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Sample records for rectal ulcer syndrome

  1. ["The three-lies disease": solitary rectal ulcer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Crespo Pérez, L; Moreira Vicente, V; Redondo Verge, C; López San Román, A; Milicua Salamero, J M

    2007-11-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon benign condition characterized by rectal bleeding, passage of mucus, and pain. Histological features are well established as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth-muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diagnosis can usually be made on sigmoidoscopy, and biopsies should always be taken. Ulceration is not universally present, and polypoid, non-ulcerated lesions and erythematous areas are also seen. The lesion or lesions are most often found on the anterior or anterolateral wall of the rectum, although they can also be located in the left colon and be more extensive or even circumferential. Lesions are multiple in 30 percent of cases. These are the reasons why this entity is also known as "the disease of three lies". We report a case of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome presenting at endoscopy with an erythematous area on the left side wall of the rectum.

  2. Gastric heterotopia of rectum in a child: a mimicker of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; Lone, Khurram; Al-Sofyani, Medhat; El Bagir, Asim

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is an uncommon presentation in pediatric patients. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is a rare cause of rectal bleeding. Here, we report a 3-year-old child with a bleeding rectal ulcer that was initially diagnosed and managed as a solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. After 1 month, the patient persisted to have intermittent rectal bleed and severe anal pain. Repeat colonoscopy showed the worsening of the rectal ulcer in size. Pediatric surgeon excised the ulcer, and histopathological examination revealed a gastric fundic-type mucosa consistent with the diagnosis of gastric heterotopia of the rectum. Over the following 18 months, our patient had experienced no rectal bleeding and remained entirely asymptomatic. In conclusion, heterotopic gastric mucosa of the rectum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a bleeding rectal ulcer.

  3. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-02-20

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  4. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  5. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome in children: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Urgancı, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Eken, Kamile Gulcin

    2013-11-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare, benign disorder in children that usually presents with rectal bleeding, constipation, mucous discharge, prolonged straining, tenesmus, lower abdominal pain, and localized pain in the perineal area. The underlying etiology is not well understood, but it is secondary to ischemic changes and trauma in the rectum associated with paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor and the external anal sphincter muscles; rectal prolapse has also been implicated in the pathogenesis. This syndrome is diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and endoscopic and histological findings, but SRUS often goes unrecognized or is easily confused with other diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, amoebiasis, malignancy, and other causes of rectal bleeding such as a juvenile polyps. SRUS should be suspected in patients experiencing rectal discharge of blood and mucus in addition to previous disorders of evacuation. We herein report six pediatric cases with SRUS.

  6. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-21

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS.

  7. The role of autofluorescence colonoscopy in diagnosis and management of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latos, W.; Kawczyk-Krupka, A.; Ledwon, A.; Kosciarz-Grzesiok, A.; Misiak, A.; Sieron-Stoltny, K.; Sieron, A.

    2008-02-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a chronic disease of the rectum. Although SRUS is a benign condition there are studies which suggest that chronic ischaemia which occurs in the SRUS may lead to "transitional mucosa" that is similar to that adjacent to colorectal carcinomas and adenomas and may lead to colorectal dysplasia and carcinoma development. The exclusion of primary or metastatic malignancy is the most important aim in the differential diagnosis of SRUS. In our study we assess the possibilities of autofluorescence colonoscopy (AFC) in diagnosis and management of SRUS. We performed white light colonoscopy first. The tissue samples were taken for pathological examination. When SRUS was histopathologically confirmed AFC was performed by means of Xillix OncoLIFE. During AFC numerical colour value (NCV) of autofluorescence of SRUS lesions was noted. During 1946 colonoscopies eight persons were diagnosed as having solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. We did not observe autofluorescence increase in case of polipoid and flat ulcer lesions (NCV 0,39-0,67; mean 0,525) and little increase of autofluorescence in case of erythema lesion (NCV- 0,94). SRUS is a rare disorder of the rectum but it causes differential diagnosis problems. The most common reason for incorrect diagnosis are inadequate tissue specimens. AFC allows to reveal subtle areas within the lesions of more intense autofluorescence and localizes the potential cancer-transformating dysplasia. In this way the most representative area with highest risk of pre- or cancerous changes, for biopsy specimen is indicated.

  8. Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... diet Behavior therapy to stop straining during bowel movements Some people strain during bowel movements out of habit. Behavior therapy can help you learn to relax your pelvic muscles during bowel movements. In one technique called biofeedback, a specialist teaches ...

  9. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with solitary rectal ulcer in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bes, C; Dağlı, Ü; Yılmaz, F; Soy, M

    2015-09-16

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder that has a wide range of clinical presentations and variable endoscopic findings which makes it difficult to diagnose and treat. The clinical and endoscopic picture in this condition can also mimic malign ulceration, malignancy or Crohn's disease. Behçet's disease can affect the gastrointestinal tract. However to the best of our knowledge, no case with solitary rectal ulceration has been reported so far in literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with Behçet's disease admitted to our clinic with rectal bleeding due to solitary rectal ulceration.

  10. A rare cause of chronic rectal bleeding in children; solitary rectal ulcer: case report.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Abdulkerim; Tander, Burak; Temiz, Muhyittin; Barış, Sancar; Arıtürk, Ender

    2011-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding is extremely rare in children. Rare presentation, non-specific symptoms, insufficient experience, and characteristics mimicking other rectal diseases may cause misdiagnosis or delay of diagnosis in some pediatric patients. Here, we report a 10-year-old boy with solitary rectal ulcer diagnosed two years after onset of the symptoms who responded well to the conservative therapy, including high-fiber diet, laxatives, defecation training, and sucralfate enema.

  11. Rectal ulcer with an elusive diagnosis: all that ulcers is not Crohn disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A single rectal ulcer is an uncommon finding in children with gastrointestinal disease. Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is foremost among the differential diagnoses, a primary immunological defect should not be forgotten. Because of the paucity of literature on the association of rectal ul...

  12. Refractory leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Yuto; Tosa, Mamiko; Iwakiri, Itaru; Nomoto, Shunichi; Kaneko, Mayuko; Kuwahara, Kousuke; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a man with refractory leg ulcers, bilateral varicosis of the lower extremities, and Buerger disease. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed Klinefelter syndrome (48 XXY). Ulcerative lesions of the lower extremities are a complication of Klinefelter syndrome. To date, the pathogenesis of ulcers in Klinefelter syndrome has not been clarified, but several factors, such as abnormalities of fibrinolysis and prothrombotic states, might be involved. Our present case emphasizes the importance of considering Klinefelter syndrome in the differential diagnosis of a male patient with nonhealing ulcers of the lower extremities.

  13. Hypostatic ulcers in 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verp, Marion S; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Martin, Alice O

    1983-01-01

    Hypostatic leg ulcers, probably secondary to vascular insufficiency, were observed in two adult men with 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome. The association between leg ulcers and 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome deserves increased attention because knowledge of the association may alert clinicians to an otherwise unsuspected chromosome abnormality. PMID:6842542

  14. Therapeutics for Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zavoshti, Fereydon Rezazadeh; Andrews, Frank M

    2017-04-01

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) is an umbrella term used to describe ulcers in the nonglandular squamous and glandular mucosa, terminal esophagus, and proximal duodenum. Gastric ulcers in the squamous and glandular regions occur more often than esophageal or duodenal ulcers and likely have a different pathogenesis. At present, omeprazole is accepted globally as the best pharmacologic therapy for both regions of the stomach; however, the addition of coating agents and synthetic prostaglandins could add to its effectiveness in treatment of EGUS. Dietary and environmental management are necessary for prevention of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of ulcerative colitis and smoking on rectal blood flow.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, E D; Russell, M A; Feyerabend, C; Rhodes, J

    1990-01-01

    Rectal blood flow was measured by laser doppler flowmetry over 60 minutes in eight patients with colitis in remission and eight healthy male non-smokers. Ten smokers were also examined on two occasions, one of which included smoking a cigarette. Plasma nicotine concentrations were measured in smokers. All subjects showed a pronounced fall in rectal blood flow in the first 30 minutes and patients with colitis had significantly higher values compared with smokers (p less than 0.002; p less than 0.04) and non-smokers (p less than 0.007; p less than 0.002) during the first and second 30 minutes respectively. Values in smokers and non-smokers were similar, but smoking a cigarette was associated with a significant fall in blood flow (p less than 0.04) and this change was inversely related to the rise in plasma nicotine concentration (r = -0.63; p less than 0.05). The findings may be relevant to the association between colitis and the smoking history. PMID:2210447

  16. Rectal Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with ulcerative colitis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Simon Ladefoged; Thomsen, Christian

    2015-04-16

    A case of Hodgkin lymphoma located in the rectum of a patient with ulcerative colitis is described. The patient was a 44 year old male treated with thiopurines for ulcerative colitis for ten years. He was admitted with malaise, weight loss and abdominal pain. Endoscopy revealed a large ulcerative lesion involving the rectum and distal part of the sigmoid colon. Although it macroscopically resembled a rectal cancer, repeated biopsies did not reveal any malignancy. In order to resolve the symptoms of stenosis and to get the final diagnosis a recto-sigmoid resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin lymphoma, positive for Epstein Barr Virus. Subsequent examination revealed disseminated disease involving the pelvic wall, liver, and bone marrow. The patient is currently receiving chemotherapeutic treatment, and follow-up shows disease remission.Hodgkin lymphoma associated with immunosuppressive therapy is rare. However, patients with ulcerative colitis receiving such treatment are at increased risk of lymphoproliferative disordes, potentially due to loss of immunosurveillance and presence of oncogenic viruses (i.e. Epstein-Barr virus). Virtual Slides: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/6156776351558952.

