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Sample records for rectal ulcer syndrome

  1. A rare cause of severe rectal bleeding: solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urganc, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Usta, Merve; Eken, Kamile Gulcin

    2014-10-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder in children which often goes unrecognized or easily misdiagnosed with other common diseases. It usually presents with rectal bleeding, constipation, mucous discharge, prolonged straining, tenesmus, and lower abdominal pain. The rectal bleeding varies from a little fresh blood to severe hemorrhage that requires blood transfusion. We report herein a pediatric case of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome who admitted to pediatric emergency department with severe rectal bleeding for reminding this rare syndrome.

  2. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: exploring possible management options.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Turker; Canbay, Emel; Yamaner, Sumer; Gulluoglu, Mine; Bugra, Dursun

    2011-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare condition with various causes that results in ischemic injury. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical findings, diagnosis, and outcomes of treatment in patients with SRUS. Between 1992 and 2006, a retrospective review was undertaken for all patients diagnosed with SRUS. Fifty-eight patients were diagnosed with SRUS. Among patients with paradoxic rectal spasm (PRS), lesions disappeared in 1 of 3 given applied biofeedback treatment, and in 2 of 4 injected with Botulinum toxin (Botox). Twenty-three patients underwent appropriate surgical treatment. Overall, postoperative improvement was seen in 18 patients (78.2%). In conclusion, every patient with SRUS must be assessed for causative disease. Treatment should include conservative approaches such as Botox injection; in patients with pelvic floor disorders, surgical treatment should be considered.

  3. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome in children: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Haghighat, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a benign and chronic disorder well known in young adults and less in children. It is often related to prolonged excessive straining or abnormal defecation and clinically presents as rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, feeling of incomplete defecation, and rarely rectal prolapse. SRUS is diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and endoscopic and histological findings. The current treatments are suboptimal, and despite correct diagnosis, outcomes can be unsatisfactory. Some treatment protocols for SRUS include conservative management such as family reassurance, regulation of toilet habits, avoidance of straining, encouragement of a high-fiber diet, topical treatments with salicylate, sulfasalazine, steroids and sucralfate, and surgery. In children, SRUS is relatively uncommon but troublesome and easily misdiagnosed with other common diseases, however, it is being reported more than in the past. This condition in children is benign; however, morbidity is an important problem as reflected by persistence of symptoms, especially rectal bleeding. In this review, we discuss current diagnosis and treatment for SRUS. PMID:23236227

  4. Gastric heterotopia of rectum in a child: a mimicker of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; Lone, Khurram; Al-Sofyani, Medhat; El Bagir, Asim

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is an uncommon presentation in pediatric patients. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is a rare cause of rectal bleeding. Here, we report a 3-year-old child with a bleeding rectal ulcer that was initially diagnosed and managed as a solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. After 1 month, the patient persisted to have intermittent rectal bleed and severe anal pain. Repeat colonoscopy showed the worsening of the rectal ulcer in size. Pediatric surgeon excised the ulcer, and histopathological examination revealed a gastric fundic-type mucosa consistent with the diagnosis of gastric heterotopia of the rectum. Over the following 18 months, our patient had experienced no rectal bleeding and remained entirely asymptomatic. In conclusion, heterotopic gastric mucosa of the rectum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a bleeding rectal ulcer.

  5. Solitary rectal ulcer: the place of biofeedback and surgery in the treatment of the syndrome.

    PubMed

    Binnie, N R; Papachrysostomou, M; Clare, N; Smith, A N

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome were studied, the majority of whom presented with fresh blood per rectum and a rectal ulcer, mucorrhoea, or a varying degree of rectal prolapse. Fourteen patients were treated conservatively or with surgery and had a high rate of recurrence of the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. Seventeen patients were treated with biofeedback for the associated obstructed defecation (anismus) either before or immediately after surgery with a lower recurrence rate. The final symptomatic cure rate was similar in both groups but 15 episodes of recurrence requiring further surgery were encountered in the non-biofeedback group compared to 4 recurrences in the biofeedback group.

  6. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  7. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  8. Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome in Children: A Report of Six Cases

    PubMed Central

    Urgancı, Nafiye; Eken, Kamile Gulcin

    2013-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare, benign disorder in children that usually presents with rectal bleeding, constipation, mucous discharge, prolonged straining, tenesmus, lower abdominal pain, and localized pain in the perineal area. The underlying etiology is not well understood, but it is secondary to ischemic changes and trauma in the rectum associated with paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor and the external anal sphincter muscles; rectal prolapse has also been implicated in the pathogenesis. This syndrome is diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and endoscopic and histological findings, but SRUS often goes unrecognized or is easily confused with other diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, amoebiasis, malignancy, and other causes of rectal bleeding such as a juvenile polyps. SRUS should be suspected in patients experiencing rectal discharge of blood and mucus in addition to previous disorders of evacuation. We herein report six pediatric cases with SRUS. PMID:24312719

  9. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-21

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS.

  10. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS. PMID:24574747

  11. The role of autofluorescence colonoscopy in diagnosis and management of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latos, W.; Kawczyk-Krupka, A.; Ledwon, A.; Kosciarz-Grzesiok, A.; Misiak, A.; Sieron-Stoltny, K.; Sieron, A.

    2008-02-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a chronic disease of the rectum. Although SRUS is a benign condition there are studies which suggest that chronic ischaemia which occurs in the SRUS may lead to "transitional mucosa" that is similar to that adjacent to colorectal carcinomas and adenomas and may lead to colorectal dysplasia and carcinoma development. The exclusion of primary or metastatic malignancy is the most important aim in the differential diagnosis of SRUS. In our study we assess the possibilities of autofluorescence colonoscopy (AFC) in diagnosis and management of SRUS. We performed white light colonoscopy first. The tissue samples were taken for pathological examination. When SRUS was histopathologically confirmed AFC was performed by means of Xillix OncoLIFE. During AFC numerical colour value (NCV) of autofluorescence of SRUS lesions was noted. During 1946 colonoscopies eight persons were diagnosed as having solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. We did not observe autofluorescence increase in case of polipoid and flat ulcer lesions (NCV 0,39-0,67; mean 0,525) and little increase of autofluorescence in case of erythema lesion (NCV- 0,94). SRUS is a rare disorder of the rectum but it causes differential diagnosis problems. The most common reason for incorrect diagnosis are inadequate tissue specimens. AFC allows to reveal subtle areas within the lesions of more intense autofluorescence and localizes the potential cancer-transformating dysplasia. In this way the most representative area with highest risk of pre- or cancerous changes, for biopsy specimen is indicated.

  12. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome in a patient with anorexia nervosa: A case report.

    PubMed

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Benini, Luigi; Sgarbi, Daniela; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    This case report describes the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of a 26-year-old patient with anorexia nervosa (AN) diagnosed with Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS). To our knowledge, this is the first case report to document SRUS in AN, whose pathogenesis in this case seems to have been determined by the patient's malnourished and underweight state. Furthermore, SRUS symptoms appear to have interacted with the eating disorder psychopathology, increasing the need to exert control over eating. Cognitive behavioral strategies and procedures were accordingly used to address the eating disorder psychopathology and to promote complete weight restoration, which brought about a significant reduction in the size of the ulcer and the complete resolution of SRUS symptoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:731-735).

  13. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Is it really a rare condition in children?

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Bahmanyar, Maryam; Geramizadeh, Bita; Alizadeh, Anahita; Haghighat, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of the children with solitary rectal ulcer. METHODS Fifty-five children with a confirmed diagnosis of solitary rectal ulcer were studied in a period of 11 years from March 2003 to March 2014. All data were collected from the patients, their parents and medical records in the hospital. RESULTS From 55 studied patients, 41 were male (74.5%) and 14 female (25.5%). The mean age of the patients was 10.4 ± 3.7 years and the average time period from the beginning of symptoms to diagnosis of solitary rectal ulcer was 15.5 ± 11.2 mo. The most common clinical symptoms in our patients were rectal bleeding (n = 54, 98.2%) and straining during defecation or forceful defecation (n = 50, 90.9%). Other symptoms were as follows respectively: Sense of incomplete evacuation (n = 34, 61.8%), mucorrhea (n = 29, 52.7%), constipation (n = 14, 25.4%), tenesmus and cramping (n = 10, 18.2%), diarrhea (n = 9, 16.4%), and rectal pain (n = 5, 9.1%). The colonoscopic examination revealed 67.3% ulcer, 12.7% polypoid lesions, 10.9% erythema, 7.3% both polypoid lesions and ulcer, and 1.8% normal. Most of the lesions were in the rectosigmoid area at a distance of 4-6 cm from the anal margin. Finally, 69.8% of the patients recovered successfully with conservative, medical and surgical management. CONCLUSION The study revealed that solitary rectal ulcer is not so uncommon despite what was seen in previous studies. As the most common symptom was rectal bleeding, clinicians and pathologists should be familiar with this disorder and common symptoms in order to prevent its complications with early diagnosis. PMID:27610352

  14. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Is it really a rare condition in children?

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Bahmanyar, Maryam; Geramizadeh, Bita; Alizadeh, Anahita; Haghighat, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of the children with solitary rectal ulcer. METHODS Fifty-five children with a confirmed diagnosis of solitary rectal ulcer were studied in a period of 11 years from March 2003 to March 2014. All data were collected from the patients, their parents and medical records in the hospital. RESULTS From 55 studied patients, 41 were male (74.5%) and 14 female (25.5%). The mean age of the patients was 10.4 ± 3.7 years and the average time period from the beginning of symptoms to diagnosis of solitary rectal ulcer was 15.5 ± 11.2 mo. The most common clinical symptoms in our patients were rectal bleeding (n = 54, 98.2%) and straining during defecation or forceful defecation (n = 50, 90.9%). Other symptoms were as follows respectively: Sense of incomplete evacuation (n = 34, 61.8%), mucorrhea (n = 29, 52.7%), constipation (n = 14, 25.4%), tenesmus and cramping (n = 10, 18.2%), diarrhea (n = 9, 16.4%), and rectal pain (n = 5, 9.1%). The colonoscopic examination revealed 67.3% ulcer, 12.7% polypoid lesions, 10.9% erythema, 7.3% both polypoid lesions and ulcer, and 1.8% normal. Most of the lesions were in the rectosigmoid area at a distance of 4-6 cm from the anal margin. Finally, 69.8% of the patients recovered successfully with conservative, medical and surgical management. CONCLUSION The study revealed that solitary rectal ulcer is not so uncommon despite what was seen in previous studies. As the most common symptom was rectal bleeding, clinicians and pathologists should be familiar with this disorder and common symptoms in order to prevent its complications with early diagnosis.

  15. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  16. Fecal Evacuation Disorder Among Patients With Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome: A Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Atul; Misra, Asha; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Data on frequency of fecal evacuation disorder (FED) among patients with solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS), hitherto an enigmatic condition, are scanty. Moreover, most such studies had limitations due to small sample size and lack of inclusion of healthy controls (HC). Methods Forty patients with SRUS underwent symptom assessments, sigmoidoscopy, anorectal manometry, defecography, balloon expulsion test (BET); endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) of anal sphincter complex was performed in a subgroup. Physiological tests (anorectal manometry and BET) were also performed in 19 HC. Results Patients with SRUS (26/40 male, age 37 [18–80] years) more often had FED than HC (10/19 male, age 43 [25–72] years) as shown by weight needed to expel the balloon (300 [0–700] g vs. 100 [0–400] g; P = 0.006), a trend towards abnormal BET (need of > 200 g weight for expulsion) (21/40 [53%] vs. 5/19 [26%], P = 0.058) and impaired anal relaxation (14/40 [35%] vs 2/19 [10.5%]; P = 0.048). Using Rome III criteria, most patients with SRUS reported having chronic constipation (36/40 [90%]) in spite of having normal (Bristol stool type IV, 21/40 [53%]) and diarrheal (types V, VI, VII, 6/40 [20%]) stool forms (Asian classification). SRUS patients more often (17/40 [43%]) had functional defecation disorder (Rome III criteria). Patients with SRUS with abnormal BET had thicker internal anal sphincter than those without (3.9 [3.4–7.0] mm vs 2.8 [2.0–4.0] mm; P = 0.01). Conclusions FED was commoner among patients with SRUS as evidenced by abnormal BET and sphincter relaxation. Those with abnormal BET had thicker internal sphincter on EUS than those without. PMID:25273123

  17. Novel combined approach in the management of non-healing solitary rectal ulcer syndrome - laparoscopic resection rectopexy and transanal endoscopic microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Ihnat, Petr; Martinek, Lubomir; Vavra, Petr; Zonca, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon chronic disorder with a wide range of endoscopic findings, clinical presentations and characteristic histopathological features. There is no clear consensus regarding SRUS management, because of its poorly understood pathogenesis and frequent association with various pelvic floor disorders. Laparoscopic resection rectopexy and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) were used for the treatment of non-healing SRUS. The present paper reports a case of non-healing SRUS due to obstructive defecation syndrome based on combined pelvic floor disorders (rectocele, enterocele, internal rectal prolapse and dolichosigma) successfully managed by a novel combined mini-invasive approach which has never been previously reported in the literature (laparoscopic resection rectopexy and TEM). The new minimally invasive concept seems to be safe and feasible - laparoscopic resection rectopexy results in effective correction of the obstructive defecation syndrome, while TEM allows comfortable access for radical resection of a rectal ulcer.

  18. Novel combined approach in the management of non-healing solitary rectal ulcer syndrome – laparoscopic resection rectopexy and transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Martinek, Lubomir; Vavra, Petr; Zonca, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon chronic disorder with a wide range of endoscopic findings, clinical presentations and characteristic histopathological features. There is no clear consensus regarding SRUS management, because of its poorly understood pathogenesis and frequent association with various pelvic floor disorders. Laparoscopic resection rectopexy and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) were used for the treatment of non-healing SRUS. The present paper reports a case of non-healing SRUS due to obstructive defecation syndrome based on combined pelvic floor disorders (rectocele, enterocele, internal rectal prolapse and dolichosigma) successfully managed by a novel combined mini-invasive approach which has never been previously reported in the literature (laparoscopic resection rectopexy and TEM). The new minimally invasive concept seems to be safe and feasible – laparoscopic resection rectopexy results in effective correction of the obstructive defecation syndrome, while TEM allows comfortable access for radical resection of a rectal ulcer. PMID:26240632

  19. [Solitary ulcer of the rectum: a report of a clinical case associated with rectal prolapse].

    PubMed

    Stolfi, V M; Bacaro, D; Rossi, P; Forlini, A; Quintigliano, D; Prisco, L; Gentileschi, E; Gentileschi, P

    1991-01-01

    Solitary ulcer of the rectum is an unusual condition occurring more often in young adults. Unfortunately the term is rather confusing, since the lesion may not necessarily be solitary, nor be confined to the rectum; moreover, it may be polypoid rather than ulcerating. The etiology is uncertain, but chronic constipation and fecal impaction could play a role. Today most authors believe solitary ulcer syndrome is a distinct clinical inflammatory manifestation associated with rectal prolapse. Surgical treatment of the prolapse is usually followed by a recovery of the solitary rectal ulcer. PMID:1836345

  20. Rectal ulcer with an elusive diagnosis: all that ulcers is not Crohn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single rectal ulcer is an uncommon finding in children with gastrointestinal disease. Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is foremost among the differential diagnoses, a primary immunological defect should not be forgotten. Because of the paucity of literature on the association of rectal ul...

  1. A case of rectal Dieulafoy's ulcer and successful endoscopic sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, J; Taniai, K; Kojima, K; Kenmotsu, M; Takai, K; Okabe, T; Tanaka, N

    2000-12-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented a massive hematochezia 7 days after sigmoidectomy. Repeated colonoscopy and angiography failed to locate the site of bleeding and Hartman's operation was performed. Rebleeding from the rectum on the day of operation occurred and pulsate arterial bleeding with minimal surrounding ulcer 1 cm above the pectinate line was observed. Screlotherapy with ethanol and electro coagulation was successfully performed to achieve permanent hemostasis. The importance of detailed rectal examination and an awareness of this clinical entity in life-threatening lower intestinal bleeding is discussed. PMID:11132922

  2. A case of rectal Dieulafoy's ulcer and successful endoscopic sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, J; Taniai, K; Kojima, K; Kenmotsu, M; Takai, K; Okabe, T; Tanaka, N

    2000-12-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented a massive hematochezia 7 days after sigmoidectomy. Repeated colonoscopy and angiography failed to locate the site of bleeding and Hartman's operation was performed. Rebleeding from the rectum on the day of operation occurred and pulsate arterial bleeding with minimal surrounding ulcer 1 cm above the pectinate line was observed. Screlotherapy with ethanol and electro coagulation was successfully performed to achieve permanent hemostasis. The importance of detailed rectal examination and an awareness of this clinical entity in life-threatening lower intestinal bleeding is discussed.

  3. Rectal corticosteroids versus alternative treatments in ulcerative colitis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J K; Irvine, E J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clear strategies to optimise the use of corticosteroids in ulcerative colitis are lacking. AIM: A meta-analysis was undertaken to examine critically the role of rectal corticosteroids in the management of active distal ulcerative colitis. METHODS: All reported randomised controlled trials were retrieved by searching the Medline and EMBASE databases and the bibliographies of relevant studies. Trials which met inclusion criteria were assessed for scientific rigour. Data were extracted by two independent observers according to predetermined criteria. RESULTS: Of 83 trials retrieved, 33 met inclusion criteria. Pooled odds ratios (POR) showed conventional rectal corticosteroids and rectal budesonide to be clearly superior to placebo. In seven trials, rectal 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) was significantly better than conventional rectal corticosteroids for inducing remission of symptoms, endoscopy, and histology with POR of 2.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.72-3.41), 1.89 (95% CI 1.29-2.76), and 2.03 (95% CI 1.28-3.20), respectively. Rectal budesonide was of comparable efficacy to conventional corticosteroids but produced less endogenous cortisol suppression. Side effects, although inconsistently reported, were generally minor. A cost comparison of rectal preparations showed 5-ASA to be less expensive than corticosteroids. CONCLUSIONS: Rectal 5-ASA is superior to rectal corticosteroids in the management of distal ulcerative colitis. PMID:9245932

  4. Hemorrhagic rectal ulcer caused by a deformity of the coccyx complicated by normal delivery.

    PubMed

    Kaneki, Toshimichi; Koyama, Shigeru; Wada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Yoshiaki; Mori, Hiromitsu; Kuraishi, Akira; Fujisawa, Toru; Kawashima, Akira; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Kubo, Keishi

    2003-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman delivered her first-born child weighing 3400 g by full-term normal delivery. Bloody stool developed 3 days after delivery. Colonoscopic examination revealed two linear ulcers parallel to the anal column on the posterior side of the rectal ampulla about 5 cm from the anal ring. Coagulated blood was detected at the ulcer bottom, suggesting the site of hemorrhage. Bowel rest in the absence of oral intake resulted in the disappearance of bloody stool. Three days later colonoscopic examination revealed improvement in the ulcer. There was no sign of constipation. A lateral pelvic radiograph showed that the apex of the coccyx was flexed anteriorly. The parturient canal may have physically pressed the rectum against the apex of the coccyx during delivery, causing mucosal injury. Only a few studies have reported the complication of a rectal ulcer due to injury during delivery. Furthermore, none of the previous studies has reported a rectal ulcer caused by deformity of the coccyx.

  5. Chronic leg ulcers in Werner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeong, E K; Yang, C C

    2004-01-01

    We report two siblings suffered from Werner's syndrome, which is a rare premature aging disorder caused by genetic mutations. They developed premature aging during adolescence with loss and graying of hair, short stature, baldness, atrophic skin, thin extremities, flat feet, 'bird' face and cataracts. Multiple chronic ulcers were noted over the feet in both patients. Healing was prolonged because of atrophic subcutaneous tissue, poor perfusion, impaired fibroblast activity and the loss of normal foot architecture. Treatment of the ulcers was challenging, as flap options were limited over the lower third of the leg and skin grafting was not easy as there was a lack of healthy granulations. However, we have successfully closed the ulcers with Integra artificial skin and ultra-thin split thickness skin grafting with the scalp as donor site. The main purpose of this paper is to alert physicians to this syndrome when treatments are being planned for patients with chronic leg ulcers.

  6. Leg ulcers: a new symptom of Blau syndrome?

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Veerle; Hofman, Sarah; Dahan, Karin; Beele, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, typically defined by granulomatous polyarthritis, uveitis and skin eruption. Biopsy specimens demonstrate non-caseating granulomas in all lesions. We present a case of Blau syndrome associated with large recalcitrant leg ulcers. Biopsies taken in the leg ulcers of our patient systematically showed granulomas. Although leg ulcers have not previously been described as a part of Blau syndrome, we assume that the ulcerations in this case form part of Blau syndrome.

  7. Rectal ulcer: Due to ketoprofen, argon plasma coagulation and prostatic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Thibaud; Servois, Vincent; Mariani, Pascale; Aubert, Emilie; Cacheux, Wulfran

    2014-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent seed implants is a recent and safe radiation therapy technique associated with radiation-induced digestive disease. Argon plasma coagulation procedure is a validated modality in the management of haemorrhagic radiation proctitis, which is known to occasionally induce chronic rectal ulcers. We report here an original case report of an acute painful rectal ulcer as a consequence of the combination of short-term therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy, prostatic brachytherapy with malposition of seed implants and argon plasma coagulation procedure in a patient with haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. The description of this clinical observation is essential to recommend the discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy and the control of the position of seed implants in case of prostatic brachytherapy before argon plasma coagulation for radiation-induced proctitis.

  8. Rectal budesonide and mesalamine formulations in active ulcerative proctosigmoiditis: efficacy, tolerance, and treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Christophi, George P; Rengarajan, Arvind; Ciorba, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an immune-mediated disease of the colon that is characterized by diffuse and continuous inflammation contiguous from the rectum. Half of UC patients have inflammation limited to the distal colon (proctitis or proctosigmoiditis) that primarily causes symptoms of bloody diarrhea and urgency. Mild-to-moderate distal UC can be effectively treated with topical formulations (rectal suppositories, enemas, or foam) of mesalamine or steroids to reduce mucosal inflammation and alleviate symptoms. Enemas or foam formulations adequately reach up to the splenic flexure, have a minimal side-effect profile, and induce remission alone or in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Herein, we compare the efficacy, cost, patient tolerance, and side-effect profiles of steroid and mesalamine rectal formulations in distal UC. Patients with distal mild-to-moderate UC have a remission rate of approximately 75% (NNT =2) after treatment for 6 weeks with mesalamine enemas. Rectal budesonide foam induces remission in 41.2% of patients with mild-to-moderate active distal UC compared to 24% of patient treated with placebo (NNT =5). However, rectal budesonide has better patient tolerance profile compared to enema formulations. Despite its favorable efficacy, safety, and cost profiles, patients and physicians significantly underuse topical treatments for treating distal colitis. This necessitates improved patient education and physician familiarity regarding the indications, effectiveness, and potential financial and tolerability barriers in using rectal formulations. PMID:27274301

  9. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with synchronous rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min-Er; Niu, Bei-Zhan; Ji, Wu-Yang; Wu, Bin

    2016-06-14

    We report on a patient diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) with synchronous rectal cancer who was treated with laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). PJS is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and increased risks of gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal cancer. This report presents a patient with a 20-year history of intermittent bloody stool, mucocutaneous pigmentation and a family history of PJS, which together led to a diagnosis of PJS. Moreover, colonoscopy and biopsy revealed the presence of multiple serried giant pedunculated polyps and rectal adenocarcinoma. Currently, few options exist for the therapeutic management of PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. For this case, we adopted an unconventional surgical strategy and ultimately performed laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA. This procedure is widely considered to be the first-line treatment option for patients with ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. However, there are no previous reports of treating PJS patients with laparoscopic IPAA. Since the operation, the patient has experienced no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and has demonstrated satisfactory bowel control. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. PMID:27298573

  10. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  11. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Maja; Füglistaler, Ida; Zettel, Andreas; Fox, Mark; Manz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a benign disease that is often misdiagnosed. It is characterized by a combination of symptoms, endoscopic findings and histology. Patients present with constipation, rectal bleeding, mucous discharge, pain and a sensation of incomplete defecation. There are many different manifestations of this disease, with or without rectal prolapse. We report an unusual presentation of SRUS as a circular stenosis in a middle-aged male.

  12. Intussusception of the rectum and the solitary ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ihre, T

    1990-12-01

    A general review is given of the intussusception of the rectum, the paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor syndrome and of the solitary ulcer syndrome. The latter is in most cases a symptom of the other two as is the descending perineum syndrome. The conditions are diagnosed by defecography, proctosigmoidoscopy and EMG. The etiologies are unknown. The treatment is either conservative or operative.

  13. Development of a rectal nicotine delivery system for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Dash, A K; Gong, Z; Miller, D W; Huai-Yan, H; Laforet, J

    1999-11-10

    The aims of this investigation were: i. to develop a rectal nicotine delivery system with bioadhesives for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and ii. to evaluate nicotine transport and cytotoxicity of the delivery system using Caco-2 cell culture systems. Rectal nicotine suppository formulations were prepared in semi-synthetic glyceride bases (Suppocire AM and AI, Gattefosse Inc.) by fusion method. The in vitro release of nicotine was carried out in modified USP dissolution apparatus 1. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction were used to study the polymorphic changes if any in the formulations. An LC method was used for the assay of nicotine. The effect of bioadhesives (glyceryl monooleate (GMO), and Carbopol) on the nicotine flux was evaluated using Caco-2 cell permeability studies and Caco-2 cell viability was determined using the MTT toxicity assay. In vitro release studies indicated that the low melting AI base was superior to that of the AM base. Presence of GMO in the formulation enhanced the release of nicotine whereas Carbopol showed an opposite effect. The enhanced release of nicotine in the presence of GMO was found to be partly due to the melting point lowering effect of this compound. Caco-2 cell absorption studies showed that there was a decrease in the flux of nicotine in the presence of both the bioadhesives. The flux of the fluorescein marker which is used to study the integrity of the cell monolayers was found to be slightly higher only in the presence of 10% (w/w) Carbopol. Nicotine, Carbopol, and GMO do not have any cytotoxic effect on these cell monolayers within the concentration range used in the formulations. Rectal nicotine formulations containing bioadhesives were developed and characterized. Both in vitro release and cell culture studies have indicated that one can manipulate the nicotine release from these rectal delivery systems by incorporation of various bioadhesives or the use of different bases in the

  14. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  15. Bowel obsession syndrome in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Piero; Leandro, Gioacchino

    2007-01-01

    Gastroenterologists are often faced with the diagnostic problem of differentiating acute symptoms of ulcerative colitis from functional intestinal disorders. Bowel obsession syndrome (BOS) is an OCD-like, functional syndrome characterized by fear of fecal incontinence and compulsive behaviors of evacuation-checking. Only sparse case studies on treatment of BOS with antidepressants have been published. This is the first study on successful psychotherapy of a male patient with ulcerative colitis overlapping functional bowel symptoms and marked symptoms of BOS. Clinical recognition of BOS may help clinicians in differential diagnosis, prevent unnecessary investigations, and give patients the most appropriate treatment.

  16. [A Patient with Recurrent Ulcerative Colitis-Associated Rectal Cancer Attaining a Complete Response with FOLFIRI plus Bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Shibutani, Masatsune; Nagahara, Hisashi; Ikeya, Tetsuro; Tamura, Tatsuro; Ohira, Go; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-11-01

    A 60-year-old man underwent laparoscopic total proctocolectomy with ileostomy for advanced ulcerative colitis-associated rectal cancer. The final diagnosis was advanced cancer pT3, pN2 and M0 (pStage Ⅲb). Adjuvant therapy with XELOX was performed. However, abdominal CT revealed a liver metastasis and lymph node metastases in the pelvis 6 months after surgery. The patient was treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. After 20 courses of chemotherapy, the patient was considered to have experienced a clinical CR, which has been maintained for 3 years 5 months. PMID:26805312

  17. [A Patient with Recurrent Ulcerative Colitis-Associated Rectal Cancer Attaining a Complete Response with FOLFIRI plus Bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Shibutani, Masatsune; Nagahara, Hisashi; Ikeya, Tetsuro; Tamura, Tatsuro; Ohira, Go; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-11-01

    A 60-year-old man underwent laparoscopic total proctocolectomy with ileostomy for advanced ulcerative colitis-associated rectal cancer. The final diagnosis was advanced cancer pT3, pN2 and M0 (pStage Ⅲb). Adjuvant therapy with XELOX was performed. However, abdominal CT revealed a liver metastasis and lymph node metastases in the pelvis 6 months after surgery. The patient was treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. After 20 courses of chemotherapy, the patient was considered to have experienced a clinical CR, which has been maintained for 3 years 5 months.

  18. The influence of LED rectal irradiation on IL-1α and IL-4 of experimental ulcerative colitis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chang-Chun; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Han-Ping; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. In this paper, the influence of IL-1α and IL-4 on the experimental ulcerative colitis by light emitting diode ( LED ) (λ: 632.8nm; power: 4.0mw) applied to colon directly were studied. Making 30 rats into 3 groups: LED curative group, model group, normal control group. There were 10 rats of each group. We used glacial acetic acid (5%) and trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS) (1%) intra-anally to replicate the rat model of ulcerative colitis. After a week treatment with administrating LED rectal irradiation to curative group, 30mm each time, once per day, the histopathological studies in colonic tissue were performed, and the expression and distribution of IL-lα and IL-4 in colonic tissues were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The extent of the Colonic tissue injury in LED curative group was not as significant as that in the model group. Compared with model group, the content of MDA in LED curative group was reductived and the activity of SOD was increased significantly, and the expression and distribution of IL-lα in LED curative group was depressed significantly, however the expression and distribution of IL-4 in LED curative group was increased obviously. This results show that the LED rectal irradiation can protect colonic mucosa from the experimental ulcerative colitis in rats, and suggest that the effects may be related to the photobiomodulation and immunomodulation of LED.

  19. Mesalamine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal mesalamine is used to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in the lining of the colon [large intestine] and rectum), proctitis (swelling in the rectum), and ...

  20. The MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage).

    PubMed

    Orme, R L; Nordlund, J J; Barich, L; Brown, T

    1990-07-01

    We describe a 42-year-old man with features of both Behçet's disease and relapsing polychondritis. The term MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) has previously been used to describe similarly affected patients. We discuss the diagnostic criteria and pathogenetic mechanisms.

  1. A case of hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with intractable gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Young; Choi, Chang Hwan; Yang, Suh Yoon; Oh, In Soo; Song, In-Do; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Hyung Joon; Do, Jae Hyuk; Chang, Sae Kyung; Cho, Ah Ra; Cha, Young Joo

    2009-01-01

    We report a rare case of hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) presenting with intractable gastric ulcers. A 71-year-old man was admitted with epigastric pain. Initial endoscopic findings revealed multiple, active gastric ulcers in the gastric antrum. He underwent Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication therapy followed by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. However, follow-up endoscopy at 4, 6, 10 and 14 mo revealed persistent multiple gastric ulcers without significant improvement. The proportion of his eosinophil count increased to 43% (total count: 7903/mm3). Abdominal-pelvic and chest computed tomography scans showed multiple small nodules in the liver and both lungs. The endoscopic biopsy specimen taken from the gastric antrum revealed prominent eosinophilic infiltration, and the liver biopsy specimen also showed eosinophilic infiltration in the portal tract and sinusoid. A bone marrow biopsy disclosed eosinophilic hyperplasia as well as increased cellularity of 70%. The patient was finally diagnosed with HES involving the stomach, liver, lung, and bone marrow. When gastric ulcers do not improve despite H pylori eradication and prolonged PPI therapy, infiltrative gastric disorders such as HES should be considered. PMID:20027690

  2. Acute phase proteins and C9 in patients with Behcet's syndrome and aphthous ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Adinolfi, M; Lehner, T

    1976-01-01

    Estimation of the concentration of C9, C-reactive protein (CRP) and alpha1-antitrypsin in forty sera from patients with Behcet's syndrome and recurrent oral ulcers showed significantly increased amounts of C9 and CRP in Behcet's syndrome. The concentration of C9 was also significantly raised in recurrent oral ulceration, though to a lesser extent than in Behcet's syndrome. The assay C9 and CRP might be useful in the differential diagnosis of Behcet's syndrome, especially from recurrent oral ulcers. It is suggested that during epithelial inflammation in recurrent oral ulcers some of the acute phase proteins are increased and in some patients these may modulate the immunological mechanism in such a way as to induce a transition from focal oral ulceration to the multifocal Behcet's syndrome. PMID:1086750

  3. Perforated duodenal ulcer associated with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Uhler, M L; Budinger, G R; Gabram, S G; Zinaman, M J

    2001-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) remains the most serious medical complication of controlled ovarian stimulation. An unusual case of perforated duodenal ulcer following critical OHSS is presented. A 29 year old nulligravid woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome underwent her first attempt at in-vitro fertilization. She was admitted to the hospital with critical OHSS and subsequently found to have a perforated posterior duodenal ulcer. She underwent exploratory laparotomy, antrectomy and gastrojejunostomy. Pathological analysis of her gastric antrum confirmed chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori. She required prolonged assisted ventilation, vasopressor support, multiple i.v. antibiotics, blood product replacement and nutritional support. The patient was hospitalized for a total of 47 days and then transferred to a rehabilitation facility for an additional 30 days before being discharged to home. In this critically ill patient with OHSS, severe stress associated with invasive monitoring and multiple medical therapies in the intensive care unit as well as H. pylori infection appear to be the most probable causative factors of her perforated viscus. Prompt recognition of potential complications and proper medical intervention are essential in the management of patients with OHSS. Avoidance strategies are still needed.

  4. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14–16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Results Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. Conclusions TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study. PMID:26486374

  5. Munchausen's syndrome presenting as rectal foreign body insertion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shakeeb A; Davey, Christine A; Khan, Shamsul A; Trigwell, Peter J; Chintapatla, Srinivas

    2008-01-01

    Background This case report shows that Munchausen's syndrome can present as rectal foreign body insertion. Although the presentation of rectal foreign bodies has frequently been described in the medical literature, the insertion of foreign bodies into the rectum for reasons other than sexual gratification has rarely been considered. Case presentation A 30 year old, unmarried Caucasian male presented with a history of having been sexually assaulted five days earlier in a nearby city by a group of unknown males. He reported that during the assault a glass bottle was forcibly inserted into his rectum and the bottle neck broke. On examination, there was no evidence of external injury to the patient. Further assessment lead to a diagnosis of Munchausen's syndrome. The rationale for this is explained. A description and summary of current knowledge about the condition is also provided, including appropriate treatment approaches. Conclusion This case report is important because assumptions regarding the motivation for insertion of foreign bodies into the rectum may lead to the diagnosis of Munchausen's syndrome being missed. This would result in the appropriate course of action, with regard to treatment, not being followed. It is suggested that clinicians consider the specific motivation for the behaviour in all cases of rectal foreign body insertion, including the possibility of factitious disorder such as Munchausen's syndrome, and avoid any assumption that it has been carried out for the purpose of sexual gratification. Early involvement of psychiatrists is recommended. Cases of Munchausen's syndrome presenting as rectal foreign body insertion may be identified and addressed more effectively using the approach described. PMID:18925957

  6. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  7. The effects of LED rectal irradiation on the experimental ulcerative colitis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chang-Chun; Wang, Xian-Ju; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of light emitting diode(LED λ 632.8nm; power 4.0mw)applied directly to the colon on the experimental ulcerative colitis. 34 rats were divided into 3 groups, which was LED treatment group (n=12), model group (n=12), and normal control group (n=10). Given glacial acetic acid (5%) intra-anally so as to be replicated the rat model of ulcerative colitis. LED irradiation was used to curative group, with 30min each time, once per day. The period of treatment was one week. Then the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and content of malondi-aldehyde (MDA) in the blood plasma were detected and the histopathological study in Colonic tissue was performed. The degree of the Colonic tissue injury in curative group was not as significant as that in the model group. Comparing with model group, the Content of MDA in LED curative group was reductive and the activity of SOD was increased significantly. We concluded that the LED irradiation can protect colonic mucosa from acetic acid induced damage in rats and the effects may be related to the photobiomodulation of LED.

  8. A reappraisal of the ileo-rectal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Myrelid, Pär; Øresland, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Colectomy is still frequently required in the care of ulcerative colitis. The most common indications are either non-responding colitis in the emergency setting, chronic active disease, steroid-dependent disease or neoplastic change like dysplasia or cancer. The use of the ileal pouch anal anastomosis has internationally been the gold standard, substituting the rectum with a pouch. Recently the use of the ileorectal anastomosis has increased in frequency as reconstructive method after subtotal colectomy. Data from centres using ileorectal anastomosis have shown the method to be safe, with functionality and risk of failure comparable to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The methods have different advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on a number of patient factors and where in life the patient is at time of reconstruction. The ileorectal anastomosis could, together with the Kock continent ileostomy, in selected cases be a complement to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis and should be discussed with the patient before deciding on reconstructive method.

