    Primary breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Metastatic cancer to the breast is very rare. Colorectal cancers usually metastasize to the liver and the lung; other sites of metastasis from colon cancer are uncommon and are usually found in association with extensive liver and/or lung metastases. This is a report of a rare case of aggressive rectal cancer with metastasis to the breast without liver or lung metastases.

  18. Rectal drug administration in adults: how, when, why.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael

    Administering medication per rectum can be the most appropriate route for some patients may not always be considered by health professionals. Cultural sensitivities, as well as misinformation regarding insertion methods, may be barriers to the practice. This article explains how the rectal route functions in drug absorption, clarifies when this route is appropriate to use and outlines the steps nurses should follow to prepare patients adequately and safely to carry out the procedure.

  19. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for rectal adenomas: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Samalavicius, Narimantas Evaldas; Mikelis, Kipras; Samalavicius, Robertas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a method of choice for the local treatment of rectal adenomas. Though generally considered as a safe method, some authors have expressed skepticism about the anorectal function following TEM. Aim To review our experience in using TEM for removal of rectal adenomas. We focused on morbidity, local recurrence rates, and anorectal function following the operation. Material and methods The study included 72 patients who underwent TEM for rectal adenomas from December 2009 to November 2014 at the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute. Of the 72 patients, 31 (43.1%) were lost in the follow-up. We recorded the demographics, operative details, final pathology, post-operative length of stay, post-operative complications, recurrences and functional outcome for each of the 41 (56.9%) remaining participants. Results Of the 41 eligible patients, 19 (46.3%) were male and 22 (53.7%) were female. The mean age of our patients was 66.8 years. There were no intraoperative complications. In 4 (9.8%) cases, postoperative complications were observed – urinary retention (2 cases, 4.9%) and postoperative hemorrhage (2 cases, 4.9%). All complications were treated conservatively. There was a single case (2.4%) of adenoma recurrence during the follow-up period. The mean score of the FISI questionnaire was 7.6 ±9.2 (ranging from 0 to 36), and the mean Wexner score was 2.3 ±3.4 (ranging from 0 to 17). Conclusions Transanal endoscopic microsurgery in our experience demonstrated low complication and recurrence rates, and good functional results. We conclude that TEM is an effective and safe method for the treatment of rectal adenomas. PMID:28133497

  20. Comparison of laparoscopic vs. open surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zihai; Wang, Zheng; Huang, Shijie; Zhong, Shizhen; Lin, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the safety of laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer. A total of 64 cases of rectal cancer patients undergoing radical surgery between January, 1998 and March, 2010 were collected. The patients were divided into the laparoscopic rectal surgery group (LS group, n=31) and the open surgery group (OS group, n=33). Operation time, postoperative recovery, complications and tumor-free survival rate were compared between the two groups. The inclusion criteria were as follows: Standard Karnofsky score >70 prior to surgery, definitive pathological diagnosis and complete clinical data. The exclusion criteria were concomitant tumors affecting survival. With the Dixon operation, the LS group had a longer operation time compared with the OS group (271.2±56.2 vs. 216.0±62.7 min, respectively; P=0.036), and an earlier time of oral intake (3.0±0.9 vs. 4.7±1.0 days, respectively; P=0.000). There were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). With the Miles operation, there were no obvious differences between the LS and OS groups regarding operation time, intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, time of oral intake, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups with the Dixon or Miles operation in terms of 3-year tumor-free survival rate (P>0.05). Thus, laparoscopic surgery appears to be a safe and feasible option for the treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:28357087

  1. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Thigh Secondary to Radiation Colitis in a Rectal Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyun; Choi, Jung Ran; Song, Ji Young; Kang, Kyu Keun; Yoo, Woong Sun; Han, Sung Wan

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis usually occurs after dermal injury or through hematogenous spread. To date, few cases have been reported as necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh secondary to rectal perforation in rectal cancer patients. A 66-year-old male complained of pelvic and thigh pain and subsequently developed necrotizing fasciitis in his right thigh. Four years earlier, he had undergone a low anterior resection and radiotherapy due to of rectal cancer. An ulcerative lesion had been observed around the anastomosis site during the colonoscopy that had been performed two months earlier. Pelvic computed tomography and sigmoidoscopy showed rectal perforation and presacral abscess extending to buttock and the right posterior thigh fascia. Thus, the necrotizing fasciitis was believed to have occurred because of ulcer perforation, one of the complications of chronic radiation colitis, at the anastomosis site. When a rectal-cancer patient complains of pelvic and thigh pain, the possibility of a rectal perforation should be considered. PMID:23346513

  2. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Comparison of Digital Rectal and Microchip Transponder Thermometry in Ferrets (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Branden M; Brunell, Marla K; Olsen, Cara H; Bentzel, David E

    2016-01-01

    Body temperature is a common physiologic parameter measured in both clinical and research settings, with rectal thermometry being implied as the ‘gold standard.’ However, rectal thermometry usually requires physical or chemical restraint, potentially causing falsely elevated readings due to animal stress. A less stressful method may eliminate this confounding variable. The current study compared 2 types of digital rectal thermometers—a calibrated digital thermometer and a common digital thermometer—with an implantable subcutaneous transponder microchip. Microchips were implanted subcutaneously between the shoulder blades of 16 ferrets (8 male, 8 female), and temperatures were measured twice from the microchip reader and once from each of the rectal thermometers. Results demonstrated the microchip temperature readings had very good to good correlation and agreement to those from both of the rectal thermometers. This study indicates that implantable temperature-sensing microchips are a reliable alternative to rectal thermometry for monitoring body temperature in ferrets. PMID:27177569

  4. Synchronous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon and Rectal Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Vootla, Vamshidhar; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Niazi, Masooma; Balar, Bhavna; Nayudu, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Primary colonic adenocarcinoma and synchronous rectal carcinoids are rare tumors. Whenever a synchronous tumor with a nonmetastatic carcinoid component is encountered, its prognosis is determined by the associate malignancy. The discovery of an asymptomatic gastrointestinal carcinoid during the operative treatment of another malignancy will usually only require resection without additional treatment and will have little effect on the prognosis of the individual. This article reports a synchronous rectal carcinoid in a patient with hepatic flexure adenocarcinoma. We present a case of a 46-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of hypothyroidism, uterine fibroids and hypercholesterolemia presenting with a 2-week history of intermittent abdominal pain, mainly in the right upper quadrant. She had no family history of cancers. Physical examination was significant for pallor. Laboratory findings showed microcytic anemia with a hemoglobin of 6.6 g/dl. CT abdomen showed circumferential wall thickening in the ascending colon near the hepatic flexure and pulmonary nodules. Colonoscopy showed hepatic flexure mass and rectal nodule which were biopsied. Pathology showed a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma of the colon (hepatic flexure mass) and a low-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm (carcinoid of rectum). The patient underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and chemotherapy. In patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum, carcinoids could be missed due to their submucosal location, multicentricity and indolent growth pattern. Studies suggest a closer surveillance of the GI tract for noncarcinoid synchronous malignancy when a carcinoid tumor is detected and vice versa. PMID:27920648

  5. Clinically relevant study end points in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Guerrero, Angel; Minsky, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    In rectal cancer currently there are no clearly validated early end points which can serve as surrogates for long-term clinical outcome such as local control and survival. However, the use of a variety of response rates (i.e. pathological complete response, downsizing the primary tumor, tumor regression grade (TRG), radiological response) as endpoints in early (phase II) clinical trials is common since objective response to therapy is an early indication of activity. Disease-free survival (DFS) has been proposed as the most appropriate end point in adjuvant trials and is one of the most frequently used in newer rectal cancer trials. Due to the devastating nature of local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer, local control (which is itself a subset of the overall DFS endpoint) is still considered an important endpoint. Recently, circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been proposed as novel early end point because the CRM status can account for effects on DFS and overall survival after chemoradiation, radiation (RT), or surgery alone. Consensus is needed to define the most appropriate end points in both early and phase III trials in locally advanced cancer.

  6. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  7. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Sarah; Sheehan, Katherine M; McNamara, Deborah A; Deasy, Joseph; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Kay, Elaine W

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  8. [Causes of local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Hôhn, József; Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Simonka, Zsolt; Géczi, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Maráz, Anikó; Kahán, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Adám

    2003-01-01

    The rate of local recurrence (LR) has been 20-40% after resective surgery for rectal cancer by the traditional - Miles or Dixon - operative technics. The authors performed curative resection in 358 patients with rectal cancer in a 10 year period (01.01.1990 - 31.12.2000) in the Surgical Department of Szeged University. Since 01.01.1996 the authors changed this type of surgery for the Heald technics (total mesorectal excision - TME - with sharp dissection, using the UltraCision device) for the surgical treatment of middle or lower third rectal cancer. To compare the results of the two procedures, the authors analysed their material in two periods: Period I: 01.01.1991 - 31.12.1992: 62 patients operated on with the traditional operative technics; LR 15% within 2 years after surgery. Period II: 01.01.1997 - 31.12.1998: 78 patients operated on with the Heald technics (TME with sharp dissection); LR 6.4% within 2 years after surgery. Based on their results, the authors found that the modern operative technics by Heald, used in the second period of the study, was a relevant factor decreasing LR from 15% to 6.4%, while the gender, age of the patients, ratio of the abdominoperineal extirpation versus anterior resection (APRE/AR) and the free margin of more than 3 cm proved to be irrelevant.

  9. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  10. Embolization of Rectal Arteries: An Alternative Treatment for Hemorrhagic Shock Induced by Traumatic Intrarectal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, Nicolas E-mail: nicolas.pichon@chu-limoges.fr; Francois, Bruno; Pichon-Lefievre, Florence; Mathonnet, Murielle; Maubon, Antoine; Vignon, Philippe

    2005-05-15

    Rectal injuries caused by foreign bodies or iatrogenic insertions may lead to severe complications whose therapeutic management remains controversial. At times, both the rapid identification and treatment of subsequent active rectal bleeding may be challenging, especially when endoscopy fails to locate and control the arterial hemorrhage. We present the first two successful cases of middle rectal artery embolization in patients presenting with sustained bleeding and hemorrhagic shock.

  11. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal iliac artery resulting in massive per-rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, T.I.; Gillespie, C.J.; Butcher, W.; Lu, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is a common reason for presentation to hospital, with large bleeds most commonly caused by diverticular disease and angiodysplasia. Here we present an unusual aetiology of massive per-rectal bleeding attributable to pseudoaneurysm of the internal iliac artery leading to an arterial fistula to the distal large bowel. It is hoped the case will serve as a reminder that rectal bleeding can have a less common aetiology. PMID:24964318

  12. Retained rectal foreign body with rectal perforation; a complication of the traditional management of haemorrhoids: a case report.

    PubMed

    Olaoye, Iyiade Olatunde; Adensina, Micheal Dapo

    2013-10-01

    Retained rectal foreign bodies are most commonly seen in homosexuals and after assault. A few have been reported after self-treatment of anorectal conditions and prostatic massage. Harmful traditional medical practices have been reported in many communities in Africa but therapeutic anal insertion of foreign bodies for the management of haemorrhoids is rare. We present a patient with features of peritonitis following insertion of a wine bottle into his rectum in an attempt to manage his prolapsed haemorrhoids.

  13. Effects of rectal and ambient temperatures and humidity on conception rates.

    PubMed

    Zakari, A Y; Molokwu, E C; Osori, D I

    1981-09-01

    One hundred and thirteen inseminations were performed for which rectal temperatures were taken at the time of inseminations. Climatological factors were also recorded daily. Pregnancy diagnosis by rectal palpation was carried out 3 months post-insemination. Pregnancy rates for all services were related to selected climatological measurements and rectal temperatures. The results obtained indicate that elevated rectal temperature, mean maximum and mean minimum temperatures and relative humidity were detrimental to conception. The effect of the climatological factor on conception is compounded by feed scarcity during the dry periods of the year.

  14. Relationship between rectal sensitivity, symptoms intensity and quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté, Jean-Marc; Veyrac, Michel; Mion, François; Siproudhis, Laurent; Ducrotté, Philippe; Zerbib, Franck; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Dapoigny, Michel; Dyard, François; Coffin, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    Background Relationships between pain threshold during rectal distension and both symptoms intensity and alteration in quality of life (QoL) in IBS patients have been poorly evaluated. Aim To evaluate relationships between rectal sensitivity, IBS symptom intensity and QoL in a multicentre prospective study. Methods Rectal threshold for moderate pain was measured during rectal distension in IBS patients (Rome II) while IBS symptoms intensity was assessed by a validated questionnaire and QoL by the FDDQL questionnaire. Results 68 patients (44.2 ± 12.7 yrs, 48 women) were included. The mean rectal distending volume for moderate pain was 127 ± 35 mL while 45 patients (66 %) had rectal hypersensitivity (pain threshold < 140 mL). Rectal threshold was not significantly related to overall IBS intensity score (r = −0.66, P = 0.62) or to its different components, neither to FDDQL score (r = 0.30, P = 0.14). Among FDDQL domains, only anxiety (r = 0.30, P = 0.01) and coping (r = 0.31, P = 0.009) were significantly related with pain threshold. Conclusion In this study, 2/3 of IBS patients exhibited rectal hypersensitivity. No significant correlation was found between rectal threshold and either symptom intensity or alteration in QoL. PMID:18544074

  15. Effect of misclassified underlying cause of death on survival estimates of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Daixin; Morris, Cyllene R; Bates, Janet H; German, Robert R

    2011-07-20

    Inaccurate coding of patients' Underlying Cause of Death (UCOD) has constrained cause-specific survival estimates for colon and rectal cancers. Using California data from the Accuracy of Cancer Mortality study, we compared the cancer site data from the California Cancer Registry (CCR) with UCODs reported on death certificates and reclassified the UCODs based on cancer registry data when they disagreed. We then calculated 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year cause-specific survival for colon and rectal cancers separately, before and after the reclassification. Records from 26 312 colon and 10 687 rectal cancer patients were examined. UCOD records disagreed with CCR records for 700 (6%) of 11 404 colon cancer deaths and with 1958 (39%) of 5011 rectal cancer deaths, and 82% of the misclassified rectal cancer deaths were coded as colon cancer deaths in the UCOD. Reclassification decreased cause-specific survival for both colon and rectal cancers, but the impact was more pronounced for rectal cancer (eg, 5-year cause-specific survival of colon cancer decreased by 2.8% and of rectal cancer decreased by 20.0% relative to previous estimates; absolute rates changed from 65.4% to 63.6%, and 81.2% to 64.9%, respectively, after reclassification). Interchangeable use of the terms colon cancer and colorectal cancer is likely to be one of the reasons for UCOD misclassification. Educational measures could improve the accuracy of UCOD for colon and rectal cancer deaths.

  16. Selective permeability barrier to urea in shark rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Zeidel, Joshua D; Mathai, John C; Campbell, John D; Ruiz, Wily G; Apodaca, Gerard L; Riordan, John; Zeidel, Mark L

    2005-07-01

    Elasmobranchs such as the dogfish shark Squalus acanthius achieve osmotic homeostasis by maintaining urea concentrations in the 300- to 400-mM range, thus offsetting to some degree ambient marine osmolalities of 900-1,000 mosmol/kgH(2)O. These creatures also maintain salt balance without losing urea by secreting a NaCl-rich (500 mM) and urea-poor (18 mM) fluid from the rectal gland that is isotonic with the plasma. The composition of the rectal gland fluid suggests that its epithelial cells are permeable to water and not to urea. Because previous work showed that lipid bilayers that permit water flux do not block flux of urea, we reasoned that the plasma membranes of rectal gland epithelial cells must either have aquaporin water channels or must have some selective barrier to urea flux. We therefore isolated apical and basolateral membranes from shark rectal glands and determined their permeabilities to water and urea. Apical membrane fractions were markedly enriched for Na-K-2Cl cotransporter, whereas basolateral membrane fractions were enriched for Na-K-ATPase. Basolateral membrane osmotic water permeability (P(f)) averaged 4.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-3) cm/s, whereas urea permeability averaged 4.2 +/- 0.8 x 10(-7) cm/s. The activation energy for water flow averaged 16.4 kcal/mol. Apical membrane P(f) averaged 7.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(-4) cm/s, and urea permeability averaged 2.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(-7) cm/s, with an average activation energy for water flow of 18.6 kcal/mol. The relatively low water permeabilities and high activation energies argue strongly against water flux via aquaporins. Comparison of membrane water and urea permeabilities with those of artificial liposomes and other isolated biological membranes indicates that the basolateral membrane urea permeability is fivefold lower than would be anticipated for its water permeability. These results indicate that the rectal gland maintains a selective barrier to urea in its basolateral membranes.

  17. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  18. High Prevalence of Rectal Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Infection in Women Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Patricia Carr; Esber, Allahna; Lahey, Samantha; Ervin, Melissa; Davis, John A.; Fields, Karen; Turner, Abigail Norris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Testing women for urogenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is common in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics. However, women may not be routinely tested for rectal GC/CT. This may lead to missed infections in women reporting anal intercourse (AI). Methods: This was a retrospective review of all women who underwent rectal GC/CT testing from August 2012 to June 2013 at an STD clinic in Columbus, Ohio. All women who reported AI in the last year had a rectal swab collected for GC/CT nucleic acid amplification testing (n=331). Using log-binomial regression models, we computed unadjusted and adjusted associations for demographic and behavioral factors associated with rectal GC/CT infection. Results: Participants (n=331) were 47% African-American, with median age of 29 years. Prevalence of rectal GC was 6%, rectal CT was 13%, and either rectal infection was 19%. Prevalence of urogenital GC and CT was 7% and 13% respectively. Among women with rectal GC, 14% tested negative for urogenital GC. Similarly, 14% of women with rectal CT tested negative for urogenital CT. In unadjusted analyses, there was increased rectal GC prevalence among women reporting sex in the last year with an injection drug user, with a person exchanging sex for drugs or money, with anonymous partners, and while intoxicated/high on alcohol or illicit drugs. After multivariable adjustment, no significant associations persisted, but a trend of increased rectal GC prevalence was observed for women <26 years of age (p=0.06) and those reporting sex while intoxicated/high on alcohol or drugs (p=0.05). For rectal CT, only age <26 years was associated with prevalent infection in unadjusted models; this association strengthened after multivariable adjustment (prevalence ratio: 6.03; 95% confidence interval: 2.29–15.90). Conclusion: Nearly one in five women who reported AI in the last year had rectal GC or CT infection. Urogenital testing alone would have

  19. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  20. The Meanings of Astronomical Observation: An Analysis on the Basis of Relationship with Knowledge. (Spanish Title: Los Sentidos de la Observación Astronómica: un Análisis sobre la Base de la Relación con el Saber.) Os Sentidos da Observação Astronômica: Uma Análise com Base na Relação com o Saber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Alberto Eduardo; de Mello Arruda, Sergio; Meneghello Passos, Marinez; Vinicius Domenes Zapparoli, Ferdinando

    2010-12-01

    This article presents results of a research which aimed to understand the meanings that people construct for astronomical observation. The subjects, students and school teachers, initially received some instruction on how to view astronomical objects through the telescope. After the observation was realized, they were interviewed. The data analysis allowed the creation of 12 categories, later interpreted on the basis of relationship with knowledge (relation to the world, with himself and with others), as presented by Bernard Charlot. Este artículo presenta los resultados de una investigación que tuvo como objetivo comprender los sentidos que las personas construyen para la observación astronómica. Los sujetos, los estudiantes y maestros de escuela, recibieron inicialmente algunas instrucciones sobre cómo ver los objetos astronómicos a través del telescopio. Al término de la observación, fueron entrevistados. El análisis de datos permitió la creación de 12 categorías que más tarde fueron interpretadas sobre la base de la relación con el conocimiento (relación con el mundo, consigo mismo y con los demás), tal como presentado por Bernard Charlot. Este artigo apresenta resultados de uma pesquisa que objetivou entender quais os sentidos que as pessoas constroem para a observação astronômica. Os sujeitos da pesquisa, estudantes e professores do ensino médio, receberam inicialmente alguma instrução sobre como visualizar os objetos astronômicos através do telescópio. Após a realização da observação, eles foram entrevistados. A análise dos dados permitiu a elaboração de 12 categorias que foram posteriormente interpretadas com base nas relações com o saber (relação com o mundo, consigo mesmo e com o outro), conforme apresentadas por Bernard Charlot.

  1. Clinical impact of HLA class I expression in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speetjens, Frank M.; de Bruin, Elza C.; Morreau, Hans; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Putter, Hein; van Krieken, J. Han; van Buren, Maaike M.; van Velzen, Monique; Dekker-Ensink, N. Geeske; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression in irradiated and non-irradiated rectal carcinomas. Experimental design Tumor samples in tissue micro array format were collected from 1,135 patients. HLA class I expression was assessed after immunohistochemical staining with two antibodies (HCA2 and HC10). Results Tumors were split into two groups: (1) tumors with >50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (high) and (2) tumors with ≤50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (low). No difference in distribution or prognosis of HLA class I expression was found between irradiated and non-irradiated patients. Patients with low expression of HLA class I (15% of all patients) showed an independent significantly worse prognosis with regard to overall survival and disease-free survival. HLA class I expression had no effect on cancer-specific survival or recurrence-free survival. Conclusions Down-regulation of HLA class I in rectal cancer is associated with poor prognosis. In contrast to our results, previous reports on HLA class I expression in colorectal cancer described a large population of patients with HLA class I negative tumors, having a good prognosis. This difference might be explained by the fact that a large proportion of HLA negative colon tumors are microsatellite instable (MSI). MSI tumors are associated with a better prognosis than microsatellite stable (MSS). As rectal tumors are mainly MSS, our results suggest that it is both, oncogenic pathway and HLA class I expression, that dictates patient’s prognosis in colorectal cancer. Therefore, to prevent confounding in future prognostic analysis on the impact of HLA expression in colorectal tumors, separate analysis of MSI and MSS tumors should be performed. PMID:17874100

  2. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  3. Transcriptomic profiles differentiate normal rectal epithelium and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hogan, J; Dejulius, K; Liu, X; Coffey, J C; Kalady, M F

    2015-05-01

    Adenocarcinoma is a histologic diagnosis based on subjective findings. Transcriptional profiles have been used to differentiate normal tissue from disease and could provide a means of identifying malignancy. The goal of this study was to generate and test transcriptomic profiles that differentiate normal from adenocarcinomatous rectum. Comparisons were made between cDNA microarrays derived from normal epithelium and rectal adenocarcinoma. Results were filtered according to standard deviation to retain only highly dysregulated genes. Genes differentially expressed between cancer and normal tissue on two-groups t test (P < 0.05, Bonferroni P value adjustment) were further analyzed. Genes were rank ordered in terms of descending fold change. For each comparison (tumor versus normal epithelium), those 5 genes with the greatest positive fold change were grouped in a classifier. Five separate tests were applied to evaluate the discriminatory capacity of each classifier. Genetic classifiers derived comparing normal epithelium with malignant rectal epithelium from pooled stages had a mean sensitivity and specificity of 99.6% and 98.2%, respectively. The classifiers derived from comparing normal and stage I cancer had comparable mean sensitivities and specificities (97% and 98%, respectively). Areas under the summary receiver-operator characteristic curves for each classifier were 0.981 and 0.972, respectively. One gene was common to both classifiers. Classifiers were tested in an independent Gene Expression Omnibus-derived dataset. Both classifiers retained their predictive properties. Transcriptomic profiles comprising as few as 5 genes are highly accurate in differentiating normal from adenocarcinomatous rectal epithelium, including early-stage disease.

  4. Defining the distal margin of rectal cancer for surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is essential in selecting the appropriate surgical procedure. However, there is no standard measurement method. The National Cancer Institute consensus group recommends use of the anal verge (AV) as a landmark, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology recommends use of the anorectal ring (ARR). In addition, whether measurements should be made on double contrast barium enema (BE) radiographs or magnetic resonance (MR) images remains controversial. We measured the distal tumor margin on both BE and MR images obtained preoperatively from 52 patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. The distances from the distal end of the tumor to the AV and the ARR were measured on both types of images, and the variability was investigated by Bland-Altman analysis. The mean distance from the tumor to the AV was 8.9 cm on the BE radiographs and 7.7 cm on the MR images (P=0.013). The mean distances to the ARR were 6.8 and 5.6 cm, respectively (P=0.070). Significant proportional bias was shown as the measured distances increased, the difference between the BE- and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements increased. Use of one or the other landmark did not affect selection of the appropriate surgical procedure. We conclude that an approximate 1-cm underestimation should be taken into account when MRI-based measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is used to choose between sphincter-saving resection and abdominoperineal resection. PMID:28280625

  5. Rectal temperature-based death time estimation in infants.

    PubMed

    Igari, Yui; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Funayama, Masato

    2016-03-01

    In determining the time of death in infants based on rectal temperature, the same methods used in adults are generally used. However, whether the methods for adults are suitable for infants is unclear. In this study, we examined the following 3 methods in 20 infant death cases: computer simulation of rectal temperature based on the infinite cylinder model (Ohno's method), computer-based double exponential approximation based on Marshall and Hoare's double exponential model with Henssge's parameter determination (Henssge's method), and computer-based collinear approximation based on extrapolation of the rectal temperature curve (collinear approximation). The interval between the last time the infant was seen alive and the time that he/she was found dead was defined as the death time interval and compared with the estimated time of death. In Ohno's method, 7 cases were within the death time interval, and the average deviation in the other 12 cases was approximately 80 min. The results of both Henssge's method and collinear approximation were apparently inferior to the results of Ohno's method. The corrective factor was set within the range of 0.7-1.3 in Henssge's method, and a modified program was newly developed to make it possible to change the corrective factors. Modification A, in which the upper limit of the corrective factor range was set as the maximum value in each body weight, produced the best results: 8 cases were within the death time interval, and the average deviation in the other 12 cases was approximately 80min. There was a possibility that the influence of thermal isolation on the actual infants was stronger than that previously shown by Henssge. We conclude that Ohno's method and Modification A are useful for death time estimation in infants. However, it is important to accept the estimated time of death with certain latitude considering other circumstances.

  6. Robotic-Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Excision Versus Traditional Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Michael S.; Abbass, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Robotic surgery has been advocated for the radical excision of rectal cancer. Most data supporting its use have been reported from European and Asian centers, with a paucity of data from the United States documenting clear advantages of the robotic technique. This study compares the short-term outcome of robotic versus laparoscopic surgery. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic (group 1) or robotic (group 2) rectal cancer excision at a single institution over a 2-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcome measures were operative time, blood loss, conversion rates, number of lymph nodes, margin positivity, length of hospital stay, complications, and readmission rates. Results: Forty-two patients were analyzed. The median operative time was shorter in group 1 than that in group 2 (240 minutes vs 260 minutes, P = .04). No difference was noted in blood loss, transfusion rates, intraoperative complications, or conversion rates. There was no difference in circumferential or distal margin positivity. The median length of stay was shorter in group 1 (5 days vs 6 days, P = .05). The 90-day complication rate was similar in both groups (33% vs 43%, P = .75), but there was a trend toward more anastomotic leaks in group 1 (14% vs 0%, P = .23). Similarly, a non–statistically significant trend toward a higher readmission rate was noted in group 1 (24% vs 5%, P = .18). Conclusion: Robotic rectal cancer excision yielded a longer operative time and hospital length of stay, although immediate oncologic results were comparable. The need for randomized data is critical to determine whether the added resource utilization in robotic surgery is justifiable. PMID:25392653

  7. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Mora Pinzon, Maria C.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Saclarides, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic complications following rectal cancer surgery occur with varying frequency. Preoperative radiation, BMI, and low anastomoses have been implicated as predictors in previous studies, but their definitive role is still under review. The objective of our study was to identify patient and operative factors that may be predictive of anastomotic complications. Methods A retrospective review was performed on patients who had sphincter-preservation surgery performed for rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2011. Results 123 patients were included in this study, mean age was 59 (26–86), 58% were male. There were 33 complications in 32 patients (27%). Stenosis was the most frequent complication (24 of 33). 11 patients required mechanical dilatation, and 4 had operative revision of the anastomosis. Leak or pelvic abscess were present in 9 patients (7.3%); 4 were explored, 2 were drained and 3 were managed conservatively. 4 patients had permanent colostomy created due to anastomotic complications. Laparoscopy approach, BMI, age, smoking and tumor distance from anal verge were not significantly associated with anastomotic complications. After a multivariate analysis chemoradiation was significantly associated with overall anastomotic complications (Wall = 0.35, p = 0.05), and hemoglobin levels were associated with anastomotic leak (Wald = 4.09, p = 0.04). Conclusion Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25685338

  8. New barium paste mixture for helical (slip-ring) CT evaluation of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Noda, Y; Nishioka, A; Inomata, T; Yoshida, S; Toki, T; Ogoshi, S; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method for complete opacification of the rectum using helical CT and a newly developed anal contrast agent. Rectal cancers were easily identified in all of the 21 patients examined, and diagnostic accuracy in detecting local invasion was 94%. Our method of rectal CT is easy to perform and well tolerated.

  9. SwiftLase: a new technology for char-free ablation in rectal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe layer-by-layer char-free ablation of hemorrhoids and other rectal lesions at very low CO2 laser power levels with a miniature `SwiftLaser' optomechanical flashscanner. Increased speed with excellent control, very shallow thermal damage, and less postoperative pain are the main advantages of the flashscan technology in rectal surgery.

  10. 78 FR 46965 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Mesalamine Rectal Suppositories...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... applications (ANDAs) for mesalamine rectal suppositories. The draft guidance is a revised version of a..., USP) Rectal Suppositories, new drug application 021252, 500 milligram (mg) and 1,000 mg strengths were... pharmacokinetic endpoints and comparative in vitro studies (melting point, differential scanning...

  11. Formulation and delivery of anti-HIV rectal microbicides: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rute; Sarmento, Bruno; das Neves, José

    2014-11-28

    Men and women engaged in unprotected receptive anal intercourse (RAI) are at higher risk of acquiring HIV from infected partners. The implementation of preventive strategies is urgent and rectal microbicides may be a useful tool in reducing the sexual transmission of HIV. However, pre-clinical and first clinical trials have been able to identify limitations of candidate products, mostly related with safety issues, which can in turn enhance viral infection. Indeed, the development of suitable formulations for the rectal delivery of promising antiretroviral drugs is not an easy task, and has been mostly based on products specifically intended for vaginal delivery, but these have been shown to provide sub-optimal outcomes when administered rectally. Research and development in the rectal microbicide field are now charting their own path and important information is now available. In particular, specific formulation requirements of rectal microbicide products that need to be met have just recently been acknowledged despite additional work being still required. Desirable rectal microbicide product features regarding characteristics such as pH, osmolality, excipients, dosage forms, volume to be administered and the need for applicator use have been studied and defined in recent years, and specific guidance is now possible. This review provides a synopsis of the field of rectal microbicides, namely past and ongoing clinical studies, and details on formulation and drug delivery issues regarding the specific development of rectal microbicide products. Also, future work, as required for the advancement of the field, is discussed.

  12. [Secondary retroperitoneal fibrosis in a 39-year-old man after rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jarosch, A; Tiller, M; Rohrbach, H; Leimbach, T; Schepp, W

    2016-05-01

    A 39-year-old man had been treated for rectal cancer 6 years ago by lower anterior resection of the rectum and perioperative radiochemotherapy. Since then follow-up had been unremarkable but now the patient presented with unspecific lower abdominal pain. The cause of the pain was identified as paraneoplastic retroperitoneal fibrosis secondary to metachronous pulmonary metastases of the rectal cancer.

  13. Esophageal and rectal temperatures as estimates of core temperature during therapeutic whole-body hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subrata; Donn, Steven M; Bhagat, Indira; Dechert, Ronald E; Barks, John D

    2013-01-01

    We monitored whole-body cooling concurrently by both esophageal and rectal probes. Esophageal temperature was significantly higher compared with simultaneous rectal temperature during cooling, with a temperature gradient ranging from 0.46 to 1.03°C (median, 0.8°C; IQR, 0.6-0.8°C). During rewarming, this temperature difference disappeared.

  14. Novel combination combining J-Vac and VAC sponge for draining a rectal wound.

    PubMed

    Durai, R; Ng, P C H

    2010-01-01

    Active drains, which work by negative pressure, require a closed space for retaining the vacuum. Here the authors describe their novel technique of combining a J-Vac drain and the sponge of a vacuum assisted closure dressing pack to drain a rectal wound. This modification may be useful for rectal wounds and anastomotic leaks.

  15. Development of a Self-contained, Indwelling Rectal Temperature Probe for Cattle Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device was developed to automatically monitor rectal temperature (RT) of cattle for application in research settings. Compared with manual measurement of rectal temperature, this device decreases labor and time requirements, and allows data collection without the influence of animal handling or re...

  16. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  17. Rectal ulcer with an elusive diagnosis: all that ulcers is not Crohn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single rectal ulcer is an uncommon finding in children with gastrointestinal disease. Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is foremost among the differential diagnoses, a primary immunological defect should not be forgotten. Because of the paucity of literature on the association of rectal ul...

  18. A conservative approach in a child with haematuria after accidental rectal impalement trauma.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Josephine; Plötz, Frans Berend

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 11-year-old boy with haematuria after traumatic rectal insertion of a sharp metal stick. It demonstrates that an expectative management with close observation can be considered in patients with rectal impalement trauma presenting with haematuria and stable vital parameters without significant injury on abdominal ultrasound.

  19. Oxaliplatin-based combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2003-08-01

    There are two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer. The first is surgery, and, if the tumor is T3 and/or N1-2, this is followed by postoperative combined-modality therapy. The second, for patients with ultrasound T3 or clinical T4 disease, is preoperative combined-modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. In this review, the results of these approaches as well as novel combined-modality approaches using oxaliplatin-based regimens will be presented.

  20. Radiation plus chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-04-01

    The most common neo-adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer is chemotherapy and concurrent radiation therapy. In general, it is delivered pre-operatively for patients with clinical evidence of T(3-4) disease or post-operatively in patients who have undergone surgery and have T(3) and/or N(1-2) disease. This chapter reviews the rationale and results for neo-adjuvant therapy, the selection process for pre-operative versus post-operative treatment, and new approaches and controversies.

  1. An Unusual Case of Rectal and Ileal Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsamad, Molham; Abbas, Naeem; Balar, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the most common neuroendocrine tumor affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The coexistence of multifocal carcinoid lesions is a well-established phenomenon. Although intubation of the terminal ileum is not routinely attempted during colonoscopy, it can occasionally reveal the presence of some incidental findings. We present a patient with known rectal carcinoid, who was found to have another carcinoid lesion in the terminal ileum during surveillance colonoscopy. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy, and no chemotherapy was required as the patient was found to have stage 1 carcinoid tumor. PMID:28203126

  2. Metachronous metastasis to the penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ketata, Sabeur; Boulaire, Jean Loup; Soulimane, Benamar; Bargain, Alain

    2007-09-01

    Penile metastases arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers, but can also arise from tumors of the large bowel; other primary sites are extremely uncommon. We report the case of a 59-year-old patient with 2 penile metastases from a rectal adenocarcinoma, which was discovered 26 years after abdominoperineal resection. Penile biopsy was carried out and established the metastatic nature. The patient underwent palliative chemotherapy treatment with cetuximab/irinotecan. All previously reported cases of penile metastasis from the rectum are reviewed. Regardless of the treatment options, the prognosis of such metastasis remains poor.

  3. Ano-Rectal Symptoms of Sexually Transmitted Disease

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    Diseases of the anus and rectum are frequently the outcome of proctogenital and oral-anal sexual activities. These sexually transmitted diseases are more common among homosexual and bisexual men than among heterosexuals. A variety of infectious agents are responsible including viruses, bacteria, spirochetes, helminths, and protozoa. Anal warts, herpetic ulcers, and syphilitic chancres are common anal STDs. Gonorrhea, herpes, and chlamydial organisms are common causes of venereal acute proctitis. Enteric infections such as shigellosis, amebiasis, giardiasis and pinworms can be transmitted by oral-anal contact. Aggressive sexual attempts at auto-eroticism using rectally inserted foreign bodies may cause traumatic proctitis complicated by bacterial peritonitis or perirectal abscesses. PMID:21263807

  4. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  5. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  6. Study on reconstruction of rectal sensation based on wavelet packet analysis and SVM strategy.

    PubMed

    Zan, P; Ren, P; Shao, Y; Jiang, E; Zhu, X

    2012-05-01

    To control anal incontinence, we have developed an artificial anal sphincter system with sensor feedback. The artificial anal sphincter system is a novel hydraulic-electric muscle which mainly comprises an artificial anal sphincter, a wireless power supply subsystem, and a rectal sensation reconstruction subsystem. To investigate the features of the patients' rectal sensation, we have developed an in vitro experimental platform of artificial anal sphincter. In vitro experiments have been performed, and demonstrate that the traditional threshold method is not suitable for predicting the time for defecation. The traditional threshold method only uses single-dimensional pressure time series which may contain a few interdependent components simultaneously. A wavelet packet analysis algorithm is employed to extract the feature vector of the rectal pressure signal, then the rectal sensation prediction model is constructed based on a support vector machine for defecation pattern recognition. The results show that the proposed method is an effective approach for the reconstruction of patients' rectal sensation.

  7. Local excision for early rectal cancer: transanal endoscopic microsurgery and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of treatment for early stage rectal cancer is to optimize oncologic control while minimizing the long-term impact of treatment on quality of life. The standard of care treatment for most stage I and II rectal cancers is radical surgery alone, specifically total mesorectal excision (TME). For early rectal cancers, this procedure is usually curative but can have a substantial impact on quality of life, including the possibility of permanent colostomy and the potential for short and long-term bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction. Given the morbidity associated with radical surgery, alternative approaches to management of early rectal cancer have been explored, including local excision (LE) via transanal excision (TAE) or transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS). Compared to the gold standard of radical surgery, local procedures for strictly selected early rectal cancers should lead to identical oncological results and even better outcomes regarding morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. PMID:26029457

  8. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome in children: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Urgancı, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Eken, Kamile Gulcin

    2013-11-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare, benign disorder in children that usually presents with rectal bleeding, constipation, mucous discharge, prolonged straining, tenesmus, lower abdominal pain, and localized pain in the perineal area. The underlying etiology is not well understood, but it is secondary to ischemic changes and trauma in the rectum associated with paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor and the external anal sphincter muscles; rectal prolapse has also been implicated in the pathogenesis. This syndrome is diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and endoscopic and histological findings, but SRUS often goes unrecognized or is easily confused with other diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, amoebiasis, malignancy, and other causes of rectal bleeding such as a juvenile polyps. SRUS should be suspected in patients experiencing rectal discharge of blood and mucus in addition to previous disorders of evacuation. We herein report six pediatric cases with SRUS.

  9. A Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Soluble Immune Factor Environment of Rectal and Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Romas, Laura M.; Hasselrot, Klara; Aboud, Lindsay G.; Birse, Kenzie D.; Ball, T. Blake; Broliden, Kristina; Burgener, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sexual transmission of HIV occurs across a mucosal surface, which contains many soluble immune factors important for HIV immunity. Although the composition of mucosal fluids in the vaginal and oral compartments has been studied extensively, the knowledge of the expression of these factors in the rectal mucosa has been understudied and is very limited. This has particular relevance given that the highest rates of HIV acquisition occur via the rectal tract. To further our understanding of rectal mucosa, this study uses a proteomics approach to characterize immune factor components of rectal fluid, using saliva as a comparison, and evaluates its antiviral activity against HIV. Methods Paired salivary fluid (n = 10) and rectal lavage fluid (n = 10) samples were collected from healthy, HIV seronegative individuals. Samples were analyzed by label-free tandem mass spectrometry to comprehensively identify and quantify mucosal immune protein abundance differences between saliva and rectal fluids. The HIV inhibitory capacity of these fluids was further assessed using a TZM-bl reporter cell line. Results Of the 315 proteins identified in rectal lavage fluid, 72 had known immune functions, many of which have described anti-HIV activity, including cathelicidin, serpins, cystatins and antileukoproteinase. The majority of immune factors were similarly expressed between fluids, with only 21 differentially abundant (p<0.05, multiple comparison corrected). Notably, rectal mucosa had a high abundance of mucosal immunoglobulins and antiproteases relative to saliva, Rectal lavage limited HIV infection by 40–50% in vitro (p<0.05), which is lower than the potent anti-HIV effect of oral mucosal fluid (70–80% inhibition, p<0.005). Conclusions This study reveals that rectal mucosa contains many innate immune factors important for host immunity to HIV and can limit viral replication in vitro. This indicates an important role for this fluid as the first line of defense

  10. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Izzo, Luciano; Pugliese, Federico; Izzo, Paolo; Bolognese, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes in patients aged 70 and older with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with multimodality approach. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively analysed 20 consecutive elderly patients, with histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma, staged T3-4, and/or node-positive tumour, who received chemoradiotherapy and proceeded to surgical approach. Performance status score and adult comorbidity evaluation-27 score were calculated, and their influence on treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes was analysed. Results. All patients completed programmed chemoradiotherapy treatment. Gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common acute side effects: proctitis in 70% of patients and diarrhoea in 55%, classified as Grade 3 in 3 patients only. Radiation dermatitis was reported in 7 patients (35%) and it was graded G3 in one patient. There was no haematological toxicity. Eighteen patients out of 20 underwent surgery. Sphincter preservation was assured in 13 patients. Comorbidity index was related to higher severe acute toxicity (P = 0.015) but no influenced treatment outcomes. Conclusion. Treatment tolerance with combined modality is good in elderly patients. Due to age, no dose reduction for radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. PMID:24392453

  11. Watch and wait approach to rectal cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Marcos E; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-11-27

    In 2014, there were an estimated 136800 new cases of colorectal cancer, making it the most common gastrointestinal malignancy. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and over one-third of newly diagnosed patients have stage III (node-positive) disease. For stage II and III colorectal cancer patients, the mainstay of curative therapy is neoadjuvant therapy, followed by radical surgical resection of the rectum. However, the consequences of a proctectomy, either by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection, can lead to very extensive comorbidities, such as the need for a permanent colostomy, fecal incontinence, sexual and urinary dysfunction, and even mortality. Recently, trends of complete regression of the rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy have been confirmed by clinical and radiographic evaluation-this is known as complete clinical response (cCR). The "watch and wait" approach was first proposed by Dr. Angelita Habr-Gama in Brazil in 2009. Those patients with cCR are followed with close surveillance physical examinations, endoscopy, and imaging. Here, we review management of rectal cancer, the development of the "watch and wait" approach and its outcomes.