  17. Ileal lesions in patients with ulcerative colitis after ileo-rectal anastomosis: Relationship with colonic metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Calabrese, Emma; Palmieri, Giampiero; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Onali, Sara; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo; Cossignani, Marta; Condino, Giovanna; Das, Kiron Moy; Pallone, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis (IRA), ileal lesions may develop in the neo-terminal-ileum and their possible relation with phenotypic changes towards colonic epithelium. METHODS: A total of 19 patients with IRA under regular follow up were enrolled, including 11 UC and 8 controls (6 Crohn’s disease, CD; 1 familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP; 1 colon cancer, colon K). Ileal lesions were identified by ileoscopy with biopsies taken from the ileum (involved and uninvolved) and from the rectal stump. Staining included HE and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against colonic epithelial protein CEP (Das-1) and human tropomyosin isoform 5, hTM5 (CG3). Possible relation between development of colonic metaplasia and ileal lesions was investigated. RESULTS: Stenosing adenocarcinoma of the rectal stump was detected in 1 UC patient. The neo-terminal ileum was therefore investigated in 10/11 UC patients. Ileal ulcers were detected in 7/10 UC, associated with colonic metaplasia in 4/7 (57.1%) and Das-1 and CG3 reactivity in 3/4 UC. In controls, recurrence occurred in 4/6 CD, associated with colonic metaplasia in 3/4 and reactivity with Das-1 and CG3 in 2/3. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that in UC, ileal lesions associated with changes towards colonic epithelium may develop also after IRA. Changes of the ileal content after colectomy may contribute to the development of colonic metaplasia, leading to ileal lesions both in the pouch and in the neo-terminal ileum after IRA. PMID:18785281

  18. Efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients with radiation-induced rectal ulcers: A report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Yoshimizu, Shoichi; Chino, Akiko; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tagao, Fuyuki; Iwasaki, Susumu; Ide, Daisuke; Tamegai, Yoshiro; Igarashi, Masahiro; Saito, Shoichi; Fujisaki, Junko

    2017-03-28

    For decades, hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been considered a treatment option in patients with chronic radiation-induced proctitis after pelvic radiation therapy. Refractory cases of chronic radiation-induced proctitis include ulceration, stenosis, and intestinal fistulas with perforation. Appropriate treatment needs to be administered. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in five patients with radiation-induced rectal ulcers. Significant improvement and complete ulcer resolution was observed in all treated patients; no side effects were reported. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has a low toxicity profile and appears to be highly effective in patients with radiation-induced rectal ulcers. However, hyperbaric oxygen therapy alone failed to improve telangiectasia and easy bleeding in four of five patients; these patients were further treated with argon plasma coagulation. Although hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be effective in healing patients with ulcers, it seems inadequate in cases that easy bleeding. Altogether, these data suggest that combination therapy with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and argon plasma coagulation may be an effective and safe treatment strategy in patients with radiation-induced rectal ulcers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  20. Biochemical analysis of enzymic markers of inflammation in rectal biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Morain, C; Smethurst, P; Levi, A J; Peters, T J

    1983-01-01

    Rectal biopsies were collected from control subjects, patients with ulcerative colitis both active and quiescent, and from patients with Crohn's disease, both with and without rectal involvement, as judged by histological assessment. Tissue homogenates were assayed for neutrophil (vitamin B12 binding protein, myeloperoxidase, lysozyme) and lymphocyte (5' nucleotidase) selective markers. Patients with acute but not those with quiescent colitis had striking increases of the neutrophil markers. Neither patient group with ulcerative colitis showed a change in the lymphocyte marker enzyme activity. Patients with Crohn's disease involving the rectum showed significant, but less marked, increases in the activity of the neutrophil markers that were found in active ulcerative colitis. Patients with Crohn's disease, not involving the rectum, showed normal or reduced levels of neutrophil markers. Patients with Crohn's disease, both those with and without rectal involvement, had increased activities of the lymphocyte selective marker. This distinguishes this inflammatory response from that of ulcerative colitis and provides further biochemical evidence of abnormalities in apparently uninvolved mucosa from Crohn's patients. PMID:6313772

  1. Neonatal isolated rectal bleeding and the risk of hypersensitivity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Reiter, O; Morag, I; Mazkereth, R; Strauss, T; Maayan-Metzger, A

    2014-01-01

    When rectal bleeding occurs in an otherwise asymptomatic child, it can be classified as isolated rectal bleeding (IRB). Among the different etiologies suggested for IRB, one of the most common is a hypersensitivity reaction of the bowel mucosa to digested antigens. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term outcomes and the risk of developing hypersensitivity syndromes among infants following an IRB event. A historical prospective comparative study was carried out. The study compared 77 infants who were born at the Sheba Medical Center in Israel during the period 2002 to 2009 and who experienced a neonatal IRB event to 77 infants with the same gestational age, but without IRB. Data were obtained from hospital records and from phone interviews with the parents regarding hypersensitivity syndrome between the ages of 3 and 10 years. The IRB group was not at an increased risk of developing a hypersensitivity syndrome or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to the control group. Longer duration of breast-feeding was found to be related to a lower incidence of hypersensitivity symptoms. An IRB event in the neonatal period does not increase the risk of developing hypersensitivity syndromes or food allergies during childhood.

  2. Development of a rectal nicotine delivery system for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Dash, A K; Gong, Z; Miller, D W; Huai-Yan, H; Laforet, J

    1999-11-10

    The aims of this investigation were: i. to develop a rectal nicotine delivery system with bioadhesives for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and ii. to evaluate nicotine transport and cytotoxicity of the delivery system using Caco-2 cell culture systems. Rectal nicotine suppository formulations were prepared in semi-synthetic glyceride bases (Suppocire AM and AI, Gattefosse Inc.) by fusion method. The in vitro release of nicotine was carried out in modified USP dissolution apparatus 1. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction were used to study the polymorphic changes if any in the formulations. An LC method was used for the assay of nicotine. The effect of bioadhesives (glyceryl monooleate (GMO), and Carbopol) on the nicotine flux was evaluated using Caco-2 cell permeability studies and Caco-2 cell viability was determined using the MTT toxicity assay. In vitro release studies indicated that the low melting AI base was superior to that of the AM base. Presence of GMO in the formulation enhanced the release of nicotine whereas Carbopol showed an opposite effect. The enhanced release of nicotine in the presence of GMO was found to be partly due to the melting point lowering effect of this compound. Caco-2 cell absorption studies showed that there was a decrease in the flux of nicotine in the presence of both the bioadhesives. The flux of the fluorescein marker which is used to study the integrity of the cell monolayers was found to be slightly higher only in the presence of 10% (w/w) Carbopol. Nicotine, Carbopol, and GMO do not have any cytotoxic effect on these cell monolayers within the concentration range used in the formulations. Rectal nicotine formulations containing bioadhesives were developed and characterized. Both in vitro release and cell culture studies have indicated that one can manipulate the nicotine release from these rectal delivery systems by incorporation of various bioadhesives or the use of different bases in the

  3. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with synchronous rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min-Er; Niu, Bei-Zhan; Ji, Wu-Yang; Wu, Bin

    2016-06-14

    We report on a patient diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) with synchronous rectal cancer who was treated with laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). PJS is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and increased risks of gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal cancer. This report presents a patient with a 20-year history of intermittent bloody stool, mucocutaneous pigmentation and a family history of PJS, which together led to a diagnosis of PJS. Moreover, colonoscopy and biopsy revealed the presence of multiple serried giant pedunculated polyps and rectal adenocarcinoma. Currently, few options exist for the therapeutic management of PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. For this case, we adopted an unconventional surgical strategy and ultimately performed laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA. This procedure is widely considered to be the first-line treatment option for patients with ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. However, there are no previous reports of treating PJS patients with laparoscopic IPAA. Since the operation, the patient has experienced no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and has demonstrated satisfactory bowel control. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with PJS with synchronous rectal cancer.

  4. Genital ulcer as a new clinical clue to PFAPA syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scattoni, R; Verrotti, A; Rinaldi, V E; Paglino, A; Carelli, A; D'Alonzo, R

    2015-04-01

    Vaginal ulcers can be associated with a number of different diseases. We describe two girls who presented genital ulcers as a persistent symptom of PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis) syndrome. The possibility of considering this clinical manifestation as a clue for the diagnosis of PFAPA is discussed.

  5. Preparation and evaluation of mesalamine collagen in situ rectal gel: a novel therapeutic approach for treating ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ramadass, Satiesh Kumar; Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Jabaris, Sugin Lal; Madhan, Balaraman

    2013-01-23

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the colonic mucosa. Mesalamine had been established as a first line drug for treating mild to moderate UC. A continued availability of the drug for treatment of damaged tissues remains a great challenge today. In the present study, a novel mesalamine collagen in situ gel has been prepared using type I collagen, which is pH/temperature sensitive. This hydrogel undergoes sol-gel transition under physiological pH and temperature which was confirmed by rheological studies. The in vitro release profile demonstrated sustained release of mesalamine over a period of 12h. The in vivo efficacy of the in situ gel was performed using dextran sodium sulphate induced ulcerative colitis model in BALB/c mice. The clinical parameters such as, body weight changes, rectal bleeding and stool consistency were evaluated. In addition, the histopathological investigation was conducted to assess severity of mucosal damage and inflammation infiltrate. There was a significant reduction in rectal bleeding and mucosal damage score for collagen-mesalamine in situ gel group compared to the reference group. Apart from releasing mesalamine in controlled manner, the strategy of administering mesalamine through collagen in situ gel facilitates regeneration of damaged mucosa resulting in a synergistic effect for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  6. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  7. [Pharyngeal ulcer in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fang, Gaoli; Zhang, Luo; Wang, Chengshuo; Xiao, Jiang; Fu, Qian; Zhao, Hongxin

    2014-02-01

    To understand the high incidence of pharyngeal ulcer in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). By analyzing the clinical features in AIDS patients with pharyngeal ulcer, this study provided reference for clinicians. Twenty AIDS patients with pharyngeal ulcer were retrospectively analysed to explore its clinical features and mechanism, and to explore the feasible therapeutic methods. The patients generally had severe sore throat and dysphagia for 7 days to 8 months, resulting in significant weight loss. Common therapeutical method does not work. The ulcers developed mainly at vestibule of pharynx (10 cases), tonsil (3 cases), epiglottis (3 cases) and pyriform sinus (2 cases). Ulcer types included major aphthous ulcer (MaAU, 14 cases), fungal ulcer (2 cases), herpes zoster (1 case), ulcer secondary to drug eruption(1 case ), and lymphoma(2 cases). The disease course was long with CD4(+) T lymphocytes decreased significantly. Treatment was given with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HARRT), regulation of immune function, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti fungal. Treatment lasted from 2 weeks to 3 months, ulcer healed in 13 cases; 1 patient lost to follow-up, 6 patients dead. The manifestation of pharyngeal ulcer in AIDS patients has its particularity. It is often associated with a variety of opportunistic infection and tumors. Local treatment is preferred. HAART therapy and systemic comprehensive treatment play more important and effective role. Pharyngeal ulcer persists for a long time, complicated with fever, diarrhea and other symptoms. The history of blood transfusion, injection drug use or unsafe sexual behavior may predict HIV infection.

  8. The influence of LED rectal irradiation on IL-1α and IL-4 of experimental ulcerative colitis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chang-Chun; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Han-Ping; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. In this paper, the influence of IL-1α and IL-4 on the experimental ulcerative colitis by light emitting diode ( LED ) (λ: 632.8nm; power: 4.0mw) applied to colon directly were studied. Making 30 rats into 3 groups: LED curative group, model group, normal control group. There were 10 rats of each group. We used glacial acetic acid (5%) and trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS) (1%) intra-anally to replicate the rat model of ulcerative colitis. After a week treatment with administrating LED rectal irradiation to curative group, 30mm each time, once per day, the histopathological studies in colonic tissue were performed, and the expression and distribution of IL-lα and IL-4 in colonic tissues were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The extent of the Colonic tissue injury in LED curative group was not as significant as that in the model group. Compared with model group, the content of MDA in LED curative group was reductived and the activity of SOD was increased significantly, and the expression and distribution of IL-lα in LED curative group was depressed significantly, however the expression and distribution of IL-4 in LED curative group was increased obviously. This results show that the LED rectal irradiation can protect colonic mucosa from the experimental ulcerative colitis in rats, and suggest that the effects may be related to the photobiomodulation and immunomodulation of LED.