  9. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    PubMed

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  10. Giant rectal polyp prolapse in an adult patient with the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cano-Contreras, Ana Delfina; Meixueiro-Daza, Arturo; Grube-Pagola, Peter; Remes-Troche, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant intestinal polyposis syndrome characterised by the presence of hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous pigmentation. Prolapse of the polyps through the anus is an infrequent manifestation in children with PJS, and this complication is extremely rare in adult patients. We report the case of a 30-year-old man recently diagnosed with PJS who was seen at the emergency department because of the abrupt onset of severe anal pain with a foreign body sensation in the anal canal and rectal bleeding.Physical examination revealed a giant prolapsed polyp. PMID:27444139

  11. [Usage of the neutral anolyte for trophic ulcer treatment in patients with postthrombophlebitic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Chernekhovskaia, N E; Ovchinnikov, S I; Chomaeva, A A

    2010-10-01

    The results of the treatment of 38 patients with trophic ulcers of lower limbs developed against the postthrombophlebitic syndrome at the age of 43-73 years. The course of a disease exceeded 10 years. Trophic ulcers recrudesced in all patients, timeline of its appearance was 2.4 +/- 0.5 months. Daily trophic ulcers were irrigated by the neutral anolyte, it took from 5 to 7 sessions. The detersion of trophic ulcers came on the 3rd-4th day; granulation tissue appeared on the 5th day. The absence of bacterial population was noted in 89.5% of patients after 5.0 +/- 0.5 sessions. Trophic ulcers were epithelialized in 1 month, while in the group of comparison the whole epithelialization came only in 32% of patients.

  12. [Hemolytic anemia and dysenteric syndrome: a case of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Colard, M; Benghiat, F S; Maerevoet, M; Bailly, B; De Wilde, V

    2015-01-01

    A 53-years-old man has a dysentery since two weeks. The blood test shows Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and inflammation. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is treated with corticosteroid. A colonoscopy reveals an ulcerative colitis. The evolution of the patient is complicated by a spontaneous digestive perforation treated by total proctocolectomy. After this intervention, there is a resolution of the AIHA and the patient is gradually weaned from corticosteroids. AIHA is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease essentially ulcerative colitis. Identification of this cause of secondary AIHA is important for the therapeutic strategy. However treatment is nonspecific and based on low levels of evidence.

  13. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chin Soon; Hogan, Patrick; McKenzie, Scott; Gibbs, Harry; Strutton, Geoff; Wong, Richard

    2007-08-01

    "MAGIC syndrome" (Mouth And Genital ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage) has been proposed to describe patients with clinical features of both relapsing polychondritis and Behcet disease. A total of 18 cases have been reported with only 1 case associated with aneurysmal aortitis described in 1997. Herein, we describe a patient with MAGIC syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis requiring cardiothoracic surgery and intensive immunosuppression. Monitoring for the possible development of inflammatory aortic aneurysms should thus be considered in patients with MAGIC syndrome who have persistently elevated serum inflammatory markers. If an aortic aneurysm is detected, cardiothoracic surgical referral is necessary, close monitoring for enlargement is mandatory, and intensification of immunosuppressive therapy should be considered.

  14. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  15. Comparison of 5-hydroxytryptophan signaling pathway characteristics in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng-Yan; Huang, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Ye, Hua; Chi, Hong-Gang; Zou, Ying; Lv, Ru-Xi; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study differences in the visceral sensitivity of the colonic mucosa between patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and those with ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission and to relate these differences with changes in the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT) signaling pathway. METHODS: Gastrointestinal symptoms were used to determine the clinical symptom scores and rectal visceral sensitivity of patients with IBS-D and patients with UC in remission. Blood levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured using an HPLC-electrochemical detection system. The levels of 5-HT 3 receptor (3R), 4R, and 7R mRNAs in colonic biopsy samples were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of TPH1 was analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Abdominal pain or discomfort, stool frequency, and the scores of these symptoms in combination with gastrointestinal symptoms were higher in the IBS-D and UC groups than in the control groups. However, no significant differences were observed between the IBS-D and UC remission groups. With respect to rectal visceral sensitivity, the UC remission and IBS-D groups showed a decrease in the initial perception threshold, defecating threshold and pain threshold. However, these groups exhibited significantly increased anorectal relaxation pressure. Tests examining the main indicators of the 5-HT signaling pathway showed that the plasma 5-HT levels, 5-HIAA concentrations, TPH1 expression in the colonic mucosa, and 5-HT3R and 5-HT5R expression were increased in both the IBS-D and the UC remission groups; no increases were observed with respect to 5-HT7R expression. CONCLUSION: The IBS-D and UC groups showed similar clinical symptom scores, visceral sensitivity, and levels of serotonin signaling pathway indicators in the plasma and colonic mucosa. However, the pain threshold and 5-HT7R expression in the colonic mucosa were significantly different

  16. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome. PMID:27293269

  17. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome. PMID:27293269

  18. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  19. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC syndrome): a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Motegi, M; Mizuki, N; Ohtani, H; Komatsuda, A; Hamai, K; Miura, A B

    1997-11-01

    A 39-year-old woman had relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease, which was described as mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage syndrome (MAGIC). Serologic human leukocyte antigen analysis showed A24 (9), A31 (19), B56 (22), B62 (15), Cw6, DR4, DR9. Human leukocyte antigen allele analysis revealed DRB1* 0406/0901, DQA1* 0301/0301, DQB1* 0302/0303, DPB1* 0201/0501 through determining the genotype using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Treatment with methotrexate (5 mg/week) and pentoxifylline (300 mg/d) was effective to control oral ulcers, erythema nodosum, and arthritis.

  20. Ulcerative colitis complicated by dysplasia-adenoma-carcinoma in a man with Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; German, J; Ashby, K; French, S W

    1999-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare genetic disorder in which the major clinical feature is growth deficiency. The genome in BS somatic cells is unstable, and hypermutability explains many clinical features. Most notably, affected persons are at enormously increased risk of developing many types of cancers at different sites. It has been well known that ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with the spectrum of epithelial changes signifying dysplasia and the progression to frank carcinoma. We report here a case of UC complicated by dysplasia-adenoma-carcinoma sequence in a 37-year-old man with BS. PMID:10372944

  1. Effectiveness of skin perfusion pressure monitoring during surgery for an ischemic steal syndrome associated refractory ulcer.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kentaro; Sato, Takashi; Matsubara, Chieko; Tsuboi, Masato; Ishii, Yasuo; Tojimbara, Tamotsu

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 80-year-old man with end-stage renal disease due to type 2 diabetes who had been maintained on hemodialysis for 9 years. He developed refractory ulcers from an abraded wound in the right hand of his access arm. The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was located between the right brachial artery and the median antecubital vein draining into the cephalic vein and the deep veins close to the elbow. The blood flow of the right brachial artery measured by using Doppler ultrasonography was 920 ml/min. On the contrary, the radial and ulnar arteries were poorly palpable near the wrist, and ultrasonography could not be performed accurately because of a high degree of calcification. The skin perfusion pressure (SPP) of the first finger on the affected side decreased to 22 mmHg. However, the SPP improved to approximately 40 mmHg upon blocking an inflow into the deep vein. According to SPP data, only a communicating branch of the deep vein was ligated, and the AVF itself was preserved. One month after surgery, the skin ulcer healed, and maintenance hemodialysis was performed by using the preserved cephalic vein for blood access.In conclusion, we successfully treated a refractory wound associated with steal syndrome, without terminating the AVF. SPP-guided surgery may be safe and effective to adjust the blood flow in patients with AVF having steal syndrome.

  2. Acute phase proteins, C9, factor B, and lysozyme in recurrent oral ulceration and Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Adinolfi, M

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations and sequential changes of some acute phase proteins, factor B, and lysozyme have been assayed in recurrent oral ulceration and Behçet's syndrome. C9 was elevated in both groups of patients and was the sensitive index of disease activity; however, it failed to discriminate between the three types of recurrent oral ulcers and four types of Behçet's syndrome. The level of alpha 1 acid glycoprotein and lysozyme were significantly increased predominantly in the ocular type, whereas factor B was significantly increased especially in the neurological type of Behçet's syndrome. It is suggested that the changes in the concentrations of some plasma proteins may help our understanding of tissue involvement in Behçet's syndrome, as well as in the selection of therapeutic agents in this disease. PMID:6900632

  3. Diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes: dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Bonaca, Marc P; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndromes constitute a spectrum of conditions characterized by disruptions in the integrity of the aortic wall that may lead to potentially catastrophic outcomes. They include classic aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Although imaging studies are sensitive and specific, timely diagnosis can be delayed because of variability in presenting symptoms and the relatively low frequency with which acute aortic syndromes are seen in the emergency setting. Traditional classification systems, such as the Stanford system, facilitate early treatment decision-making through recognition of the high risk of death and major complications associated with involvement of the ascending aorta (type A). These patients are treated surgically unless intractable and severe co-morbidities are present. Outcomes with dissections that do not involve the ascending aorta (type B) depend on the presence of acute complications (e.g., malperfusion, early aneurysm formation, leakage), the patency and size of the false lumen, and patient co-morbidities. Patients with uncomplicated type B dissections are initially treated medically. Endovascular techniques have emerged as an alternative to surgery for the management of complicated type B dissections when intervention is necessary. Patients with acute aortic syndromes require aggressive medical care, risk stratification for additional complications and targeted genetic assessment as well as careful long-term monitoring to assess for evolving complications. The optimal care of patients with acute aortic syndrome requires the cooperation of members of an experienced multidisciplinary team both in the acute and chronic setting.

  4. Cryoglobulins in Behçet's syndrome and recurrent oral ulceration: assay by laser nephelometry.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Losito, A; Williams, D G

    1979-01-01

    The presence of cryoglobulins was investigated in ninety patients with recurrent oral ulcers (ROU) and sixty-one patients with Behçet's syndrome (BS). The immunodiffusion method was compared with Laser nephelometry for the analysis of IgG, IgM, IgA and C3 in cryoglobulins. Although the two methods of assessment showed a very significant agreement. Laser nephelometry was more sensitive than the double diffusion precipitation method and was used for quantitative analysis of cryoglobulins. The prevalence of any type of cryoglobulins was 64% in ROU and 75% in BS, as compared with controls (15%). In ROU significant levels of IgA were found in minor (P = 0.0196) and major (P = 0.0114) aphthous ulcers and to a lesser extent in herpetiform ulcers (P = 0.0624). Among the four types of BS signficant increases in C3 were found in the arthritic type (P = 0.0068) and ocular type (P = 0.0275), whereas IgM (P = 0.0031) and IgG (P = 0.0369) were increased only in the muco-cutaneous type. Sequential studies showed that disease remissions or exacerbations were correlated with a decrease or increase in IgM or IgG classes of cryoglobulins. However, the converse was found with IgA which may inhibit some functions of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and this may be responsible for the failure to remove damaging IgG, IgM and C3 complexes from the circulation. PMID:119596

  5. Genital ulcers as an unusual sign of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome: a novel symptom?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ming; Wang, Chih-Chien; Lai, Chi-Chieh; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Huang, Wei-Hsuan; Cheng, Shin-Nan

    2011-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome, which is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis, is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. A patient with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome simultaneously presenting with genital ulcers has not been reported previously. We describe a 12-year-old Chinese girl with a 2-year history of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome who exhibited vulvar ulcers accompanying an episode of febrile periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, and cervical adenopathy. Although during a 1-year follow-up this girl did not manifest typical symptoms/signs of Behçet's disease except recurrent oral aphthae and genital ulcers, it is possible that periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome and Behçet's disease could have overlapping manifestations. Furthermore, this report would add to the evidence of a wide variation in the clinical symptomatology of PFAPA syndrome.

  6. Rectal mucocoele following subtotal colectomy for colitis.

    PubMed

    Appleton, N; Day, N; Walsh, C

    2014-09-01

    We present a unique case of a rectal mucocoele affecting a patient several years after his subtotal colectomy for ulcerative colitis. This was secondary to both a benign anorectal stenosis and a benign mucus secreting rectal adenoma. This case highlights the importance of surveillance in such patients.

  7. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  8. A new case of a LUMBAR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Golabi, Mahin; An, Andrew C; Lopez, Christina; Lee, Lauren; Kwong, Michael; Hall, Bryan D

    2014-01-01

    LUMBAR syndrome (lower body congenital infantile hemangiomas and other skin defects; urogenital anomalies and ulceration; myelopathy; bony deformities; anorectal malformations and arterial anomalies; and rectal anomalies) is a rare association between infantile hemangiomas of the lower half of the body and regional congenital anomalies. Since 1986, 53 cases have been reported and no etiology has been identified. We report on the 54th case in a male infant and review the literature concerning the manifestations of the LUMBAR syndrome.

  9. Ogilvie's syndrome after rectal prolapse repair and total hemorrhoidectomy: Case report and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Omer

    2016-02-01

    This case highlights the rare diagnosis of Ogilvie's syndrome after minor surgery in a private hospital where facilities and expertise are generally sparse. It shows the importance of knowledge of the subject, proper assessment, accurate diagnosis, and early input from seniors is crucial to prevent ischemia and perforation of colon that carries high mortality.

  10. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations.

  11. Divergent metabolic responses of Apostichopus japonicus suffered from skin ulceration syndrome and pathogen challenge.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yina; Li, Chenghua; Ou, Changrong; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Yali; Su, Xiurong; Li, Ye; Li, Taiwu

    2013-11-13

    Skin ulceration syndrome (SUS) is the main limitation in the development of Apostichopus japonicus culture industries, in which Vibrio splendidus has been well documented as one of the major pathogens. However, the intrinsic mechanisms toward pathogen challenge and disease outbreak remain largely unknown at the metabolic level. In this work, the metabolic responses were investigated in muscles of sea cucumber among natural SUS-diseased and V. splendidus-challenged samples. The pathogen did not induce obvious biological effects in A. japonicus samples after infection for the first 24 h. An enhanced energy storage (or reduced energy demand) and immune responses were observed in V. splendidus-challenged A. japonicus samples at 48 h, as marked by increased glucose and branched chain amino acids, respectively. Afterward, infection of V. splendidus induced significant increases in energy demand in A. japonicus samples at both 72 and 96 h, confirmed by decreased glucose and glycogen, and increased ATP. Surprisingly, high levels of glycogen and glucose and low levels of threonine, alanine, arginine, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and ATP were founded in natural SUS-diseased sea cucumber. Our present results provided essential metabolic information about host-pathogen interaction for sea cucumber, and informed that the metabolic biomarkers induced by V. splendidus were not usable for the prediction of SUS disease in practice. PMID:24127639

  12. Characteristics of a new reovirus isolated from epizootic ulcerative syndrome infected snakehead fish.

    PubMed

    John, K R; George, M R; Richards, R H; Frerichs, G N

    2001-09-12

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) has been infecting a wide range of fishes in the South and Southeast Asia for the last 2 decades. One reovirus-like agent (snakehead reovirus, SKRV), isolated from an EUS-infected snakehead fish and investigated in the present study, is the only reovirus so far isolated from an EUS-infected fish. SKRV was characterised by the presence of a double-stranded RNA genome with icosahedral symmetry and double capsid. The virus had an average size of 71 nm, a buoyant density of 1.36 g ml(-1) in CsCl and lacked a lipid-containing envelope. Apart from the above, the presence of a segmented genome and structural proteins falling into 3 specific size classes confirmed that the virus belongs to the family Reoviridae. SKRV differed from aquareoviruses by the lack of a cytopathic effect (CPE) with syncitium formation and in the segmentation pattern of RNA genome. The resistance to pH (3.0 to 9.0) and heat treatment and inability to multiply in mammalian cell lines and haemagglutinate human 'O' red blood cells (RBCs) differentiated SKRV from the rest of the similar genera in the family Reoviridae. Serological comparison indicated the antigenic distinctness of the isolate from selected American and European aquareoviruses. SKRV grew well in SSN-1 and SSN-3 cells at 25 to 30 degrees C but not in the most common Aquareovirus susceptible coldwater fish cell line--CHSE-214.

  13. Rebamipide: A Novel Agent in the Treatment of Recurrent Aphthous Ulcer and Behcet's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kudur, Mohan H; Hulmani, Manjunath

    2013-01-01

    Rebamipide is an amino acid analog of 2 (1H)-quinolinone. It is being introduced and used since 1980 for the treatment of peptic ulcer. Its therapeutic use in recurrent aphthous ulcer was not known. It acts by the decrease in oxygen radicals, increase in blood flow and production of protective prostaglandins in ulcer mucosa, which accelerates the process of healing. In this article, we focus on the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, side-effects and other therapeutic uses of Rebamipide. It will be a new and effective drug in the dermatologists’ drug armamentarium for the treatment of aphthous ulcers and related diseases. PMID:24082178

  14. A study of 113 cases of genital ulcerative disease and urethral discharge syndrome with validation of syndromic management of sexually transmitted diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Chintan; Patel, Raksha M.; Marfatia, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To validate syndromic management of cases having genital ulcerative disease (GUD) and urethral discharge syndrome (UDS). Materials and Methods: A study of 113 cases of GUD and UDS was carried out in the Department of Skin and VD from March 2011 to August 2012. All cases having history and clinical evidence suggestive of GUD and UDS were included in the study. Results: According to syndromic diagnosis, GUD herpetic syndrome was the most common 71 (62.27%), followed by GUD non-herpetic syndrome 25 (21.89%) and UDS 17 (14.91%). Out of 71 cases clinically diagnosed as GUD herpetic, 16 (22.53%) were validated by immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV) serology, 14 (19.71%) by Tzanck smear and 3 (4.22%) by both. 24 (33.80%) were Reactive plasma Reagin (RPR)(<1:8) reactive and trepenomma palidum haem-agglutination positive. Out of total 25 clinically diagnosed GUD non herpetic cases, 22 (88%) were validated by laboratory tests Out of 17 cases of UDS, 15 (88%) were validated by smear. Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity of clinically diagnosed syndrome is not so high particularly for GUD herpetic syndrome Continuous monitoring of diagnostic component of syndromic approach is key to success of STD control program. PMID:24958984

  15. [INJECTING MATERIAL FOR SKIN REGENERATION LACERTA APPLICATION IN TREATMENT OF TROPHIC ULCERS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC FOOT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, K V; Sydorchuk, R I

    2015-07-01

    Examined 22 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) type II of neuropathic form of diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). In 12 patients (comparison group) local povidone-iodine was used main in 10 (study group), except povidone-iodine, in the phase of exudation used tyrothricin in gel form, the granulation and epithelization phase, after cleaning the wounds, were injected intradermally 1 ml of injecting material for skin regeneration Lacerta. Trophic defects in 9 (90%) patients of the main group during the observation period healed completely, in the comparison group complete healing of the ulcer reached in 2 (16.7%) patients, the rest-wounds, although purified, however, were lethargic granulation, epithelization occurred very slowly. Consequently, the use of the proposed method allows to achieve more rapid healing of trophic ulcers that do not heal continued in patients of neuropathic forms of DFS. PMID:26591219

  16. Coexistence of pyoderma gangrenosum and sweet's syndrome in a patient with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ajili, Faida; Souissi, Asmahan; Bougrine, Fathi; Boussetta, Najah; Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Sayhi, Sameh; Louzir, Bassem; Doss, Nejib; Laabidi, Janet; Othmani, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's Syndrome (SS) are inflammatory skin diseases caused by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin and, rarely, in internal organs. These neutrophilic dermatosis (NDs) are distinguished by the existence of forms of transition or overlap. They are frequently associated to systemic diseases especially hematologic and gastrointestinal ones. We report a case of a patient with ulcerative colitis (UC) who successively developed two types of NDs: PG then SS. A 66 years old patient with a history of UC consulted in July 2012 for an erythematous swelling of the back of the right hand treated with antibiotics without improvement. At that time, bacteriological samples were negative. In October 2012, he was hospitalized for polyarthralgia and impaired general condition. In physical examination, he had vesiculobullous plaque of 10 cm long of the right hand and wrist, infiltrated erythematous plaque on the right leg and another topped with a large pustule at the left ankle. Skin biopsy showed at the back of the right hand an aspect of PG and at the infiltrated plaques of the ankle an aspect of SS. Prednisone was started with improvement of the skin lesions and a recovery condition. The combination of PG and SS has already been described in cases of hematologic malignancy and rarely in UC. There is also the notion of passage from a neutrophilic dermatosis to another. Indeed, a typical lesion initially of SS can evolve to a future PG. This case demonstrates that neutrophilic dermatoses form a continous spectrum of entities that may occur in UC. PMID:26327988

  17. Environmental and climatic factors associated with epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) in fish from the Zambezi floodplains, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Choongo, K; Hang'ombe, B; Samui, K L; Syachaba, M; Phiri, H; Maguswi, C; Muyangaali, K; Bwalya, G; Mataa, L

    2009-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine environmental and climatic factors associated with Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome (EUS) in fish in the Zambezi floodplains. EUS is a fish disease that causes economic loses to the fishing industry. Streambed colour in affected water was rusty-, reddish- or yellowish- brown and pH 4.5-6.0 while pH of non affected water was 7.2. The rusty-brown precipitate on fish gills was positive for Prussian blue iron stain. Therefore, predisposing factors for EUS in the Zambezi floodplains were the acidification of ground water during drought years and eventual contamination of surface water during the floods of 2006/2007.

  18. The Role of Syndrome Differentiation in the Clinical Efficacy of Punica Granatum on Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Mohammadali; Khodadoost, Mahmoud; Tavakoli, Hamid; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Gachkar, Latif; Adibi, Payman; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the difference between therapeutic responses of hot and cold temperament patients (based on traditional Persian medicine) with ulcerative colitis to pomegranate peel extract. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with moderate ulcerative colitis based on Lichtiger Colitis Activity Index (LCAI) criteria were randomized to receive an aqueous extract of the Punica granatum peel (6 gram per day) or placebo for four weeks. They were assessed before and after the intervention in terms of symptoms by LCAI scoring system. The results were compared in two therapeutic groups based on the patient s’ temperament (cold and hot) which were diagnosed based on a previously validated questionnaire. Results: Therapeutic response was significantly higher in patients with hot temperament compared to patients with cold temperament in the P. granatum group (1.91±0.492 vs. -0.500±0.500, P=0.029). Conclusion: This study showed the importance of considering syndrome differentiation and temperament in interpreting the effect of P. granatum peel extract on ulcerative colitis. PMID:27516649

  19. Rectal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The rectum is the lower part of your large intestine where your body stores stool. Problems with rectum are common. They include hemorrhoids, abscesses, incontinence and cancer. Many people are embarrassed to talk about rectal ...

  20. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  1. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage: MAGIC syndrome. Five patients with features of relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Firestein, G S; Gruber, H E; Weisman, M H; Zvaifler, N J; Barber, J; O'Duffy, J D

    1985-07-01

    Five patients with features of coexistent relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease are described. Review of the literature supports the overlap of the clinical manifestations of these two conditions. A common immunologic abnormality is likely, and elastin is cited as a possible target antigen. The "mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome" is the proposed name for this entity.

  2. Ulcerative colitis with inflammatory polyposis in a teenage boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Ye, Ying; Guo, Can-Can; Luo, Bo-Tao; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-21

    Ulcerative colitis in addition to inflammatory polyposis is common. The benign sequel of ulcerative colitis can sometimes mimic colorectal carcinoma. This report describes a rare case of inflammatory polyposis with hundreds of inflammatory polyps in ulcerative colitis which was not easy to distinguish from other polyposis syndromes. A 16-year-old Chinese male suffering from ulcerative colitis for 6 mo underwent colonoscopy, and hundreds of polyps were observed in the sigmoid, causing colonic stenosis. The polyps were restricted to the sigmoid. Although rectal inflammation was detected, no polyps were found in the rectum. A diagnosis of inflammatory polyposis and ulcerative colitis was made. The patient underwent total colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 8. Endoscopic surveillance after surgery is crucial as ulcerative colitis with polyposis is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Recognition of polyposis requires clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic correlation, and helps with chemoprophylaxis of colorectal cancer, as the drugs used postoperatively for colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis and polyposis are different. PMID:25624746

  3. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, Ryan; Miller, Debra; Vandersea, Mark; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Schofield, Pamela; Bennett, Wayne

    2010-02-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  4. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Ryan K; Miller, Debra L; Vandersea, Mark W; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Schofield, Pamela J; Bennett, Wayne A

    2010-01-25

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  5. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saylor, Ryan K.; Miller, Debra L.; Vandersea, Mark W.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Bennett, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  6. Delorme's operation and sphincteroplasty for rectal prolapse and fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pescatori, M; Interisano, A; Stolfi, V M; Zoffoli, M

    1998-01-01

    Clinical and manometric results of Delorme's operation and sphincteroplasty were assessed retrospectively in patients undergoing this procedure for fecal incontinence and rectal prolapse. A series of 33 patients (11 males, 22 females; aged 18-83 years, mean 59) with external rectal prolapse were treated by Delorme's operation between 1989 and 1996. Mean follow-up was 39 months (range 7-84). Sphincteroplasty was associated in 12 cases with severe fecal incontinence due to striated muscle defects. Good results were achieved in 27 patients (79%); prolapse recurrence was observed in 6 (21%), the mean recurrence time being 9 months (range 1-24 months). There were no postoperative deaths. Minor complications occurred in 15 patients. Changes in preoperative and postoperative manometric patterns were as follows (mean +/- SEM): voluntary contraction from 59 +/- 6.9 to 66 +/- 7.1 mmHg (P = 0.05), resting tone from 33 +/- 5 to 32 +/- 4.3 mmHg, rectal sensation from 59 +/- 5 to 61 +/- 5.2 ml of air (n.s.). A solitary rectal ulcer syndrome was detected in five patients. The histological pattern demonstrated pathological changes in 40% of cases. Fecal incontinence was resolved in 6 of 20 cases (30%) and chronic constipation in 4 of 9 (44%). Failure (n = 3) was related primarily to postoperative sepsis. The incontinence score showed a mean improvement of 35% decreasing, from 4.5 +/- 0.39 to 2.9 +/- 0.44 after surgery (P < 0.01). In conclusion, Delorme's procedure did not lead to constipation and improved anal continence when associated with sphincteroplasty.

  7. Perioperative Use of Bispectral Monitor (BIS) for a Pressure Ulcer patient with Lock-In Syndrome (LIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R.; Bloom, Marc J.; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. Our goal was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, ie anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses. PMID:25252146

  8. Perioperative use of bispectral (BIS) monitor for a pressure ulcer patient with locked-in syndrome (LIS).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R; Bloom, Marc J; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure the depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anaesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anaesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. The goal of this study was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, i.e. anaesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses.

  9. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  10. Intestinal Intravascular Large B-cell Lymphoma Mimicking Ulcerative Colitis with Secondary Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneyuki, Daisuke; Komeno, Yukiko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis (UC) was admitted to our hospital for renal dysfunction and progressive anemia. Colonoscopy revealed intestinal lesions and pathological findings showed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). According to the polymerase chain reaction analysis of sequential rectal specimens, we concluded that she suffered from intestinal BCL, not UC. After chemotherapy, her renal function progressed to nephrotic syndrome. The pathological findings of renal biopsy specimens indicated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). Chemotherapy was continued and led to the remission of BCL and MPGN. We herein describe the first case of intestinal IVLBCL mimicking UC with secondary MPGN. PMID:27580553

  11. [Carpal tunnel syndrome revealed by digital ulcerations caused by arterial vasospasm].

    PubMed

    Léger, O; Lavallé, F

    2005-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome presenting as a trophic disorder in the hand is unusual. We report the case of a 66 year old man in whom nerve conduction tests confirmed compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and vasospasm in the corresponding area was demonstrated by arteriography for, we believe, the first time. Simple decompression of the carpal tunnel brought about total recovery. The mechanism of the autonomic disorders found in carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The clinical case that we report objectively demonstrates the vasospasm caused by the compression of the autonomic fibres of the median nerve.

  12. Ulcerated yellow spot syndrome: implications of aquaculture-related pathogens associated with soft coral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi tissue lesions.

    PubMed

    Cervino, James M; Hauff, Briana; Haslun, Joshua A; Winiarski-Cervino, Kathryn; Cavazos, Michael; Lawther, Pamela; Wier, Andrew M; Hughen, Konrad; Strychar, Kevin B

    2012-12-27

    We introduce a new marine syndrome called ulcerated yellow spot, affecting the soft coral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi. To identify bacteria associated with tissue lesions, tissue and mucus samples were taken during a 2009 Indo-Pacific research expedition near the Wakatobi Island chain, Indonesia. Polymerase chain reaction targeting the 16S rDNA gene indicated associations with the known fish-disease-causing bacterium Photobacterium damselae, as well as multiple Vibrio species. Results indicate a shift toward decreasing diversity of bacteria in lesioned samples. Photobacterium damselae ssp. piscicida, formerly known as Pasteurella piscicida, is known as the causative agent of fish pasteurellosis and in this study, was isolated solely in lesioned tissues. Globally, fish pasteurellosis is one of the most damaging fish diseases in marine aquaculture. Vibrio alginolyticus, a putative pathogen associated with yellow band disease in scleractinian coral, was also isolated from lesioned tissues. Lesions appear to be inflicting damage on symbiotic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium sp.), measurable by decreases in mitotic index, cell density and photosynthetic efficiency. Mitotic index of zooxanthellae within infected tissue samples was decreased by ~80%, while zooxanthellae densities were decreased by ~40% in lesioned tissue samples compared with healthy coral. These results provide evidence for the presence of known aquaculture pathogens in lesioned soft coral and may be a concern with respect to cross-species epizootics in the tropics.

  13. Horizontal transmission of epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS)-associated virus in the snakehead Ophicephalus striatus under simulated natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Lio-Po, Gilda D; Albright, Lawrence J; Traxler, Garth S; Leaño, Eduardo M

    2003-12-29

    Natural transmission of the epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) was conducted on naïve snakeheads Ophicephalus striatus (also known as Channa striata) kept (A) in aquifer water, (B) in lakewater, (C) cohabiting with EUS snakeheads in lakewater, and (D) cohabiting with apparently healthy snakeheads in lakewater during the 1994 to 1995 EUS season. The results showed that EUS-like lesions developed in 6 to 14 d among naïve snakeheads cohabiting with EUS snakeheads and with apparently healthy snakeheads in lakewater (Treatments C and D). Among naïve fish exposed to lakewater (Treatment B), similar lesions developed in 16 to 21 d, while naïve fish in aquifer water (Treatment A) did not develop EUS-like lesions. EUS signs began as Grade I (slight) lesions that gradually progressed to Grades III-IV (severe) 3 to 5 d from lesion onset, similar to the naturally affected EUS fish. The virus was recovered from some but not all naturally EUS-affected snakeheads, snakeheads with healing lesions and apparently healthy snakeheads, but not from naïve snakeheads. The results provide evidence of a waterborne horizontal transmission of the EUS-associated virus. This is the first report of a successful horizontal transmission of the EUS-associated virus from apparently healthy snakeheads to naïve fish under natural conditions and of virus recovery in tissue culture from naturally exposed experimental fish. PMID:14960033

  14. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  15. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  16. Emergence of Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome in Native Fish of the Murray-Darling River System, Australia: Hosts, Distribution and Possible Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Boys, Craig A.; Rowland, Stuart J.; Gabor, Melinda; Gabor, Les; Marsh, Ian B.; Hum, Steven; Callinan, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is a fish disease of international significance and reportable to the Office International des Epizootics. In June 2010, bony herring Nematalosa erebi, golden perch Macquaria ambigua, Murray cod Maccullochella peelii and spangled perch Leiopotherapon unicolor with severe ulcers were sampled from the Murray-Darling River System (MDRS) between Bourke and Brewarrina, New South Wales Australia. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction identified the fungus-like oomycete Aphanomyces invadans, the causative agent of EUS. Apart from one previous record in N. erebi, EUS has been recorded in the wild only from coastal drainages in Australia. This study is the first published account of A. invadans in the wild fish populations of the MDRS, and is the first confirmed record of EUS in M. ambigua, M. peelii and L. unicolor. Ulcerated carp Cyprinus carpio collected at the time of the same epizootic were not found to be infected by EUS, supporting previous accounts of resistance against the disease by this species. The lack of previous clinical evidence, the large number of new hosts (n = 3), the geographic extent (200 km) of this epizootic, the severity of ulceration and apparent high pathogenicity suggest a relatively recent invasion by A. invadans. The epizootic and associated environmental factors are documented and discussed within the context of possible vectors for its entry into the MDRS and recommendations regarding continued surveillance, research and biosecurity are made. PMID:22558170

  17. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  18. Expression analysis of microRNAs related to the skin ulceration syndrome of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongjuan; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Yang, Aifu; Jiang, Jingwei; Chen, Zhong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Bai; Gao, Shan; Jiang, Bei

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in many biological processes. To investigate the miRNAs related to skin ulceration syndrome (SUS) of Apostichopus japonicus, small RNA libraries of body wall, intestine, respiratory tree and coelomocytes from healthy and diseased A. japonicus were sequenced on Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. A total of 247 conserved and 10 novel miRNAs were identified across all libraries. After pair-wise comparisons, 215 miRNAs in body wall, 36 in intestine, 2 in respiratory tree and 38 in coelomocytes showed significant expression differences. Further analyses were conducted on some tissue-specific differentially expressed miRNAs: miR-8 and miR-486-5p in body wall, miR-200-3p, let-7-5p and miR-125 in intestine, miR-278a-3p and bantam in respiratory, miR-10a and miR-184 in coelomocytes. Notably, these miRNAs in some species were reported to function in various physiological or pathological processes associated with immune regulations. Using stem-loop quantitative real time PCR, six representative miRNAs in four tissues were selected to validate the sequencing results. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (R) of the six miRNAs ranged from 0.777 to 0.948, which confirmed the consistency and accuracy between these two approaches. This study provides comprehensive expression and regulation patterns of functional miRNAs in different tissues and gives insights into the tissue-specific immune response mechanisms in SUS-infected A. japonicus. PMID:26723265

  19. Expression analysis of microRNAs related to the skin ulceration syndrome of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongjuan; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Yang, Aifu; Jiang, Jingwei; Chen, Zhong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Bai; Gao, Shan; Jiang, Bei

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in many biological processes. To investigate the miRNAs related to skin ulceration syndrome (SUS) of Apostichopus japonicus, small RNA libraries of body wall, intestine, respiratory tree and coelomocytes from healthy and diseased A. japonicus were sequenced on Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. A total of 247 conserved and 10 novel miRNAs were identified across all libraries. After pair-wise comparisons, 215 miRNAs in body wall, 36 in intestine, 2 in respiratory tree and 38 in coelomocytes showed significant expression differences. Further analyses were conducted on some tissue-specific differentially expressed miRNAs: miR-8 and miR-486-5p in body wall, miR-200-3p, let-7-5p and miR-125 in intestine, miR-278a-3p and bantam in respiratory, miR-10a and miR-184 in coelomocytes. Notably, these miRNAs in some species were reported to function in various physiological or pathological processes associated with immune regulations. Using stem-loop quantitative real time PCR, six representative miRNAs in four tissues were selected to validate the sequencing results. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (R) of the six miRNAs ranged from 0.777 to 0.948, which confirmed the consistency and accuracy between these two approaches. This study provides comprehensive expression and regulation patterns of functional miRNAs in different tissues and gives insights into the tissue-specific immune response mechanisms in SUS-infected A. japonicus.

  20. Sleeping position and rectal temperature.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S A; Anderson, E S; Lodemore, M; Rawson, D; Wailoo, M P

    1991-08-01

    The effects of sleeping position upon body temperature were assessed by continuous monitoring of rectal temperature in 137 babies sleeping at home under conditions chosen by their parents. There were three groups of subjects: (1) normal babies aged 12-22 weeks whose temperature rhythms were developed, (2) normal babies aged 6-12 weeks who were developing their night time temperature rhythms, and (3) babies the night after diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus immunisation, whose temperature rhythms were disturbed. Sleeping in the prone position was not associated with higher rectal temperatures at any time of night in young babies, nor did it exaggerate the disturbance of rectal temperature rhythm after immunisation. In older normal babies the prone position did not disturb rectal temperature in the first part of the night, though prone sleepers warmed a little faster prior to walking, especially in warm conditions. Prone sleepers were, however, born earlier in gestation and tended to be of lower birth weight. Normal babies can therefore thermoregulate effectively whatever their sleeping posture, even in warm conditions, though the prone position may make it slightly more difficult to lose heat. It is difficult to see how the prone position, even interacting with warm conditions, could induce lethal hyperthermia in otherwise normal babies. Perhaps the prone position is associated with other risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome.

  1. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  2. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. ... a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at any age, but it usually ...

  3. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  4. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Kattan, Michael W.; Rancati, Tiziana; Yu Changhong; Vavassori, Vittorio; Fellin, Giovanni; Cagna, Elena; Gabriele, Pietro; Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela; Bianchi, Carla; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo F.; Stasi, Michele; Giganti, Maria Olga; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient's characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  5. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  6. [Ulcerative colitis and proctitis in two Swiss Braunvieh cows].