  12. Presacral venous bleeding during mobilization in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casal Núñez, Jose Enrique; Vigorita, Vincenzo; Ruano Poblador, Alejandro; Gay Fernández, Ana María; Toscano Novella, Maria Ángeles; Cáceres Alvarado, Nieves; Pérez Dominguez, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the anatomy of sacral venous plexus flow, the causes of injuries and the methods for controlling presacral hemorrhage during surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS A review of the databases MEDLINE® and Embase™ was conducted, and relevant scientific articles published between January 1960 and June 2016 were examined. The anatomy of the sacrum and its venous plexus, as well as the factors that influence bleeding, the causes of this complication, and its surgical management were defined. RESULTS This is a review of 58 published articles on presacral venous plexus injury during the mobilization of the rectum and on techniques used to treat presacral venous bleeding. Due to the lack of cases published in the literature, there is no consensus on which is the best technique to use if there is presacral bleeding during mobilization in surgery for rectal cancer. This review may provide a tool to help surgeons make decisions regarding how to resolve this serious complication. CONCLUSION A series of alternative treatments are described; however, a conventional systematic review in which optimal treatment is identified could not be performed because few cases were analyzed in most publications. PMID:28321171

  13. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  14. Current debate in the oncologic management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Trish; Kunk, Paul R; Ramsdale, Erika; Rahma, Osama E

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable amount of research in the field, the management of locally advanced rectal cancer remains a subject to debate. To date, effective treatment centers on surgical resection with the standard approach of total mesorectal resection. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been incorporated in order to decrease local and systemic recurrence. While it is accepted that a multimodality treatment regimen is indicated, there remains significant debate for how best to accomplish this in regards to order, dosing, and choice of agents. Preoperative radiation is the standard of care, yet remains debated with the option for chemoradiation, short course radiation, and even ongoing studies looking at the possibility of leaving radiation out altogether. Chemotherapy was traditionally incorporated in the adjuvant setting, but recent reports suggest the possibility of improved efficacy and tolerance when given upfront. In this review, the major studies in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer will be discussed. In addition, future directions will be considered such as the role of immunotherapy and ongoing trials looking at timing of chemotherapy, inclusion of radiation, and non-operative management. PMID:27795811

  15. Pilot Study of a Clinical Pathway Implementation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uña, Esther; López-Lara, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a highly prevalent disease which needs a multidisciplinary approach to be treated. The absence of specific protocols implies a significant and unjustifiable variability among the different professionals involved in this disease. The purpose is to develop a clinical pathway based on the analysis process and aims to reduce this variability and to reduce unnecessary costs. Methods: We created a multidisciplinary team with contributors from every clinical area involved in the diagnosis and treatment in this disease. We held periodic meetings to agree on a protocol based on the best available clinical practice guidelines. Once we had agreed on the protocol, we implemented its use as a standard in our institution. Every patient older than 18 years who was diagnosed with rectal cancer was considered a candidate to be treated via the pathway. Results: We evaluated 48 patients during the course of this study. Every parameter measured was improved after the implementation of the pathway, except the proportion of patients with 12 nodes or more analysed. The perception that our patients had about this project was very good. Conclusions: Clinical pathways are needed to improve the quality of health care. This kind of project helps reduce hospital costs and optimizes the use of limited resources. On the other hand, unexplained variability is also reduced, with consequent benefits for the patients. PMID:21151842

  16. Current debate in the oncologic management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Millard, Trish; Kunk, Paul R; Ramsdale, Erika; Rahma, Osama E

    2016-10-15

    Despite the considerable amount of research in the field, the management of locally advanced rectal cancer remains a subject to debate. To date, effective treatment centers on surgical resection with the standard approach of total mesorectal resection. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been incorporated in order to decrease local and systemic recurrence. While it is accepted that a multimodality treatment regimen is indicated, there remains significant debate for how best to accomplish this in regards to order, dosing, and choice of agents. Preoperative radiation is the standard of care, yet remains debated with the option for chemoradiation, short course radiation, and even ongoing studies looking at the possibility of leaving radiation out altogether. Chemotherapy was traditionally incorporated in the adjuvant setting, but recent reports suggest the possibility of improved efficacy and tolerance when given upfront. In this review, the major studies in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer will be discussed. In addition, future directions will be considered such as the role of immunotherapy and ongoing trials looking at timing of chemotherapy, inclusion of radiation, and non-operative management.

  17. Distant metastasis of rectal adenocarcinoma in a temporary tracheostoma

    PubMed Central

    Sifrer, Robert; Strojan, Primoz; Zidar, Nina; Zargi, Miha; Groselj, Ales; Krajinovic, Milena

    2014-01-01

    Background The temporary tracheostoma’s metastases of head and neck cancer had already been reported in the literature. So far, they had been considered as regional dissemination of the malignant disease. We report a case of temporary tracheostoma’s metastasis of carcinoma from non-head-and-neck primary site, what has not been reported in the literature, yet. Therefore, it is the first reported case of the systemic dissemination of malignant tumour into temporary tracheostoma. Case report. Fifty-four-year-old female patient, previously treated for a rectal adenocarcinoma, reported in our office with exophytic pink tissue masses around the temporary tracheostoma. The biopsy and immunohistochemistry findings were consistent with temporary tracheostoma’s metastasis of the rectal adenocarcinoma. The patient received palliative radiotherapy and died of systemic progression of the disease. Conclusions The patients with history of primary cancer of any origin and exophytic proliferating changes around the tracheostoma require an appropriate diagnostic work-up including a biopsy. The type of treatment depends on the extent of the disease, previous therapy and general condition of the patient. PMID:25435853

  18. Internal rectal prolapse: Definition, assessment and management in 2016.

    PubMed

    Cariou de Vergie, L; Venara, A; Duchalais, E; Frampas, E; Lehur, P A

    2017-02-01

    Internal rectal prolapse (IRP) is a well-recognized pelvic floor disorder mainly seen during defecatory straining. The symptomatic expression of IRP is complex, encompassing fecal continence (56%) and/or evacuation disorders (85%). IRP cannot be characterized easily by clinical examination alone and the emergence of dynamic defecography (especially MRI) has allowed a better comprehension of its pathophysiology and led to the proposition of a severity score (Oxford score) that can guide management. Decision for surgical management should be multidisciplinary, discussed after a complete work-up, and only after medical treatment has failed. Information should be provided to the patient, outlining the goals of treatment, the potential complications and results. Stapled trans-anal rectal resection (STARR) has been considered as the gold standard for IRP treatment. However, inconsistent results (failure observed in up to 20% of cases, and fecal incontinence occurring in up to 25% of patients at one year) have led to a decrease in its indications. Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy has substantial advantages in solving the functional problems due to IRP (efficacy on evacuation and resolution of continence symptoms in 65-92%, and 73-97% of patients, respectively) and is currently considered as the gold standard therapy for IRP once the decision to operate has been made.

  19. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  20. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  1. Ultrastructure of the excretory organs of Bombus morio (Hymenoptera: Bombini): bee without rectal pads.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Wagner Gonzaga; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Azevedo, Dihego Oliveira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    Bumblebees need to keep bodily homeostasis and for that have an efficient system of excretion formed by the Malpighian tubules, ileum, and rectum. We analyzed the excretory organs of Bombus morio, a bee without rectal pads. In addition, we analyzed the rectal epithelium of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides which has rectal pads. The Malpighian tubules exhibited two cell types and the ileum four types. However, comparative analysis of the rectum showed that only cells of the anterior region of the rectal epithelium of B. morio are structurally distinct. We suggest that cells of the Malpighian tubules of B. morio have an excretory feature and that cells of ileum have different functions, such as ion absorption and water, organic compound, and protein secretion. In addition, only the anterior region of the rectum of B. morio showed characteristic absorption. We suggest that Malpighian tubules participate in the excretion of solutes and that the ileum and rectal epithelium are responsible for homeostasis of water and solutes, compensating for the absence of rectal papillae. These results contribute to our understanding of the morphophysiology of the excretory organs of bees without rectal pads.

  2. Advantages of the robotic approach to deep infiltrating rectal endometriosis: because less is more.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Marques, Renato Moretti; Gomes, Mariano Tamura Vieira

    2016-06-01

    For symptomatic deep infiltrating endometriosis, surgery is often required to achieve symptom relief and restore fertility. A minimally invasive approach using laparoscopy is considered the gold standard. However, specific limitations of the laparoscopic approach deep in the pelvis keep challenging even surgeons with a solid experience with minimally invasive techniques. Robotic surgery has the potential to compensate for technical drawbacks inherent in conventional laparoscopic surgery, such as limited degree of freedom, two-dimensional vision, and the fulcrum effect. In the present report, we aim at demonstrating the central role of robotic surgery for deep infiltrating endometriosis, with special emphasis in the ability to practice organ (rectal) preservation. A 45-year-old white female with a 4-month history of chronic pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dysmenorrhea, refractory to hormonal therapy was referred to our unit. MRI findings were diagnostic of deep infiltrating endometriosis (retrocervical and rectovaginal) extending to the anterior rectal serosal layer (partial-thickness rectal invasion). Using a fully robotic approach, appropriate dissection of the rectovaginal septum and of the extraperitoneal rectum followed by complete excision of the endometriotic rectal nodule with organ (rectal) preservation was undertaken. It is our belief that using a robotic approach, the potential to boost rectal preservation might be established. Moreover, it is possible that in many cases, a robotic operation may allow the surgeon to perform the intervention with greater accuracy and comfort. As a result, more patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis may benefit from rectal sparing procedures.

  3. 'Believe it or not': the medical framing of rectal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William J

    2017-01-06

    Medical and lay attention to and intervention for rectal foreign bodies, the presence of an object in the rectum most often via insertion through the anus, has long been a source of humour and suspicion in both medical and public discourses. How do the ways medical providers write and talk to each other about rectal foreign bodies shape and reflect understandings of gender, sexuality and the (im)proper use of the anus and rectum? This paper examines the medical literature on rectal foreign bodies to shed light on the ways in which medical providers frame rectal foreign bodies. It develops a set of six frames that demonstrate how the medical literature on rectal foreign bodies (re)produces a variety of normative assumptions about and sociocultural values concerning bodies and sexuality, danger, shame, deception, mental illness and medical professionalism. It concludes with a discussion of how these framings of rectal foreign bodies might potentially contribute to the ongoing stigmatisation not only of rectal foreign body patients, but of non-heteronormative sexualities in general.

  4. Gasterophilosis: a major cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Adako Mulugeta; Innocent, Giles; Trawford, Andrew Francis; Reid, Stuart William James; Love, Sandy

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia. Analysis of data on rectal prolapse cases obtained from the Donkey Health and Welfare Project clinic at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Addis Ababa University, from 1995 to 2004 revealed that 83.6% (n = 177) of the cases were associated with Gasterophilus nasalis. The rest 10.7% and 5.7% were associated with work-related (overloading) cause and diarrhoea, respectively. The mean and median numbers of G. nasalis recovered from the rectum of infected donkeys were 66 and 64, respectively, with a range of 2-195. Over 100 G. nasalis larvae were recovered from the rectum of 22% of the donkeys. Circular demarcated ulcer-like and deep circumferential pits or ring-like mucosal lesions were found at the larval attachment sites. G. nasalis infection and the associated rectal prolapse were observed year round. However, the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse were significantly higher during the rainy season (P < 0.01). Age and sex of the donkeys had no significant effect on the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse (P > 0.05).

  5. PrPCWD in rectal lymphoid tissue of deer (Odocoileus spp.).

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Spraker, Terry R; González, Lorenzo; Dagleish, Mark P; Sirochman, Tracey M; Brown, Jeremy C; Jeffrey, Martin; Miller, Michael W

    2007-07-01

    The utility of rectal lymphoid tissue sampling for the diagnosis of chronic wasting disease (CWD) infections in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was evaluated. CWD-associated prion protein (PrP(CWD)) deposits were observed in the rectal mucosa from 19 orally inoculated mule deer by 381 days post-inoculation (p.i.); similarly, 45 out of 50 naturally infected mule deer had PrP(CWD) in their rectal mucosa. In orally inoculated white-tailed deer, the presence of glycine (G) or serine (S) at codon 96 of the native PrP (denoted 96GG, 96GS or 96SS) appeared to influence the temporal patterns of PrP(CWD) deposition: nine out of 11 infected 96GG individuals had PrP(CWD) in their rectal mucosa by 342 days p.i., whereas only three out of seven infected 96GS individuals had PrP(CWD) in their rectal mucosa by 381 days p.i. and none of three 96SS individuals had PrP(CWD) in their rectal mucosa by 751 days p.i. These findings support further evaluation of rectal mucosa sampling in CWD surveillance.

  6. Rectal-wall dose dependence on postplan timing after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: Juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Dose to rectal wall after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy is dependent on distance between posterior prostatic seeds and anterior rectal wall and is influenced by postimplant periprostatic edema. We analyzed the effect of postplan timing on anterior rectal-wall dose. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received permanent seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy as monotherapy (145 Gy). Implants were preplanned by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and carried out by use of preloaded needles. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated by use of magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion on Days 1, 8, and 30. The anterior rectal-wall dose is reported as the isodose enclosing 1.0 or 2.0 cc of rectal wall and as the RV100 in cc. Results: The dose to rectal wall increased progressively over time. The median increase in dose to 1.0 cc of rectal wall (RD [1 cc]) from Day 1 to 30 was 39.2 Gy (p < 0.001). RV100 increased from a median of 0.07 cc on Day 1 to 0.67 cc on Day 30. The most significant predictor of rectal-wall dose (RD [1 cc], RD [2 cc], or RV100) was the time of evaluation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Although periprostatic edema cannot be quantified by postimplant imaging, the dose to the anterior rectal wall increases significantly over time as prostatic and periprostatic edema resolve. Critical-organ dose reporting and guidelines for minimizing toxicity must take into account the time of the assessment.

  7. Update and Debate Issues in Surgical Treatment of Middle and Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; AL-Asari, Sami F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature, this paper provides an update on surgical treatment of middle and low rectal cancer and discusses issues of debate surrounding that treatment. The main goal of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is radical resection of the tumor and surrounding lymphatic tissue. Local excision of early rectal cancer can be another treatment option, in which the patient can avoid possible complications related to radical surgery. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has been recommended for patients with cT3-4N0 or any T N+ rectal cancer because CRT shows better local control and less toxicity than adjuvant CRT. However, recent clinical trials showed promising results for local excision after neoadjuvant CRT in selected patients with low rectal cancer. In addition, the "wait and see" concept is another modality that has been reported for the management of tumors that show complete clinical remission after neoadjuvant CRT. Although radical surgery for middle and low rectal cancer is the cornerstone therapy, an ultralow anterior resection with or without intersphincteric resection (ISR) has become an alternative standard surgical method for selected patients. Many studies have reported on the oncological safety of the ISR, but few of them have addressed the issue the functional outcome. Furthermore, an abdominoperineal resection (APR) has problems with high rates of tumor perforations and positive circumferential resection margins, and those factors have contributed to its having a high rate of local recurrence and a poor survival rate for rectal cancer compared with sphincter-saving procedures. Recently, great efforts have been made to reduce these problems, and the total levator excision or the extended APR concept has emerged. Surgical management for low rectal cancer should aim to radically excise the tumor and to preserve as much of the sphincter function as possible by using multidisciplinary approaches. However, further prospective

  8. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases.

    PubMed

    Slebos, Robbert J C; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L; Liebler, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants.

  9. Proposal of a neotype strain (A1-86) for Eubacterium rectale. Request for an opinion.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J

    2008-07-01

    Eubacterium rectale is one of the most abundant bacterial species recovered from human faeces. E. rectale (Hauduroy et al. 1937) appears in the 'List of Bacterial Names with Standing in Nomenclature', but it is noted that the originally proposed type strain, VPI 0989(T), has been lost and its possible replacement by another strain (VPI 0990) from the same faecal sample has never been formally proposed. It is therefore proposed that strain A1-86 (=DSM 17629=NCIMB 14373), isolated from human adult faeces, be formally recognized as the neotype strain of Eubacterium rectale.

  10. Strong PMSA Radioligand Uptake by Rectal Carcinoma: Who Put the "S" in PSMA?

    PubMed

    Stoykow, Christian; Huber-Schumacher, Sabine; Almanasreh, Nadja; Jilg, Cordula; Ruf, Juri

    2017-03-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old patient with newly diagnosed rectal adenocarcinoma and hepatic metastases. Restaging after chemotherapy revealed a good response of the rectal primary while liver metastases were progressive. As the patient also had a history of prostate cancer, a Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scan was performed to noninvasively further assess hepatic metastases. However, a definite differentiation between tumor entities was not possible because not only the liver metastases but also the rectal primary showed radioligand uptake (moderate and strong, respectively). Consecutive liver biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of intestinal origin.

  11. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  12. Chemoradiation for rectal cancer: rationale, approaches, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2010-10-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment of cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These controversies include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation, as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  13. Seasonal variations in rectal temperature of Yankasa sheep.

    PubMed

    Igono, M O; Molokwu, E C; Aliu, Y O

    1983-06-01

    From measurements of rectal temperature (Tre) at 06:00h (06:00Tre) and at 14:00h (14:00Tre), meteorological stress was determined in six Yankasa ewes in terms of per cent rise of 14:00Tre over 06:00Tre reference values during the harmattan and hot-dry seasons. Absolute and mean Tre values were significantly higher (P less than 0.05) during the harmattan than the hot-dry season. In both seasons, mean 14:00Tre was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) than 06:00Tre. The mean diurnal difference between 14:00Tre and 06:00Tre, i.e. delta Tre was about 1 degrees C during the harmattan but ranged between 0.5 and 0.7 degrees C during the hot-dry season. All animals were observed to shiver during harmattan nights.

  14. Management of rectal carcinoma: impact of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    van Waes, P.F.G.M.; Koehler, P.R.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty-one patients with rectal carcinoma were examined preoperatively in order to assess the accuracy of CT in recognizing the extraluminal extension of the tumor and its effect on treatment planning. Evaluation was done by barium enema, endoscopy, and standard CT augmented by nonreconstructed coronal and sagittal sections. The information was compared with the operative and pathologic findings. Correct staging was achieved in 19 out of 21 patients. In two patients, CT overestimated the extent of the disease. In two patients, small distant metastases detected at surgery were not appreciated; however, the extent of pelvic disease was accurately assessed. In 17 patients, CT added new important information unobtainable by standard techniques. This new information affected treatment planning in 10 patients.

  15. Rectal bleeding in a 4-month-old boy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutro, J.A.; Santanello, S.A.; Unger, F.; Goodwin, C.D.

    1986-10-24

    A case of bleeding Meckel's diverticulum is described in an infant. A 4-month-old boy was seen initially with a 24-hour history of painless hematochezia. His parents had noted two episodes of maroon-colored stool that did not appear to be associated with any abdominal distress. His medical history was unremarkable, with normal growth and development. Physical examination revealed a well-nourished, well-hydrated infant in no apparent distress. Vital signs were normal. Rectal examination revealed no masses, but bright-red blood was noted on the examining finger. Findings from the remainder of the examination were normal. An upright roentgenogram of the abdomen was obtained and demonstrated no abnormalities. The abdominal technetium scan was abnormal. An exploratory laparotomy was performed later on the day of admission.

  16. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  17. Rectal metastasis from Breast cancer: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cho Ee; Wright, Lucie; Pieri, Andrew; Belhasan, Anas; Fasih, Tarannum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer metastases occurs in around 50% of all presentation. It is the second most common type of cancer to metastasise to the GI tract but this only occurs in less than 1% of cases. Presentation of case We report a case that underwent treatment for invasive lobular cancer (ILC) of the breast and 5 years later was found to have rectal and peritoneal metastasis. She is currently receiving palliative management including chemotherapy in the form of weekly Paclitaxel (Taxol®) and stenting to relieve obstruction. Conclusion There should be high clinical suspicion of bowel metastasis in patients presenting with positive faecal occult blood with or without bowel symptoms even if the incidence is less <1% of metastases, particularly in cases where the initial breast tumour was large, with positive axillary nodes. PMID:26188979

  18. Delaying surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves prognosis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Celayir, Mustafa Fevzi; Yazıcı, Pınar; Tunçel, Deniz; Bek, Tuba Tülin; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prognostic effect of a delayed interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS We evaluated 87 patients with locally advanced mid- or distal rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision following an interval period after neoadjuvant CRT at Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul between January 2009 and January 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval before surgery: < 8 wk (group I) and ≥ 8 wk (group II). Data related to patients, cancer characteristics and pathological examination were collected and analyzed. RESULTS When the distribution of timing between group I (n = 45) and group II (n = 42) was viewed, comparison of interval periods (median ± SD) of groups showed a significant difference of as 5 ± 1.28 wk in group I and 10.1 ± 2.2 wk in group II (P < 0.001). The median follow-up period for all patients was 34.5 (9.9-81) mo. group II had significantly higher rates of pathological complete response (pCR) than group I had (19% vs 8.9%, P = 0.002). Rate of tumor regression grade (TRG) poor response was 44.4% in group I and 9.5% in group II (P < 0.002). A poor pathological response was associated with worse disease-free survival (P = 0.009). The interval time did not show any association with local recurrence (P = 0.79). CONCLUSION Delaying the neoadjuvant CRT-surgery interval may provide nodal down-staging, improve pCR rate, and decrease the rate of TRG poor response. PMID:27672428

  19. Position Verification for the Prostate: Effect on Rectal Wall Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Haverkort, Marie A.D.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Pieters, Bradley R.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Assendelft, Esther; Lensing, Andrea L.; Herk, Marcel van; Reijke, Theo M. de; Stoker, Jaap; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of gold marker (GM)-based position correction on the cumulative dose in the anorectal wall compared with traditional bony anatomy (BA)-based correction, taking into account changes in anorectal shape and position. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 consecutive prostate cancer patients, treated with curative external beam radiotherapy, were included. Four fiducial GMs were implanted in the prostate. Positioning was verified according to the shift in BA and GMs on daily electronic portal images. Position corrections were determined using on- and off-line position verification protocols according to the position of the GMs (GM-on and GM-off) and BA (BA-off). For all patients, intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were made for the GM (8-mm planning target volume margin) and BA (10-mm planning target volume margin) protocols. The dose distribution was recomputed on 11 repeat computed tomography scans to estimate the accumulated dose to the prostate and anorectal wall while considering internal organ motion. Results: The dose that is at least received by 99% of the prostate was, on average, acceptable for all protocols. The individual patient data showed the best coverage for both GM protocols, with >95% of the prescribed dose for all patients. The anorectal wall dose was significantly lower for the GM protocols. The dose that is at least received by 30% of the rectal wall was, on average, 54.6 Gy for GM-on, 54.1 Gy for GM-off, and 58.9 Gy for BA-off (p <.001). Conclusion: Position verification with GM and reduced planning target volume margins yielded adequate treatment of the prostate and a lower rectal wall dose, even when accounting for independent movement of the prostate and anorectal wall.

  20. The role of the robotic technique in minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Luca, Fabrizio; Petz, Wanda; Valvo, Manuela; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery is feasible, oncologically safe, and offers better short-term outcomes than traditional open procedures in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, and time until return to working activity. Nevertheless, laparoscopic techniques are not widely used in rectal surgery, mainly because they require a prolonged and demanding learning curve that is available only in high-volume and rectal cancer surgery centres experienced in minimally invasive surgery. Robotic surgery is a new technology that enables the surgeon to perform minimally invasive operations with better vision and more intuitive and precise control of the operating instruments, promising to overcome some of the technical difficulties associated with standard laparoscopy. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data on clinical and oncological outcomes of minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer, focusing on robotic surgery, and providing original data from the authors’ centre. PMID:24101946

  1. An adolescent with prolapsed omentum per rectum: Spontaneous rectal perforation managed laparoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ameet; Jakhmola, Chandra K.; Kukreja, Yogesh; Kumar, S. S.; Sandhu, Arjun Singh

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the rectum is a rare occurrence. A total laparoscopic approach to rectal perforation has only occasionally been reported. We report an unusual case of a young boy who developed a spontaneous rupture of the rectum following a trivial fall. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tear in the rectum at the peritoneal reflection with the omentum plugging it. He denied any history of rectal instrumentation or abnormal sexual activity. He had no history of constipation or rectal prolapse. The tear was repaired laparoscopically and a covering loop sigmoid colostomy was added. He made an uneventful post-operative recovery. Spontaneous rupture of the rectum can occur in younger age groups and even in the absence of significant trauma. One needs to diligently bring out a history of rectal trauma. Equally important is to rule out any underlying pathological condition. A laparoscopic approach is feasible, especially in early cases. PMID:28281483

  2. Necrotising fasciitis secondary to perforated rectal adenocarcinoma presenting as a thigh swelling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, William David George; Winters, Conchubhair; Amin, Eshan

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted to the medical admissions ward with right thigh pain presumed to be a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Subsequent duplex ultrasonography excluded a DVT but noted the presence of a significant amount of subcutaneous gas. A plain film radiograph was performed with the same finding raising the possibility of necrotising fasciitis (NF). Only at this point was digital rectal examination performed revealing a large rectal mass oozing pus and blood. CT imaging showed thickening of the rectum consistent with a tumour with gas and fluid in the perirectal space extending to the anterolateral right femur. Despite aggressive debridement and treatment, the patient deteriorated and died 6 weeks later. This case should serve as a reminder to consider digital rectal examination and the occurrence of a rectal perforation in all patients who present with suspicious thigh swellings. PMID:25824287

  3. Immunosuppressive effect induced by intraperitoneal and rectal administration of boar seminal immunosuppressive factor.

    PubMed

    Dostál, J; Veselský, L; Drahorád, J; Jonáková, V

    1995-06-01

    The immunosuppressive component was isolated from boar seminal vesicle secretion and administered i.p. or rectally to male mice. By means of the immunofluorescent method, the seminal immunosuppressive component was found on the membranes of 50-70% of white blood cells of treated mice the first day after i.p. and the third day after rectal administration. The immunosuppressive component was observed on the membranes of 10-20% of white cells even at the 17th day after treatment. Intraperitoneal or rectal administration of the immunosuppressive component led to a decrease in the white cell concentration in blood of treated mice. These findings indicate that rectal deposition of semen may compromise some aspects of the immune system and may be an important cofactor in the development of viral or bacterial infections among homosexual men.

  4. Gastric duplication cyst: A cause of rectal bleeding in a young child.

    PubMed

    Surridge, Clare A; Goodier, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon congenital anomaly and rectal bleeding is a rare presentation of a complicated gastric duplication cyst. This case report describes the radiological findings in a child with a complicated gastric duplication cyst.

  5. Rectal adenocarcinoma infiltrating the bulbar urethra and metastasising to the penis.

    PubMed

    James, Mathews; Amaranathan, Anandhi; Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Toi, Pampa Chakrabarty

    2016-06-16

    Secondary penile tumours from rectal carcinoma is a known clinical entity but can be missed unless carefully evaluated. We report a case of rectal adenocarcinoma with synchronous painless penile nodules. A patient presented with constipation and rectal bleeding. He had an anorectal growth as well as palpable nodules on his penis. Rectal biopsy yielded adenocarcinoma. Imaging revealed direct infiltration of tumour into the bulb of the penis as well as distal shaft lesions. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the penile nodule showed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Diversion colostomy was performed and the patient referred for chemoradiation. Since he did not have any urinary symptoms, the penile lesions were left unaltered. Repeat imaging after concurrent chemoradiotherapy showed no response. The prognosis was explained and the patient was given palliative clinic care.

  6. Transmission of rectal electric waves: is it through circular or longitudinal smooth muscle layers or both?

    PubMed

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2001-04-01

    The rectum possesses electric activity in the form of pacesetter (PPs) and action potentials (APs). In recent studies we suggested that the waves are not initiated by the extrarectal autonomic innervation but might be triggered by a 'rectosigmoid pacemaker' and are transmitted in the rectal wall through the rectal musculature and not the enteric nerve plexus. To investigate whether the rectal waves are transmitted through the circular or longitudinal muscle layer, the rectum of 18 mongrel dogs was exposed under anesthesia through an abdominal incision. Three electrodes were applied to the rectal wall (longitudinal muscle layer) and another 3 electrodes to the circular muscle; the latter was exposed by splitting apart the fibers of the longitudinal muscle. Rectal electric activity and pressure were recorded from the 6 electrodes before and after performing individual myotomy of the rectal longitudinal (9 dogs), circular (9 dogs), and then the whole muscle layers (18 dogs). The myotomy was performed proximal to and between the electrodes. Pacesetter (PPs) and action potentials (APs) were recorded from the 3 electrodes on the longitudinal muscle but no waves were registered from those on the circular muscle. After longitudinal muscle myotomy was performed between electrodes 1 and 2, PPs and APs were recorded from electrode 1 but not 2 and 3 and when performed proximally to electrode 1, no waves were registered. The rectal pressure increased concomitantly with occurrence of APs. Circular muscle myotomy effected no change in the rectal electric activity recorded from the 3 electrodes applied to the longitudinal muscle. In total muscle myotomy, the electric waves were recorded from the electrodes proximal but not distal to the myotomy. We propose that the motile activity of the rectal longitudinal muscle is initiated by the electric activity which appears to be triggered by the rectosigmoid pacemaker, while that of the circular muscle fibers is believed to be initiated

  7. [Rectal anaesthesia with diazepam added to ketamine for preschool child (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Postel, J P; Brille, P; Starobinsky, E; Buffet, J P; Milhaud, A

    1981-01-01

    The authors relate their experience of 61 rectal anesthesias with ketamine (10 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.25-0.5 mg/kg). Rectal anesthesia is well accepted by children who are afraid of percutaneous injection. When ketamine is used alone, they obtained only 76 p. cent good result. When diazepam is associated, good results arise to 95 p. cent. Diazepam added to ketamine allows surface surgery during 10 to 15 minutes.

  8. Effect of intra-rectal administration of boar seminal immunosuppressive fraction on mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Dostál, J; Drahorád, J

    1994-08-01

    The repeated deposition of an immunosuppressive fraction isolated from boar vesicular gland secretion into the rectum of healthy male and female mice reduced responses of lymphocytes to mitogens in vitro. Rectal deposition of the immunosuppressive component also led to a decrease in the activity of plaque-forming cells. These findings indicate that repeated rectal deposition of semen may compromise some aspects of the immune system and may be an important cofactor in the development of viral or bacterial infections among homosexual men.

  9. Metachronous squamous-cell carcinoma of the colon and treatment of rectal squamous carcinoma with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brammer, R D; Taniere, P; Radley, S

    2009-02-01

    Rectal squamous-cell carcinoma is a rare tumour with an incidence of less than 1 per 1000 cases. We report such a case treated with chemoradiotherapy. The patient developed a metastasis in the spleen and a further squamous tumour in the right colon, both of which were successfully resected. No histological evidence of recurrent rectal tumour has been found. Two years following presentation, the patient remains disease-free although symptomatic from a radiotherapy-induced stricture of the rectum.

  10. Metachronous bilateral isolated adrenal metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jabir, H; Tawfiq, N; Moukhlissi, M; Akssim, M; Guensi, A; Kadiri, B; Bouchbika, Z; Taleb, A; Benchekroun, N; Jouhadi, H; Sahraoui, S; Zamiati, S; Benider, A

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of adrenal metastasis from colorectal cancer in a 54-year-old woman. Nine months after resection for advanced rectal carcinoma, a computed tomography scan revealed bilateral adrenal metastasis. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen was normal. A bilateral adrenalectomy was performed after chemotherapy. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. Adrenal metastasis should be considered in the patients' follow-up for colorectal cancer.

  11. Lack of prophylactic efficacy of oral maraviroc in macaques despite high drug concentrations in rectal tissues.

    PubMed

    Massud, Ivana; Aung, Wutyi; Martin, Amy; Bachman, Shanon; Mitchell, James; Aubert, Rachael; Solomon Tsegaye, Theodros; Kersh, Ellen; Pau, Chou-Pong; Heneine, Walid; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2013-08-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is a potent CCR5 coreceptor antagonist that is in clinical testing for daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. We used a macaque model consisting of weekly SHIV162p3 exposures to evaluate the efficacy of oral MVC in preventing rectal SHIV transmission. MVC dosing was informed by the pharmacokinetic profile seen in blood and rectal tissues and consisted of a human-equivalent dose given 24 h before virus exposure, followed by a booster postexposure dose. In rectal secretions, MVC peaked at 24 h (10,242 ng/ml) with concentrations at 48 h that were about 40 times those required to block SHIV infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. Median MVC concentrations in rectal tissues at 24 h (1,404 ng/g) were 30 and 10 times those achieved in vaginal or lymphoid tissues, respectively. MVC significantly reduced macrophage inflammatory protein 1β-induced CCR5 internalization in rectal mononuclear cells, an indication of efficient binding to CCR5 in rectal lymphocytes. The half-life of CCR5-bound MVC in PBMCs was 2.6 days. Despite this favorable profile, 5/6 treated macaques were infected during five rectal SHIV exposures as were 3/4 controls. MVC treatment was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of CD3(+)/CCR5(+) cells in blood. We show that high and durable MVC concentrations in rectal tissues are not sufficient to prevent SHIV infection in macaques. The increases in CD3(+)/CCR5(+) cells seen during MVC treatment point to unique immunological effects of CCR5 inhibition by MVC. The implications of these immunological effects on PrEP with MVC require further evaluation.

  12. Late Rectal Toxicity on RTOG 94-06: Analysis Using a Mixture Lyman Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Bosch, Walter R.; Michalski, Jeff; Winter, Kathryn; Mohan, Radhe; Purdy, James A.; Kuban, Deborah; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, M. Rex; Thames, Howard D.; Cox, James D.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To estimate the parameters of the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model using censored time-to-event data for Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06, a dose-escalation trial designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model was fitted to data from 1,010 of the 1,084 patients accrued on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06 using an approach that accounts for censored observations. Separate fits were obtained using dose-volume histograms for whole rectum and dose-wall histograms for rectal wall. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.2 years, the crude incidence of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity was 15% (n = 148). The parameters of the Lyman model fitted to dose-volume histograms data, with 95% profile-likelihood confidence intervals, were TD{sub 50} = 79.1 Gy (75.3 Gy, 84.3 Gy), m = 0.146 (0.107, 0.225), and n = 0.077 (0.041, 0.156). The fit based on dose-wall histogram data was not significantly different. Patients with cardiovascular disease had a significantly higher incidence of late rectal toxicity (p = 0.015), corresponding to a dose-modifying factor of 5.3%. No significant association with late rectal toxicity was found for diabetes, hypertension, rectal volume, rectal length, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, or prescribed dose per fraction (1.8 Gy vs. 2 Gy). Conclusions: These results, based on a large cohort of patients from a multi-institutional trial, are expected to be widely representative of the ability of the Lyman model to describe the long-term risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  13. Relation between rectal sensation and anal function in normal subjects and patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, W M; Read, N W; Miner, P B

    1990-01-01

    The relation between sensory perception of rapid balloon distension of the rectum and the motor responses of the rectum and external and internal anal sphincters in 27 normal subjects and 16 patients with faecal incontinence who had impaired rectal sensation but normal sphincter pressures was studied. In both patients and normal subjects, the onset and duration of rectal sensation correlated closely with the external anal sphincter electrical activity (r = 0.8, p less than 0.0001) and with rectal contraction (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not with internal sphincter relaxation. All normal subjects perceived a rectal sensation within one second of rapid inflation of a rectal balloon with volumes of 20 ml or less air. Six patients did not perceive any rectal sensation until 60 ml had been introduced, while in the remaining nine patients the sensation was delayed by at least two seconds. Internal sphincter relaxation occurred before the sensation was perceived in three of 27 normal subjects and 11 of 16 patients (p less than 0.001), and could be associated with anal leakage, which stopped as soon as sensation was perceived. The lowest rectal volumes required to induce anal relaxation, to cause sustained relaxation, or to elicit sensations of a desire to defecate or pain were similar in patients and normal subjects. In conclusion, these results show the close association between rectal sensation and external anal sphincter contraction, and show that faecal incontinence may occur as a result of delayed or absent external anal sphincter contraction when the internal anal sphincter is relaxed. PMID:2210452

  14. Effects of Prostate-Rectum Separation on Rectal Dose From External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Susil, Robert C.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is the major dose-limiting structure. Physically separating the rectum from the prostate (e.g., by injecting a spacer) can reduce the rectal radiation dose. Despite pilot clinical studies, no careful analysis has been done of the risks, benefits, and dosimetric effects of this practice. Methods and Materials: Using cadaveric specimens, 20 mL of a hydrogel was injected between the prostate and rectum using a transperineal approach. Imaging was performed before and after spacer placement, and the cadavers were subsequently dissected. Ten intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated (five before and five after separation), allowing for characterization of the rectal dose reduction. To quantify the amount of prostate-rectum separation needed for effective rectal dose reduction, simulations were performed using nine clinically generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. Results: In the cadaveric studies, an average of 12.5 mm of prostate-rectum separation was generated with the 20-mL hydrogel injections (the seminal vesicles were also separated from the rectum). The average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy decreased from 19.9% to 4.5% (p < .05). In the simulation studies, a prostate-rectum separation of 10 mm was sufficient to reduce the mean rectal volume receiving 70 Gy by 83.1% (p <.05). No additional reduction in the average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy was noted after 15 mm of separation. In addition, spacer placement allowed for increased planning target volume margins without exceeding the rectal dose tolerance. Conclusion: Prostate-rectum spacers can allow for reduced rectal toxicity rates, treatment intensification, and/or reduced dependence on complex planning and treatment delivery techniques.

  15. 75 FR 51080 - Determination That DIASTAT (Diazepam Rectal Gel), 5 Milligrams/Milliliter, 10 Milligrams/2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... (diazepam rectal gel) (DIASTAT), 5 milligrams (mg)/milliliter (mL), 10 mg/2 mL, 15 mg/3 mL, and 20 mg/4 mL... to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for diazepam rectal gel, 5 mg/mL, 10 mg/2 mL, 15 mg/3 mL, and 20 mg/4 mL, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR...

  16. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52-119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7-14) g/dL to 13 (10-15) g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  17. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14) g/dL to 13 (10–15) g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. PMID:26357522

  18. Clinical value of MRI-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pratik; Rao, Sheng Xiang; Zeng, Meng Su

    2017-01-01

    Extramural venous invasion (EMVI) is associated with a poor prognosis and a poor overall survival rate in rectal cancer. It can independently predict local and distant tumor recurrences. Preoperative EMVI detection in rectal cancer is useful for determining the treatment strategy. EMVI status is beneficial for the post-treatment evaluation and analysis of rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic modality with no radiation effects. High-resolution MRI can detect EMVI with high accuracy. In addition, MRI results are equal to or even better than pathological results in the detection of medium to large EMVI in rectal cancer. MRI-detected EMVI (mrEMVI) can be used as a potential biomarker that facilitates treatment methods. This review highlights the importance of MRI before and after rectal cancer treatment. In addition, we analyze the prognostic correlation between mrEMVI and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in rectal cancer. This article may help shed light on the significance of mrEMVI.

  19. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio; Cilla, Savino; Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna; Pacelli, Fabio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Ingrosso, Marcello; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  20. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  1. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer. PMID:27689329

  2. Oil Red O-positive lipid in peritoneal fluid from a horse with a rectal tear.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer S; Johnson, Mark C; Sims, Will P; Boone, Lindsey H; Swor, Tamara M; Weeks, Bradley R

    2011-06-01

    A 4-year-old Quarter Horse mare was presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for evaluation of a rectal tear. On initial evaluation, rectal palpation and colonoscopy revealed a grade IIIb rectal tear. Analysis of peritoneal fluid revealed a modified transudate. Preliminary supportive care included fluid therapy and mineral oil administration via nasogastric tube. Approximately 48 hours after presentation, a second abdominocentesis was performed, and cytologic examination of the fluid revealed a marked suppurative exudate. Round clear nonrefractile material observed within neutrophils and macrophages and in the background stained bright pink to red with Oil Red O, confirming the material as lipid, likely from leakage of mineral oil through the rectal tear. The condition of the mare deteriorated and euthanasia was elected due to the poor prognosis. At necropsy, gross and histologic findings included peritoneal effusion and a full-thickness rectal tear with transmural necrotizing pyogranulomatous colitis and fibrinous peritonitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of Oil Red O-positive lipid vacuoles in the peritoneal fluid of a horse from presumed leakage of mineral oil through a transmural rectal perforation. The frequency of this occurrence in horses is unknown, but it is important for cytopathologists to be familiar with the appearance and significance of lipid-type droplets in phagocytic cells in cytologic fluid analysis specimens.