  9. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    An ulcer is a crater-like sore on the skin or mucous membrane . Ulcers form when the top layers of skin or ... Ulcers can be caused by inflammation or infection. Some ulcers may be caused by a cancer.

  10. The effects of LED rectal irradiation on the experimental ulcerative colitis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chang-Chun; Wang, Xian-Ju; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of light emitting diode(LED λ 632.8nm; power 4.0mw)applied directly to the colon on the experimental ulcerative colitis. 34 rats were divided into 3 groups, which was LED treatment group (n=12), model group (n=12), and normal control group (n=10). Given glacial acetic acid (5%) intra-anally so as to be replicated the rat model of ulcerative colitis. LED irradiation was used to curative group, with 30min each time, once per day. The period of treatment was one week. Then the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and content of malondi-aldehyde (MDA) in the blood plasma were detected and the histopathological study in Colonic tissue was performed. The degree of the Colonic tissue injury in curative group was not as significant as that in the model group. Comparing with model group, the Content of MDA in LED curative group was reductive and the activity of SOD was increased significantly. We concluded that the LED irradiation can protect colonic mucosa from acetic acid induced damage in rats and the effects may be related to the photobiomodulation of LED.

  11. A reappraisal of the ileo-rectal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Myrelid, Pär; Øresland, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Colectomy is still frequently required in the care of ulcerative colitis. The most common indications are either non-responding colitis in the emergency setting, chronic active disease, steroid-dependent disease or neoplastic change like dysplasia or cancer. The use of the ileal pouch anal anastomosis has internationally been the gold standard, substituting the rectum with a pouch. Recently the use of the ileorectal anastomosis has increased in frequency as reconstructive method after subtotal colectomy. Data from centres using ileorectal anastomosis have shown the method to be safe, with functionality and risk of failure comparable to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The methods have different advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on a number of patient factors and where in life the patient is at time of reconstruction. The ileorectal anastomosis could, together with the Kock continent ileostomy, in selected cases be a complement to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis and should be discussed with the patient before deciding on reconstructive method.

  12. [A case of an ulcer of the sigmoid colon during chemotherapy with FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab for recurrence of rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Okuya, Koichi; Mizushima, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The patient was a 73-year-old female. After curative resection for rectal cancer with uterus invasion, UFT/Leucovorin was administered orally for 16 months. Three years and six months after the initial surgery, en bloc cystourethrectomy was performed to control the bleeding caused by a local recurrence invading the bladder and ureter. Although postoperative FOL- FOX4/bevacizumab therapy was started, bevacizumab was discontinued after 4 courses of treatment because an ulcer was confirmed at the sigmoid colon with stoma. The ulcer was relieved by conservative medical treatment. In this case, we attempted to make a quick response because the site of the ulcer could be easily observed. During chemotherapy. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully observe the patient's conditions.

  13. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-31

    Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14-16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study.

  14. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14–16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Results Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. Conclusions TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study. PMID:26486374

  15. Ethanol sclerotherapy of rectal venous abnormalities in Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agostinho, Nelson; Ge, Ludi; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by the triad of capillary malformations, atypical venous malformations and varicosities and bony and/or soft tissue hypertrophy. We present the case of an 18-year-old man with KTS affected by haematochezia secondary to rectal venous malformations that was managed with endoscopic sclerotherapy. In this case, we compared the use of ethanol to phenol as a sclerosant. PMID:25141856

  16. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Topal, Firdevs; Senel, Engin; Akbulut, Sabiye; Topal, Fatih; Dölek, Yasemin

    2011-08-03

    The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto's thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  17. Consecutive monitoring of faecal calprotectin during mesalazine suppository therapy for active rectal inflammation in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Shimoyama, T; Matsumoto, K

    2015-09-01

    No studies have monitored the levels of faecal calprotectin (FC) during mesalazine suppository therapy for proctitis in ulcerative colitis (UC). To evaluate the value of consecutive monitoring of FC in patients with UC during mesalazine suppository therapy. One hundred and sixty patients with active inflammation limited to the rectum were treated with mesalazine 1 g suppository once daily for 8 weeks. Patients who achieved clinical remission were advised to maintain the treatment, and were followed up for further 40 weeks. FC levels were measured every 8 weeks during the study. At week 8, 118 patients (74%) went into clinical remission, of whom 88 achieved endoscopic healing. The median FC level significantly decreased in patients with clinical and endoscopic remission (both P < 0.0001), while it did not change significantly in those without remission. Eighty (68%) of the 118 patients with remission continued the treatment. Twenty-four patients (30%) relapsed during the 40-week follow-up. In patients with clinical relapse, the median FC level elevated already 8 weeks before the diagnosis of relapse. In contrast, in patients who maintained remission it remained at a low level and did not significantly change during the follow-up. Elevated FC level (≥55 μg/g) was useful for the early diagnosis of relapse (88% sensitivity and 80% specificity). Faecal calprotectin may represent a useful biomarker for the assessment of disease activity in UC patients treated with mesalazine suppositories. Serial monitoring of faecal calprotectin appears to be valuable for the prediction and early diagnosis of relapse during maintenance therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Study on the Chinese medical syndrome distribution of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Hui; Cong, Long-Ling

    2012-04-01

    To study on the Chinese medicine (CM) syndrome distribution of ulcerative colitis (UC) and the distribution of CM syndrome types at different staging periods. From March 2007 to April 2010, 110 UC out- or inpatients at the Department of Digestive Diseases of Guangzhou Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine were recruited. The patients' symptoms were calculated. The systematic clustering was used. The symptom was taken as the variable in the clustering. The syndrome types were confirmed according to the clustering results. The syndrome typing was performed and its results were analyzed. There were 64 main symptoms in UC patients, including diarrhea, mushy stool, watery stool, abdominal pain, and bloody stool. Seventy cases belonged to the active period and 40 to the remission period. The UC syndrome types were sequenced from high to low as the dampness-heat of Dachang syndrome, Pi-Wei qi deficiency syndrome, Gan depression and Pi deficiency syndrome, Pi-Shen yang deficiency syndrome, blood stasis in the intestinal collaterals syndrome, yin and blood deficiency syndrome. There was statistical difference in the case number among different syndrome types (P < 0.05). In the active period, dominated were the dampness-heat of Dachang syndrome (28 cases, 25.5%), Gan depression and Pi deficiency syndrome (14 cases, 12.7%), and blood stasis in the intestinal collaterals syndrome (10 cases, 9.0%). In the remission period, dominated were Pi-Wei qi deficiency syndrome (18 cases, 16.4%) and Pi-Shen yang deficiency syndrome (10 cases, 9.0%), showing statistical difference (P<0.05). The typical symptoms of patients of the dampness-heat of Dachang syndrome were sequenced from high to low as yellow tongue fur (31 cases, 28.1%), tenesmus (26 cases, 23.6%), mucopurulent bloody stool (25 cases, 227%), diarrhea (24 cases, 21.8%), anal burning (24 cases, 21.8%), watery stool (21 cases, 19.0%), abdominal pain (19 cases, 17.2%), red tongue (19 cases, 17.2%), and greasy tongue

  19. Occipital condyle syndrome secondary to bone metastases from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marruecos, J; Conill, C; Valduvieco, I; Vargas, M; Berenguer, J; Maurel, J

    2008-01-01

    Skull-base metastases are very unfrequent. Occipital condyle syndrome (OCS) is usually underdiagnosed. Until now few cases have been reported in the literature. We present a 71-year-old woman with metastatic rectum adenocarcinoma, with right occipital headache and ipsilateral hypoglossal palsy, diagnosed by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of OCS due to a skull-base metastasis and treated with radiation therapy.

  20. The effects of sildenafil on rectal sensitivity and tone in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Medeiros, M T; de Oliveira, R B; dos Santos, A A; de Leopoldino, D M; Lima, M C Oliveira; Nobre, R Arrais; Nobre e Souza, M Â

    2012-03-01

    Visceral tone supposedly affects gut sensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Sildenafil increases nitric oxide and influences visceral compliance. To evaluate the effects of sildenafil tone inhibition on rectal sensitivity. Eight controls and 21 IBS patients (Rome II) were enrolled in a double-blind study, after dosing with placebo or sildenafil (50 mg p.o.). Thresholds for first sensation, first desire to defecate, pain and supraliminar pain were the sensory endpoints, measured with a barostat and 600-mL rectal bag. Pain (100-mm VAS) and depression-anxiety (Hamilton questionnaire) were scored. Irritable bowel syndrome rectal compliance and sensory-endpoint thresholds were similar to controls. Five IBS patients had pain threshold lower than controls 95% confidence interval (hypersensitive). Depression score was greater in IBS than controls (11.9 ± 1.3 vs. 6.3 ± 2.5, P = 0.036). In IBS, pain intensity was nonsignificantly higher (37.6 ± 5.3 mm vs. 23.4 ± 8.5 mm, P = 0.064) and supraliminar pain intensity was greater (45.6 ± 5.4 mm vs. 25.9 ± 5.1 mm, P = 0.044) than controls. IBS rectal relaxation increased volume (155.4 ± 41.3 mL vs. 118.8 ± 47.7 mL, P = 0.004) and tension (193.1 ± 118.6 mmHg mL(-1) vs. 133.2 ± 98.1 mmHg mL(-1) , P = 0.019) for triggering first desire to defecate but not for other perceptions. Sildenafil increased volume for both first desire to defecate and pain in the hypersensitive IBS patients. Sildenafil increased rectal compliance only in diarrhoea-IBS. Mixed-IBS obtained higher anxiety (12.9 ± 1.3 vs. 5.9 ± 3.1, P < 0.05) and depression scores (13.9 ± 1.9 vs. 6.3 ± 2.5, P < 0.05) and reported more intense supraliminar pain (53.6 ± 9.8 mm vs. 25.9 ± 5.1 mm, P < 0.05) than controls. Rectal relaxation following dosing with sildenafil 50 mg increased the first desire to defecate threshold in IBS as a whole, but decreased pain only in the hypersensitive subset. Mixed-IBS presented higher supraliminar pain and anxiety

  1. Apex technique in the treatment of obstructed defecation syndrome associated with rectal intussusception and full rectal mucosa prolapse.