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Hilbe, M; Gerspach, C; Ruetten, M

    2015-04-01

    Two Swiss Braunvieh cows were referred to our clinic because of narrowing of the rectum and difficult rectal examination attributable to restricted arm movement within the pelvic cavity. Cow 1 also had perforation of the cranial rectum and cow 2 had multiple small funnel-shaped depressions in the rectal mucosa. Both cows had ultrasonographic evidence of peritonitis with thickening of the intestinal wall and fibrin and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. A diagnosis of peritonitis was made in both cows, most likely caused by rectal perforation; they were euthanized and a post-mortem examination was carried out. Both cows had proctitis and ulcerative colitis with three or four perforated ulcers which were associated with fibrinopurulent peritonitis. The final diagnosis was ulcerative colitis and proctitis of unknown aetiology. Infectious causes of colitis and proctitis, including bovine viral diarrhoea, adenovirus infection and salmonellosis, and trauma and poisoning were ruled out.

  7. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  8. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inflammatory bowel disease - ulcerative colitis - discharge; Ulcerative proctitis - discharge; Colitis - discharge ... were in the hospital because you have ulcerative colitis. This is a swelling of the inner lining ...

  9. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  10. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  11. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  12. Foam preparations for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Loew, Burr J; Siegel, Corey A

    2012-07-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis uniformly have disease involving the distal colon. When patients have disease limited to the left colon or symptoms suggestive of active rectal inflammation, guidelines recommend topical rectal therapies as first-line agents either as monotherapy or in conjunction with oral products. Rectal delivery modalities offer the advantage of delivering high local concentrations of active medication to the site of maximal inflammation with minimization of systemic side effects. Methods of rectal administration include suppositories, liquid enemas and foams. Suppositories are limited to the treatment of rectal disease, and patients often have difficulty retaining the liquid enema secondary to its high volume and consistency. Rectal foams reliability extend to the descending and sigmoid colon with application. Foams are further characterized by increased viscosity, lower volumes, finer dispersion on the colonic mucosa, and increased adhesiveness to the colonic mucosa compared with liquid enemas. Additionally, rectal foam agents demonstrate equal efficacy to their liquid enema counterparts yet consistently yield better patient tolerance, lower incidence of side effects, and increased patient acceptability. Currently available agents include 5-aminosalicylic acid and corticosteroids, both first and newer generation. This review focuses on clinical trials assessing efficacy, tolerability, and patient preferences for these agents as well as describing the currently available rectal foam products.

  13. Rectal Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have seen important progress in demonstrating the efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, vaginal microbicides, and treatment as prevention as effective strategies for reducing the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection. There has also been significant progress in the development of rectal microbicides. Preclinical non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antiretroviral microbicides can provide significant protection from rectal challenge with SIV or SHIV. Recent Phase 1 rectal microbicide studies have characterized the safety, acceptability, compartmental pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmaco-dynamics (PD) of both UC781 and tenofovir gels. The tenofovir gel formulation used in vaginal studies was not well tolerated in the rectum and newer rectal-specific formulations have been developed and evaluated in Phase 1 studies. The PK/PD data generated in these Phase 1 studies may reduce the risk of advancing ineffective candidate rectal microbicides into late stage development. Tenofovir gel is currently poised to move into Phase 2 evaluation and it is possible that a Phase 2B/3 effectiveness study with this product could be initiated in the next 2–3 years. PMID:23612991

  14. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  16. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  17. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  18. Diagnosis and management of genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Mayor, Mejebi T; Uduhiri, Kelechi A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection and syphilis are the most common causes of genital ulcers in the United States. Other infectious causes include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), secondary bacterial infections, and fungi. Noninfectious etiologies, including sexual trauma, psoriasis, Behçet syndrome, and fixed drug eruptions, can also lead to genital ulcers. Although initial treatment of genital ulcers is generally based on clinical presentation, the following tests should be considered in all patients: serologic tests for syphilis and darkfield microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody testing for Treponema pallidum, culture or polymerase chain reaction test for herpes simplex virus, and culture for Haemophilus ducreyi in settings with a high prevalence of chancroid. No pathogen is identified in up to 25 percent of patients with genital ulcers. The first episode of herpes simplex virus infection is usually treated with seven to 10 days of oral acyclovir (five days for recurrent episodes). Famciclovir and valacyclovir are alternative therapies. One dose of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine is recommended to treat genital ulcers caused by primary syphilis. Treatment options for chancroid include a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone or oral azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. Lymphogranuloma venereum and donovanosis are treated with 21 days of oral doxycycline. Treatment of noninfectious causes of genital ulcers varies by etiology, and ranges from topical wound care for ulcers caused by sexual trauma to consideration of subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a for ulcers caused by Behçet syndrome.

  19. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  20. Venous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Caprini, J A; Partsch, H; Simman, R

    2012-09-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence.

  1. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  2. Short term outcome of laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad; Anwer, Mariyah; Qureshi, Muhammad Shamim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find out the short term outcomes of effectiveness and safety of laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for rectal prolapse. Methods: It was a descriptive case series study of 31 consecutive patients of rectal prolapse in Colorectal division of Ward 2, Department of General surgery, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Center, Karachi, from November 2009 to November 2015. These patients were admitted through outpatient department with complains of something coming out of anus, constipation and per rectal bleeding. All patients were clinically examined and baseline investigations were done. All patients underwent laparoscopic repair with ventral mesh placement on rectum. Results: Among 31 patients, mean age was 45 years range (20 - 72). While females were 14(45%) and males 17(55%). We observed variety of presentations, including solitary rectal ulcers (n=4) and rectocele (n=3) but full thickness rectal prolapse was predominant(n=24). All patients had laparoscopic repair with mesh placement. Average hospital stay was three days. Out of 31 patients, there was one (3.2%) recurrence. Port site minor infection in 3(9.7%) patients, while conversion to open approach was done in two (6.4%), postoperative ileus observed in two (6.4%) patients. one(3.2%) patient developed intractable back pain and mesh was removed six weeks after the operation. one(4.8%) patient complained of abdominal pain off and on postoperatively. No patient developed denovo or worsening constipation while constipation was improved in 21 patients (67%). Sexual dysfunction such as dysperunia in females and impotence in males was not detected in follow up. Conclusions: This study provides the limited evidence that nerve sparing laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is safe and effective treatment of external and symptomatic internal rectal prolapse. It has better cosmetic and functional outcome as advantages of minimal access and comparable recurrence rate.

  3. Short term outcome of laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad; Anwer, Mariyah; Qureshi, Muhammad Shamim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find out the short term outcomes of effectiveness and safety of laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for rectal prolapse. Methods: It was a descriptive case series study of 31 consecutive patients of rectal prolapse in Colorectal division of Ward 2, Department of General surgery, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Center, Karachi, from November 2009 to November 2015. These patients were admitted through outpatient department with complains of something coming out of anus, constipation and per rectal bleeding. All patients were clinically examined and baseline investigations were done. All patients underwent laparoscopic repair with ventral mesh placement on rectum. Results: Among 31 patients, mean age was 45 years range (20 - 72). While females were 14(45%) and males 17(55%). We observed variety of presentations, including solitary rectal ulcers (n=4) and rectocele (n=3) but full thickness rectal prolapse was predominant(n=24). All patients had laparoscopic repair with mesh placement. Average hospital stay was three days. Out of 31 patients, there was one (3.2%) recurrence. Port site minor infection in 3(9.7%) patients, while conversion to open approach was done in two (6.4%), postoperative ileus observed in two (6.4%) patients. one(3.2%) patient developed intractable back pain and mesh was removed six weeks after the operation. one(4.8%) patient complained of abdominal pain off and on postoperatively. No patient developed denovo or worsening constipation while constipation was improved in 21 patients (67%). Sexual dysfunction such as dysperunia in females and impotence in males was not detected in follow up. Conclusions: This study provides the limited evidence that nerve sparing laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is safe and effective treatment of external and symptomatic internal rectal prolapse. It has better cosmetic and functional outcome as advantages of minimal access and comparable recurrence rate. PMID:27648031

  4. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  5. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  6. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint.

  7. [Clinical picture of pure corneal ulcers of different localizations].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, L N; Kudriashova, Iu I

    1999-01-01

    Pure corneal ulcers can be localized at the periphery and in the center. Peripheral ulcers are bilateral in 66% and multifocal in 48% cases. They are combined with local vasculitis of perilimbic vessels of the conjunctiva. In 84% cases the disease occurred in patients with connective tissue and articular diseases. Clinical picture of the peripheral corneal ulcer differs from Mourene's phagodenic ulcer. Central corneal ulcers are bilateral in 40% patients, are associated with primary and secondary "dry eye" syndrome in Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic vasculitis, Behçet's disease, and in 18% patients with cicatricial deformation of the conjunctiva after Stevens-Johnson's syndrome, trachoma, and chemical burns of the eyes. Pure corneal ulcers run a chronic relapsing course, complicated in one-fourth of patients by corneal perforation and secondary infections.

  8. Gasterophilosis: a major cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Adako Mulugeta; Innocent, Giles; Trawford, Andrew Francis; Reid, Stuart William James; Love, Sandy

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia. Analysis of data on rectal prolapse cases obtained from the Donkey Health and Welfare Project clinic at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Addis Ababa University, from 1995 to 2004 revealed that 83.6% (n = 177) of the cases were associated with Gasterophilus nasalis. The rest 10.7% and 5.7% were associated with work-related (overloading) cause and diarrhoea, respectively. The mean and median numbers of G. nasalis recovered from the rectum of infected donkeys were 66 and 64, respectively, with a range of 2-195. Over 100 G. nasalis larvae were recovered from the rectum of 22% of the donkeys. Circular demarcated ulcer-like and deep circumferential pits or ring-like mucosal lesions were found at the larval attachment sites. G. nasalis infection and the associated rectal prolapse were observed year round. However, the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse were significantly higher during the rainy season (P < 0.01). Age and sex of the donkeys had no significant effect on the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse (P > 0.05).

  9. Effect of macrophages and serum of fish susceptible or resistant to epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) on the EUS pathogen, Aphanomyces invadans.

    PubMed

    Miles, D J; Kanchanakhan, S; Lilley, J H; Thompson, K D; Chinabut, S; Adams, A

    2001-10-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is one of the most destructive diseases of fresh and brackish water farmed and wild fish in the Asia-Pacific region. The in vitro germination and growth of the propagules of the EUS pathogen, Aphanomyces invadans (= A. piscicida), were assessed in the presence of the head-kidney macrophages, serum, and serum heated to inactivate complement proteins, of three EUS-susceptible and one resistant fish species. The susceptible species were: striped snakehead (Channa striata), giant gourami (Osphronemus gouramy) and silver barb [Barbodes (= Puntius) gonionotus], and the resistant species was Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Fish of all species were acclimatised to either low temperature (20 degrees C +/- 1.6) at which EUS is known to occur, or to high temperature (32 degrees C +/- 5.0) at which EUS does not occur, except for giant gouramis which were only studied at low temperature. The respiratory burst of the macrophages was assessed in the presence of A. invadans or the stimulant phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and compared to that of controls. Anti-A. invadans antibody concentrations were assessed in all species except silver barbs. All assays were carried out at the same temperature, regardless of the temperature that the fish were kept at. Macrophages of all species other than snakeheads inhibited fungal germination at both temperatures, though only silver barb and gourami macrophages could inhibit germling growth. PMA increased the respiratory burst in nearly all cases. The respiratory burst in the presence of A. invadans was consistently lower than that of controls, though the difference was only significant in the case of snakeheads. The respiratory burst of all macrophage treatments was higher at a low temperature. Except in the case of PMA-stimulated macrophages, regressions between respiratory burst and inhibitory action were only found in susceptible species, suggesting that the respiratory burst is important in those

  10. Wild Banana Seed Phytobezoar Rectal Impaction Causing Intestinal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chai, Feng Yih; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Tan, Yew Eng; Chong, Hock Chin

    2016-08-01

    Wild banana (Musa acuminata subsp. microcarpa) seed phytobezoar rectal impaction in adult is a rare entity. Here, we report a 75-year-old male with dementia who presented with lower abdominal pain, per-rectal bleeding and overflow faecal incontinence. Our investigation discovered a large wild banana seed phytobezoar impacted in the rectum causing intestinal obstruction, stercoral ulcer and faecal overflow incontinence. In this article, we discuss the patient's clinical findings, imaging and management. The culprit plant was identified and depicted. This may be the first report of its kind. Public consumption of these wild bananas should be curtailed. It is hoped that this report would increase the awareness of such condition and its identification. PMID:27574355

  11. Ileocolonic ulcer treated by endoscopic application of collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone

    PubMed Central

    de Hoyos Garza, Andrés; Aguilar, Edgar A Esparza; Checa Richards, Griselda

    2007-01-01

    Ulceration is a complication that may occur after an ileocolonic anastomosis. Most of the etiologies remain speculative. The case of a 33-year-old woman with eosinophilic colitis is reported, in whom a colectomy with an ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. After four months, the patient presented with a stenosis in the ileocolonic anastomosis, necessitating surgical restoration. Four weeks later, the patient presented with rectal bleeding, and a colonoscopy showed an ulcer in the anastomosis. Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone was applied into and on the surface of the ulcer, and five days later the procedure was repeated. Follow-up endoscopies at seven days and three months showed complete healing of the ulcer and the patient remained without bleeding throughout a further four weeks of follow-up tests. It was concluded that this biological product could be an excellent treatment for these lesions. PMID:17703251

  12. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  13. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romêo, Daniela de Araújo; Escudero, Carlos Caparrós; Vázquez, Rosa María Lepe; Falcón, María Del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease.

  14. Rectal bleeding induced by Dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Bayer, I; Kyzer, S; Creter, D; Lewinski, U H

    1986-02-01

    Nineteen patients treated continuously with Dipyridamole were evaluated for rectal bleeding. Thirteen suffered from overt rectal bleeding and six served as controls. Hemorrhoids were found in all patients. Contact bleeding was found in 16. The bleeding continued despite rubber band ligation, and stopped only on withdrawal of the drug. PMID:3484697

  15. [Vaginal ulceration induced by abuse of tampons].

    PubMed

    Raudrant, D; de Haas, P; Saintfort, P

    1987-01-01

    A large vaginal ulcerated area which came about because super-absorbant tampons had been worn for three years is reported. Cure was obtained when the area was excised and sutured. There was no recurrence after the patient stopped using the tampons. There are 36 cases reported in the literature. Ulceration occurs in young women (25 years), nulliparous or primiparous (79%), who use tampons abnormally during the periods and between the periods (75%). The ulceration is always characteristic in appearance: it is a punched-out area, round or oval in shape, and is situated in the upper third of the vaginal barrel near where the tampon presses on to the vagina. Spontaneous cure occurs in 75% of cases when the tampon is no longer used. Physio-pathological hypotheses as to the causation are given. A suggestion is made as to the relationship between this syndrome and the staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. The discovery of vaginal ulceration is not usually due to use of menstrual tampons. One has to think of adenosis of the vagina, herpetic ulceration, a syphilitic chancre or cancer, the diagnosis depending a little on the age of the patient. In our case that we report, continuous usage of super-absorbant tampons was accompanied by a large vaginal ulcer. Because of this case we have reviewed the literature about the cases that have been reported and have collected 36 cases.

  16. Rectal cancer: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Claus; Hofheinz, Ralf; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2016-08-01

    The monolithic approach to apply the same schedule of preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)- or capecitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to all patients with clinically staged TNM stage II/III rectal cancer need to be questioned. Five randomized trials have been completed to determine if the addition of oxaliplatin to preoperative 5-FU/capecitabine-based CRT offers an advantage compared with single-agent CRT. In contrast to the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 trial, results from the ACCORD 12, STAR-01, PETACC-6 and NSAPB R-04 trials failed to demonstrate a significant improvement of early or late efficacy endpoints with the addition of oxaliplatin. Most of the phase II trials incorporating cetuximab into CRT reported disappointingly low rates of pCR; the combination of CRT with VEGF inhibition showed encouraging pCR rates but at the cost of increased surgical complications. Novel clinical trials currently address (1) the role of induction and consolidation chemotherapy before or after CRT, (2) minimal or omitted surgery following complete response to CRT, or (3) the omission of radiotherapy for selected patients with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The notion of different multimodal treatment concepts according to tumor stage, location, mesorectal fascia margin status, molecular profiles, tumor response, and patients' preferences becomes increasingly popular and will render the multimodal treatment approach of rectal cancer more risk-adapted. PMID:27644910

  17. [Ulcer surgery - what remains?].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, A H; Bollschweiler, E; Mönig, S P

    2006-06-01

    Ulcer surgery today concentrates on the complications of chronic ulcer disease, especially ulcer perforation and endoscopically uncontrollable ulcer bleeding. In this case the laparoscopic or open closure of the gastroduodenal defect or local hemostasis of the bleeding ulcer by laparotomy are the main aims of surgery. Elective operations due to recurrent gastric or duodenal ulcers have become rare. An indication for gastric ulcer resistant to conservative therapy could be persisting suspicion of malignancy whereas in duodenal ulcer gastric outlet obstruction represents a reason for surgery. If these indications are confirmed the classic procedures of gastric resection like Billroth I and Billroth II are performed whereas vagotomy is no longer used. Altogether ulcer surgery has become very safe although it is practiced quite rarely.

  18. Emergency ulcer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Constance W; Sarosi, George A

    2011-10-01

    The rate of elective surgery for peptic ulcer disease has been declining steadily over the past 3 decades. During this same period, the rate of emergency ulcer surgery rose by 44%. This means that the gastrointestinal surgeon is likely to be called on to manage the emergent complications of peptic ulcer disease without substantial experience in elective peptic ulcer disease surgery. The goal of this review is to familiarize surgeons with our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, and management of peptic ulcer disease in the emergency setting, with a focus on peptic ulcer disease-associated bleeding and perforation.

  19. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  20. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  1. Ulcer emergencies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcers may lead to emergency situations. Severe abdominal pain with or without evidence of bleeding may indicate a perforation of the ulcer through the stomach or duodenum. Vomiting of a substance that resembles coffee grounds, ...

  2. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  3. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Somesh; Ajith, C; Malhotra, S; Kumar, Bhushan

    2004-01-01

    Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having 'genital ulcer syndrome' in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  4. Ulcerative colitis and a bleeding polyp detected on Tc-99m-pertechnetate abdominal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Howman-Giles, R.

    1981-10-01

    Two children with rectal bleeding were diagnosed as having ulcerative colitis and a bleeding colonic polyp respectively using abdominal scanning with Tc-99m pertechnetate. Early flow studies are recommended with careful attention paid to the amount of time abnormal areas of activity are seen on the abdominal scan.

  5. Rectal organ culture as a model for the investigation of bacterial adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, R J; Branch, W J; Warren, R E; Neale, G

    1984-01-01

    A system was developed for the in vitro culture of human rectal mucosa. Its viability was proved by histological appearances and by metabolic studies. Biopsy samples were cultured in the presence of appropriate bacteria isolated from the faeces of patients with ulcerative colitis or with dysenteric illnesses. Attempts to show adhesion of bacteria to the mucosa or invasion of the cultured tissue failed. Problems with the use of this model are discussed. Images PMID:6373834

  6. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  7. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  8. [Rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sierra-Montenegro, Ernesto; Sierra-Luzuriaga, Gastón; Calle-Loffredo, Daniel; Rodríguez Quinde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: el síndrome de Trousseau se describió por primera vez en 1865; es la relación entre tromboembolismo venoso y cáncer. Objetivo: informar el caso de una paciente con cáncer de recto y síndrome de Trousseau. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 40 años de edad que acudió al servicio de Coloproctología por rectorragia indolora. La TAC reportó un tumor de 5 por 6cm y del margen anal a 5cm. Se efectuó resección anterior ultrabaja, con reservorio colónico e ileostomía de protección. El reporte de patología fue de: adenocarcinoma semidiferenciado del recto, con clasificación T3N0M0. A las 72 horas del postoperatorio tuvo hipotensión arterial súbita y distensión abdominal dolorosa. En la reintervención quirúrgica se encontró: necrosis del colon desde el ángulo esplénico hasta el reservorio colónico, con trombos en meso, signos de isquemia en el útero, trompa de Falopio y ovarios, piso pélvico y 40 cm de intestino delgado, antes de la ileostomía e íleon. Se realizó hemicolectomía izquierda y colostomía. Se trasladó a la unidad de terapia intensiva donde continuó con la administración de heparina; falleció a los cinco días por insuficiencia multiorgánica. Conclusiones: el mecanismo de este síndrome se desconoce pero existen varias hipótesis: se ha sugerido que los cánceres hematológicos son los que tienen mayor riesgo de trombosis venosa profunda. El cáncer de páncreas se relaciona con este síndrome en 50% de los casos. Se sugiere continuar con las normas de prevención del tromboembolismo.

  9. Ulcerative Colitis: A Challenge to Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23189226

  10. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  11. Management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries.

    PubMed

    Bostick, P J; Johnson, D A; Heard, J F; Islas, J T; Sims, E H; Fleming, A W; Sterling-Scott, R P

    1993-06-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive extraperitoneal rectal injuries for a period of 34 months ending in May 1990 were reviewed retrospectively. All injuries were due to penetrating gunshot wounds. The rectal exam was positive in 75% of patients versus 80.8% with proctosigmoidoscopy. All 28 patients had diversion of the fecal stream. Diverting colostomies were performed in 17 patients, Hartmann's colostomies in 7 patients, and proximal loop colostomies in 4 patients. Presacral drainage was used in 25 patients (89.3%). Distal irrigation was performed in 13 patients (46.4%) and primary repair in 9 patients (32.1%). There was one infectious complication (3.6%) and no deaths (0%). Fecal diversion and presacral drainage are the mainstay of therapy for civilian rectal injuries. The importance of distal irrigation of the rectum has not been established. Primary repair of the rectum has no effect on morbidity and mortality.

  12. Thalidomide for mouth ulcers and wasting.

    PubMed

    Baker, R

    1995-12-01

    Thalidomide (Synovir), noted for causing severe birth defects when taken by pregnant women, can effectively and safely heal serious mouth ulcers (oral aphthous ulcers) in people with HIV infection. Interim results from a study supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) show that ulcers healed in 14 of 23 people taking 200 mg/day oral thalidomide compared to only 1 of 22 people receiving placebo. Celgene Corporation is conducting a multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of Synovir for the treatment of wasting syndrome. Participants will receive the drug for free, and will take one of three doses: 10, 50, or 200 mg. Interested parties should call the Healing Alternatives Foundation or the PWA Health group.

  13. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery as optimal option in treatment of rare rectal lesions: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Monica; Ghiselli, Roberto; Cappelletti Trombettoni, Maria Michela; Cardinali, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the outcomes of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rare rectal condition like mesenchymal tumors, condylomas, endometriosis and melanoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a twenty-three years database. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in this study. The lesions were considered suitable for TEM if they were within 20 cm from the anus. All of them underwent an accurate preoperative workup consisting in clinical examination, total colonoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography, and pelvic computerized tomography or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Operative time, intraoperative complications, rate of conversion, tumor size, postoperative morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, local and distant recurrence were analyzed. RESULTS Among the 1328 patients treated by TEM in our department, the 52 patients with rectal abnormalities other than adenoma or adenocarcinoma represented 4.4%. There were 30 males (57.7%) and 22 females (42.3%). Mean age was 55 years (median = 60, range = 24-78). This series included 14 (26.9%) gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 21 neuroendocrine tumors (40.4%), 1 ganglioneuroma (1.9%), 2 solitary ulcers in the rectum (3.8%), 6 cases of rectal endometriosis (11.5%), 6 cases of rectal condylomatosis (11.5%) and 2 rectal melanomas (3.8%). Mean lesion diameter was 2.7 cm (median: 4, range: 0.4-8). Mean distance from the anal verge was 9.5 cm (median: 10, range: 4-15). One patient operated for rectal melanoma developed distant metastases and died two years after the operation. We experienced 2 local recurrences (3.8%) with an overall survival equal to 97.6% (95%CI: 95%-99%) at the end of follow-up and a disease free survival of 98% (95%CI: 96%-99%). CONCLUSION We could conclude that TEM is an important therapeutical option for rectal rare conditions. PMID:27668073

  14. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery as optimal option in treatment of rare rectal lesions: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Monica; Ghiselli, Roberto; Cappelletti Trombettoni, Maria Michela; Cardinali, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the outcomes of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rare rectal condition like mesenchymal tumors, condylomas, endometriosis and melanoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a twenty-three years database. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in this study. The lesions were considered suitable for TEM if they were within 20 cm from the anus. All of them underwent an accurate preoperative workup consisting in clinical examination, total colonoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography, and pelvic computerized tomography or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Operative time, intraoperative complications, rate of conversion, tumor size, postoperative morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, local and distant recurrence were analyzed. RESULTS Among the 1328 patients treated by TEM in our department, the 52 patients with rectal abnormalities other than adenoma or adenocarcinoma represented 4.4%. There were 30 males (57.7%) and 22 females (42.3%). Mean age was 55 years (median = 60, range = 24-78). This series included 14 (26.9%) gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 21 neuroendocrine tumors (40.4%), 1 ganglioneuroma (1.9%), 2 solitary ulcers in the rectum (3.8%), 6 cases of rectal endometriosis (11.5%), 6 cases of rectal condylomatosis (11.5%) and 2 rectal melanomas (3.8%). Mean lesion diameter was 2.7 cm (median: 4, range: 0.4-8). Mean distance from the anal verge was 9.5 cm (median: 10, range: 4-15). One patient operated for rectal melanoma developed distant metastases and died two years after the operation. We experienced 2 local recurrences (3.8%) with an overall survival equal to 97.6% (95%CI: 95%-99%) at the end of follow-up and a disease free survival of 98% (95%CI: 96%-99%). CONCLUSION We could conclude that TEM is an important therapeutical option for rectal rare conditions.

  15. Rectal microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Adam M.; Hand, Nicholas J.; Tsoucas, Daphne M.; Le Guen, Claire L.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Friedman, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in intestinal microRNAs have been reported in adult patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. The goal of this study was to identify changes in microRNA expression associated with colitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods Rectal mucosal biopsies (n=50) and blood samples (n=47) were collected from patients with known or suspected inflammatory bowel disease undergoing endoscopy. Rectal and serum microRNA levels were profiled using the human nCounter® platform and the TaqMan® low-density array platform, respectively. Significantly altered microRNAs were then validated in independent sample sets via quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro luciferase reporter assays were performed in the human colorectal Caco-2 cell line to determine the effect of miR-192 on NOD2 expression. Results Profiling of rectal RNA identified 21 microRNAs significantly altered between control, UC, and colonic CD sample groups. Nine of the ten microRNAs selected for validation were confirmed as significantly changed. Rectal miR-24 was increased 1.47-fold in UC compared to CD samples (p=0.0052) and was the only microRNA altered between IBD subtypes. Three colitis-associated microRNAs were significantly altered in the sera of disease patients and displayed diagnostic utility. However, no serum microRNAs were found to distinguish ulcerative colitis from Crohn’s colitis. Finally, miR-192 inhibition did not affect luciferase reporter activity, suggesting miR-192 does not regulate human NOD2. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that rectal and serum microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Future studies identifying the targets of inflammatory bowel disease-associated microRNAs may lead to novel therapies. PMID:24613022

  16. Ulcerating type 1 lepra reaction mimicking lazarine leprosy: an unusual presentation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramesh; Pinto, Malcolm; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Kambil, Srinath

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy maybe "unmasked" in the context of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and treating dermatologists, particularly in highly endemic areas for Hansen's disease, need to be cognizant to this possibility. It may also reflect emergence of a previously clinically silent infection in the course of immunologic restoration. PMID:24216029

  17. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  18. Incidence and prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Punjab, North India

    PubMed Central

    Sood, A; Midha, V; Sood, N; Bhatia, A S; Avasthi, G

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Ulcerative colitis occurs worldwide. It is considered common in most of Europe and North America and uncommon in most of the developing Asian countries. The incidence/prevalence of ulcerative colitis varies not only according to geographical region but also with race and ethnicity. There are no reported data from India on the incidence of the disease and its prevalence. Material and methods: A house to house survey was conducted by questionnaire, formulated to enquire about symptoms that are suggestive of ulcerative colitis. Those with prolonged diarrhoea with or without rectal bleeding were considered as suspected cases. These suspected cases were subjected to video sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy and rectal biopsy. In addition, patients already diagnosed and receiving treatment for ulcerative colitis, encountered during the survey, were reviewed. Resurvey of the same areas was conducted after a one year interval to detect new cases. Using direct methods, standardised rates were calculated using world standard population weights 22, 18, 16, 12, 12, 9, 7, 3, and 1 for each 10 year age group. Standardised rates were also obtained separately for males, females, and combined populations, using the Punjab state 1991 population census data. Rates were also estimated according to UK 2000 population data. Ninety five per cent confidence intervals (95% CI) of prevalence and incidence rates of ulcerative colitis were estimated under the assumption that the distribution of cases followed a Poisson probability model. Results: A total population of 51 910 were screened from January to March 1999. We identified 147 suspected cases and of these 23 were finally established as ulcerative colitis cases, giving a crude prevalence rate of 44.3 per 100 000 inhabitants (95% CI 29.4–66.6). A second visit to the same areas after one year identified 10 suspected cases in a population of 49 834. Of these, three were confirmed as “definite” ulcerative colitis giving a crude

  19. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  20. Multiple colonic ulcers associated with trisomy 8: serial changes in colonoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shunichi; Nakamura, Shotaro; Kawasaki, Keisuke; Ito, Shigeki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2016-10-01

    We report a 54-year-old female patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with trisomy 8, who had multiple colonic ulcers. The patient had been diagnosed as having MDS of refractory cytopenia with trisomy 8 10 years previously. She underwent colonoscopy for abdominal pain, which revealed severe circumferential stenosis with multiple ulcers in the ileocecal region and a discrete excavating ulcer in the transverse colon. The patient had been free from any dermatological, oral, genital or ocular symptoms suggestive of Behçet's disease (BD). A diagnosis of multiple colonic ulcers associated with MDS with trisomy 8 was thus suggested. Follow-up colonoscopies 5 and 6 years later revealed progression of the ileocecal stenosis to a circumferential ulcer, while the ulcer in the transverse colon had not changed. Because our patient lacked extraintestinal symptoms of BD, trisomy 8 was presumed to be responsible for her colonic ulcers. PMID:27412026

  1. Excessive bleeding from genital ulcers of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bostankolu, A; Aksungur, V L; Aksungur, E H; Ozpoyraz, M; Yücel, A; Memisoglu, H R

    1997-09-01

    Although genital ulcers are a common manifestation of Behçet's disease, bleeding from these lesions is unusual. In this report, a patient with excessive bleeding from genital ulcers is presented. A 22-year-old man with recurrent oral and genital ulcers, erythema nodosum, folliculitis, positive pathergic reaction, uveitis, superior vena cava syndrome, and generalized lymphadenopathy fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Behçet's disease. Three years after presenting he was admitted to our clinic with excessive bleeding from large ulcers on the scrotum and upper thighs and with a leg ulcer. Bleeding was controlled with compresses. Examination of a biopsy specimen obtained from the leg ulcer showed findings consistent with Kaposi-like acroangiodermatitis. Results of various radiologic investigations showed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, peritesticular varicosities, and venous insufficiency of the lower extremities. We suggest that the bleeding was secondary to the extension of genital ulcers to the varicose veins.

  2. Efficacy of omeprazole paste in the prevention of gastric ulcers in 2 years old Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yoshiro; Tsuchiya, Takeru; Sato, Fumio; Murase, Harutaka; Omura, Takaya; Korosue, Kenji; Nambo, Yasuo; Ishimaru, Mutsuki; Wakui, Yasuhiro

    2012-08-01

    Prevalence of equine gastric ulcer syndrome in 85 young Thoroughbreds was investigated. The presence of gastric ulcers was confirmed in 27.1% (23/85) of the horses by endoscopic examination. Sixty-two horses without gastric ulcers were allocated randomly to either the treated group (31 horses) or sham-dosed control group (31 horses) in order to investigate the efficacy of omeprazole oral paste in the prevention of gastric ulcers. At the second endoscopic examination conducted after 28 days of administration, only 1 horse in the treated group developed gastric ulcers, while 12 horses developed gastric ulcers in the control group. Based on these data, the efficacy of omeprazole in prevention of equine gastric ulcers in young Thoroughbreds during the training period was confirmed.

  3. Etiology of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Smith, J G

    1993-10-01

    The etiology of venous ulceration is far more complex than Homans' theory of stagnation and hypo-oxygenation. Indeed, studies have shown that flow in lipodermatosclerotic limbs is actually faster than normal. We suggest, therefore, that the terms "stasis dermatitis" and "stasis ulcer" be dropped from medical parlance. The term "lipodermatosclerosis with ulceration" as used by the British, or simply "venous ulcer," would seem more appropriate. Venous hypertension, produced by incompetence of deep and communicating vein valves and thrombosis of segments of the deep system, is closely correlated with the development of venous ulcers. Precisely how this venous hypertension translates into ulceration is unclear. Burnand et al showed that fibrin cuffs are deposited around the capillaries in lipodermatosclerotic limbs. These cuffs may serve as barriers to the diffusion of oxygen, leading to local ischemia and epidermal necrosis. Others suggest that trapped leukocytes in the microcirculation alter capillary permeability by releasing various inflammatory mediators that hasten the flow of fibrinogen across the capillary membrane and promote the formation of fibrin cuffs. Proof of this hypothesis is still lacking, but may eventually come from using radioactive WBC tagging procedures. A synthesis of these two theories may in fact explain the etiology of venous ulceration. PMID:8211332

  4. [Perforated gastroduodenal stress ulcer].

    PubMed

    Melinte, C; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data support the role of oxidative stress in the development of gastro-duodenal inflammatory lesions and peptic ulcer. Although quite common, stress ulcer remains a minor concern in the The authors review the literature data and perform a retrospective study on 205 personal cases of gastroduodenal ulcers, diagnosed and operated in the period 1986-2005. Of these, 58 (28.29%) were perforated ulcers, including 4 cases (6.8%) caused by various psychic traumas. All the patients presented symptoms and signs characteristic for perforated ulcer and were undoubtedly of psychogenic cause. The surgical treatment consisted in the closure of the perforation and peritoneal drainage. Besides medical treatment of peptic ulcer disease consisting of antisecretory drugs, antioxidants and sedatives were used. Postoperative follow-up showed a rapid and uneventful recovery in all cases. In conclusion, surgery is the mainstay of treatment in perforated ulcer, but additional stress therapy promotes healing and may reduce postoperative morbidity in cases with certain involvement of psychic trauma.

  5. Nonspecific genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Recent intervention of nonspecific genital ulcers has added refreshing dimensions to genital ulcer disease. It was considered pertinent to dwell on diverse clinical presentation and diagnostic strategies. It seems to possess spectrum. It includes infective causes, Epstein Bar Virus, tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, HIV/AIDS related ulcers and amoebiasis. Noninfective causes are immunobullous disorders, aphthosis, Behcet's disease (BD), inflammatory bowel disease, lichen planus and lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, drug reactions, premalignant and malignant conditions, pyoderma gangrenosum, and hidradenitis suppurativa. The diagnostic features and treatment option of each disorder are succinctly outlined for ready reference.

  6. Histological evaluation in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    DeRoche, Tom C; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Xiuli

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes diagnostic problems, challenges and advances in ulcerative colitis (UC). It emphasizes that, although histopathological examination plays a major role in the diagnosis and management of UC, it should always be interpreted in the context of clinical, endoscopic, and radiological findings. Accurate diagnosis requires knowledge of the classic morphological features of UC, as well as a number of atypical pathological presentations that may cause mis-classification of the disease process, either in resection or biopsy specimens. These atypical pathological presentations include rectal sparing and patchiness of disease at initial presentation of UC in pediatric patients or in the setting of medically treated UC, cecal or ascending colon inflammation in left-sided UC, and backwash ileitis in patients with severe ulcerative pancolitis. Loosely formed microgranulomas, with pale foamy histiocytes adjacent to a damaged crypt or eroded surface, should not be interpreted as evidence of Crohn's disease. Indeterminate colitis should only be used in colectomy specimens as a provisional pathological diagnosis. Patients with UC are at risk for the development of dysplasia and carcinoma; optimal outcomes in UC surveillance programs require familiarity with the diagnostic criteria and challenges relating to UC-associated dysplasia and malignancy. Colon biopsy from UC patients should always be evaluated for dysplasia based on cytological and architectural abnormalities. Accurate interpretation and classification of dysplasia in colon biopsy from UC patients as sporadic adenoma or UC-related dysplasia [flat, adenoma-like, or dysplasia-associated lesion or mass (DALM)] requires clinical and endoscopic correlation. Isolated polypoid dysplastic lesions are considered to be sporadic adenoma if occurring outside areas of histologically proven colitis, or adenoma-like dysplasia if occurring in the diseased segment. Recent data suggest that such lesions may be treated

  7. Diagnosis and classification of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karsten; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Laass, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterised by superficial mucosal ulceration, rectal bleeding, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. In contrast to Crohn's disease (CrD), UC is restricted to the colon and the inflammation is limited to the mucosal layer. Classic UC affects the colon in a retrograde and continuous fashion starting from the rectum and extending proximally. Dependent on the anatomic extent of involvement, UC can be classified as proctitis, left-sided colitis, or pancolitis. Inflammatory arthropathies and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are the most common and clinically most important extraintestinal manifestations of UC. The aetiopathogenesis of UC is incompletely understood, but immune-mediated mechanisms are responsible for dysregulated immune responses against intraluminal antigens in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnosis is based on the history, as well as clinical, radiological, endoscopic and histological features. Autoantibodies, mainly antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-goblet cell antibodies (GAB) may be helpful in the early diagnosis of UC and in differentiating it from CrD.