  3. Rectal gland of Bactrocera papayae: ultrastructure, anatomy, and sequestration of autofluorescent compounds upon methyl eugenol consumption by the male fruit fly.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Cynthia C H; Tan, Keng Hong

    2005-08-01

    Sexually mature males of Bactrocera papayae are strongly attracted to and consume methyl eugenol (ME). Upon consumption, ME is biotransformed to two phenylpropanoids, 2-allyl-4,5-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) and (E)-coniferyl alcohol (CF), that are transported in the hemolymph, sequestered and stored in the rectal glands, and subsequently released as sex and aggregation pheromones during courtship. To date, very little work on the ultrastructure and anatomy of the rectal gland has been done, and the accumulation of phenylpropanoids in the rectal glands of males has not been observed visually. Our objectives are to describe the anatomy and fine structures of the rectal glands of males and females and to observe the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds in the rectal glands of males. The rectal glands of males and females have four rectal papillae with each papilla attached to a rectal pad. The rectal pads protrude from the rectal gland as the only surfaces of the gland that are not surrounded by muscles. The rectal papillae of ME-fed males had oil droplets and autofluorescent compounds that were absent from those of ME-deprived males. The autofluorescent compounds accumulated in the rectal sac, which is an evagination that is not found in rectal glands of females. The accumulation of these compounds increased with time and reached maximum at a day post-ME feeding and decreased thereafter. This trend is similar to the accumulation pattern of phenylpropanoids, CF and DMP in the rectal gland.

  4. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Jakobsen, Anders; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of studies have investigated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential markers of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. So far, agreement between studies has been minimal, which may in part be explained by intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression. The aim of the present study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. Materials and Methods The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated using Spearman’s correlation. Results ICCsingle (one sample from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21 and miRNA-31. For miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630, ICCsingle was lower than 50%. The ICCmean (mean of three samples from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21(RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-125b (RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-145 (ISH), miRNA-630 (RT-qPCR), and miRNA-31 (RT-qPCR). For miRNA-145 (RT-qPCR) and miRNA-630 (ISH), ICCmean was lower than 50%. Spearman correlation coefficients, comparing results obtained by RT-qPCR and ISH, respectively, ranged from 0.084 to 0.325 for the mean value from each patient, and from -0.085 to 0.515 in the section including the deepest part of the tumour. Conclusion Intratumoral heterogeneity may influence the measurement of miRNA expression and consequently the number of samples needed for representative estimates. Our findings with two different methods suggest that one sample is sufficient for adequate assessment of miRNA-21 and miRNA-31, whereas more samples would improve the assessment of miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630

  5. Pre-referral rectal artesunate in severe malaria: flawed trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immediate injectable treatment is essential for severe malaria. Otherwise, the afflicted risk lifelong impairment or death. In rural areas of Africa and Asia, appropriate care is often miles away. In 2009, Melba Gomes and her colleagues published the findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of rectal artesunate for suspected severe malaria in such remote areas. Enrolling nearly 18,000 cases, the aim was to evaluate whether, as patients were in transit to a health facility, a pre-referral artesunate suppository blocked disease progression sufficiently to reduce these risks. The affirmative findings of this, the only trial on the issue thus far, have led the WHO to endorse rectal artesunate as a pre-referral treatment for severe malaria. In the light of its public health importance and because its scientific quality has not been assessed for a systematic review, our paper provides a detailed evaluation of the design, conduct, analysis, reporting, and practical features of this trial. Results We performed a checklist-based and an in-depth evaluation of the trial. The evaluation criteria were based on the CONSORT statement for reporting clinical trials, the clinical trial methodology literature, and practice in malaria research. Our main findings are: The inclusion and exclusion criteria and the sample size justification are not stated. Many clearly ineligible subjects were enrolled. The training of the recruiters does not appear to have been satisfactory. There was excessive between center heterogeneity in design and conduct. Outcome evaluation schedule was not defined, and in practice, became too wide. Large gaps in the collection of key data were evident. Primary endpoints were inconsistently utilized and reported; an overall analysis of the outcomes was not done; analyses of time to event data had major flaws; the stated intent-to-treat analysis excluded a third of the randomized subjects; the design-indicated stratified or multi

  6. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with solitary rectal ulcer in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bes, C; Dağlı, Ü; Yılmaz, F; Soy, M

    2015-09-16

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder that has a wide range of clinical presentations and variable endoscopic findings which makes it difficult to diagnose and treat. The clinical and endoscopic picture in this condition can also mimic malign ulceration, malignancy or Crohn's disease. Behçet's disease can affect the gastrointestinal tract. However to the best of our knowledge, no case with solitary rectal ulceration has been reported so far in literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with Behçet's disease admitted to our clinic with rectal bleeding due to solitary rectal ulceration.

  7. Un analisis de la influencia de las fricciones de los campos no militares sobre las fricciones del campo militar presentes en la operacion de rescate de rehenes Chavin de Huantar (An Analysis of the Influence that Friction in Non-Military Fields of Action Had Upon Military Friction in the Hostage Rescue Operation Chavin de Huantar)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-16

    necesidad inmediata de eliminar la incertidumbre de lo que ocurría al interior de la residencia, por lo que el empleo de micrófonos era vital, a fin...en rarísimas ocasiones se pronuncia sobre hechos políticos y que esta solicitud directa significó una tremenda presión internacional sobre un

  8. The endo-rectal probe prototype for the TOPEM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musico, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The TOPEM project was funded by INFN with the aim of studying the design of a TOF-PET system dedicated to prostate imaging. During last year a big effort was put into building the prototype of the endo-rectal probe from all point of view: mechanical, thermal, electrical. A dedicated integrated circuit was adopted to have the minimum dimensions: the TOFPET ASIC. The system is composed by a LYSO pixellated crystal which is seen by a 128 SiPM matrix on both surfaces: this permits Depth Of Interaction (DOI) measurement. The 4 needed ASICs are handled by a FPGA board which transmits the acquired data over an UDP connection. The external container was made using 3-D printing technology: internal channels on the external surface permit the flowing of controlled temperature (≈35 °C) water. Electronic components power is dissipated using an internal air flow kept at lower temperature (≈20 °C). The probe is MR compatible: a dedicated small antenna can be accommodated in the container. This will permit simultaneous imaging in MRI and PET systems.

  9. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery as optimal option in treatment of rare rectal lesions: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Monica; Ghiselli, Roberto; Cappelletti Trombettoni, Maria Michela; Cardinali, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the outcomes of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rare rectal condition like mesenchymal tumors, condylomas, endometriosis and melanoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a twenty-three years database. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in this study. The lesions were considered suitable for TEM if they were within 20 cm from the anus. All of them underwent an accurate preoperative workup consisting in clinical examination, total colonoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography, and pelvic computerized tomography or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Operative time, intraoperative complications, rate of conversion, tumor size, postoperative morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, local and distant recurrence were analyzed. RESULTS Among the 1328 patients treated by TEM in our department, the 52 patients with rectal abnormalities other than adenoma or adenocarcinoma represented 4.4%. There were 30 males (57.7%) and 22 females (42.3%). Mean age was 55 years (median = 60, range = 24-78). This series included 14 (26.9%) gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 21 neuroendocrine tumors (40.4%), 1 ganglioneuroma (1.9%), 2 solitary ulcers in the rectum (3.8%), 6 cases of rectal endometriosis (11.5%), 6 cases of rectal condylomatosis (11.5%) and 2 rectal melanomas (3.8%). Mean lesion diameter was 2.7 cm (median: 4, range: 0.4-8). Mean distance from the anal verge was 9.5 cm (median: 10, range: 4-15). One patient operated for rectal melanoma developed distant metastases and died two years after the operation. We experienced 2 local recurrences (3.8%) with an overall survival equal to 97.6% (95%CI: 95%-99%) at the end of follow-up and a disease free survival of 98% (95%CI: 96%-99%). CONCLUSION We could conclude that TEM is an important therapeutical option for rectal rare conditions. PMID:27668073

  10. Complete rectal prolapse in young Egyptian males: Is schistosomiasis really condemned?

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Zeid, Ahmed A; ElAbbassy, Islam H; Kamal, Ahmed M; Somaie, Dina A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the assumption that schistosomiasis is the main cause of rectal prolapse in young Egyptian males. METHODS Twenty-one male patients between ages of 18 and 50 years with complete rectal prolapse were included in the study out of a total 29 patients with rectal prolapse admitted for surgery at Colorectal Surgery Unit, Ain Shams University hospitals between the period of January 2011 and April 2014. Patients were asked to fill out a specifically designed questionnaire about duration of the prolapse, different bowel symptoms and any past or present history of schistosomiasis. Patients also underwent flexible sigmoidoscopy and four quadrant mid-rectal biopsies documenting any gross or microscopic rectal pathology. Data from questionnaire and pathology results were analyzed and patients were categorized according to their socioeconomic class. RESULTS Twelve patients (57%) never contracted schistosomiasis and were never susceptible to the disease, nine patients (43%) had history of the disease but were properly treated. None of the patients had gross rectal polyps and none of the patients had active schistosomiasis on histopathological examination. Fifteen patients (71%) had early onset prolapse that started in childhood, majority before the age of 5 years. Thirteen patients (62%) were habitual strainers, and four of them (19%) had straining dating since early childhood. Four patients (19%) stated that prolapse followed a period of straining that ranged between 8 mo and 2 years. Nine patients (43%) in the present study came from the low social class, 10 patients (48%) came from the working class and 2 patients (9%) came from the low middle social class. CONCLUSION Schistosomiasis should not be considered the main cause of rectal prolapse among young Egyptian males. Childhood prolapse that continues through adult life is likely involved. Childhood prolapse probably results from malnutrition, recurrent parasitic infections and diarrhea that induce

  11. Rectal Dose-Volume Differences Using Proton Radiotherapy and a Rectal Balloon or Water Alone for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Mahajan, Chaitali; Fryer, Amber; Indelicato, Daniel; Henderson, Randal H.; McKenzie, Craig C.; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; Lawlor, Paula C.; Li Zuofeng; Oliver, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To describe dose-volume values with the use of water alone vs. a rectal balloon (RB) for the treatment of prostate cancer with proton therapy. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 30 proton plans for 15 patients who underwent CT and MRI scans with an RB or water alone. Simulation was performed with a modified MRI endorectal coil and an RB with 100 mL of water or water alone. Doses of 78-82 gray equivalents were prescribed to the planning target volume. The two groups were compared for three structures: rectum, rectal wall (RW), and rectal wall 7 cm (RW7) at the level of the planning target volume. Results: Rectum and RW volumes radiated to low, intermediate, and high doses were small: rectum V10, 33.7%; V50, 17.3%; and V70, 10.2%; RW V10, 32.4%; V50, 20.4%; and V70, 14.6%. The RB effectively increased the rectal volume for all cases (139.8 {+-} 44.9 mL vs. 217.7 {+-} 32.2 mL (p < 0.001). The RB also decreased the volume of the rectum radiated to doses V10-V65 (p {<=} 0.05); RW for V10-V50; and RW7 for V10-V35. An absolute rectum V50 improvement >5% was seen for the RB in 5 of 15 cases, for a benefit of 9.2% {+-} 2.3% compared with 2.4% {+-} 1.3% for the remaining 10 cases (p < 0.001). Similar benefit was seen for the rectal wall. No benefit was seen for doses {>=}70 gray equivalents for the rectum, RW, or RW7. No benefit of {<=}1% was seen with an RB in 46% for the rectum V70 and in 40% for the rectal wall V70. Conclusions: Rectum and rectal wall doses with proton radiation were low whether using water or an RB. Selected patients will have a small but significant advantage with an RB; however, water alone was well tolerated and will be an alternative for most patients.

  12. Estabilidad de los modelos de Heggie y Ramamani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzio, J. C.; Vergne, M. M.; Wachlin, F. C.; Carpintero, D. D.

    Los modelos de Heggie y Ramamani de satélites galácticos en órbitas circulares se basan en una teoría aproximada, por lo que es importante verificar su estabilidad mediante simulaciones numéricas. En esta forma, hemos logrado mostrar que son estables sobre intervalos de tiempo mucho mayores que los que lograron los propios autores de los modelos. Por otra parte, dado que hemos mostrado que el caos es significativo en estos modelos, son un sistema ideal para investigar si, pese a ello, se mantienen estacionarios. Nuestras simulaciones numéricas muestran que, pese al caos, la estacionariedad se mantiene sobre intervalos de centenares de tiempos de cruce del sistema, mucho mayores que los tiempos de Liapunov característicos de sus movimientos caóticos.

  13. Delayed endoluminal vacuum therapy for rectal anastomotic leaks after rectal resection in a swine model: a new treatment option.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Shada, Amber; Ritter, Lane A; Mauro, David M; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Feldman, Sanford H; Kleiner, Daniel E

    2014-04-01

    Anastomotic leaks are a dreaded surgical complication following colorectal operations. Creation of a temporary proximal diverting ileostomy is used in high-risk anastomoses, however, additional surgical risk is accumulated with its creation and reversal. Endoluminal vacuum therapy has been shown to seal anastomotic defects in the prophylactic setting in a pig model and we hypothesized it could be utilized in a delayed fashion to rescue subjects with an active anastomotic leak. Yorkshire pigs underwent rectal resection, intentional leak confirmed by fluoroscopy, and endoluminal vacuum therapy device placement to low continuous suction. Following treatment, a contrast enema and necropsy was performed for gross and histopathology. Pigs underwent 2 (or 5) days of free intraperitoneal leak prior to device placement and 5 (or 7) subsequent days of endoluminal vacuum therapy. Six of seven early-treated pigs sealed their anastomotic defect, while two of the four treated pigs in this extended group sealed the defect. Endoluminal vacuum therapy is feasible and well tolerated in a pig model, and it has been shown to seal a significant number of freely leaking anastomoses in the early period (86%). This technology warrants further study as it may provide a noninvasive means to treatment of anastomotic leaks.

  14. Extralevator abdominoperineal excision versus conventional surgery for low rectal cancer: a single surgeon experience

    PubMed Central

    Neşşar, Gürel; Demirbağ, Ali Eba; Celep, Bahadır; Elbir, Orhan Hayri; Kayaalp, Cüneyt

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) reduces the risk of positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and of intraoperative perforation (IOP), both of which are associated with high local recurrence rates and poor survival outcomes for rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to compare the results of ELAPE with conventional abdominoperineal excision (APE) for low rectal cancer. Material and Methods A total of 25 consecutive patients underwent ELAPE for low rectal cancer between November 2008 and September 2011. Fifty-six patients treated by conventional APE prior to 2008 were selected from our rectal cancer database for comparison as a historical cohort. Results The mean follow-up was 44.7 months in the ELAPE group, and 70.6 months in the APE group. Patients undergoing ELAPE had a lower CRM positivity and IOP rate than APE (12% vs. 20%, p=0,531; 4% vs. 8,9%, p=0,826; respectively). The ELAPE group was associated with higher perineal wound complications than the APE group (16.0% vs. 1.8%, p=0.030). Local recurrence rates for patients in both groups did not differ significantly (4.0% vs. 3.6%, p=1.0). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that ELAPE technique was associated with less CRM involvement and reduced rates of IOP but markedly higher rates of postoperative perineal complications occurred as compared to conventional surgery. ELAPE must be reserved for advanced low rectal cancers. PMID:28149119

  15. HIF-1α expression correlates with cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liu; Tao, Lin; Dawei, He; Xuliang, Li; Xiaodong, Luo

    2014-07-01

    Regional hypoxia caused by accelerated cell proliferation and overgrowth is an important characteristic of neoplasm. Hypoxia can cause a series of changes in gene transcription and protein expression, thereby not only inducing tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy but also promoting tumor invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HIF-1α expression and cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. In 113 rectal carcinoma cases, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, whereas the levels of HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression, microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density(LVD) were examined by immunohistochemical staining. HIF-1 expression was detected in 67 of 113 rectal carcinoma cases (59.3 %). A positive correlation was found among HIF-1α expression, cellular apoptosis and angiogenesis. The 5-year survival rate in the HIF-1α-negative group was significantly higher than that in the HIF-1α-positive group (81.34 % versus 50 %, P < 0.05). According to the Cox regression analysis, HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression and cellular apoptosis index were independent risk factors for clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. Aberrant HIF-1α expression correlates with apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis and poor prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

  16. Rectal carcinoids are on the rise: early detection by screening endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Scherübl, H

    2009-02-01

    Rectal carcinoids are on the rise; in the United States the age-adjusted incidence has increased by 800% -1000% in the last 35 years. The incidence of carcinoids of the stomach, pancreas, or small bowels has also multiplied. The reasons for these epidemiological changes are not yet understood. Both screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy lead to a shift to smaller-sized (< or =13 mm) rectal carcinoids and earlier tumor stages at diagnosis. During the last 35 years the overall 5-year survival of patients with rectal carcinoid disease has increased by almost 20% (in the US). Thus, endoscopic screening of the colorectum is effective in the early diagnosis not only of colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas but also of carcinoids. Rectal carcinoids that are 10.0 mm or less and do not infiltrate the muscularis propria can be removed endoscopically. If histological angioinvasion or lymph node metastases are found, surgical lymph node dissection has to be considered. Before deciding on definitive therapy, rectal carcinoids should be staged by means of endoscopic ultrasonography, CT, or MRI and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

  17. Ovarian cycle approach by rectal temperature and fecal progesterone in a female killer whale, Orcinus orca.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Satoshi; Kakizoe, Yuka; Kanda, Koji; Sengoku, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yohei; Adachi, Itsuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Doi, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the measurements of body temperature and fecal progesterone concentrations as minimally invasive techniques for assessing ovarian cycle in a single sexually mature female killer whale. Rectal temperature data, fecal and blood samples were collected in the dorsal position using routine husbandry training on a voluntary basis. The correlations between rectal temperature and plasma progesterone concentration and between fecal and plasma progesterone concentrations were investigated. Fecal progesterone metabolites were identified by a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Plasma progesterone concentrations (range: 0.2-18.6 ng/ml) and rectal temperature (range: 35.3-35.9°C) changed cyclically, and cycle lengths were an average (±SD) of 44.9±4.0 days (nine cycles) and 44.6±5.9 days (nine cycles), respectively. Rectal temperature positively correlated with the plasma progesterone concentrations (r=0.641, P<0.01). There was a visual trend for fecal progesterone profiles to be similar to circulating plasma progesterone profiles. Fecal immunoreactive progestagen analysis resulted in a marked immunoreactive peak of progesterone. The data from the single killer whale indicate that the measurement of rectal temperature is suitable for minimally invasive assessment of the estrous cycle and monitoring the fecal progesterone concentration is useful to assess ovarian luteal activity.

  18. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of {sup 3}H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells.

  19. The effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2014-04-01

    Biopsy of rectal carcinoid tumor is commonly taken before endoscopic resection. However the preceding biopsy can inhibit complete resection by causing blurred tumor border and fibrosis of the tissue. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor. It was also determined if rectal carcinoid tumors can be macroscopically distinguished by endoscopy. We reviewed retrospectively the records of patients with rectal carcinoid tumor who had undergone an endoscopic treatment at our hospital, during a 7-yr period. The resection margin was clear in 57 of 98 cases. The preceding biopsy was taken in 57 cases and the biopsy was significantly associated with the risk of incomplete tumor resection (OR, 3.696; 95% CI, 1.528-8.938, P = 0.004). In 95.9% of the cases, it was possible to suspect a carcinoid tumor by macroscopic appearance during initial endoscopy. The preceding biopsy may disturb complete resection of rectal carcinoid tumor. In most cases, the carcinoid tumor could be suspected by macroscopic appearance. Therefore the preceding biopsy is not essential, and it may be avoided for the complete resection.

  20. Nitrates in drinking water and risk of death from rectal cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between nitrate levels in drinking water and rectal cancer development has been inconclusive. A matched case-control and nitrate ecology study was used to investigate the association between mortality attributed to rectal cancer and drinking-water nitrate exposure in Taiwan. All deaths due to rectal cancer of Taiwan residents from 1999 through 2003 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair matched to the cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Each matched control was selected randomly from the set of possible controls for each case. Data on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) levels in drinking water throughout Taiwan were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was assumed to be the source of the subject's nitrate exposure via drinking water. The adjusted odds ratios for rectal cancer death for those with high nitrate levels in their drinking water, as compared to the lowest tertile, were 1.22 (0.98-1.52) and 1.36 (1.08-1.70), respectively. The findings of this study warrant further investigation of the role of nitrates in drinking water in the etiology of rectal cancer in Taiwan.

  1. Variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Wolff, Roger K

    2011-07-01

    CYP19A1, or aromatase, influences estrogen-metabolizing enzymes and may influence cancer risk. We examine variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer using data from population-based case-control studies (colon n = 1,574 cases, 1,970 controls; rectal n = 791 cases, 999 controls). Four SNPs were statistically significantly associated with colon cancer and four were associated with rectal cancer. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, the AA genotype of rs12591359 was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.44 95% CI 1.16-1.80) and the AA genotype of rs2470144 was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.65 95% CI 0.50-0.84). Variants of CYP19A1 were associated with CIMP+ and CIMP+/KRAS2-mutated tumors. CT/TT genotypes of rs1961177 were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of a MSI+ colon tumor (OR 1.77 95% CI 1.26-2.37). We observed statistically significant interactions between genetic variation in NFκB1 and CYP19A1 for both colon and rectal cancer. Our data suggest the importance of CYP19A1 in the development of colon and rectal cancer and that estrogen may influence risk through an inflammation-related mechanism.

  2. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-14

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer.

  3. Rectal sac distention is induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone in the pupa of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takumi; Sakurai, Sho; Iwami, Masafumi

    2009-03-01

    Holometabolous insects do not excrete but store metabolic wastes during the pupal period. The waste is called meconium and is purged after adult emergence. Although the contents of meconium are well-studied, the developmental and physiological regulation of meconium accumulation is poorly understood. In Bombyx mori, meconium is accumulated in the rectal sac; thereby, the rectal sac distends at the late pupal stage. Here, we show that rectal sac distention occurs between 4 and 5 days after pupation. The distention is halted by brain-removal just after larval-pupal ecdysis but not by brain-removal 1 day after pupation. In the pupae, brain-removal just after ecdysis kept the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer low during early and mid-pupal stages. An injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) evoked the distention that was halted by brain-removal in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, brain-removal caused the lack of ecdysteroid, and rectal sac distention did not appear in the brain-removed pupae because of the lack of ecdysteroid. We conclude that rectal sac distention is one of the developmental events regulated by 20E during the pupal period in B. mori.

  4. Multicompartmental Pharmacokinetic Model of Tenofovir Delivery to the Rectal Mucosa by an Enema

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yajing; Katz, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Rectal enemas that contain prophylactic levels of anti-HIV microbicides such as tenofovir have emerged as a promising dosage form to prevent sexually transmitted HIV infections. The enema vehicle is promising due to its likely ability to deliver a large amount of drug along the length of the rectal canal. Computational models of microbicide drug delivery by enemas can help their design process by determining key factors governing drug transport and, more specifically, the time history and degree of protection. They can also inform interpretations of experimental pharmacokinetic measures such as drug concentrations in biopsies. The present work begins rectal microbicide PK modeling, for enema vehicles. Results here show that a paramount factor in drug transport is the time of enema retention; direct connectivity between enema fluid and the fluid within rectal crypts is also important. Computations of the percentage of stromal volume protected by a single enema dose indicate that even with only a minute of enema retention, protection of 100% can be achieved after around 14 minutes post dose. Concentrations in biopsies are dependent on biopsy thickness; and control and/or knowledge of thickness could improve accuracy and decrease variability in biopsy measurements. Results here provide evidence that enemas are a promising dosage form for rectal microbicide delivery, and offer insights into their rational design. PMID:28114388

  5. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y.; Tezcaner, Tugan; Moray, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. RESULTS: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. CONCLUSION: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions. PMID:26622116

  6. Quantitative analysis of rectal cancer by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. Q.; Wu, X. J.; Tang, T.; Zhu, S. W.; Yao, Q.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X. C.

    2012-08-01

    To quantify OCT images of rectal tissue for clinic diagnosis, the scattering coefficient of the tissue is extracted by curve fitting the OCT signals to a confocal single model. A total of 1000 measurements (half and half of normal and malignant tissues) were obtained from 16 recta. The normal rectal tissue has a larger scattering coefficient ranging from 1.09 to 5.41 mm-1 with a mean value of 2.29 mm-1 (std:±0.32), while the malignant group shows lower scattering property and the values ranging from 0.25 to 2.69 mm-1 with a mean value of 1.41 mm-1 (std:±0.18). The peri-cancer of recta has also been investigated to distinguish the difference between normal and malignant rectal tissue. The results demonstrate that the quantitative analysis of the rectal tissue can be used as a promising diagnostic criterion of early rectal cancer, which has great value for clinical medical applications.

  7. Optimization of collimator parameters to reduce rectal dose in intensity-modulated prostate treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chapek, Julie . E-mail: Julie.chapek@hci.utah.edu; Tobler, Matt; Toy, Beau J.; Lee, Christopher M.; Leavitt, Dennis D.

    2005-01-01

    The inability to avoid rectal wall irradiation has been a limiting factor in prostate cancer treatment planning. Treatment planners must not only consider the maximum dose that the rectum receives throughout a course of treatment, but also the dose that any volume of the rectum receives. As treatment planning techniques have evolved and prescription doses have escalated, limitations of rectal dose have remained an area of focus. External pelvic immobilization devices have been incorporated to aid in daily reproducibility and lessen concern for daily patient motion. Internal immobilization devices (such as the intrarectal balloon) and visualization techniques (including daily ultrasound or placement of fiducial markers) have been utilized to reduce the uncertainty of intrafractional prostate positional variation, thus allowing for minimization of treatment volumes. Despite these efforts, prostate volumes continue to abut portions of the rectum, and the necessary volume expansions continue to include portions of the anterior rectal wall within high-dose regions. The addition of collimator parameter optimization (both collimator angle and primary jaw settings) to intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows greater rectal sparing compared to the use of IMRT alone. We use multiple patient examples to illustrate the positive effects seen when utilizing collimator parameter optimization in conjunction with IMRT to further reduce rectal doses.

  8. Laparoscopic-Assisted Altemeier’s Procedure for Recurrent Strangulated Rectal Prolapse: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameen, Wael M.; Privitera, Antonio; Al-Ayed, Amal; Sabr, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 39 Final Diagnosis: Recurrent strangulated rectal prolapse Symptoms: Chronic constipation • painful rectal mass • irreducible rectal prolapse Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Operation Specialty: Surgery Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Rectal prolapse is an uncommon disease that usually requires surgical intervention. Several techniques have been described with either an abdominal or perineal approach, the latter having a higher recurrence rate. In case of irreducible and strangulated full-thickness prolapse, a perineal approach is necessary, and efforts should be made to reduce recurrence rates. Case Report: A 39-year-old mentally retarded woman presented with a painful, recurrent, strangulated sigmoid prolapse following a perineal recto-sigmoidectomy (Altemeier’s procedure) for strangulated rectal prolapse 2 months previously. Examination revealed a 10-cm strangulated, prolapsed sigmoid. A laparoscopic-assisted perineal sigmoid resection with colo-anal anastomosis was carried out. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. Conclusions: This is the second report in the literature highlighting the role of laparoscopy in Altemeier’s procedure for strangulated prolapse. Laparoscopy aids assessment of sigmoid length, allows colonic mobilization, and assures that all redundant bowel is excised. This approach can reduce recurrence rate and need of further surgical interventions. PMID:27811832

  9. Unusual cause of 55 years of rectal bleeding: hemolymphangioma (a case report)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sagar; Fan, Miao; Zhu, Junfeng; Lu, Xiaofang; Chang, Dandan; Li, Xiuhong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hemolymphangioma is a rare developmental error of combined blood and lymphatic vasculature. To the best of our knowledge, there is only one case of rectal hemolymphangioma reported in Pubmed. Our case probably is the first reported rectal hemolymphangioma with computed tomography (CT) evaluation. Patient concerns and diagnosis: A 57-year-old male was presented to our hospital with 55 years of long history of episodic rectal bleeding. Past medical history showed numerous hospital visits for similar illness. Multiple diagnoses were made and different treatment modalities were applied for his benefit, but none of them relieved the symptoms permanently. He was then referred to our hospital. On admission, he was presented with intermediate rectal bleeding of fresh blood. CT examination showed isodense homogenous rectal wall thickening with heterogeneous enhancement on contrast examination. Multiple calcifications were seen in and around the lesion. Interventions and outcomes: He underwent open abdominal surgery with total surgical excision of the lesion. Post-surgical histopathological examination of excised specimen showed submucosal multiple thin-walled vessel of varying size, some consistent with blood vessel and other with lymph vessel, thus diagnosis of hemolymphangioma was made. Follow-up for 6 months showed no recurrence. Lessions: Hemolymphangioma is a benign developmental lesion. Radiological findings can be challenging and range from benign cystic lesion to aggressive lesion mimicking malignancy. Therefore, combined clinical history, radiological findings, and continuous follow-up can help make proper diagnosis and provide prompt and accurate treatment. PMID:28272235

  10. Is endoscopic ultrasonography essential for endoscopic resection of small rectal neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Bum; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyung Wook; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Su Jin; Nam, Hyeong Seok

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the importance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for small (≤ 10 mm) rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) treatment. METHODS Patients in whom rectal NETs were diagnosed by endoscopic resection (ER) at the Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between 2008 and 2014 were included in this study. A total of 120 small rectal NETs in 118 patients were included in this study. Histologic features and clinical outcomes were analyzed, and the findings of endoscopy, EUS and histology were compared. RESULTS The size measured by endoscopy was not significantly different from that measured by EUS and histology (r = 0.914 and r = 0.727 respectively). Accuracy for the depth of invasion was 92.5% with EUS. No patients showed invasion of the muscularis propria or metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. All rectal NETs were classified as grade 1 and demonstrated an L-cell phenotype. Mean follow-up duration was 407.54 ± 374.16 d. No patients had local or distant metastasis during the follow-up periods. CONCLUSION EUS is not essential for ER in the patient with small rectal NETs because of the prominent morphology and benign behavior. PMID:28373770

  11. Rectal cancer: future directions and priorities for treatment, research and policy in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher; Ehrenberg, Nieves; Frizelle, Frank; Sarfati, Diana; Balasingam, Adrian; Pearse, Maria; Parry, Susan; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Bissett, Ian

    2014-06-06

    New Zealand has one of the highest incidences of rectal cancer in the world, and its optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach. A National Rectal Cancer Summit was convened in August 2013 to discuss management of rectal cancer in the New Zealand context, to highlight controversies and discuss domestic priorities for the future. This paper summarises the priorities for treatment, research and policy for rectal cancer services in New Zealand identified as part of the Summit in August. The following priorities were identified: - Access to high-quality information for service planning, review of outcomes, identification of inequities and gaps in provision, and quality improvement; - Engagement with the entire sector, including private providers; - Focus on equity; - Emerging technologies; - Harmonisation of best practice; - Importance of multidisciplinary team meetings. In conclusion, improvements in outcomes for patients with rectal cancer in New Zealand will require significant engagement between policy makers, providers, researchers, and patients in order to ensure equitable access to high quality treatment, and strategic incorporation of emerging technologies into clinical practice. A robust clinical information framework is required in order to facilitate monitoring of quality improvements and to ensure that equitable care is delivered.

  12. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-01-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  13. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®—Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, W. Warren; Herman, Joseph M.; Blackstock, A. William; Hong, Theodore S.; Poggi, Matthew M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R.; Zook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions. These Criteria are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The development and review of these guidelines includes an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Local recurrence of rectal cancer can result in devastating symptoms for patients, including intractable pain and discharge. Prior treatment can limit subsequent treatment options. Preoperative 5-FU based chemoradiotherapy is the treatment of choice for patients with a local recurrence who did not receive adjuvant therapy after initial resection or who might have received chemotherapy alone. Chemoradiotherapy followed by evaluation for surgery is the preferred treatment for patients who have undergone previous radiotherapy after surgery. The inclusion of surgery has resulted in the best outcomes in a majority of studies. Palliative chemoradiotherapy is appropriate for patients who have received previous radiotherapy whose recurrent disease is considered inoperable. Radiotherapy can be delivered on a standard or hyperfractionated treatment schedule. Newer systemic treatments have improved response rates and given physicians more options for treating patients in this difficult situation. The use of induction chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy is an evolving treatment option. Specialized treatment modalities should be used at institutions with experience in these techniques and preferably in patients enrolled in clinical trials. PMID:22574231

  14. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  15. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  16. Differences in carcinoembryonic antigen levels between colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunlong; Xuan, Weibo; Chen, Chunlin; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Ziyi; Zuo, Yunfei; Ren, Shuangyi

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of the serum tumor biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with carcinoma of the colon and rectum in different clinical stages. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer worldwide and previous studies have reported rapidly updated therapeutic regimes. While the majority of studies focus on CRC as a single entity, certain studies distinguish colon cancer (CC) from rectal cancer (RC), as there is a hypothesis stating that CC and RC are two naturally different entities. CEA is reported to be an important tumor-associated antigen overexpressed in CRC, which is routinely detected as a significant indicator of CRC. Our study aimed to identify potential differences in the expression of CEA between CC and RC, which may, to some degree, reflect the natural differences between the two. We investigated 240 CRC cases between July, 2010 and December, 2012 from The First and Second Affiliated Hospitals of Dalian Medical University, including 117 CC and 123 RC patients with tumors classified by Duke's staging as A-D. The serum CEA level was measured preoperatively by radioimmunoassays as a routinely used auxiliary indicator. The expression of CEA differed between CC and RC, with the former exhibiting variation among the four stages, whereas no variation was observed in RC. In addition, there were differences between CC and RC regarding the CEA level in stage C and D. Furthermore, the CEA level in stage C of CC was significantly lower compared to that in any other stage. In conclusion, the intrinsic distribution of the CEA level between CC and RC suggests that CC and RC may be two naturally different entities; the significantly low CEA level in stage C of CC indicates that stage C may be crucial in the evolution of CC.

  17. Rectal bleeding after radiation therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Devarati; Nout, Remi; Catalano, Paul J.; Creutzberg, Carien; Cimbak, Nicole; Lee, Larissa; Viswanathan, Akila

    2015-01-01

    Background & Purpose The goals of this study were to determine the rate and risk factors of rectal bleeding (RB) after external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy (EBRT+VB), and to compare this data to previously unreported RB rates from PORTEC-2 patients receiving EBRT or VB alone. Materials & Methods Retrospective chart review identified 212 endometrial cancer patients receiving adjuvant EBRT+VB between 2006–2013. Patient-reported RB data were also obtained from PORTEC-2 patients randomized to EBRT (n=166) or VB (n=182). The two populations were compared using an RB Scale of symptom severity. Results After a median 35 months, 17.9% of EBRT+VB patients (n=38) experienced any RB with 1.9% (n=4) having bleeding requiring intervention. Age ≤70 years was the only predictor of RB (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.1–8.7; p=0.027). Rates of patient-reported RB after EBRT were similar with 15.0% (n=25) having any RB and 0.6% (n=1) having “very much” bleeding. On regression analysis, any EBRT (either EBRT alone or EBRT+VB) increased the risk of RB compared to those who received VB alone (OR 3.0; p=0.0028; 95% CI 1.4–6.7). The rates of more severe RB were low and did not significantly differ between treatments. Conclusions Significant RB is rare after radiation. The addition of VB to EBRT does not significantly alter bleeding rates. PMID:26003340

  18. Integrated analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression profiles identifies potential novel biomarkers of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinning; Zhou, Yuhui; Dang, Shuwei; Chen, Hongsheng; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation was regarded as the promising biomarker for rectal cancer diagnosis. However, the optimal methylation biomarkers with ideal diagnostic performance for rectal cancer are still limited. To identify new molecular markers for rectal cancer, we mapped DNA methylation and transcriptomic profiles in the six rectal cancer and paired normal samples. Further analysis revealed the hypermethylated probes in cancer prone to be located in gene promoter. Meanwhile, transcriptome analysis presented 773 low-expressed and 1,161 over-expressed genes in rectal cancer. Correction analysis identified a panel of 36 genes with an inverse correlation between methylation and gene expression levels, including 10 known colorectal cancer related genes. From the other 26 novel marker genes, GFRA1 and GSTM2 were selected for further analysis on the basis of their biological functions. Further experiment analysis confirmed their methylation and expression status in a larger number (44) of rectal cancer samples, and ROC curves showed higher AUC than SEPT9, which has been used as a biomarker in rectal cancer. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of contiguous CpG sites in methylation array may be potential diagnostic markers of rectal cancer. PMID:27566576

  19. Poloxamer 188 and propylene glycol-based rectal suppository enhances anticancer effect of 5-fluorouracil in mice.

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung-Hwan; Xuan, Jing-Ji; Choi, Han-Gon; Park, Byung Chul; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Jeong, Tae-Cheon; Jin, Chun Hua; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2006-05-01

    The tumoricidal and apoptosis-inducing activities of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) have been demonstrated in experimental and clinical investigations. Clinically, the 5-FU suppository form has been widely adopted for its advantages of less systemic toxicity, higher local tissue concentrations, and reduced first-pass effect. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of rectal administration of 5-FU suppository based on poloxamer 188 (P188) and propylene glycol (PG) and its anticancer effect on the murine experimental cancer models. The rectal suppository was made with 70% P188 and 30% PG, which was a solid phase at room temperature and instantly melted at physiological temperature. The treatment with the 5-FU suppository was more effective than the oral route in decreasing the volume of rectal cancer in mice. In addition, the survival rate of the mice with rectal cancer was higher in the group treated with the 5-FU suppository than in the group treated with 5-FU orally. Furthermore, in mice skin cancers induced by inoculation of murine CT-26 colon carcinoma cells, the anticancer effect of 5-FU was significantly enhanced by the rectal administration of the suppository than by oral treatment. Taken together, the results suggest that a poloxamer gel system with 5-FU/P188/PG is an effective rectal dosage form for the treatment of both rectal and non-rectal cancers.

  20. Essential Items for Structured Reporting of Rectal Cancer MRI: 2016 Consensus Recommendation from the Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI.

  1. Examining the Quality of Rectal Cancer Operative Reports in Teaching Institutions: Is There an Opportunity for Resident Education?

    PubMed

    Parrish, Aaron B; Sanaiha, Yas; Petrie, Beverley A; Russell, Marcia M; Chen, Formosa

    2016-10-01

    The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons rectal cancer checklist describes a set of best practices for rectal cancer surgery. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of operative reports for rectal cancer surgery based on the intraoperative American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons checklist items. Patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery at two public teaching hospitals from 2009 to 2015 were included. A total of 12 intraoperative checklist items were assessed. One hundred and fifty-eight operative reports were reviewed. Overall adherence to checklist items was 55 per cent, and was significantly higher in attending versus resident dictated reports (67% vs 51%, P < 0.01). Senior residents had significantly higher adherence to checklist items than junior residents (55% vs 44%, P < 0.01). However, overall adherence to rectal cancer checklist items was low. This represents an opportunity to improve the quality of operative documentation in rectal cancer surgery, which could also impact the technical quality of the operation itself.

  2. Essential Items for Structured Reporting of Rectal Cancer MRI: 2016 Consensus Recommendation from the Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI. PMID:28096724

  3. [A case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after ALTA therapy for an internal hemorrhoid].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Shigetomi; Uchima, Yasutake; Aomatsu, Keiho

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after aluminum potassium and tannic acid (ALTA) therapy for an internal hemorrhoid. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of bleeding during defecation. He was diagnosed via anoscopy with Goligher grade II internal hemorrhoids. Examination via colonoscopy revealed 2 yellowish submucosal tumors in the lower rectum that were 5mm and 10mm in diameter. A rectal carcinoid tumor was diagnosed based on histopathology. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated no metastases to the liver or lymph nodes. First, we performed ALTA therapy for the internal hemorrhoids. Two weeks later, we performed laparoscopic-assisted low anterior resection (D2) for the rectal carcinoid. The patient was discharged without complications and has not experienced recurrence during the 2 years of follow-up care.

  4. Screening paediatric rectal forms of azithromycin as an alternative to oral or injectable treatment.

    PubMed

    Kauss, Tina; Gaudin, Karen; Gaubert, Alexandra; Ba, Boubakar; Tagliaferri, Serena; Fawaz, Fawaz; Fabre, Jean-Louis; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; White, Nicholas J; Olliaro, Piero L; Millet, Pascal

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to identify a candidate formulation for further development of a home or near-home administrable paediatric rectal form of a broad-spectrum antibiotic - specially intended for (emergency) use in tropical rural settings, in particular for children who cannot take medications orally and far from health facilities where injectable treatments can be given. Azithromycin, a broad-spectrum macrolide used orally or intravenously for the treatment of respiratory tract, skin and soft tissue infections, was selected because of its pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties. Azithromycin in vitro solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions were studied. Various pharmaceutical forms, i.e. rectal suspension, two different rectal gels, polyethylene glycol (PEG) suppository and hard gelatin capsule (HGC) were assessed for in vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability in the rabbit. Azithromycin PEG suppository appears to be a promising candidate.

  5. Major Pelvic Bleeding Following a Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection: Use of Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Keane, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) and stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) are well-established techniques for treating rectal prolapse and obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Occasionally, they can be associated with severe complications. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent STARR for ODS and developed a postoperative pelvic hemorrhage. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast pelvic, retroperitoneal hematoma and free gas in the abdomen. Laparoscopy ruled out any bowel lesions, but identified a hematoma of the pelvis. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a small leakage of the rectal suture. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered completely. Surgeons performing STARR and SH must be aware of the risk of this rare, but severe, complication. If the patient is not progressing after a STARR or SH, a CT scan can be indicated to rule out intra-abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage. Laparoscopy is a diagnostic tool and should be associated with intraluminal exploration with flexible sigmoidoscopy. PMID:27847791

  6. Discrimination of rectal cancer through human serum using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Li, Siqi; Zhang, Su; Jin, Lili

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to detect the changes in blood serum components that accompany rectal cancer. The differences in serum SERS data between rectal cancer patients and healthy controls were examined. Postoperative rectal cancer patients also participated in the comparison to monitor the effects of cancer treatments. The results show that there are significant variations at certain wavenumbers which indicates alteration of corresponding biological substances. Principal component analysis (PCA) and parameters of intensity ratios were used on the original SERS spectra for the extraction of featured variables. These featured variables then underwent linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression tree (CART) for the discrimination analysis. Accuracies of 93.5 and 92.4 % were obtained for PCA-LDA and parameter-CART, respectively.