    PubMed

    Regadas, F Sergio P; Abedrapo, Mario; Cruz, Jose Vinicius; Murad Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas Filho, F Sergio P

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to demonstrate the use of a modified stapling technique, called the apex technique, to treat rectal intussusception and full rectal mucosal prolapse. It was conducted as a retrospective study at 3 centers (2 in Brazil and 1 in Chile). The apex technique is performed by using a HEM/EEA-33 stapler. A pursestring suture is placed at the apex of the prolapse, on the 4 quadrants, independent of the distance to the dentate line. A second pursestring is then placed to define the band of rectal mucosa to be symmetrically resected. Outcome measures included width of the resected full-thickness rectal wall; the intensity of postoperative pain on a visual analog scale from 1 to 10; full mucosal prolapse and rectal intussusception assessed by physical examination, cinedefecography, or echodefecography; and change in the constipation scale. Forty-five patients (30 women/15 men; mean age, 59.5 years) with rectal intussusception and full mucosal prolapse were included. The median operative time was 17 (range, 15-30) minutes. Bleeding after stapler fire requiring manual suture occurred in 3 patients (6.7%); 25 (55.6%) patients reported having no postoperative pain. Hospital stay was 24 hours. The mean width of the resected rectal wall was 5.9 (range, 5.0-7.5) cm. Stricture at the staple line was seen in 4 patients, of whom 1 required dilation under anesthesia. The median follow-up time was 120 (range, 90-120) days. A small residual prolapse was identified in 6 (13.3%) patients. Imaging demonstrated complete disappearance of rectal intussusception in all patients, and the mean postoperative constipation score decreased from 13 (range, 8-15) to 5 (range, 3-7). The apex technique appears to be a safe, quickly performed, and low-cost method for the treatment of rectal intussusception. In this series, imaging examinations showed the disappearance of rectal intussusception, and a significant decrease in constipation score suggested improvement in

  2. Subtypes of constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome based on rectal perception

    PubMed Central

    Harraf, F; Schmulson, M; Saba, L; Niazi, N; Fass, R; Munakata, J; Diehl, D; Mertz, H; Naliboff, B; Mayer, E

    1998-01-01

    Background—Patients who complain of constipation can be divided into those who have lost the natural call to stool, but develop abdominal discomfort after several days without a bowel movement (no urge); and those who experience a constant sensation of incomplete evacuation (urge). 
Aims—To determine whether the two groups differ in symptoms, colonic transit, and perceptual responses to controlled rectal distension. 
Methods—Forty four patients with constipation were evaluated with a bowel symptom questionnaire, colonic transit (radiopaque markers), and rectal balloon distension. Stool (S) and discomfort (D) thresholds to slow ramp (40 ml/min) and rapid phasic distension (870 ml/min) were determined with an electronic distension device. Fifteen healthy controls were also studied. 
Results—All patients had Rome positive irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); 17 were no urge and 27 urge. Mean D threshold to phasic rectal distensions was 28 (3) mm Hg in no urge, 27 (3) mm Hg in urge (NS), but higher in the control group (46 (2) mm Hg; p<0.01). Sixty seven per cent of no urge and 69% of urge were hypersensitive for D. Slow ramp distension thresholds were higher in no urge (S: 26 (3); D: 45 (4) mm Hg) compared with urge (S: 16 (2); D: 31 (3) mm Hg; p<0.01), or with controls (S: 15 (1); D: 30 (3); p<0.01). 
Conclusions—Hyposensitivity to slow rectal distension is found in patients with IBS who complain of constipation and have lost the call to stool even though their sensitivity to phasic distension is increased. 

 Keywords: visceral sensation; colonic transit PMID:9863485

  3. An uncommon ocular manifestation of Sweet syndrome: peripheral ulcerative keratitis and nodular scleritis.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ahmet Burak; Tavas, Pınar; Turkoglu, Elif Betul; Ilhan, Hatice Deniz; Toru, Serap; Apaydin, Kadri Cemil

    2015-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and abrupt appearance of painful erythematous nodules and plaques, particularly on the face, neck, and limbs. In this study, we report a very rare case of Sweet syndrome in which the patient presented nodular scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis during the dermatologically inactive period of the disease.

  4. [Usage of the neutral anolyte for trophic ulcer treatment in patients with postthrombophlebitic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Chernekhovskaia, N E; Ovchinnikov, S I; Chomaeva, A A

    2010-10-01

    The results of the treatment of 38 patients with trophic ulcers of lower limbs developed against the postthrombophlebitic syndrome at the age of 43-73 years. The course of a disease exceeded 10 years. Trophic ulcers recrudesced in all patients, timeline of its appearance was 2.4 +/- 0.5 months. Daily trophic ulcers were irrigated by the neutral anolyte, it took from 5 to 7 sessions. The detersion of trophic ulcers came on the 3rd-4th day; granulation tissue appeared on the 5th day. The absence of bacterial population was noted in 89.5% of patients after 5.0 +/- 0.5 sessions. Trophic ulcers were epithelialized in 1 month, while in the group of comparison the whole epithelialization came only in 32% of patients.

  5. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIII: A Rare Cause of Leg Ulcers in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Antoine; Piérard, Gérald E.; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; De Paepe, Anne; Dupuy, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII (EDS-VIII) is a very rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by early-onset periodontitis associated with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report a 32-year-old man whose chronic leg ulcer led to the diagnosis of EDS-VIII. He had severe periodontitis with complete loss of permanent teeth and skin fragility with thin skin, atrophic scars, and brownish atrophic pretibial plaques. Leg ulcer is not a prominent feature of EDS-VIII. We suggest adding EDS-VIII to the list of rare diseases accounting for chronic leg ulcers, if this case report prompts others to report leg ulcers associated with EDS-VIII. PMID:24198978

  6. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... result may be: Swollen and inflamed tissue, called ( gastritis ) An ulcer Watch this video about: Stomach ulcer ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 51. Read More Gastritis Intestinal obstruction Peritonitis Zollinger-Ellison syndrome Patient Instructions ...

  7. Randomised clinical trial: evaluation of the efficacy of mesalazine (mesalamine) suppositories in patients with ulcerative colitis and active rectal inflammation -- a placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Nishino, H; Sameshima, Y; Ota, A; Nakamura, S; Hibi, T

    2013-08-01

    Mesalazine suppositories are recommended and widely used as the standard therapy in induction and maintenance of remission for proctitis. To evaluate the efficacy of mesalazine suppositories in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and rectal inflammation; and in patient groups categorised by the extent of lesions. This study was a phase III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Mild-to-moderate UC patients with rectal inflammation were randomly assigned either a 1 g mesalazine or placebo suppository. The suppository was administered in the rectum once daily for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was the rate of endoscopic remission (mucosal score of 0 or 1) after 4 weeks. The endoscopic remission rates after 4 weeks in the mesalazine and placebo suppository groups were 81.5% and 29.7%, respectively, and the superiority of mesalazine to placebo was confirmed (P < 0.0001, chi-squared test). For proctitis, the endoscopic remission rates after 4 weeks were 83.8% and 36.1% in the mesalazine and placebo suppository groups, respectively, and the corresponding rates for all other types of UC were 78.6% and 21.4%, respectively. The superiority of mesalazine to placebo was confirmed in both subgroups (P < 0.0001, Fisher's exact test). The percentage of patients without bleeding was significantly higher in the mesalazine group than the placebo group from Day 3 of treatment (P = 0.0001, Fisher's exact test). The effectiveness of mesalazine suppositories in all types of UC patients with rectal inflammation was confirmed for the first time in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study (JapicCTI- 111421). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Immunohistochemical study of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and epithelial HLA-DR expression in the rectal and colonic mucosae of children with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M; Klemola, T

    1989-02-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulations, plasma cells in the lamina propria, and the expression of HLA-DR antigens on the epithelium of the rectal and colonic mucosae were studied in eight children with ulcerative colitis and 12 control subjects using a panel of monoclonal antisera and the peroxidase technique before any treatment and 3 months later (four patients). The numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar in specimens from patients and controls. The majority of these cells (on average, 73% in the patients and 84% in the controls) were mature CD3+ T cells; among them, CD8+ suppressor-cytotoxic cells were preponderant. In both untreated and treated patients, the numbers of mature T cells in the rectal mucosae were supranormal (1,870 +/- 205 cells/mm2, p less than 0.01 and 1,537 +/- 214 cells/mm2, p less than 0.05, respectively; controls, 1,105 +/- 214 cells/mm2). In rectal specimens from untreated patients, the number of helper T (CD4+) cells was increased (1,094 +/- 74 versus 801 +/- 74 cells/mm2, p less than 0.05); the same specimens had more B-1-positive (CD20+) B cells and pre-B cells (122 +/- 21 versus 71 +/- 17 cells/mm2, p less than 0.05). The number of IgG-containing cells was significantly greater than in the controls (1,058 +/- 263 versus 359 +/- 64 cells/mm2, p less than 0.01), and the commonest isotype in the plasma cells of patients was IgG. The number of IgE-containing cells was also significantly elevated (230 +/- 40 versus 95 +/- 16 cells/mm2, p less than 0.01). The numbers of IgA- and IgM-containing cells were similar in patients and controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Hematuria and rectal bleeding in the child with Klippel and Trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Servelle, M; Bastin, R; Loygue, J; Montagnani, A; Bacour, F; Soulie, J; Andrieux, J B

    1976-01-01

    We have operated upon 588 patients with Klippel and Trenaunay syndrome. The underlying factor is a congenital malformation of the deep veins: agenesis, atresia or compression by fibrovascular bands of the popliteal, femoral or iliac veins. Of these 588 patients, 6 children between 15 months and 4 years of age had severe rectal bleeding and hematuria. One of these children died from massive bleeding of the rectum with septicemia. Another boy was saved by rectal resection and the last one by subtotal cystectomy. The important venogram shows an absence of the anterior venous pathway (superficial femoral vein) compensated by the abnormal development of 2 venous groups, the vein of the sciatic nerve and large veins along the external aspect of the inferior limb. These 2 venous groups penetrate into the pelvis by the sciatic and gluteal notches and terminate in the internal iliac vein which becomes enormous and has a very high flow. This overflow hinders drainage of the venous collateral from the rectum, the bladder and the vagina. The retro adductor vein, prolongated by the deep femoral vein, represents an anastomosis between the sciatic nerve vein and the common femoral vein. The surgeon must try to widen this pathway. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. PMID:178278

  10. [Involvement of splenic hemangioma and rectal varices in a patient with klippel: trenaunay syndrome].

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jung; Jee, Sam Ryong; Park, Kwan Sik; Ryu, Choong Heon; Seo, Hyo Rim; Ha, Seoung In; Lee, Sang Heon; Ok, Kyung Sun

    2011-09-25

    Klippel - Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by a cutaneous vascular nevus of the involved extremity, bone and soft tissue hypertrophy of the extremity and venous malformations. We present a case of KTS with splenic hemangiomas and rectal varices. A 29-year-old woman was referred for intermittent hematochezia for several years. She had history with a number of operations for cutaneous and soft tissue hamangiomas since the age of one year old and for increased circumference of her left thigh during the last few months. Abdominal CT revealed multiple hemangiomas in the spleen, fusiform aneurysmal dilatation of the deep veins and soft tissue hemangiomas. There was no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly or liver cirrhosis. Colonoscopy revealed hemangiomatous involvement in the rectum. There were rectal varices without evidence of active bleeding. Upon venography of the left leg, we also found infiltrative dilated superficial veins in the subcutaneous tissue and aneurysmal dilatation of the deep veins. The patient was finally diagnosed with KTS, and treated with oral iron supplementation only, which has been tolerable to date. Intervention or surgery is not required. When gastrointestinal varices or hemangiomatous mucosal changes are detected in a young patient without definite underlying cause, KTS should be considered.