  8. Rectal Ischemia Mimicked Tumor Mass

    PubMed Central

    Zikos, Nicolaos; Aggeli, Panagiota; Louka, Evangelia; Pappas-Gogos, George

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic proctitis is a rare disease which is usually encountered in elderly with comorbidities. We present a case of an 80-year old man with severe coronary disease who presented with severe hematochezia and hypotension. Endoscopy revealed a rectal mass 3-4 cm above the dental line and rectosigmoid mucosal inflammation compatible with ischemic colitis. The rectal insult was so intense that it resembled a neoplasmatic lesion. We discuss the causes, the prognostic factors, and the clinical and therapeutic challenges of this rare, albeit life-threatening entity, and we review the relative literature. A percentage of 10%–20% of patients with ischemic colitis usually have a distal potentially obstructing lesion or disorder such as cancer, diverticulitis or fecal impaction. Ischemic colitis, when mucosal and submucosal edema is severe and hemorrhagic nodules are large enough, can mimic a neoplasmatic lesion. The best treatment approach is a conservative management initially with a close clinical followup and after stabilization a repetition of rectal endoscopy with new biopsies. Early recognition of this clinical entity is of paramount importance to implement appropriate therapy (conservative or surgical) and avoid potentially fatal treatment of presumed inflammatory or infectious bowel diseases. PMID:24109523

  9. Optimizing Treatment for Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Jennifer; Gurland, Brooke

    2016-09-01

    Rectal prolapse is associated with debilitating symptoms and leads to both functional impairment and anatomic distortion. Symptoms include rectal bulge, mucous drainage, bleeding, incontinence, constipation, tenesmus, as well as discomfort, pressure, and pain. The only cure is surgical. The optimal surgical repair is not yet defined though laparoscopic rectopexy with mesh is emerging as a more durable approach. The chosen approach should be individually tailored, taking into account factors such as presence of pelvic floor defects and coexistence of vaginal prolapse, severe constipation, surgical fitness, and whether the patient has had a previous prolapse procedure. Consideration of a multidisciplinary approach is critical in patients with concomitant vaginal prolapse. Surgeons must weigh their familiarity with each approach and should have in their armamentarium both perineal and abdominal approaches. Previous barriers to abdominal procedures, such as age and comorbidities, are waning as minimally invasive approaches have gained acceptance. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is one such approach offering relatively low morbidity, low recurrence rates, and good functional improvement. However, proficiency with this procedure may require advanced training. Robotic rectopexy is another burgeoning approach which facilitates suturing in the pelvis. Successful rectal prolapse surgeries improve function and have low recurrence rates, though it is important to note that correcting the prolapse does not assure functional improvement. PMID:27582654

  10. [The value of corticosteroids in the treatment of sterile ulcer in rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Elasri, F; Souhail, H; Reda, K; Iferkhass, S; Massoudi, R; Idrissi, A; Naoumi, A; Chana, H; Oubaaz, A

    2011-12-01

    Ocular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis are mainly dry eye syndrome, scleritis, and keratitis. The occurrence of corneal ulceration in the course of this disease is a rare complication but can lead to ocular perforation. We report the case of a woman followed for rheumatoid arthritis who presented a bilateral sterile paracentral ulcer that responded well to medical treatment.

  11. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. PMID:24403010

  12. Long-term prognosis of children with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, K. M.; Shanks, Robert A.

    1973-01-01

    The subsequent course of ulcerative colitis in 25 children admitted to hospital during the period 1931 to 1971 is reviewed. The period of observation averaged 24 years, ranging from 1 to 41 years. 19 patients showed extracolonic manifestations. 4 patients had a single attack of colitis, and in 19 the disease was of the chronic intermittent type. There was one case each of the acute fulminating and chronic continuous types. Three of 8 patients who had colectomy died postoperatively. One further patient died later of carcinoma of the rectal stump. At follow-up 5 patients (20%) had died and the remaining 20 (80%) were in remission. Although the case for surgery in the treatment of acute fulminating or resistant ulcerative colitis may be clear, that for prophylactic panproctocolectomy while the disease is in remission requires further study. PMID:4703063

  13. Diffuse colorectal angiodysplasia misdiagnosed preoperatively as ulcerative colitis in a child: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ilter; Birol Bostanci, E; Ozogul, Yusuf B; Ulker, Aysel; Temucin, Tulay; Akoglu, Musa

    2008-01-01

    Angiodysplasia is primarily a disease of the elderly, and it is rarely encountered in the pediatric population. We report a case of diffuse colorectal angiodysplasia, diagnosed postoperatively in a 13-year-old boy who underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) for assumed corticosteroid-resistant ulcerative colitis. The findings of preoperative repeated colonoscopies and biopsies had been consistent with active colitis. Distinguishing ulcerative colitis from angiodysplasia is not usually difficult in patients with rectal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the fi rst case report of such a challenging diagnostic problem. PMID:18668317

  14. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  15. Ulcer and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, H

    2007-02-01

    Five papers, discussing important topics related to ulcer and gastritis, have been selected for review here. The papers, which include some excellent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, were published between July 2005 and August 2006.

  16. Currarino syndrome: Rare clinical variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical condition. The classical presentation includes a triad of sacral anomaly, anorectal malformations, and presacral mass. This syndrome belongs to the group of persistent neuroenteric malformations. This article presents two cases of Currarino syndrome, where there was rare clinical variants such as rectal atresia in the first case and rectal stenosis in the second case. The clinical presentations were very deceptive as the first case presented as high anorectal malformation and the second case was simulating Hirschprung's disease.

  17. Currarino syndrome: Rare clinical variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical condition. The classical presentation includes a triad of sacral anomaly, anorectal malformations, and presacral mass. This syndrome belongs to the group of persistent neuroenteric malformations. This article presents two cases of Currarino syndrome, where there was rare clinical variants such as rectal atresia in the first case and rectal stenosis in the second case. The clinical presentations were very deceptive as the first case presented as high anorectal malformation and the second case was simulating Hirschprung's disease. PMID:27695213

  18. [Leg ulcer: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Fradique, Caldeira; Pupo, Alexandra; Quaresma, Luísa; Palma-Rosa, Ana; Fernandes, Mário; Silva, Gualdino; Almeida, Heitor; Diogo, Cláudia; Pinho, Ana Catarina

    2011-01-01

    During 16 years 202 patients with leg ulcer have been studied prospectively. Whenever possible, cure has been obtained in ambulatory, which was the main objective. Surgery was preferentially made after the cure of the ulcer. From the 202 patients, 166 have made a prolonged follow-up. Cure in ambulatory has been obtained in 91% of the patients. We stress the importance of the direct control of all the treatment by the responsible doctor.

  19. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  20. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  1. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  5. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  6. [A Case of Peristomal Cutaneous Ulcer Following Amebic Colitis Caused by Entamoeba histolytica].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Jun; Kobayashi, Seiki; Sato, Tomotaka

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese male with a history of a rectal ulcer and rectovesical fistula following brachytherapy and radiotherapy for prostate cancer, who had undergone colostomy and vesicotomy presented with a painful peristomal ulcer of approximately 5 x 2.5cm adjacent to the direction of 6 o'clock of the stoma in his left lower abdomen. Although he was admitted to be treated with intravenous antibiotics and topical debridement, the ulcer was rapidly increasing. In the laboratory findings, WBC was 12,400/μL, CRP was 16.9 mg/dL, ESR was 105mm in the first hour. Contrast enhanced CT images showed a wide high density area of skin and subcutaneous tissue around the stoma and dillitation of the transverse and descending colon. Colonoscopy showed furred profound ulcers in the rectum. A biopsy from the ulcer floor submitted to histopathology showed necrotic tissue with a mixed inflammatory infiltrates mainly composed of neutrophils and lymphocytes in the dermis. We suspected pyoderma gangrenosum with an inflammatory bowel disease in the beginning. Although he was started on oral prednisolone 60 mg daily, the ulcer did not respond to treatment. Additional methylprednisolone pulse therapy, intravenous cyclosporine and granulocytapheresis were also ineffective. A biopsy specimen from the skin ulcer margin showed erythrophagocytosis by trophozoites of amebae which were identified on PAS stained slides. The PCR method and stool examination showed positive for Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), but serum antibodies were negative. Within two weeks of treatment with oral metronidazole 2,250 mg/day and topical metronidazole ointment, resolution of the ulcer was observed, then the prednisolone dosage was tapered. A split-thickness skin graft was used to cover the ulcer with a successful result. Even though we originally misdiagnosed this case, we finally reached a diagnosis of amebiasis. It is important to take account of amebiasis in the differential diagnosis of intractable

  7. [A Case of Peristomal Cutaneous Ulcer Following Amebic Colitis Caused by Entamoeba histolytica].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Jun; Kobayashi, Seiki; Sato, Tomotaka

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese male with a history of a rectal ulcer and rectovesical fistula following brachytherapy and radiotherapy for prostate cancer, who had undergone colostomy and vesicotomy presented with a painful peristomal ulcer of approximately 5 x 2.5cm adjacent to the direction of 6 o'clock of the stoma in his left lower abdomen. Although he was admitted to be treated with intravenous antibiotics and topical debridement, the ulcer was rapidly increasing. In the laboratory findings, WBC was 12,400/μL, CRP was 16.9 mg/dL, ESR was 105mm in the first hour. Contrast enhanced CT images showed a wide high density area of skin and subcutaneous tissue around the stoma and dillitation of the transverse and descending colon. Colonoscopy showed furred profound ulcers in the rectum. A biopsy from the ulcer floor submitted to histopathology showed necrotic tissue with a mixed inflammatory infiltrates mainly composed of neutrophils and lymphocytes in the dermis. We suspected pyoderma gangrenosum with an inflammatory bowel disease in the beginning. Although he was started on oral prednisolone 60 mg daily, the ulcer did not respond to treatment. Additional methylprednisolone pulse therapy, intravenous cyclosporine and granulocytapheresis were also ineffective. A biopsy specimen from the skin ulcer margin showed erythrophagocytosis by trophozoites of amebae which were identified on PAS stained slides. The PCR method and stool examination showed positive for Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), but serum antibodies were negative. Within two weeks of treatment with oral metronidazole 2,250 mg/day and topical metronidazole ointment, resolution of the ulcer was observed, then the prednisolone dosage was tapered. A split-thickness skin graft was used to cover the ulcer with a successful result. Even though we originally misdiagnosed this case, we finally reached a diagnosis of amebiasis. It is important to take account of amebiasis in the differential diagnosis of intractable

  8. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  9. Baseline Oral 5-ASA Use and Efficacy and Safety of Budesonide Foam in Patients with Ulcerative Proctitis and Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis: Analysis of 2 Phase 3 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandborn, William J.; Rubin, David T.; Harper, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rectal budesonide foam is a second-generation corticosteroid efficacious for active mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. This subgroup analysis examined the impact of baseline oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) on the efficacy and safety of budesonide foam in patients with mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis or ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. Methods: Patients received budesonide foam 2 mg/25 mL twice daily for 2 weeks, then once daily for 4 weeks, or placebo, with or without continued stable dosing of baseline oral 5-ASAs, for remission induction at week 6 (primary endpoint) in 2 identically designed, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 studies. Results: Of the 267 and 279 patients randomized to treatment with budesonide foam or placebo (pooled population), 55.1% and 55.2%, respectively, reported baseline 5-ASA use. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved remission with budesonide foam versus placebo, either with (42.2% versus 31.8%, respectively; P = 0.03) or without (40.0% versus 14.4%; P < 0.0001) baseline 5-ASA use at week 6. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved a Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index rectal bleeding subscale score of 0 at week 6, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use (5-ASA, 50.3% versus 35.7%; P = 0.003: no 5-ASA, 45.8% versus 19.2%; P < 0.0001). The frequency of adverse events was comparable between groups, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use. Conclusions: Budesonide foam was efficacious and safe for induction of remission of mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis in patients receiving oral 5-ASA at baseline and those who were not (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01008410 and NCT01008423). PMID:27416045

  10. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Litchford, Mary D.; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available. PMID:24761345

  11. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Litchford, Mary D; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available.

  12. Nonoperative management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torok, Jordan A; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G; Czito, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has long been the primary curative modality for localized rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has significantly improved local control rates and, in a significant minority, eradicated all disease. Patients who achieve a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant therapy have an excellent prognosis, although the combination treatment is associated with long-term morbidity. Because of this, a nonoperative management (NOM) strategy has been pursued to preserve sphincter function in select patients. Clinical and radiographic findings are used to identify patients achieving a clinical complete response to chemoradiation, and they are then followed with intensive surveillance. Incomplete, nonresponding and those demonstrating local progression are referred for salvage with standard surgery. Habr-Gama and colleagues have published extensively on this treatment strategy and have laid the groundwork for this approach. This watch-and-wait strategy has evolved over time, and several groups have now reported their results, including recent prospective experiences. Although initial results appear promising, several significant challenges remain for NOM of rectal cancer. Further study is warranted before routine implementation in the clinic.

  13. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  14. [Genital ulcers caused by sexually transmitted diseases: current therapies, diagnosis and their relevance in HIV pandemy].

    PubMed

    Da Costa, João Borges; Domingues, Dulce; Castro, R; Exposto, Filomena

    2006-01-01

    The sexual transmitted pathogens associated with genital ulcers are Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes simplex virus type 1 or 2. Although geographic differences still exist, herpetic infections prevalence is growing worldwide as the most frequent ulcerative sexual transmitted disease. The failure of the many different used guidelines in achieving a sustained reduction in the number of new cases, in particular the WHO syndromic management, leads into an over treatment of bacterial agents and missing of viral agents. This situation is also associated with poor efficacy and wasting of economical resources. Ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexual transmitted diseases are important in the world HIV pandemy because they promote HIV transmission and are also associated with the disease evolution. Portugal had until recently the highest incidence of HIV infection in Europe and that points out to importance of treating and control of both ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexual transmitted diseases in order.

  15. The Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Basu, Somprakas; Bhartiya, Satyanam Kumar; Shukla, Vijay Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and can manifest as a simple nodule or as aggressive skin ulcers leading to debilitating osteoarthritis or limb deformity. The disease is more prevalent in those living in remote rural areas, especially in children younger than 15 years. The exact mode of transmission is possibly through traumatic skin lesions contaminated by M ulcerans. IS2404 polymerase chain reaction from ulcer swabs or biopsies is a rapid method for confirmation of BU. In coendemic countries, HIV infection complicates the progression of BU, leading to rapidly spreading osteomyelitis. Treatment is principally medical, with antitubercular drugs, and surgery is utilized for complicated disease. Because of ineffective vaccination, primary prevention is the best option for control of the disease. PMID:26286931

  16. Ulcerated tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Filanovsky, Michelle Gita; Sukhdeo, Kumar; McNamara, Megan Cunnane

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterised by hyperuricemia, which, if poorly controlled, can lead to the development of tophi. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with poorly controlled polyarticular tophaceous gout with multiple comorbidities (including renal failure) who presented with tophaceous ulcers of the upper extremity. These ulcers caused extreme pain, requiring chronic opiate medications, and were associated with decreased sensation and reduced ability to move the extremity. His hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury, haemolytic anaemia and Clostridium difficile infection. He required 1 month of antibiotics and intensive wound care for his ulcers. This case highlights the diagnosis, natural history and management of an unusual complication of hyperuricemia. PMID:26240104

  17. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  18. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  19. New approach to surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis and polyposis coli without pelvic pouch. Experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chaimoff, C; Kyzer, S; Karib, N; Kessler, H; Bayer, I

    1989-07-01

    A new method for the surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis and polyposis coli is described. Instead of preparing a pelvic pouch, the natural rectal pouch stripped of the diseased mucosa was used experimentally in dogs. The undisturbed muscular cuff of the rectum (12 cm from the anal verge) was covered by healthy vascularized mucosa of small bowel in such a manner that the dog could use its rectum as usual before surgery. The results are encouraging. The rectal reservoir is spared, with its sensitivity, continence and motor activity covered by healthy mucosa. The dogs thrived. PMID:2544382

  20. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  1. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst. PMID:26691370

  2. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. [Ultrasonographic study of rectal carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Nomura, M; Fujita, N; Matsunaga, A; Ando, M; Tominaga, G; Noda, Y; Kobayashi, G; Kimura, K; Yuki, T; Ishida, K; Yago, A; Mochizuki, F; Chonan, A

    1996-11-01

    To compare intraluminal ultrasonographic (ILUS) findings with histological findings of rectal carcinoid tumors, 35 patients with rectal carcinoid tumors were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1) The rectal wall was visualized as a seven- or nine-layer structure by means of ILUS in 81% of the patients. 2) The possibility that the thin hyperechoic third layer above the tumor on ILUS corresponds to the muscularis mucosae and fibrointerstitium above the tumor histologically. 3) In cases with relatively high internal echoes, the amount of fibrointerstitium exceeded that of tumor cells histologically. 4) In cases with nonuniform internal echo patterns, tumor cells were separated by thick fibrointerstitium forming nodular nests.

  4. MRI staging of low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shihab, Oliver C; Moran, Brendan J; Heald, Richard J; Quirke, Philip; Brown, Gina

    2009-03-01

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. PMID:18810451

  5. Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula is a complication of gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Culafić, Dorde-M; Matejić, Olivera-D; Dukić, Vladimir-S; Vukcević, Miodrag-D; Kerkez, Mirko-D

    2007-01-21

    Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula formation is an extremely rare complication of gastric ulcer disease. We report a 77-year old woman who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, weight loss, malaise, nausea, and occasional dark stools. Laboratory tests showed extreme hyposideremic anemia with inflammatory syndrome. In addition, biochemical parameters of malnourishment were presented. Upper endoscopy revealed the patent esophagus along the full length without any pathological changes. Large and deep ulceration with perforation in the small intestine was detected in the posterior gastric wall. The small intestine loop was reached by endoscope through spontaneously developed gastrojejunal fistula. Polytopic biopsies of described ulcerative change were carried out. Histopathologically reepithelialized ulcerous zone was seen in the gastric mucosa. Also, gastrojejunal fistula was visualized after wide opening of hepatogastric and gastrocolic ligament. Jejunal loop 25 cm from ligament of Treitz was attached to mesocolon and posterior gastric wall because of ulcer penetration. Postoperative course was uneventful. Per oral intake started on the 4(th) postoperative day, and the patient was discharged on the 8(th) postoperative day. In summary, this case indicates that persistent symptoms of peptic ulcer disease associated with nutritional disturbances may be caused by gastrojejunal fistula.

  6. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  7. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  8. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  9. [Perianal and rectal impalement injuries].

    PubMed

    Joos, A K; Herold, A; Palma, P; Post, S

    2006-09-01

    Perianal impalement injuries with or without involvement of the anorectum are rare. Apart from a high variety of injury patterns, there is a multiplicity of diagnostic and therapeutic options. Causes of perianal impalement injury are gunshot, accidents, and medical treatment. The diagnostic work-up includes digital rectal examination followed by rectoscopy and flexible endoscopy under anaesthesia. We propose a new classification for primary extraperitoneal perianal impalement injuries in four stages in which the extension of sphincter and/or rectum injury is of crucial importance. Therapeutic aspects such as wound treatment, enterostomy, drains, and antibiotic treatment are discussed. The proposed classification encompasses recommendations for stage-adapted management and prognosis of these rare injuries. PMID:16896899

  10. Rectal temperature after marathon running.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, R J; Leiper, J B; Thompson, J

    1985-01-01

    Rectal temperature was measured in 62 male runners who competed in the 1983 Dundee marathon race: all measurements were made immediately after the race. Competitors' times were noted at 5, 10, 15 and 20 miles (8.0, 16.1, 24.1, 32.2 km) and at the finish (26.2 miles, 42.2 km). Mean finishing time of the group was 3 hr 33 min +/- 48 min (mean +/- S.D.; range = 2 hr 17 min-5 hr 11 min). Mean running speed of the group decreased progressively as the distance covered increased. Mean post-race rectal temperature was 38.7 +/- 0.9 degrees C (range 35.6-40.3 degrees C). The post-race temperature was correlated (p less than 0.01) with the time taken to cover the last 6.2 miles (10 km) of the race, but not with the overall finishing time (p greater than 0.05). Only the fastest runners were able to maintain an approximately constant pace throughout the race, whereas the slower runners slowed down progressively. The runners with the highest post-race temperature, although not necessarily the fastest runners, also tended to maintain a steady pace throughout. The runners with the lowest post-race temperature slowed down markedly only over the last 6.2 mile section of the race. The results clearly indicate that runners forced by fatigue or injury to slow down in the latter stages of races held at low ambient temperatures may already be hypothermic or at serious risk of hypothermia. Images p192-a p192-b p192-c PMID:4092138

  11. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  12. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  13. Scrotal cooling increases rectal temperature in man.

    PubMed

    Vash, Peter D; Engels, Thomas M; Kandeel, Fouad R; Greenway, Frank

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scrotal cooling on rectal temperature in man. Pilot studies suggested that immersing the scrotum in a 30 degrees C water bath increased rectal temperature, but immersing the scrotum in a 0 degree C water bath did not. Six healthy young men immersed their scrotums in a 35 degrees C water bath for 11 min followed by 21 min at 30 degrees C. Rectal temperature rose by 0.38 +/- 0.04 degrees C (P < 0.01) in response to the 30 degrees C water bath. Repetition of the study by immersing the hands instead of the scrotum in the water bath had no effect on rectal temperature. The scrotum appears to play a role in human temperature regulation.

  14. Sigmoid volvulus: is it a possible complication after stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR)?

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; SCAGLIARINI, L.; BANDI, M.; VEDANA, L.; MARZETTI, A.; FERROCCI, G.; SANTINI, M.; ANANIA, G.; CAVALLESCO, G.; BACCARINI, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report a case of sigmoid volvulus post-stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for obstructed defecation. The patient, a 68-year-old woman with chronic constipation and dolichosigma, two days post-STARR presented severe abdominal pain. CT revealed sigmoid ischemia. The patient underwent resection of the sigmoid colon with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). Can STARR procedure produce a serious complication as sigmoid volvulus in patient with dolichosigma and obstructed defecation syndrome? PMID:24091179

  15. Sigmoid volvulus: is it a possible complication after stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR)?

    PubMed

    Resta, G; Scagliarini, L; Bandi, M; Vedana, L; Marzetti, A; Ferrocci, G; Santini, M; Anania, G; Cavallesco, G; Baccarini, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of sigmoid volvulus post-stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for obstructed defecation. The patient, a 68-yearold woman with chronic constipation and dolichosigma, two days post-STARR presented severe abdominal pain. CT revealed sigmoid ischemia. The patient underwent resection of the sigmoid colon with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). Can STARR procedure produce a serious complication as sigmoid volvulus in patient with dolichosigma and obstructed defecation syndrome?

  16. Problems in family practice. Rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Graham, J

    1978-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of rectal bleeding problems varies with the urgency of the situation, the age of the patient, and the applicability of available diagnostic methods. Every instance of rectal bleeding is a problem that demands investigation by endoscopic, radiographic, and laboratory means. A physician can be misled by the patient's understatement or underobservance of bleeding. A good history obtained as quickly as possible in urgent circumstances and in great detail under more relaxed circumstances is of immeasurable diagnostic value.

  17. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  18. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  19. Genital ulcers in women: clinical, microbiologic and histopathologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Christiane Maria Moreira; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gomes, Francis de Assis Moraes; Amaral, Rose; Passos, Mauro Romero Leal; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine da Silveira

    2007-04-01

    Female genital ulcer is a disease that affects a large number of women, and its etiologic diagnosis can be difficult. The disease may increase the risk of acquiring HIV. Genital ulcer may be present in sexually transmitted diseases (STD)--syphilis, chancroid, genital herpes, donovanosis, lymphogranuloma venereum; and other non-STD disorders (NSTD)--Behçet's syndrome, pemphigus, Crohn's disease, erosive lichen planus and others. This study evaluated the clinical-histopathologic-microbiologic characteristics of female genital ulcers. A cross-sectional descriptive prospective study was conducted during a six-month period to investigate the first 53 women without a definitive diagnosis, seeking medical care for genital ulcers at a genital infections outpatient facility in a university hospital. A detailed and specific history was taken, followed by a dermatologic and gynecologic examination. In addition to collecting material from the lesions for microbiologic study, a biopsy of the ulcer was performed for histopathologic investigation. The average age of the patients was 32.7 years, 56.6% had junior high school education and higher education. The most frequent etiology was herpetic lesion, followed by auto-immune ulcers. At the time of their first consultation, around 60% of the women were using inadequate medication that was inconsistent with the final diagnosis. Histologic diagnosis was conclusive in only 26.4% of the patients (14/53). Cure was obtained in 99% of the cases after proper therapy. The female genital ulcers studied were equally distributed between sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted causes. Herpes was the most frequent type of genital ulcer, affecting women indiscriminately, mostly between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The etiologic diagnosis of herpetic ulcers is difficult to make even when various diagnostic methods are applied. It is imperative that NSTD should be included in the differential diagnoses of female genital ulcers. The

  20. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  1. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  2. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus from genital ulcers in Nairobi prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, J K; Coombs, R; Plummer, F; Holmes, K K; Nikora, B; Cameron, W; Ngugi, E; Ndinya Achola, J O; Corey, L

    1989-09-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have implicated genital/anorectal ulcer disease as an important cofactor for acquisition and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during sexual intercourse. To better understand the mechanism for the association between genital ulcers and HIV, exudates from 62 genital ulcers of 56 HIV-seropositive prostitutes in Nairobi (Kenya) were cultured for HIV. Twenty-six ulcer cultures could not be evaluated for the presence of HIV because of bacterial or fungal contamination. HIV was isolated from 4 (11%) of the 36 remaining uncontaminated ulcer cultures (2 introital, 1 vaginal, and 1 cervical) from 4 separate women. HIV was isolated from the cervical os from only 2 of the 4 women. HIV p24 antigen was detected in exudate from 1 of the 4 culture-positive ulcers and 0 of 32 culture-negative ulcers. Genital ulcers in seropositive patients should be regarded as potential sources of HIV, which could be important in transmission of HIV during intercourse. Public health measures aimed at controlling sexually transmitted genital ulcer diseases should be an integral part of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention programs.

  3. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  4. [Ulcerative colitis? Guidelines 2004].

    PubMed

    Siegmund, B; Zeitz, M

    2005-10-12

    Ulcerative colitis was first described in 1859 from Samuel Wilks, a physician at Guy's hospital in London. The prevalence in the high incidence areas ranges from 80 to 120/100.000/year. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic relapsing or chronic active disease which starts at the rectum and presents with a continuous inflammation. Primarily young adults are affected (20 to 40 years of age) but the disease may present at all ages, from younger than 1 year of life to the 80s. Many series show a secondary peak in incidence in the elderly. In the present review we will focus on the basic principles of the therapy with regard to the variety of disease manifestations. The therapeutic algorithms will be described separately for the induction of remission and the maintenance of remission. The localization of inflammation and disease activity represent crucial factors which have to be considered. With regard to these factors, the therapeutic regimens range from simple local therapy with aminosalicylates to systemic immunosuppressive therapy, which will in extreme cases require the administration of ciclosporin. Since ulcerative colitis is associated with an increased risk in developing colon carcinoma, medical therapy as well as endoscopic surveillance are fundamental in the prevention of carcinoma. In the end an outlook to future therapeutic targets and strategies will be provided. PMID:16245638

  5. Bacteriology of chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lookingbill, D P; Miller, S H; Knowles, R C

    1978-12-01

    The quantitative bacteriology of 13 chronic leg ulcers was sequentially assessed by both swab and biopsy culture techniques, and the effect of either a 10% benzoyl peroxide lotion or placebo lotion was evaluated. There was good correlation between the swab and biopsy culture techniques in 12 of the 17 instances where simultaneous swabs and biopsies were done. Though the benzoyl peroxide did not favorably affect the bacterial flora, ulcer healing did appear to correlate with quantitative bacterial counts. THREE of five ulcers containing fewer than 10(5) organisms per gram of tissue or per centimeter of ulcer surface area healed, while none of eight ulcers containing more than 10(5) organisms healed. Quantitative bacteriological measurements can serve as useful tools in evaluating healing of leg ulcers.

  6. Identification of capsaicin-sensitive rectal mechanoreceptors activated by rectal distension in mice.

    PubMed

    Spencer, N J; Kerrin, A; Singer, C A; Hennig, G W; Gerthoffer, W T; McDonnell, O

    2008-05-01

    Rodents detect visceral pain in response to noxious levels of rectal distension. However, the mechanoreceptors that innervate the rectum and respond to noxious levels of rectal distension have not been identified. Here, we have identified the mechanoreceptors of capsaicin-sensitive rectal afferents and characterized their properties in response to circumferential stretch of the rectal wall. We have also used the lethal spotted (ls/ls) mouse to determine whether rectal mechanoreceptors that respond to capsaicin and stretch may also develop in an aganglionic rectum that is congenitally devoid of enteric ganglia. In wild type (C57BL/6) mice, graded increases in circumferential stretch applied to isolated rectal segments activated a graded increase in firing of slowly-adapting rectal mechanoreceptors. Identical stimuli applied to the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice also activated similar graded increases in firing of stretch-sensitive rectal afferents. In both wild type and aganglionic rectal preparations, focal compression of the serosal surface using von Frey hairs identified mechanosensitive "hot spots," that were associated with brief bursts of action potentials. Spritzing capsaicin (10 microM) selectively onto each identified mechanosensitive hot spot activated an all or none discharge of action potentials in 32 of 56 identified hot spots in wild type mice and 24 of 62 mechanosensitive hot spots in the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice. Each single unit activated by both capsaicin and circumferential stretch responded to low mechanical thresholds (1-2 g stretch). No high threshold rectal afferents were ever recorded in response to circumferential stretch. Anterograde labeling from recorded rectal afferents revealed two populations of capsaicin-sensitive mechanoreceptor that responded to stretch: one population terminated within myenteric ganglia, the other within the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers. In the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice, only the

  7. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  8. Pressure ulcer management: the importance of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M; Cook, A; Rimmasch, H; Bender, S; Voss, A

    2000-08-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Nutrition assessment techniques and nutritional interventions for patients at risk for developing a pressure ulcer or who currently have pressure ulcers are essential components of quality patient care.

  9. [The outlook for the ambulatory treatment of adolescents with duodenal peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Filimonbov, R M; Denisova, N A

    1990-01-01

    An analysis was made of the potentialities and efficacy of the treatment of adolescents suffering from duodenal ulcer under outpatient conditions. 65 patients aged 14 to 18 years with duodenal ulcer in the stage of clinical exacerbation and with the presence of ulcer in the acute phase were placed under observation. Outpatient treatment appeared effective in 83.3% of patients. The time of ulcer healing under out- and inpatient conditions was 21.5 +/- 2.5 and 23.5 +/- 3.1 days, respectively. Therefore, selection of adolescent patients with duodenal ulcer for outpatient treatment requires a strictly differentiated approach depending on the disease stage and the character of macroscopic changes in the gastric and duodenal mucosae. At the same time it is necessary to take into consideration the rate and accuracy of removing the painful and dyspeptic syndromes, the lack of complications, consent and interest on the part of adolescents and their parents. PMID:2336611

  10. Degrees of acid suppression and ulcer healing: dosage considerations.

    PubMed

    Pounder, R E

    1991-01-01

    The human stomach has a normal circadian rhythm of intragastric acidity characterized by increasing acidity during the day and peaks in the early hours of the morning. Eating causes a transient decrease of intragastric acidity. Acid appears to be the permissive factor in peptic ulcer disease and to be responsible for symptoms; the patient with duodenal ulcer may secrete too much acid. Pharmacological control of gastric acid secretion will speed ulcer healing. Modern regimens, which typically use a bedtime dose of an H2-receptor antagonist, produce a pulse of decreased acidity. Intragastric acidity is decreased during the night and early morning, leaving a normal profile of acidity during the day and early evening. Higher or more frequent doses of an antisecretory agent can produce a more profound decrease of 24-h intragastric acidity. Theoretical problems associated with a sustained or profound decrease of 24-h intragastric acidity include the threat of enteric infection and infestation, potential bacterial overgrowth with possible N-nitrosamine formation, and drug-induced hypergastrinaemia. In light of these potential problems, for the management of simple peptic ulceration, it appears sensible to use the minimum intervention required. Bedtime H2-receptor blockade is one such regimen. The more potent antisecretory regimens can be used for difficult clinical problems such as the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, intractable duodenal ulceration, and severe oesophagitis.

  11. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Luis G; Ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D; Tatiersky, Laetitia; Delay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-09-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed.

  12. New molecules as drug candidates for the treatment of upper and lower GI tract ulcers.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Sandor; Tolstanova, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Ulcers in the stomach, duodenum, ileum/jejunum and colon may look alike grossly and microscopically, but they have very different etiologies and pathogenesis. Unfortunately, there is virtually no etiologic treatment for any of these lesions which are also accompanied by limited or extensive inflammation. This article reviews four groups of new antiulcer drugs discovered and patented in our lab in Boston and Long Beach/Irvine (Table 1). Actually, the first group, pyrazole and its derivatives can be used for prevention, i.e., long lasting protection of gastric mucosa against alcohol- or NSAID-induced erosions. Dopamine seems to be a new etiologic treatment for both upper and lower GI tract ulcers. Angiogenic growth factors like bFGF or PDGF (daily administration as peptides orally or by rectal enemas, or as single or double-dose of gene therapy) accelerated the healing of gastroduodenal ulcers and UC, while VEGF seems to be effective only for upper GI tract ulcers. Last but not least, a novel group of angiogenic steroids which not only stimulate new blood vessel formation and granulation tissue production (essential elements of healing of ulcer types) but may also exert mild or prominent antiinflammatory action and seem to be ideal drugs for the treatment of IBD.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus-associated genital ulcers: an under-recognized disorder.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Cheryl J; Alió, Alessandra B; Cunningham, Bari B; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2007-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is the best-known syndrome associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. Although a variety of cutaneous and mucosal manifestations are recognized in infectious mononucleosis, genital ulcers have only rarely been described. We describe an otherwise healthy 14-year-old girl in whom painful genital ulcers developed during an episode of serologically-confirmed primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. Clinical, serologic, and histopathologic evaluation failed to disclose evidence of any other etiologic explanation for her lesions. The patient remains well, without recurrence. To date, only 13 instances of genital ulceration in females attributable to Epstein-Barr virus infection have been reported.

  14. Californium-252 brachytherapy for anal and ano-rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, B.; Maruyama, Y.; Proudfoot, W.; Malcolm, A.

    1986-01-01

    Surgery has historically been the standard treatment for anal, ano-rectal and rectal carcinoma but is prone to local or regional failure. Over the past 15 years there has been increasing interest in and success with radiation therapy and combined chemoradiotherapy for treatment of anal and ano-rectal cancers. Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with external beam teletherapy has been investigated for anal and ano-rectal lesions at the Univ. of Kentucky with encouraging results.

  15. Lipschütz ulcer in a 17-month-old girl: a rare manifestation of Epstein-Barr primoinfection.

    PubMed

    Burguete Archel, Edurne; Ruiz Goikoetxea, Maite; Recari Elizalde, Eva; Beristain Rementería, Xabier; Gómez Gómez, Lourdes; Iceta Lizarraga, Ainhoa

    2013-08-01

    Lipschütz ulcer is an uncommon entity that is clinically characterised by a flu-like syndrome accompanied by an acute painful necrotic vulvar ulcer. It typically occurs in young women with no sexual contact history, and it is very rare among children. The aetiology is unknown, although recently several reports have related Epstein-Barr virus primary infection with this entity. We report a 17-month-old girl with fever and an acute genital ulcer. All the complementary tests for the most frequent causes of vulvar ulcers yielded negative results, whereas viral serology and polymerase chain reaction technique confirmed the presence of an acute Epstein-Barr virus infection. When main causes of genital ulcer have been excluded, and there is no history of sexual contact, Lipschütz ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome by polymerase chain reaction can lead to an earlier diagnosis.

  16. Stapled transanal rectal mucosectomy ten years after.

    PubMed

    Pescatori, M; Aigner, F

    2007-03-01

    Stapled mucosectomy (SM) was first proposed for the management of patients with rectal internal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation, but gained popularity worldwide for the treatment of hemorrhoids. The present review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of the operation. SM tends to decrease postoperative pain and shortens convalescence after hemorrhoid surgery, but may be followed by severe complications, e.g. rectal obliteration and pelvic sepsis requiring a diverting stoma, more frequently than after standard hemorrhoidectomy. Moreover it carries a higher recurrence rate in the treatment of fourth-degree piles. A recent Cochrane metaanalysis demonstrated that SM is less effective than standard hemorrhoidectomy since it carries a higher recurrence rate (OR=3.6) and reintervention rate (OR=2.3). When used for rectal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation, SM is reported to have variable results. A better outcome is likely to be achieved in patients without anismus and psychoneurosis operated on by specialists trained with this technique.