  7. Rectal Cancer With Disseminated Carcinomatosis of the Bone Marrow: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yuichiro; Takeishi, Kazuki; Guntani, Atsushi; Tsujita, Eiji; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Matsuyama, Ayumi; Hamatake, Motoharu; Maeda, Takashi; Tsutsui, Shinichi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Fujihara, Megumu; Ishida, Teruyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from rectal cancer with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). A 65-year-old man was admitted with melena and low back pain at rest. X-ray examination showed rectal cancer with multiple bone metastases. Laboratory examination showed severe anemia and DIC. Histologic examination showed disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow. The DIC was considered to be caused by disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from rectal cancer, and we immediately started treatment with anti-DIC therapy and anticancer chemotherapy with the modified FOLFOX6 regimen (mFOLFOX6). After some response to therapy, the patient's general condition deteriorated, and he died 128 days after admission. This is the first English report showing disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from colorectal cancer treated with mFOLFOX6. PMID:25216414

  8. MALT lymphoma of the rectum, presenting with rectal prolapsus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, there have been only a few reported cases of Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas arising in the rectum. Its clinical presentation is indistinguishable from that of rectal carcinoma but the treatment is apparently different. Symptoms of primary lymphomas involving the rectum include; anorexia, weight loss, change in bowel habits, obstruction, and bleeding. These symptoms are not disease specific and can be seen in many other gastrointestinal disorders. Patients with polypoid masses may present with obstruction symptoms. In this rare case, a female patient admitted to the emergency service with prolapsus of a rectal mass. The optimal treatment of rectal MALT lymphoma is not well defined yet, given the rarity of the disease. Surgical resection of the localized lesion and following adjuvant chemotherapy has proved to be an effective treatment option. However, a close and long-lasting follow-up is important. PMID:20180989

  9. New technique of transanal proctectomy with completely robotic total mesorrectal excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ruiz, Marcos; Palazuelos, Carlos Manuel; Martín Parra, José Ignacio; Alonso Martín, Joaquín; Cagigas Fernández, Carmen; del Castillo Diego, Julio; Gómez Fleitas, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Anterior resection with total mesorectal excision is the standard method of rectal cancer resection. However, this procedure remains technically difficult in mid and low rectal cancer. A robotic transanal proctectomy with total mesorectal excision and laparoscopic assistance is reported in a 57 year old male with BMI 32 kg/m2 and rectal adenocarcinoma T2N1M0 at 5 cm from the dentate line. Operating time was 420 min. Postoperative hospital stay was 6 days and no complications were observed. Pathological report showed a 33 cm specimen with ypT2N0 adenocarcinoma at 2 cm from the distal margin, complete TME and non affected circumferential resection margin. Robotic technology might reduce some technical difficulties associated with TEM/TEO or SILS platforms in transanal total mesorectal excision. Further clinical trials will be necessary to assess this technique.

  10. [An Unusual Case of Proctitis and Rectal Abscess due to Irritants by Artemisia asiatica Smoke (Ssukjwahun)].

    PubMed

    Kim, Seunghyup; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Seo Hyun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Park, Se Jun; Yun, Seo Young; Kim, Dae Young; Lee, Jeonghun; Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-04-25

    Proctitis is an inflammatory change of rectal mucosa induced by various agents or stimulus. Among many etiologies, it may be caused by medical treatments such as radiation or antibiotics. Proctitis usually presents with rectal ulcer but abscess formation is uncommon. Therapy using Ssukjwahun exerts its effect by directly applying the smoke around genital area and anus with various medicinal brewed herbs, especially worm-wood. Secondary metabolite of this plant, monoterpene, is known to facilitate circulation, exert anti-inflammatory effect, and help control pain. Herein, we report an unusual case of infectious proctitis presenting with rectal ulcer and abscess formation after perianal application of warm steam made by Artemisia asiatica smoke for treatment of dysmenorrhea.

  11. El problema de estabilidad de los sistemas Hamiltonianos multidimensionales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cincotta, P. M.

    Se revisarán los aspectos básicos del problema de estabilidad de sistemans Hamiltonianos N-dimensionales, haciendo especial énfasis en los posibles mecanismos que dan lugar a la aparición de ``caos": overlap de resonancias, difusión de Arnol'd y otros procesos difusivos alternativos. Se mencionarán los aspectos aún no resueltos sobre la estabilidad de los sistemas con N > 2. Finalmente, se discutirá cuáles de estos mecanismos podrían tener alguna relevancia en la dinámica de sistemas estelares y planetarios.

  12. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ospina, Juan D.; Zhu, Jian; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Delobel, Jean B.; Beckendorf, Véronique; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Correa, Juan C.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models.

  13. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 {+-} 3mm (mean {+-} SD) and 10 {+-} 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 {+-} 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 {+-} 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  14. Challenge or opportunity: outcomes of laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer in patients with high operative risk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xue-wei; Mao, Zhi-hai; Han, Ding-pei; Zhao, Jing-kun; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Zhang, Zhuo; Zong, Ya-ping; Thasler, Wolfgang; Feng, Hao

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the impact of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection for patients with high operative risk, which was defined as American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) grades III and IV. This study was conducted at a single center on patients undergoing rectal resection from 2006 to 2010. After screening by ASA grade III or IV, 248 patients who met the inclusion criteria were identified, involving 104 open and 144 laparoscopic rectal resections. The distribution of the Charlson Comorbidity Index was similar between the two groups. Compared with open rectal resection, laparoscopic resection had a significantly lower total complication rate (P<.0001), lower pain rate (P=.0002), and lower blood loss (P<.0001). It is notable that the two groups of patients had no significant difference in cardiac and pulmonary complication rates. Thus, these data showed that the laparoscopic group for rectal cancer could provide short-term outcomes similar to those of their open resection counterparts with high operative risk. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 0.8361 and 0.8119 in the laparoscopic and open groups for stage I/II (difference not significant), as was the 5-year overall survival rate in stage III/IV (P=.0548). In patients with preoperative cardiovascular or pulmonary disease, the 5-year survival curves were significantly different (P=.0165 and P=.0210), respectively. The cost per patient did not differ between the two procedures. The results of this analysis demonstrate the potential advantages of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection for high-risk patients, although a randomized controlled trial should be conducted to confirm the findings of the present study.

  15. Short communication: repeatability of measures of rectal temperature in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Weary, D M; Veira, D M; Heuwieser, W

    2010-02-01

    Although taking body temperature by rectal thermometer is the method most commonly used to identify sick cows in the postpartum period, no data on the repeatability of this measure are available. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate variability of rectal temperatures in dairy cows considering different factors (intra- and interinvestigator repeatability, different thermometers, penetration depth into the rectum, and defecation). High coefficients of correlation (r=0.98) and small differences between values of rectal temperatures (observer A=39.3+/-1.0 degrees C and observer B=39.4+/-1.0 degrees C) provide evidence that rectal temperature was a repeatable measure in dairy cows. Testing was carried out using 4 different digital thermometers: GLA M750 (GLA Agricultural Electronics, San Luis Obispo, CA), MTI8101 (SES Scala Electronics, Stahnsdorf, Germany), MT1831 (Microlife AG, Widnau, Switzerland) and Domotherm TH1 (Uebe Medical GmbH, Wertheim, Germany). Thermometers were inserted into the rectum to a certain depth (GLA M750 and MTI8101=11.5cm; MT1831=8.4cm; Domotherm TH1=7.7cm) and a measure was finished when a visual or acoustic signal was emitted by the thermometer. The measures could be influenced by the procedure itself (up to 0.5 degrees C), type of thermometer (up to 0.3 degrees C), and the penetration depth (11.5cm or 6.0cm in one of the experiments) into the rectum (up to 0.4 degrees C difference between a penetration depth of 11.5cm and 6.0cm in one of the experiments). Differences in rectal temperature before and after defecation were minor (<0.1 degrees C). These results indicate that some care is required in generalizing rectal measures of body temperature.

  16. Low thrombospondin 2 expression is predictive of low tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Chang, I-Wei; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Li, Chien-Feng; Lee, Sung-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ying-En; He, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Several heparin-binding associated proteins have been reported to play a critical role in cancer progression. However, the clinical relevancies of such proteins and their associations with CCRT response in rectal cancer have not yet to be fully elucidated. Methods: The analysis of a public transcriptome of rectal cancer indicated that thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) is a predictive factor for CCRT response. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the expression of THBS2 in pretreatment biopsy specimens from rectal cancer patients without distant metastasis. Furthermore, the relationships between THBS2 expression and various clinicopathological factors or survival were analyzed. Results: Low expression of THBS2 was significantly associated with advanced pretreatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P=0.004), post-treatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P<0.001), increased vascular invasion (P=0.003), increased perineural invasion (P=0.023) and inferior tumor regression grade (P=0.015). In univariate analysis, low THBS2 expression predicted worse outcomes for disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival and metastasis-free survival (all P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, low expression of THBS2 still served as a negative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.057, P=0.002) and metastasis-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.362, P=0.012). Conclusion: Low THBS2 expression was correlated with advanced disease status and low tumor regression after preoperative CCRT and that it acted as an independent negative prognostic factor in rectal cancer. THBS2 may represent a predictive biomarker for CCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:26807188

  17. Critical analysis of the literature investigating urogenital function preservation following robotic rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; Ahmed, Jamil; Harper, Mick; Parvaiz, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyses the current literature regarding the urogenital functional outcomes of patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed in October 2015. The following search terms were applied: “rectal cancer” or “colorectal cancer” and robot* or “da Vinci” and sexual or urolog* or urinary or erect* or ejaculat* or impot* or incontinence. All original studies examining the urological and/or sexual outcomes of male and/or female patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery were included. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were manually searched for further relevant articles. Abstracts were independently searched by two authors. RESULTS Fifteen original studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 1338 patients were included; 818 received robotic, 498 laparoscopic and 22 open rectal cancer surgery. Only 726 (54%) patients had their urogenital function assessed via means of validated functional questionnaires. From the included studies, three found that robotic rectal cancer surgery leads to quicker recovery of male urological function and five of male sexual function as compared to laparoscopic surgery. It is unclear whether robotic surgery offers favourable urogenital outcomes in the long run for males. In female patients only two studies assessed urological and three sexual function independently to that of males. In these studies there was no difference identified between patients receiving robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. However, in females the presented evidence was very limited making it impossible to draw any substantial conclusions. CONCLUSION There seems to be a trend towards earlier recovery of male urogenital function following robotic surgery. To evaluate this further, larger well designed studies are required. PMID:27933136

  18. Reduction of prostate intrafraction motion using gas-release rectal balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Su Zhong; Zhao Tianyu; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Brad; Henderson, Randy; Mendenhall, William; Nichols, R. Charles; Marcus, Robert; Mendenhall, Nancy

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To analyze prostate intrafraction motion using both non-gas-release (NGR) and gas-release (GR) rectal balloons and to evaluate the ability of GR rectal balloons to reduce prostate intrafraction motion. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with NGR rectal balloons and 29 patients with GR balloons were randomly selected from prostate patients treated with proton therapy at University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (Jacksonville, FL). Their pretreatment and post-treatment orthogonal radiographs were analyzed, and both pretreatment setup residual error and intrafraction-motion data were obtained. Population histograms of intrafraction motion were plotted for both types of balloons. Population planning target-volume (PTV) margins were calculated with the van Herk formula of 2.5{Sigma}+ 0.7{sigma} to account for setup residual errors and intrafraction motion errors. Results: Pretreatment and post-treatment radiographs indicated that the use of gas-release rectal balloons reduced prostate intrafraction motion along superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. Similar patient setup residual errors were exhibited for both types of balloons. Gas-release rectal balloons resulted in PTV margin reductions from 3.9 to 2.8 mm in the SI direction, 3.1 to 1.8 mm in the AP direction, and an increase from 1.9 to 2.1 mm in the left-right direction. Conclusions: Prostate intrafraction motion is an important uncertainty source in radiotherapy after image-guided patient setup with online corrections. Compared to non-gas-release rectal balloons, gas-release balloons can reduce prostate intrafraction motion in the SI and AP directions caused by gas buildup.

  19. [Clinical and histopathological results after the neo-adjuvant treatment of advanced rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Hohn, József; Simonka, Zsolt; Hideghéthy, Katalin; Maráz, Anikó; Nikolényi, Alíz; Veréb, Blanka; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Mán, Eszter; Lázár, György

    2010-06-01

    The role of the surgical intervention is decisive in treating colorectal tumors. The neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy has improved the efficacy of the treatment of advanced rectum tumors. In order to decrease the size and stage of advanced rectal carcinoma and to increase the rate of resecability, we introduced neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. We carried out neo-adjuvant and surgical treatment in case of 67 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-2 M 0 ) between June 1, 2005 and July 31, 2008. The average age of the patients was 61.2 years, the division according to sex was 44 males/23 females. Regarding the local stage of the rectal process or the proximity to the sphincter, we applied radio-chemotherapy (radiotherapy 25 times altogether 45 Gy and on the first and last week for 5-5 days they received 350 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day leucovorin chemotherapy, recently complemented with 3 x 1.8 Gy advanced boost radiation aiming at the macroscopic tumor site with security zone). Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks on average after restaging examinations. Thirty-eight patients underwent anterior rectal resection with double stapler procedure; there were 18 abdominoperineal rectal extirpations, 7 Hartmann operations and 4 per annum excisions. Compared to the preoperative staging, the histological evaluation of the resected specimens showed total remission (pT 0 N 0 ) in 11% and partial remission in 43%. The morbidity necessitating reoperation was 5.9%, without mortality and suture insufficiency. The long-term neo-adjuvant oncological treatment led to down-staging of rectal tumors in most cases and increased the resecability and rate of resection operations.

  20. [Excision of mid-lower rectal carcinoma through abdomen and anogenital space].

    PubMed

    Wei, F; Zhu, B; Hou, S

    1995-07-01

    28 men with male mid and lower rectal carcinoma were treated by dissecting sigmoid colon and rectum in the abdomen through the anogenital space, which refers to the potential coronoid space located between the deep transverse perineal muscles and anal sphincter muscles. The rectal segment was pulled out through the anogenital space to accomplish resection and anastomosis outside the pelvic cavity. Follow-up for 9-57 months showed that 26 cases (92.9%) survived without recurrence of carcinoma and 1 had local recurrence. The advantages of the procedure include clear exploration, minimal trauma, super-lower anastomoses under direct vision, good recovery of defecating function, and less contamination of pelviccavity.

  1. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  2. Optimal follow-up to curative colon and rectal cancer surgery: how and for how long?

    PubMed

    Asgeirsson, Theodor; Zhang, Sen; Senagore, Anthony J

    2010-10-01

    In 2009, the projected incidence for colon and rectal cancers in the United States was 106,100 and 40,870, respectively, and approximately 75% of these patients were treated with curative intent. Surveillance or follow-up after colon and rectal cancer resection serves multiple purposes; however, the primary argument supporting the validity of surveillance is the detection of metachronous and recurrent cancers amenable to curative treatment. The surveillance may provide some comfort for cancer survivors who can be informed that they have no evidence of disease.

  3. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  4. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  5. [Laparoscopy-assisted reoperation after sigmoid resection and Hartman rectal occlusion].

    PubMed

    Pernegger, C; Hornof, R; Keiler, A

    1994-03-01

    The anastomosis between the descending colon an the rectal stump after sigma-resection and blind closure of the rectum according to Hartmann could be performed as well via an open laparotomy approach as via a laparoscopic procedure. By means of a first group of five laparoscopically reoperated patients the authors are demonstrating the good practicability of their laparoscopic method. Extended adhesions in the pelvic area could be detached in all cases. The advantages of this laparoscopic operation are obvious and in the authors opinion laparoscopic assisted reconnection between colon and rectal stump seems to be a serious alternative to open surgery by laparotomy.

  6. Procedure of rectal temperature measurement affects brain, muscle, skin, and body temperatures and modulates the effects of intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Bae, David D; Brown, P Leon; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2007-06-18

    Rectal probe thermometry is commonly used to measure body core temperature in rodents because of its ease of use. Although previous studies suggest that rectal measurement is stressful and results in long-lasting elevations in body temperatures, we evaluated how this procedure affects brain, muscle, skin, and core temperatures measured with chronically implanted thermocouple electrodes in rats. Our data suggest that the procedure of rectal measurement results in powerful locomotor activation, rapid and strong increases in brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures, as well as a biphasic, down-up fluctuation in skin temperature, matching the response pattern observed during tail-pinch, a representative stressful procedure. This response, moreover, did not habituate after repeated day-to-day testing. Repeated rectal probe insertions also modified temperature responses induced by intravenous cocaine. Under quiet resting conditions, cocaine moderately increased brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures. However, during repeated rectal measurements, which increased temperatures, cocaine induced both hyperthermic and hypothermic responses. Direct comparisons revealed that body temperatures measured by a rectal probe are typically lower (approximately 0.6 degrees C) and more variable than body temperatures recorded by chronically implanted electrodes; the difference is smaller at low and greater at high basal temperatures. Because of this difference and temperature increases induced by the rectal probe per se, cocaine had no significant effect on rectal temperatures compared to control animals exposed to repeated rectal probes. Therefore, although rectal temperature measurements provide a decent correlation with directly measured deep body temperatures, the arousing influence of this procedure may drastically modulate the effects of other arousing stimuli and drugs.

  7. Memories of Astronomy Education in Brazil: Clippings from the Discourses of Interviewed Researchers on the Subject. (Spanish Title: Memorias de la Educación en Astronomía en Brasil: Recortes de los Discursos de Investigadores Entrevistados Acerca del Tema ) Memórias da Educação em Astronomia no Brasil: Recortes a Partir das Falas de Pesquisadores Entrevistados sobre o Tema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iachel, Gustavo; Nardi, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a historical retrospective concerning data from a research in Astronomy Education in Brazil, after 1973. It was organized on the basis of the speech analysis of national researchers considered references in this field by their peers. Furthermore, it was elaborated on the basis of other studies from the areas of Science Education, Physics and Astronomy. This historical overview was developed in order to facilitate understanding of the contexts in which the interviewed researchers have developed professionally. Moreover, we attempted to recover the memory of the growing field of research in Astronomy Education in the country. We believe that the history presented can help those trying to understand the past in an attempt to resolve current and future demands. Se presenta en este artículo una retrospectiva histórica referente a datos provenientes de la investigación en enseñanza de la astronomía en el Brasil, después de 1973, organizada sobre la base del análisis de los discursos de los investigadores nacionales considerados referencias en este campo, y también en la lectura de las publicaciones en las áreas de Enseñanza de las Ciencias, Física y Astronomía. Este repaso histórico se desarrolló con el fin de facilitar la comprensión de los contextos en los que los investigadores entrevistados se han desarrollado profesionalmente. Por otra parte, se intentó recuperar la memoria del creciente campo de la investigación en Educación en Astronomía en el país. Creemos que el relato presentado puede contribuir a quien trata de comprender el pasado, en un intento de resolver las demandas actuales y futuras. Relata-se neste artigo uma retrospectiva histórica referente a dados provenientes de pesquisa em Educação em Astronomia no país, pós 1973, organizada com base na análise das falas de pesquisadores considerados referências nacionais nesse campo, como também na leitura de publicações das áreas de ensino de Ciências, F

  8. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  9. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-01-01

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:28272347

  10. Technical aspects of image-based treatment planning of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Robert; Drzymala, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The role of 3-dimensional treatment planning in the management of rectal cancer is not well defined. This report reviews technical guidelines for simulation, defining target volumes, and suggested beam configurations. Outcome from pilot clinical trials, with emphasis on the impact of volume and dose on tumor response and treatment morbidity is discussed.

  11. PELVIC FLOOR SYMPTOMS AND QUALITY OF LIFE ANALYSES IN WOMEN UNDERGOING SURGERY FOR RECTAL PROLPASE

    PubMed Central

    ELLINGTON, DR; MANN, M; BOWLING, CB; DRELICHMAN, ER; GREER, WJ; SZYCHOWSKI, JM; RICHTER, HE

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterize pelvic floor symptom distress and impact, sexual function and quality of life in women who underwent rectal prolapse surgery. Methods Subjects undergoing rectal prolapse surgery from 2004–2009 completed questionnaires including the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, and the Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire. Baseline demographic, medical, and surgical characteristics were extracted by chart review. Demographic and clinic outcomes of women undergoing transperineal and abdominal approaches were compared. Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for continuous variables and Fisher’s exact test for categorical measures. Results 45 were identified; two deceased at follow-up. 28/43 subjects (65.1%) responded to the questionnaires. Mean time from original procedure was 3.9 ± 3.1 years. No differences in median total Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, and subscale scores, and Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire scores in women undergoing open rectopexy versus transperineal proctectomy were seen (all p>0.05). 26 (60%) participants answered the Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire, nine reported sexual activity within the last month. All underwent abdominal procedures. Conclusion There are few colorectal or other pelvic floor symptoms after rectal prolapse repair. Robust prospective studies are needed to more fully characterize and understand issues associated with rectal prolapse surgery in women. PMID:25379122

  12. School Nurses' Experience with Administration of Rectal Diazepam Gel for Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine school nurses' knowledge of state and school district policies, their experience regarding the administration of rectal diazepam gel in the school, and the perceived benefits and barriers of providing this treatment. Four hundred nineteen nurses responded to a survey conducted during the National…

  13. The rectal microbiota of cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and uninfected controls.

    PubMed

    Weese, J S; Nichols, J; Jalali, M; Litster, A

    2015-10-22

    Rectal swabs were collected from 31 cats, 16 with FIV infection and 15 uninfected controls, to evaluate and compare the rectal bacterial microbiota in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection and uninfected controls. The rectal microbiota was characterized via next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene (V4 region) polymerase chain reaction products. Eighteen different phyla were identified. Firmicutes dominated in both groups, followed by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, but there were no significant differences between groups. When predominant orders are compared, FIV-infected cats had significant higher median relative abundances of Bifidobacteriales (P=0.022), Lactobacillales (P=0.022) and Aeromonadales (P=0.043). No differences were identified in the 50 most common genera when adjusted for false discovery rate. There were significant differences in community membership (Jaccard index, unifrac P=0.008, AMOVA P<0.001) and community structure (Yue&Clayton index, unifrac P=0.03, AMOVA P=0.005) between groups. However, only one metacommunity (enterotype) was identified. The rectal microbiota differed between cats with FIV infection and uninfected controls. Some of the changes that were noted have been associated with 'dysbiosis' and proinflammatory states in other species, so it is possible that subclinical alteration in the intestinal microbiota could influence the health of FIV-infected cats. Evaluation of the reasons for microbiota alteration and the potential impact on cat health is required.

  14. Benign Post-Radiation Rectal Stricture Treated with Endoscopic Balloon Dilation and Intralesional Triamcinolone Injection

    PubMed Central

    Karanikas, Michael; Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Zezos, Petros; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Efremidou, Eleni; Liratzopoulos, Nikolaos; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Kouklakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Post-radiation stricture is a rare complication after pelvis irradiation, but must be in the mind of the clinician evaluating a lower gastrointestinal obstruction. Endoscopy has gained an important role in chronic radiation proctitis with several therapeutic options for management of intestinal strictures. The treatment of rectal strictures has been limited to surgery with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a less invasive therapeutic approach for benign rectal strictures, endoscopic balloon dilation with or without intralesional steroid injection, has become a common treatment modality. We present a case of benign post-radiation rectal stricture treated successfully with balloon dilation and adjuvant intralesional triamcinolone injection. A 70-year-old woman presented to the emergency room complaining for 2 weeks of diarrhea and meteorism, 11 years after radiation of the pelvis due to adenocarcinoma of the uterus. Colonoscopy revealed a stricture at the rectum and multiple endoscopic biopsies were obtained from the stricture. The stricture was treated with endoscopic balloon dilation and intralesional triamcinolone injection. The procedure appears to have a high success rate and a very low complication rate. Histologic examination of the biopsies revealed non-specific inflammatory changes of the rectal mucosa and no specific changes of the mucosa due to radiation. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. The patient is stricture-free 12 months post-treatment. PMID:23271987

  15. Heritability of rectal temperature and genetic correlations with production and reproduction traits in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic selection for body temperature regulation during heat stress might be a useful approach to reduce the magnitude of heat stress effects on production and reproduction. Present objectives were to estimate the genetic parameters of rectal temperature in dairy cows reared in free stall barns und...

  16. Heritability of rectal temperature and genetic correlations with production and reproduction traits in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress affects production and reproduction in dairy cattle. Genetic selection for body temperature might help to decrease the effects of heat stress on those traits. Objectives of the current study were a) to estimate genetic parameters of rectal temperature in dairy cows under heat stress cond...

  17. Rectal mucosal endometriosis primarily misinterpreted as adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Qiuping; Liu, Shaoyan; Xiong, Hanzhen; Jiang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis involving intestinal mucosa is relatively uncommon. It poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and pathologists. We herein report a case of colonoscopic specimen revealing rectal mucosal endometriosis. A 39-year-old woman complained of red rectal bleeding and intermittent abdominal pain. Colonoscopic examination showed a rectal mass with ulceration and circum wall involvement. Biopsy was processed in the suspicious of carcinoma. Morphologically, irregular glands replaced residual colorectal ones, displayed mucin depletion, nuclear stratification and subtile subnuclear vacuoles. The stroma was full of spindle cells with abundant pink cytoplasm and unclear boundary. Due to subjectively interpreting as dysplastic glands in desmoplastic setting, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was firstly raised. Immunohistochemically, CK7, ER and CD10 identified the essence of ectopic endometrium. CK20 and CDX2 highlighted residual glands. In case of misdiagnosis, any pathologists should be aware of intestinal endometriosis for each female’s colorectal biopsy, especially for that morphology not typical for primary adenocarcinoma or endometriosis. Reading slides carefully combined with a panel of immunomarkers would solve the pitfall. PMID:26191316

  18. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Udrescu, Corina; Devonec, Marian; Tanguy, Ronan; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Enachescu, Ciprian; Colombel, Marc; Azria, David; Jalade, Patrice; Ruffion, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall.

  19. A watch-and-wait approach to the management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-10-01

    There has been increasing interest in whether a watch-and-wait strategy can be pursued instead of routine surgery in selected rectal cancer patients who have a clinical complete response (cCR) after chemoradiation. The watch-and-wait approach could potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in selected rectal cancer patients. A large study from Brazil and a prospective trial from the Netherlands appear to support this approach, although multiple other studies have raised concerns about the high rate of local recurrence with this strategy. This article reviews current evidence in support of a watch-and-wait approach to rectal cancer management, and discusses the challenges and limitations of this approach. Among these are the facts that current methods of assessing tumor response have limited accuracy, and that a cCR does not necessarily imply pathologic complete response. Careful patient selection and systematic methods of response assessment and follow-up will be critical to the success of nonoperative approaches. Based on the available evidence, ideally a watch-and-wait approach for patients with rectal cancer should be pursued within the context of a prospective clinical trial.

  20. Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Men Screened for Pharyngeal and Rectal Infection, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Dudareva-Vizule, Sandra; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar; Wisplinghoff, Fabian; Sailer, Andrea; Jansen, Klaus; Henrich, Birgit; Marcus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    To determine prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum among men who have sex with men in Germany, we conducted a multicenter study during 2009–2010 and found high rates of rectal and pharyngeal infection in men positive for the causative agent, Chlamydia trachomatis. Many infections were asymptomatic. An adjusted C. trachomatis screening policy is justified in Germany. PMID:23621949

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  2. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the treatment of stage IV rectal cancer after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Sung-Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Heung Kwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Joo, Jung Nam; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in stage IV rectal cancer with total mesorectal excision (TME) has not been defined. We evaluated the impact of RT on oncologic outcomes among patients with stage IV rectal cancer who underwent TME and performed a meta-analysis of published studies. The records of stage IV rectal cancer patients who underwent TME between August 2001 and December 2011 were reviewed. Patients who received pelvic RT (RT group) and those who did not (non-RT group) were matched using a propensity score. Oncologic outcomes were compared between the groups. A systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted. One hundred seventy-six patients were matched with propensity score matching, resulting in 39 patients in each group. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) of the RT group was significantly higher than that of the non-RT group (2-year LRFS: 100% vs 83.6%, respectively, P = 0.038). The overall survival, disease-free survival, and systemic recurrence were not significantly different between the groups. In the meta-analysis, the RT group had a reduced risk for loco-regional recurrence than the non-RT group (RR: 0.48, 95% confidence interval: 0.29–0.79). Pelvic RT might have benefits for loco-regional control in patients with stage IV rectal cancer who undergo TME. PMID:27893653

  3. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by transanal local excision for T3 distal rectal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2016-01-01

    Local excision (LE) for rectal cancer is currently indicated for selected T1 stage tumors. However, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves local disease control, but also leads to a decrease in the stage and size of the primary mural tumor, along with a decrease in the risk of regional lymphadenopathy. The present study reports the outcome of a patient with T3N0M0 rectal cancer who was treated with LE following preoperative CRT. The distal pole of the tumor was located 2 cm from the anal verge. Preoperative pelvic radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy was administered in 28 fractions. Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was administered during the first and last weeks of radiotherapy. The tumor response to CRT, was found to be marked at 7 weeks after CRT completion, and a complete response was presumed clinically. Transanal full-thickness LE was performed, and pathological examination revealed the absence of residual cancer cells. After 30 months of close follow-up, the patient was alive with no evidence of disease, and treatment-associated severe toxicities were not observed. Although a longer follow-up period is required, this case report suggests that LE may also be a feasible alternative treatment for T3 rectal cancer, which exhibits a marked response to preoperative CRT, particularly in elderly and comorbid patients contraindicated for radical surgery, or patients who are reluctant to undergo sphincter-ablation surgery. PMID:27073466

  4. Chromoendoscopy with a Standard-Resolution Colonoscope for Evaluation of Rectal Aberrant Crypt Foci

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Marcin; Zinkiewicz, Krzysztof; Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Kowalczyk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death worldwide. According to the theory by Vogelstein, colorectal carcinogenesis involves a series of successive changes in the normal colonic mucosa, starting with excessive proliferation and focal disorders of intestinal crypts, followed by adenoma and its subsequent malignant transformation. The first identifiable changes in CRC carcinogenesis are aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ACF are invisible during routine colonoscopy yet are well identifiable in chromoendoscopy using methylene blue or indigo carmine. High-resolution colonoscopes are used for assessment of ACF. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of standard-resolution colonoscopy for identification of rectal ACF. The following parameters were evaluated: duration of chromoendoscopy of a given rectal segment, type of ACF, sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy combined with histopathological evaluation. The mean duration of colonoscopy and chromoendoscopy was 26.8 min. In the study population, typical ACF were found in 73 patients (p = 0.489), hyperplastic ACF in 49 (p = 0.328), and dysplastic ACF in 16 patients (p = 0.107). Mixed ACF were observed in 11 individuals (p = 0.073). The sensitivity of the method was found to be 0.96 whereas its specificity 0.99. Identification of rectal ACF using standard-resolution colonoscopy combined with rectal mucosa staining with 0.25% methylene blue is characterised by high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26886097

  5. A new method of assessing the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma—using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; Deng, Tongxin; Jiang, Liwei; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Guan, Guoxian; Chi, Pan; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, surgical resection is still the most effective treatment strategy for rectal carcinoma and one of the most important factors affecting whether the operation is successful or not is the surgical margin determination, especially in the distal rectal carcinoma which should take the sphincter-preserving issue into consideration. However, until recently no reliable evaluation method has been developed for this purpose. There are some shortcomings in intraoperative negative surgical margin assessment such as either lack of enough detailed information of biological tissues or the fact that it is time-consuming. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM)—nonlinear optical microscopy, which is based on the nonlinear optical process two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), has the ability to label freely and noninvasively visualize tissue micro-architecture at the sub-cellular level. The advantage of providing high contrast and high resolution biomedical image in real time makes MPM have a wide range of applications in life sciences. In this study, we introduced MPM to identify the boundary between normal and abnormal rectal tissues. MPM images clearly exhibit biological tissue microstructure and its morphological changes in the regions of our interest, which enable it to determine the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma. It can be foreseen that once MPM imaging system is used in clinical examination, it will greatly improve the accuracy of surgical resection.

  6. Evaluation of disinfection techniques for, and their effects on, rectal thermocouple catheters.

    PubMed

    MAHER, J T; ROGERS, M R; PETERSON, D W

    1961-07-01

    The antibacterial activities of an iodophor (Wescodyne G), a quaternary ammonium compound (Roccal), and an iodine tincture as agents for the cold disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vitro were determined. Following thorough cleaning with an alcoholic solution of soft soap, each of the three disinfectants tested showed satisfactory results (100% kill) in 5 min against the enteric test bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa) as well as a test species of the genus Pseudomonas, among the bacteria most resistant to surface-active agents. An aqueous solution of Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine was used both as a wiping solution and for subsequent disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vivo. Total bacterial destruction was found to follow a 60-min soak preceded by the wiping procedure. Rectal catheters subjected to prolonged immersion in each of the test disinfectants were found to be essentially unaffected, retaining their initial calibrations within a permissible tolerance. Neither Roccal nor Wescodyne G solutions were found to measurably attack bare thermocouples. Alcoholic iodine 0.5% did, however, exert a deteriorating effect on bare thermocouples in a short time, as measured by change in resistance characteristics. The results of this study have led to the recommendation that Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine be used in standing operating procedures for the initial cleaning and subsequent disinfection of rectal thermocouple catheters.

  7. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colon & rectal cancer multidisciplinary management: the radiology experts review.

    PubMed

    Tudyka, V; Blomqvist, L; Beets-Tan, R G H; Boelens, P G; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J; Dieguez, A; Brown, G

    2014-04-01

    Some interesting shifts have taken place in the diagnostic approach for detection of colorectal lesions over the past decade. This article accompanies the recent EURECCA consensus group reccomendations for optimal management of colon and rectal cancers. In summary, imaging has a crucial role to play in the diagnosis, staging assessment and follow up of patients with colon and rectal cancer. Recent advances include the use of CT colonography instead of Barium Enema in the diagnosis of colonoic cancer and as an alternative to colonoscopy. Modern mutlidetector CT scanning techniques have also shown improvements in prognostic stratification of patients with colonic cancer and clinical trials are underway testing the selective use of neoadjuvant therapy for imaging identified high risk colon cancers. In rectal cancer, high resolution MRI with a voxel size less or equal to 3 × 1 × 1 mm3 on T2-weighted images has a proven ability to accurately stage patients with rectal cancer. Moreover, preoperative identification of prognostic features allows stratification of patients into different prognostic groups based on assessment of depth of extramural spread, relationship of the tumour edge to the mesorectal fascia (MRF) and extramural venous invasion (EMVI). These poor prognostic features predict an increased risk of local recurrence and/or metastatic disease and should form the basis for preoperative local staging and multidisciplinary preoperative discussion of patient treatment options.

  8. [Metachronous metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma to the penis--case report].

    PubMed

    Küronya, Zsófia; Bodrogi, István; Lövey, József; Plótár, Vanda; Manninger, Sándor; Pápai, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    Despite of its rich vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, penile metastases are rare. Even more infrequent is a penile metastasis of rectum tumors. Since the first report of rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the penis (Ehbert 1870), approximately 50 cases have been reported, most of them from the USA, the remaining from Western Europe, the Middle East and Japan. The first Hungarian case is reported now of penile metastasis of a rectal carcinoma. The case of a 65-year-old man is presented: isolated penile metastasis discovered 4.5 years after the primary rectal cancer resection. IHC tissue diagnosis and detailed clinical investigations confirmed metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma. As our patient refused penectomy and KRAS mutation was proven, FOLFIRI chemotherapy was initiated without cetuximab. This was followed by chemoradiotherapy that resulted only in transient regression. Currently the patient receives the FOLFOX regimen. At present the patient is in good performance status,without pain. The size and the number of penile metastases have not shown significant changes. According to the literature the average survival of patients with penile metastases treated with radiochemotherapy is 8 months. New chemotherapeutic modalities may improve the survival.

  9. Relationship between temperament and transportation with rectal temperature and secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated whether temperament influences rectal temperature and the secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in response to transportation. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS) measured 28 days prior to weaning with the 8...

  10. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  11. Rectal perforations and fistulae secondary to a glycerin enema: Closure by over-the-scope-clip

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Masaki, Tsutomu; Izuishi, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Rectal perforations due to glycerin enemas (GE) typically occur when the patient is in a seated or lordotic standing position. Once the perforation occurs and peritonitis results, death is usually inevitable. We describe two cases of rectal perforation and fistula caused by a GE. An 88-year-old woman presented with a large rectal perforation and a fistula just after receiving a GE. Her case was further complicated by an abscess in the right rectal wall. The second patient was a 78-year-old woman who suffered from a rectovesical fistula after a GE. In both cases, we performed direct endoscopic abscess lavage with a saline solution and closed the fistula using an over-the-scope-clip (OTSC) procedure. These procedures resulted in dramatic improvement in both patients. Direct endoscopic lavage and OTSC closure are very useful for pararectal abscess lavage and fistula closure, respectively, in elderly patients who are in poor general condition. Our two cases are the first reports of the successful endoscopic closure of fistulae using double OTSCs after endoscopic lavage of the debris and an abscess of the rectum secondary to a GE. PMID:22791955

  12. Sphincter-saving surgeries for rectal cancer: A single center study from Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shabeer Ahmed; Chowdri, Nisar A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Mir, Parvez Ahmed; Bashir, Yasir; Nafae, Muntakhab

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Background Data: The goals in the treatment of rectal cancer are cure, local control, and preservation of sphincter, bladder and sexual function. Surgical resection using sharp mesorectal dissection is important for achieving these goals. Objectives: The current treatment of choice for carcinoma rectum is sphincter saving procedures, which have practically replaced the previously done abdominoperineal resection. We performed a study in our institute to evaluate the surgical outcome and complications of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: This prospectivestudy included 117 patients, treated for primary rectal cancer by low anterior resection (LAR) from May 2007 to December 2010. All patients underwent standard total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by restoration of continuity. Results: The peri-operative mortality rate was 2.5% (3/117). Post-operative complications occurred in 32% of the patients. After a median follow up of 42 months, local recurrences developed in 6 (5%) patients and distant metastasis in 5 (4.2%). The survival rate was 93%. Conclusion: The concept of total mesorectal excision (TME), advances in stapling technology and neoadjuvant therapy have made it possible to preserve the anal sphincter in most of the patients. Rectal cancer needs to be managed especially in a specialized unit for better results. PMID:24455643

  13. A rare presentation of breast cancer: near obstructing rectal mass and gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rachel; Mathews, Winn; Scarcliff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are exceedingly rare. The low incidence and vague presentation of GI metastasizes often cause delay in diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present a case of metastatic breast cancer causing gastric outlet obstruction and rectal obstruction. PMID:27672104

  14. Rectal cancer mortality and total hardness levels in Taiwan's drinking water.

    PubMed

    Yang, C Y; Tsai, S S; Lai, T C; Hung, C F; Chiu, H F

    1999-05-01

    The possible association between the risk of rectal cancer and hardness levels in drinking water from municipal supplies was investigated in a matched case-control study in Taiwan. All eligible rectal cancer deaths (986 cases) of Taiwan residents from 1990 through 1994 were compared with deaths from other causes (986 controls), and the hardness levels of the drinking water used by these residents were determined. Data on water hardness throughout Taiwan were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The control group consisted of people who died from other causes and the controls were pair matched to the cases by sex, year of birth, and year of death. The results show a significant negative relationship between drinking water hardness and rectal cancer mortality. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 1.24 (1.01-1. 55) and 1.38 (1.10-1.73), respectively, for exposure to moderately hard water and soft water compared with the use of hard water. Trend analyses showed an increasing odds ratio for rectal cancer with decreasing levels of hardness in drinking water. This is an important finding for the Taiwan water industry and human health.

  15. Paraneoplastic leukocytosis associated with a rectal adenomatous polyp in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J P; Christopher, M M; Ellison, G W; Homer, B L; Buchanan, B A

    1992-09-01

    A dog with a rectal adenomatous polyp had extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, monocytosis, and eosinophilia consistent with a paraneoplastic syndrome. Resolution of the leukogram abnormalities after tumor excision supported this belief. Except for a lack of circulating myeloblasts, the dog had leukogram findings consistent with a neutrophilic leukemoid reaction.

  16. Prognosis and value of preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chun-Run; Wang, Rui; Wang, Mo-Jin; Ping, Jie; Zhuang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    As well known, signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare histological subtype of colorectal adenocarcinoma, which has been associated with poor prognosis and resistant to non-surgery therapy compared with common adenocarcinoma. In this study, we assessed the effect of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) for locally advanced rectal SRCC in a large patient group from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER, 1988–2011) database. SRCC was found in 0.9% (n = 622) rectal cancer (RC) patients in our study. In the PRT setting, SRCC had significantly worse cancer-specific survival than mucinous adenocarcinoma and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma patients (log-rank, P < 0.001). In terms of SRCC, stage III RC patients benefited from PRT (log-rank, P < 0.001) while stage II did not (P = 0.095). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that PRT was an independent benefit factor in stage III rectal SRCC patients (HR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.407–0.919; P = 0.018). In conclusion, SRCC was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in stage III RC patients, but not in stage II. In the PRT setting of locally advanced RC, SRCC patients had significantly worse prognosis. PRT was an independent prognostic factor associated with improved survival in stage III rectal SRCC. PMID:28345614

  17. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-03-07

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer.