  11. Efficacy and safety of PPC-5650 on experimental rectal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Simrén, Magnus; Törnblom, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-02-01

    PPC-5650 is a new pharmacological agent that can modulate acid-sensing ion channel activity, leading to a reduction in the pain signal under up-regulated conditions. The non-clinical programme for PPC-5650 supported a role for this novel agent in the treatment of pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In patients with IBS, the aims of the study were: (1) to assess the efficacy of a single bolus of PPC-5650 locally applied in the rectum using multi-modal stimulations of the recto sigmoid and (2) to assess the safety profile of PPC-5650. The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial in patients with IBS, excluding females of child-bearing potential. The study consisted of a training visit, study visit 1 and 2 and a follow-up visit. Rectosigmoid electrical, thermal and mechanical stimulations were performed, pain perception was rated on a pain intensity scale and referred pain areas were assessed. All adverse events were registered. Twenty-five patients with IBS were enrolled and completed the study (9 women and 16 men; mean age 50.4 ± 12.7 years). No effects of the study drug were found on any of the rectal stimulations or for referred pain areas (all p > 0.05). No significant or clinically relevant treatment-related differences were seen for the laboratory safety variables or any other reported adverse event. In conclusion, in patients with IBS on rectal sensitivity to multi-modal stimulations, PPC-5650 did not produce efficacy relative to placebo. The overall safety and tolerability of PPC-5650 was acceptable.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly associated with giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bei; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Jackson; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Liping; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shaoping; Fan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Yinzhong; Li, Lei; Liu, Baochi; Qi, Tangkai; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Jilin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exists in giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in the patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). 16 AIDS patients with a primary complaint of epigastric discomfort were examined by gastroscopy. Multiple and giant esophageal ulcers were biopsied and analyzed with pathology staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the potential pathogenic microorganisms, including HIV, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV). HIV was detected in ulcer samples from 12 out of these 16 patients. Ulcers in 2 patients were infected with CMV and ulcers in another 2 patients were found HSV positive. No obvious cancerous pathological changes were found in these multiple giant esophageal ulcer specimens. HIV may be one of the major causative agents of multiple benign giant esophageal ulcers in AIDS patients.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly associated with giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bei; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Jackson; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Liping; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shaoping; Fan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Yinzhong; Li, Lei; Liu, Baochi; Qi, Tangkai; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Jilin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to determine whether the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exists in giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in the patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods: 16 AIDS patients with a primary complaint of epigastric discomfort were examined by gastroscopy. Multiple and giant esophageal ulcers were biopsied and analyzed with pathology staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the potential pathogenic microorganisms, including HIV, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV). Results: HIV was detected in ulcer samples from 12 out of these 16 patients. Ulcers in 2 patients were infected with CMV and ulcers in another 2 patients were found HSV positive. No obvious cancerous pathological changes were found in these multiple giant esophageal ulcer specimens. Conclusion: HIV may be one of the major causative agents of multiple benign giant esophageal ulcers in AIDS patients. PMID:27830031

  14. [Ulcerative colitis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naveau, S; Roulot, D; Cartier, I; Blanchard, A; Poynard, T; Drouhet, E; Chaput, J C

    1986-11-01

    The authors report a case of ulcerative colitis due to Histoplasma capsulatum in a previously healthy 35 year-old french geologist with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Gomori-Grocott and PAS stains and indirect immunofluorescence revealed Histoplasma capsulatum in colonic biopsies. The search for LAV antibody was positive. T-lymphocyte analysis revealed 10/mm3 OKT4 with OKT4/OKT8 ratio of 0.16. Histoplasmosis should be considered in subjects with ulcerative colitis according to the epidemiological context. In patients with AIDS relapses after discontinuation of treatment are to be expected and suppressive therapy with an imidazole derivative should probably be continued indefinitely.

  15. Relationship between rectal sensitivity, symptoms intensity and quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté, Jean-Marc; Veyrac, Michel; Mion, François; Siproudhis, Laurent; Ducrotté, Philippe; Zerbib, Franck; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Dapoigny, Michel; Dyard, François; Coffin, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    Background Relationships between pain threshold during rectal distension and both symptoms intensity and alteration in quality of life (QoL) in IBS patients have been poorly evaluated. Aim To evaluate relationships between rectal sensitivity, IBS symptom intensity and QoL in a multicentre prospective study. Methods Rectal threshold for moderate pain was measured during rectal distension in IBS patients (Rome II) while IBS symptoms intensity was assessed by a validated questionnaire and QoL by the FDDQL questionnaire. Results 68 patients (44.2 ± 12.7 yrs, 48 women) were included. The mean rectal distending volume for moderate pain was 127 ± 35 mL while 45 patients (66 %) had rectal hypersensitivity (pain threshold < 140 mL). Rectal threshold was not significantly related to overall IBS intensity score (r = −0.66, P = 0.62) or to its different components, neither to FDDQL score (r = 0.30, P = 0.14). Among FDDQL domains, only anxiety (r = 0.30, P = 0.01) and coping (r = 0.31, P = 0.009) were significantly related with pain threshold. Conclusion In this study, 2/3 of IBS patients exhibited rectal hypersensitivity. No significant correlation was found between rectal threshold and either symptom intensity or alteration in QoL. PMID:18544074

  16. Decreased colonization of fecal Clostridium coccoides/Eubacterium rectale species from ulcerative colitis patients in an in vitro dynamic gut model with mucin environment.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Joan; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Laukens, Debby; Vigsnaes, Louise Kristine; De Vos, Martine; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2012-03-01

    The mucus layer in the colon, acting as a barrier to prevent invasion of pathogens, is thinner and discontinuous in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). A recent developed in vitro dynamic gut model, the M-SHIME, was used to compare long-term colonization of the mucin layer by the microbiota from six healthy volunteers (HV) and six UC patients and thus distinguish the mucin adhered from the luminal microbiota. Although under the same nutritional conditions, short-chain fatty acid production by the luminal communities from UC patients showed a tendency toward a lower butyrate production. A more in-depth community analysis of those microbial groups known to produce butyrate revealed that the diversity of the Clostridium coccoides/Eubacterium rectale and Clostridium leptum group, and counts of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were lower in the luminal fractions of the UC samples. Counts of Roseburia spp. were lower in the mucosal fractions of the UC samples. qPCR analysis for butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, responsible for butyrate production, displayed a lower abundance in both the luminal and mucosal fractions of the UC samples. The M-SHIME model revealed depletion in butyrate producing microbial communities not restricted to the luminal but also in the mucosal samples from UC patients compared to HV.

  17. Therapeutic Evaluation of Biofeedback Therapy in the Treatment of Anterior Resection Syndrome After Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhonglin; Ding, Wenjun; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zhongchuan; Du, Peng; Cui, Long

    2016-09-01

    Anterior resection syndrome (ARS) is common after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. It includes changes in the frequency and urgency of bowel movements and fecal incontinence. The therapeutic efficacy of biofeedback on ARS is unclear. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of biofeedback therapy in patients with ARS after anterior resection for rectal cancer and to investigate the associated factors for therapeutic success. The study was designed as a retrospective review of the data from 61 patients with ARS collected from a prospectively maintained institutional cancer database. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated using anorectal manometry, the number of bowel movements daily, and fecal incontinence scoring systems (Vaizey and/or Wexner scores). Changes of > 15% in the Vaizey and/or Wexner scores were considered to indicate effectiveness. Stepwise logistic regression models were performed to evaluate whether the associated factors influenced therapeutic efficacy. The parameters of anorectal manometry in patients with rectal cancer were significantly lower than those in control group (P < .01). After biofeedback therapy, significant improvements were observed in the incontinence scale scores (P < .001), number of bowel movements (P < .001), and anorectal manometry data (maximum resting pressure, P < .001; maximum squeeze pressure, P = .001; and rectal capacity, P = .015). In contrast, no significant difference in the rectal initial sensation threshold was observed (P = .089). Patients with fecal incontinence as the primary symptom experienced significant improvements in all variables (P < .01), except for the rectal initial sensation threshold (P = .125). Age at surgery, current smoking status, diabetes, treatment cycles, laparoscopic surgery, interval from surgery to biofeedback therapy, and the use of radiation therapy were closely associated with therapeutic success. On multivariate analysis, current smoking status (odds ratio [OR], 0.09; 95

  18. [Faecal transplantation as a treatment for Clostridium difficile infection, ulcerative colitis and the metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Jeppe West; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2014-02-17

    Faecal transplantation as a therapeutic tool is increasingly reported in the scientific literature. Faecal transplantation is currently becoming a treatment for nosocomial, refractory infections with C. difficile. Furthermore, faecal transplantation has been suggested as a treatment for ulcerative colitis as well as for the metabolic syndrome. In the accumulated literature faecal transplantations appear to be safe, effective and superior to current treatments. Faecal transplantation remains a sparsely investigated treatment, however, especially for other diagnoses than C. difficile infection.

  19. Comparison of 5-hydroxytryptophan signaling pathway characteristics in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng-Yan; Huang, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Ye, Hua; Chi, Hong-Gang; Zou, Ying; Lv, Ru-Xi; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2016-03-28

    To study differences in the visceral sensitivity of the colonic mucosa between patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and those with ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission and to relate these differences with changes in the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT) signaling pathway. Gastrointestinal symptoms were used to determine the clinical symptom scores and rectal visceral sensitivity of patients with IBS-D and patients with UC in remission. Blood levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured using an HPLC-electrochemical detection system. The levels of 5-HT 3 receptor (3R), 4R, and 7R mRNAs in colonic biopsy samples were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of TPH1 was analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Abdominal pain or discomfort, stool frequency, and the scores of these symptoms in combination with gastrointestinal symptoms were higher in the IBS-D and UC groups than in the control groups. However, no significant differences were observed between the IBS-D and UC remission groups. With respect to rectal visceral sensitivity, the UC remission and IBS-D groups showed a decrease in the initial perception threshold, defecating threshold and pain threshold. However, these groups exhibited significantly increased anorectal relaxation pressure. Tests examining the main indicators of the 5-HT signaling pathway showed that the plasma 5-HT levels, 5-HIAA concentrations, TPH1 expression in the colonic mucosa, and 5-HT3R and 5-HT5R expression were increased in both the IBS-D and the UC remission groups; no increases were observed with respect to 5-HT7R expression. The IBS-D and UC groups showed similar clinical symptom scores, visceral sensitivity, and levels of serotonin signaling pathway indicators in the plasma and colonic mucosa. However, the pain threshold and 5-HT7R expression in the colonic mucosa were significantly different between these groups. The results

  20. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome. PMID:27293269

  1. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  2. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with chronic malabsorption syndrome and miliary tuberculosis in a child

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Tarun; Sharma, Namrata; Shashni, Adarsh; Titiyal, Jeewan S.