  17. Management and imaging of low rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Gisella; Daniels, Ian; Heald, R J; Brown, Gina; Moran, B J

    2004-01-01

    Large variations in recurrence rates have been reported with the best results following total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery for low and middle rectal cancers. However, the low rectal cancers still have higher rates of local recurrence (up to 30%) whether operated by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal excision (APE) due to high rates of circumferential margin involvement. The treatment of choice for low rectal cancers that encroach upon the potential circumferential resection margin is surgery combined with preoperative neoadjuvant treatment. Preoperative chemotherapy combined with long-term radiotherapy reduces recurrence rates and preoperative loco-regional staging can help to select the patients more likely to benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy. Surface coil MRI is the most promising modality for patient selection, which can provide good views of the circumferential resection margin especially the presence or absence of tumour encroaching the intersphincteric plane. PMID:15572087

  18. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  19. [Rectal stenosis due to Schnitzler metastasis following surgery for gastric cancer--a case successfully treated with TS-1 and CDDP combination chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Niinobu, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Sumiko; Itani, Yutaka; Nishikawa, Yasuaki; Amano, Masahiro; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hiroto; Sakon, Masato

    2005-10-01

    The patient, a 40-year-old woman, underwent total gastrectomy and excision of the pancreatic tail, spleen and gallbladder for gastric cancer in September 2000. The lesion was judged to be P1, SE, H0, N2 and Stage IV and the patient was managed on a regular schedule as an outpatient. In September 2004, she passed blood-stained feces and rectal palpation detected a hard nodule at the anterior rectal wall. A fiber optic examination of the sigmoid colon detected an ulcerous lesion with a hemorrhage at the anterior rectal wall. A biopsy revealed the lesion to be Group V poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Starting in October 2004, 100 mg/day of TS-1 was administered for 3 weeks; intravenous drip infusion of 100 mg/body of CDDP was conducted in the second week for a period of 24 hours. After 3 courses of this regimen, a fiber optic examination of the colon conducted in February 2005 no longer detected the rectal tumor, leaving only a cicatrix. Upon a CT examination, the para-aortic lymph nodes that had been enlarged were notably reduced in size and an improvement was eminent in the hypertrophic rectal wall. The patient no longer experienced constipation or melena. Her clinical course is being observed while an oral administration of 100 mg/day of TS-1 continues. PMID:16315933

  20. Silicone elastomer sling for rectal prolapse in cats

    PubMed Central

    Corgozinho, Katia Barão; Belchior, Cristiane; de Souza, Heloisa Justen Moreira; Ferreira, Ana Maria; Resende, Carolina; Damico, Brandão; Cunha, Simone

    2010-01-01

    This study reports 2 cases of recurrent rectal prolapse secondary to anal abnormality in cats. In both cases the anus was wide, leading to a rectal mucosal prolapse during defecation. A silicone elastomer sling was introduced around the anus, and the rectal prolapse was definitively resolved. PMID:20676293

  1. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route.

  2. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  3. Enlightenment from a small but rapidly evolving penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangyi; Tang, Wenyi; Chen, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) is a pathologic type of acute aortic syndrome and usually locates in the descending aorta. The presentation, behavior and natural history of this disease process have not been clear. Here we report a case in which a rapidly evolving PAU in descending aorta needed aggressive percutaneous interventional treatment. The present case with its unique scenario might draw clinicians' attention on a "beyond the guidelines" issue.

  4. Enlightenment from a small but rapidly evolving penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangyi; Tang, Wenyi; Chen, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) is a pathologic type of acute aortic syndrome and usually locates in the descending aorta. The presentation, behavior and natural history of this disease process have not been clear. Here we report a case in which a rapidly evolving PAU in descending aorta needed aggressive percutaneous interventional treatment. The present case with its unique scenario might draw clinicians' attention on a "beyond the guidelines" issue. PMID:26961076

  5. Genital ulcers during treatment with ALL-trans retinoic acid for acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fukuno, Kenji; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Goto, Hideko; Oyama, Masami; Tanabashi, Shinobu; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2003-11-01

    Scrotal ulcer is a unique adverse effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The pathogenesis of scrotal ulceration remains unknown. We describe genital ulcers that developed in four patients with APL who were undergoing ATRA therapy (45 mg/m2 per day p.o.). Two of the patients were female, in whom this condition is quite rare. Genital ulcers with concomitant fever appeared between 17 and 32 days of therapy in all four patients. Genital ulcers healed in three of the patients while another patient developed Fournier's gangrene and underwent left testectomy. Ulcer healing was brought by either local or intravenous corticosteroids. Intravenous dexamethasone actually enabled continued ATRA administration in one patient, while ATRA was discontinued in other two patients. If corticosteroids cannot control progression of genital ulcers nor concomitant fever, ATRA administration should be discontinued so as not to induce Fournier's gangrene nor retionic acid syndrome. Our experience indicates the importance of recognizing genital ulcers associated with ATRA in order that appropriate countermeasures can be taken.

  6. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  7. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ponte Vedra, FL View More Upcoming Events Educational Videos See All Media Abscess and Fistula ASCRS 2016 ... overcame a colorectal disease a Ulcerative Colitis Educational Videos See All Media Abscess and Fistula ASCRS 2016 ...

  8. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  9. Stromal vascularization prevents corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Conn, H; Berman, M; Kenyon, K; Langer, R; Gage, J

    1980-04-01

    Experiments were performed with a model of focal, thermal-induced ulceration to test the clinical impression that vascularization prevents ulceration of the corneal stroma. Slow-release polymers containing a vasoproliferase agent (tumor angiogenesis factor) were placed in corneal pockets 2 mm central to the limbus of albino rabbits. These polymers elicited blood vessel ingrowth up to the implant. Control eyes received empty polymers which caused minimal to no vessel growth. Polymers were removed, and each cornea received a focal, thermal burn placed just central to the polymer site. All control corneas ulcerated: most (79%) developed deep stromal or perforating ulcers. Only 25% of prevascularized corneas developed stromal ulcers, and none was deep or perforating. After thermal burns, vessels in both groups grew at the same linear rate toward the burned area. There was a direct relationship between the distance separating the nearest blood vessel and the burned area at the time of burning and the maximum depth of stromal ulceration. Thus prevention of or less severe stromal ulceration is correlated with the earlier presence of vessels in the burned area.

  10. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  11. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening...

  12. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution.

  13. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  14. Venous ulcers of the lower limbs due to congenital thalidomide-related valve defect.

    PubMed

    Rubegni, Pietro; Poggiali, Sara; Bilenchi, Roberta; Diana, Agnese; Risulo, Massimiliano; Civeli, Letizia; Fimiani, Michele

    2007-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with fetal thalidomide syndrome and congenital pseudoainhum of the left big toe had a 5-year history of painful nonhealing ulcers in the left malleolar region. Venous Doppler ultrasonography showed hypoagenesis of the valve flaps of the deep and superficial venous circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first description of congenital pseudoainhum associated with fetal thalidomide syndrome. The coexistence of cutaneous ulcers in our case might be coincidental but may be related to a congenital valve defect (hypoagenesis) caused by thalidomide.

  15. [Golimumab Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis].

    PubMed

    Moon, Won

    2016-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the colon, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation and blood-mixed diarrhea. The main treatment has been 5-aminosalicylic acid, steroid, thiopurine, and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibodies including infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab. Golimumab, a new anti-TNF-α agent has been recently approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy and safety has been demonstrated in line with infliximab and adalimumab in preclinical and clinical studies. This review will focus on golimumab therapy in ulcerative colitis.

  16. [Psychological differences between ulcer and non-ulcer dyspeptic patients].

    PubMed

    Slepoy, V; Pezzotto, S; Pedrana, R; Gatto, A; Poletto, L

    1994-01-01

    The existence of differences in the psychological profile of 39 endoscopically evaluated patients with ulcer (U) and non ulcer (NU) dyspepsia were examined. There were 21 U and 18 NU subjects. Cigarette smoking, intake of alcohol, coffee, mate, aspirin and NSAID were recorded, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Personality traits were determined by the Rorschach Test, considering psychological profile (introversive, extroversive, self-restrained), impulse and emotion control (do not allow their expression, impulsive, adequately conveyed) and level of social adaptation (low, normal, high). U and NU subjects experienced a similar number of potentially stressful life events. However, U patients perceived their events more negatively. Although no one type of "ulcer personality" was found consistently, ulcer patients tended to be more introversive and they had a better social adaptation than NU.

  17. Ulcerative Colitis in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Rukunuzzaman, Md; Karim, A. S. M. Bazlul

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorder of colon. Frequency of UC is gradually increasing over few years worldwide. Prevalence is 35 to 100/100 000 people in USA, 1% of them are infants. UC develops in a genetically predisposed individual with altered intestinal immune response. An eight-month-old girl presented with loose bloody stool, growth failure, and moderate pallor. The girl was diagnosed as a case of UC by colonoscopy and biopsy. Treatment was thereafter started with immunosuppressive drugs. After initial induction therapy with parenteral steroid and infliximab, the patient is now on remission with azathioprine and mesalamine. UC is rare in Bangladesh, especially in children, and it is rarer during infancy. Several conditions like infective colitis, allergic colitis, Meckel's diverticulitis, Crohn's disease, etc. may mimic the features of UC. So, if a child presents with recurrent bloody diarrhea, UC should be considered as differential diagnosis. PMID:22064342

  18. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael S.; Williamson, Katherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  19. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Williamson, Katherine K

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  20. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education.

  1. A new option for endovascular treatment of leg ulcers caused by venous insufficiency with fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rybak, Zbigniew; Jargiello, Tomasz; Łokaj, Marek; Czapla, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcers of lower legs are the most bothersome complication of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Aim To assess the effectiveness of endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of venous ulcers. Material and methods Thirty-eight limbs in 35 patients with crural venous ulcers were treated with guided sclerotherapy under the control of fluoroscopy. Patients with non-healing ulcers in the course of chronic venous insufficiency, with and without features of past deep vein thrombosis, were qualified for the study. Doppler ultrasound and dynamic venography with mapping of venous flow were performed. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements, leg circumference and varicography were performed just before and following the procedure. Results In 84% of cases, ulcers were treated successfully and healed. Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 17) healed in 13 (76.5%) cases, whereas patients without post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 21) healed in 19 (90.5%) cases. The mean time of healing of an ulcer for all patients was 83 days (in the first group it was 121 days and in the second group 67 days). Recurrence of an ulcer was observed in 10 limbs: 6 cases in the first group and 4 cases in the second group. Occurrence of deep vein thrombosis associated with the procedure was not observed. Temporary complications were reported but none giving a serious clinical outcome. Conclusions Endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy can be an alternative method of treatment of venous ulcers, especially in situations when surgical procedures or other options of treatment are impossible. PMID:26649090

  2. Nutritional prediction of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R A; Bergstrom, N

    1994-11-01

    This article focuses on nutritional risk factors that predict the development of pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients. Cross-sectional studies associate inadequate energy and protein intake; underweight; low triceps skinfold measurement; and low serum albumin, low serum cholesterol, and low hemoglobin levels with pressure ulcers. Prospective studies identify inadequate energy and protein intake, a poor score on the Braden scale (a risk assessment instrument that includes a nutrition component), and possibly low serum albumin level as risk factors for developing a pressure ulcer. Nutritionists should provide a high-energy, high-protein diet for patients at risk of development of pressure ulcers to improve their dietary intake and nutritional status.

  3. [Surgical treatment of peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Andrade, Humberto

    2003-01-01

    Despite a decreasing number of operations for ulcer, there are many patients who require definitive treatment. If an operation is required for duodenal ulcer, vagotomy of some type is part of the treatment, and in gastric ulcer resection with or without vagotomy is required. Extended proximal gastric vagotomy can be performed in the majority of patients, excluding those who are unstable or have severe concomitant diseases. In cases of urgent surgery for hemorrhage or perforation, the surgical procedure must be selected individually. Although the role of traditional operations is well established, there is increasing interest in laparoscopic approaches. However, because there is a diminishing of elective surgery for ulcer, it is unlikely that these new procedures may be evaluated as operations were evaluated in the past.

  4. [Peritonitis following gastroduodenal ulcer perforation disease in children: report of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Ndour, O; Bansouda, J; Fall, A F; Alumeti, D M; Diouf, C; Ngom, G; Ndoye, M

    2012-10-01

    Peritonitis due to gastroduodenal ulcer perforation disease is a rare entity in pediatric surgery. In Senegal, no study has been dedicated to ulcer complications in children. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of perforated peptic ulcer in patients less than 15 years old. This retrospective study was conducted in the Surgical Emergencies and Paediatric Surgery Department at Aristide Le Dantec University Hospital Center in Dakar, Senegal, during a period of 11 years (January 1999 to December 2010). We found 4 children who presented perforated gastroduodenal ulcer: 3 females and 1 male. The average age of these patients was 9 years (range, 7-14 years). No family history was found. We noted 3 cases of perforated duodenal ulcer and one perforated gastric ulcer. The clinical diagnosis was suspected based on a peritoneal irritation syndrome. A plain x-ray of the abdomen was taken in all patients, which objectified a pneumoperitoneum image in 3 cases. The leukocytosis was constant. Treatment in all patients consisted on pre-, intra-, and postoperative intensive care, supra- and infraumbilical midline laparotomy, which allowed us to perform a debridement-suture of the gap followed by epiploplasty and extensive washing with lukewarm physiologic serum. Adjuvant therapy based on anti-ulcer and antibiotic therapy was initiated. Bacteriological examination of peritoneal fluid isolated a polymicrobial flora. Helicobacter pylori was not isolated. Histological examination of the biopsied perforation edges showed a benign ulcer in all cases. The follow-up endoscopy was performed 4 weeks after surgery and showed cicatrization of the ulcer in all patients. After a mean of 2 years, no recurrence was noted. The gastric or duodenal ulcer in children is rare. It is often discovered at the stage of perforation, a complication for which the essential treatment is surgery. Routine screening would certainly help to reduce the risk of this

  5. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  6. Trigeminal trophic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parimalam; Thomas, Jayakar

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare cause of facial ulceration, consequent to damage to the trigeminal nerve or its central sensory connections. We reporta case of TTS in a 48-year-old woman with Bell's palsy following herpes zoster infection. The patient was treated and counseled. There hasnot been any recurrence for 1 year and the patient is being followed-up. The diagnosis of TTS should be suspected when there is unilateral facial ulceration, especially involving the ala nasi associated with sensory impairment. PMID:24470665

  7. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  8. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  9. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  10. In vivo measurement of colonic butyrate metabolism in patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, E; Chapman, M; Dawson, J; Berry, D; Macdonald, I; Cole, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Butyrate, a short chain fatty acid produced by bacterial fermentation, is a major fuel source for the colonocyte. In vitro work has shown that ulcerative colitis may be characterised by a metabolic defect in colonocyte butyrate oxidation.
AIMS—To investigate the rate of metabolism of rectally administered butyrate in patients with quiescent colitis.
METHODS—[1-13C]-butyrate enemas were administered to 11 patients with long standing quiescent ulcerative colitis and to 10 control patients. The rate of production of 13CO2 in exhaled breath over four hours was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with indirect calorimetry in order to measure CO2 production. This allowed calculation of the patients' resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient.
RESULTS—Over a four hour period, 325 (SEM 21) µmol 13CO2 was recovered in breath samples from the colitis group compared with 322 (17) µmol from the control group (NS). The respiratory quotient of the colitic group was significantly lower than that of the control group.
CONCLUSION—There was no difference in the rate of metabolism of butyrate between the two groups. It is unlikely that there is a primary metabolic defect of butyrate metabolism in patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis.


Keywords: ulcerative colitis; in vivo butyrate metabolism PMID:10601058

  11. Review article: evolutionary advances in the delivery of aminosalicylates for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R D

    2006-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic and debilitating disease that involves inflammation of the colonic mucosa. Current therapies aim to reduce the symptom burden of ulcerative colitis and maintain disease quiescence. The standard first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis is 5-aminosalicylate therapy, which is available in oral and rectal (topical) formulations. While current 5-aminosalicylate formulations are effective in the majority of patients, they are associated with a number of limitations including inconvenient dosing regimens and poor patient acceptability, which may lead to non-compliance with prescribed therapy. A variety of improved delivery mechanisms have been developed in an effort to overcome these limitations. Micropellet formulations and high-dose tablets appear to offer comparable efficacy and tolerability to conventional formulations, although any benefit in terms of long-term patient compliance remains to be proven. Novel methods of delivery, such as those using a combination of hydrophilic and lipophilic matrices, designed to provide once-daily dosing in a high-strength tablet, may offer a significant improvement in the therapy of active and quiescent ulcerative colitis. This review examines the limitations of current 5-aminosalicylate formulations and reports on the evolution of novel oral formulations designed to overcome these limitations, maximize patient compliance during both induction and maintenance of quiescence, and optimize overall clinical outcomes.

  12. Rectal antinociceptive properties of alverine citrate are linked to antagonism at the 5-HT1A receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Coelho, A M; Jacob, L; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    2001-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is considered as a major mediator causing hyperalgesia and is involved in inflammatory reactions and irritable bowel syndrome. Alverine citrate may possess visceral antinociceptive properties in a rat model of rectal distension-induced abdominal contractions. This study was designed to evaluate the pharmacological properties of alverine citrate in a rat model of rectal hyperalgesia induced by 5-HTP (5-HT precursor) and by a selective 5-HT1A agonist (8-OH-DPAT) and to compare this activity with a reference 5-HT1A antagonist (WAY 100635). At 4 h after their administration, 5-HTP and 8-OH-DPAT increased the number of abdominal contractions in response to rectal distension at the lowest volume of distension (0.4 mL). When injected intraperitoneally before 8-OH-DPAT and 5-HTP, WAY 100635 (1 mg kg(-1)) blocked their nociceptive effect, but also reduced the response to the highest volume of distension (1.6 mL). Similarly, when injected intraperitoneally, alverine citrate (20 mg kg(-1)) suppressed the effect of 5-HTP, but not that of 8-OH-DPAT. However, when injected intracerebroventricularly (75 microg/rat) alverine citrate reduced 8-OH-DPAT-induced enhancement of rectal distension-induced abdominal contractions. In-vitro binding studies revealed that alverine citrate had a high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors and a weak affinity for 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 subtypes. These results suggest that 5-HTP-induced rectal hypersensitivity involves 5-TH1A receptors and that alverine citrate acts as a selective antagonist at the 5-HT1A receptor subtype to block both 5-HTP and 8-OH-DPAT-induced rectal hypersensitivity. PMID:11697552

  13. Transanal Evisceration Caused by Rectal Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Torres Sánchez, María Teresa; Richart Aznar, Jose Manuel; Martí Martínez, Eva María; Martínez-Abad, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal evisceration caused by colorectal injury is an unusual entity. This pathology is more frequent in elderly patients and it is usually produced spontaneously. Rectal prolapse is the principal predisposing factor. An 81-year-old woman was taken to the hospital presenting exit of intestinal loops through the anus. After first reanimation measures, an urgent surgery was indicated. We observed the absence of almost every small intestine loop in the abdominal cavity; these had been moved to the pelvis. After doing the reduction, a 3 to 4 cm linear craniocaudal perforation in upper rectum was objectified, and Hartmann's procedure was performed. We investigated and knew that she frequently manipulate herself to extract her faeces. The fast preoperative management avoided a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. Reasons that make us consider rectal self-injury as the etiologic factor are explained. PMID:24639971

  14. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  15. The Evaluation of Rectal Bleeding in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Elizabeth; Nicolaidis, Christina; Helfand, Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though primary care patients commonly present with rectal bleeding, the optimal evaluation strategy remains unknown. OBJECTIVE To compare the cost-effectiveness of four diagnostic strategies in the evaluation of rectal bleeding. DESIGN Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov decision model. DATA SOURCES Systematic review of the literature, Medicare reimbursement data, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Cancer Registry. TARGET POPULATION Patients over age 40 with otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding. TIME HORIZON The patient's lifetime. PERSPECTIVE Modified societal perspective. INTERVENTIONS Watchful waiting, flexible sigmoidoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy followed by air contrast barium enema (FS+ACBE), and colonoscopy. OUTCOME MEASURES Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy was $5,480 per quality-adjusted year of life saved (QALY). Watchful waiting and FS+ACBE were more expensive and less effective than colonoscopy. RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSES The cost of colonoscopy was reduced to $1,686 per QALY when age at entry was changed to 45. Watchful waiting became the least expensive strategy when community procedure charges replaced Medicare costs, when age at entry was maximized to 80, or when the prevalence of polyps was lowered to 7%, but the remaining strategies provided greater life expectancy at relatively low cost. The strategy of FS+ACBE remained more expensive and less effective in all analyses. In the remaining sensitivity analyses, the incremental cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy never rose above $34,000. CONCLUSIONS Colonoscopy is a cost-effective method to evaluate otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding, with a low cost per QALY compared to other strategies. PMID:15693933

  16. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  17. [Multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Faes, Seraina; Gié, Olivier; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2016-06-15

    Treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer remains challenging. Preoperative imaging with pelvic MRI allows to identify patients for multimodal treatment including induction chemothe- rapy or neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy and an extended surgical resection. With multidisciplinary approach and an experienced team, excellent oncologic results may be achieved, as well as a good function and quality of life, even with preservation of the anus in the majority of patients. PMID:27487624

  18. Importance of surgical margins in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukkai Krishnamurty, Devi; Wise, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Distal resection margin (DRM) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) are two important considerations in rectal cancer management. Although guidelines recommend a 2 cm DRM, studies have shown that a shorter DRM is adequate, especially in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Standardization of total mesorectal excision has greatly improved quality of CRM. Although more patients are undergoing sphincter-saving procedures, abdominoperineal resection is indicated for very distal tumors, and pelvic exenteration is often necessary for tumors involving pelvic organs. PMID:27094456

  19. Acute rectal obstruction after PPH stapled haemorrhoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, S.; Pescatori, M.

    2002-09-01

    An unusual case of acute intestinal obstruction following a PPH stapled haemorrhoidectomy is reported: the complication was due to an almost complete interruption of the rectal lumen tightened by a purse-string suture anchored by staples. The stricture was dilated and the suture released thus restoring intestinal continuity. Surgeons should be aware that such troublesome complication may occur and can be treated successfully by a transanal approach.

  20. Spiral rectal valves: Anatomy, eponyms, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ikard, Robert W

    2015-05-01

    Rectal wall valves are obscure anatomic parts that rarely are considered in current medical practice. Yet from the seminal analysis of them in the early nineteenth century by the Irish anatomist and surgeon, John Houston, their structure, purpose, and clinical significance were topics of surprising disagreement. Were they true structures? What function might they have? Did disease originate in rectal valves? Were special operations required for any such diseases? Because Houston's anatomic analyses of rectal valves were substantiated, they came to be known in the English literature as the Spiral Rectal Valves of Houston. In the mid-nineteenth century, a single mid-rectal valve was described by the Hanoverian, Otto Kohlrausch., creating confusion with the established eponym "Houston's Valves." Many hypotheses about rectal valves have been discredited; and their physiologic functions are still unknown.

  1. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  2. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  3. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  5. [Rectal cancer in a pregnant woman, a case report].

    PubMed

    Højgaard, Helle Manfeld; Rahr, Hans

    2012-06-25

    A case of disseminated rectal cancer in a 32-year-old pregnant woman is described. Pain was her main complaint, but this had been ascribed to haemorrhoids and treated with topical agents. She was diagnosed with rectal cancer late in the third trimester when her midwife referred her for surgical assessment. Following caesarian section, diagnostic workup showed multiple liver metastases. Rectal cancer in pregnancy is rare, while haemorrhoids are common. We recommend keeping the differential diagnoses in mind and performing a digital rectal examination if pregnant women have anal symptoms.

  6. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  7. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  8. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  9. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  10. Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems that are hidden—such as earache, headache, toothache, sinusitis, gastritis, ulcer, pelvic pain, glaucoma, and so on—the situation results in behaviors that may appear “autistic-like” such as ... Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & ...

  11. TNBS-induced inflammation modulates the function of one class of low-threshold rectal mechanoreceptors in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Lynn, P A; Chen, B N; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Costa, M; Brookes, S J H

    2008-10-01

    The effects of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced inflammation on specialized, low-threshold, slowly adapting rectal mechanoreceptors were investigated in the guinea pig. Under isoflurane anesthesia, 300 microl saline or TNBS (15 mg/ml) in 30% ethanol was instilled 7 cm from the anal sphincter. Six or 30 days later, single unit extracellular recordings were made from rectal nerve trunks in flat-sheet in vitro preparations attached to a mechanical tissue stretcher. TNBS treatment caused macroscopic ulceration of the rectal mucosa at 6 days, which fully resolved by 30 days. Muscle contractility was unaffected by TNBS treatment. At 6 days posttreatment, responses of low-threshold rectal mechanoreceptors to circumferential stretch were increased, and the proportion of afferents responding with von Frey hair thresholds

  12. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  13. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  14. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  15. [Genital ulcers--what's new?].

    PubMed

    Abu Raya, Bahaa; Bamberger, Ellen; Srugo, Isaac

    2013-08-01

    The most common infectious causes of genital ulcers are herpes simplex virus and syphilis. However, mixed infections can occur and genital ulcer may increase the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus. Although the history and physical examination can narrow the differential diagnosis, there is a need for initial routine laboratory testing for the most common pathogens that includes: for syphilis: serologic screening and dark field examination of the lesion; for herpes simplex virus: serology, vial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. Human immunodeficiency testing is mandatory. Recently, some clinical laboratories adapted the reverse screening algorithm for syphilis (initial treponemal test, and, if positive, followed by non-treponemal test) that may potentially lead to overtreatment. Early and prompt therapy may decrease the risk of transmission of the infectious agent to others. This article reviews the infectious pathogens causing genital ulcers, their unique clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  17. [Martorell Hypertensive Ischaemic Leg Ulcer].

    PubMed

    Nobbe, S; Hafner, J

    2015-10-01

    Martorell hypertensive ischaemic leg ulcer (HYTILU) represents an important differential diagnosis of painful leg ulcerations. Stenotic subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis in patients with long-standing arterial hypertension finally leads to skin infarction. The typical histological changes are very similar in Martorell HYTILU and calciphylaxis. This raises the hypothesis that the two entities may have a common pathogenesis. Martorell HYTILU presents as an extremely painful ulcer that is regularly located at the laterodorsal lower leg or at the Achilles tendon. Because of its inflammatory and violaceous wound edges and its tendency to progression, clinicians unaware of the diagnosis Martorell HYTILU might misdiagnose pyoderma gangrenosum or necrotising cutaneous vasculitis start an immunosuppressive treatment and avoid surgical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Instead, necrosectomy and split skin grafting are the treatment of choice for Martorell HYTILU.

  18. Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis are frequent manifestations of patients with systemic sclerosis. Digital ulcers are seen in more than half of the patients with scleroderma. Hospitalizations, ischemic complications and impairment of hand function are frequently observed in patients with digital ulcers, especially if treatment is delayed. Rapid and intensive treatment escalation in patients with scleroderma and refractory Raynaud's phenomenon is one of the most effective preventive action available in order to avoid the development of digital ulcers and tissue loss.

  19. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  20. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  1. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  2. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  3. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  4. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients and methods Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Results Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Conclusions Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes. PMID:23411588

  5. "Graciloplasty" in treatment of recurrent complete rectal prolapse: case report.

    PubMed

    Khainga, S O

    2007-08-01

    Gracilis muscle flap was used to treat a seven year old boy with a one year history of recurrent rectal prolapse. Initial perineal surgery in form of Thiersch stitch resulted into failure to control rectal prolapse and damage to anal sphincter. Graciloplasty corrected both problems. PMID:17970009

  6. Why Rectal Douches May Be Acceptable Rectal-Microbicide Delivery Vehicles for MSM

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Bauermeister, José; Ventuneac, Ana; Dolezal, Curtis; Mayer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Rationale To explore age of onset of rectal douching among men who have sex with men (MSM) and reasons leading to and maintaining douching behavior; and to consider whether rectal douches containing microbicidal agents might be acceptable for men at HIV risk. Methods In Stage 1, we used qualitative methods to explore douching behavior in a sample of 20 MSM. Subsequently, we developed a structured questionnaire that was administered in Stage 2 to 105 MSM. Results More than half of participants who completed Stage 1 douched during the trial despite having been advised not to do so. Of the 105 HIV uninfected participants in Stage 2, 51% reported using rectal douches in the prior six months; 47% douched before and 25% after anal intercourse. Most participants reported douching frequently or always. On average, men reported douching about two hours prior to or one hour following intercourse. Average age of onset was late 20s. Most men who douched wanted to be clean or were encouraged to douche by their partners. Some men thought douching after sex could prevent STIs. Conclusion Rectal douching appears to be a popular behavior among men who have RAI. It is necessary to identify harmless douches. If HIV/STI preventive douches can be developed, rectal douching prior to or following sexual intercourse could become an important additional prevention tool. To reshape an existing behavior to which some men strongly adhere, like douching, by suggesting use of one type of douche over another may be more successful than trying to convince MSM to engage in behaviors they never practiced before or those they resist (e.g., condom use). PMID:19959973

  7. A new 'enterocompressor' to facilitate rectal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Barraza, R P

    1990-02-01

    A newly devised enterocompressor facilitates low rectal anastomosis in children with Hirschsprung's disease. This simple surgical instrument, composed of two semicylindrical valves, a hinge, and a regulating screw, maintains intestinal anastomoses properly placed and produces spur crushing. In addition, it is inexpensive and reusable. The enterocompressor, used in 33 primary and 15 secondary Duhamel operations, and applied to normalize intestinal transit in 10 colectomies, provided adequate anastomosis and prevented leakage of intestinal contents. This enterocompressor can be used safely in children as young as six months of age. PMID:2298104

  8. Postthrombotic Syndrome: Surgical Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ajay K.; Singh, Shivanshu

    2012-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a late outcome of deep vein thrombosis characterized by cramping pain, swelling, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis, and ulceration in the leg due to increased venous outflow resistance and reflux venous flow. Newer surgical and endovascular interventions have a promising result in the management of postthrombotic syndrome. Early surgical or endovascular interventions in appropriately selected patients may decrease the incidence of recurrent ulceration and skin changes and provide a better quality of life. Duplex and IVUS (intravenous ultrasound) along with venography serve as cornerstone investigative tools for assessment of reflux and obstruction. Venous obstruction, if present, should be addressed earlier than reflux. It requires endovenous stenting, endophlebectomy, or open bypass procedures. Venous stripping, foam sclerotherapy, radiofrequency, or laser ablation are used to abolish superficial venous reflux. Valvuloplasty procedures are useful for incompetent but intact deep venous valves, while transposition or axillary vein autotransplantation is done for completely destroyed valves. PMID:22084674

  9. Ulcer Disease, Metabolic Alkalosis and Hyperparathyroidism: A Mechanism of Interrelationship?

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Edwin L.; Peskin, Gerald W.; Deveney, Clifford; Way, Lawrence; Jaffe, Bernard

    1974-01-01

    In both normal volunteers and in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, the induction of a metabolic alkalosis by infusion of sodium bicarbonate results in a decrease in serum calcium ion and in an increase of circulating parathyroid hormone concentrations. Bicarbonate infusion may serve in man as a new provocative test for release of parathyroid hormone. Furthermore, we speculate that the metabolic alkalosis which is found at times in patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and severe peptic ulcer disease may result in parathyroid gland stimulation. PMID:4416767

  10. Recording pressure ulcer risk assessment and incidence.

    PubMed

    Plaskitt, Anne; Heywood, Nicola; Arrowsmith, Michaela

    2015-07-15

    This article reports on the introduction of an innovative computer-based system developed to record and report pressure ulcer risk and incidence at an acute NHS trust. The system was introduced to ensure that all patients have an early pressure ulcer risk assessment, which prompts staff to initiate appropriate management if a pressure ulcer is detected, thereby preventing further patient harm. Initial findings suggest that this electronic process has helped to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data on pressure ulcer risk and incidence. In addition, it has resulted in a reduced number of reported hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  11. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  12. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  13. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  14. Genital ulcers: etiology, clinical diagnosis, and associated human immunodeficiency virus infection in Kingston, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Behets, F M; Brathwaite, A R; Hylton-Kong, T; Chen, C Y; Hoffman, I; Weiss, J B; Morse, S A; Dallabetta, G; Cohen, M S; Figueroa, J P

    1999-05-01

    Individuals presenting consecutively with genital ulcers in Kingston, Jamaica, underwent serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chlamydial infection, and syphilis. Ulcer material was analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) analysis. DNA from herpes simplex virus (HSV), Haemophilus ducreyi, and Treponema pallidum was detected in 158 (52.0%), 72 (23.7%), and 31 (10.2%) of 304 ulcer specimens. Of the 304 subjects, 67 (22%) were HIV-seropositive and 64 (21%) were T. pallidum-seroreactive. Granuloma inguinale was clinically diagnosed in nine (13.4%) of 67 ulcers negative by M-PCR analysis and in 12 (5.1%) of 237 ulcers positive by M-PCR analysis (P = .03). Lymphogranuloma venereum was clinically diagnosed in eight patients. Compared with M-PCR analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical diagnosis of syphilis, herpes, and chancroid were 67.7%, 53.8%, and 75% and 91.2%, 83.6%, and 75.4%, respectively. Reactive syphilis serology was 74% sensitive and 85% specific compared with M-PCR analysis. Reported contact with a prostitute in the preceding 3 months was associated with chancroid (P = .009), reactive syphilis serology (P = .011), and HIV infection (P = .007). The relatively poor accuracy of clinical and locally available laboratory diagnoses pleads for syndromic management of genital ulcers in Jamaica. Prevention efforts should be intensified.

  15. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health.

  16. FAQs on leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene; King, Brenda; Knight, Susan; Keynes, Milton

    In a webchat on leg ulcer management issues, hosted by Nursing Times, participants raised three key areas of care: the role of healthcare assistants in compression bandaging; reporting and investigating damage caused by compression therapy; and recommendations for dressings to be used under compression. This article discusses each of these in turn.

  17. [Diagnosis of gastric ulcer in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Kiyoshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that gastric ulcers are most often found at anglus and upper corpus in the elderly. The number of gastric ulcer found at upper corpus hold half of all cases in the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer. Sixty percent of the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer took NSAIDs including low-dose aspirin in authors' hospital. Now it is easy to treat and cure bleeding ulcers due to development of endoscopic hemostasis and antiulcer drugs such as proton pump inhibitor(PPI). However, the elderly patients sometimes result in fatal outcome on bleeding from gastric ulcer. Therefore, it is important to prevent ulcer complications by PPI for the high-risk group such as elderly patients taking NSAIDs.

  18. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  19. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  20. Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boustani, J; Caubet, M; Bosset, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this overview was to investigate whether adjuvant chemotherapy has a favourable effect on the outcome of patients with rectal cancer who had preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. A review of randomised clinical trials that allocated patients between fluorouracil-based and observation or between fluorouracil-based and oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy was carried out, including their corresponding meta-analyses. None of the five randomised trials has shown a significant benefit of fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for overall survival or disease-free survival. Also, the three corresponding meta-analyses failed to show a benefit of adjuvant treatment. Of three randomised trials - two phase III and one phase II with a 3-year disease-free survival end point - two showed a small benefit of adding oxaliplatin to fluorouracil, one failed. The corresponding meta-analyses showed that the pooled difference was not significant. In conclusion, the use of postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is not scientifically proven.

  1. Transsacral rectopexy for recurrent complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Araki, Y; Isomoto, H; Tsuzi, Y; Matsumoto, A; Yasunaga, M; Yamauchi, K; Hayashi, K; Kodama, T

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the functional outcome of transsacral rectopexy performed with Dexon mesh for recurrent complete rectal prolapse. Anorectal function was assessed by anorectal manometry and defecography, before and from 1 year after surgery in five patients who were followed up for 1-3 years. The fecal incontinence score recovered from a preoperative mean score of 3.8 to a postoperative mean score of 1.2, and constipation was improved in four patients (80%). The straining anorectal angle (S-ARA), measured by defecography, improved from a preoperative value of 120.6 degrees +/- 6.9 degrees to a postoperative value of 98.5 degrees +/- 3.5 degrees (P < 0.05), and the perineal descent (PD) improved from a preoperative value of 16.2 +/- 2.5 cm to a postoperative value of 8.1 +/- 1.3 cm (P < 0.05). The maximal resting pressure (MRP) increased from a preoperative value of 20.5 +/- 3.7 cmH2O to a postoperative value of 40.5 +/- 4.8 cmH2O (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that transsacral rectopexy with Dexon mesh can achieve good control of recurrent complete rectal prolapse. PMID:10489150

  2. Rectal examination in paediatric trauma care.

    PubMed

    Winnett, M

    1999-01-01

    When providing trauma care, there is a danger that staff might forget what a frightening and confusing experience it can be for the patient, particularly if that patient is a child. As part of an academic exercise in reflection, I recently examined a critical incident involving the trauma care of a 9-year-old boy. In Accident and Emergency (A&E) the doctor inappropriately performed a rectal examination, which I witnessed in horror. The doctor failed to consider the effect of his actions on the child, the legal necessity for consent and the importance of a full explanation. Deeply disturbed by this incident and determined to avoid any repetition, I set out to find documented evidence to support my assertion that no child should be subjected to such intimate examinations, unless absolutely unavoidable. It is hoped that discussion of this incident will serve to raise the awareness of A&E staff working throughout the country with regard to paediatric rectal examination, as has been the case in my own workplace.