  18. Heritability of rectal temperature and genetic correlations with production and reproduction traits in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, S; Cole, J B; Null, D J; Hansen, P J

    2012-06-01

    Genetic selection for body temperature during heat stress might be a useful approach to reduce the magnitude of heat stress effects on production and reproduction. Objectives of the study were to estimate the genetic parameters of rectal temperature (RT) in dairy cows in freestall barns under heat stress conditions and to determine the genetic and phenotypic correlations of rectal temperature with other traits. Afternoon RT were measured in a total of 1,695 lactating Holstein cows sired by 509 bulls during the summer in North Florida. Genetic parameters were estimated with Gibbs sampling, and best linear unbiased predictions of breeding values were predicted using an animal model. The heritability of RT was estimated to be 0.17 ± 0.13. Predicted transmitting abilities for rectal temperature changed 0.0068 ± 0.0020°C/yr from (birth year) 2002 to 2008. Approximate genetic correlations between RT and 305-d milk, fat, and protein yields, productive life, and net merit were significant and positive, whereas approximate genetic correlations between RT and somatic cell count score and daughter pregnancy rate were significant and negative. Rectal temperature during heat stress has moderate heritability, but genetic correlations with economically important traits mean that selection for RT could lead to lower productivity unless methods are used to identify genes affecting RT that do not adversely affect other traits of economic importance.

  19. Renaissance of contact x-ray therapy for treating rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Myint, Arthur Sun; Croce, Olivier; Lindegaard, Jacob; Jensen, Anie; Myerson, Robert; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Marcie, Serge

    2011-07-01

    Contact x-ray therapy (CXRT) with 50 kV has proven to be an efficient radiation therapy technique to achieve local control and rectal preservation for early rectal adenocarcinoma. Despite these results, CXRT has not been used due to the shortage of the no longer manufactured Philips RT 50™ unit. Recently, a new CXRT machine (Papillon 50™) became available on the market. This machine delivers a beam of 50 kV with a dose rate close to 15 Gy/min and has a percentage depth dose of 50% at 6-7 mm. The applicator size varies from 2-3 cm in diameter. Due to the original design of the main tube, treatment delivery is quick and more comfortable for the patients. An online viewing system incorporated in the tube allows a good visualization of the tumor with improved accuracy of radiation delivery. An international collaborative trial (Contact Endoscopic Microsurgery [CONTEM]) was set up to accrue approximately 300 cases of rectal adenocarcinoma staged T1, T2 or early T3 tumors in the UK, France, Denmark and Sweden. This trial should confirm the role of CXRT in curative treatment with organ preservation for early rectal cancers.

  20. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

  1. Chromosomal copy number changes of locally advanced rectal cancers treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Gaedcke, Jochen; Wangsa, Danny; Varma, Sudhir; Beckmann, Jaje; Liersch, Torsten; Hess, Clemens; Becker, Heinz; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ried, Thomas; Ghadimi, B. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Standard treatment of rectal cancer patients comprises preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery. However, clinicians are faced with the problem that response rates vary from one individual to another. Predictive biomarkers would therefore be helpful. Materials and Methods In order to identify genomic imbalances that might assist in stratifying tumors into responsive or non-responsive, we used metaphase comparative genomic hybridization to prospectively analyze pre-therapeutic biopsies from 42 patients with locally advanced rectal cancers. These patients were subsequently treated with 5-FU based preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Results Based on downsizing of the T-category, 21 rectal cancers were later classified as responsive, while 21 were non-responsive. Comparing these two groups, we could show that gains of chromosomal regions 7q32-q36 and 7q11-q31, and amplifications of 20q11-q13 were significantly associated with responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (P<0.05). However, the probability to detect these copy number changes by chance is high (P=0.21). Conclusion Our primary results suggest that pre-therapeutic evaluation of chromosomal copy number changes may be of value for response prediction of rectal cancers to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This will require validation in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:19602460

  2. Analysis of anastomotic leakage after rectal surgery: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of anastomotic leakage in rectal surgery is around 10 percent. Poor blood supply to the anastomosis, high anastomotic pressure and tension, increased operative blood loss, long operative time, and male sex are risk factors of anastomotic leakage. In the present study, we examined anastomotic leakage cases in rectal surgery at our institute and tried to ascertain the risk factors. Methods Three hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients who underwent rectal resection with anastomosis between January 2008 and October 2013 were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the existence of anastomotic leakage. Clinicopathological features, operative procedures, and intraoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Regarding intraoperative procedure, we focused on the ligation level of the inferior mesenteric artery, installing a transanal drainage tube in the rectum, and constructing a diverting stoma. Results Anastomotic leakage occurred in eight patients. All of them were male (p = 0.0284). There were no statistical differences in other characteristics of the patients or tumors, in operative procedures, or in intraoperative outcomes. Conclusions In the present study, no statistically significant risk factors for anastomotic leakage in rectal surgery were detected, except for male sex. However, the rate of anastomotic leakage at our institute was revealed to be rather low. Our exertion to preserve good blood flow and to prevent high tension and pressure on the anastomosis in operation may have led to this result. PMID:26042185

  3. Comparison of Rectal and Esophageal Sensitivity in Women With Functional Heartburn.

    PubMed

    Freede, Margaret; Leasure, A Renee; Proskin, Howard M; Hatch, Daniel; Edwards, Karethy; Pascucci, MaryAnn; Smith, Patsy R

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the primary hypothesis that there is a correlation of maximum pain threshold (MPT) in the esophagus and rectum in persons with functional heartburn. Secondary aims evaluated correlations with initial perception threshold (IPT) and pain threshold (PT). This study explored objective sensory endpoints of IPT, PT, and MPT in the esophagus and rectum of 14 females with functional heartburn to determine whether visceral hypersensitivity is generalized or organ-specific. Data on volume and pressure measurements at IPT, PT, and MPT with esophageal and rectal barostat distention were collected. The relationship of sensation and pain to volume, pressure, and compliance was analyzed. Esophageal and rectal IPT balloon volume scores were highly and significantly correlated (r = .61, p = .02). Esophageal and rectal PT balloon volume scores were highly and significantly correlated (r = .6, p = .02). Esophageal and rectal MPT balloon volume scores were not correlated (r = .35, p = .26). The correlation of visceral sensitivity in the esophagus and rectum in persons with functional heartburn supports the hypothesis that visceral sensory changes in functional gastrointestinal disorders are not organ specific.

  4. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  5. Modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter Medium for Direct Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains in Nasal and Rectal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacob; Kim, Taek-Kyung; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CHROMagar Acinetobacter medium (CHROMagar, France) in combination with an antimicrobial supplement (modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter; CHROMagar, France) can be used for detecting and isolating multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MRA) in nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Nasal and rectal swab samples were collected from patients in an intensive care unit at a teaching hospital. The samples were used to inoculate modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter plates, which were examined after 24 and 48 hr of incubation at 37℃. Their susceptibility against the antimicrobial agents meropenem, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin was analyzed using the Etest (bioMerieux, France). A total of 406 paired samples (406 nasal swabs and 406 rectal swabs) were obtained from 226 patients, and 120 samples (28 nasal and 28 rectal cultures, 47 nasal cultures only, and 17 rectal cultures only) yielded MRA. Seventy-five MRA isolates (18.5%) were recovered from the 406 nasal samples, and 45 MRA isolates (11.1%) were recovered from the 406 rectal samples. Of the 120 MRA isolates, 3 (2.5%) were detected only after 48 hr of incubation. The use of modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter together with nasal and rectal swabs and 1-day incubation is an effective surveillance tool for detecting MRA colonization. PMID:23667846

  6. [Evaluation of Intra-abdominal fat distribution using X-ray CT data for detection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiro; Takatsu, Kazuaki; Negishi, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Kouichi; Satou, Masanori; Yanai, Kazuya; Sasaki, Isamu; Fukuda, Kazuya; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Kouno, Atsushi; Shimomura, Younosuke

    2005-06-20

    To develop a novel method of detecting rectal cancer, we assessed relationships between intra-abdominal fat distribution and rectal cancer in Japanese patients. Subjects comprised 38 patients with rectal cancer apparent on CT-colonography and 110 other cases. The intra-abdominal fat area was determined by calculating pixel distribution with attenuation values from -140 HU to -40 HU. The area of intra-abdominal fat was measured on axial images using an interslice gap of 10 mm. Profile curves of intra-abdominal fat were in the plane direction from diaphragm to anus. Of note is the fact that Ogura's peak, a secondary small peak around the rectal cancer, was apparent on the profile of intra-abdominal fat, with 73.7% of rectal cancers displaying Ogura's peak. In comparison, only 19.1% of other cases displayed Ogura's peak on this profile. The relationship between fat and rectal cancer is difficult to explain. However, making good use of these results showing intra-abdominal fat distribution, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for detecting rectal cancer according to the presence of Ogura's peak has potential as a method of mass screening. As only 148 cases were investigated in the present study, the accumulation of additional data is needed. More detailed studies with larger patient populations are warranted.

  7. Project Gel a Randomized Rectal Microbicide Safety and Acceptability Study in Young Men and Transgender Women

    PubMed Central

    Cranston, Ross D.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Febo, Irma; Duffill, Kathryn; Siegel, Aaron; Engstrom, Jarret C.; Nikiforov, Alexyi; Park, Seo-Young; Brand, Rhonda M.; Jacobson, Cindy; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Frasca, Timothy; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Schwartz, Jill L.; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of Project Gel was to determine the safety and acceptability of rectal microbicides in young men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) at risk of HIV infection. Methods MSM and TGW aged 18–30 years were enrolled at three sites; Pittsburgh, PA; Boston, MA; and San Juan, PR. Stage 1A was a cross-sectional assessment of sexual health and behavior in MSM and TGW. A subset of participants from Stage 1A were then enrolled in Stage 1B, a 12-week evaluation of the safety and acceptability of a placebo rectal gel. This was followed by the final phase of the study (Stage 2) in which a subset of participants from Stage 1B were enrolled into a Phase 1 rectal safety and acceptability evaluation of tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel. Results 248 participants were enrolled into Stage 1A. Participants’ average age was 23.3 years. The most common sexually transmitted infection (STIs) at baseline were Herpes simplex (HSV)-2 (16.1% by serology) and rectal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (10.1% by NAAT). 134 participants were enrolled into Stage 1B. During the 12 week period of follow-up 2 HIV, 5 rectal CT, and 5 rectal Neisseria gonorrhea infections were detected. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were infections (N = 56) or gastrointestinal (N = 46) and were mild (69.6%) or moderate (28.0%). Of the participants who completed Stage 1B, 24 were enrolled into Stage 2 and randomized (1:1) to receive TFV or placebo gel. All participants completed Stage 2. The majority of AEs were gastrointestinal (N = 10) and of mild (87.2%) or moderate (10.3%) severity. Conclusions In this study we were able to enroll a sexually active population of young MSM and TGW who were willing to use rectal microbicides. TFV gel was safe and acceptable and should be further developed as an alternative HIV prevention intervention for this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01283360 PMID:27362788

  8. Pre-treatment high-resolution rectal MRI and treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, George J.; You, Y. Nancy; Park, In Ja; Kaur, Harmeet; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Ernst, Randy D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of rectal MRI evaluation of patients with rectal cancer for primary tumor staging and for identification for poor prognostic features is increasing. MR imaging permits precise delineation of tumor anatomy and assessment of mesorectal tumor penetration and radial margin risk. Objective To evaluate the ability of pre-treatment rectal MRI to classify tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Design Retrospective, consecutive cohort study, central review. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Patients 62 consecutive patients with locally advanced (stage cII-cIII)rectal cancer who underwent rectal cancer protocol high resolution MRI prior to surgery(12/09-3/11). Main Outcome Measures Probability of good (ypT0-2N0) vs. poor (≥ypT3N0) response as a function of mesorectal tumor depth, lymph node status, extramural vascular invasion, and grade assessed by uni- and multi-variate logistic regression. Results Tumor response was good in 25, 40.3% and poor in 37, 59.7%.Median interval from MRI to OP was 7.9weeks (IQR: 7.0–9.0). MRI tumor depth was <1 mm in 10 (16.9%), 1–5 mm in 30 (50.8%), and >5 mm in 21(33.9%). LN status was positive in 40 (61.5%) and vascular invasion was present in 16 (25.8%). Tumor response was associated with MRI tumor depth (P=0.001), MRI lymph nodes status (P=<0.001)and vascular invasion (P=0.009). Multivariate regression indicated >5mm MRI tumor depth (OR=0.08, 95% CI=0.01–0.93, p=0.04) and MRI LN positivity (OR=0.12, 95% CI=0.03–0.53, p=0.005) were less likely to achieve a good response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Limitations Uncertain generalizability in centers with limited experience with MRI staging for rectal cancer. Conclusion MRI assessment of tumor depth and lymph node status in rectal cancer is associated to tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. These factors should therefore be considered for stratification of patients for novel treatment strategies reliant on pathologic response to treatment or for

  9. Sobre el estado evolutivo de β Pictoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, A.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Desde el descubrimiento de fuertes excesos infrarrojos en β Pictoris, esta estrella ha sido muy estudiada y es considerada candidata a poseer un sistema planetario propio. β Pic está rodeada de un disco asimétrico de polvo que se observa de canto y que esta vacío a distancias <= 40 AU. Esto se considera una fuerte evidencia en favor de la presencia de (al menos) un planeta gigante. Recientemente se han observado líneas de material circunestelar que se han interpretado como consecuencia de la caída de objetos cometarios sobre esta estrella. Recientemente se ha utilizado la existencia del disco de polvo para atribuir una edad corta (pre - secuencia principal) a βPic. Sin embargo, la evaporación de estos cometas provee suficiente polvo como para explicar la presencia del disco observado sin necesidad de edades cortas. En este trabajo mostramos que la comparación entre la tasa de impactos cometarios estimada en el Sistema Solar para diferentes etapas de su evolución y los datos observados en β Pic indica edades avanzadas para β Pic. Esta estimación debe tomarse con cautela ya que depende de la estructura de los sistemas planetarios. Además mostramos que, desde el punto de vista de la evolución estelar y con las incertezas presentes en la luminosidad y la temperatura efectiva, existe un continuo de edades posible para β Pic. Sin embargo, empleando los datos provenientes de los flujos cometarios encontramos que una edad prolongada es consistente con ambos tratamientos.

  10. Role of endoscopic submucosal dissection in treatment of rectal gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Koptas, Włodzimierz; Zelga, Piotr; Dziki, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A significant rise in incidence of rectal gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) has been observed in the last decade. Most detected gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are well differentiated and less than 2 cm in diameter. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a new method for endoscopic treatment of such tumors, difficult to resect by conventional endoscopic techniques and thus subject to surgical treatment. Aim To present the results of the endoscopic treatment of GEP NET tumors in the rectum using ESD in single academic center. Material and methods From June 2013 to April 2014, 4 cases of GEP-NET in the rectum were treated by ESD in our center. Effectiveness of dissection, complications and tumor recurrence after 3 months of treatment were then retrospectively investigated. Results The group contained 2 patients with primary rectal GEP-NET (1 male, 1 female; age range: 48–60 years) and 2 with scars after incomplete polypectomy of rectal GEP-NET (1 male, 1 female; 61–65 years). Primary rectal GEP-NET diameters were 0.6 cm and 1.5 cm. Scar resection specimen diameters were 0.7 cm and 1 cm. Mean resection time was 28 min. The en bloc resection rate was 100% (2 of 2) and the histologically complete resection was confirmed in both cases. No foci of neuroendocrine neoplasia were reported in dissected scars. No complications were observed. After 3 months, 3 patients underwent follow-up colonoscopy – no local recurrence was reported. Conclusions Endoscopic submucosal dissection of rectal GEP-NET should be recommended as a treatment of choice when dealing with lesions over 1 cm in diameter without invasion of the muscle layer. Due to technical difficulties, performing this procedure should be reserved for centers with appropriately trained endoscopic staff. PMID:28337231

  11. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for Patients With Rectal Tumors: A Single Institution's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kilius, Alfredas; Petrulis, Kestutis; Samalavicius, Narimantas E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to look at our complication rates and recurrence rates, as well as the need for further radical surgery, in treating patients with benign and early malignant rectal tumors by using transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Methods Our study included 130 patients who had undergone TEM for rectal adenomas and early rectal cancer from December 2009 to December 2015 at the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Lithuania. Patients underwent digital and endoscopic evaluation with multiple biopsies. For preoperative staging, pelvic magnetic resonance imaging or endorectal ultrasound was performed. We recorded the demographics, operative details, final pathologies, postoperative lengths of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and recurrences. Results The average tumor size was 2.8 ± 1.5 cm (range, 0.5–8.3 cm). 102 benign (78.5%) and 28 malignant tumors (21.5%) were removed. Of the latter, 23 (82.1%) were pT1 cancers and 5 (17.9%) pT2 cancers. Of the 5 patients with pT2 cancer, 2 underwent adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, 1 underwent an abdominoperineal resection, 1 refused further treatment and 1 was lost to follow up. No intraoperative complications occurred. In 7 patients (5.4%), postoperative complications were observed: urinary retention (4 patients, 3.1%), postoperative hemorrhage (2 patients, 1.5%), and wound dehiscence (1 patient, 0.8%). All complications were treated conservatively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 2.3 days. Conclusion TEM in our experience demonstrated low complication and recurrence rates. This technique is recommended for treating patients with a rectal adenoma and early rectal cancer and has good prognosis. PMID:28289660

  12. Timing Is Everything: What Is the Optimal Duration After Chemoradiation for Surgery for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-09-06

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 47-year-old woman was referred for management of a newly diagnosed rectal cancer. She presented with a 2-month history of rectal bleeding and change in bowel habits. She underwent a colonoscopy that demonstrated a 5-cm fungating, friable, and partially obstructing mass in the distal rectum, approximately 5 cm from the anal verge. The tumor was palpable on digital rectal examination on the anterior wall of rectum. The biopsy demonstrated a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma, microsatellite stable. A staging work-up, including a computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, demonstrated rectal wall thickening in the midrectum and small lymph nodes in the left perirectal fat. There was a nonspecific 3-mm right lower lobe pulmonary nodule. Rectal magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 3-cm mass arising from mid-distal rectum with minimal extension beyond muscularis propria into the mesorectal fat, but without invasion of mesorectal fascia (Fig 1). There were at least three small mesorectal lymph nodes present; the largest rounded node measured up to 5 mm, and no additional pelvic lymphadenopathy was identified. Her carcinoembryonic antigen was 1.1, and all other laboratory studies were within normal limits. She was seen in the Colorectal Multidisciplinary Conference for a discussion of her treatment options.

  13. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  14. Evidence of improving survival of patients with rectal cancer in France: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Finn-Faivre, C; Maurel, J; Benhamiche, A; Herbert, C; Mitry, E; Launoy, G; Faivre, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Over the past 20 years there have been many changes in the management of rectal cancer. Their impact on the overall population is not well known. 
AIMS—To determine trends in management and prognosis of rectal cancer in two French regions. 
SUBJECTS—1978 patients with a rectal carcinoma diagnosed between 1978 and 1993. 
METHODS—Time trends in treatment, stage at diagnosis, operative mortality, and survival were studied on a four year basis. A non-conditional logistic regression was performed to obtain an odds ratio for each period adjusted for the other variables. To estimate the independent effect of the period a multivariate relative survival analysis was performed. 
RESULTS—Over the 16 year period resection rates increased from 66.0% to 80.1%; the increase was particularly noticeable for sphincter saving procedures (+30.6% per four years, p=0.03). The percentage of patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy increased from 24.0% to 40.0% (p=0.02). The proportion of patients with Dukes' type A cancer increased from 17.7% to 30.6% with a corresponding decrease in those with more advanced disease. Operative mortality decreased by 31.1% per four years (p=0.03). All these improvements have resulted in a dramatic increase in relative survival (from 35.4% for the 1978-1981 period to 57.0% for the 1985-1989 period). 
CONCLUSIONS—Substantial advances in the management of rectal cancer have been achieved, but there is evidence that further improvements can be made in order to increase survival. 

 Keywords: rectal cancer; treatment; stage at diagnosis; survival; time trends; cancer registries PMID:10026324

  15. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  16. High Rate of Positive Circumferential Resection Margins Following Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Rickles, Aaron S.; Dietz, David W.; Chang, George J.; Wexner, Steven D.; Berho, Mariana E.; Remzi, Feza H.; Greene, Frederick L.; Fleshman, James W.; Abbas, Maher A.; Peters, Walter; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R.T.; Fleming, Fergal J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of positive circumferential resection margin following rectal cancer resection in the United States. Background Positive circumferential resection margin is associated with a high rate of local recurrence and poor morbidity and mortality for rectal cancer patients. Prior study has shown poor compliance with national rectal cancer guidelines, but whether this finding is reflected in patient outcomes has yet to be shown. Methods Patients who underwent resection for stage I-III rectal cancer were identified from the 2010-2011 National Cancer Database. The primary outcome was a positive circumferential resection margin. The relationship between patient, hospital, tumor, and treatment-related characteristics was analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Findings A positive circumferential resection margin was noted in 2,859 (17.2%) of the 16,619 patients included. Facility location, clinical T and N stage, histologic type, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, type of operation, and operative approach were significant predictors of positive circumferential resection margin on multivariable analysis. Total proctectomy had nearly a 30% increased risk of positive margin compared to partial proctectomy (OR 1.293, 95%CI 1.185-1.411) and a laparoscopic approach had nearly 22% less risk of a positive circumferential resection margin compared to an open approach (OR 0.882, 95%CI 0.790-0.985). Interpretation Despite advances in surgical technique and multimodality therapy, rates of positive circumferential resection margin remain high in the United States. Several tumor and treatment characteristics were identified as independent risk factors, and advances in rectal cancer care are necessary to approach the outcomes seen in other countries. PMID:26473651

  17. Rectal microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Adam M.; Hand, Nicholas J.; Tsoucas, Daphne M.; Le Guen, Claire L.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Friedman, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in intestinal microRNAs have been reported in adult patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. The goal of this study was to identify changes in microRNA expression associated with colitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods Rectal mucosal biopsies (n=50) and blood samples (n=47) were collected from patients with known or suspected inflammatory bowel disease undergoing endoscopy. Rectal and serum microRNA levels were profiled using the human nCounter® platform and the TaqMan® low-density array platform, respectively. Significantly altered microRNAs were then validated in independent sample sets via quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro luciferase reporter assays were performed in the human colorectal Caco-2 cell line to determine the effect of miR-192 on NOD2 expression. Results Profiling of rectal RNA identified 21 microRNAs significantly altered between control, UC, and colonic CD sample groups. Nine of the ten microRNAs selected for validation were confirmed as significantly changed. Rectal miR-24 was increased 1.47-fold in UC compared to CD samples (p=0.0052) and was the only microRNA altered between IBD subtypes. Three colitis-associated microRNAs were significantly altered in the sera of disease patients and displayed diagnostic utility. However, no serum microRNAs were found to distinguish ulcerative colitis from Crohn’s colitis. Finally, miR-192 inhibition did not affect luciferase reporter activity, suggesting miR-192 does not regulate human NOD2. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that rectal and serum microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Future studies identifying the targets of inflammatory bowel disease-associated microRNAs may lead to novel therapies. PMID:24613022

  18. [Four resections of metachronous liver metastases and lateral lymph node metastases of a rectal carcinoid tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takayuki; Koyama, Fumikazu; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ueda, Takeshi; Nishigori, Naoto; Inoue, Takashi; Kawasaki, Keijirou; Obara, Shinsaku; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The authors present a case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lateral lymph node metastases and liver metastases that was successfully treated by 4 resections. A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (20 mm in diameter) with submucosal (SM) invasion. Radical resection was performed at 25 months, 38 months, and 57 months, when abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed metachronous liver metastases of the rectal carcinoid tumor. At 50 months, metachronous lateral lymph node metastases were also revealed. Three hepatectomies and a laparoscopic lateral lymph node dissection were performed. The patient is currently free of disease at 25 months after the last intervention.

  19. [Is there a relationship between rectal colonization and nosocomial infection of patients in intensive care unit?].

    PubMed

    Yeşilbağ, Zuhal; Çağatay, Arif Atahan; Karadeniz, Aslı; Başaran, Seniha; Orhun, Günseli; Ergin Özcan, Perihan; Özsüt, Halit; Eraksoy, Haluk

    2015-07-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) microorganisms are a major problem in intensive care units (ICUs) with high mortality and morbidity rates and the prior colonization is an important risk factor for these infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of rectal colonization of MDR microorganisms and the association between the microorganisms that caused colonization and infection in the patients with nosocomial infections in ICUs. Rectal swabs were obtained on the day of 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and weekly thereafter from 80 patients over 18 years of age hospitalized in ICU for more than 48 hours, and cultured for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- producing gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and carbapenem-resistant enteric and nonenteric bacilli. Patients whose rectal swabs were not obtained on admission (on the day of 0), were excluded even they were hospitalized more than 48 hours. Bile esculin agar containing 64 μg/mL ceftazidime and 6 μg/mL vancomycin, chromogenic MRSA agar and blood agar media, MacConkey agar containing 1 mg/L ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, and 5 mL tryptic soy broth media containing 10 µg imipenem and meropenem discs were used for identification. Identification of GNB was determined by conventional methods and ESBL production was determined by double-disc synergy test. Patients have been followed up for nosocomial infections. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed with standard microbiological methods. In 37 (46%) of the 80 patients, at least one MDR microorganism was isolated in rectal swab cultures on the day of 0. The most common microorganisms were ESBL-positive E.coli (19%), followed by ESBL-positive K.pneumoniae (13%), carbapenem-resistant P.aeruginosa (10%), ESBL-positive K.oxytoca (3%), MRSA (1%), VRE (1%), carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter sp. (1%) and carbapenem

  20. Percutaneous Transhepatic Embolization of Bleeding Rectal Varices Using A New Embolic And Sclerotic Mixture Augmented By Amplatzer Vascular Plug 2

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel; Dawoud, Nabila; Moustafa, Amr Soliman; Hamed, Maysoon F; Saddekni, Souheil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of 59-year-old female with non-alcoholic-steato-hepatitis (NASH) induced cirrhosis, who presented with hematochezia. The patient had a history of bleeding esophageal varices treated with endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Colonoscopy showed large rectal varices which were the source of her lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB). Since endoscopic treatment for LGIB are limited, and because the patient had portal vein thrombosis which contraindicated transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), we performed percutaneous transhepatic embolization of her rectal varices using a new mixture of embolic and sclerotic agents, followed by Amplatzer plug 2 (AVP 2). To our knowledge, the use of this new mixture with the AVP 2 in the rectal varices treatment has not been previously published in literature. Our case provides an alternative treatment modality that can be used for rectal varices treatment, when TIPS and endoscopic management fails or is contraindicated. PMID:27761198

  1. Local advanced rectal cancer perforation in the midst of preoperative chemoradiotherapy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Nobuhisa; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Takeru; Oshikiri, Taro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koma, Yu-Ichiro; Komatsu, Masato; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for local advanced rectal cancer (LARC) rarely induce rectal perforation. Here we report a rare case of rectal perforation in a patient with LARC in the midst of preoperative CRT. A 56-year-old male was conveyed to our hospital exhibiting general malaise. Colonoscopy and imaging tests resulted in a clinical diagnosis of LARC with direct invasion to adjacent organs and regional lymphadenopathy. Preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based CRT was started. At 25 d after the start of CRT, the patient developed a typical fever. Computed tomography revealed rectal perforation, and he underwent emergency sigmoid colostomy. At 12 d after the surgery, the remaining CRT was completed according to the original plan. The histopathological findings after radical operation revealed a wide field of tumor necrosis and fibrosis without lymph node metastasis. We share this case as important evidence for the treatment of LARC perforation in the midst of preoperative CRT. PMID:28138443

  2. Molecular, Pathologic and MRI Investigation of the Prognostic and Redictive Importance of Extramural Venous Invasion in Rectal Cancer (MARVEL) Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Diseases; Colorectal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases

  3. Intrarectal application of amifostine for the prevention of radiation-induced rectal injury.

    PubMed

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Han, Sue; Tobi, Martin; Vargas, Barbara J; Stamos, Beth; Kelly, Laura; Biggar, Sandra; Kaplan, Irving

    2002-01-01

    Clinically symptomatic late injury to the rectal wall occurs in about one third of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation. Reducing the physical dose to the anterior rectal wall without a similar reduction in the posterior peripheral zone is difficult because of the proximity of these structures. Based on our previous observations that intrarectal application of amifostine resulted in very high concentrations of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 in the rectal wall of Copenhagen rats, the authors initiated a phase I clinical trial in 1998. Twenty-nine patients with localized prostate cancer were accrued. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, a Karnofsky performance status of > or =70, and no pelvic lymphadenopathy or distant metastases. The total dose to the prostate was 70.2 Gy (20 patients) and 73.8 Gy (9 patients). Therapy was delivered using a 4-field axial technique and 3-dimensional conformal planning. Amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution 30 minutes before irradiation on the first 15 days of therapy. Amifostine dose was escalated, in cohorts, from 500 mg to 2,500 mg. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scale. All patients completed therapy with no amifostine-related toxicity at any dose level. The application was feasible and well tolerated. With a median follow-up time of 21 months, 9 patients (33%) had rectal bleeding (8 grade 1, 1 grade 2). Four patients (14%) had symptoms suggestive of radiation injury, which proved to be secondary to nonrelated processes. These included preexisting nonspecific proctitis (1 patient), diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon, rectal polyp (1 patient), and ulcerative colitis (1 patient). Symptoms developed significantly more often in patients receiving 500 to 1,000 mg than in patients receiving 1,500 to 2,500 mg amifostine (7 of 14 [50%] versus 2 of 13 [15%]; P =.0325, 1-sided

  4. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  5. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Jesus, Eliane C; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Rocha, Rafael M; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C; Silva, Israel T; Nunes, Diana N; Setubal, João C; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  6. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  7. A Penetrating Stab Wound of the Perianal Area Causing a Combined Rectal and Bladder Injury: One Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Ahallal, Youness; Riyach, Omar; El Ammari, Jalal Eddine; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Although the management of either isolated rectal or bladder injury is no more controversial, their combined effect and their optimal management has been seldom reported in the English literature. From a case report of a 45-year-old male who was found to have a combined bladder and rectal injury secondary to a stab wound of the perianal area, the authors develop a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the management of this uncommon trauma. PMID:22844630

  8. Associations between red meat and risks for colon and rectal cancer depend on the type of red meat consumed.

    PubMed

    Egeberg, Rikke; Olsen, Anja; Christensen, Jane; Halkjær, Jytte; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Cancer prevention guidelines recommend limiting intake of red meat and avoiding processed meat; however, few studies have been conducted on the effects of specific red meat subtypes on colon cancer or rectal cancer risk. The study aim was to evaluate associations between intake of red meat and its subtypes, processed meat, fish, and poultry and risk for colon cancer or rectal cancer in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study. We also evaluated whether fish or poultry should replace red meat intake to prevent colon cancer or rectal cancer. During follow-up (13.4 y), 644 cases of colon cancer and 345 cases of rectal cancer occurred among 53,988 participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute incidence rate ratio (IRRs) and 95% CIs. No associations were found between intake of red meat, processed meat, fish, or poultry and risk for colon cancer or rectal cancer. The risk associated with specific red meat subtypes depended on the animal of origin and cancer subsite; thus, the risk for colon cancer was significantly elevated for higher intake of lamb [IRR(per 5g/d) = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02-1.13)], whereas the risk for rectal cancer was elevated for higher intake of pork [IRR(per 25g/d) = 1.18 (95% CI: 1.02-1.36)]. Substitution of fish for red meat was associated with a significantly lower risk for colon cancer [IRR(per 25g/d) = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80-0.99)] but not rectal cancer. Substitution of poultry for red meat did not reduce either risk. This study suggests that the risks for colon cancer and potentially for rectal cancer differ according to the specific red meat subtype consumed.

  9. Recovery of nosocomial fecal flora from frozen stool specimens and rectal swabs: comparison of preservatives for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Bonten, M J; Nathan, C; Weinstein, R A

    1997-04-01

    The recovery of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant aerobic Gram-negative bacilli from stool specimens and from mock rectal swabs after freezing (-20 degrees C) for as long as 4 weeks was studied using three preservatives: Cary-Blair (CB) transport medium, buffered glycerol saline (BGS), and Para Pak C&S solution (CS). In addition, the recovery of enterococci from rectal swabs was investigated after storage of swabs in Stuart's transport media at 4 degrees C as long as 4 weeks. The log10 decreases in bacterial counts from seeded stool suspensions frozen in BGS were 0.64 (i.e., fourfold) and 1.16 after 1 and 4 weeks, respectively, which were significantly less (p < .05) than 1 and 4 week decreases following freezing in CB (1.57 and 2.85) or in CS (1.50 and 2.45). The recovery of Gram-negative bacilli from patients' rectal swabs preserved in BGS was consistent with the results of the experiments with seeded stool suspensions. There was no detectable decrease in recovery of enterococci from rectal swabs stored at 4 degrees C. BGS performed well as a preservative for freezing stool specimens or rectal swabs for later recovery of nosocomial Gram-negative bacilli; enterococci survived well in refrigerated rectal swab specimens.

  10. Novel Parameter Predicting Grade 2 Rectal Bleeding After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy Combined With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Hanada, Takashi; Ohashi, Toshio; Yorozu, Atsunori; Toya, Kazuhito; Saito, Shiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel parameter predicting rectal bleeding on the basis of generalized equivalent uniform doses (gEUD) after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy and to assess the predictive value of this parameter. Methods and Materials: To account for differences among radiation treatment modalities and fractionation schedules, rectal dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of 369 patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing combined therapy retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to equivalent dose-based DVHs. The gEUDs for the rectum were calculated from these converted DVHs. The total gEUD (gEUD{sub sum}) was determined by a summation of the brachytherapy and external-beam radiation therapy components. Results: Thirty-eight patients (10.3%) developed grade 2+ rectal bleeding. The grade 2+ rectal bleeding rate increased as the gEUD{sub sum} increased: 2.0% (2 of 102 patients) for <70 Gy, 10.3% (15 of 145 patients) for 70-80 Gy, 15.8% (12 of 76 patients) for 80-90 Gy, and 19.6% (9 of 46 patients) for >90 Gy (P=.002). Multivariate analysis identified age (P=.024) and gEUD{sub sum} (P=.000) as risk factors for grade 2+ rectal bleeding. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate gEUD to be a potential predictive factor for grade 2+ late rectal bleeding after combined therapy for prostate cancer.

  11. Comparison of Microchip Transponder and Noncontact Infrared Thermometry with Rectal Thermometry in Domestic Swine (Sus scrofa domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Amanda L; Hanson, Jarod M; Gabbard, Jon D; Johnson, Scott K; Register, Emery T; He, Biao

    2016-01-01

    During disease outbreaks, core temperature is a useful health metric in swine, due to the presence of pyrexia especially during the acute phase of infection. Despite technologic advances in other facets of swine production and health management, rectal thermometry continues to be the ‘gold standard’ for measuring core body temperature. However, for various reasons, collecting rectal temperatures can be difficult and unsafe depending on the housing modality. In addition, the delay between insertion of the rectal thermometer and obtaining a reading can affect measurement accuracy, especially when the pig requires physical restraint. Clearly safer, faster, and more accurate and precise temperature acquisition methods that necessitate minimal or no handling of swine are needed. We therefore compared rectal thermometers, subcutaneous microchips, and an inexpensive handheld infrared thermometer by measuring the core body temperature of 24 male castrated piglets at random intervals over a 5-wk period. The core body temperature (mean ± 1 SD) was 39.3 ± 0.5 °C by rectal thermometry, 39.0 ± 0.7 °C by microchip transponder, and 34.3 ± 1.0 °C by infrared thermometry; these 3 values differed significantly. Although the readings obtain by using infrared thermometry were numerically lower than those from the other methods, it is arguably the safest method for assessing the core temperature of swine and showed strong relative correlation with rectal temperature. PMID:27657715

  12. Physiological requirements for 20-hydroxyecdysone-induced rectal sac distention in the pupa of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takumi; Sakurai, Sho; Iwami, Masafumi

    2010-06-01

    Successful insect development is achieved via appropriate fluctuation of ecdysteroid levels. When an insect's ecdysteroid level is disrupted, physiological and developmental defects occur. In the pupa of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the rectal sac is an essential organ that operates as a repository for degraded ecdysteroids, and it can be distended by administration of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our previous study showed that rectal sac distention appears 4 days after 20E administration. Hemolymph ecdysteroid levels, however, decrease to lower level during this period. Thus, the timing of the rectal sac distention does not match with that of ecdysteroid elevation. Here, we examine how 20E induces rectal sac distention. A ligature experiment and ecdysteroid quantification showed that continuous 20E stimulation induces rectal sac distention. Thorax tissue contributed to the continuous 20E stimulation needed to induce distention. Ecdysteroid released from the thorax tissue may be converted to 20E by ecdysone 20-hydroxylase to produce continuous 20E stimulation. Thus, the ecdysone metabolic pathway plays a critical role in rectal sac distention.

  13. Pathological Assessment of Rectal Cancer after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy: Distribution of Residual Cancer Cells and Accuracy of Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Yu, Xin; Deng, Wenjing; Feng, Huixia; Chang, Hui; Xiao, Weiwei; Zhang, Huizhong; Xi, Shaoyan; Liu, Mengzhong; Zhu, Yujia; Gao, Yuanhong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of residual cancer cells (RCCs) within different layers of the bowel wall in surgical specimens and the value of biopsies of primary rectal lesion after preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with concurrent chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Between April 2011 and April 2013, 178 patients with rectal cancer who received preoperative VMAT, concurrent chemotherapy, and surgery were evaluated; 79 of the patients received a biopsy of the primary lesion after chemoradiotherapy and prior to surgery. The distribution of RCCs in the surgical specimens and the sensitivity and specificity of the biopsy of primary rectal lesions for pathological response were evaluated. Fifty-two patients had a complete pathological response in the bowel wall. Of the 120 patients with ypT2-4, the rate of detection of RCCs in the mucosa, submucosa, and muscularis propria was 20%, 36.7%, 69.2%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of biopsies of primary rectal lesions was 12.9% and 94.1%, respectively. After chemoradiotherapy, the RCCs were primarily located in the deeper layers of the bowel wall, and the biopsy results for primary rectal lesions were unreliable due to poor sensitivity. PMID:27721486

  14. A phase Ib study of the effects of black raspberries on rectal polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Shu; Burke, Carol A; Hasson, Henrietta; Kuo, Chieh-Ti; Molmenti, Christine L Sardo; Seguin, Claire; Liu, Pengyuan; Huang, Tim H-M; Frankel, Wendy L; Stoner, Gary D

    2014-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the early onset of colonic polyposis and a high risk for colorectal cancer. FAP is treated by colectomy followed by lifelong removal of rectal polyps. This study determined whether black raspberries (BRBs) might regress rectal polyps in patients with FAP. Fourteen patients with FAP were treated with BRBs daily for 9 months. Seven patients received BRB powder orally plus two BRB suppositories inserted into the rectum at bedtime. The other 7 received an oral placebo plus the suppositories. Rectal polyp counts and polyp sizes were obtained at time zero and after 9 months of BRB treatment. Polyps and adjacent normal tissue were collected at both time points. The burden (P = 0.036) but not number (P = 0.069) of rectal polyps was significantly decreased. No benefit was noted with the addition of oral BRBs. Three patients were nonresponders. BRBs significantly decreased cellular proliferation, DNA methylation methyl transferase 1 protein expression, and p16 promoter methylation, but not promoter methylation of the Wnt pathway antagonists, SFRP2 and WIF1, in rectal polyps (adenomas) from responders but not from nonresponders. The MBD-seq assay revealed more demethylated transcription start sites (TSS), including those for miRNAs, in BRB-treated adenomas from the responders. In conclusion, BRB suppositories seem sufficient for regressing rectal polyps in patients with FAP.

  15. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. PMID:26929456

  16. The use of capecitabine in the combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liauw, Stanley L; Minsky, Bruce D

    2008-03-01

    Locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma is treated by combined-modality therapy, which consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. A series of randomized trials established a preferred treatment sequence of preoperative radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)-based chemotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy for patients with stage II/III disease. Capecitabine is an oral prodrug of 5-FU that has potential advantages compared with intravenous 5-FU, including ease of administration and potentially increased therapeutic effect. Capecitabine is converted by a 3-step enzymatic process; the last step involves the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase, which is overexpressed in tumor tissues and is stimulated by concurrent radiation therapy. Over the past 5 years, several phase I/II trials of capecitabine-based therapy were reported. This review discusses the evolution of combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer with specific attention given to the use of capecitabine in conjunction with radiation therapy.

  17. Reconstruction techniques after extralevator abdominoperineal rectal excision or pelvic exenteration: meshes, plasties and flaps.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Matteo; Flor-Lorente, Blas; Carreño, Omar

    2014-03-01

    Perineal wound complications after abdomino-perineal rectal resection are frequent and clinically relevant for their impact on the length of hospitalization, costs, patients' quality of life and oncologic results. With the diffusion of the preoperative radiotherapy and the gradual shift to the extra-elevator technique, the perineal morbidity rate has increased. Many series describing different techniques of primary closure of the perineal defect have been published, but high-quality clinical studies, indicating which is the best option, are missing. A biologic mesh, associated if possible to an omentoplasty, seems to be sufficient to close the perineal defect after extra-elevator abdomino-perineal rectal resection. However, when the proctectomy is associated to the resection of other organs, as for example vagina or sacrum, resulting in an ample perineal defect, the vertical rectus abdominis flap seems to be the best option. If the perineal defect is smaller, the gracilis or gluteus flaps could be other valid alternatives.