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with pain, redness, watering, and blurring of vision in her right eye. Slit lamp examination revealed the presence of peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) and nodular scleritis. On clinical examination, the patient had stunted growth, low body mass index, and enlarged axillary nodes. Giardia cysts were present in the stool sample and histopathology of axillary lymph nodes showed caseating necrosis suggestive of tuberculosis (TB). A diagnosis of PUK with chronic malabsorption syndrome secondary to giardiasis and miliary TB was made. Oral metronidazole, anti-tubercular treatment, high protein diet and vitamin supplements were started. Topical steroids were started for peripheral ulcerative lesions following, which the PUK resolved. PMID:26903734

  3. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome affecting fish in the Zambezi river system in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Andrew, T G; Huchzermeyer, K D A; Mbeha, B C; Nengu, S M

    2008-11-22

    In late 2006, diseased fish of a variety of species began to appear in the Chobe and upper Zambezi rivers in southern Africa. In April 2007, investigations showed that the levels of pesticides and heavy metals in the tissues of the fish were very low, discounting pollution as an underlying cause for the disease. However, histological evidence showed that the disease closely resembled the epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans, a serious aquatic pathogen that has been isolated from freshwater and estuarine fish in Japan, south-east Asia, Australia and the usa since the 1970s, but not previously recorded in Africa.

  4. Mycolactone activation of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins underpins Buruli ulcer formation

    PubMed Central

    Guenin-Macé, Laure; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume; Hong, Hui; Leadlay, Peter F.; Danckaert, Anne; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Mostowy, Serge; Zurzolo, Chiara; Bousso, Philippe; Chrétien, Fabrice; Carlier, Marie-France; Demangel, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Mycolactone is a diffusible lipid secreted by the human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, which induces the formation of open skin lesions referred to as Buruli ulcers. Here, we show that mycolactone operates by hijacking the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family of actin-nucleating factors. By disrupting WASP autoinhibition, mycolactone leads to uncontrolled activation of ARP2/3-mediated assembly of actin in the cytoplasm. In epithelial cells, mycolactone-induced stimulation of ARP2/3 concentrated in the perinuclear region, resulting in defective cell adhesion and directional migration. In vivo injection of mycolactone into mouse ears consistently altered the junctional organization and stratification of keratinocytes, leading to epidermal thinning, followed by rupture. This degradation process was efficiently suppressed by coadministration of the N-WASP inhibitor wiskostatin. These results elucidate the molecular basis of mycolactone activity and provide a mechanism for Buruli ulcer pathogenesis. Our findings should allow for the rationale design of competitive inhibitors of mycolactone binding to N-WASP, with anti–Buruli ulcer therapeutic potential. PMID:23549080

  5. Effectiveness of skin perfusion pressure monitoring during surgery for an ischemic steal syndrome associated refractory ulcer.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kentaro; Sato, Takashi; Matsubara, Chieko; Tsuboi, Masato; Ishii, Yasuo; Tojimbara, Tamotsu

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 80-year-old man with end-stage renal disease due to type 2 diabetes who had been maintained on hemodialysis for 9 years. He developed refractory ulcers from an abraded wound in the right hand of his access arm. The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was located between the right brachial artery and the median antecubital vein draining into the cephalic vein and the deep veins close to the elbow. The blood flow of the right brachial artery measured by using Doppler ultrasonography was 920 ml/min. On the contrary, the radial and ulnar arteries were poorly palpable near the wrist, and ultrasonography could not be performed accurately because of a high degree of calcification. The skin perfusion pressure (SPP) of the first finger on the affected side decreased to 22 mmHg. However, the SPP improved to approximately 40 mmHg upon blocking an inflow into the deep vein. According to SPP data, only a communicating branch of the deep vein was ligated, and the AVF itself was preserved. One month after surgery, the skin ulcer healed, and maintenance hemodialysis was performed by using the preserved cephalic vein for blood access.In conclusion, we successfully treated a refractory wound associated with steal syndrome, without terminating the AVF. SPP-guided surgery may be safe and effective to adjust the blood flow in patients with AVF having steal syndrome.

  6. Clinical Immunology Review Series: An approach to the patient with recurrent orogenital ulceration, including Behçet's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keogan, M T

    2009-01-01

    Patients presenting with recurrent orogenital ulcers may have complex aphthosis, Behçet's disease, secondary complex aphthosis (e.g. Reiter's syndrome, Crohn's disease, cyclical neutropenia) or non-aphthous disease (including bullous disorders, erythema multiforme, erosive lichen planus). Behçet's syndrome is a multi-system vasculitis of unknown aetiology for which there is no diagnostic test. Diagnosis is based on agreed clinical criteria that require recurrent oral ulcers and two of the following: recurrent genital ulcers, ocular inflammation, defined skin lesions and pathergy. The condition can present with a variety of symptoms, hence a high index of suspicion is necessary. The most common presentation is with recurrent mouth ulcers, often with genital ulcers; however, it may take some years before diagnostic criteria are met. All patients with idiopathic orogenital ulcers should be kept under review, with periodic focused assessment to detect evolution into Behçet's disease. There is often a delay of several years between patients fulfilling diagnostic criteria and a diagnosis being made, which may contribute to the morbidity of this condition. Despite considerable research effort, the aetiology and pathogenesis of this condition remains enigmatic. PMID:19210521

  7. Transcatheter arterial embolization with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) leads to life-threatening tumor lysis syndrome in a rectal carcinoid patient with hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Kuo, Chen-Yu; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Li, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Chao, Yee

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal carcinoids appears to be increasing, and the rectum is the third most common location. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) has been reported as an effective method for hepatic metastases of rectal carcinoids. Complications are uncommon and usually of minor consequence. We report an unusual case of a 34-year-old man with tumor lysis syndrome following TAE with Embosphere® in a patient with multiple hepatic metastases of a rectal carcinoid. Early detection and effective treatment are essential for this rare but potentially catastrophic complication. PMID:23986828

  8. Closure of non-healing chronic ulcer in Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome using low-level laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Snehil; Maiya, Arun G; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Shastry, Barkur A

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old man diagnosed with Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) reported to the physiotherapy outpatient clinic with the complaint of a non-healing ulcer over the right medial malleolus, for a 6-month duration, that was non-granulating and had moderate pus discharge with foul odour at initial assessment. There was a decrease in scores of the Pressure Ulcer Scale of Healing, a significant increase in granulation tissue, a decrease in the amount of discharge and foul odour along with complete closure of the chronic wound after irradiation with a light-emitting diode (LED). This is a novel case study analysing the possible effect of a helium–neon laser  and LEDs on non-healing chronic ulcers associated with KTS, where the complete closure of the chronic ulcer that was initially not responsive to standard medical care was observed. PMID:22707702

  9. [Effects of heat and cool-producing needling manipulations on rectal temperature and serum endotoxin content in endotoxin-induced heat syndrome rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Yan; Yang, Jie; Feng, Yue; Yang, Shen-Qiao

    2012-08-01

    To observe the effect of traditional manipulations of "Shaoshanhuo" (heat-producing needling) and "Toutianliang"(cool-producing needling) on body temperature and serum endotoxin level in heat syndrome rabbits. Twenty-four Japanese rabbits were randomly divided into control, model, Shaoshanhuo and Toutianliang groups. Heat-syndrome model was established by subcutaneous injection of bacterium coli endotoxin solution (40 microg/mL, 2 mL/kg). Heat-producing and cool-producing needling was applied to bilateral "Quchi" (LI 11) for 5 min, respectively. Rectal temperature was detected by using a thermometer, and serum endotoxin content assayed by using Limulus Ameboyte Lysate kit (luminescence measuring). In comparison with the control group, both rectal temperature and serum endotoxin levels were increased significantly in the model group (P < 0.01). While compared to the model group, the rectal temperature and serum endotoxin levels were down-regulated considerably in both Shaoshanhuo and Toutianliang groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The effect of the Toutianliang group was obviously superior to that of the Shaoshanhuo group in reducing serum endotoxin content (P < 0.01). Both heat-producing needling and cool-producing needling can lower rectal temperature and serum endotoxin levels in heat-syndrome rabbits, and the effect of cool-producing needling is relatively better in reducing endotoxin content.

  10. Autonomic function at rest and in response to emotional and rectal stimuli in women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spetalen, Signe; Sandvik, Leiv; Blomhoff, Svein; Jacobsen, Morten B

    2008-06-01

    Our aim was to study autonomic function in patients with Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) without constipation and psychiatric comorbidity. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) (representing cardiac vagal activity), skin conductance (representing sympathetic activity) and heart rate were measured at baseline and as a response to emotional stress and rectal discomfort in 33 women with IBS and 21 healthy women. Baseline heart rate was higher in the patients than in the healthy volunteers. Both groups had decreased RSA and increased heart rate and skin conductance level when exposed to emotional stress, but the autonomic responses did not differ significantly between the groups. At discomfort threshold the patients had increased heart rate response and skin conductance amplitude when compared to the healthy volunteers. Correlations between autonomic responses and the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) score differed markedly between the diarrhea-predominant IBS patients and the IBS patients with alternating stool habits.

  11. A case of ulcerative colitis complicated with bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) and air leak syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, Müge; Gürsel, Gül; Özyilmaz, Ezgi; Akyürek, Nalan; Memış, Leyla

    2012-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases are well recognized and mainly affect the joints, skin, liver, and eyes; however, clinically significant pulmonary involvement is very rare. Early identification of pulmonary involvement is important and will be life-saving. We report herein a case of an ulcerative colitis patient, presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and bilateral recurring pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema, i.e., air leak syndrome. He was diagnosed with open lung biopsy as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia most probably due to viral etiology and responded well to steroid therapy, with almost complete resolution of radiographic and clinical findings. In inflammatory bowel disease patients, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia developing due to viral or fungal infectious etiology or due to the inflammatory bowel disease itself may progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome and may present with air leak syndrome. Early detection is important and life-saving, since bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia often responds well to steroid treatment provided an infectious etiology has been excluded or adequate antimicrobial therapy has already been initiated.

  12. Segmental ulcerated perineal hemangioma of infancy: a complex case of PELVIS syndrome successfully treated using a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Shivani B; Kwatra, Shawn G; McLean, Thomas W; Powers, Alexander; Atala, Anthony J; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of PELVIS (perineal hemangioma, external genital malformations, lipomyelomeningocele, vesicorenal abnormalities, imperforate anus and skin tag) syndrome in which hemangioma in the perineal area was misdiagnosed at birth as diaper rash. Investigations revealed associated vesicorenal and spinal abnormalities. We emphasize careful diagnosis of suspicious lesions at birth and confirm the successful use of propranolol in treating ulcerated segmental hemangiomas.

  13. Sexual dysfunction in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Fass, R; Fullerton, S; Naliboff, B; Hirsh, T; Mayer, E A

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence and type of sexual dysfunction in patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders involving the upper (functional dyspepsia) or lower GI tract (irritable bowel syndrome) were studied in 683 patients seen at a tertiary referral center and a comparison group of 247 community volunteers. Associations between sexual dysfunction and type and severity of GI symptoms, and psychological symptoms were examined. All subjects were evaluated with a validated bowel syndrome questionnaire, which included questions about sexual function. Psychological symptom severity was assessed by SCL-90R. The prevalence of self-reported sexual dysfunction in patients with functional GI disorders was 43.3% and did not differ by gender, age stratification or disease subtype: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), and IBS + NUD. In the comparison subjects without IBS symptoms and those with IBS symptoms but not seeking health care (IBS non-patients), the reported sexual dysfunction prevalence was significantly lower (16.1 and 24.4%, respectively, p < 0.005). Decreased sexual drive was the symptom most commonly reported by both male (36.2%) and female (28.4%) patients. Dyspareunia was reported by 16.4% of females and 4% of males with IBS, but was rarely observed in patients with NUD. Report of sexual dysfunction was positively associated with perceived GI symptom severity, but not with psychological symptom severity. Sexual dysfunction should be incorporated into the quality-of-life assessment of patients with functional GI disorders and addressed in future outcome studies.