  3. Topical therapy is underused in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Seibold, F; Fournier, N; Beglinger, C; Mottet, C; Pittet, V; Rogler, G

    2014-01-01

    The availability of new topical preparations for the treatment of left sided ulcerative colitis offers a therapy optimization for many patients. Rectal application of steroids and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is associated with fewer side effects and has a higher therapeutic efficacy in left-sided colitis as compared to a systemic therapy. Therefore, we were interested in the use of topical therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis. The key question was whether topical treatment is more frequently used than oral therapy in patients with proctitis and left sided colitis. Data of 800 patients of the Swiss IBD cohort study were analyzed. Sixteen percent of patients of the cohort had proctitis, 21% proctosigmoiditis and 41% pancolitis. Topical therapy with 5-ASA or corticosteroids was given in 26% of patients with proctitis, a combined systemic and topical treatment was given in 13%, whereas systemic treatment with 5-ASA without topical treatment was given in 29%. Proportion of topical drug use decreased with respect to disease extension from 39% for proctitis to 13.1% for pancolitis (P=0.001). Patients with severe colitis received a significantly higher dose of topical 5-ASA than patients in remission. Side effects of topical or systemic 5-ASA or budesonide treatment were less frequently seen compared to other medications. Topical treatment was frequently stopped over time. The quality of life was the same in patients with limited disease compared to patients with pancolitis. Topical treatment in proctitis patients was underused in Switzerland. Since topical treatment is safe and effective it should be used to a larger extend.

  4. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B diagnosed on suction rectal biopsy in infancy: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Yin, Minzhi; King, Sebastian K; Hutson, John M; Chow, Chung Wo

    2006-01-01

    Suction rectal biopsies in a newborn and a 10-month-old infant presenting with intestinal obstruction showed marked increase in neurons and nerve bundles in the submucosa. Although there were no syndromic features or a positive family history, mutation analysis of the RET proto-oncogene showed a de novo germline Met918Thr mutation in both patients, confirming the diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B). Thyroidectomy was performed at 9 and 14 months, showing medullary carcinoma and focal prominent C-cell hyperplasia, respectively. These 2 cases are presented to emphasize that when the submucosal plexus is obviously and prominently increased in suction rectal biopsies, diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis should be considered. As this can be associated with genetic conditions, especially MEN 2B, it is crucial that further investigations be performed to ensure proper patient management, such as early thyroidectomy.

  5. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  6. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  7. Jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in dairy and beef cattle: 11 cases (2001 to 2003)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The medical records of 11 cattle with jejunal hemorrhage syndrome were reviewed. Female and male, lactating and pregnant, dairy and beef cattle were affected. Decreased feed intake and milk production, reduced amounts of dark feces, and abdominal discomfort were common historical findings. Common clinical findings included depressed demeanor, a “ping” and fluid-splashing sounds over the right abdomen, melena, and distended loops of intestine on rectal palpation. Surgery was done on 7 cases, 10 cases were euthanized, and 1 died. Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from the intestinal contents from 7 of 7 cases. At necropsy, the characteristic finding was a varying length of a dark purple-red distended jejunum with an intraluminal blood clot. Histologically, there was segmental necrosis, ulceration, and mucosal and transmural hemorrhage of the jejunum. This is a sporadic disease of adult cattle characterized by mechanical obstruction of the small intestines by a large blood clot with a case fatality of almost 100%. PMID:16187715

  8. [The newly occurred and recurrent gastric ulcers after organ-preserving operations for the ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Todurov, I M; Dibrova, Iu A

    2008-10-01

    The literature data and the results of own investigations on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence after organpreserving operations performance for the ulcer disease are summarized. The data on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence rate are adduced. Modern views on possible causes of occurrence, necessary volume and informativity of investigation methods and tactics of treatment are presented. Gastroduodenal motor-evacuation function disorders, duodenogastric reflux and gastric hypersecretion are suggested as a most frequent causes of gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence. The method of operative intervention choice for recurrent gastric ulcer is determined by the cause of its occurrence, as well as the character of ulcer complication and the kind of previous surgical procedure performed.

  9. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  10. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laws, H L; McKernan, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the authors' experience with endoscopic management of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with complications of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure still require surgical management. Virtually all operations for duodenal ulcer include some form of vagotomy. American surgeons in academic centers prefer highly selective vagotomy in suitable candidates. Video-directed laparoscopic and thoracoscopic operations have been done for all complications of duodenal ulcer except for acute hemorrhage. METHODS: The authors have performed laparoscopic operation on eight patients with intractable chronic duodenal ulcer, seven patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with duodenal ulcer, one patient with chronic duodenal ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction, and one patient with acute perforation. Operations performed included omentopexy, anterior seromyotomy plus post truncal vagotomy, and highly selective vagotomy. Seven patients had a simultaneous Nissen fundoplication; and the patient with obstruction underwent concomitant pyloroplasty and vagotomy. Six patients with intestinal ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure were treated with thoracoscopic vagotomy. Techniques used are shown. RESULTS: There has been one recurrent ulcer in the laparoscopic group after anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy. The patient treated by omentopexy for duodenal perforation recovered gastrointestinal function promptly with no further difficulty, but eventually died of primary medical disease. Patients undergoing thoracoscopic vagotomy have all become asymptomatic. Postoperative hospital stay after highly selective vagotomy, anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy, or thoracoscopic vagotomy was 1-5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic management of duodenal ulcers is feasible. Larger numbers of patients with

  11. Anti-platelet therapy and managing ulcer risk.

    PubMed

    Chan, Francis K L

    2012-02-01

    Low-dose aspirin (ASA) has emerged as one of the most important causes of peptic ulcer bleeding in developed countries. Among the risk factors of ASA-associated ulcer bleeding, Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the few that is treatable. Recent evidence showed that among patients with a history of ASA-associated ulcer bleeding, the long-term incidence of recurrent bleeding with ASA use is low after eradication of H. pylori alone. Thus, test-and-treat H. pylori is a potentially useful strategy for ASA users with high ulcer risk. However, the risk of bleeding is further increased by combining other anti-platelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel) with ASA in acute coronary syndromes and coronary stent placement. There is good evidence that co-therapy with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) reduces upper gastrointestinal bleeding with ASA alone or dual anti-platelet therapy. Recently, several meta-analyses of observational studies found that concurrent use of PPI and clopidogrel was associated with increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, the evidence does not suggest a clinically important interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel. However, there is a subset of patients who have reduced conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolites due to genetic polymorphism of hepatic P-450 (carriers of CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles). Since PPIs are also metabolized by similar hepatic enzymes, it is uncertain whether patients carrying CY2C19 loss-of-function alleles are susceptible to concomitant PPI use. In the future, management of patients on dual anti-platelet therapy needs to be individualized according to their thrombotic and bleeding risks. PMID:22142030

  12. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  13. Relapsing and refractory ulcerative colitis in children.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the children with ulcerative colitis (UC) have refractory, relapsing or steroid-dependent disease. UC in children is more extensive than in adults, presents more often with severe attacks and carries a more aggressive disease course. Therefore, although a step-up approach is usually recommended in UC, aggressive therapy will often be indicated in children since steroid dependency should never be tolerated. It is vital to ensure that in every resistant case, the symptoms are truly related to the inflammatory disease activity and not to other conditions such as poor adherence to treatment, infections, adverse reactions to drugs, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, celiac disease and bacterial overgrowth. The clinician should be ready to escalate therapy in a timely manner but only after ensuring optimization of current treatments. Optimization may include, among others, appropriate dosage, utilization of assays that determine thiopurine, calcineurin inhibitors and anti-tumor necrosis factor levels, introduction of combination therapy when indicated (enemas and immunomodulators) and a long enough time for treatment to become effective. Colectomy is always a valid option and should be discussed before major treatment escalations. Experimental therapies can be considered when all else fails and the family prefers to avoid colectomy. The management of refractory and relapsing disease is particularly challenging in children, and this review summarizes the available evidence to guide treatment decisions in this setup. PMID:24969290

  14. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  15. Intractable ulcerating enterocolitis of infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, I R; Risdon, R A; Walker-Smith, J A

    1991-01-01

    Five children (three boys, two girls) presenting in the first year of life with intractable diarrhoea had a number of features in common. All had ulcerating stomatitis, four had partial villous atrophy on small intestinal biopsy, all had colitis characterised by large ulcers with overhanging edges, and four had severe perianal disease; no stool pathogens were detected. Treatment with steroids, sulphasalazine, and azathioprine was unsuccessful. All five required subtotal colectomy. Four were children of consanguinous marriages, two were siblings of Pakistani origin, two were cousins of Arab origin, and the fifth was Portuguese. Although the diagnoses of Behçet's disease and Crohn's disease were considered, it appears that these children represent a distinct inherited condition affecting the whole gastrointestinal tract, particularly the colon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2025003

  16. [Digital ulcers in systemic scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Belz, D; Hunzelmann, N; Moinzadeh, P

    2014-11-01

    Digital ulcers (DU's) are one of the main symptoms of systemic scleroderma and occur in approximately 60% of all scleroderma patients. Due to possible complications such as infections, gangrene or amputation, they require regular medical attention and a good wound treatment by doctors and nursing staff. A definition of DU's has not yet been established. In 2009 the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) published guidelines for the treatment of DU's. An improvement of the healing of active ulcers has been described with Iloprost. Bosentan significantly reduced the frequency of occurrence of new DU's. In some small studies PDE-5 inhibitors appear helpful. Further studies with other therapeutic approaches will follow in the next few years. PMID:25336296

  17. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  18. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  19. Comparison of digital rectal and microchip transponder thermometry in cats.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Lappin, Michael R

    2009-07-01

    This study compares the use of traditional rectal thermometry with an implantable microchip temperature transponder in cats. The microchip transponder was implanted over the shoulder blades and was programmed with cat identification information. Concurrently, the cats were involved in a study in which they were infected experimentally with feline herpesvirus 1; this situation enabled temperature comparisons in both normal and abnormal ranges. Results from the microchip transponder technique were compared with rectal thermometry by using a concordance test of agreement. These data revealed close agreement between rectal and microchip transponder thermometry in the cat at both normal and abnormal temperature ranges.

  20. Anorectal avulsion: Management of a rare rectal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, C.; Andreuccetti, J.; Iannone, L.; Armellino, M.; Rispoli, G.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Traumatic injuries of the rectum are unusual even though their treatment is challenging and often lead to high morbidity and mortality rate. PRESENTATION OF CASE This paper reports a rare case of complete rectal avulsion with multiple fracture and hemoperitoneum treated with a multistep approach in our department. DISCUSSION The anorectal avulsion is a rare rectal trauma; only few reports are available. Treatment key points of rectal trauma are: direct repair, diverting stoma and sacral drainage. CONCLUSION We reported a case of anorectal avulsion with complete detachment of external sphincter muscle. A multidisciplinary approach was mandatory in this kind of lesions. PMID:22554940

  1. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass.

    PubMed

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral. PMID:27683028

  2. Endorectal sonography in the evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease.

    PubMed

    St Ville, E W; Jafri, S Z; Madrazo, B L; Mezwa, D G; Bree, R L; Rosenberg, B F

    1991-09-01

    Endorectal sonography initially was developed for evaluation of the prostate and now has been adapted for evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease. We used endorectal sonography to evaluate a spectrum of diseases, including primary and recurrent rectal carcinoma, metastases, villous adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, endometriosis, sacrococcygeal teratoma, chordoma, retroperitoneal cystic hamartoma, pelvic lipomatosis, diverticulitis, and perirectal abscess. The technique has been useful in localization of perirectal abscesses and in sonographically guided biopsy of perirectal masses. Knowledge of normal sonographic anatomy of the rectum is essential in the evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease. In this essay, we describe the technique of endorectal sonography and illustrate the sonographic findings in a variety of diseases.

  3. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for Rectal Tumors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kunitake, Hiroko; Abbas, Maher A

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1983, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) has emerged as a safe and effective method to treat rectal lesions including benign tumors, early rectal cancer, and rectal fistulas and strictures. This minimally invasive technique offers the advantages of superior visualization of the lesion and greater access to proximal lesions with lower margin positivity and specimen fragmentation and lower long-term recurrence rates over traditional transanal excision. In addition, over two decades of scientific data support the use of TEM as a viable alternative to radical excision of the rectum with less morbidity, faster recovery, and greater potential cost savings when performed at specialized centers. PMID:22745615

  4. Co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon ulceration of acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis via facilitation of NO/COX-2/miR-210 cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Saad, Evan I; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; Ibrahim, Einas R

    2015-11-01

    In this work, α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine demonstrated significant protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. We proposed that α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine co-administration might modulate their individual effects. Induction of ulcerative colitis in rats was performed by intra-rectal acetic acid (5% v/v) administration for 3 consecutive days. Effects of individual or combined used of α-lipoic acid (35 mg/kg ip) or cyclosporine (5mg/kg sc) for 6 days starting 2 days prior to acetic acid were assessed. Acetic acid caused colon ulceration, bloody diarrhea and weight loss. Histologically, there was mucosal atrophy and inflammatory cells infiltration in submucosa, associated with depletion of colon reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and elevated colon malondialdehyde, serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Colon gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 was also elevated. These devastating effects of acetic acid were abolished upon concurrent administration of α-lipoic acid. Alternatively, cyclosporine caused partial protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis. Cyclosporine did not restore colon reduced glutathione, catalase activity, serum C-RP or TNF-α. Unexpectedly, co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravated colon ulceration. Concomitant use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine significantly increased nitric oxide production, cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 gene expression compared to all other studied groups. The current findings suggest that facilitation of nitric oxide/cyclooxygenase-2/miR-210 cascade constitutes, at least partially, the cellular mechanism by which concurrent use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon damage. Collectively, the present work highlights the probable risk of using α-lipoic acid/cyclosporine combination in ulcerative colitis patients.

  5. Gastroduodenal ulcer treated by pylorus and pyloric vagus-preservinggastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun-Fu; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Zhao, Ge; Zhu, Qing-Hua

    1999-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the curative effect of pylorus and pyloric vagus-preserving gastrectomy (PPVPG) on peptic ulcer. METHODS Treating 132 cases of GU and DU with PPVPG, and com parative studies made with 24 cases treated with Billroth I (B I) and 20 cases with Billroth II (B II); advantages and shortcomings evaluated. RESULTS Not a single death after PPVPG. No recurrence of the disorder in the subsequent follow-up for an average of 6.5 years. Curative effect (visik I-&-II) 97.7%. Acidity reduction similar to that found in B I and B II, but 97.7% of the B I and all B II cases having more than second degree intestinal fluid reflux, in contrast to 7.1% in PPVPG cases. Dumping syndrome occurred in the B I and B II cases, none in PPVPG cases. With regard to gastric emptying, food digestion, absorption, body weight and life quality, PPVPG proved to be superior to Billroth procedure. CONCLUSION PPVPG has the advantages of conventional Billroth gastrectomy in reducing acid, removing ulcer focus, and at the same time preserves the pylorus and pyloric vagus for maintaining the normal gastric physiological function. Dumping syndrome, intestinal fluid reflux and other complications of conventional gastrectomy may be avoided. PMID:11819417

  6. Fulminant ulcerative colitis in a healthy pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Orabona, Rossana; Valcamonico, Adriana; Salemme, Marianna; Manenti, Stefania; Tiberio, Guido A M; Frusca, Tiziana

    2015-05-21

    This case report concerns a 25-year-old patient with 6-7 bloody stools/d, abdominal pain, tachycardia, and weight loss occurring during the third trimester of pregnancy. Severe ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon and gravidic sepsis was diagnosed by clinical evaluation, colonoscopy, and rectal biopsy that were performed safely without risk for the mother or baby. The patient underwent a cesarean section at 28+6 wk gestation. The baby was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital and survived without complications. Fulminant colitis was managed conservatively by combined colonoscopic decompression and medical treatment. Although current European guidelines describe toxic megacolon as an indication for emergency surgery for both pregnant and non-pregnant women, thanks to careful monitoring, endoscopic decompression, and intensive medical therapy with nutritional support, we prevented the woman from having to undergo emergency pancolectomy. Our report seems to suggest that conservative management may be a helpful tool in preventing pancolectomy if the patient's condition improves quickly. Otherwise, surgery is mandatory. PMID:26019473

  7. Approach of trans-rectal NIR optical tomography probing for the imaging of prostate with trans-rectal ultrasound correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Xu, Guan; Musgrove, Cameron; Bunting, Charles F.

    2008-02-01

    The trans-rectal implementation of NIR optical tomography makes it possible to assess functional status like hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in prostate non-invasively. Trans-rectal NIR tomography may provide tissue-specific functional contrast that is potentially valuable for differentiation of cancerous lesions from normal tissues. Such information will help to determine if a prostate biopsy is needed or can be excluded for an otherwise ambiguous lesion. The relatively low spatial resolution due to the diffuse light detection in trans-rectal NIR tomography, however, limits the accuracy of localizing a suspicious tissue volume. Trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) is the clinical standard for guiding the positioning of biopsy needle owing to its resolution and convenience; nevertheless, TRUS lacks the pathognomic specificity to guide biopsy to only the suspicious lesions. The combination of trans-rectal NIR tomography with TRUS could potentially give better differentiation of cancerous tissue from normal background and to accurately localize the cancer-suspicious contrast obtained from NIR tomography. This paper will demonstrate the design and initial evaluation of a trans-rectal NIR tomography probe that can conveniently integrate with a commercial TRUS transducer. The transrectal NIR tomography obtained from this probe is concurrent with TRUS at matching sagittal imaging plane. This design provides the flexibility of simple correlation of trans-rectal NIR with TRUS, and using TRUS anatomic information as spatial prior for NIR image reconstruction.

  8. [Therapeutic options for pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Damert, H-G; Meyer, F; Altmann, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this overview is based on remarks on the pathogenesis of and therapy for pressure ulcers and selected but representative cases to demonstrate current options of plastic coverage. As a consequence of the demographic developments, in particular, with regard to the increasing proportion of older patients as well as the advances in modern medicine, the number of multimorbid, geriatric and bedridden patients and of those with prolonged sickbed periods has been steadily growing. Therefore, partly severe manifestations of pressure ulcers at various exposed body regions can be observed in spite of the best preventive intention of care. While in the early stages rather conservative treatment is adequate, surgical intervention might become important and indispensable for a sufficient treatment in advanced stages. To facilitate basic care and to appropriately treat the infectious focus, the methods and procedures of plastic surgery can become relevant. Although there are several options and approaches existing to sanitise and cover defects of pressure ulcers, which are described within the article based on representative cases, preventive measures can still be considered the best approach.

  9. [The treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Alberda, Wijnand J; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J; Rothbarth, Joost; Burger, Jacobus W A

    2015-01-01

    Its incidence has decreased in recent decades due to advances in the treatment of patients with primary rectal cancer, but LRRC still occurs in 6-10% of these patients. LRRC is often accompanied by severe, progressive pain and has a major impact on quality of life. Curative treatment is possible based on surgical resection combined with chemoradiotherapy. Radical resection is the most important prognostic factor in curative treatment. Neo-adjuvant systemic therapy may further improve outcomes in LRRC patients. Many patients are not eligible for surgical treatment due to the presence of metastases or irresectability of the local recurrence. These patients should receive optimal palliative care for the disabling pain. Radiotherapy is effective against local pain in around 75% of patients but the duration of palliation is limited.

  10. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  11. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  12. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  13. Conservative treatment of esophageal perforation related to a peptic ulcer with pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Daisuke; Hirukawa, Hiroshi; Tada, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of esophageal perforation (Boerhaave syndrome) caused by vomiting related to a duodenal ulcer with pyloric stenosis. A 45-year-old male presented with left chest pain and dyspnea after forceful vomiting. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) revealed a massive left pleural effusion and left tension pneumothorax. Abdominal CT revealed pyloric stenosis with a remarkably dilated stomach. Tube thoracostomy and nasogastric suction were immediately performed and we selected conservative treatment based on the following factors-a stable general condition without sepsis, early diagnosis, and good drainage. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy on hospital day 9 demonstrated a healing ulcer in the lower esophagus and pyloric stenosis. We performed distal gastrectomy as elective surgery for pyloric stenosis due to a duodenal ulcer on hospital day 30. In summary, an esophageal perforation with contamination spreading to the thoracic cavity was successfully treated with conservative treatment.

  14. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  15. Three cases of Lipschutz vulval ulceration.

    PubMed

    Alés-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-Pichardo, A; García-Bravo, B; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L; Camacho-Martínez, F M

    2010-05-01

    A Lipschütz ulcer or 'ulcus vulvae acutum' is an acute simple ulceration of the vulva or vagina of non-venereal origin which can be associated with lymphadenopathy. Three cases are described with accompanying clinical photographs. Two cases refer to adolescents, one an infant, all without any history of sexual contact. The cases serve to illustrate a little known but potentially important differential diagnosis of vulval ulceration.

  16. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur.

  17. Recurrence of Mooren's ulcer after lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J

    1989-09-01

    A 45-year-old man with unilateral Mooren's ulcer in a quiescent state underwent annular lamellar keratoplasty after corneal rupture due to minor trauma. Postoperatively, he did well until 8 months later when a recurrence of the Mooren's ulceration occurred, involving the central island of the patient's original corneal stroma. The stroma of the lamellar graft was uninvolved. This unusual occurrence lends support to the concept that there is a specific immunologic reaction to the cornea in patients with Mooren's ulcer.

  18. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  19. A revised risk analysis of stress ulcers in burn patients receiving ulcer prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Jae Jun; Cho, Young Soon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most of the literature about Curling’s ulcer was published from 1960 through 1980. Therefore, an updated study of Curling’s ulcer is needed. We analyzed the risk factors affecting ulcer incidence in burn patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of burn patients who were admitted to two burn centers. We collected information about the general characteristics of patients, burn area size, abbreviated burn severity index, whether surgery was performed, endoscopy results, and the total body surface area (TBSA). We performed a multivariate regression analysis predicting development of Curling’s ulcer. Results In total, 135 patients (mean age, 49.5±13.5 years) underwent endoscopy. Endoscopy revealed ulcer in 51 patients: 36 (70.6%) with gastric ulcers, 9 (17.6%) with duodenal ulcers, and 6 (11.8%) with both ulcer types. Burn area, burn depth, epigastric pain, melena, intensive care unit admission, burn area >20% of TBSA, and undergoing surgery for the burn were significantly different between the ulcer and non-ulcer groups. Multivariate analysis showed two independent factors significantly associated with ulcer: epigastric pain (odds ratio [OR]: 4.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.74 to 11.90), major burn (TBSA > 20%)(OR: 4.31 ,95% CI: 1.34 to 13.85). Conclusion For burn patients, presence of epigastric pain and major burn with TBSA > 20% showed significant association with ulcer development. PMID:27752605

  20. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  1. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  2. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments. PMID:21346647

  3. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  4. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  5. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  6. Rectal wall sparing by dosimetric effect of rectal balloon used during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Teh, Bin S; Dong, Lei; McGary, John E; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Grant, Walter; Butler, E Brian

    2005-01-01

    The use of an air-filled rectal balloon has been shown to decrease prostate motion during prostate radiotherapy. However, the perturbation of radiation dose near the air-tissue interfaces has raised clinical concerns of underdosing the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of an air-filled rectal balloon on the rectal wall/mucosa and prostate gland. Clinical rectal toxicity and dose-volume histogram (DVH) were also assessed to evaluate for any correlation. A film phantom was constructed to simulate the 4-cm diameter air cavity created by a rectal balloon. Kodak XV2 films were utilized to measure and compare dose distribution with and without air cavity. To study the effect in a typical clinical situation, the phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned on a Siemens DR CT scanner for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. A target object was drawn on the phantom CT images to simulate the treatment of prostate cancer. Because patients were treated in prone position, the air cavity was situated superiorly to the target. The treatment used a serial tomotherapy technique with the Multivane Intensity Modulating Collimator (MIMiC) in arc treatment mode. Rectal toxicity was assessed in 116 patients treated with IMRT to a mean dose of 76 Gy over 35 fractions (2.17-Gy fraction size). They were treated in the prone position, immobilized using a Vac-Loktrade mark bag and carrier-box system. Rectal balloon inflated with 100 cc of air was used for prostate gland immobilization during daily treatment. Rectal toxicity was assessed using modifications of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and late effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales systems. DVH of the rectum was also evaluated. From film dosimetry, there was a dose reduction at the distal air-tissue interface as much as 60% compared with the same geometry without the air cavity for 15-MV photon beam and 2x2-cm field size. The dose beyond the

  7. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  8. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  9. Using rectal irrigation for faecal incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Clare

    Claire Bohr describes how she introduced rectal irrigation as a treatment for children with faecal incontinence who had failed to respond to conservative treatment. She won a Nursing Times Award in the continence care category for this service in 2008.

  10. High Rate of Sexual Dysfunction Following Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Caglar; Tinay, Ilker; Yegen, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified. Methods Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes. Results Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction. Conclusion Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25360427

  11. [Rectal impalement with rupture of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Wahnschaff, F; Gerstorfer, M; Roder, J

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old farmer who fell from a ladder onto the handle of a wheelbarrow and sustained a rectal impalement with rupture of the small intestine. After the clinical diagnostics an emergency laparotomy was carried out with primary suturing of the rectal perforation. Furthermore there were two perforations of the small intestine which were treated with an ileostomy. The replacement of the ileostomy was carried out after 7 weeks. PMID:21113567

  12. Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Walter R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent published trials have failed to demonstrate that laparoscopic resection is not inferior to open resection of rectal cancer in terms of pathologic outcomes. However, there have been numerous studies showing the benefit of laparoscopic resection in terms of short-term complications and quality of life. Fewer complications and shorter hospital stays improve the chance of maintaining functional status, which is very important for the elderly population. Thus, laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer remains a viable option for the elderly.

  13. Applied felted foam for plantar pressure relief is an efficient therapy in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zimny, S; Meyer, M F; Schatz, H; Pfohl, M

    2002-10-01

    The application of felted foam is a promising method for plantar pressure reduction in the ulcer region of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers, but the knowledge of its impact on the wound healing and healing times in foot ulcers compared to conventional methods of pressure relief is sparse. The aim of this study was to assess the effects on the wound healing of felted foam dressings for plantar pressure reduction in the therapy of neuropathic foot ulcers. This prospective cohort study evaluates healing times and wound healing in 61 diabetic patients with neuropathic foot ulcerations. Ulcer healing was assessed by planimetric measurement of the wound area at beginning of the study and after 10 weeks and at least until wound healing. The patients were consecutively enrolled in the study, 27 patients were randomized to the felted foam therapy, and 34 patients were randomized to conventional therapy. In the felted foam group, the initial average wound area was 110.8 +/- 14.4 mm 2 (mean +/- SE), and 2.1 +/- 0.5 mm 2 after ten weeks (p < 0.0001), with an average healing time of 79.6 (95%-CI 75-84) days. In the conventional therapy group, the initial average wound area was 119.2 +/- 13.8 mm 2, and 3.4 +/- 0.7 mm 2 after ten weeks (p < 0.0001). The average healing times was 83.2 (95%-CI 77-90) days. Both with respect to the wound healing process and the healing times, the felted foam technique appears to be as effective as conventional plantar ulcer treatment. We conclude that the felted foam technique is an useful alternative in the therapy of the neuropathic diabetic foot syndrome, especially in patients who are not able to avoid weight-bearing reliably.

  14. Confusing untypical intestinal Behcet’s disease: Skip ulcers with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Shi, Hui; Wang, Shao-Dong; Liu, Jiong; Zhu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Miao-Fang; Liu, Chan; Lu, Heng; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a rare and life-long disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels throughout the body. BD was originally described in 1937 as a syndrome involving oral and genital ulceration in addition to ocular inflammation. Intestinal BD refers to colonic ulcerative lesions documented by objective measures in patients with BD. Many studies have shown that over 40% of BD patients have gastrointestinal complaints. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia and abdominal distension. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common, the demonstration of gastrointestinal ulcers is rare. This so-called intestinal BD accounts for approximately 1% of cases. There is no specific test for BD, and the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. The manifestations of intestinal BD are similar to those of other colitis conditions such as Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis, thus, it is challenging for gastroenterologists to accurately diagnose intestinal BD in patients with ileo-colonic ulcers. However, giant ulcers distributed in the esophagus and ileocecal junction with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are rare in intestinal BD. Here, we present a case of untypical intestinal BD. The patient had recurrent aphthous ulceration of the oral mucosa, and esophageal and ileo-colonic ulceration, but no typical extra-intestinal symptoms. During examination, the patient had massive acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent ileostomy after an emergency right hemicolectomy and partial ileectomy, and was subsequently diagnosed with incomplete-type intestinal BD by pathology. The literature on the evaluation and management of this condition is reviewed. PMID:24527178

  15. Clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Li, Chung-Pin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2012-11-15

    Clopidogrel is not safe enough for the gastric mucosa in patients with high risk of peptic ulcer. This study aimed to explore if clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing and elucidate the involved mechanisms. Gastric ulcer was induced in rats and the ulcer size, mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin, expression of growth factors [epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor] and their receptors, and signal transduction pathways for cell proliferation were measured and compared between the clopidogrel-treated group and untreated controls. For the in vitro part, rat gastric mucosal epithelial cell line (RGM-1 cells) was used to establish EGF receptor over-expressed cells. Cell proliferation and molecular change under EGF treatment (10ng/ml) with and without clopidogrel (10(-6)M) were demonstrated. Ulcer size was significantly larger in the clopidogrel-treated group compared to the control and mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin was significantly decreased in the clopidogrel-treated group (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (2mg and 10mg/kg/day) significantly decreased ulcer-induced gastric epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer-stimulated expressions of EGF receptor and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PERK) at the ulcer margin (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (10(-6)M) also inhibited EGF-stimulated EGF receptor, PERK expression, and cell proliferation in RGM-1 cells (P<0.05), and caused much less inhibition of EGF-stimulated cell proliferation in EGF receptor over-expressed RGM-1 cells than in RGM-1 cells (22% vs. 32% reduction). In conclusion, clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats via inhibiting gastric epithelial cell proliferation, at least by inhibition of the EGF receptor-ERK signal transduction pathway.

  16. Transformation of epithelioma adenoides cysticum into multiple rodent ulcers: fact or fallacy. A historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Howell, J B; Anderson, D E

    1976-09-01

    This historical study has examined the persistent controversy about the propensity of epithelioma adenoides cysticum (EAC) to transform into multiple rodent ulcers, by reviewing cases reported through the years that seemed to support the idea. After focusing on the biological behaviour and natural history of the tumours and comparing them with our present knowledge of the behaviour of EAC, we believe that these cases were incorrectly diagnosed. Rather than EAC, they were probably examples of the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The latter syndrome was actually established by the recognition that patients who have multiple rodent ulcers that appear early in life and behave aggressively usually have a constellation of associated developmental defects and that the tumours sould be classified as genetically determined basal cell carcinomas and not as EAC.

  17. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in the experiment and in the bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapralov, S. V.; Shapkin, Y. G.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most complex problems of emergency surgery is the choice of surgical tactics to deal with bleeding peptic ulcer. Endoscopic hemostasis is prescribed to patients with continuing bleedings and prerelapse syndrome. But till nowdays the objective verification of the prerelapse condition had not been worked out. What is more there are no objective criteria to judge the effectiveness of the carried endohemostasis. The aim of the study was to work out a new objective diagnostic method of pre-recurrence syndrome that can be able to make prognosis for possible gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding recurrence more precise. Laser Doppler flowmetry was the method of studies the regional perfusion. The device used in this work was made at the Optics and Biophysics Department of Saratov State University.

  18. Crystal-Associated Colitis with Ulceration Leading to Hematochezia and Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Desai, Meeta; Reiprich, Aaron; Khov, Nancy; Yang, Zhaohai; Mathew, Abraham; Levenick, John

    2016-01-01

    Lower GI bleeding is a common cause for hospitalization in adults. Medication-associated mucosal injury is an important clinical entity that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 3-month history of intermittent abdominal cramping and rectal bleeding. Her medical history was extensive and included end-stage renal disease and a remote history of endometrial carcinoma that was treated with radiation. Initial workup was concerning for ischemic and radiation colitis, however, histology was most consistent with acute inflammation and ulceration associated with crystal fragments. Sevelamer and cholestyramine are commonly used ion-exchange resins that have been associated with mucosal damage. Both medications were discontinued and her symptoms resolved. Our case highlights an underrecognized but important cause of hematochezia. PMID:27482192

  19. Crystal-Associated Colitis with Ulceration Leading to Hematochezia and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Meeta; Reiprich, Aaron; Khov, Nancy; Yang, Zhaohai; Mathew, Abraham; Levenick, John

    2016-01-01

    Lower GI bleeding is a common cause for hospitalization in adults. Medication-associated mucosal injury is an important clinical entity that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 3-month history of intermittent abdominal cramping and rectal bleeding. Her medical history was extensive and included end-stage renal disease and a remote history of endometrial carcinoma that was treated with radiation. Initial workup was concerning for ischemic and radiation colitis, however, histology was most consistent with acute inflammation and ulceration associated with crystal fragments. Sevelamer and cholestyramine are commonly used ion-exchange resins that have been associated with mucosal damage. Both medications were discontinued and her symptoms resolved. Our case highlights an underrecognized but important cause of hematochezia. PMID:27482192

  20. Thrombophilia and chronic venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A W; MacKenzie, R K; Burns, P; Fegan, C

    2002-08-01

    It is known that thrombophilia (TP) is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and that DVT predisposes to chronic venous ulceration (CVU). However, the relationship between TP and CVU has not been well studied. Review of the literature reveals that the prevalence of TP in CVU patients is high--similar to the prevalence found in patients with a history of DVT. This is despite many patients with CVU having no clear history, or duplex evidence of previous DVT. TP may predispose to CVU by leading to macro- or micro-vascular thrombosis. This association raises several issues regarding the investigation, prevention and management of patients with venous disease.

  1. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  2. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  3. Rectal microbicides: clinically relevant approach to the design of rectal specific placebo formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to identify the critical formulation parameters controlling distribution and function for the rectal administration of microbicides in humans. Four placebo formulations were designed with a wide range of hydrophilic characteristics (aqueous to lipid) and rheological properties (Newtonian, shear thinning, thermal sensitive and thixotropic). Aqueous formulations using typical polymers to control viscosity were iso-osmotic and buffered to pH 7. Lipid formulations were developed from lipid solvent/lipid gelling agent binary mixtures. Testing included pharmaceutical function and stability as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Results The aqueous fluid placebo, based on poloxamer, was fluid at room temperature, thickened and became shear thinning at 37°C. The aqueous gel placebo used carbopol as the gelling agent, was shear thinning at room temperature and showed a typical decrease in viscosity with an increase in temperature. The lipid fluid placebo, myristyl myristate in isopropyl myristate, was relatively thin and temperature independent. The lipid gel placebo, glyceryl stearate and PEG-75 stearate in caprylic/capric triglycerides, was also shear thinning at both room temperature and 37°C but with significant time dependency or thixotropy. All formulations showed no rectal irritation in rabbits and were non-toxic using an ex vivo rectal explant model. Conclusions Four placebo formulations ranging from fluid to gel in aqueous and lipid formats with a range of rheological properties were developed, tested, scaled-up, manufactured under cGMP conditions and enrolled in a formal stability program. Clinical testing of these formulations as placebos will serve as the basis for further microbicide formulation development with drug-containing products. PMID:21385339

  4. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ursani, Mohammad A.; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 44 Final Diagnosis: PAPASH syndrome Symptoms: Recurrent skin ulcers • diarrhea • inflammatory arthritis Medication: Prednisone • anti-tumor necrosis factor Clinical Procedure: N/A Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Case Report: A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. Conclusions: Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various

  5. A rapidly fatal palatal ulcer: rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Van der Westhuijzen, A J; Grotepass, F W; Wyma, G; Padayachee, A

    1989-07-01

    A case of a patient with a palatal ulcer who was in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma is described. This ulcer proved to be the presenting sign of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The patient had hemifacial swelling, ocular signs, and gross tissue destruction and died less than 4 weeks after she was first seen.

  6. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  7. Ulcerative colitis flare with splenic ven thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Huseyin Sancar; Kara, Banu; Citil, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Here, we present a 28-year-old man with active ulcerative pancolitis presenting via splenic vein thrombosis and left renal superior infarct that was not associated with a surgical procedure.