  18. Design of a rectal probe for diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for chemotherapy and radiotherapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Santoro, Ylenia; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush; Pigazzi, Alessio; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) has shown great potential for the early detection of non-responding tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, already one day after therapy starts. Patients with rectal cancer receive similar chemotherapy treatment. The rectum geometry and tissue properties of healthy and tumor tissue in the rectum and the requirement of surface contact impose constraints on the probe design. In this work we present the design of a DOSI probe with the aim of early chemotherapy/radiotherapy effectiveness detection in rectal tumors. We show using Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements that the colon tissue can be characterized reliably using a source-detector separation in the order of 10 mm. We present a design and rapid prototype of a probe for DOSI measurements that can be mounted on a standard laparoscope and that fits through a standard rectoscope. Using predominantly clinically approved components we aim at fast clinical translation.

  19. The treatment of squamous anal carcinoma: guidelines of the Italian Society of Colo-Rectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Giani, I; Mistrangelo, M; Fucini, C

    2013-04-01

    The Italian society of colo-rectal surgery (SICCR) is dedicated to improving the study, prevention and management of the diseases of the colon, rectum and anus. One of the aims of the society is to establish guidelines to the treatment of these diseases. These guidelines are based on the international literature and on the best available evidence. Clinical practice guidelines are one of the most important instruments to provide therapeutic decision-making support, based on the best scientific evidence available at the time. Guidelines are advisory and not prescriptive, susceptible to continual variations secondary to innovations and new scientific evidence. These guidelines are a guide for all colo-rectal surgeons and physicians who approach anal cancer.

  20. Hypothalamic, rectal, and muscle temperatures in exercising dogs - Effect of cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanisms of performance prolongation during exercise is presented. Measurements were obtained of the rectal, muscle, and hypothalamic temperature of dogs during treadmill exercise at an ambient temperature of 22 + or - 1 C, with and without cooling by use of ice packs. In comparison with exercise without cooling, exercise with cooling was found to: (1) increase exercise duration from 90 + or - 14 to 145 + or - 15 min; (2) attenuate increases in hypothalamic, rectal and muscle temperature; (3) decrease respiratory and heart rates; and (4) lower blood lactic acid content. It is shown that although significant differences were found between the brain, core, and muscle temperatures during exercise with and without cooling, an inverse relation was observed between muscle temperature and the total duration of exercise. It is suggested that sustained muscle hyperthermia may have contributed to the limitation of working ability in exercise with and without cooling.

  1. Spontaneous rupture of the renal pelvis presenting as an urinoma in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti; Rathi, Vinita; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 29-year-old gentleman underwent a transverse colostomy for intestinal obstruction caused by advanced rectal carcinoma. On the 5th postoperative day, the patient developed a painful swelling on the right side of the abdomen. The contrast enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a right sided hydronephrosis, a large rent in the renal pelvis, and a large retroperitoneal fluid collection on the right side. Percutaneous nephrostomy and pigtail catheter drainage of the urinoma led to resolution of abdominal swelling. Development of a urinoma as a consequence of rectal carcinoma is highly unusual. Prompt imaging for confirmation of diagnosis, decompression of the renal pelvicalyceal system, and drainage of the urinoma limits morbidity. PMID:24749123

  2. Transanal evisceration of the small bowel a rare complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kornaropoulos, Michael; Makris, Marinos C.; Yettimis, Evripides; Zevlas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transanal evisceration of small bowel is an extremely rare surgical emergency. Of the nearly 70 cases reported in the literature, rectal prolapse is the predisposing factor that has been most frequently related to this pathology. Presentation of case We report a 78-year-old female with history of chronic rectal prolapse who presented in our emergency department with evisceration of small intestinal loops through the anus. In surgery after complete reduction of the eviscerated bowel into the peritoneal cavity, almost 20 cm of the terminal ileum up to the ileocecal valve were necrotic and therefore a right hemicolectomy with primary anastomosis was performed. Additionally a 2 cm craniocaudally tear was revealed in the antimesenteric border of the upper rectum and a Hartman procedure was also performed. The patient was discharged after 10 days. Discussion Early recognition and timely surgical intervention offers the best prognosis, avoiding a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. PMID:26708948

  3. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  4. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of the colonic and rectal carcinoma: concepts and uptodate results].

    PubMed

    Weber, W; Nagel, G A

    1977-06-18

    The aim of adjuvant chemotherapy is the destruction of micrometastases after surgical removal of a malignant tumor. This treatment modality is gaining in importance in the light of experimental data and lcinical success in pediatric tumors. Results of ongoing studies in colo-rectal cancer show a marginal effect of prophylactic treatment with 5-fluorouracil. The treatment benefits in trials with historical controls are much greater than in studies with simultaneous controls. Use of historical controls is therefore of doubtful value. Ongoing trials use the combination of 5-fluorouracil and methyl-CCNU, which has been shown to double the remission rate in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy of colo-rectal cancer is still experimental and justified only in the framework of clinical trials.

  5. Metastasis to the Glans Penis: An Unusual Site of Rectal Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Beatriz; Matias, Margarida; Alves, António; Jorge, Marília

    2015-01-01

    Secondary malignancy of the penis is a rare clinical condition, often associated with disseminated genitourinary malignancies. The prognosis is poor and the treatment options include penectomy, local surgical excision, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and supportive therapy. Neither of these therapeutic options lead to superior treatment outcomes in the literature. The authors report the case of a 66 year-old man with a metastasis to the glans penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma, diagnosed two years after radical treatment for primary disease. The patient underwent palliative treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, remaining asymptomatic and disease-free at one year follow-up. Close follow-up of patients with history of rectal adenocarcinoma is very important. Radiochemotherapy is a feasible and effective therapeutic option for penile metastasis, addressing both disease control and symptomatic improvement.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of a single 1g dose of azithromycin in rectal tissue in men

    PubMed Central

    Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Simpson, Julie A.; Vodstrcil, Lenka A.; Fairley, Christopher K.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Hocking, Jane S.

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection among men who have sex with men. Repeat infection following treatment with 1g azithromycin is common and treatment failure of up to 22% has been reported. This study measured the pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in rectal tissue in men following a single 1g dose to assess whether azithromycin reaches the rectal site in adequate concentrations to kill chlamydia. Ten healthy men took a single oral dose of 1g azithromycin and provided nine self-collected swabs and one blood sample over 14 days. Participant demographics, medications, sexual behaviour, treatment side effects, lubricant use and douching practices were recorded with each swab. Drug concentration over time was determined using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and total exposure (AUC0-∞) was estimated from the concentration-time profiles. Following 1g of azithromycin, rectal concentrations peaked after a median of 24 hours (median 133mcg/g) and remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration for chlamydia (0.125mcg/mL) for at least 14 days in all men. AUC0-∞ was the highest ever reported in human tissue (13103((mcg/g).hr)). Tissue concentrations were not associated with weight (mg/kg), but data suggest that increased gastric pH could increase azithromycin levels and diarrhoea or use of water-based lubricants could decrease concentrations. High and sustained concentrations of azithromycin were found in rectal tissue following a single 1g dose suggesting that inadequate concentrations are unlikely to cause treatment failure. Factors effecting absorption (pH and diarrhoea) or drug depletion (douching and water-based lubricants) may be more important determinants of concentrations in situ. PMID:28350806

  7. Diversity of Duodenal and Rectal Microbiota in Biopsy Tissues and Luminal Contents in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Gangping; Yang, Min; Zhou, Kan; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Lugao; Lv, Shangze; Jin, Yu; Qian, Wei; Xiong, Hanhua; Lin, Rong; Fu, Yu; Hou, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    The diverse microbial communities that colonize distinct segments of the gastrointestinal tract are intimately related to aspects of physiology and the pathology of human health. However, most recent studies have focused on the rectal or fecal microbiota, and the microbial signature of the duodenum is poorly studied. In this study, we compared the microbiota in duodenal and rectal samples to illustrate the characteristic microbial signatures of the duodenum in healthy adults. Nine healthy volunteers donated biopsies and luminal contents from the duodenum and rectum. To determine the composition and diversity of the microbiota, 454- pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA was performed and multiple bioinformatics analyses were applied. The α-diversity and phylogenetic diversity of the microbiota in the duodenal samples were higher than those of the rectal samples. There was higher biodiversity among the microbiota isolated from rectal biopsies than feces. Proteobacteria were more highly represented in the duodenum than in the rectum, both in the biopsies and in the luminal contents from the healthy volunteers (38.7% versus 12.5%, 33.2% versus 5.0%, respectively). Acinetobacter and Prevotella were dominant in the duodenum, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were dominant in the rectum. Additionally, the percentage of OTUs shared in biopsy groups was far higher than in the luminal group (43.0% versus 26.8%) and a greater number of genera was shared among the biopsies than the luminal contents. Duodenal samples demonstrated greater biological diversity and possessed a unique microbial signature compared with the rectum. The mucosa-associated microbiota was more relatively conserved than luminal samples.

  8. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  9. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant

  10. Teaching bovine rectal palpation with live cows in the slaughterhouse: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Lopes, G; Rocha, A

    2006-12-01

    Bovine rectal palpation, a procedure that requires considerable practice to develop the necessary skills, is often taught during extramural activities, or even learnt in practice after graduation. However, student access to cows in extramural activities may be limited because of student numbers, animal welfare considerations and concerns over induction of embryo mortality because of inexperience of the student. To overcome some of these limitations, in our school practical classes of bovine rectal palpation are taught in a slaughterhouse, with small groups of approximately 10 students per class, over a period of 30 weeks. Number of cows palpated, type of cases found and the success rate of students in the final practical exam were recorded and analysed for 3 years, and contrasted with the pre-established goals for the course. Additionally, a questionnaire was sent to former students to assess their opinion on the usefulness of the palpation course, as well as to identify main learning difficulties and collect suggestions to improve teaching methods. Overall, the information obtained indicated that the course is useful to teach palpation skills, even if the original goals may have been very optimistic. Most (96%) of the respondents had the opinion that the course was very useful or useful. Several suggestions were offered to improve teaching methods, but there was no consensus on a single recommendation. Despite the fact that a considerable number of respondents to the questionnaire did not use bovine rectal palpation in their practice, only one considered the classes 'not useful'. It is concluded that this method of teaching rectal palpation should be continued and the teaching methods improved with the adoption of some modifications.

  11. [Nuclear morphology in false negative and negative rectal biopsies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rilke, F; Clemente, C; Pilotti, S

    1975-01-01

    An typical nuclear structure consisting of a cribriform and condensed chromatin pattern with hyperchromasia, a small nucleolus and a moderately increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio was observed in the epithelial cells of the crypts and in the stromal and muscular cells of 51 out of 70 oncologically negative biopsies of the rectal mucosa. The subsequent retrieval of all clinical and histologia data revealed that the 51 cases included 39 of adenocarcinoma of the large intestine either present (15 cases) at a variable distance from the false negative biopsy or removed previously (24 cases), 7 of extra-intestinal malignant tumor (parotid gland, urinary bladder, endometrium, breast, stomach, metastatic, anus) and 5 with benign conditions of the large intestine. Of the remaining 19 cases whose biopsies did not reveal the atypical nuclear structure 16 had benign lesions of the large intestine and nowhere evidence of malignancy, two had an adenocarcinoma of the large bowel (one present and one removed previously) and one a carcinoma of the anus. In the rectal biopsies examined the atypical nuclear structure was detected in 93.9% of the cases with a malignant tumor either present or removed previously and in 19% of the cases with benign conditions. The morphologic evidence indicated that the atypical nuclear structure was compatible with a possible distrubance of the mitotic cycle since the findings were restricted to the generative compartment of rectal epithelium. The results are discussed in connection with their possible practical use as a diagnostic aid in the evaluation and interpretation of false negative and negative rectal biopsies as well as with their possible significance in the biology of tumor-bearing hosts.

  12. Risk factors of late rectal bleeding after carbon ion therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi . E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Kamada, Tadashi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity after hypofractionated carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2000 and November 2003, a Phase II clinical trial of C-ion RT with a total dose of 66 GyE in 20 fractions was performed on 175 patients with prostate cancer, and the correlations of clinical and dosimetric parameters with the incidence of late GI toxicity in 172 patients who survived for more than 18 months were investigated. Results: Although no Grade 3-4 late morbidities of the rectum were observed, Grade 1 and 2 morbidities developed in 23 (13%) and 4 (2%) patients, respectively. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that the percentage of rectal volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V50) was significantly higher in patients with rectal toxicity than without toxicity (13.2 {+-} 5.6% with toxicity; 11.4 {+-} 4.0% without toxicity, p = 0.046). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of anticoagulation therapy (p = 0.010) and rectal V50 (p = 0.012) were significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 1-2 late GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although C-ion RT with hypofractionation yielded favorable results regarding late GI complication, dosimetric parameter was a very important factor in the occurrence of rectal bleeding after C-ion RT as well as photon beam RT. Our results provide useful information for physicians applying charged particle RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  13. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Epping, Ingo; Kramer, Frank; Jo, Peter; Bernhardt, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Salinas, Gabriela; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was performed to identify potential microRNAs to predict overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific survival, distant-metastasis-free survival, tumor regression grade, or nodal stage. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on an independent set of 147 rectal cancer patients to validate relevant miRNAs. Results: In the microarray screen, 14 microRNAs were significantly correlated to overall survival. Five microRNAs were included from previous work. Finally, 19 miRNAs were evaluated by qPCR. miR-515-5p, miR-573, miR-579 and miR-802 demonstrated significant correlation with overall survival and cancer-specific survival (p < 0.05). miR-573 was also significantly correlated with the tumor regression grade after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. miR-133b showed a significant correlation with distant-metastasis-free survival. miR-146b expression levels showed a significant correlation with nodal stage. Conclusion: Specific microRNAs can be used as biomarkers to predict prognosis of patients with rectal cancer and possibly stratify patients’ therapy if validated in a prospective study. PMID:27092493

  14. Protocol for a multicentre randomised feasibility trial evaluating early Surgery Alone In LOw Rectal cancer (SAILOR)

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Kymberley; Hutchings, Hayley; Islam, Saiful; Holland, Gail; Hatcher, Olivia; Gwynne, Sarah; Jenkins, Ian; Coyne, Peter; Duff, Michael; Feldman, Melanie; Winter, Des C; Gollins, Simon; Quirke, Phil; West, Nick; Brown, Gina; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Brown, Alan; Beynon, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are 11 500 rectal cancers diagnosed annually in the UK. Although surgery remains the primary treatment, there is evidence that preoperative radiotherapy (RT) improves local recurrence rates. High-quality surgery in rectal cancer is equally important in minimising local recurrence. Advances in MRI-guided prediction of resection margin status and improvements in abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (APER) technique supports a reassessment of the contribution of preoperative RT. A more selective approach to RT may be appropriate given the associated toxicity. Methods and analysis This trial will explore the feasibility of a definitive trial evaluating the omission of RT in resectable low rectal cancer requiring APER. It will test the feasibility of randomising patients to (1) standard care (neoadjuvant long course RT±chemotherapy and APER, or (2) APER surgery alone for cT2/T3ab N0/1 low rectal cancer with clear predicted resection margins on MRI. RT schedule will be 45 Gy over 5 weeks as current standard, with restaging and surgery after 8–12 weeks. Recruitment will be for 24 months with a minimum 12-month follow-up. Objectives Objectives include testing the ability to recruit, consent and retain patients, to quantify the number of patients eligible for a definitive trial and to test feasibility of outcomes measures. These include locoregional recurrence rates, distance to circumferential resection margin, toxicity and surgical complications including perineal wound healing, quality of life and economic analysis. The quality of MRI staging, RT delivery and surgical specimen quality will be closely monitored. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by the Regional Ethics Committee and Health Research Authority (HRA) or equivalent. Written informed consent will be obtained. Serious adverse events will be reported to Swansea Trials Unit (STU), the ethics committee and trial sites. Trial results will be submitted for peer review

  15. A long and distant journey: a case of rectal cancer with metastasis to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Michelle; Kwong, Wilson T

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 33-year-old man with acute onset of eye pain and diplopia as the presenting symptoms of rectal cancer with orbital metastasis. Colorectal cancer with orbital metastasis is exceedingly rare with only 7 cases worldwide despite the prevalence of colorectal cancer. The rarity of this presentation may be related to the long path through multiple vascular beds that tumor emboli from the rectum must travel in order to reach the orbit.

  16. A comparative study on the rectal aminopeptidase enzymatic activities of different species.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, F; Parlatan, Z I

    2003-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the enzymatic activity of four different aminopeptidases (aminopeptidase N, leucine aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B) in rectal homogenates from different species: rabbit, rat, guinea-pig, sheep and human. Different substrates were used as the relative specific substrates for the determination of aminopeptidase enzymatic activity. For this purpose, 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide of L-alanine for aminopeptidase N, 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide of L-leucine for leucine aminopeptidase, 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide of L-glutamic acid for aminopeptidase A and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide of L-arginine for aminopeptidase B were employed. The rectal aminopeptidase enzymatic activity was determined spectrofluorometrically. The inhibition of activity of aminopeptidase in the presence of bestatin and puromycin inhibitors was also investigated. The results showed the presence of aminopeptidase enzymatic activity in all rectal homogenates. Sheep and guinea-pig had the greatest aminopeptidase activity. The four aminopeptidase activities of rat and rabbit were not significantly different from each other. Human data was not evaluated statistically, due to insufficient sample. But the values of human data was close to those of the rabbit and rat values except for aminopeptidase A. Based on the data of the hydrolysis and inhibition of the 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide substrates, it was rather difficult to determine the aminopeptidase type in the rectal homogenates of the species studied. It has been found that the aminopeptidase activities of rat and rabbit were not statistically different from each other and the human data were close to them.

  17. [Downstaging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer modifies the planned original surgery].

    PubMed

    Scutari, F; Tramutola, G; Morlino, A; Rossi, M T; Manzione, L; Rosati, G; Sopranzi, A

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of the rectum has been for more years burdened with a heavy rate of local relapse about 30%. The introduction of total meso-rectum excision has reduced the rate of up to 5-8%. Later more studies proved how the preoperative radiotherapy was able to reduce the rate of local relapse. The Authors introduce studies about downstaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer and discuss about their own series from 2005 to 2007.

  18. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy. PMID:26730279

  19. The Impact of Ileostomy-Related Complications on the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Uma R.; Kao, Lillian S.; You, Y. Nancy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Feig, Barry W.; Nguyen, Sa; Chang, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radical resection is the primary treatment for rectal cancer. When anastomosis is possible, a temporary ileostomy is used to decrease morbidity from a poorly healed anastomosis. However, ileostomies are associated with complications, dehydration, and need for a second operation. Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of ileostomy related complications on the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent sphincter preserving surgery between January 2005 and December 2010 at a tertiary cancer center. The primary outcome was the overall rate of ileostomy related complications. Secondary outcomes included complications related to ileostomy status, ileostomy closure, anastomotic complications at primary resection, rate of stoma closure, and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Statistical analyses were performed with STATA 12. Results A total of 294 patients were analyzed, 32% (n=95) were women. Two hundred seventy-one (92%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The median tumor distance from the anal verge was 7 centimeters (interquartile range 5-10). Two hundred eighty-one (96%) underwent stoma closure at a median 7 months (interquartile range 5.4 – 8.3). The most common complication related to readmission was dehydration (n=32, 11%). Readmission within 60 days of primary resection was associated with delay in initiating adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.42-6.38, p=0.004). Conclusion Diverting ileostomies created during surgical treatment of rectal cancers are associated with morbidity; however this is balanced against the risk of anastomosis-related morbidity at rectal resection. Given the potential benefit of fecal diversion, patient-oriented interventions to improve ostomy management, particularly during adjuvant chemotherapy, can be expected to yield marked benefits. PMID:24085329

  20. Higher organism load associated with failure of azithromycin to treat rectal chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Kong, F Y S; Tabrizi, S N; Fairley, C K; Phillips, S; Fehler, G; Law, M; Vodstrcil, L A; Chen, M; Bradshaw, C S; Hocking, J S

    2016-09-01

    Repeat rectal chlamydia infection is common in men who have sex with men (MSM) following treatment with 1 g azithromycin. This study describes the association between organism load and repeat rectal chlamydia infection, genovar distribution, and efficacy of azithromycin in asymptomatic MSM. Stored rectal chlamydia-positive samples from MSM were analysed for organism load and genotyped to assist differentiation between reinfection and treatment failure. Included men had follow-up tests within 100 days of index infection. Lymphogranuloma venereum and proctitis diagnosed symptomatically were excluded. Factors associated with repeat infection, treatment failure and reinfection were investigated. In total, 227 MSM were included - 64 with repeat infections [28·2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 22·4-34·5]. Repeat positivity was associated with increased pre-treatment organism load [odds ratio (OR) 1·7, 95% CI 1·4-2·2]. Of 64 repeat infections, 29 (12·8%, 95% CI 8·7-17·8) were treatment failures and 35 (15·4%, 95% CI 11·0-20·8) were reinfections, 11 (17·2%, 95% CI 8·9-28·7) of which were definite reinfections. Treatment failure and reinfection were both associated with increased load (OR 2·0, 95% CI 1·4-2·7 and 1·6, 95% CI 1·2-2·2, respectively). The most prevalent genovars were G, D and J. Treatment efficacy for 1 g azithromycin was 83·6% (95% CI 77·2-88·8). Repeat positivity was associated with high pre-treatment organism load. Randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to evaluate azithromycin's efficacy and whether extended doses can overcome rectal infections with high organism load.

  1. [APPLICATION OF FISTULA PLUG WITH THE FIBRIN ADHESIVE IN TREATMENT OF RECTAL FISTULAS].

    PubMed

    Aydinova, P R; Aliyev, E A

    2015-05-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 21 patients, suffering high transsphincteric and extrasphincteric rectal fistulas, were studied. In patients of Group I the fistula passage was closed, using fistula plug obturator; and in patients of Group II--by the same, but preprocessed by fibrin adhesive. The fistula aperture germeticity, prophylaxis of rude cicatrices development in operative wound zone, promotion of better fixation of bioplastic material were guaranteed, using fistula plug obturator with preprocessing, using fibrin adhesive.

  2. Subtypes of constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome based on rectal perception

    PubMed Central

    Harraf, F; Schmulson, M; Saba, L; Niazi, N; Fass, R; Munakata, J; Diehl, D; Mertz, H; Naliboff, B; Mayer, E

    1998-01-01

    Background—Patients who complain of constipation can be divided into those who have lost the natural call to stool, but develop abdominal discomfort after several days without a bowel movement (no urge); and those who experience a constant sensation of incomplete evacuation (urge). 
Aims—To determine whether the two groups differ in symptoms, colonic transit, and perceptual responses to controlled rectal distension. 
Methods—Forty four patients with constipation were evaluated with a bowel symptom questionnaire, colonic transit (radiopaque markers), and rectal balloon distension. Stool (S) and discomfort (D) thresholds to slow ramp (40 ml/min) and rapid phasic distension (870 ml/min) were determined with an electronic distension device. Fifteen healthy controls were also studied. 
Results—All patients had Rome positive irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); 17 were no urge and 27 urge. Mean D threshold to phasic rectal distensions was 28 (3) mm Hg in no urge, 27 (3) mm Hg in urge (NS), but higher in the control group (46 (2) mm Hg; p<0.01). Sixty seven per cent of no urge and 69% of urge were hypersensitive for D. Slow ramp distension thresholds were higher in no urge (S: 26 (3); D: 45 (4) mm Hg) compared with urge (S: 16 (2); D: 31 (3) mm Hg; p<0.01), or with controls (S: 15 (1); D: 30 (3); p<0.01). 
Conclusions—Hyposensitivity to slow rectal distension is found in patients with IBS who complain of constipation and have lost the call to stool even though their sensitivity to phasic distension is increased. 

 Keywords: visceral sensation; colonic transit PMID:9863485

  3. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti Svartberg, Johan; Carlsen, Erik; Dueland, Svein; Haug, Egil; Skovlund, Eva; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.

  4. A comparison of gastric and rectal CO2 in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Elaine M; Kerr, Mary E; Hoffman, Leslie A; Steiner, Richard P; Baranek, Robert A

    2005-04-01

    Critical care nurses assess and treat clinical conditions associated with inadequate oxygenation. Changes in regional organ (gut) blood flow are believed to occur in response to a decrease in oxygenation. Although the stomach is a widely accepted monitoring site, there are multiple methodological and measurement issues associated with the gastric environment that limit the accuracy of P CO2 detection. The rectum may provide nurses with an alternative site for monitoring changes in P CO2 without the limitations associated with gastric monitoring. This pilot study used a repeated measures design to examine changes in gastric and rectal P CO2 during elective coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and in the immediate 4-hr postoperative period in 26 subjects. The systemic indicators explained little variation in the regional indicators during protocol. A comparison of rectal and gastric P CO2 revealed no statistically significant differences in the direction or magnitude of change over any phase of cardiac surgery (baseline, CPB, post-CPB). A reduction in both rectal and gastric P CO2 occurred during CPB, and both values trended upward during the post-CPB phase. However, poor correlation and agreement was found between the measures of P CO2 at the two sites. Although clinically important, the cause is unclear. Possible explanations include variation in CO2 production between the gastric and rectal site, differences in sensitivity of the two monitoring instruments, or the absence of hemodynamic complications, which limited the extent of change in P CO2. Further investigation using patients with more profound changes in oxygenation are needed to identify response patterns and possible mechanisms.

  5. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  6. Automatic segmentation software in locally advanced rectal cancer: READY (REsearch program in Auto Delineation sYstem)-RECTAL 02: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gambacorta, Maria A; Boldrini, Luca; Valentini, Chiara; Dinapoli, Nicola; Mattiucci, Gian C; Chiloiro, Giuditta; Pasini, Danilo; Manfrida, Stefania; Caria, Nicola; Minsky, Bruce D; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2016-07-05

    To validate autocontouring software (AS) in a clinical practice including a two steps delineation quality assurance (QA) procedure.The existing delineation agreement among experts for rectal cancer and the overlap and time criteria that have to be verified to allow the use of AS were defined.Median Dice Similarity Coefficient (MDSC), Mean slicewise Hausdorff Distances (MSHD) and Total-Time saving (TT) were analyzed.Two expert Radiation Oncologists reviewed CT-scans of 44 patients and agreed the reference-CTV: the first 14 consecutive cases were used to populate the software Atlas and 30 were used as Test.Each expert performed a manual (group A) and an automatic delineation (group B) of 15 Test patients.The delineations were compared with the reference contours.The overlap between the manual and automatic delineations with MDSC and MSHD and the TT were analyzed.Three acceptance criteria were set: MDSC ≥ 0.75, MSHD ≤1mm and TT sparing ≥ 50%.At least 2 criteria had to be met, one of which had to be TT saving, to validate the system.The MDSC was 0.75, MSHD 2.00 mm and the TT saving 55.5% between group A and group B. MDSC among experts was 0.84.Autosegmentation systems in rectal cancer partially met acceptability criteria with the present version.

  7. Automatic segmentation software in locally advanced rectal cancer: READY (REsearch program in Auto Delineation sYstem)-RECTAL 02: prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dinapoli, Nicola; Mattiucci, Gian C.; Chiloiro, Giuditta; Pasini, Danilo; Manfrida, Stefania; Caria, Nicola; Minsky, Bruce D.

    2016-01-01

    To validate autocontouring software (AS) in a clinical practice including a two steps delineation quality assurance (QA) procedure. The existing delineation agreement among experts for rectal cancer and the overlap and time criteria that have to be verified to allow the use of AS were defined. Median Dice Similarity Coefficient (MDSC), Mean slicewise Hausdorff Distances (MSHD) and Total-Time saving (TT) were analyzed. Two expert Radiation Oncologists reviewed CT-scans of 44 patients and agreed the reference-CTV: the first 14 consecutive cases were used to populate the software Atlas and 30 were used as Test. Each expert performed a manual (group A) and an automatic delineation (group B) of 15 Test patients. The delineations were compared with the reference contours. The overlap between the manual and automatic delineations with MDSC and MSHD and the TT were analyzed. Three acceptance criteria were set: MDSC ≥ 0.75, MSHD ≤1mm and TT sparing ≥ 50%. At least 2 criteria had to be met, one of which had to be TT saving, to validate the system. The MDSC was 0.75, MSHD 2.00 mm and the TT saving 55.5% between group A and group B. MDSC among experts was 0.84. Autosegmentation systems in rectal cancer partially met acceptability criteria with the present version. PMID:27302924

  8. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G.; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D.; Bajwa, Farrukh M.; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70–87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57–83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT. PMID:26414816

  9. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D; Bajwa, Farrukh M; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70-87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57-83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT.

  10. Neoadjuvant Treatment Does Not Influence Perioperative Outcome in Rectal Cancer Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Alexis; Weitz, Juergen Slodczyk, Matthias; Koch, Moritz; Jaeger, Dirk; Muenter, Marc; Buechler, Markus W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing resection of primary rectal cancer, with a specific focus on the effect of neoadjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: This exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data included all patients who underwent anterior resection/low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary rectal cancer between October 2001 and October 2006. The study endpoints were perioperative surgical and medical morbidity. Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors were performed. Results: A total of 485 patients were included in this study; 425 patients (88%) underwent a sphincter-saving anterior resection/low anterior resection, 47 (10%) abdominoperineal resection, and 13 (2%) multivisceral resection. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was performed in 100 patients (21%), and 168 (35%) underwent neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy). Patient age and operative time were independently associated with perioperative morbidity, and operative time, body mass index >27 kg/m{sup 2} (overweight), and resection type were associated with surgical morbidity. Age and a history of smoking were confirmed as independent prognostic risk factors for medical complications. Neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with a worse outcome. Conclusion: The results of this prospective study have identified several risk factors associated with an adverse perioperative outcome after rectal cancer surgery. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with increased perioperative complications.

  11. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lower rectal tumors with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Namiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids. METHODS: The outcome of ESD for 23 lesions with hemorrhoids (hemorrhoid group) was compared with that of 48 lesions without hemorrhoids extending to the dentate line (non-hemorrhoid group) during the same study period. RESULTS: Median operation times (ranges) in the hemorrhoid and non-hemorrhoid groups were 121 (51-390) and 130 (28-540) min. The en bloc resection rate and the curative resection rate in the hemorrhoid group were 96% and 83%, and they were 100% and 90% in the non-hemorrhoid group, respectively. In terms of adverse events, perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in both groups. In terms of the clinical course of hemorrhoids after ESD, the rate of complete recovery of hemorrhoids after ESD in lesions with resection of more than 90% was significantly higher than that in lesions with resection of less than 90%. CONCLUSION: ESD on lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids could be performed safely, similarly to that on rectal lesions extending to the dentate line without hemorrhoids. In addition, all hemorrhoids after ESD improved to various degrees, depending on the resection range. PMID:27468216

  12. Comparison of tympanic membrane and rectal temperatures of anesthetized fallow deer (Dama dama)

    PubMed

    Drew, M L

    1998-09-01

    Paired tympanic membrane and rectal temperatures were compared for 103 female fallow deer (Dama dama) after short-term anesthesia to determine if tympanic temperature was a reliable indicator of hyperthermia associated with handling stress. Each deer was restrained in a drop-floor chute, anesthetized by i.v. injection of xylazine hydrochloride and ketamine hydrochloride, and removed from the chute. After a short procedure was completed, i.m. antibiotics and i.v. yohimbine hydrochloride were given to each deer. Temperature measurements were obtained during recovery from anesthesia, approximately 10 min after initial restraint. Mean tympanic temperature (38.6 degrees C +/- 0.7 degrees C; range 37.4-40.8 degrees C) was significantly lower than mean rectal temperature (40.1 degrees C +/- 0.8 degrees C; range 37.5-42.0 degrees C) [corrected]. One animal had rectal and tympanic temperatures of 42.0 degrees C and 40.8 degrees C, respectively, but regained normal body temperature after cooling measures were applied. Tympanic membrane temperature measurement may provide a method for evaluation of body temperature by separating retained body heat caused by exertion from critical elevations in core body temperature associated with clinical disease or capture stress.

  13. Systematic review of prognostic importance of extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Swift, Ian; Brown, Gina

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the survival outcomes relating to extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted using PRISMA guidelines. An electronic search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane library databases, Google scholar and PubMed until October 2014. Search terms were used in combination to yield articles on extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer. Outcome measures included prevalence and 5-year survival rates. These were graphically displayed using Forest plots. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out. RESULTS: Fourteen studies reported the prevalence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI) positive patients. Prevalence ranged from 9%-61%. The pooled prevalence of EMVI positivity was 26% [Random effects: Event rate 0.26 (0.18, 0.36)]. Most studies showed that EMVI related to worse oncological outcomes. The pooled overall survival was 39.5% [Random effects: Event rate 0.395 (0.29, 0.51)]. CONCLUSION: Historically, there has been huge variation in the prevalence of EMVI through inconsistent reporting. However the presence of EMVI clearly leads to worse survival outcomes. As detection rates become more consistent, EMVI may be considered as part of risk-stratification in rectal cancer. Standardised histopathological definitions and the use of magnetic resonance imaging to identify EMVI will improve detection rates in the future. PMID:26819536

  14. Tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus folinic acid in advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanchiz, F; Milla, A

    1994-12-01

    We previously reported positive results to Tegafur-Uracil (UFT) chemotherapy in a group of patients with advanced rectal cancer. We have continued the study and now report the effectiveness of UFT plus folinic acid (FA) in 52 patients with advanced rectal cancer. The therapeutic schedule was UFT, 600 mg/m2/day x 14 days p.o. + FA, 90 mg/m2/day x 14 days p.o. Fifty-two out of a total of 56 patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. A higher incidence of positive responses in patients without previous chemotherapy was appreciated. Twenty-one of the 52 evaluated patients showed a partial response (PR). Responses were strongly correlated with previous chemotherapy (14/20; 70% PR of cases without previous chemotherapy vs 7/32; 22% of cases with previous chemotherapy). All responding patients came forward with a median time to progression of 8.2 months (19.6 months for patients without previous chemotherapy vs 7.7 months for patients with previous chemotherapy, P < 0.01). We concluded that the UFT plus FA could be a treatment of choice for patients with advanced rectal cancer.

  15. [The preoperative staging of rectal neoplasms: the clinical exam and diagnostic imaging].

    PubMed

    Grande, M; Danza, F M

    1999-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer remains an important clinical problem. Although there was been great progress in surgical management, the survival of patients with locally advanced disease has not improved significantly during the past decades. Preoperative staging and evaluation of the risk of recurrence may help in the choice of operation. It is difficult for clinicians to quantify reliably with digital examination the degree of fixation of the tumor, and they usually cannot distinguish nodal metastases except in advanced cases. The more frequent overstaging of small tumors within one quadrant of the rectum is a major drawback of digital examination. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance seems to underestimate the extension of rectal tumors, but both can be helpful in selecting patients with advanced tumors for whom preoperative adjuvant treatment is being considered. Endoluminal ultrasound is superior in staging tumors confined to the rectal wall, but is not the ideal tool for staging: the results are examiner dependent, the field of vision in depth is limited, and stricturing tumors cannot be passed by the ultrasound transducer. Imaging diagnostic attendibility confirms the preeminent role of intraoperative exploration in the assessment of neoplastic diffusion in order to plan a correct surgical treatment.

  16. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  17. La duplication rectale de l'adulte: une cause exceptionnelle de masse pelvienne

    PubMed Central

    El Fahssi, Mohammed; Baba, Hicham; Bounaim, Ahmed; Ali, Abdelmounaim Ait; Sair, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    La duplication rectale est une anomalie constitutionnelle rare du tube digestif, elle représente 5% des duplications digestives son diagnostic se fait habituellement au tour de la période néonatale ou pendant les premières années de vie et ce n'est qu'exceptionnellement que son diagnostic reste méconnu jusqu’à l’âge adulte. Nous rapportant le cas d'une duplication rectale chez une femme de 41 ans se plaignant de douleurs pelviennes, l'examen clinique suivi des examens complémentaires ont suspecté le diagnostic la patiente est opérée par un abord antérieur isolé, permettant l'exérèse de la totalité de la masse kystique dont examen anatomo-pathologique confirme le diagnostic de duplication rectale kystique postérieure non communicante. L’évolution postopératoire est satisfaisante sans morbidité sur un recul de 20 mois. PMID:26985264

  18. Prognostic Significance of Microvessel Density Determining by Endoglin in Stage II Rectal Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Drazen; Martinovic, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of endoglin in the Dukes B rectal cancer is still unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of endoglin (CD105) in resected rectal cancer and to evaluate the relationship between microvessels density (MVD), clinicopathological factors, and survival rates. Methods. The study included 95 primary rectal adenocarcinomas, corresponding to 67 adjacent and 73 distant normal mucosa specimens from surgical resection samples. Tumor specimens were paraffin-embedded and immunohistochemical staining for the CD105 endothelial antigen was performed to count CD105-MVD. For exact measurement of the CD105-MVD used a computer-integrated system Alphelys Spot Browser 2 was used. Results. The intratumoral CD105-MVD was significantly higher compared with corresponding adjacent mucosa (P < 0.0001) and distant mucosa specimens (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CD105-MVD according to patients age, gender, tumor location, grade of differentiation, histological type, depth of tumor invasion, and tumor size. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low CD105-MVD group of patients than in the high CD105-MVD group of patients (log-rank test, P = 0.0406). Conclusion. CD105-assessed MVD could help to identify patients with possibility of poor survival in the group of stage II RC. PMID:26089870

  19. [Different strategies between Japan and other countries for the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2008-11-01

    In the treatment of rectal cancer, various attempts have been made to reduce the local recurrence rate. In Japan, lateral node dissection (LND) has been widely performed as a standard procedure for lower rectal cancers. Studies since the 1980s have shown that LND reduces the local recurrence rate and improves the survival rate. However, significant sexual or urinary dysfunction has been reported due to impairment of autonomic nerves by LND. To overcome these problems, autonomic nerve-preserving LND has been introduced. At present, autonomic nerve-preserving LND is the standard procedure for the treatment of lower rectal cancers in Japan. On the other hand, radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision is the standard procedure in other countries. Survival data also differ between Japan and elsewhere. In Japanese series, the postoperative survival rate is higher than those in other countries. This may be due to differences in the method of lymph node examination, surgical technique, etc. However, this is a very important issue in determining the postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In Japan, these differences need to be taken into account in determining the postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy regimen.

  20. RECTAL IMPACTION DUE TO PRICKLY PEAR SEEDS BEZOAR: A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Marchese, S; Bertucci, B; Manti, F; Berritto, D; Roperto, A G; Tamburrini, S

    2015-01-01

    Fecal impaction is the third cause of lower gastrointestinal tract obstruction after strictures for colon cancer and postoperative adhesions. A rapid diagnosis is necessary to avoid complications due to intestinal obstruction. Rectal phytobezoar due to prickly pear fruit seeds are an extremely rare entity, in the literature about twenty similar cases are described. Prickly pears are common in many countries, even in the Mediterranean area. When the ingestion of their fruit is excessive, this can be harmful, leading to the formation of phytobezoar causing fecal impaction. We describe the first case of phytobezoar due to prickly pear fruit seeds in continental Europe: a 76-year-old Italian female who ingested almost 40 prickly pear fruit leading to the composition of a large rectal phytobezoar. The patient presented clinically with fecal impaction, diagnosed by imaging and successfully treated by rectal irrigation and manual disimpaction. Our aim is to remind the physicians of these risks in evaluating patients with intestinal obstruction, when there is positive anamnesis for provenience from some areas in which these fruits are eaten. We also want to underline the role of Imaging Multi Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of these very uncommon entities.

  1. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in Radiation-Induced Rectal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram; Jackson, Andrew; Tucker, Susan L.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2010-03-01

    The available dose/volume/outcome data for rectal injury were reviewed. The volume of rectum receiving >=60Gy is consistently associated with the risk of Grade >=2 rectal toxicity or rectal bleeding. Parameters for the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model from four clinical series are remarkably consistent, suggesting that high doses are predominant in determining the risk of toxicity. The best overall estimates (95% confidence interval) of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters are n = 0.09 (0.04-0.14); m = 0.13 (0.10-0.17); and TD{sub 50} = 76.9 (73.7-80.1) Gy. Most of the models of late radiation toxicity come from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy dose-escalation studies of early-stage prostate cancer. It is possible that intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton beam dose distributions require modification of these models because of the inherent differences in low and intermediate dose distributions.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and anti-hypertensive effect of metoprolol tartrate rectal delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abou el Ela, Amal El Sayeh F; Allam, Ayat A; Ibrahim, Ehsan H

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this work was to develop rectal suppositories for better delivery of metoprolol tartrate (MT). The various bases used were fatty, water soluble and emulsion bases. The physical properties of the prepared suppositories were characterized such as weight variation, hardness, disintegration time, melting range and the drug content uniformity. The in vitro release of MT from the prepared suppositories was carried out. The evaluation of the pharmacological effects of MT on the blood pressure and heart rate of the healthy rabbits after the rectal administration compared to the oral tablets was studied. Moreover, the formulation with the highest in vitro release and the highest pharmacological effects would be selected for a further pharmacokinetics study compared to the oral tablets. The results revealed that the emulsion bases gave the highest rate of the drug release than the other bases used. The reduction effect of the emulsion MT suppository base on the blood pressure and heart rate was found to be faster and greater than that administered orally. The selected emulsion suppository base (F11) showed a significant increase in the AUC (1.88-fold) in rabbits as compared to the oral tablets. From the above results we can conclude that rectal route can serve as an efficient alternative route to the oral one for systemic delivery of MT which may be due to the avoidance of first-pass effect in the liver.

  3. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-21

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS.