  14. Genital ulcers as an unusual sign of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome: a novel symptom?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ming; Wang, Chih-Chien; Lai, Chi-Chieh; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Huang, Wei-Hsuan; Cheng, Shin-Nan

    2011-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome, which is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis, is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. A patient with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome simultaneously presenting with genital ulcers has not been reported previously. We describe a 12-year-old Chinese girl with a 2-year history of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome who exhibited vulvar ulcers accompanying an episode of febrile periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, and cervical adenopathy. Although during a 1-year follow-up this girl did not manifest typical symptoms/signs of Behçet's disease except recurrent oral aphthae and genital ulcers, it is possible that periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome and Behçet's disease could have overlapping manifestations. Furthermore, this report would add to the evidence of a wide variation in the clinical symptomatology of PFAPA syndrome.

  15. Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome Sequentially Complicated by Acute Kidney Injury and Painful Skin Ulcers due to Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ryuta; Akimoto, Tetsu; Imai, Toshimi; Nakagawa, Saki; Okada, Mari; Miki, Atsushi; Takeda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is rare cutaneous manifestation associated with painful skin ulceration and necrosis. It primarily occurs in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. In this report, we would like to show our experience with a male patient presenting with minimal change nephrotic syndrome that was sequentially complicated by acute kidney injury and painful ulcerative cutaneous lesions due to calciphylaxis. There seemed to be several contributing factors, including a disturbance of the patient's mineral metabolism and the systemic use of glucocorticoids and warfarin. Various concerns regarding the diagnostic and therapeutic conundrums that were encountered in the present case are also discussed. PMID:27853075

  16. Persistent lingual ulceration (Riga-Fede disease) in an infant with Down syndrome and natal teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Manouri P; Karunaratne, Irantha

    2014-08-22

    Riga-Fede disease is a rare pediatric condition in which chronic lingual ulceration results from repetitive trauma. Neonatal teeth or underlying neuro-developmental disorders which include Down syndrome are described as causative factors, but to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of both Down syndrome and natal teeth coexisting. The need for early extraction in the presence of two risk factors is highlighted in this case report. An 18-month-old Sinhalese male presented with an ulcerating lingual mass on the ventral surface of the tongue. The lesion had progressed over the past six months. He also had clinically diagnosed Down syndrome.The ulcer was non-tender, indurated, and had elevated margins. It was not bleeding and two natal teeth in lower central dentition were seen in apposition with the lesion. There was no regional lymphadenopathy but the ulcer was causing concerns as it mimicked a malignant lesion. A clinical diagnosis of Riga-Fede disease caused by raking movements of the tongue against anterior natal teeth by a child who was developmentally delayed and prone to suck on his tongue was made. The mother was reassured and the natal teeth were extracted. Early extraction of natal teeth is recommended only if there is a risk of aspiration or interference with breast feeding. Although Down syndrome is among the neuro-developmental conditions that lead to this lesion, its occurrence is usually at an older age. The presence of natal teeth together with Down syndrome caused the lesion to occur in infancy. Awareness of the benign nature of this rare condition by pediatricians and dental practitioners is important as it will allay anxiety and avoid unnecessary biopsy. This case also highlights the impact of two risk factors and needs consideration as an added indication for the early extraction of natal teeth.

  17. Excessive coupling of the salience network with intrinsic neurocognitive brain networks during rectal distension in adolescents with irritable bowel syndrome: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Silverman, Alan; Kern, Mark; Ward, B. Douglas; Li, Shi-Jiang; Shaker, Reza; Sood, Manu R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The neural network mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are incompletely understood. It has been proposed that an intrinsic salience network plays an important role in chronic pain and IBS symptoms. Using neuroimaging, we examined brain responses to rectal distension in adolescent IBS patients, focusing on determining the alteration of salience network integrity in IBS and its functional implications in current theoretical frameworks. We hypothesized that (1) brain responses to visceral stimulation in adolescents are similar to those in adults, and (2) IBS is associated with an altered salience network interaction with other neurocognitive networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN), as predicted by the theoretical models. Methods IBS patients and controls received subliminal and liminal rectal distension during imaging. Stimulus-induced brain activations were determined. Salience network integrity was evaluated by functional connectivity of its seed regions activated by rectal distension in the insular and cingulate cortices. Key Results Compared with controls, IBS patients demonstrated greater activation to rectal distension in neural structures of the homeostatic afferent and emotional arousal networks, especially the anterior cingulate and insular cortices. Greater brain responses to liminal vs. subliminal distension were observed in both groups. Particularly, IBS is uniquely associated with an excessive coupling of the salience network with the DMN and ECN in their key frontal and parietal node areas. Conclusions & Inferences Our study provided consistent evidence supporting the theoretical predictions of altered salience network functioning as a neuropathological mechanism of IBS symptoms. PMID:26467966

  18. The impact of metabolic syndrome on outcome and response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brandon J; Wahlquist, Amy E; Hill, Elizabeth G; Marshall, David T; Kimchi, Eric T; Staveley O'Carroll, Kevin F; Camp, E Ramsay

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors shown to increase the risk of developing various malignancies, as well as diminish tumor response to conventional therapies. The effects of MetS and its individual components on therapeutic response and treatment-related outcomes were examined in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Data was retrospectively collected on LARC patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) and surgery. Medical records were reviewed for patient characteristics, staging, treatment plan, and outcomes. One hundred two patients were included in the study. Patients with HTN had a significantly decreased nCRT response and were four times more likely to experience a poor response to treatment compared to patients without HTN. Additionally, HTN was found to significantly increase the rate of surgical complications. Neither DM nor obesity exhibited any significant effect on therapeutic response or complication rates, either individually or in combination with another risk factor. This study demonstrates the importance of considering underlying MetS risk factors, especially HTN, when predicting tumor response in LARC patients undergoing nCRT followed by radical surgery. The results provide support for an increased focus on pre-treatment risk factor control to optimize cancer therapy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are ... Diazepam comes as a gel to instill rectally using a prefilled syringe with a special plastic tip. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ...

  20. Autoinflammatory Diseases in Pediatric Dermatology-Part 1: Urticaria-like Syndromes, Pustular Syndromes, and Mucocutaneous Ulceration Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ostiz, S; Prieto-Torres, L; Xirotagaros, G; Noguera-Morel, L; Hernández-Martín, Á; Torrelo, A

    2017-09-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases are a heterogeneous emergent group of conditions that are currently under intensive study. We review the etiopathogenesis of these syndromes and their principal manifestations. Our aim is to propose a classification system based on the clinicopathologic features of typical skin lesions for routine clinical use in dermatology. Our focus is on diagnosis in pediatric practice given that this is the period when the signs and symptoms of these syndromes first appear. In Part 1 we discuss the course of urticaria-like syndromes, which include cryopyrin-associated periodic conditions and hereditary periodic fever syndromes. Pustular syndromes are also covered in this part. Finally, we review the range of therapies available as well as the genetic mutations associated with these autoinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of psychiatric morbidity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Susanta Kumar; Mishra, Surbhi; Sarkar, Siddharth; Bang, Late Govind; Panigrahi, Mahima

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to find psychiatric morbidity, stress, anxiety, and depression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and compare it with patients having non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). This case NUD study compared 50 patients each with IBS and NUD. The two groups were compared on demographic data, psychiatric diagnosis using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis 1 disorders, anxiety levels using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The Presumptive Stressful Life Events Scale (PSLES) was used to measure stress. The cases of IBS were more likely to be of female gender (P = 0.012), married (P = 0.009), and employed (P < 0.001). Psychiatric diagnoses were more common in the cases of IBS than NUDs (88% vs. 30%, P < 0.001), the most common being major depression and somatization disorder. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were more common in patients with IBS (P < 0.001 for HAM-A and HAM-D). Logistic regression revealed that having IBS and increased age were independent predictors of having a psychiatric diagnosis. IBS is associated with the considerable degree of psychiatric morbidity. Adequate attention should be paid toward comorbid psychiatric illnesses, and prompt treatment should be instituted.

  2. Review of biological factors relevant to import risk assessments for epizootic ulcerative syndrome (Aphanomyces invadans).

    PubMed

    Oidtmann, B

    2012-02-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is a disease affecting both wild and farmed fish in freshwater and estuarine environments. After it was first described in Japan in 1971, the disease has spread widely across Asia and to some regions of Australia, North America and Africa. In Asia and Africa, the spread of the disease has substantially affected livelihoods of fish farmers and fishermen. No reports are yet published showing the presence of the disease in Europe or South America. Given its epizootic nature and its broad susceptible fish species range, it would appear that the disease has the potential for further spread. This study provides a review of the scientific literature on several biological factors of the pathogen, Aphanomyces invadans, associated with the disease EUS and aspects of the disease that are relevant to undertaking import risk assessments (IRA) covering (i) Life cycle and routes of transmission; (ii) Minimum infectious dose; (iii) Tissue localization and pathogen load; (iv) Predisposing factors for infection and factors influencing expression of disease; (v) Carrier state in fish; (vi) Diagnostic methods; (vii) Survival in the environment; (viii) Permissive temperature range; (ix) Stability of the agent in aquatic animal products; (x) Prevalence of infection; and (xi) Affected life stages. Much of the biological information presented is relevant to a broad range of risk questions. Areas where data are lacking were identified, and the information provided is put into context with other aspects that need to be addressed in an IRA. © 2011 Crown copyright.