  8. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  9. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  10. Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatitis of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions are common in captive reptiles. Although these conditions have distinct differences histologically, they are commonly sequelae to each other. This article examines the anatomy and physiology of reptile skin; discusses reported causes of vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions; and reviews various management options.

  11. [Multiple and prepyloric ulcers of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Dibrova, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    The literature data and own experience results concerning treatment of relatively rare multiple and prepyloric ulcers were summarized. The peculiarities of functional diagnosis methods of these ulcers are adduced. The tactics of surgical treatment, depending on localization, the complication character and gastric functional state was substantiated.

  12. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  13. [A Case of Rectal Villous Tumor Detected with Heart Failure and Electrolyte Imbalance].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Junya; Maeda, Yoshinari; Nagashima, Yukiko; Nishimura, Taku; Morita, Katsuhiko; Setoguchi, Mihoko; Sakata, Kouichiro

    2015-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with a chief complaint of appetite loss, and already diagnosed dehydration and heart failure. After hospitalization, the signs of heart failure were improved with liquid supplementation and electrolyte revision. At admission, computed tomography incidentally detected a rectal tumor. She underwent colonography, which revealed a huge villous tumor in the rectum. Based on the result of the initial biopsy, it was classified as a group 4 tumor, but additional biopsy of specimens obtained from 6 places led to a diagnosis of group 5 tumor. Then, we performed laparoscopic super-low anterior resection and made an ileal stoma. The electrolyte imbalance was improved and did not recur after the operation. In this case, the electrolyte imbalance caused by the huge villous tumor was electrolyte depletion syndrome (EDS). PMID:26805333

  14. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Saich, Rebecca; Chapman, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic inflammation and stricture formation of the biliary tree. Symptoms include itch and lethargy and in advanced cases cholangitis and end-stage liver disease, however increasing numbers of asymptomatic individuals are being identified. The disease is rare in the general population but is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting up to 5% of patients with Ulcerative Colitis, with a slightly lower prevalence (up to 3.6%) in Crohn's disease. The strength of this association means that the vast majority (> 90%) of patients with PSC also have IBD, although many may have only mild gastro-intestinal symptoms. Usually IBD presents before PSC, although vice-versa can occur and the onset of both conditions can be separated in some cases by many years. Mean age of diagnosis of PSC is in the fifth decade of life with a strong male predominance. Risk is increased in those with a family history of PSC, suggesting a genetic predisposition and the disease is almost exclusive to non-smokers. The ulcerative colitis associated with PSC is characteristically mild, runs a quiescent course, is associated with rectal sparing, more severe right sided disease, backwash ileitis and has a high risk of pouchitis post-colectomy. Most worrisome is the high risk of colorectal malignancy which necessitates routine colonoscopic surveillance. Cholangiocarcinoma is also a frequent complication of PSC with a 10%-15% lifetime risk of developing this condition. Treatment with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid offers some chemoprotective effects against colorectal malignancy and may decrease symptoms, biochemical and histological progression of liver disease. Small duct PSC patients characteristically have normal cholangiography, and liver biopsy is required for diagnosis, it appears to have a more favourable prognosis. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is also more prevalent

  15. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards.

  16. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards. PMID:1681170

  17. Pediatric Rectal Exam: Why, When, and How.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Susan R; Wald, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    The digital rectal examination (DRE) is performed in children less often than is indicated. Indications for the pediatric DRE include diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and anemia. Less well-recognized indications may include abdominal mass, urinary symptoms, neurologic symptoms, urogenital or gynecologic symptoms, and anemia. Indeed, we believe that it should be considered part of a complete physical examination in children presenting with many different complaints. Physicians avoid this part of the physical examination in both children and adults for a number of reasons: discomfort on the part of the health care provider; belief that no useful information will be provided; lack of adequate training and experience in the performance of the DRE; conviction that planned "orders" or testing can obviate the need for the DRE; worry about "assaulting" a patient, particularly one who is small, young, and subordinate; anticipation that the exam will be refused by patient or parent; and concern regarding the time involved in the exam. The rationale and clinical utility of the DRE will be summarized in this article. In addition, the components of a complete pediatric DRE, along with suggestions for efficiently obtaining the child's consent and cooperation, will be presented. PMID:26739462

  18. Factors precipitating acute ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Puri, A S; Chaubal, C C; Midha, Vandana

    2014-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is characterized by mucosal inflammation of a variable length of the colon starting from the rectum. The precise etiopathogenesis is unknown but it occurs in genetically susceptible individuals who manifest an abnormal immunological response against gut commensal bacteria. The disease course is-characterized by multiple spontaneous relapses and remissions. Two pathogens namely CMV and C. difficile have been associated with disease exacerbation in specific clinical situations. Whereas C. difficile may produce worsening of the disease in those exposed to broad spectrum antibiotics, CMV reactivation is seen only in patients with moderate to severe steroid refractory disease. The importance of these two super-infections can be gauged by the fact that both the ACG and the ECCO recommend testing for these two pathogens in appropriate clinical situations. The applicability of these guidelines in the Indian scenario has yet to be determined in view of the bacterial and parasitic infections endemic in tropical countries. The guidelines for diagnosis and management of these two super-infections in the presence of ulcerative colitis are discussed in this review. PMID:25735121

  19. Rectal reservoir and sensory function studied by graded isobaric distension in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Akervall, S; Fasth, S; Nordgren, S; Oresland, T; Hultén, L

    1989-01-01

    The rectal expansion and concomitant sensory function on graded, isobaric, rectal distension within the interval 5-60 cm H2O was investigated in 36 healthy young volunteers. Anal pressure and electromyography (EMG) from the external anal sphincter were simultaneously recorded. Rectal distension caused an initial rapid expansion followed by transient, often repeated, reflex rectal contractions and a slow gradual increase of rectal volume. The maximal volume displaced by the first reflex rectal contraction was 18 (13) ml, which was less than 10% of the volume at 60 s. The pressure threshold for appreciation of rectal filling was 12 cm H2O (95% CL 5-15 cm H2O) and coincided with the threshold for rectoanal inhibition. Urge to defecate was experienced at 28 cm H2O (15-50 cm H2O) distension pressure, which was close to the threshold for maximal rectal contraction, also coinciding with the appearance of the external anal sphincter reflex. The interindividual variation of rectal volume on distension with defined pressures varied widely, indicating a considerable variation of rectal compliance in normal man. No correlation was found between rectal volume and sex or anthropometric variables. The relative variations in pressure thresholds for eliciting rectal sensation and rectoanal reflexes were less than the corresponding threshold volumes. It was concluded that the dynamic rectal response to distension reflects a well graded reflex adjustment ideal for a reservoir. PMID:2714682

  20. Holmium laser use in the treatment of selected dry eye syndrome complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial results of treatment selected complications of dry eye syndrome with holmium laser. The lacrimal puncta obliteration and coagulation of the corneal ulcer surface were done.

  1. Assessment and management of pressure ulcers in the elderly: current strategies.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2010-04-01

    Pressure ulcers (pressure sores) continue to be a common health problem, particularly among the physically limited or bedridden elderly. The problem exists within the entire health framework, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and private homes. For many elderly patients, pressure ulcers may become chronic for no apparent reason and remain so for prolonged periods, even for the remainder of the patient's lifetime. A large number of grade 3 and 4 pressure ulcers become chronic wounds, and the afflicted patient may even die from an ulcer complication (sepsis or osteomyelitis). The presence of a pressure ulcer constitutes a geriatric syndrome consisting of multifactorial pathological conditions. The accumulated effects of impairment due to immobility, nutritional deficiency and chronic diseases involving multiple systems predispose the aging skin of the elderly person to increasing vulnerability. The assessment and management of a pressure ulcer requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach in order to understand the patient with the ulcer. Factors to consider include the patient's underlying pathologies (such as obstructive lung disease or peripheral vascular disease), severity of his or her primary illness (such as an infection or hip fracture), co-morbidities (such as dementia or diabetes mellitus), functional state (activities of daily living), nutritional status (swallowing difficulties), and degree of social and emotional support; focusing on just the wound itself is not enough. An understanding of the physiological and pathological processes of aging skin throws light on the aetiology and pathogenesis of the development of pressure ulcers in the elderly. Each health discipline (nursing staff, aides, physician, dietitian, occupational and physical therapists, and social worker) has its own role to play in the assessment and management of the patient with a pressure ulcer. The goals of treating a pressure ulcer include avoiding any

  2. [HNPCC (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) or Lynch syndrome: a syndrome related to a failure of DNA repair system].

    PubMed

    Manceau, Gilles; Karoui, Mehdi; Charachon, Antoine; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Sobhani, Iradj

    2011-03-01

    The HNPCC syndrome (hereditary non polyposis colon cancer) or Lynch syndrome stands for an autosomic dominant condition leading to the most prevalent hereditary colo-rectal cancers (CCR). MMR (mismatch repair)'s genes are involved in carcinogenesis as they play a role in ADNA mismatch repair. Microsatellite instability (MSI+ phenotype) induced by germline mutations is characteristic of such tumors and is necessary to assert the diagnosis. The HNPCC syndrome is associated with a significant increased risk of CCR altogether with endometrium, upper urinary tract and small bowel carcinomas as well as ovarian, biliary system and gastric cancers although of lesser extent. It is of importance to diagnose HNPCC syndrome prior to the treatment starts because it may influence patient's (as well as her/his relatives) disease management (type of surgery, surveillance and screening exams). New French recommendations, developed in 2009, about prophylactic colo-rectal and gynecologic surgeries and monitoring update latest ones published on 2004. PMID:21459714

  3. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach is empty. Eating something or taking an antacid medication sometimes makes the pain go away for ... are taken every day for about 2 weeks. Antacids — acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors — are given ...

  4. Ulcerative Colitis and Its Association with Salmonella Species.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manish Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Dixit, Vinod K; Singh, Tej Bali; Shukla, Sunit K; Jain, Ashok K; Nath, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by presence of ulcer in colon and bloody diarrhea. The present study explores the possibility of association between Salmonella and ulcerative colitis. The present study comprised 59 cases of UC, 28 of colon cancer (CC), 127 of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and 190 of healthy control. The serological study was done by Widal and Indirect Haemagglutination Assay (IHA) for ViAb. Nested PCR was performed targeting fliC, staA, and stkG gene for Typhi and Paratyphi A, respectively. A total of 15.3% patients were positive for Salmonella "O" antigen among them 18.6% UC, 35.5% CC, 12.6% IBS, and 15.3% healthy control. A total of 36.9% patients were positive for "H" antigen including 39.0%, 57.1%, and 67.7% UC, CC, and IBS, respectively. About 1.73% show positive agglutination for AH antigen including 3.4%, 3.6%, and 1.6%, UC, CC, and IBS. A total of 10.89% were positive for ViAb. While 6.8% of UC, 10.7% of CC, 11.0% of IBS, and 12.1% of healthy subjects were positive for the antibody, the PCR positivity rates for Salmonella specific sequences were 79.7% in UC, 53.6% in CC, 66.1% in IBS, and 16.3% in healthy controls. The present study suggested that higher prevalence of Salmonella might play important role in etiopathogenesis of UC, IBS, and CC. PMID:26904116

  5. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  6. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the "foot at risk" to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-04-10

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities.

  7. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  8. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer.

  9. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  10. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer. PMID:26586163

  11. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  12. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  13. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  14. Corneal ulceration following measles in Nigerian children.

    PubMed Central

    Sandford-Smith, J H; Whittle, H C

    1979-01-01

    Acute corneal ulceration in malnourished children is the commonest cause of childhood blindness in Northern Nigeria and usually develops after measles. Other severe diseases in malnourished children rarely precipitate corneal ulceration. A survey in a school for blind children showed that 69% of the children were blind from corneal disease, and a survey of children with corneal scars showed that at least 42% were caused by ulceration after measles. The clinical appearance of the active ulcers was very varied. The serum retinol-binding protein and prealbumin levels in children with corneal ulcers following measles were below normal, but a group of malnourished children without eye complaints following measles were found to have even lower levels. Thus a specific deficiency of vitamin A does not appear to be the primary cause of these ulcers, though it may be a contributory one. A specific measles keratitis and secondary herpes simplex infectious may be local factors contributing to this ulceration, and there is nearly always a background of protein calorie malnutrition. Racial factors may also be of some significance. PMID:508686

  15. Management of finger ulcers in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ward, W A; Van Moore, A

    1995-09-01

    Twelve patients (15 hands) with documented scleroderma and chronic nonhealing digital ulcers were followed for their response to nonoperative and operative treatment. The patients were initially managed with nifedipine, biofeedback, digital xylocaine blockade, and silver sulfadiazine topical ointment and cessation of all vasoconstrictive agents. Ulcerations healed in 6 of 15 hands and remained healed at a 2-year follow-up examination. The remaining nine hands in seven patients failed nonoperative treatment and underwent a palmar digital sympathectomy. These chronic digital ulcerations healed within 6 weeks after surgery. After a 26- to 64-month follow-up period, six of the nine hands remained free of all digital ulcerations. Two patients (three hands) had partial recurrence of the ulceration. Digital sympathectomy can be an effective procedure for treating nonhealing digital ulcers in scleroderma patients after nonoperative treatment has failed. Significant vaso-occlusive disease is likely to be present in these patients, as demonstrated by arteriography. Our initial approach is cessation of all vasoconstricting agents, nifedipine biofeedback, and local antibiotic ointment. Wrist blocks with xylocaine and marcaine are offered if these modalities fail. If these methods do not result in healing of the ulcer within 12 weeks, then digital sympathectomy is considered.

  16. Clinical picture of peptic ulceration diagnosed endoscopically.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M C; Holmes, G K; Cockel, R

    1977-01-01

    Clinical features and laboratory data are presented for 100 patients with benign gastric ulceration and 150 patients with duodenal ulceration confirmed endoscopically in a district general hospital unit. Abdominal pain was the commonest indication for endoscopy, but one third of examinations were performed for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Although the patients were selected by referral for endoscopy their clinical presentation, age, and sex distribution were similar to those reported in previous general surveys. There were no clinical features which clearly distinguished gastric from duodenal ulceration. However, of those with gastric ulceration younger patients more often had distal ulcers and presented with pain, while elderly subjects tended to have high lesser curve involvement and presented with haemorrhage. Moreover, all females presenting with haemorrhage were aged over 50 years, while 6% of males bleeding from gastric ulceration and 40% of males bleeding from duodenal ulceration were under this age. Anaemia when present, except in two premenopausal females, indicated either a recent acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage or a coexistent second diagnosis. PMID:873333

  17. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Pal, L S

    1998-04-01

    Incidence of peptic ulcer is more in people living at higher altitude and similarly relapse of healed duodenal ulcer is more in winter season. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer with or without maintenance therapy with H2 blockers was studied among subjects residing around Shimla (approximate altitude 7000 feet above mean sea level). Sixty-four subjects of endoscopically healed duodenal ulcer were alternatively advised placebo (32 subjects) and ranitidine 150 mg (32 subjects) at bed time as maintenance therapy for period of one year. Subjects were reviewed endoscopically and evaluated for H pylori by rapid urease test, every months or earlier if symptomatic. Relapse rate was analysed among 60 subjects at the end of one year. Cumulative relapse rate was found 60% in ranitidine group and 100% in placebo group. In ranitidine group percentage of relapse to number of endoscopic examinations was 21.4% throughout the year, but in placebo group during winter and spring season relapse was 87.5% of endoscopic examination whereas 57.2% during summer and fall season. Incidence of duodenal ulcer relapse without maintenance therapy was more in winter and spring season (October to March) as compared to summer and fall (April to September), whereas intermittent seasonal treatment is efficacious in prevention of duodenal ulcer relapse and also improves cost benefit ratio of ulcer treatment.

  18. Effect of surface chemistry on nanoparticle interaction with gastrointestinal mucus and distribution in the gastrointestinal tract following oral and rectal administration in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura; Reddy, Mihika; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2015-01-10

    It is believed that mucoadhesive surface properties on particles delivered to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract improve oral absorption or local targeting of various difficult-to-deliver drug classes. To test the effect of nanoparticle mucoadhesion on distribution of nanoparticles in the GI tract, we orally and rectally administered nano- and microparticles that we confirmed possessed surfaces that were either strongly mucoadhesive or non-mucoadhesive. We found that mucoadhesive particles (MAP) aggregated in mucus in the center of the GI lumen, far away from the absorptive epithelium, both in healthy mice and in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis (UC). In striking contrast, water absorption by the GI tract rapidly and uniformly transported non-mucoadhesive mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) to epithelial surfaces, including reaching the surfaces between villi in the small intestine. When using high gavage fluid volumes or injection into ligated intestinal loops, common methods for assessing oral drug and nanoparticle absorption, we found that both MAP and MPP became well-distributed throughout the intestine, indicating that the barrier properties of GI mucus were compromised. In the mouse colorectum, MPP penetrated into mucus in the deeply in-folded surfaces to evenly coat the entire epithelial surface. Moreover, in a mouse model of UC, MPP were transported preferentially into the disrupted, ulcerated tissue. Our results suggest that delivering drugs in non-mucoadhesive MPP is likely to provide enhanced particle distribution, and thus drug delivery, in the GI tract, including to ulcerated tissues.

  19. Effect of surface chemistry on nanoparticle interaction with gastrointestinal mucus and distribution in the gastrointestinal tract following oral and rectal administration in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura; Reddy, Mihika; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2015-01-10

    It is believed that mucoadhesive surface properties on particles delivered to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract improve oral absorption or local targeting of various difficult-to-deliver drug classes. To test the effect of nanoparticle mucoadhesion on distribution of nanoparticles in the GI tract, we orally and rectally administered nano- and microparticles that we confirmed possessed surfaces that were either strongly mucoadhesive or non-mucoadhesive. We found that mucoadhesive particles (MAP) aggregated in mucus in the center of the GI lumen, far away from the absorptive epithelium, both in healthy mice and in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis (UC). In striking contrast, water absorption by the GI tract rapidly and uniformly transported non-mucoadhesive mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) to epithelial surfaces, including reaching the surfaces between villi in the small intestine. When using high gavage fluid volumes or injection into ligated intestinal loops, common methods for assessing oral drug and nanoparticle absorption, we found that both MAP and MPP became well-distributed throughout the intestine, indicating that the barrier properties of GI mucus were compromised. In the mouse colorectum, MPP penetrated into mucus in the deeply in-folded surfaces to evenly coat the entire epithelial surface. Moreover, in a mouse model of UC, MPP were transported preferentially into the disrupted, ulcerated tissue. Our results suggest that delivering drugs in non-mucoadhesive MPP is likely to provide enhanced particle distribution, and thus drug delivery, in the GI tract, including to ulcerated tissues. PMID:25449804

  20. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. Liposomes as drug carriers for oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harsanyi, B B; Hilchie, J C; Mezei, M

    1986-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the potential of liposomes as drug carriers to the ulcerated oral mucosa. Radioactive triamcinolone acetonide palmitate (3H-TRMAp) was encapsulated in large multilamellar lipid vesicles and served as the test lotion. 3H-TRMAp in solution served as control. Forty-six hamsters were divided into three groups. In group I, multiple confluent ulcers in both cheek pouches were treated by topical application. In group II, single ulcers on the cheeks were treated by intramucosal injection. In group III, multiple confluent ulcers were produced in the cheek pouch on one side, with a single ulcer in the contralateral cheek pouch; no drug was applied, and the tissues were prepared for histology. Hamsters were killed at three and 24 hours, respectively, after treatment. Pouches were divided into ulcerated and intact adjacent mucosa. Cheeks were divided into ulcerated mucosa and distant mucosa. Drug levels in the four mucosal portions as well as in the blood, liver, spleen, brain, and thalamic region were determined by radioactive tracer technique. At three hours, liposomal drug concentrations were lower than in control animals in the brain and the thalamic region. At 24 hours, liposomal drug values were higher than in control animals in the ulcerated mucosa and lower than in control animals in the thalamic region. Mean drug concentrations in the ulcerated mucosa were higher in group II than group I. The results parallel those of Mezei and Gulasekharam (1980, 1982); liposomes increase local and decrease systemic drug concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. [Treatment of venous trophic ulcers, using echoscleroobliteration of perforant veins].

    PubMed

    Rusyn, V I; Korsak, V V; Boldizhar, P O; Borsenko, M I; Mytrovka, B A

    2014-02-01

    In 36 patients, suffering trophic ulcers on a chronic venous insufficiency background in a decompensated stage (C6 in accordance to CEAP), echoscleroobliteration of perforant veins, using a "foam-form" method in accordance to Tessari, was performed. In 29 patients postrombophlebitic syndrome in incomplete recanalization stage was diagnosed, in 7 recurrence of varicose disease of the lower extremities. In all the patients during echoscleroobliteration there was possible to obliterate the insufficient perforant veins, in 3 patients two perforant veins were obliterated in each of them. In a one week a pathological blood flow along perforant veins, in accordance to data of ultrasound duplex scanning, was absent. This effect lasted during 6 mo in 29 (80.6%) patients. In 25 (69.4%) patients a trophic ulcers healing was achieved in 1 - 3 mo. In a one year in 30 (83.3%) patients a stable obliteration was noted, in 3 (8.3%) - partial recanalization, in 3 (8.3%) - complete recanalization of perforant veins.

  3. [Indications for radiotherapy of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Winkler, R; Franke, H D; Dörner, A

    1990-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy complete each other in local control of suffering from rectal carcinoma. A radiotherapeutic effect on tumor is secured often. The adjuvant radiotherapy is the most interesting indication, though the most controversial as present too. Analysing all data and with experiences of an own irradiation study we have not any doubt that the indication is qualified for a combined therapy, if the therapeutic aim with priority is to prevent a local relapse as the most frequent and complained of form of therapeutic failure. In this problem, radical irradiation forms, as pre- and accumulating irradiation (sandwich-technique) and after-irradiation, render superior to an exclusive pre irradiation. In result of this study we practise a preirradiation of 25 Gy with immediately following operation and an accumulating irradiation to 50 Gy in proved high-risk-stage (T greater than or equal to 3 NoMo,Tx N1-3 Mo). If there is a primary local incurability by tumor invasion into the neighbourhood a pre-irradiation is done with 50 Gy and following explorative laparatomy within 4-6 weeks. Nearly 60% of these tumors become operable after that. Likewise we practise in unirradiated patients with locoregional tumor recurrence. Also here the extirpation quota of patients with general or systemic incurability, that a stoma construction is required in, we carry out a transanal tumor reduction and irradiate with 50 Gy after that. Especially this therapeutic principle has proved its worth in patients that are past eighty. Here with acceptable living quality and avoiding a stoma construction a survival can be reached that corresponds to the statistical survival of this stage of life. PMID:2101452

  4. Lipschutz ulcers: evaluation and management of acute genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jill S

    2010-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers are painful and distressing to women and perplexing to the providers who care for them. The differential diagnosis includes sexually and nonsexually transmitted infections, autoimmune conditions, drug reactions, and local manifestations of systemic illness. However, in many cases, no causative agent is identified, and lesions are classified as idiopathic aphthosis. In the setting of fever and acute onset of genital ulcers in girls and women, the term Lipschutz ulcers has been used to describe ulcers associated with an immunologic reaction to a distant source of infection or inflammation. The aims of this article are to review the differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of acute genital ulcers, to offer an evaluation and classification scheme, and to discuss treatment options for the dermatologist who cares for women and girls with vulvar ulcers.

  5. [Lipschütz acute genital ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N; Garcia, C; Guillot, B

    2009-10-01

    Lipschütz acute genital ulcer is a rare distinctive cause of nonvenereal acute genital ulcers that occurs particularly in adolescents described in 1913. We report here a typical case that occurred in a 24-year-old virgin woman who developed flu-like symptoms and painful genital ulcers that healed spontaneously within a week and without any infection (Epstein Barr Virus, toxoplasmosis, salmonella). The physiopathogeny remains unknown. However, there are body of evidences pointing out a possible link to several nonvenereal infections, including mainly Epstein-Barr virus acute infection. This rare benign but disabling entity should be known by gynecologists.

  6. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are among the most common foot disorders with ulceration, infection, and gangrene that may ultimately lead to lower extremity amputation. The goals of treatment include the control of diabetes and proper shoe wear. An effective therapy and appropriate foot care are important in wound healing in DFUs. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was reported to significantly promote and accelerate the healing of complex soft tissue wounds as compared to the standard methods of treatment in DFUs. ESWT showed positive results in short-term and long-term outcomes in diabetic patients suffering from foot ulcers. In this article, we review the clinical results of ESWT in DFUs.

  7. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative. PMID:2770215

  8. [Contact eczema in patients with leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Degreef, H; Dooms-Goossens, A; Gladys, K

    1986-01-01

    Patients with leg ulcers or varicose eczema suffer much more often from contact eczema due to the local application of pharmaceutical preparations than patients suffering from other dermatological problems (even those of eczematous origin). This contact allergy may concern not only the active ingredient but also the excipient, the preservative, or even the perfume. In all cases of leg ulcers, of varicose eczema, but also of badly healed ulcers, epicutaneous tests should be carried out with all the components of the pharmaceutical preparations concerned. Moreover, the pharmaceutical industry really must perfect non-allergenic preparations.

  9. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  10. Quantification of Organ Motion During Chemoradiotherapy of Rectal Cancer Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Irene; Hawkins, Maria; Hansen, Vibeke; Thomas, Karen; McNair, Helen; O'Neill, Brian; Aitken, Alexandra; Tait, Diana

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic ({Sigma}) and random ({sigma}) setup errors. Methods and Materials: CBCT images were acquired from 16 patients on the first 3 days of treatment and weekly thereafter. The rectum and bladder were outlined on all CBCT images. The interfraction movement was measured using fixed bony landmarks as references to define the rectal location (upper, mid, and low), The maximal rectal diameter at the three rectal locations was also measured. The bony anatomy displacements were quantified, allowing the calculation of systematic ({Sigma}) and random ({sigma}) setup errors. Results: A total of 123 CBCT data sets were analyzed. Analysis of variance for standard deviation from planning scans showed that rectal anterior and lateral wall movement differed significantly by rectal location. Anterior and lateral rectal wall movements were larger in the mid and upper rectum compared with the low rectum. The posterior rectal wall movement did not change significantly with the rectal location. The rectal diameter changed more in the mid and upper than in the low rectum. No consistent relationship was found between the rectal and bladder volume and time, nor was a significant relationship found between the rectal volume and bladder volume. Conclusions: In the present study, the anterior and lateral rectal movement and rectal diameter were found to change most in the upper rectum, followed by the mid rectum, with the smallest changes seen in the low rectum. Asymmetric margins are warranted to ensure phase 2 coverage.

  11. Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Tai; Meng, Shu-Yong; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole. Azulfidine, Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum, and Rowasa all contain 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the topical anti-inflammatory ingredient. Pentasa is more commonly used in treating Crohn’s ileitis because Pentasa capsules release more 5-ASA into the small intestine than Asacol tablets. Pentasa can also be used for treating mild to moderate UC. Rowasa enemas are safe and effective in treating ulcerative proctitis and proctosigmoiditis. The sulfa-free 5-ASA agents (Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum and Rowasa) have fewer side effects than sulfa-containing Azulfidine. In UC patients with moderate to severe disease and in patients who failed to respond to 5-ASA compounds, systemic (oral) corticosteroids should be used. Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.) are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn’s ileitis and ileocolitis. Systemic corticosteroids are not effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment. To minimize side effects, corticosteroids should be gradually reduced as soon as the disease remission is achieved. In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered. Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP, methotrexate, and cyclosporine. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine is safe and effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. PMID:15285010

  12. Smooth muscle pseudotumours: a potentially confusing artefact of rectal biopsy.

    PubMed Central

    Dankwa, E K; Davies, J D

    1988-01-01

    An artefactual smooth muscle lesion was found in seven of 500 consecutive rectal biopsy specimens. The lesions had the deceptive appearance of a genuine tumour although none of the patients with the lesion had presented with a rectal mucosal swelling. The morphology of the lesion and its poor reproducibility under experimental conditions suggested that it was an artefact of the biopsy procedure: it was easily reproduced in resected specimens of large bowel using punch or basket forceps but not when using flat forceps. The presence of the lesion seems to depend on the type of forceps used rather than on differences in deployment and seems to be caused by avulsion of the superficial part of the muscularis propria and its incorporation into the tissues included in rectal biopsy specimens. Images Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 1 Fig 4 PMID:3045159

  13. Approach to concomitant rectal and uterine prolapse: case report.

    PubMed

    Karateke, Ateş; Batu, Pınar; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Selçuk, Selçuk; Cam, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    The classic description of rectal prolapse is a protrusion of the rectum beyond the anus. Peaks of occurrences are noted in the fourth and seventh decades of life, and most patients (80-90%) are women. The condition is often concurrent with pelvic floor descent and prolapse of other pelvic floor organs, such as the uterus or the bladder. In this study, two cases having contraindication to general anesthesia with rectal and uterine prolapse are presented. These cases were operated on under local anesthesia with support of sedation by Leforte and Delorme's operation at the same time. In conclusion; pelvic floor disorders should be considered as a whole, and surgical correction of rectal prolapse and uterine prolapse may be done at the same time under local anesthesia with the support of sedation. Performance of these operations by experienced and trained pelvic reconstructive surgeons may be advocated.

  14. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, UA; Ugwu, EO; Obi, SN; Nnagbo, JE

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  15. Emerging and Evolving Technology in Colon and Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bosio, Raul M.; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has changed the way we manage many colon and rectal pathologies. Multiple techniques, from straight laparoscopic procedures, to hand-assisted and single-port techniques are available, requiring surgeons to go through various learning curves. Robotic surgery is a relatively novel technique in general surgery which appears to hold most promise for rectal resection. Laparoscopic rectal procedures are difficult, and even in experienced hands, conversion rates are around 17%. Robotic surgery may be a point of difference in these cases, despite a long learning curve and higher costs. This article will describe the role of robotics in colorectal surgery. Room set up, port placement, and docking strategies will be described for common procedures, with emphasis on a hybrid robotic low anterior resection. PMID:26491407

  16. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  17. Leg ulcers and abscesses caused by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Langrock, Marie-Luise; Linde, Hans-Jörg; Landthaler, Michael; Karrer, Sigrid

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by S. marcescens, a gram-negative bacillus belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, are uncommon but may be predisposed by immunocompromised conditions or pre-damaged skin. A 73-year-old man presented with multiple ulcers and painful nodules on the lower right leg as well as abscesses on the right malleolus lateralis. He had been treated with oral penicillin without success. Due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, he was receiving a systemic therapy with corticosteroids. In addition, he had a post-thrombotic syndrome of the lower right leg. Serratia marcescens was the only microorganism isolated from all cultures performed. After a microbial sensitivity test, ertapenem 1 g/day was given intravenously for 10 days, followed by oral administration of ciprofloxacin 500 mg 1-0-1 for a further 7 days. This therapy resulted in the resolution of all lesions. This rare skin infection with S. marcescens needs specific microbiological diagnosis and adapted antibiosis.

  18. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  19. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    PubMed

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H G; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-03-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, erosions, duodenitis at initial endoscopy and healing of ulcer were assessed by one endoscopist. Basic and peak acid output were measured. The extent of duodenitis on the site opposite the ulcer was determined by histological examination. Sixty per cent of the duodenal ulcers were healed after three weeks. By univariate analysis, the following factors affect the healing; pain radiation to back and pain duration during treatment (p less than 0.001), multiple or deep ulcers, narrowing of duodenal bulb (p less than 0.01), number of pain attacks and poor appetite (p less than 0.05). By the stepwise logistic regression model, the following factors were selected as predictors for healing of duodenal ulcer with 76% correct classification: pain radiation to back (p = 0.002), deep ulcer (p = 0.013), multiple ulcers (p = 0.028). Number of cigarettes/day (p less than 0.007) and male sex (p = 0.036). By this model, the prediction of healing could be accurately assessed in 78% in a new sample. Individual treatment should be carried out on the basis of these factors. PMID:3356359

  20. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, William R.; Hosford, Charles C.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  1. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  2. Rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases: Do we have a clear direction?

    PubMed

    Pathak, S; Nunes, Q M; Daniels, I R; Smart, N J; Poston, G J; Påhlman, L

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a common entity and often presents with synchronous liver metastases. There are discrepancies in management guidelines throughout the world regarding the treatment of advanced rectal cancer, which are further compounded when it presents with synchronous liver metastases. The following article examines the evidence regarding treatment options for patients with synchronous rectal liver metastases and suggests potential treatment algorithms.

  3. Pressure ulcer pain: a systematic literature review and national pressure ulcer advisory panel white paper.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Langemo, Diane; Cuddigan, Janet

    2009-02-01

    Pain is an ever-present problem in patients with pressure ulcers. As an advocate for persons with pressure ulcers, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) is concerned about pain. To synthesize available pressure ulcer pain literature, a systematic review was performed of English language literature, specific to human research, 1992 to April 2008, using PubMed and the Cumulative Index in Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Fifteen relevant papers were found; they examined pain assessment tools, topical analgesia for pain management, and/or descriptions of persons with pressure ulcer pain. Studies had small sample sizes and included only adults. The literature established that 1) pressure ulcers cause pain; 2) pain assessment was typically found to be self-reported using different versions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Faces Rating Scale, or Visual Analog Scale; 3) pain assessment instruments should be appropriate to patient cognitive level and medical challenges; 4) in some cases, topical medications can ease pain and although information on systemic medication is limited, pain medications have been found to negatively affect appetite; and 5) wound treatment is painful, particularly dressing changes. Research gaps include the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer pain, the impact of pain on nutrition, and pressure ulcer pain considerations for special groups (eg, children, end-of-life patients, and bariatric patients). The NPUAP presents this white paper as the current scientific know-ledge base on the topic. Research regarding the multidimensional aspects of pressure ulcer pain is strongly recommended.

  4. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  5. Cure of peptic gastric ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Finnish Gastric Ulcer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, K; Pikkarainen, P; Sipponen, P; Kivilaakso, E; Gormsen, M H

    1995-06-01

    The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on ulcer healing and the relapse rate were investigated in a multicentre trial of 239 gastric ulcer patients. Patients with H pylori positive gastric ulcer were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (A) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole and eight weeks' treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) (84 patients); (B) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole placebo and eight weeks with CBS (73 patients); or (C) ranitidine (82 patients). At 12 weeks in 210 patients, gastric ulcer was present in three (9%) of 35 H pylori negative patients, and in 45 (26%) of 175 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.05). Results after one year of follow up were available for 205 patients. Between 12 and 52 weeks, two (7%) ulcer relapses occurred in 29 H pylori negative patients and in 60 (47%) of 128 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.001). After two weeks of open triple therapy (CBS 120 mg four times daily, amoxicillin 500 mg four times daily, and metronidazole 400 mg three times daily), given to the patients with ulcer relapse, only one (an NSAID user) of 55 successfully treated patients had an ulcer relapse during the one year follow up. Healing of gastric ulcer is rapid and recurrence is infrequent after successful H pylori eradication. H pylori eradication changes the natural history of the gastric ulcer disease.

  6. Hand-assisted laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Norimitsu; Ohge, Hiroki; Yano, Raita; Murao, Naoki; Shigemoto, Norifumi; Uegami, Shinnosuke; Watadani, Yusuke; Uemura, Kenichiro; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Sueda, Taijiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the utility of hand-assisted laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy (HALS-RP) compared with the conventional open procedure (OPEN-RP). METHODS Fifty-one patients who underwent restorative total proctocolectomy with rectal mucosectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis between January 2008 and July 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-three patients in the HALS-RP group and twenty-four patients in the OPEN-RP group were compared. Four patients who had purely laparoscopic surgery were excluded. Restorative total proctocolectomy was performed with mucosectomy and a hand-sewn ileal-pouch-anal anastomosis. Preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative factors such as blood loss and operative time, postoperative complications, and postoperative course were compared between two groups. RESULTS Patients in both groups were matched with regards to patient age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score. There were no significant differences in extent of colitis, indications for surgery, preoperative comorbidities, and preoperative medications in the two groups. The median operative time for the HALS-RP group was 369 (320-420) min, slightly longer than the OPEN-RP group at 355 (318-421) min; this was not statistically significant. Blood loss was significantly less in HALS-RP [300 (230-402) mL] compared to OPEN-RP [512 (401-1162) mL, P = 0.003]. Anastomotic leakage was noted in 3 patients in the HALS-RP group and 2 patients in the OPEN-RP group (13% vs 8.3%, NS). The rates of other postoperative complications and the length of hospital stay were not different between the two groups. CONCLUSION HALS-RP can be performed with less blood loss and smaller skin incisions. This procedure is a feasible technique for total proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. PMID:27648162

  7. Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: An Update in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, robotic surgery for rectal cancer has rapidly gained acceptance among colorectal surgeons worldwide, with well-established safety and feasibility. The lower conversion rate and better surgical specimen quality of robotic compared with laparoscopic surgery potentially improves survival. Earlier recovery of voiding and sexual function after robotic total mesorectal excision is another favorable outcome. Long-term survival data are sparse with no evidence that robotic surgery offers major benefits in oncological outcomes. Although initial reports are promising, more rigorous scientific evaluation in multicenter, randomized clinical trials should be performed to definitely determine the advantages of robotic rectal cancer surgery. PMID:26875201

  8. Rectal foreign bodies: imaging assessment and medicolegal aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Miele, Vittorio; Pinto, Fabio; Mizio, Veronica Di; Panico, Maria Rita; Muzj, Carlo; Romano, Luigia

    2015-02-01

    The amount of patients presenting at the emergency hospitals with retained rectal foreign bodies appears recently to have increased. Foreign objects retained in the rectum may result from direct introduction through the anus (more common) or from ingestion. Affected individuals often make ineffective attempts to extract the object themselves, resulting in additional delay of medical care and potentially increasing the risk of complications. The goals of radiological patient assessment are to identify the type of object retained, its location, and the presence of associated complications. Plain film radiographs still play an important role in the assessment of retained rectal foreign bodies. PMID:25639182

  9. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  10. [The transphincteric approach excision of rectal villous adenomas].