  4. Glucagon-, glicentin-, and pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreativities in rectal carcinoids and related colorectal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fiocca, R.; Capella, C.; Buffa, R.; Fontana, R.; Solcia, E.; Hage, E.; Chance, R. E.; Moody, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Three nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids have been investigated immunohistochemically. In one case most tumor cells reacted with antiglucagon sera as well as with antiglicentin, antibovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP), and antihuman pancreatic polypeptide (HPP) sera; they were identified ultrastructurally as L cells. Another case showed glucagon-, glicentin-, and BPP-immunoreactive cells but lacked HPP immunoreactivity. In the third case glucagon- and glicentin-immunoreactive cells were well represented, while PP immunoreactivities were scarce. Parallel investigations of human rectal and sigmoid mucosa showed numerous cells reacting with glucagon, glicentin, and BPP antisera, most of which lacked HPP immunoreactivity. Cells reacting with glucagon and glicentin antisera, while lacking PP immunoreactivities, were also found. Thus, both tumor and nontumor cells produce glucagonlike immunoreactive (GLI) peptides--one of which may be glicentin or a related molecule--as well as PP-related sequences, although differing histochemically and ultrastructurally from glucagon or PP cells of the human pancreas. It is concluded that nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids are histogenetically linked to nonargentaffin endocrine cells of the human rectum. Images p[92]-a Figures 1-3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7395969

  5. Clinical significance of radiation-induced CD133 expression in residual rectal cancer cells after chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Aya; Tanaka, Koji; Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Morimoto, Yuhki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Takashi; Matsushita, Kohei; Yokoe, Takeshi; Yasuda, Hiromi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-03-01

    CD133 and CD44 have been considered as markers for colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs). The association of CD133 and CD44 expression with radiation has not been fully examined in rectal cancer. Both CD133 (PROM) and CD44 mRNA levels were measured in post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) specimens of 52 rectal cancer patients using real-time RT-PCR and compared to clinicopathological variables and clinical outcome. Their protein levels were examined in the radiation-treated HT29 human colon cancer cell line. Post-CRT CD133 in residual cancer cells was significantly higher than matched pre-CRT CD133 in biopsy specimens (n=30). By contrast, CD44 was significantly lower in post-CRT specimens (P<0.01). CD133 was associated with distant recurrence after CRT followed by surgery (P<0.05). Patients with elevated CD133 in residual cancer cells showed poor disease-free survival (P<0.05). No significant association between post-CRT CD44 and clinical outcome was found. The in vitro study showed that CD133 protein was increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner, despite of the decreased number of clonogenic radiation-surviving cells. CD44 protein was decreased after irradiation. CD133, but not CD44, was increased in radiation-resistant surviving colon cancer cells. Post-CRT CD133 in residual cancer cells may predict metachronous distant recurrence and poor survival of rectal cancer patients after CRT.

  6. Molecular details of a starch utilization pathway in the human gut symbiont Eubacterium rectale

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Darrell W.; Orlovsky, Nicole I.; Foley, Matthew H.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Bahr, Constance M.; Maynard, Mallory; Demeler, Borries; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Eubacterium rectale is a prominent human gut symbiont yet little is known about the molecular strategies this bacterium has developed to acquire nutrients within the competitive gut ecosystem. Starch is one of the most abundant glycans in the human diet, and E. rectale increases in vivo when the host consumes a diet rich in resistant starch, although it is not a primary degrader of this glycan. Here we present the results of a quantitative proteomics study in which we identify two glycoside hydrolase 13 family enzymes, and three ABC transporter solute-binding proteins that are abundant during growth on starch and, we hypothesize, work together at the cell surface to degrade starch and capture the released maltooligosaccharides. EUR_21100 is a multidomain cell wall anchored amylase that preferentially targets starch polysaccharides, liberating maltotetraose, while the membrane associated maltogenic amylase EUR_01860 breaks down maltooligosaccharides longer than maltotriose. The three solute-binding proteins display a range of glycan-binding specificities that ensure the capture of glucose through maltoheptaose and some α1,6-branched glycans. Taken together, we describe a pathway for starch utilization by E. rectale DSM 17629 that may be conserved among other starch-degrading Clostridium cluster XIVa organisms in the human gut. PMID:25388295

  7. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-07-15

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery.

  8. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Gastroesophageal carcinoma with rectal metastasis Symptoms: Bloating • constipation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy • flexible sigmoidoscopy • lower endoscopic ultrasound Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. Case Report: A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. Conclusions: Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  9. The effect of mercury on chloride secretion in the shark (Squalus acanthias) rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Epstein, F H; Solomon, R J

    1992-11-01

    1. Mercuric chloride inhibited chloride secretion in a dose dependent way in isolated perfused rectal glands. The effect was readily apparent at a concentration of 10(-6) M and profound and irreversible at 10(-4) M. 2. The dithiol dithiothreitol (DTT) 10(-2) M completely prevented the effect of 10(-6) M mercuric chloride, reduced that at 10(-5) M and 10(-4) M, and made the inhibition at the latter concentration reversible. 3. Two organic mercurials, mersalyl and meralluride, that are effective diuretics in the mammalian kidney, and p-chloromercuribenzoyl sulfonic acid (PCMBS), that has no diuretic activity, had no effect on chloride secretion by the rectal gland. 4. The effect of mersalyl was not modified by lowering the pH of the solution perfusing the glands. 5. These results indicate that inorganic mercury and organic mercurials do not share the same mechanism of action. 6. The absence of an effect of organic mercurials on chloride transport in the rectal gland suggests that its effect on another chloride transporting epithelia, the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, is not mediated by inhibition of the chloride cotransporter or Na+, K(+)-ATPase, common to both epithelia.

  10. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Locally Advanced Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-wu; Lin, Hui-ming; Lu, Xing-rong; Huang, Ying; Xu, Zong-bin; Huang, Sheng-hui; Wang, Xiao-jie

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To compare the surgical and oncological outcomes of rectal mucinous adenocarcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone. Methods. A total of 167 locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery alone between 2008 and 2014 were matched using propensity score; the surgical and oncological outcomes were compared. Results. Ninety-six patients were matched. Postoperative morbidity was similar between groups. Sphincter preservation rate was higher in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (79.2% versus 60.4%, P = 0.045), especially for tumors ≥ 3 cm but ≤5 cm from the anal verge (75.0% versus 44.0%, P = 0.036). With a median follow-up of 54.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate (neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone: 79.6% versus 67.1%; P = 0.599) and disease-free survival rate (75.6% versus 64.2%; P = 0.888) were similar. The 5-year local recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (7.7% versus 26.0%, P = 0.036), while no difference was observed in distant metastasis. A poor response to chemoradiation was associated with higher local recurrence (P = 0.037). Conclusions. Compared with surgery alone, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was found to increase the sphincter preservation rate and reduce local recurrence, thus being beneficial for locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients.

  11. Surgeon-performed sonographic findings in a traumatic trans-anal rectal perforation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Early diagnosis and active management of trans-anal rectal injuries is essential for a favorable outcome. Intraperitoneal free air (IFA) is usually diagnosed by an erect Chest X-ray. Point-of-care ultrasound has been recently used to detect IFA. We report a 45-year-old male who presented to the Emergency Department with lower abdominal peritonitis. Surgeon-performed portable point-of-care ultrasound as an extension of the abdominal examination revealed an inflamed omentum with hypoechoic stranding, thickened non compressible small bowel, and free fluid in the pelvis. A transverse abdominal section of the right upper quadrant showed free intraperitoneal air. Rectal examination revealed a longitudinal rectal tear. Laparotomy has confirmed the sonographic findings. There was a 12 cm intraperitoneal tear of the anterior wall of the rectum which was necrotic. This case clearly demonstrates that portable point-of-care ultrasound gives very useful detailed information even when performed by a non radiologist. Surgeons should be encouraged to use point-of-care ultrasound after appropriate training. PMID:21838859

  12. [Rectal squamous cell carcinoma treatment: Retrospective experience in two French university hospitals, review and proposals].

    PubMed

    Schernberg, A; Servagi-Vernat, S; Loganadane, G; Touboul, E; Bosset, J-F; Huguet, F

    2016-12-01

    After publishing a retrospective series of 23 patients treated for a rectal squamous cell carcinoma with exclusive curative and conservative intent chemoradiation, we aim to propose a review of the literature about this rare tumour. We identified 11 retrospective studies, on 106 patients, treated between 2007 and 2016. Treatment of rectal squamous cell carcinoma should be similar to anal carcinoma, based on exclusive chemoradiation, displaying a 5-year overall survival rate over 80%, while it was 32% in surgical series. Baseline explorations should be similar as for anal carcinoma, with an interest in PET-CT at diagnosis and monitoring, after a delay over 6 weeks after chemoradiation. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is legitimate, to a prophylactic dose between 36 and 45Gy, and over 54Gy to the tumour. Concomitant chemotherapy should combine an antimetabolite (5-fluorouracil or capecitabine) and mitomycin C, or cisplatin. This treatment seems well tolerated, associated with grade 2 or above toxicity below 30%. Follow-up should be established on anal squamous cell carcinoma schedule, with endoscopic ultrasonography and PET-CT. Rectal squamous cell carcinoma is a rare tumour; it management should be based on anal curative and conservative intent chemoradiation.

  13. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  14. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p {<=} 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT.

  15. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  16. The intentional oblique transection double stapling technique in anterior resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Masafumi; Ikeshima, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Morita, Keisuke; Uchihara, Tomoyuki; Itouyama, Rumi; Yoshimatsu, Shinichi; Shimada, Shinya; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    The double stapling technique (DST) is an intestinal reconstruction technique that has been widely adopted in anterior resection (AR) for rectal cancer. However, anastomotic leakage (AL) after the operation remains a major concern for colorectal surgeons. The sharp-angled corner of the remnant rectum that is often created by the ordinary DST can be a risk factor for AL. We have developed a new method of performing intentional oblique transection DST (IOT-DST). Using this technique, the anal side of the rectum is intentionally obliquely transected with linear staplers, and the area of the sharp-angled edge is totally punched out with a circular stapler. Between September 2015 and March 2016, we used the IOT-DST technique in the treatment of 15 consecutive rectal cancer patients and experienced no anastomosis-related complications, including leakage and stenosis. IOT-DST is easy to use and less stressful to perform than other techniques. IOT-DST has the potential to become the standard technique for AR in rectal cancer surgery.

  17. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-22

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to two drugs-the prototypical CFTR potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor/KALYDECO) and the CFTR corrector VX-809 (lumacaftor)-in organoid cultures derived from the rectal epithelia of subjects with CF, who expressed a broad range of CFTR mutations. We observed that CFTR residual function and responses to drug therapy depended on both the CFTR mutation and the genetic background of the subjects. In vitro drug responses in rectal organoids positively correlated with published outcome data from clinical trials with VX-809 and VX-770, allowing us to predict from preclinical data the potential for CF patients carrying rare CFTR mutations to respond to drug therapy. We demonstrated proof of principle by selecting two subjects expressing an uncharacterized rare CFTR genotype (G1249R/F508del) who showed clinical responses to treatment with ivacaftor and one subject (F508del/R347P) who showed a limited response to drug therapy both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that in vitro measurements of CFTR function in patient-derived rectal organoids may be useful for identifying subjects who would benefit from CFTR-correcting treatment, independent of their CFTR mutation.

  18. Clinical predictive circulating peptides in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crotti, Sara; Enzo, Maria Vittoria; Bedin, Chiara; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Maretto, Isacco; Del Bianco, Paola; Traldi, Pietro; Tasciotti, Ennio; Ferrari, Mauro; Rizzolio, Flavio; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio; Nitti, Donato; Agostini, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is worldwide accepted as a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Current standard of treatment includes administration of ionizing radiation for 45-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions associated with 5-fluorouracil administration during radiation therapy. Unfortunately, 40% of patients have a poor or absent response and novel predictive biomarkers are demanding. For the first time, we apply a novel peptidomic methodology and analysis in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Circulating peptides (Molecular Weight <3 kDa) have been harvested from patients' plasma (n = 33) using nanoporous silica chip and analyzed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight mass spectrometer. Peptides fingerprint has been compared between responders and non-responders. Random Forest classification selected three peptides at m/z 1082.552, 1098.537, and 1104.538 that were able to correctly discriminate between responders (n = 16) and non-responders (n = 17) before therapy (T0) providing an overall accuracy of 86% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.92. In conclusion, the nanoporous silica chip coupled to mass spectrometry method was found to be a realistic method for plasma-based peptide analysis and we provide the first list of predictive circulating biomarker peptides in rectal cancer patients underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  19. Lack of CD44 variant 6 expression in rectal cancer invasive front associates with early recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Avoranta, Suvi Tuulia; Korkeila, Eija Annika; Syrjänen, Kari Juhani; Pyrhönen, Seppo Olavi; Sundström, Jari Toivo Tapio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6), a membranous adhesion molecule, in rectal cancer. METHODS: Altogether, 210 rectal cancer samples from 214 patients treated with short-course radiotherapy (RT, n = 90), long-course (chemo) RT (n = 53) or surgery alone (n = 71) were studied with immunohistochemistry for CD44v6. The extent and intensity of membranous and cytoplasmic CD44v6 staining, and the intratumoral membranous staining pattern, were analyzed. RESULTS: Membranous CD44v6 expression was seen in 84% and cytoplasmic expression in 81% of the cases. In 59% of the tumors with membranous CD44v6 expression, the staining pattern in the invasive front was determined as “front-positive” and in 41% as “front-negative”. The latter pattern was associated with narrower circumferential margin (P = 0.01), infiltrative growth pattern (P < 0.001), and shorter disease-free survival in univariate survival analysis (P = 0.022) when compared to the “front-positive” tumors. CONCLUSION: The lack of membranous CD44v6 in the rectal cancer invasive front could be used as a method to identify patients at increased risk for recurrent disease. PMID:22969228

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seob; Yoon, Yong sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin-hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-Wook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients’ characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. Results All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer. PMID:27730804

  1. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (≥75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ≥3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ≥2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ≥3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ≥3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ≥2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ≥3 (P=.015) but not grade ≥2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient age and a history of MI or CHF significantly impact rectal toxicity following EBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, even after controlling for NTCP.

  2. Preparación de los adultos mayores en los Estados Unidos para hacer frente a los desastres naturales: encuesta a escala nacional*

    PubMed Central

    Al-rousan, Tala M.; Rubenstein, Linda M.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objetivos. Nos propusimos determinar el grado de preparación frente a los desastres naturales de los adultos mayores en los Estados Unidos y evaluar los factores que pueden afectar negativamente la salud y la seguridad durante este tipo de incidentes. Métodos. Obtuvimos una muestra de adultos de 50 años en adelante (n = 1 304) de la encuesta del 2010 del Estudio de la Salud y la Jubilación (HRS por su sigla en inglés). La encuesta recogió datos sobre las características demográficas generales, el estado de discapacidad o las limitaciones funcionales, y también sobre factores y comportamientos relacionados con la preparación frente a los desastres. Calculamos una puntuación global de preparación mediante indicadores individuales a fin de evaluar el grado de preparación general. Resultados. La media de la edad de los participantes (n = 1 304) fue de 70 años (desviación estándar [DE] = 9,3). Solo 34,3% informaron que habían participado en un programa formativo o que habían leído materiales sobre la preparación para los desastres. Casi 15% indicaron que usaban dispositivos médicos eléctricos que podían correr riesgo de no funcionar si se interrumpiera el suministro eléctrico. La puntuación de preparación indicó que la edad más avanzada, la discapacidad física y el menor nivel de escolaridad y de ingresos se asociaban independiente y significativamente a un grado de preparación general inferior. Conclusiones. A pesar de la mayor vulnerabilidad ante los desastres y del número cada vez mayor de adultos mayores en los Estados Unidos, muchos de los problemas sustanciales que encontramos son remediables y requieren atención en los sectores de la sociedad dedicados a la atención clínica, a la salud pública y al manejo de situaciones de emergencia.

  3. USE OF FRACTIONAL DOSE-VOLUME HISTOGRAMS TO MODEL RISK OF ACUTE RECTAL TOXICITY AMONG PATIENTS TREATED ON RTOG 94-06

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Susan L.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Bosch, Walter R.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong, Lei; Winter, Kathryn; Purdy, James A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose For toxicities occurring during the course of radiotherapy, it is conceptually inaccurate to perform normal-tissue complication probability analyses using the complete dose-volume histogram. The goal of this study was to analyze acute rectal toxicity using a novel approach in which the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model is based on the fractional rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH). Materials and Methods Grade ≥2 acute rectal toxicity was analyzed in 509 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 94-06. These patients had no field reductions or treatment-plan revisions during therapy, allowing the fractional rectal DVH to be estimated from the complete rectal DVH based on the total number of dose fractions delivered. Results The majority of patients experiencing Grade ≥2 acute rectal toxicity did so before completion of radiotherapy (70/80=88%). Acute rectal toxicity depends on fractional mean rectal dose, with no significant improvement in the LKB model fit when the volume parameter differs from n=1. The incidence of toxicity was significantly lower for patients who received hormone therapy (P=0.024). Conclusions Variations in fractional mean dose explain the differences in incidence of acute rectal toxicity, with no detectable effect seen here for differences in numbers of dose fractions delivered. PMID:22673726

  4. A model to predict bladder shapes from changes in bladder and rectal filling.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Heidi T; Remeijer, Peter; van Herk, Marcel; Lebesque, Joos V; de Bois, Josien A; Zijp, Lambert J; Moonen, Luc M

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a model that quantifies in three dimensions changes in bladder shape due to changes in bladder and/or rectal volume. The new technique enables us to predict changes in bladder shape over a short period of time, based on known urinary inflow. Shortly prior to the treatment, the patient will be scanned using a cone beam CT scanner (x-ray volume imager) that is integrated with the linear accelerator. After (automated) delineation of the bladder, the model will be used to predict the short-term shape changes of the bladder for the time interval between image acquisition and dose delivery. The model was developed using multiple daily CT scans of the pelvic area of 19 patients. For each patient, the rigid bony structure in follow-up scans was matched to that of the planning CT scan, and the outer bladder and rectal wall were delineated. Each bladder wall was subdivided in 2500 domains. A fixed reference point inside the bladder was used to calculate for each bladder structure a "Mercator-like" 2D scalar map (similar to a height map of the globe), containing the distances from this reference point to each domain on the bladder wall. Subsequently, for all bladder shapes of a patient and for all domains on the wall individually, the distance to the reference point was fitted by a linear function of both bladder and rectal volume. The model uses an existing bladder structure to create a new structure via expansion (or contraction), until the expressed volume is reached. To evaluate the predictive power of the model, the jack-knife method was used. The errors in the fitting procedure depended on the part of the bladder and range from 0 to 0.5 cm (0.2 cm on average). It was found that a volume increase of 150 cc can lead to a displacement up to about 2.5 cm of the cranial part of the bladder. With the model, the uncertainty in the position of the bladder wall can be reduced down to a maximum value of about 0.5 cm in case the bladder

  5. Treatment of rectal cancer by transanal endoscopic microsurgery: Experience with 425 patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, Mario; Gesuita, Rosaria; Ghiselli, Roberto; Lezoche, Giovanni; Budassi, Andrea; Baldarelli, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe our experience in treating rectal cancer by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), report morbidity and mortality and oncological outcome. METHODS: A total of 425 patients with rectal cancer (120 T1, 185 T2, 120 T3 lesions) were staged by digital rectal examination, rectoscopy, transanal endosonography, magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography. Patients with T1-N0 lesions and favourable histological features underwent TEM immediately. Patients with preoperative stage T2-T3-N0 underwent preoperative high-dose radiotherapy; from 1997 those aged less than 70 years and in good general health also underwent preoperative chemotherapy. Patients with T2-T3-N0 lesions were restaged 30 d after radiotherapy and were then operated on 40-50 d after neoadjuvant therapy. The instrumentation designed by Buess was used for all procedures. RESULTS: There were neither perioperative mortality nor intraoperative complications. Conversion to other surgical procedures was never required. Major complications (urethral lesions, perianal or retroperitoneal phlegmon and rectovaginal fistula) occurred in six (1.4%) patients and minor complications (partial suture line dehiscence, stool incontinence and rectal haemorrhage) in 42 (9.9%). Postoperative pain was minimal. Definitive histological examination of the 425 malignant lesions showed 80 (18.8%) pT0, 153 (36%) pT1, 151 (35.5%) pT2, and 41 (9.6%) pT3 lesions. Eighteen (4.2%) patients (ten pT2 and eight pT3) had a local recurrence and 16 (3.8%) had distant metastasis. Cancer-specific survival rates at the end of follow-up were 100% for pT1 patients (253 mo), 93% for pT2 patients (255 mo) and 89% for pT3 patients (239 mo). CONCLUSION: TEM is a safe and effective procedure to treat rectal cancer in selected patients without evidence of nodal involvement. T2-T3 lesions require preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:25071352

  6. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus endoscopic mucosal resection for large rectal adenomas (TREND-study)

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Frank JC; de Graaf, Eelco JR; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Reitsma, Johannes B; Haringsma, Jelle; Timmer, Robin; Weusten, Bas LAM; Gerhards, Michael F; Consten, Esther CJ; Schwartz, Matthijs P; Boom, Maarten J; Derksen, Erik J; Bijnen, A Bart; Davids, Paul HP; Hoff, Christiaan; van Dullemen, Hendrik M; Heine, G Dimitri N; van der Linde, Klaas; Jansen, Jeroen M; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie CH; Breumelhof, Ronald; Geldof, Han; Hardwick, James CH; Doornebosch, Pascal G; Depla, Annekatrien CTM; Ernst, Miranda F; van Munster, Ivo P; de Hingh, Ignace HJT; Schoon, Erik J; Bemelman, Willem A; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent non-randomized studies suggest that extended endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is equally effective in removing large rectal adenomas as transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). If equally effective, EMR might be a more cost-effective approach as this strategy does not require expensive equipment, general anesthesia and hospital admission. Furthermore, EMR appears to be associated with fewer complications. The aim of this study is to compare the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of TEM and EMR for the resection of large rectal adenomas. Methods/design Multicenter randomized trial among 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients with a rectal adenoma ≥ 3 cm, located between 1–15 cm ab ano, will be randomized to a TEM- or EMR-treatment strategy. For TEM, patients will be treated under general anesthesia, adenomas will be dissected en-bloc by a full-thickness excision, and patients will be admitted to the hospital. For EMR, no or conscious sedation is used, lesions will be resected through the submucosal plane in a piecemeal fashion, and patients will be discharged from the hospital. Residual adenoma that is visible during the first surveillance endoscopy at 3 months will be removed endoscopically in both treatment strategies and is considered as part of the primary treatment. Primary outcome measure is the proportion of patients with recurrence after 3 months. Secondary outcome measures are: 2) number of days not spent in hospital from initial treatment until 2 years afterwards; 3) major and minor morbidity; 4) disease specific and general quality of life; 5) anorectal function; 6) health care utilization and costs. A cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of EMR against TEM for large rectal adenomas will be performed from a societal perspective with respectively the costs per recurrence free patient and the cost per quality adjusted life year as outcome measures. Based on comparable recurrence rates for TEM and EMR of 3.3% and

  7. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P < 0.001) and incurred higher costs ($6300 (IQR: $5900, $6600)) than the VIB group (7.0 days, $4800; P < 0.05). Stoma-related complications in the ileostomy group included dermatitis (n = 2), stoma bleeding (n = 1), and wound infection after closure (n = 2). No BAR-related complications occurred. The mean time to Valtrac™ ring loosening was 14.1 ± 3

  8. Rectal 1% Tenofovir Gel Use Associates with Altered Epidermal Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Romas, Laura; Birse, Kenzie; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Abou, Max; Westmacott, Garrett; Giguere, Rebecca; Febo, Irma; Cranston, Ross D.; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; McGowan, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rectal use of a 1% tenofovir (TFV) gel is currently being evaluated for HIV prevention. While careful assessment of mucosal safety of candidate microbicides is a primary concern, tools to assess mucosal toxicity are limited. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a sensitive and high-throughput technique that can provide in-depth information on inflammation processes in biological systems. In this study, we utilized a proteomics approach to characterize mucosal responses in study participants involved in a phase 1 clinical trial of a rectal TFV-based gel. Project Gel was a phase 1 randomized (1:1), double-blind, multisite, placebo-controlled trial in which 24 participants received rectal TFV or a universal placebo [hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC)] over a course of 8 daily doses. Rectal mucosal swabs were collected after 0, 1, and 8 doses and were analyzed by label-free tandem mass spectrometry. Differential protein expression was evaluated using a combination of paired (time-effects) and unpaired (across study arm) t-tests, and multivariate [least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)] modeling. Within the TFV arm, 7% (17/249, p < .05) and 10% (25/249, p < .05) of total proteins changed after 1 and 8 daily applications of TFV gel, respectively, compared to 3% (7/249, p < .05) and 6% (16/249, p < .05) in the HEC arm. Biofunctional analysis associated TFV use with a decrease in epidermal barrier proteins (adj. p = 1.21 × 10−10). Multivariate modeling identified 13 proteins that confidently separated TFV gel users (100% calibration and 96% cross-validation accuracy), including the epithelial integrity factors (FLMNB, CRNN, CALM), serpins (SPB13, SPB5), and cytoskeletal proteins (VILI, VIME, WRD1). This study suggested that daily rectal applications of a 1% TFV gel may be associated with mucosal proteome changes involving epidermal development. Further assessment of more extended use of TFV-gel is recommended to validate

  9. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer and its correlation with tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, FU; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, LUGUANG; WANG, ZHEN; CHEN, YUKUN

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a novel imaging modality that can be used to reflect the microcirculation, although its value in diagnosing rectal cancer is unknown. The present study aimed to explore the clinical application of DCE-MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer, and its correlation with tumor differentiation. To achieve this, 40 pathologically confirmed patients with rectal cancer and 15 controls were scanned using DCE-MRI. The Tofts model was applied to obtain the perfusion parameters, including the plasma to extravascular volume transfer (Ktrans), the extravascular to plasma volume transfer (Kep), the extravascular fluid volume (Ve) and the initial area under the enhancement curve (iAUC). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the diagnostic value. The results demonstrated that the time-signal intensity curve of the rectal cancer lesion exhibited an outflow pattern. The Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and iAUC values were higher in the cancer patients compared with controls (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficients of Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC, as measured by two independent radiologists, were 0.991, 0.988, 0.972 and 0.984, respectively (all P<0.001), indicating a good consistency. The areas under the ROC curves for Ktrans and iAUC were both >0.9, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% for Ktrans, and of 92.5%, and 93.3% or 100%, for iAUC, respectively. In the 40 rectal cancer cases, there was a moderate correlation between Ktrans and iAUC, and pathological differentiation (0.3rectal cancer and differentiation, and therefore may provide novel insights into the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer. PMID:27073650

  10. Mercury toxicity in the shark (Squalus acanthias) rectal gland: apical CFTR chloride channels are inhibited by mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Martha A; Decker, Sarah E; Aller, Stephen G; Weber, Gerhard; Forrest, John N

    2006-03-01

    In the shark rectal gland, basolateral membrane proteins have been suggested as targets for mercury. To examine the membrane polarity of mercury toxicity, we performed experiments in three preparations: isolated perfused rectal glands, primary monolayer cultures of rectal gland epithelial cells, and Xenopus oocytes expressing the shark cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. In perfused rectal glands we observed: (1) a dose-dependent inhibition by mercury of forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-stimulated chloride secretion; (2) inhibition was maximal when mercury was added before stimulation with forskolin/IBMX; (3) dithiothrietol (DTT) and glutathione (GSH) completely prevented inhibition of chloride secretion. Short-circuit current (Isc) measurements in monolayers of rectal gland epithelial cells were performed to examine the membrane polarity of this effect. Mercuric chloride inhibited Isc more potently when applied to the solution bathing the apical vs. the basolateral membrane (23 +/- 5% and 68 +/- 5% inhibition at 1 and 10 microM HgCl2 in the apical solution vs. 2 +/- 0.9% and 14 +/- 5% in the basolateral solution). This inhibition was prevented by pre-treatment with apical DTT or GSH; however, only the permeant reducing agent DTT reversed mercury inhibition when added after exposure. When the shark rectal gland CFTR channel was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and chloride conductance was measured by two-electrode voltage clamping, we found that 1 microM HgCl2 inhibited forskolin/IBMX conductance by 69.2 +/- 2.0%. We conclude that in the shark rectal gland, mercury inhibits chloride secretion by interacting with the apical membrane and that CFTR is the likely site of this action.

  11. Genetic variation in C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to colon and rectal cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Curtin, Karen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Duggan, David J.; Samowitz, Wade S.; Peters, Ulrike; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation has been shown to be influenced by genetic variation in the CRP gene. Methods In this study, we test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CRP influences both the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer and survival. Two population-based studies of colon cancer (n=1574 cases, 1970 controls) and rectal (n=791 cases, 999 controls) were conducted. We evaluated four CRP tagSNPs: rs1205 (G>A, 3’ UTR); rs1417938 (T>A, intron); rs1800947 (G>C, L184L); and rs3093075 (C>A, 3’ flanking). Results The CRP rs1205 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.7), whereas the rs3093075 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.7, 95%CI 0.5-0.9). The strongest association for the rs1205 polymorphism and colon cancer was observed among those with KRAS2 mutations (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0). The CRP rs1205 AA genotype also was associated with an increased risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3); conversely, the rs1417938 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.9). We observed interactions between CRP rs1800947 and BMI and family history of CRC in modifying risk of both colon and rectal cancer. Conclusions These data suggest that genetic variation in the CRP gene influences risk of both colon and rectal cancer development. PMID:20949557

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a term originally used to describe the administration of chemotherapy preoperatively before surgery. The original rationale for administering NACT or so-called induction chemotherapy to shrink or downstage a locally advanced tumour, and thereby facilitate more effective local treatment with surgery or radiotherapy, has been extended with the introduction of more effective combinations of chemotherapy to include reducing the risks of metastatic disease. It seems logical that survival could be lengthened, or organ preservation rates increased in resectable tumours by NACT. In rectal cancer NACT is being increasingly used in locally advanced and nonmetastatic unresectable tumours. Randomised studies in advanced colorectal cancer show high response rates to combination cytotoxic therapy. This evidence of efficacy coupled with the introduction of novel molecular targeted therapies (such as Bevacizumab and Cetuximab), and long waiting times for radiotherapy have rekindled an interest in delivering NACT in locally advanced rectal cancer. In contrast, this enthusiasm is currently waning in other sites such as head and neck and nasopharynx cancer where traditionally NACT has been used. So, is NACT in rectal cancer a real advance or just history repeating itself? In this review, we aimed to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the separate approaches of neoadjuvant, concurrent and consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer, drawing on theoretical principles, preclinical studies and clinical experience both in rectal cancer and other disease sites. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve outcome in terms of disease-free or overall survival in selected groups in some disease sites, but this strategy has not been shown to be associated with better outcomes than postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In particular, there is insufficient data in rectal cancer. The evidence for benefit is strongest when NACT is administered

  13. Comparison of Digital Rectal Examination and Serum Prostate Specific Antigen in the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Clinical Trial of 6,630 Men.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Richie, Jerome P; Ahmann, Frederick R; Hudson, M'Liss A; Scardino, Peter T; Flanigan, Robert C; DeKernion, Jean B; Ratliff, Timothy L; Kavoussi, Louis R; Dalkin, Bruce L; Waters, W Bedford; MacFarlane, Michael T; Southwick, Paula C

    2017-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of digital rectal examination and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the early detection of prostate cancer, we conducted a prospective clinical trial at 6 university centers of 6,630 male volunteers 50 years old or older who underwent PSA determination (Hybritech Tandom-E or Tandem-R assays) and digital rectal examination. Quadrant biopsies were performed if the PSA level was greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination was suspicious, even if transrectal ultrasonography revealed no areas suspicious for cancer. The results showed that 15% of the men had a PSA level of greater than 4 μg./l., 15% had a suspicious digital rectal examination and 26% had suspicious findings on either or both tests. Of 1,167 biopsies performed cancer was detected in 264. PSA detected significantly more tumors (82%, 216 of 264 cancers) than digital rectal examination (55%, 146 of 264, p = 0.001). The cancer detection rate was 3.2% for digital rectal examination, 4.6% for PSA and 5.8% for the 2 methods combined. Positive predictive value was 32% for PSA and 21% for digital rectal examination. Of 160 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and pathological staging 114 (71%) had organ confined cancer: PSA detected 85 (75%) and digital rectal examination detected 64 (56%, p = 0.003). Use of the 2 methods in combination increased detection of organ confined disease by 78% (50 of 64 cases) over digital rectal examination alone. If the performance of a biopsy would have required suspicious transrectal ultrasonography findings, nearly 40% of the tumors would have been missed. We conclude that the use of PSA in conjunction with digital rectal examination enhances early prostate cancer detection. Prostatic biopsy should be considered if either the PSA level is greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination is suspicious for cancer, even in the absence of abnormal transrectal ultrasonography findings.

  14. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Doxycycline Efficacy for Rectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Leeyaphan, Charussri; Ong, Jason J.; Chow, Eric P.F.; Kong, Fabian Y.S.; Hocking, Jane S.; Bissessor, Melanie; Fairley, Christopher K.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) has reemerged as a sexually transmitted infection among men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly those who are HIV-positive. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy of doxycycline (100 mg 2×/d for 21 days) for rectal LGV in MSM. Nine studies were included: 4 prospective, 4 retrospective, and 1 combined retrospective and prospective. In total, 282 MSM with rectal LGV were included in the studies. All studies reported using nucleic acid amplification tests to assess microbial cure. Most patients (>80%) had symptomatic rectal infection. The fixed-effects pooled efficacy for doxycycline was 98.5% (95% CI 96.3%–100%, I2 = 0%; p = 0.993). Doxycycline at 100 mg twice daily for 21 days demonstrated a high microbial cure rate. These data support doxycycline at this dosage and duration as first-line therapy for rectal LGV in MSM. PMID:27513890

  15. High Frequency of CD8 Positive Lymphocyte Infiltration Correlates with Lack of Lymph Node Involvement in Early Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Däster, Silvio; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Hirt, Christian; Zlobec, Inti; Delko, Tarik; Nebiker, Christian A.; Soysal, Savas D.; Amicarella, Francesca; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Heberer, Michael; Lugli, Alessandro; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Kettelhack, Christoph; Terracciano, Luigi; Oertli, Daniel; von Holzen, Urs; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. A trend towards local excision of early rectal cancers has prompted us to investigate if immunoprofiling might help in predicting lymph node involvement in this subgroup. Methods. A tissue microarray of 126 biopsies of early rectal cancer (T1 and T2) was stained for several immunomarkers of the innate and the adaptive immune response. Patients' survival and nodal status were analyzed and correlated with infiltration of the different immune cells. Results. Of all tested markers, only CD8 (P = 0.005) and TIA-1 (P = 0.05) were significantly more frequently detectable in early rectal cancer biopsies of node negative as compared to node positive patients. Although these two immunomarkers did not display prognostic effect “per se,” CD8+ and, marginally, TIA-1 T cell infiltration could predict nodal involvement in univariate logistic regression analysis (OR 0.994; 95% CI 0.992–0.996; P = 0.009 and OR 0.988; 95% CI 0.984–0.994; P = 0.05, resp.). An algorithm significantly predicting the nodal status in early rectal cancer based on CD8 together with vascular invasion and tumor border configuration could be calculated (P < 0.00001). Conclusion. Our data indicate that in early rectal cancers absence of CD8+ T-cell infiltration helps in predicting patients' nodal involvement. PMID:25609852

  16. Rectal atresia and anal stenosis: the difference in the operative technique for these two distinct congenital anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Lane, V A; Wood, R J; Reck, C; Skerritt, C; Levitt, M A

    2016-04-01

    Rectal atresia and anal stenosis are rare forms of anorectal malformations. The aim of the definitive surgical repair in such cases is to preserve the anal canal, the dentate line, and the sphincter complex. We present a case of rectal atresia and anal stenosis to demonstrate the differences in the operative repair. The techniques described leave the anterior wall of the very distal anal canal untouched in both rectal stenosis and anal atresia; however, the dissection of the rectum differs. The atretic rectum in rectal atresia is mobilized and sutured to the anal canal circumferentially. In anal stenosis, the posterior rectum is mobilized in the form of rectal advancement, and the posterior 180° is anastomosed directly to the skin (as in a standard PSARP) with preservation of the anal canal as the anterior 180° of the final anoplasty. These patients have an excellent prognosis for bowel control and fecal continence, and therefore, complete mobilization and resection of the anal canal must be avoided.

  17. The Role of Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Overcoming Technical Challenges in Laparoscopic Surgery by Advanced Techniques.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungwan; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-07-01

    The conventional laparoscopic approach to rectal surgery has several limitations, and therefore many colorectal surgeons have great expectations for the robotic surgical system as an alternative modality in overcoming challenges of laparoscopic surgery and thus enhancing oncologic and functional outcomes. This review explores the possibility of robotic surgery as an alternative approach in laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer. The da Vinci® Surgical System was developed specifically to compensate for the technical limitations of laparoscopic instruments in rectal surgery. The robotic rectal surgery is associated with comparable or better oncologic and pathologic outcomes, as well as low morbidity and mortality. The robotic surgery is generally easier to learn than laparoscopic surgery, improving the probability of autonomic nerve preservation and genitourinary function recovery. Furthermore, in very complex procedures such as intersphincteric dissections and transabdominal transections of the levator muscle, the robotic approach is associated with increased performance and safety compared to laparoscopic surgery. The robotic surgery for rectal cancer is an advanced technique that may resolve the issues associated with laparoscopic surgery. However, high cost of robotic surgery must be addressed before it can become the new standard treatment.

  18. Rectal site and suboptimal nodal yield predict systemic recurrence in resected colorectal carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brian D; O'Riordan, James M; Stuart, Charlotte; Muldoon, Cian

    2014-09-01

    We assessed the contribution of histopathological features to systemic recurrence (SR) in patients with colorectal cancer, using a case-control design: 71 cases and 184 controls were included, with a mean time until SR of 1.4 ± 0.1 years and a mean follow-up of controls of 1.6 ± 0.06 years. Cases had significantly greater odds of rectal site (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82), stage ≥ pT3 (OR = 2.11), suboptimal (<12) lymph node yield (OR = 4.6), stage ≥ pN1 (OR = 2.46), KRAS mutation (OR = 2.76), and extramural venous invasion (OR = 1.97). By multiple regression analysis, rectal site, stage ≥ pT3, suboptimal lymph node yield, and lymph node positivity independently predicted SR. Rectal cancers were more likely to have a suboptimal node yield than nonrectal cancers (relative risk = 1.6) among the entire cohort. We conclude that rectal cancers have greater risk of SR than colon cancers. A lower yield of lymph nodes in rectal cancer specimens may contribute to this.

  19. Can computed tomography scan be performed effectively in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis without the added morbidity of rectal contrast?

    PubMed

    Dearing, Daniel D; Recabaren, James A; Alexander, Magdi

    2008-10-01

    The highest degrees of accuracy have been demonstrated for CT scans using rectal contrast in diagnosing appendicitis. However, the administration of rectal contrast is associated with patient discomfort and rarely, rectosigmoid perforation (0.04%). Additionally, the commonly accepted negative appendectomy rate is around 16 per cent. We performed a retrospective review of radiology, operative, and pathology reports of consecutive patients undergoing appendectomy or CT examination for appendicitis during 2006. CT scans were performed without rectal contrast. The accuracy of each type of inpatient CT examination and negative appendectomy rates were determined. Two hundred and thirty-eight patients underwent appendectomy. One hundred and thirty-four appendectomy patients (56%) received a preoperative CT scan. The negative appendectomy rates were 6.3 per cent overall, 8.7 per cent without CT examination and 4.5 per cent with CT (P = 0.3). Two hundred and forty-five inpatient CT scans were performed for suspected appendicitis with a sensitivity of 90 per cent, specificity of 98 per cent, accuracy of 94 per cent, positive predictive value of 98 per cent, and negative predictive value of 91 per cent. CT scanning without rectal contrast is effective for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis making rectal contrast, with its attendant morbidity, unnecessary. The previously acceptable published negative appendectomy rate is higher than that found in current surgical practice likely due to preoperative CT scanning.

  20. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  1. Assessment and in vitro experiment of artificial anal sphincter system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Jiang, Enyu; Wang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel artificial anal sphincter (AAS) system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function is proposed to treat human fecal incontinence. The executive mechanism of the traditional AAS system was redesigned and integrated for a simpler structure and better durability. The novel executive mechanism uses a sandwich structure to simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter. To rebuild the lost rectal sensation function caused by fecal incontinence, we propose a novel method for rebuilding the rectal sensation function based on an Optimal Wavelet Packet Basis (OWPB) using the Davies-Bouldin (DB) index and a support vector machine (SVM). OWPB using a DB index is used for feature vector extraction, while a SVM is adopted for pattern recognition.Furthermore, an in vitro experiment with the AAS system based on rectal sensation function rebuilding was carried out. Experimental results indicate that the novel executive mechanism can simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter, and the proposed method is quite effective for rebuilding rectal sensation in patients.

  2. Asymptomatic rectal carriage of blaKPC producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: who is prone to become clinically infected?

    PubMed

    Schechner, V; Kotlovsky, T; Kazma, M; Mishali, H; Schwartz, D; Navon-Venezia, S; Schwaber, M J; Carmeli, Y

    2013-05-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are emerging extremely drug-resistant pathogens; blaKPC is the predominant carbapenemase in Israel. Early detection of asymptomatic rectal carriers is important for infection control purposes. We aimed to determine who among newly identified CRE rectal carriers is prone to have a subsequent clinical specimen with CRE. A matched case-control study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Israel. Cases with a primary positive CRE rectal test and subsequent CRE clinical specimens were matched in a 1:2 ratio with CRE rectal carriers who did not develop subsequent CRE clinical specimens (controls). Matching was based on calendar time of primary CRE isolation, whether the primary CRE isolation was ≤ 48 h or > 48 h after hospital admission, and time at risk to have a subsequent clinical specimen. Data were extracted from the patients' medical records and from the hospital's computerized database. One hundred and thirty-two newly identified CRE rectal carriers (44 cases, 88 controls) were included. The median time interval between screening and subsequent clinical specimens was 11 days (range, 3-27); 86% of the clinical specimens were classified as true infections. Independent predictors of subsequent CRE clinical specimens were: admission to the intensive care unit, having a central venous catheter, receipt of antibiotics, and diabetes mellitus. Identification of the risk factors for subsequent infections among CRE-colonized patients can be used to control modifiable risk factors and to direct empirical antimicrobial therapy when necessary.