    PubMed

    Qiu, H; Tang, W; Zhu, Y

    1995-03-01

    Twenty-four patients with rectal villous adenomas were operated on which posterior transphincteric approach. They had benign villous adenona in (13 patients), villous adenomas showing atypia (2), and villous adenomas developed malignancy (9). All the patients gained excellent results, except one with wounded infection after operation. No patient died at operation. No patient developed rectal fistula and incontinence of feces. The different methods of operation with excised villous adenoma of the rectum were discussed and compared. We conclude that the posterior transsphincteric approach is better than others. PMID:7555388

  11. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  12. Octopus automutilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reimschuessel, R; Stoskopf, M K

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes an automutilation syndrome (OAS) in three species of captive octopuses, Octopus dolfleini, O. bimaculoides, and O. maya, characterized by external arm and mantle lesions. Three clinical patterns in nine animals had similar and characteristic gross and histopathologic features. Axial nerve or brachial artery lesions were observed in six of the nine cases and vascular lesions were seen in two of eight cases with mantle ulcerations. A relationship between automutilation in the octopus and dysesthesias due to neural or vascular pathology is proposed. PMID:2351844

  13. [Pressure ulcer management--Evidence-based interventions].

    PubMed

    Rocha, J A; Miranda, M J; Andrade, M J

    2006-01-01

    Despite improved awareness and quality of care among health care personnel, pressure ulcers prevalence remains high especially in the inpatient setting. Pressure ulcers are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, affecting the quality of life of patients and their caregivers, and significantly increasing direct and indirect healthcare costs. Early risk assessment for developing a pressure ulcer is essential to decide on the appropriate preventive measures and for initiation of a tailored therapeutic approach. Interventions include strategies to reduce extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors associated with tissue ischemia, optimization of patient's nutritional status, and local wound care. This revision intends to review current evidence-based therapeutic interventions in pressure ulcer care, and support implementation of management protocols in an inpatient ward.

  14. Cutaneous leishmaniasis "chiclero's ulcer" in subtropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Martinez, Leonardo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-08-01

    An 18-year-old female presented with a severe ulcerative lesion on her right ear of 6 weeks duration. Her right ear was edematous and erythematous with a large, painless ulcerative lesion covering a third of the pinna and satellite papular lesions on the posterior. She was diagnosed with chiclero's ulcer. A skin smear stained with Diff-quik showed abundant Leishmania parasites. Chiclero's ulcer is a rare clinical presentation and is typically severe and difficult to treat. Physicians in Ecuador recommend administering prolonged intramuscular Glucantime. Side effects are common and can be severe resulting in low patient compliance. Because of preferences of the patient and the large volume needed for her weight, we recommended topical treatment with a lotion of Glucantime mixed half and half with white Merthiolate. After applying this lotion to the lesion 3 to 4 times a day for 6 weeks, the lesion healed.

  15. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Akanay-Diesel, S; Hoff, N P; Kürle, S; Haes, J; Erhardt, A; Häussinger, D; Schulte, K-W; Bölke, Edwin; Matuschek, C; Budach, W; Gerber, P A; Homey, B

    2011-11-10

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutro?philic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α- and ?β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22027642

  16. Genital ulcers: their diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sacks, S L

    1987-08-01

    THIS ARTICLE OFFERS SOME BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THREE MAJOR CAUSES OF GENITAL ULCERS: syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chancroid. The author also discusses differential diagnoses and suggests an approach to treatment.

  17. Pressure ulcers - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to transfer from bed to a wheelchair or chair? If there is leakage of stool ... done to prevent pressure ulcers? If using a wheelchair: How often should someone make sure the wheelchair ...

  18. [The ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A N; Samtsov, A V

    1990-01-01

    A female patient suffering from the ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis is described and the literature dealing with this problem is reviewed. Peculiar features of this case are described: ulceration of the nodes, which is an extremely rare phenomenon; no involvement of other organs, lungs included, was detectable, which is not typical of ulcerative sarcoidosis; small-nodular elements are parallelled by nodes (Boeck's small-nodular sarcoid and Darier-Roussy's subcutaneous sarcoids) in this patient, this evidencing an uniform pathologic process in the skin and subcutaneous fat. Ulceration in this patient is explained by the development of allergic vasculitis of the immediate hypersensitivity type (leukocytoclastic vasculitis and manifest increase of the level of circulating immune complexes). Prednisolone therapy has resulted in an excellent clinical effect.

  19. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  20. Diabetic foot ulcer: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Saraogi, Ravi Kant

    2008-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a rising health problem with rising prevalence of diabetes. It is the most important cause of non-traumatic foot amputations. Diabetic foot ulcers are primarily due to neuropathy and/or ischaemia, and are frequently complicated by infection. Up to 85% of all diabetic foot related problems are preventable through a combination of good foot care and appropriate education for patients and healthcare providers. The holistic care of diabetic foot ulcer patients requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Apart from blood sugar control, treatment of ulcer involves debridement, offloading, appropriate dressings, vascular maintenance and infection control. Use of adjunctive treatments such as various growth factors, skin replacement dressings and vacuum assisted closure will accelerate healing in selected cases.

  1. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutrophilic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α - and -β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22027642

  2. The economics of adalimumab for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation in the colon. Adalimumab, as a TNF-α blocker, offers a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and refractory or intolerant to conventional medications; however, its cost-effectiveness profile has not yet been well established. Future economic evaluations should choose appropriate comparators in the context of target-reimbursement decision making and focus on cost-effectiveness over a long time horizon.

  3. Quantitative distribution of radiolabeled 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas in patients with left-sided ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Vitti, R.A.; Meyers, F.; Knight, L.C.; Siegel, J.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Rectally administered suspensions of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) are topically effective in treating left-sided ulcerative colitis. The extent to which the contents of these enemas are distributed to inflamed mucosal linings has not previously been determined. This study was undertaken to validate a technique for labeling 5-ASA with 99mTc and to quantitate the distribution of (99mTc)5-ASA in eight patients with left-sided ulcerative colitis. Eight patients underwent three colonic scintigraphic exams within five days, receiving a 60-ml radiolabeled 5-ASA enema into the unprepared rectum for each study, with sequential anterior abdominal images obtained for 4 hr. Activity within the rectum, sigmoid, descending, transverse, and ascending colon was quantitated. Over 50% of the labeled enema had advanced beyond the rectum in five of eight patients and in six of eight patients by 30 min and 60 min, respectively. The distribution of (99mTc)5-ASA was quantitatively reproducible when repeated in the same patient on different days, despite apparent visual differences. By 2 hr, the amount of the enema present within the rectum decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) compared to the initial distribution. The amount of enema present within the descending colon was increased significantly at 0.5 hr (P less than 0.05) and at 2 hr (P less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in the distribution from initial values for the sigmoid, transverse, or ascending colon at any time. In each of these cases the spread of the enema to or beyond the extent of disease was documented. In patients with left-sided ulcerative colitis, small volume (99mTc)5-ASA enemas reliably reach the area of inflammation.

  4. Pressure ulcer prevention: utilizing unlicensed assistive personnel.

    PubMed

    Walker Sewill, Danielle K; Van Sell, Sharon; Kindred, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide education to the RN regarding pressure ulcer prevention and best practice interventions. This investigation focuses on the definition of a pressure ulcer, risk factors for pressure ulcers, and the benefits and importance of using unlicensed assistive personnel to help prevent pressure ulcers. A comprehensive literature review was completed using the Texas Woman's University Library, the Texas Christian University Library, and the World Wide Web. The search engine used was Google. The databases included were CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The literature was current, defined as from the last 10 years, and the primary language searched was English. Full-text articles from these databases were included as well as print publications from the university collections. The key search terms from the literature review included (a) pressure ulcer, (b) prevention, (c) unlicensed assistive personnel, (d) nursing assistant, (e) theory of nursing knowledge, (f) incidence, (g) prevalence, (h) Braden scale, (i) moisture, and (j) repositioning. Best practice guidelines were reviewed via the Joanna Briggs database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the National Institutes of Health. Literature was synthesized to define evidence-based practices that would justify the use of unlicensed assistive personnel for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers. PMID:20827067

  5. [Round table discussion. Ulcer - vagus - gastrin].

    PubMed

    1976-03-01

    1. Both gastrin and the vagus nerve play a part in the pathogenesis of the duodenal ulcer. Which of these two factors is of greater significance--this problem is still subject to discussion as is the question whether other factors such as duodenal neutralization are more important than hitherto assumed. 2. At this time no reliable and harmless drugs that speed up the healing of duodenal ulcers and prevent relapses are yet available. Candidates for this are H2 receptor blockers, prostaglandines and possibly substances resembling secretin. 3. Only some of the participants considered it necessary to do endoscopic and radiological follow-ups in duodenal ulcers. 4. Proximal gastric vagotomy for the treatment of duodenal ulcers is still undergoing clinical trials. At present this method should only be used by surgeons with a special interest in gastric surgery who also dispose of the technology and the staff for careful postoperative checks on these patients. The advantages of proximal gastric vagotomy consist in sparing truncation, low mortality and good functional results. 5. In gastric ulcers--contrary to duodenal ones--malignancy should always be suspected. If medical treatment does not lead to complete remission within a few months, surgery must be performed. 6. Many surgeons still prefer resection to vagotomy and excision in the management of gastric ulcers.

  6. Giant gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobara, Hideki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-09-01

    A 57-year-old man developed haematemesis and was referred to our institution. His discomfort had begun 3 weeks earlier and localised to the upper abdomen. Abdominal CT showed a defect of gastric mucosa and gastric wall thickening. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed that he had an active gastric ulcer, 40 mm in diameter, on the lesser curvature in the upper third of the corpus and the presence of a pancreatic body at the ulcer base, penetration to the pancreas. Open gastrectomy was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of localised peritonitis caused by penetration of the stomach into the pancreas. Histopathology of resected specimens showed a benign peptic ulcer, 40×40 mm in size, was found on the lesser curvature in the antrum, and this had penetrated through the pancreas. The most serious complications of PUD include haemorrhage, perforation, penetration, and gastric outlet obstruction. Approximately 7% of patients experience perforation, which occurs when an ulcer erodes through the wall and leaks air and digestive contents into the peritoneal cavity. Antral and duodenal ulcers can penetrate into the pancreas. We report a case of gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

  7. The evolution of surgical procedures in the management of duodenal and gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ajao, O G; Ugwu, B T

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the surgical management of duodenal ulcer had evolved through many stages, over the years. It started with gastroenterostomy alone, then followed by subtotal gastrectomy, vagotomy alone, vagotomy and gastro-jejunostomy, vagotomy and pyloroplasty, and highly selective vagotomy - all which started as open surgical procedures. Now unless there are complications the treatment is essentially medical following the work of Marshall and Warren. Currently, even when surgery is indicated, minimal invasive procedures are preferred. Four main types of pyloroplasties are well known. They are Weinberg, Heinecke-Mikulicz, Finney and Jaboulay. Vagotomy can be truncal, selective, and highly selective. Accepted surgical treatment for gastric ulcer is the distal gastric resection to include the ulcerated area, but not resecting more than 50-60% of the stomach. In the uncommon cases of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, aggressive gastric surgery, the use of drugs, and the resection of the tumour have all been recommended in appropriate cases. With the discovery of Helicobacter pylori and its effective medical treatment, surgery has little role in the initial management of peptic ulcer disease. The place of the history of the surgical procedures employed earlier in the treatment of this disease would remain relevant.

  8. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  9. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  10. Severe chronic iron deficiency anaemia secondary to Trichuris dysentery syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Azira N, M S; Zeehaida, M

    2012-12-01

    Trichuris dysentery syndrome is caused by Trichuris trichiura which contributes to one of the most common helminthic infections in the world. It is associated with heavy colonic infection that manifests as mucoid diarrhoea, rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse, iron deficiency anaemia, and finger clubbing. Here, we report a case of trichuris dysentery syndrome complicated with severe chronic iron deficiency anaemia in a 4-year-old girl who required blood transfusion. The nematode was visualized on stool microscopic and colonoscopic examination. A longer duration of anti-helminthic treatment is required to achieve effective and better outcome.

  11. Ruptured rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal rupture of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a ruptured RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of ruptured RD. PMID:25552833

  12. Visual diagnosis: Rectal foreign body: A primer for emergency physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a case that is occasionally seen within emergency departments, namely a rectal foreign body. After presentation of the case, a discussion concerning this entity is given, with practical information on necessity of an accurate and thorough history and removal of the object for clinicians. PMID:22152071

  13. The flexible implant in treatment of rectal carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Vider, M.; Lim, N.; Ditlow, R. Jr.; Au, F.; Gennaro, A.R.

    1982-07-01

    A modified technique for removable afterloading Iridium-192 implantation is described. Under local or general anesthesia, a series of flexible tygone tubes are introduced into all the tumor area in the rectum. This technique is especially suitable for palliation in high-risk, elderly patients. No rectal tube is necessary in this technique.

  14. Rectal angiolipoma: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kacar, Sabite; Kuran, Sedef; Temucin, Tulay; Odemis, Bulent; Karadeniz, Nilufer; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2007-03-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare vascular variant of the benign lipomatous tumors and is generally seen in subcutaneous tissues. We report a 70-year-old female with abdominal distension not related to rectal small polypoid mass with peduncule described as angiolipoma by histologically, and review the literature.

  15. Genomic evaluation of rectal temperature in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress negatively impacts the production, fertility, and health of dairy cattle. Rectal temperature (RT) has unfavorable genetic correlations with production, longevity, economic merit, and somatic cell score in Holstein cows. The objectives of the current study were to perform a genome-wide as...

  16. Influence of Rectal Decompression on Abdominal Symptoms and Anorectal Physiology following Colonoscopy in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postcolonoscopy abdominal discomfort and bloating are common. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether rectal decompression improved distension-induced abdominal symptoms and influenced anorectal physiology. Methods. In 15 healthy subjects, rectal distension was achieved by direct air inflation into the rectum by colonoscopy. Placement of rectal and sham tube was then performed in each subject on a separate occasion. The anorectal parameters and distension-induced abdominal symptoms were recorded. Results. Anorectal parameters were similar between placements of rectal tube and sham tube except for greater rectal compliance with rectal tube than with sham tube (P < 0.05). Abdominal pain and bloating were significantly reduced by rectal tube and sham tube at 1 minute (both P < 0.05) and 3 minutes (both P < 0.05). After placement of rectal tube, abdominal pain at 3 minutes correlated positively with first sensation (r = 0.53, P = 0.04), and bloating at 3 minutes also correlated positively with urge sensation (r = 0.55, P = 0.03). Conclusions. Rectal decompression with either rectal or sham tube improved distension-induced abdominal symptoms. Our study indicates that the mechanisms that improved abdominal symptoms by rectal decompression might be mediated by a central pathway instead of a peripheral mechanism.

  17. The Expression Level and Prognostic Value of Y-Box Binding Protein-1 in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ping-Wu; Feng, Gang; Xie, Gang; Wang, An-Qun; Yang, Yong-Hong; Wang, Dong; Du, Xiao-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to simultaneously evaluate the expression of Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) in non-neoplastic rectal tissue and rectal cancer tissue, and to collect clinical follow-up data for individual patients. Additionally, we aimed to investigate the developmental functions and prognostic value of YB-1 in rectal cancer. We performed immunohistochemical studies to examine YB-1 expression in tissue samples from 80 patients with rectal cancer, 30 patients with rectal tubular adenoma, and 30 patients with rectitis. The mean YB-1 histological scores for rectal cancer, rectal tubular adenoma, and rectitis tissue specimens were 205.5, 164.3, and 137.7, respectively. Shorter disease-free and overall survival times were found in patients with rectal cancer who had higher YB-1 expression than in those with lower expression (38.2 months vs. 52.4 months, P = 0.013; and 44.4 months vs. 57.3 months, P = 0.008, respectively). Our results indicate that YB-1 expression is higher in rectal cancer tissue than in rectal tubular adenoma and rectitis tissue and that it may be an independent prognostic factor for rectal cancer. PMID:25790262

  18. Influence of Rectal Decompression on Abdominal Symptoms and Anorectal Physiology following Colonoscopy in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postcolonoscopy abdominal discomfort and bloating are common. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether rectal decompression improved distension-induced abdominal symptoms and influenced anorectal physiology. Methods. In 15 healthy subjects, rectal distension was achieved by direct air inflation into the rectum by colonoscopy. Placement of rectal and sham tube was then performed in each subject on a separate occasion. The anorectal parameters and distension-induced abdominal symptoms were recorded. Results. Anorectal parameters were similar between placements of rectal tube and sham tube except for greater rectal compliance with rectal tube than with sham tube (P < 0.05). Abdominal pain and bloating were significantly reduced by rectal tube and sham tube at 1 minute (both P < 0.05) and 3 minutes (both P < 0.05). After placement of rectal tube, abdominal pain at 3 minutes correlated positively with first sensation (r = 0.53, P = 0.04), and bloating at 3 minutes also correlated positively with urge sensation (r = 0.55, P = 0.03). Conclusions. Rectal decompression with either rectal or sham tube improved distension-induced abdominal symptoms. Our study indicates that the mechanisms that improved abdominal symptoms by rectal decompression might be mediated by a central pathway instead of a peripheral mechanism. PMID:27651788

  19. Pre-slaughter rectal temperature as an indicator of pork meat quality.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, L; Van de Perre, V; Permentier, L; De Bie, S; Geers, R

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates whether rectal temperature of pigs, prior to slaughter, can give an indication of the risk of developing pork with PSE characteristics. A total of 1203 pigs were examined, measuring the rectal temperature just before stunning, of which 794 rectal temperatures were measured immediately after stunning. pH30LT (M. Longissimus thoracis) and temperature of the ham (Temp30Ham) were collected from about 530 carcasses, 30 min after sticking. The results present a significant positive linear correlation between rectal temperature just before and after slaughter, and Temp30Ham. Moreover, pH30LT is negatively correlated with rectal temperature and Temp30Ham. Finally, a linear mixed model for pH30LT was established with the rectal temperature of the pigs just before stunning and the lairage time. This model defines that measuring rectal temperature of pigs just before slaughter allows discovery of pork with PSE traits, taking into account pre-slaughter conditions.

  20. Susceptibility to decubitus ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J H; Germs, P H; Schneider, H; Ribbe, M W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis of blood-flow recovery time after pressure relief was prospectively evaluated as a measure of a patient's susceptibility to develop decubitus ulcers. This blood-flow recovery time was measured using the noninvasive pressure-temperature-time (PTT) method, which uses a 10-minute test-pressure stimulus. The blood-flow response after pressure relief was measured by means of skin-temperature measurements. The evaluation was performed in a group of 109 elderly nursing home patients. A pressure-index was used as a measure for the intensity and duration of pressure and shear forces, to which a patient was exposed, to measure a set of external determinants that are independent of the susceptibility. Both the blood-flow recovery time and the pressure-index were found to correlate significantly with the risk to develop decubitus. A conceptualization of the relationship between the risk, on the one hand, and the susceptibility and the external determinants, on the other hand, is presented, assuming independence (orthogonality) of both sets of determinants. Based on this conceptualization, a three-dimensional risk-relationship was constructed. It is concluded that the blood-flow recovery time can be considered to be a measure for the susceptibility. Further, the conceptualization provides valuable insight into the risk-relationships and forms a base for future research with regard to susceptibility. PMID:8129586

  1. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  2. The idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Alfaham, M A; Ferguson, S D; Sihra, B; Davies, J

    1987-01-01

    A 14 year old girl with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is described. In addition to weight loss, anaemia, amenorrhoea, general lethargy, anorexia, mouth ulcers, blisters of hands and feet, and petechial skin rash, she had features of involvement of the cardiovascular system as the major complication. She responded well to treatment. After a comprehensive search of the published reports 18 cases of this syndrome were identified in children under 16 years. Fifteen of these children had involvement of the cardiovascular system as the major source of their morbidity and mortality. Summary of the clinical details and laboratory, biopsy, and necropsy findings of the involvement of the various organ systems of the 18 children is presented. PMID:3619478

  3. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically.

  4. Histological examination of ulcer margin for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yu, Li-Kuang; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lee, Mu-Shien

    2013-02-01

    Biopsy of ulcer margin is routinely performed to exclude malignancy in patients with gastric ulcers, but its utility in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection has not yet been fully studied. A cohort of 50 patients with gastric ulcer was prospectively examined. Three tests including histology, rapid urease test, and urea breath test were performed in all patients for diagnosing H pylori infection. Six biopsied specimens from the margin of the gastric ulcer and 1 each specimen from antrum and body of non-ulcer part were obtained for histology using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain. The criterion used for defining H pylori infection was a positive result in at least 2 of the 3 tests. H pylori infection was diagnosed in 27 (54%) of the patients. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the histological examination of the ulcer margin were 92.6%, 95.7%, 96.2%, 91.7%, and 94%, respectively. The addition of 1 specimen from the antrum or body or a combination of the 2 specimens did not increase the diagnostic yields of those for histological examination of ulcer margin alone. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for the rapid urease test were 96.3%, 100%, 100%, 95.8%, and 98%, respectively, and the corresponding values for the urea breath test were 88.9%, 87%, 88.9%, 87%, and 88%. We performed Giemsa stain for the 3 patients with false-negative and false-positive results of histological examination of ulcer margin using H&E stain, and all were positive for H pylori infection. In conclusion, histological examination of the ulcer margin using hematoxylin-eosin stain was quite accurate and useful for diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers. A special stain is required when the diagnosis of H pylori infection is questionable on routine H&E staining.

  5. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ursani, Mohammad A; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-08-17

    BACKGROUND Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). CASE REPORT A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. CONCLUSIONS Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various auto-inflammatory disorders may share pathogenic commonalities.

  6. Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Acne, Suppurative Hidradenitis (PA-PASH) Syndrome: An Atypical Presentation of a Rare Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ursani, Mohammad A; Appleyard, Joan; Whiteru, Onome

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PA-PASH) syndrome has been linked to an auto-inflammatory pathway. We report a case that is an atypical presentation of a rare syndrome, which supports literature suggesting that different phenotypes of PG-related syndromes may be a variation of the same pathogenic spectrum. Interestingly, our patient displayed a positive proteinase-3 antibody (PR-3). The clinical relevance of this is unclear. In recent literature, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) positivity has been reported in various inflammatory conditions other than ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). CASE REPORT A 44-year-old African American male with history of pyogenic arthritis, acne, suppurative hidradenitis, and chronic diarrhea presented for evaluation of painful ulcers located on the bilateral lower extremities, bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, buttocks, and scrotum, and chronic diarrhea. Infectious etiologies for the ulcers were ruled out. Biopsy of an ulcer revealed PG. Colonoscopy revealed inflammation and ulceration with biopsy consistent with ulcerative colitis (UC). After treatment with prednisone, the ulcers healed within 4 weeks, and the chronic diarrhea resolved. CONCLUSIONS Our patient displayed a variation of PA-PASH syndrome and UC. Previously reported cases of similar phenotypes of PG-related syndromes have not presented in this fashion. Furthermore, the literature does not report cases of PG-related syndromes with an elevation in PR-3 antibody. Elevation in PR-3 has been reported in various inflammatory disorders aside from AAV. The relevance of this is currently unclear. It may be possible that the milieus of these various auto-inflammatory disorders may share pathogenic commonalities. PMID:27530224

  7. Acne in Klinefelter Syndrome-46XY/47XXY Mosaicism?

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli; Swarnalakshimi, Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KFS) is the most common non-heritable sex chromosome anomaly caused by nondisjunction during cell division and contains two or more X chromosomes. More than two third of all cases are homogenous (47XXY) and the remaining are mosaic (46XY/47XXY). Lower limb ulcers are frequently observed and attributed to impaired fibrinolysis. A case of KFS with post acne scars and leg ulcers is presented. The rarity of acne in this syndrome is explained by the phenomenon of mosaicism. PMID:26538700

  8. Imported tropical infectious ulcers in travelers.

    PubMed

    Zeegelaar, Jim E; Faber, William R

    2008-01-01

    Skin ulcers are a commonly encountered problem at departments of tropical dermatology in the Western world. Furthermore, the general dermatologist is likely to be consulted more often for imported chronic skin ulcers because of the ever-increasing travel to and from tropical countries. The most common cause of chronic ulceration throughout the world is probably pyoderma. However, in some parts of the world, cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most prevalent causes. Mycobacterium ulcerans is an important cause of chronic ulcers in West Africa. Bacterial infections include pyoderma, mycobacterial infections, diphtheria, and anthrax. Pyoderma is caused by Staphylococcus aureus and/or beta-hemolytic streptococci group A. This condition is a common cause of ulcerative skin lesions in tropical countries and is often encountered as a secondary infection in travelers. The diagnosis is often made on clinical grounds. Antibacterial treatment for pyoderma should preferably be based on culture outcome. Floxacillin is generally active against S. aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococci. Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, M. marinum, and M. tuberculosis may cause ulcers. Buruli ulcers, which are caused by M. ulcerans, are endemic in foci in West Africa and have been reported as an imported disease in the Western world. Treatment is generally surgical, although a combination of rifampin (rifampicin) and streptomycin may be effective in the early stage. M. marinum causes occasional ulcerating lesions in humans. Treatment regimens consist of combinations containing clarithromycin, rifampin, or ethambutol. Cutaneous tuberculosis is rare in travelers but may be encountered in immigrants from developing countries. Treatment is with multiple drug regimens consisting of isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, and rifampin. Cutaneous diphtheria is still endemic in many tropical countries. Cutaneous diphtheria ulcers are nonspecific and erythromycin and penicillin are both effective

  9. Simple algorithms for the management of genital ulcers: evaluation in a primary health care centre in Kigali, Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Bogaerts, J.; Vuylsteke, B.; Martinez Tello, W.; Mukantabana, V.; Akingeneye, J.; Laga, M.; Piot, P.

    1995-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 395 patients presenting with genital ulcers at a primary health care centre in Kigali, Rwanda. Using clinical data and the results of a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, we simulated the diagnostic outcome of two simple WHO flowcharts for the management of genital ulcers. These outcomes and a clinical diagnosis were then compared with the laboratory diagnosis based on culture for genital herpes and Haemophilus ducreyi and serology for syphilis. The prevalence of HIV infection was high (73%) but there was no difference between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in the clinical presentation and etiology of genital ulcer disease. The proportion of correctly managed chancroid and/or syphilis cases was 99% using a syndromic approach, 82.1% using a hierarchical algorithm including an RPR test, and 38.3% with a clinical diagnosis. In situations where no laboratory support is available, a simple syndromic approach is preferable to the clinical approach for the management of genital ulcer. If an RPR test can be included in the diagnostic strategy, patients with a reactive RPR test should be treated for both syphilis and chancroid infection. PMID:8907769

  10. Simple algorithms for the management of genital ulcers: evaluation in a primary health care centre in Kigali, Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, J; Vuylsteke, B; Martinez Tello, W; Mukantabana, V; Akingeneye, J; Laga, M; Piot, P

    1995-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 395 patients presenting with genital ulcers at a primary health care centre in Kigali, Rwanda. Using clinical data and the results of a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, we simulated the diagnostic outcome of two simple WHO flowcharts for the management of genital ulcers. These outcomes and a clinical diagnosis were then compared with the laboratory diagnosis based on culture for genital herpes and Haemophilus ducreyi and serology for syphilis. The prevalence of HIV infection was high (73%) but there was no difference between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in the clinical presentation and etiology of genital ulcer disease. The proportion of correctly managed chancroid and/or syphilis cases was 99% using a syndromic approach, 82.1% using a hierarchical algorithm including an RPR test, and 38.3% with a clinical diagnosis. In situations where no laboratory support is available, a simple syndromic approach is preferable to the clinical approach for the management of genital ulcer. If an RPR test can be included in the diagnostic strategy, patients with a reactive RPR test should be treated for both syphilis and chancroid infection.

  11. Vagotomy and double pyloroplasty for peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Hines, J R; Geurkink, R E; Kornmesser, T A; Wikholm, L; Davis, R P

    1975-01-01

    Seventy patients with peptic ulcers (55 duodenal and 15 gastric) were treated by truncal vagotomy and doulbe pyloroplasty during the past four years. Clinical and experimental data as presented lead us to believe that transecting the pylorus twice produces an incontinent pyloric sphincter and a larger gastric outlet than is found in other methods of pyloroplasty. This decreases gastric stasis and has led to a lower ulcer recurrence rate (1.5%). In addition the untoward postoperative sequelae are minimal. The 70 patients treated (for the most pare consecutive cases) exhibited the usual complications of peptic ulcer disease. Thirty-three had intractable pain, 23 bleeding (15 massive), 13 obstruction, and one acute perforation. There were no operative or postoperative deaths and the only serious postoperative complication was unrelated to the double pyloroplasty. During the followup period four patients have died of unrelated diseases. Of the remaining 66 patients one developed a probable recurrent peptic ulcer which has responded to medical management. Four patients have intermittent dumping, three have mild diarrhea and one has failed to gain weight, Constipation and weight gain are more common complaints. It would appear that vagotomy with double pyloroplasty is a safe and effective operation for peptic ulcers and that further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:1119866

  12. Traumatic ulcers and pain during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kvam, E; Gjerdet, N R; Bondevik, O

    1987-04-01

    In the present investigation the frequency of oral ulcers and pain in 161 orthodontic patients was recorded. Of all patients, 95% had experienced pain, but 84.5% said that the pain lasted a few days only. About 11% maintained that the treatment was constantly painful. Significantly more patients coming from private clinics complained of pain than those attending treatment at the Department of Orthodontics. About 50% said that activating or changing archwire was most annoying, whereas 28.7% said ulceration and 21% said headgear was the most annoying part of the treatment. According to 75% of the patients, sleeping habits were not influenced. Only eight patients reported truancy, and seven of these had done this only once. Of all patients, 6.2% had requested interim visits. Small wounds caused by the fixed appliance were reported by 75.8% of the patients, and 2.5% had suffered badly from ulceration caused by the fixed appliances. More girls than boys reported ulceration. There was a significant sex difference as regards recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU). Increase in the frequency of RAU was reported by 23.1% of the girls and 9.6% of the boys while they had fixed appliances.

  13. Invasive mucormycosis in benign gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Al-Rikabi, A C; Al-Dohayan, A D; Al-Boukai, A A

    2000-03-01

    Fungal elements are frequently noted overlying the base of chronic peptic ulcers of the stomach and it has been suggested that the fungi enhance the degree of necrosis and that these cases have protracted disease and deeper ulcers with more perforations. It has also been postulated that the number of fungal elements might be increased in the stomach of patients who are receiving potent medications such as H2-receptor antagonists to reduce gastric acidity, but there have not been adequate control studies, and the deleterious effects from the presence of the fungi in these cases have not been substantiated. We present a very rare case of invasive mucormycosis (phycomycosis) occurring in the base of a chronic gastric ulcer in a 55 years old diabetic male. This case was clinically and radiologically been mistaken for a gastric carcinoma. In addition, the ulcer was complicated by perforation and fungal septicemia with subsequent fatal outcome. The clinical, radiological and histopathological features are described together with a literature review of other reported fungal gastric ulcers.

  14. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  15. Patterns of inflammation in mucosal biopsies of ulcerative colitis: perceived differences in pediatric populations are limited to children younger than 10 years.

    PubMed

    Robert, M E; Tang, L; Hao, L M; Reyes-Mugica, M

    2004-02-01

    The histologic criteria used to diagnose ulcerative colitis in colonic mucosal biopsies have been established for many years and include crypt architectural distortion, plasmacellular infiltrates, and neutrophils in the crypt epithelium and lumen. In several recent studies, it has been noted that colonic mucosal biopsies from children presenting with ulcerative colitis show fewer histologic abnormalities at initial presentation, especially less architectural distortion, than do biopsies from adults. In this study, colonic mucosal biopsies taken at the time of presentation of ulcerative colitis in 15 adults and 25 children were examined blindly by two pathologists. All biopsies were taken prior to the initiation of therapy. Twelve children were between 1 and 10 years of age, and 13 children were between the ages of 11 and 17 years. All patients had at least 1 year of follow-up, with clinical and pathologic confirmation of the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Five separate histologic features that are characteristic of ulcerative colitis were scored on mucosal biopsies. Children < or = 10 years of age had significantly less crypt branching, plasma cells in the lamina propria, cryptitis, crypt abscesses, and epithelial injury than adults (P values ranging from < 0.0001 to 0.0032). Children between the ages of 11 and 17 years had less cryptitis, crypt abscesses, and epithelial injury than adults (P values ranging from 0.0001 to 0.007) but similar degrees of crypt architectural distortion and plasma cell infiltrates. For all histologic features examined except epithelial injury, the significant findings were due to differences in biopsies taken proximal to the rectum. No significant differences in histology scores were found in rectal biopsies between any age group, except for epithelial injury, which was significantly less in children < or = 10 years. The findings show for the first time that the perceived differences between adults and children with ulcerative colitis

  16. Pathogenesis of foot ulcers and the need for offloading.

    PubMed

    Rathur, H M; Boulton, A J

    2005-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration represents a major medical, social and economic problem all over the world. While more than 5% of diabetic patients have a history of foot ulceration, the cumulative lifetime incidence may be as high as 15%. Ethnic differences exist in both ulcer and amputation incidences. Foot ulceration results from the interaction of several contributory factors, the most important of which is neuropathy. The use of the total-contact cast is demonstrated in the treatment of plantar neuropathic ulcers. Histological evidence suggests that pressure relief results in chronic foot ulcers changing their morphological appearance by displaying some features of an acute wound. Thus, repetitive stresses on the insensate foot appear to play a major role in maintaining ulcer chronicity. It is hoped that research activity in foot disease will ultimately result in fewer ulcers and less amputation in diabetes.

  17. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status.

  18. [Munchausen's syndrome: a diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Tlacuilo-Parra, J A; Guevara-Gutiérrez, E; Barrón-Pérez, E; Estrada-Contreras, M

    1999-01-01

    The Munchausen's syndrome is a variant of chronic factitious illness with predominantly physical signs and symptoms under the conscious control of the patient without any obvious gain. The disorder has also been called hospital addiction, professional patient syndrome and in the field of dermatology, dermatitis artefacta. Munchausen's syndrome may mimic many different conditions, especially acute abdominal pain, hemorrhagic disorders, rheumatologic manifestations, factitious fever, and injury of skin. We describe a 28-year-old woman, who was admitted at a local teaching hospital and studied during three years with complaints of a bleeding ulcer on the left knee, severe enough to require blood transfusions. Many procedures and tests were performed without pathologic findings. Afterward, she was seen at our institution; during the study, the suspicion had arisen that the patient had manipulated her ulcer, after the diagnosis of factitious disease was communicated, she admitted. Munchausen's syndrome may have a broad spectrum of manifestations; early recognition can avoid unnecessary treatments and invasive diagnostic studies, with their inherent risk of complications.

  19. Advances in endoscopic imaging in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Pastorelli, Luca; Ishaq, Sauid; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies for the treatment of ulcerative colitis require more accurate tools for gastrointestinal imaging to better assess mucosal disease activity and long-term prognostic clinical outcomes. Recent advances in gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy are radically changing the role of endoscopy in every-day clinical practice and research trials. Advanced endoscopic imaging techniques including high-definition endoscopes, optical magnification endoscopy, and various chromoendoscopy techniques have remarkably improved endoscopic assessment of ulcerative colitis. More recently, optical biopsy techniques with either endocytoscopy or confocal laser endomicroscopy have shown great potential in predicting several histological changes in real time during ongoing endoscopy. Here, we review current applications of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques in ulcerative colitis and present the most promising upcoming headways in this field. PMID:26365308

  20. [Decubitus ulcer and nutritional status: literature review].

    PubMed

    Castilho, Lillian Dias; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand aspects related to the nutritional assessment of patients in risk for pressure ulcers, we reviewed the national and international literature indexed on Medline and LILACS bibliographic databases, from 1987 to 2001. The aim of this research was to investigate the knowledge production on pressure ulcers and nutritional status, as well as to learn about the authors and the publication focus. We concluded that patients in risk for pressure ulcers can be early identified based on nutritional assessment, including biochemical data, anthropometric evaluation, clinical data, diet history and energetic consumption. The alterations are frequent in elderly patients, hospitalized patients, patients with a chronic disease such as a vascular cerebral accident, cancer and spinal cord injury.