  3. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  4. Advances in management of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: Consequences for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jeanne; Douard, Richard; Durdux, Catherine; Landi, Bruno; Berger, Anne; Taieb, Julien

    2016-11-01

    More than half the patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal disease at diagnosis with a high risk of recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and standardized radical surgery with total mesorectal excision have been established as the 'gold standard' for treating these patients. Pathological staging using the ypTNM classification system to decide on adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is widely used in clinical practice, but the delivery of ACT is still controversial, as many discrepancies persist in the conclusions of different trials, due to heterogeneity of the inclusion criteria between studies, lack of statistical power, and variations in preoperative and adjuvant regimens. In 2014, a meta-analysis of four randomized phase-III trials (EORTC 22921, I-CNR-RT, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, CHRONICLE) failed to demonstrate any statistical efficacy of fluorouracil (5FU)-based ACT. Three recent randomized trials aimed to compare 5FU with 5FU plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Two of them (ADORE, CAO/ARO/AIO-04) appeared to find a disease-free survival benefit for patients treated with the combination therapy. Thus, while awaiting new data, it can be said that, as of 2015, patients with yp stage I tumors or histological complete response derived no benefit from adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen should be proposed for yp stage III patients, and may be considered for yp stage II tumors in fit patients with high-risk factors. Nevertheless, well-designed and sufficiently powered clinical trials dedicated to adjuvant treatments for rectal cancer remain justified in future to achieve a high level of proof in keeping with evidence-based medical standards.

  5. Late Side Effects and Quality of Life After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Skovlund, Eva; Hjermstad, Marianne J.; Dahl, Olav; Frykholm, Gunilla; Carlsen, Erik; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is little knowledge on long-term morbidity after radiotherapy (50 Gy) and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. Therefore, late effects on bowel, anorectal, and urinary function, and health-related quality of life (QoL), were studied in a national cohort (n = 535). Methods and Materials: All Norwegian patients who received pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified. Patients treated with surgery alone served as controls. Patients were without recurrence or metastases. Bowel and urinary function was scored with the LENT SOMA scale and the St. Marks Score for fecal incontinence and QoL with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). Results: Median time since surgery was 4.8 years. Radiation-treated (RT+) patients (n = 199) had increased bowel frequency compared with non-radiation-treated (RT-) patients (n = 336); 19% vs. 6% had more than eight daily bowel movements (p < 0.001). In patients without stoma, a higher proportion of RT+ (n = 69) compared with RT- patients (n = 240), were incontinent for liquid stools (49% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), needed a sanitary pad (52% vs. 13%, p < 0.001), and lacked the ability to defer defecation (44% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). Daily urinary incontinence occurred more frequently after radiotherapy (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.001). Radiation-treated patients had worse social function than RT- patients, and patients with fecal or urinary incontinence had impaired scores for global quality of life and social function (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with considerable long-term effects on anorectal function, especially in terms of bowel frequency and fecal incontinence. RT+ patients have worse social function, and fecal incontinence has a negative impact on QoL.

  6. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  7. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy during preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tunio, Mutahir Ali; Rafi, Mansoor; Hashmi, Altaf; Mohsin, Rehan; Qayyum, Abdul; Hasan, Mujahid; Sattar, Amjad; Mubarak, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDR-ILBT) boost during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 2008 and 2009, thirty-six patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (≥ T3 or N+), were treated initially with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m2 oral twice daily) and pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (45 Gy in 25 fractions), then were randomized to group A; HDR-ILBT group (n = 17) to receive 5.5-7 Gy × 2 to gross tumor volume (GTV) and group B; EBRT group (n = 19) to receive 5.4 Gy × 3 fractions to GTV with EBRT. All patients underwent total mesorectal excision. RESULTS: Grade 3 acute toxicities were registered in 12 patients (70.6%) in group A and in 8 (42.1%) in group B. Complete pathologic response of T stage (ypT0) in group A was registered in 10 patients (58.8%) and in group B, 3 patients (15.8%) had ypT0 (P < 0.0001). Sphincter preservation was reported in 6/9 patients (66.7%) in group A and in 5/10 patients (50%) in group B (P < 0.01). Overall radiological response was 68.15% and 66.04% in Group A and B, respectively. During a median follow up of 18 mo, late grade 1 and 2 sequelae were registered in 3 patients (17.6%) and 4 patients (21.1%) in the groups A and B, respectively. CONCLUSION: HDR-ILBT was found to be effective dose escalation technique in preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancers, with higher response rates, downstaging and with manageable acute toxicities. PMID:20845511

  8. Transanal Endoscopic Operation for Benign Rectal Lesions and T1 Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Emi; Dedrye, Lieven; Vindevoghel, Koen; Nuytens, Frederiek; Pottel, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) is a minimally invasive technique used for local excision of benign and selected malignant rectal lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and oncological outcomes of the procedure and to report the experience in 3 centers. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed of all patients with benign lesions or ≤cT1N0 rectal cancer who underwent TEO with curative intent at 3 Belgian centers (2012 through 2014). Results: Eighty-three patients underwent 84 TEOs for 89 rectal lesions (37 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas, 1 gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 1 lipoma, 2 neuroendocrine tumors, and 5 scar tissues). Operative time was associated with lesion size (P < .001). Postoperative complications occurred in 13 patients: 7 hemorrhages, 1 urinary tract infection, 1 urinary retention, 2 abscesses, 1 anastomotic stenosis, and 1 entrance into the peritoneal cavity. Median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1–8). During a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–27), there was 1 recurrence. Conclusion: Although longer follow-up is still necessary, TEO appears to be an effective method of excising benign tumors and low-risk T1 carcinomas of the rectum. However, TEO should be considered as part of the diagnostic work-up. Furthermore, the resected specimen of a TEO procedure allows adequate local staging in contrast to an endoscopic piecemeal excision. Nevertheless, definitive histology must be appreciated, and in case of unfavorable histology, radical salvage resection still has to be performed. PMID:28144126

  9. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  10. Comparison of reticular and rectal core body temperatures in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bewley, J M; Einstein, M E; Grott, M W; Schutz, M M

    2008-12-01

    The Phase IV Cattle Temperature Monitoring System (CTMS; Phase IV Engineering Inc., Boulder, CO) marketed by MaGiiX (MaGiiX Inc., Post Falls, ID) uses a passive bolus equipped with a temperature sensor, a panel reader placed at a parlor entrance or exit to query the bolus, and a software package to collect, analyze, and view data. The biologically inert bolus resides in the cow's reticulum and is queried each time the cow passes the reader. Reticular temperature (RETT) and rectal temperature (RECT) were recorded simultaneously in the milking parlor exit lane in 4 consecutive milkings in each of 4 seasons, totaling 16 measurements per cow. The RETT were obtained by using the phase IV CTMS, whereas the RECT were obtained manually with a GLA M750 thermometer (GLA Agricultural Electronics, San Luis Obispo, CA). Data were edited to remove RETT likely to have been affected by a recent drinking bout. For the 2,042 observations used in analyses, means (+/-SD) were 39.28 (+/-0.41), 38.83 (+/-0.36), and 0.45 (+/-0.33) for RETT, RECT, and the difference between RETT and RECT, respectively. The RETT and RECT were strongly correlated (r = 0.645). The relationship between RETT and RECT varied by season, milking, housing system, and parity. Because dairy producers and veterinarians are accustomed to viewing rectal temperatures, equations to adjust reticular temperatures to a rectal-based scale may increase the utility of the phase IV CTMS. The resulting conversion equations were RECT = 19.23 + 0.496(RETT) for the a.m. milking and RECT = 15.88 + 0.587(RETT) for the p.m. milking.

  11. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in Patients With Prior Pelvic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Bedi, Manpreet; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine rates of toxicity, freedom from local progression, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with reirradiation. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and February 2005, 50 patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for primary (n = 2 patients) or recurrent (n = 48 patients) rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients were treated with 150-cGy fractions twice daily, with a total dose of 39 Gy (n = 47 patients) if the retreatment interval was >=1 year or 30 Gy (n = 3) if the retreatment interval was <1 year. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 48 (96%) patients. Eighteen (36%) patients underwent surgical resection following radiotherapy. Results: Two patients had grade 3 acute toxicity and 13 patients had grade 3 to 4 late toxicity. The 3-year rate of grade 3 to 4 late toxicity was 35%. The 3-year rate of freedom from local progression was 33%. The 3-year freedom from local progression rate was 47% in patients undergoing surgery and 21% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.057). The 3-year overall survival rate was 39%. The 3-year overall survival rate was 66% in patients undergoing surgery and 27% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.003). The 3-year overall survival rate was 53% in patients with a retreatment interval of >2 years and 21% in those with a retreatment interval of <=2 years (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated, accelerated reirradiation was well tolerated, with low rates of acute toxicity and moderate rates of late toxicity. Reirradiation may help improve pelvic control in rectal cancer patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy.

  12. Interfraction Prostate Movement in Bone Alignment After Rectal Enema for Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Eun; Kim, Tae Hyo; Lee, Ki Soo; Cho, Won Yeol; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of a rectal enema on interfraction prostate movement in bone alignment (BA) for prostate radiotherapy (RT), we analyzed the spatial difference in prostates in a bone-matched setup. Materials and Methods We performed BA retrospectively with data from prostate cancer patients who underwent image-guided RT (IGRT). The prostate was identified with implanted fiducial markers. The setup for the IGRT was conducted with the matching of three fiducial markers on RT planning computed tomography images and those on two oblique kV x-ray images. Offline BA was performed at the same position. The coordinates of a virtual prostate in BA and a real prostate were obtained by use of the ExaxTrac/NovalisBody system, and the distance between them was calculated as the spatial difference. Interfraction prostate displacement was drawn from the comparison of the spatial differences. Results A total of 15 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with curative hypofractionated IGRT were enrolled. A total of 420 fractions were analyzed. The mean of the interfraction prostate displacements after BA was 3.12±2.00 mm (range, 0.20-10.53 mm). The directional difference was profound in the anterior-posterior and supero-inferior directions (2.14±1.73 mm and 1.97±1.44 mm, respectively) compared with the right-left direction (0.26±0.22 mm, p<0.05). The required margin around the clinical target volume was 4.97 mm with the formula of van Herk et al. Conclusions The interfraction prostate displacement was less frequent when a rectal enema was performed before the procedure. A rectal enema can be used to reduce interfraction prostate displacement and resulting clinical target volume-to-planning target volume margin. PMID:24466393

  13. Massive presacral bleeding during rectal surgery: From anatomy to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Meng, Rong-Gui; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate control of two different types of massive presacral bleeding according to the anatomy of the presacral venous system. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed in 1628 patients with middle or low rectal carcinoma who were treated surgically in the Department of Colorectal Surgery, Changhai Hospital, Shanghai, China from January 2008 to December 2012. In four of these patients, the presacral venous plexus (n = 2) or basivertebral veins (n = 2) were injured with massive presacral bleeding during mobilization of the rectum. The first two patients with low rectal carcinoma were operated upon by a junior associate professor and the source of bleeding was the presacral venous plexus. The other two patients with recurrent rectal carcinoma were both women and the source of bleeding was the basivertebral veins. RESULTS: Two different techniques were used to control the bleeding. In the first two patients with massive bleeding from the presacral venous plexus, we used suture ligation around the venous plexus in the area with intact presacral fascia that communicated with the site of bleeding (surrounding suture ligation). In the second two patients with massive bleeding from the basivertebral veins, the pelvis was packed with gauze, which resulted in recurrent bleeding as soon as it was removed. Following this, we used electrocautery applied through one epiploic appendix pressed with a long Kelly clamp over the bleeding sacral neural foramen where was felt like a pit Electrocautery adjusted to the highest setting was then applied to the clamp to “weld” closed the bleeding point. Postoperatively, the blood loss was minimal and the drain tube was removed on days 4-7. CONCLUSION: Surrounding suture ligation and epiploic appendices welding are effective techniques for controlling massive presacral bleeding from presacral venous plexus and sacral neural foramen, respectively. PMID:23840150

  14. Participation in Activities Associated With Quality of Life for Long-Term Survivors of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Carmit; Liu, Liyan; Bulkley, Joanna E; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher; Grant, Marcia; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa KF; Krouse, Robert S; Herrinton, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Context: Cancer patients’ participation in social, recreational, and civic activities is strongly associated with quality of life (QOL), but these activities are not well integrated into cancer survivorship research or interventions. Objective: Test the hypothesis that for long-term (≥ 5 years) survivors of rectal cancer, clinical factors (type of surgery and bowel function) are associated with long-term participation in activities and that participation in activities is associated with long-term QOL. Design: Observational study with longitudinal and cross-sectional components. Main Outcome Measures: Participation in activities and QOL. Tumor registry records were used to identify patients and obtain clinical data; surveys assessed participation and QOL. Using general linear models, we analyzed participation in activities in relation to type of surgery and bowel function after adjustment for potential confounders. We analyzed overall QOL relative to participation in activities after adjustment. Results: A total of 567 rectal cancer survivors completed a mailed questionnaire. Overall response rate was 61%. The type of operation (p < 0.0001), receipt of radiation therapy (p = 0.002), and bowel function (p < 0.0001) were associated with participation in activities. Participation in activities was the strongest predictor of QOL (p < 0.0001), explaining 20% of the variance (R2) in QOL, with all other variables together accounting for another 18% of the variance. Conclusion: The importance of participation in activities on rectal cancer survivors’ QOL is underappreciated. We recommend revising QOL instruments used in cancer care and research to include questions about participation in activities. Interventions should address maintenance of preferred activities and adoption of new, fulfilling activities. PMID:28241904

  15. MRE11 and ATM Expression Levels Predict Rectal Cancer Survival and Their Association with Radiotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Revoltar, Maxine; Lim, Stephanie H.; Tut, Thein-Ga; Abubakar, Askar; Henderson, Chris J.; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Lee, Mark; De Souza, Paul; Morgan, Matthew; Lee, C. Soon; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of DNA repair proteins is associated with poor survival in cancer patients. We investigated the combined expression of MRE11 and ATM as a predictive marker of response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods MRE11 and ATM expression were examined in tumor samples from 262 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer, including a sub-cohort of 54 patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The relationship between expression of the two-protein panel and tumor regression grade (TRG) was assessed by Mann–Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristics area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis. The association between expression of the two-protein panel and clinicopathologic variables and survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Results A high score for two-protein combined expression in the tumor center (TC) was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.035) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.003) in the whole cohort, and with DFS (P = 0.028) and OS (P = 0.024) in the neoadjuvant subgroup (n = 54). In multivariate analysis, the two-protein combination panel (HR = 2.178, 95% CI 1.115–4.256, P = 0.023) and perineural invasion (HR = 2.183, 95% CI 1.222–3.899, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with DFS. Using ROC-AUC analysis of good versus poor histological tumor response among patients treated preoperatively with radiotherapy, the average ROC-AUC was 0.745 for the combined panel, 0.618 for ATM alone, and 0.711 for MRE11 alone. Conclusions The MRE11/ATM two-protein panel developed in this study may have clinical value as a predictive marker of tumor response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. PMID:27930716

  16. Do pathological variables have prognostic significance in rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Lionti, Simona; Domati, Federica; Barresi, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To clarify which factors may influence pathological tumor response and affect clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery. METHODS Tumor regression grade (TRG) according to the Dworak system and yTNM stage were assessed and correlated with pre-treatment clinico-pathological variables in 215 clinically locally advanced (cTNM stage II and III) rectal carcinomas. Prognostic value of all pathological and clinical factors on disease free survival (DFS) and cancer specific survival (CSS) was analyzed by Kaplan Meier and Cox-regression analyses. RESULTS cN+ status, mucinous histotype or poor differentiation in the pre-treatment biopsy were significantly associated with lower pathological response (low Dworak grade and TNM remaining unchanged/upstaging). Cases showing acellular mucin pools in surgical specimens all had unremarkable clinical courses with no deaths or recurrences during follow-up. Dworak grade had prognostic significance for DFS and CSS. However, compared to the 5-tiered system, a simplified two-tiered grading system, in which grades 0, 1 and 2 were grouped as absent/partial regression and grades 3 and 4 were grouped as total/subtotal regression, was more reproducible and prognostically informative. The two-tiered Dworak system, yN stage, craniocaudal extension of the tumor and radial margin status were significant independent prognostic variables. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that caution should be applied in using a conservative approach in rectal carcinomas with cN+ status, extensive/lower involvement of the rectum and mucinous histotype or poor differentiation. Although Dworak TRG is prognostically significant, a simplified two-tiered system could be preferable. Finally, cases with acellular mucin pools should be carefully evaluated to definitely exclude residual mucinous carcinoma. PMID:28293088

  17. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures After Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Course

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael P.; Kopetz, Scott; Bhosale, Priya R.; Eng, Cathy; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency (SI) fractures can occur as a late side effect of pelvic radiation therapy. Our goal was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of SI fractures in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 2004, 562 patients with non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by mesorectal excision. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy. The hospital records and radiology reports of these patients were reviewed to identify those with pelvic fractures. Radiology images of patients with pelvic fractures were then reviewed to identify those with SI fractures. Results: Among the 562 patients, 15 had SI fractures. The 3-year actuarial rate of SI fractures was 3.1%. The median time to SI fractures was 17 months (range, 2-34 months). The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women compared to men (5.8% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.014), and in whites compared with non-whites (4% vs. 0%, p = 0.037). On multivariate analysis, gender independently predicted for the risk of SI fractures (hazard ratio, 3.25; p = 0.031). Documentation about the presence or absence of pain was available for 13 patients; of these 7 (54%) had symptoms requiring pain medications. The median duration of pain was 22 months. No patient required hospitalization or invasive intervention for pain control. Conclusions: SI fractures were uncommon in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women. Most cases of SI fractures can be managed conservatively with pain medications.

  18. Feasibility of transanal endoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Byung Kwan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Chang, Hee Jin; Han, Kyung Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of transanal total mesorectal excision (TME) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods This study enrolled 12 patients with clinically node negative rectal cancer located 4–12 cm from the anal verge who underwent transanal endoscopic TME with the assistance of single port laparoscopic surgery between September 2013 and August 2014. The primary endpoint was TME quality; secondary endpoints included number of harvested lymph nodes and postoperative complications within 30 days (NCT01938027). Results The 12 patients included 7 males and 5 females, of median age 59 years and median body mass index 24.2 kg/m2. Tumors were located on average 6.7 cm from the anal verge. Four patients (33.3%) received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Median operating time was 195 minutes and median blood loss was 50 mL. There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open surgery. TME was complete or nearly complete in 11 patients (91.7%). Median distal resection and circumferential resection margins were 18.5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. Median number of harvested lymph nodes was 15. Median length of hospital stay was 9 days. There were no postoperative deaths. Six patients experienced minor postoperative complications, including urinary dysfunction in 2, transient ileus in 3, and wound abscess in 1. Conclusion This pilot study showed that high-quality TME was possible in most patients without serious complications. Transanal TME for patients with rectal cancer may be feasible and safe, but further investigations are necessary to evaluate its long-term functional and oncologic outcomes and to clarify its indications. PMID:27757396

  19. Effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baeten, Coen . E-mail: C.Baeten@surgery.azm.nl; Castermans, Karolien; Lammering, Guido; Hillen, Femke; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hillen, Harry; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Baeten, Cornelius G.M.I.

    2006-11-15

    Background: We and others have shown that angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration are important prognostic factors in rectal cancer. However, little is known about its possible changes in response to radiotherapy (RTX), which is frequently given to rectal tumors as a neoadjuvant treatment to improve the prognosis. We therefore investigated the biologic effects of RTX on these parameters using fresh-frozen biopsy samples of tumor and normal mucosa tissue before and after RTX. Methods: Biopsy samples were taken from a total of 34 patients before and after either a short course or long course of RTX combined with chemotherapy. The following parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: Microvessel density, leukocyte infiltration, proliferating epithelial and tumor cells, proliferating endothelial cells, adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, and the angiogenic mRNA profile. Results: The tumor biopsy samples taken after RTX treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in microvessel density and the number of proliferating tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the leukocyte infiltration, the levels of basic fibroblast growth factor in carcinoma tissue, and the adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells in normal as well as carcinoma tissue increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data show that together with an overall decrease in tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation, RTX results in an increase in the expression of adhesion molecules that stimulate leukocyte infiltration. This suggests the possibility that, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effect, radiation may also stimulate an immunologic tumor response that could contribute to the documented improvement in local tumor control and distal failure rate of rectal cancers.

  20. Rectal Adenocarcinoma: Proposal for a Model Based on Pretreatment Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Fernando; Freire, Viviana; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Quevedo, Gerardo; Echenique, Ignacio A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Currently the choice of chemotherapy regimen in rectal cancer is made prior to surgery in contrast to colon cancer where it is made postoperatively after the pathological stage has been determined. If we could identify which are the important pretreatment prognostic factors in rectal cancer, we could then target those patients with unfavorable features to investigate potentially more effective preoperative chemotherapy regimens aimed at those with unfavorable features. The present study aims to determine pre-treatment prognostic factors that are associated with an unfavorable outcome. Methods A retrospective review of 99 rectal cancer patients operated at the Hospital Auxilio Mutuo and Hospital San Pablo was done. Sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and treatment data was collected. Results 54% were males. The mean ± sd age was 62.2 ± 10.4. In age-adjusted Cox model, male gender [HR (95%CI): 3.32 (1.09–10.13)], mucinous carcinoma [HR (95%CI): 3.67 (1.25–10.77)], and clinical stages II & III [HR (95%CI): 8.19 (1.08–62.08)] were predictors of poor prognosis. In multivariate age-adjusted analysis, a tendency towards a poorer prognosis was observed for male patients [HR: 2.60] CEA level ≥ 5ng/ml [HR: 2.55], mucinous carcinoma [HR:2.96], and clinical stages II & III [HR:4.96], although results were not statistically significant (p>0.05), Conclusion Although current therapeutic results are relatively favorable with preoperative 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) and radiotherapy, future clinical trials should address the management of those cases with adverse pretreatment prognostic factors so that they can be treated with potentially more effective albeit more toxic chemotherapy regimens. PMID:22783696

  1. Application of Laparoscopic Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision in Locally Advanced Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Lei; Dai, Yong; Jiang, Jin-Bo; Yuan, Hui-Yang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: When compared with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APR), extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of local recurrence for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. Combined with the laparoscopic technique, laparoscopic ELAPE (LELAPE) has the potential to reduce invasion and hasten postoperative recovery. In this study, we aim to investigate the advantages of LELAPE in comparison with conventional APR. Methods: From October 2010 to February 2013, 23 patients with low rectal cancer (T3–4N0–2M0) underwent LELAPE; while during the same period, 25 patients were treated with conventional APR. The patient characteristics, intraoperative data, postoperative complications, and follow-up results were retrospectively compared and analyzed. Results: The basic patient characteristics were similar; but the total operative time for the LELAPE was longer than that of the conventional APR group (P = 0.014). However, the operative time for the perineal portion was comparable between the two groups (P = 0.328). The LELAPE group had less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.022), a lower bowel perforation rate (P = 0.023), and a positive circumferential margin (P = 0.028). Moreover, the patients, who received the LELAPE, had a lower postoperative Visual Analog Scale, quicker recovery of bowel function (P = 0.001), and a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.047). However, patients in the LELAPE group suffered more chronic perineal pain (P = 0.002), which may be related to the coccygectomy (P = 0.033). Although the metastasis rate and mortality rate were similar between the two groups, the local recurrence rate of the LELAPE group was statistically improved (P = 0.047). Conclusions: When compared with conventional APR, LELAPE has the potential to reduce the risk of local recurrence, and decreases operative invasion for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. PMID:25963355

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  3. Aspirin as a neoadjuvant agent during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Restivo, Angelo; Cocco, Ivana Maria Francesca; Casula, Giuseppe; Scintu, Francesco; Cabras, Francesco; Scartozzi, Mario; Zorcolo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, many studies have suggested a possible adjuvant role of aspirin in colorectal cancer, reporting a positive prognostic effect with its use in patients with established disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticancer effect of aspirin use during preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Methods: Two hundred and forty-one patients with stage II–III rectal cancer and candidates for chemoradiation (CRT) were selected and assigned to two groups: group 1, patients taking aspirin at the time of diagnosis, and group 2, all others. Treatment and oncological outcomes were explored. Results: Aspirin use was associated with a higher rate of tumour downstaging (67.6% vs 43.6%, P=0.01), good pathological response (46% vs 19% P<0.001), and a slightly, although not significant, higher rate of complete pathological response (22% vs 13% P=0.196). Aspirin use was also associated with a better 5-year progression-free survival (86.6% vs 67.1% hazard rate (HR)=0.20; 95% CI=0.07–0.60) and overall survival (90.6% vs 73.2% HR=0.21; 95% CI=0.05–0.89). Although chance of local relapse was similar (HR=0.6; 95% CI=0.06–4.5), aspirin use was associated with a lower risk of developing metastasis (HR=0.30; 95% CI=0.10–0.86). Conclusions: Aspirin might have anticancer activity against rectal cancer during preoperative CRT. This finding could be clinically relevant and should be further investigated with randomised trials. PMID:26372700

  4. PHARMACOKINETICS OF A SINGLE DOSE OF METRONIDAZOLE AFTER RECTAL ADMINISTRATION IN CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS).

    PubMed

    Sander, Samantha J; Siegal-Willott, Jessica L; Ziegler, Jessie; Lee, Elizabeth; Tell, Lisa; Murray, Suzan

    2016-03-01

    Metronidazole is a nitroimidazole antibacterial and antiprotozoal drug with bacteriocidal activity against a broad range of anaerobic bacteria. It is a recognized treatment for elephants diagnosed with anaerobic bacterial infection or protozoal disease or exhibiting signs of colonic impaction, diarrhea, and colic. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of rectally administered metronidazole (15 mg/kg) in five adult female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Serum samples were collected from each animal for 96 hr after rectal administration of metronidazole. Serum concentrations of metronidazole and its primary metabolite, hydroxymetronidazole, were measured via ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Data were analyzed via a noncompartmental pharmacokinetic approach. Results indicated that serum levels of metronidazole were quantifiable at the 0.25 hr time point and absent in all elephants by the 96 hr time point. The serum peak concentration (mean ± SD, 13.15 ± 2.59 μg/ml) and area under the curve from time 0 to infinity (mean ± SD, 108.79 ± 24.77 hr × μg/ml) were higher than that reported in domestic horses after similar usage. Concurrently, the time of maximum serum concentration (mean ± SD, 1.2 ± 0.45 hr) and terminal elimination half-life (harmonic mean ± pseudo-SD, 7.85 ± 0.93 hr) were longer when compared to equine reports. Rectal administration of metronidazole was well tolerated and rapidly absorbed in all study elephants. Based on the findings in this study, metronidazole administered at a single dose of 15 mg/kg per rectum in the Asian elephant is likely to result in serum concentrations above 4 μg/ml for 8 hr and above 2 μg/ml for 24 hr after treatment is administered. Dosing recommendations should reflect the mean inhibitory concentration of metronidazole for each pathogen.

  5. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kotti, Angeliki Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  6. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Jo; Boland, Patrick J.; Meredith, Dennis S.; Lis, Eric; Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji; Yamada, Yoshiya J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  7. Fortune of temporary ileostomies in patients treated with laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haksal, Mustafa; Okkabaz, Nuri; Atici, Ali Emre; Civil, Osman; Ozdenkaya, Yasar; Erdemir, Ayhan; Aksakal, Nihat

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to analyze the risk factors for the failure of ileostomy reversal after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Methods All patients who underwent a laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer with a diverting ileostomy between 2007 and 2014 were abstracted. The patients who underwent and did not undergo a diverting ileostomy procedure were compared regarding patient, tumor, treatment related parameters, and survival. Results Among 160 (103 males [64.4%], mean [± standard deviation] age was 58.1 ± 11.9 years) patients, stoma reversal was achieved in 136 cases (85%). Anastomotic stricture (n = 13, 52.4%) was the most common reason for stoma reversal. These were the risk factors for the failure of stoma reversal: Male sex (P = 0.035), having complications (P = 0.01), particularly an anastomotic leak (P < 0.001), or surgical site infection (P = 0.019) especially evisceration (P = 0.011), requirement for reoperation (P = 0.003) and longer hospital stay (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis revealed that male sex (odds ratio [OR], 7.82; P = 0.022) and additional organ resection (OR, 6.71; P = 0.027) were the risk factors. Five-year survival rates were similar (P = 0.143). Conclusion Fifteen percent of patients cannot receive a stoma reversal after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Anastomotic stricture is the most common reason for the failure of stoma takedown. Having complications, particularly an anastomotic leak and the necessity of reoperation, limits the stoma closure rate. Male sex and additional organ resection are the risk factors for the failure in multivariate analyses. These patients require a longer hospitalization period, but have similar survival rates as those who receive stoma closure procedure. PMID:28090504

  8. Ileal lesions in patients with ulcerative colitis after ileo-rectal anastomosis: Relationship with colonic metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Calabrese, Emma; Palmieri, Giampiero; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Onali, Sara; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo; Cossignani, Marta; Condino, Giovanna; Das, Kiron Moy; Pallone, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis (IRA), ileal lesions may develop in the neo-terminal-ileum and their possible relation with phenotypic changes towards colonic epithelium. METHODS: A total of 19 patients with IRA under regular follow up were enrolled, including 11 UC and 8 controls (6 Crohn’s disease, CD; 1 familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP; 1 colon cancer, colon K). Ileal lesions were identified by ileoscopy with biopsies taken from the ileum (involved and uninvolved) and from the rectal stump. Staining included HE and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against colonic epithelial protein CEP (Das-1) and human tropomyosin isoform 5, hTM5 (CG3). Possible relation between development of colonic metaplasia and ileal lesions was investigated. RESULTS: Stenosing adenocarcinoma of the rectal stump was detected in 1 UC patient. The neo-terminal ileum was therefore investigated in 10/11 UC patients. Ileal ulcers were detected in 7/10 UC, associated with colonic metaplasia in 4/7 (57.1%) and Das-1 and CG3 reactivity in 3/4 UC. In controls, recurrence occurred in 4/6 CD, associated with colonic metaplasia in 3/4 and reactivity with Das-1 and CG3 in 2/3. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that in UC, ileal lesions associated with changes towards colonic epithelium may develop also after IRA. Changes of the ileal content after colectomy may contribute to the development of colonic metaplasia, leading to ileal lesions both in the pouch and in the neo-terminal ileum after IRA. PMID:18785281

  9. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  10. Comparison of non-Gaussian and Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer at 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangwen; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wen, Didi; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Xiaocheng; Ma, Wanling; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Mian; Wu, Guosheng; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Water molecular diffusion in vivo tissue is much more complicated. We aimed to compare non-Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM), stretched-exponential model (SEM) and Gaussian diffusion model at 3.0 T MRI in patients with rectal cancer, and to determine the optimal model for investigating the water diffusion properties and characterization of rectal carcinoma. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with 16 b-values at a 3.0 T MRI system. DWI signals were fitted to the mono-exponential and non-Gaussian diffusion models (IVIM-mono, IVIM-bi and SEM) on primary tumor and adjacent normal rectal tissue. Parameters of standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow- and fast-ADC, fraction of fast ADC (f), α value and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were generated and compared between the tumor and normal tissues. The SEM exhibited the best fitting results of actual DWI signal in rectal cancer and the normal rectal wall (R2 = 0.998, 0.999 respectively). The DDC achieved relatively high area under the curve (AUC = 0.980) in differentiating tumor from normal rectal wall. Non-Gaussian diffusion models could assess tissue properties more accurately than the ADC derived Gaussian diffusion model. SEM may be used as a potential optimal model for characterization of rectal cancer. PMID:27934928

  11. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.W. Nathan; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Straka, Christopher; Christie, Alana; Lotan, Yair; Pistenmaa, David; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Nanda, Akash; Kueplian, Patrick; Brindle, Jeffrey; Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida; Raben, David; Xie, Xian-Jin; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  12. ‘I–We’ boundary fluctuations in couple adjustment to rectal cancer and life with a permanent colostomy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Molly; Fergus, Karen; Miller, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates couples’ adjustment to rectal cancer and a colostomy using the ‘Classification System of Couple Adjustment to Cancer’, a framework delineating fluctuations in couples’ sense of ‘I’ and ‘We’ in response to cancer. Nine couples affected by rectal cancer and adjusting to life with a colostomy were interviewed. A theoretical thematic analysis of the transcripts was conducted; nearly all ‘I–We’ shifts of the Classification System of Couple Adjustment to Cancer were observed – often in unique ways in response to rectal cancer–specific challenges – and one new shift was described. The results provide a novel and experientially grounded means of conceptualizing complex dyadic coping processes. PMID:28070388

  13. Comparison of noncontact infrared thermometry and 3 commercial subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Brunell, Marla K

    2012-07-01

    This study compared a noncontact infrared laser thermometer and 3 different brands of subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in 50 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The data were analyzed by using intraclass correlation coefficients and limits of agreement. In addition, the technical capabilities and practicality of the thermometers in the clinical setting were reviewed. None of the alternative techniques investigated was equivalent to rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques. Temperatures obtained by using microchips had higher correlation and agreed more closely with rectal temperatures than did those obtained by the noncontact infrared method. However, transponding microchips did not yield consistent results. Due to difficulty in positioning nonsedated macaques in their homecage, subcutaneous microchips were not practical in the clinical setting. Furthermore, pair-housed macaques may be able to break or remove microchips from their cagemates.

  14. Pancreatic Metastasis from Rectal Cancer that was Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasonography-guided Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA)

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Itsuki; Katanuma, Akio; Yane, Kei; Kin, Toshifumi; Nagai, Kazumasa; Yamazaki, Hajime; Koga, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Koh; Yokoyama, Kensuke; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Omori, Yuko; Shinohara, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and there have been only a few reports of its preoperative diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with immunohistochemical staining. We herein describe the case of a 77-year-old woman in whom a solitary mass in the pancreatic tail was detected 11 years after rectal cancer resection. The patient also had a history of pulmonary tumor resection. We performed EUS-FNA and a histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma with CD20+, CD7-, and CDX2+ (similar to her rectal cancer). EUS-FNA enabled a histopathological examination, including immunohistochemical staining, which helped to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic and pulmonary metastasis from rectal cancer. PMID:28154274

  15. The Prognostic Impact of Protein Expression of E-Cadherin-Catenin Complexes Differs between Rectal and Colon Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aamodt, Rolf; Bondi, Johan; Andersen, Solveig Norheim; Bakka, Arne; Bukholm, Geir; Bukholm, Ida R K

    2010-01-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin complex provides cell-cell adhesion. In order for a carcinoma to metastasize, cancer cells must let go of their hold of neighboring cells in the primary tumor. The presence of components of the E-cadherin-catenin complex in 246 rectal adenocarcinomas was examined by immunohistochemistry and compared to their presence in 219 colon carcinomas. The expression data were correlated to clinical information from the patients' records. There were statistically significant differences in protein expression between the rectal and the colon carcinomas regarding membranous beta-catenin, gamma-catenin, p120-catenin, and E-cadherin, as well as nuclear beta-catenin. In the rectal carcinomas, there was a significant inverse association between the expression of p120-catenin in cell membranes of the primary tumors and the occurrence of local recurrence, while membranous protein expression of beta-catenin was inversely related to distant metastases.

  16. Laparoscopic-assisted one-stage resection of rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastasis utilizing a pfannenstiel incision.

    PubMed

    Aljiffry, Murad; Alrajraji, Mawaddah; Al-Sabah, Salman; Hassanain, Mazen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic approaches have been increasingly used in selected patients with either colorectal or liver cancer. However, simultaneous resection of colorectal carcinoma with synchronous liver metastases is still a subject of debate. The present case describes combined laparoscopic rectal and liver resections for a patient with primary rectal cancer and a synchronous liver metastasis utilizing a Pfannenstiel incision for specimen extraction. The operative time was 370 min and estimated blood loss was 400 mL. Postoperatively, the patient required parenteral analgesia for 48 h, resumed normal diet on day 3 and was discharged on day 7 after the operation. A laparoscopic approach utilizing a Pfannenstiel extraction incision may present an advantageous and attractive option for simultaneous laparoscopic rectal and liver resection in selected patients with the aim of improving short-term outcomes.

  17. [A case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lymph node and liver metastasis 5 years after curative resection].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Yoshitaro; Hazama, Shoichi; Maeda, Yoshinari; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Tamesa, Takao; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kawano, Hiroo; Oka, Masaaki

    2013-11-01

    A 65-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (10 mm in diameter) in July 2007. We performed low anterior resection with lymph node dissection. Histological depth of penetration of the rectal wall by the primary tumor was up to the submucosa, and lymph node metastasis was observed at station 251 (Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma, seventh Edition). Five years later, abdominal enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple liver tumors and swelling of the right obturator lymph nodes. During surgery, ultrasonography revealed 10 hypoechoic masses in both hepatic lobes. We performed right pelvic lymph node dissection, partial hepatectomy (S5/6, S7, and S8), and microwave coagulation therapy. After surgery, the patient was treated with octreotide long-acting repeatable( LAR). The patient remained disease-free for 10 months after surgery. Our findings suggest that careful monitoring is necessary for metachronous lymph node and liver metastasis during follow-up treatment for rectal carcinoid tumors.

  18. The development of metachronous prostate cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia in a patient with metastatic rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oztop, I; Yaren, A; Demirpence, M; Alacacioglu, I; Tuna, B; Piskin, O; Yilmaz, U

    2008-01-01

    We report herein an unusual case of metachronous triple cancers (rectum, prostate and Philadelphia(+) [Ph(+)] chronic myeloid leukemia [CML]). A metastatic rectal cancer was diagnosed in a 76-year-old male patient, who was treated with transanal tumor resection and chemotherapy. Thirty months from the initial rectal cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer was diagnosed and the patient was administered maximal androgen blockade and received palliative radiotherapy to the lumbar spine because of painful bone metastases. Thirty months after the diagnosis of rectal cancer and 12 months after the diagnosis of prostate cancer the patient developed Ph(+) CML and imatinib treatment was started. After one-year period in remission, CML evolved into accelerated phase and the patient died of intracranial hemorrhage.

  19. Absolute bioavailability of hydromorphone after peroral and rectal administration in humans: saliva/plasma ratio and clinical effects.

    PubMed

    Ritschel, W A; Parab, P V; Denson, D D; Coyle, D E; Gregg, R V

    1987-09-01

    The absolute bioavailability of hydromorphone was investigated in eight healthy male subjects by a cross-over design (with washout period of two weeks) after intravenous (2 mg), peroral (4 mg) and rectal (3 mg) administration of hydromorphone. The use of saliva hydromorphone concentrations as a noninvasive technique in pharmacokinetic evaluation was investigated, and the clinical effects after the three routes of administration were determined. Hydromorphone has an absolute bioavailability of 51.35 +/- 29.29% and 36.33 +/- 29.60% after peroral and rectal administration, respectively. More side effects were observed after intravenous administration of hydromorphone than after rectal or peroral dosing. The saliva sampling for the hydromorphone concentration was found to be a useful noninvasive technique for the estimation of the elimination half-life of hydromorphone.

  20. Assessment of pharmacokinetics and tolerability of intranasal diazepam relative to rectal gel in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Henney, Herbert R; Sperling, Michael R; Rabinowicz, Adrian L; Bream, Gary; Carrazana, Enrique J

    2014-09-01

    Diazepam rectal gel (RG) is currently the only approved rescue therapy for outpatient management of seizure clusters in the United States. There is an unmet medical need for an alternative rescue therapy for seizure clusters that is effective, and more convenient to administer with a socially acceptable method of delivery. An intranasal diazepam formulation has been developed, and this study evaluates the tolerability and bioavailability of diazepam nasal spray (NS) relative to an equivalent dose of diazepam-RG in healthy adults. Twenty-four healthy adults were enrolled in a phase 1, open-label, 3-period crossover study. Plasma diazepam and metabolite concentrations were measured by serial sampling. Dose proportionality for 5- and 20-mg intranasal doses and the bioavailability of 20mg diazepam-NS relative to 20mg diazepam-RG were assessed by maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and systemic exposure parameters (AUC0-∞ and AUC0-24). The mean Cmax values for 20mg diazepam-NS and 20mg diazepam-RG were 378 ± 106 and 328 ± 152 ng/mL, achieved at 1.0 and 1.5h, respectively. Subjects administered intranasal and rectal gel formulations experienced nasal and rectal leakage, respectively. Diazepam absorption following intranasal administration was consistent but 3 subjects with diazepam-RG had low plasma drug levels at the earliest assessment of 5 min, due to poor retention, and were excluded from analysis. Excluding them, the treatment ratios (20mg diazepam-NS:20mg diazepam-RG) and 90% confidence intervals for diazepam Cmax and AUC0-24 were 0.98 (0.85-1.14) and 0.89 (0.80-0.98), respectively, suggesting that the bioavailability was comparable between the two formulations. Dose proportionality was observed between the lowest and highest dose-strengths of intranasal formulation. Both intranasal and rectal treatments were well tolerated with mild to moderate adverse events. Results suggest that a single-dose of 20mg diazepam-NS is tolerable and comparable in bioavailability