  3. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Griffiths, Heidi; Miyashita, Yosuke; Bhatt, Riha; Jaffe, Ronald; Moritz, Michael; Hofer, Johannes; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic microangiopathy of the kidney and usually results from Shiga-toxin induced activation of the alternative complement pathway. Gastroenteritis is a common feature of the Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli HUS, referred to as STEC-HUS. An inherited or acquired complement dysregulation may lead to HUS referred to as non-STEC or atypical (a)HUS. Although gastroenteritis is not a common presentation of aHUS, some patients develop ischemic colitis and may be misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis or acute ulcerative colitis (UC). Case Diagnosis –Treatment We present a patient with low circulating complement (C) 3 levels who developed aHUS in the course of chronic active UC. Resolution of renal and gastrointestinal manifestations in response to treatment with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against terminal C5 protein suggests the role of alternative complement in the pathogenesis of both, aHUS and UC. Conclusion This case illustrates that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway may manifest in other organs besides the kidney and that the circulating C3 levels do not correlate with the disease activity or the clinical response to eculizumab. PMID:27135055

  4. Rebamipide: A Novel Agent in the Treatment of Recurrent Aphthous Ulcer and Behcet's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kudur, Mohan H; Hulmani, Manjunath

    2013-01-01

    Rebamipide is an amino acid analog of 2 (1H)-quinolinone. It is being introduced and used since 1980 for the treatment of peptic ulcer. Its therapeutic use in recurrent aphthous ulcer was not known. It acts by the decrease in oxygen radicals, increase in blood flow and production of protective prostaglandins in ulcer mucosa, which accelerates the process of healing. In this article, we focus on the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, side-effects and other therapeutic uses of Rebamipide. It will be a new and effective drug in the dermatologists’ drug armamentarium for the treatment of aphthous ulcers and related diseases. PMID:24082178

  5. Mesenteric ischemia after capecitabine treatment in rectal cancer and resultant short bowel syndrome is not an absolute contraindication for radical oncological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Perpar, Ana; Brecelj, Erik; Kozjek, Nada Rotovnik; Anderluh, Franc; Oblak, Irena; Vidmar, Marija Skoblar; Velenik, Vaneja

    2015-01-01

    Background. Thrombotic events, arterial or venous in origin, still remain a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The propensity for their development in oncology patients is partially a consequence of the disease itself and partially a result of our attempts to treat it. One of the rarest and deadliest thromboembolic complications is arterial mesenteric ischemia. The high mortality rate is caused by its rarity and by its non-specific clinical presentation, both of which make early diagnosis and treatment difficult. Hence, most diagnoses and treatments occur late in the course of the disease. The issue survivors of arterial mesenteric ischemia may face is short bowel syndrome, which has become a chronic condition after the introduction of parenteral nutrition at home. Case report. We present a 73-year-old rectal cancer patient who developed acute arterial mesenteric thrombosis at the beginning of the pre-operative radiochemotherapy. Almost the entire length of his small intestine, except for the proximal 50 cm of it, and the ascending colon had to be resected. After multiorgan failure his condition improved, and he was able to successfully complete radical treatment (preoperative radiotherapy and surgery) for the rectal carcinoma, despite developing short bowel syndrome (SBS) and being dependent upon home-based parenteral nutrition to fully cover his nutritional needs. Conclusions. Mesenteric ischemia and resultant short bowel syndrome are not absolute contraindications for radical oncological treatment since such patients can still achieve long-term remission. PMID:26029030

  6. Urine Markers Do Not Predict Biopsy Findings or Presence of Bladder Ulcers in Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Deborah R.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Stetter, Christina M.; Peters, Kenneth M.; Rovner, Eric S.; Demers, Laurence M.; Wheeler, Marcia A.; Keay, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To test for associations between urine markers, bladder biopsy features and bladder ulcers in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). Materials and Methods Subjects were 72 patients with IC/PBS undergoing bladder distention and biopsy. Urine was collected before the procedure. Urine marker levels were correlated with biopsy and cystoscopic findings. Patients with no previous IC/PBS treatments (n=47) were analyzed separately from previously treated patients (n=25). Results For untreated patients, urine IL-6 and cGMP were associated with urothelial EGF receptor staining (for IL-6 r=0.29, 95% CI (0.07, 0.51), p=0.01; for cGMP r=0.34, 95% CI (0.13, 0.55), p=0.002). Urine IL-8 was negatively associated with urothelial HB-EGF staining (r=-0.34, 95% CI (-0.55, -0.12), p=0.002) and positively associated with lamina propria mast cell count (r=0.29, 95% CI (0.06, 0.52), p=0.01). The latter association also was seen in treated patients (r=0.46, 95% CI (0.20, 0.73), p<0.001). None of the urine markers was significantly different for ulcer vs. nonulcer patients. All of the ulcer patients had extensive inflammation on bladder biopsy: severe mononuclear cell infiltration, moderate or strong IL-6 staining in the urothelium and lamina propria, and LCA staining in >10% of the lamina propria. However, these features also were seen in 24-76% of the nonulcer patients. Conclusions Overall, urine markers did not associate robustly with biopsy findings. The strongest association was a positive association between urine IL-8 levels and bladder mast cell count. Ulcer patients consistently had bladder inflammation, but the cystoscopic finding of ulcers was not a sensitive indicator of inflammation on bladder biopsy. PMID:18353383

  7. A study of 113 cases of genital ulcerative disease and urethral discharge syndrome with validation of syndromic management of sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Chintan; Patel, Raksha M; Marfatia, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    To validate syndromic management of cases having genital ulcerative disease (GUD) and urethral discharge syndrome (UDS). A study of 113 cases of GUD and UDS was carried out in the Department of Skin and VD from March 2011 to August 2012. All cases having history and clinical evidence suggestive of GUD and UDS were included in the study. According to syndromic diagnosis, GUD herpetic syndrome was the most common 71 (62.27%), followed by GUD non-herpetic syndrome 25 (21.89%) and UDS 17 (14.91%). Out of 71 cases clinically diagnosed as GUD herpetic, 16 (22.53%) were validated by immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV) serology, 14 (19.71%) by Tzanck smear and 3 (4.22%) by both. 24 (33.80%) were Reactive plasma Reagin (RPR)(<1:8) reactive and trepenomma palidum haem-agglutination positive. Out of total 25 clinically diagnosed GUD non herpetic cases, 22 (88%) were validated by laboratory tests Out of 17 cases of UDS, 15 (88%) were validated by smear. Sensitivity and specificity of clinically diagnosed syndrome is not so high particularly for GUD herpetic syndrome Continuous monitoring of diagnostic component of syndromic approach is key to success of STD control program.

  8. Coexistence of pyoderma gangrenosum and sweet's syndrome in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ajili, Faida; Souissi, Asmahan; Bougrine, Fathi; Boussetta, Najah; Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Sayhi, Sameh; Louzir, Bassem; Doss, Nejib; Laabidi, Janet; Othmani, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's Syndrome (SS) are inflammatory skin diseases caused by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin and, rarely, in internal organs. These neutrophilic dermatosis (NDs) are distinguished by the existence of forms of transition or overlap. They are frequently associated to systemic diseases especially hematologic and gastrointestinal ones. We report a case of a patient with ulcerative colitis (UC) who successively developed two types of NDs: PG then SS. A 66 years old patient with a history of UC consulted in July 2012 for an erythematous swelling of the back of the right hand treated with antibiotics without improvement. At that time, bacteriological samples were negative. In October 2012, he was hospitalized for polyarthralgia and impaired general condition. In physical examination, he had vesiculobullous plaque of 10 cm long of the right hand and wrist, infiltrated erythematous plaque on the right leg and another topped with a large pustule at the left ankle. Skin biopsy showed at the back of the right hand an aspect of PG and at the infiltrated plaques of the ankle an aspect of SS. Prednisone was started with improvement of the skin lesions and a recovery condition. The combination of PG and SS has already been described in cases of hematologic malignancy and rarely in UC. There is also the notion of passage from a neutrophilic dermatosis to another. Indeed, a typical lesion initially of SS can evolve to a future PG. This case demonstrates that neutrophilic dermatoses form a continous spectrum of entities that may occur in UC.

  9. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcer in the duodenum is called a duodenal ulcer . Both a gastric ulcer and a duodenal ulcer happen when H. pylori ... are commonly associated with H. pylori infection, and gastric ulcers, which may stem from other causes. It's recognized ...

  10. Environmental and climatic factors associated with epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) in fish from the Zambezi floodplains, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Choongo, K; Hang'ombe, B; Samui, K L; Syachaba, M; Phiri, H; Maguswi, C; Muyangaali, K; Bwalya, G; Mataa, L

    2009-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine environmental and climatic factors associated with Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome (EUS) in fish in the Zambezi floodplains. EUS is a fish disease that causes economic loses to the fishing industry. Streambed colour in affected water was rusty-, reddish- or yellowish- brown and pH 4.5-6.0 while pH of non affected water was 7.2. The rusty-brown precipitate on fish gills was positive for Prussian blue iron stain. Therefore, predisposing factors for EUS in the Zambezi floodplains were the acidification of ground water during drought years and eventual contamination of surface water during the floods of 2006/2007.

  11. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-13

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  12. A case of rectal neuroendocrine carcinoma in a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis involving alterations of the p16-Rb pathway.

    PubMed

    Norose, Tomoko; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Imai, Hideyuki; Shibata, Hideki; Suzuki, Reika; Isobe, Tomohide; Asonuma, Kunio; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi; Takimoto, Masafumi

    2017-10-01

    The patient was a 54-year-old male who had been suffering from extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) for 17 years. Colonoscopy revealed an elevated lesion in the affected rectum, and its biopsy demonstrated neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). The surgical specimen obtained on laparoscopic high anterior resection showed extensive active inflammatory and dysplastic lesions and three grossly visible multifocal malignant lesions: a polypoid fungating tumor of NEC (type 1, 20 mm in diameter, pT3) that had been preoperatively noticed, a polypoid fungating tumor of adenocarcinoma (type 1, 22 mm, pT2) and a protruded sessile polypoid tumor (0-Is, 5 mm, pTis) of adenocarcinoma. The NEC was adjacently accompanied by dysplasia-carcinoma sequential lesions and showed a diffuse immunohistochemical overexpression of p53 and p16 proteins and the loss of Rb with no abnormal immunohistochemical staining of microsatellite instability markers and no KRAS mutations. Fifteen months later, the patient showed liver metastasis from the NEC component, followed by bone and spinal metastasis; he died 22 months after the initial diagnosis. A rare case of lethal NEC arising from long-standing extensive UC was reported. The NEC appeared to be UC-related, not incidental, and complicated by progression from dysplasia to carcinoma involving alterations of the p16-Rb pathway. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Ulcerative colitis with inflammatory polyposis in a teenage boy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Ye, Ying; Guo, Can-Can; Luo, Bo-Tao; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis in addition to inflammatory polyposis is common. The benign sequel of ulcerative colitis can sometimes mimic colorectal carcinoma. This report describes a rare case of inflammatory polyposis with hundreds of inflammatory polyps in ulcerative colitis which was not easy to distinguish from other polyposis syndromes. A 16-year-old Chinese male suffering from ulcerative colitis for 6 mo underwent colonoscopy, and hundreds of polyps were observed in the sigmoid, causing colonic stenosis. The polyps were restricted to the sigmoid. Although rectal inflammation was detected, no polyps were found in the rectum. A diagnosis of inflammatory polyposis and ulcerative colitis was made. The patient underwent total colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 8. Endoscopic surveillance after surgery is crucial as ulcerative colitis with polyposis is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Recognition of polyposis requires clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic correlation, and helps with chemoprophylaxis of colorectal cancer, as the drugs used postoperatively for colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis and polyposis are different. PMID:25624746

  14. Ulcerative colitis with inflammatory polyposis in a teenage boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Ye, Ying; Guo, Can-Can; Luo, Bo-Tao; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-21

    Ulcerative colitis in addition to inflammatory polyposis is common. The benign sequel of ulcerative colitis can sometimes mimic colorectal carcinoma. This report describes a rare case of inflammatory polyposis with hundreds of inflammatory polyps in ulcerative colitis which was not easy to distinguish from other polyposis syndromes. A 16-year-old Chinese male suffering from ulcerative colitis for 6 mo underwent colonoscopy, and hundreds of polyps were observed in the sigmoid, causing colonic stenosis. The polyps were restricted to the sigmoid. Although rectal inflammation was detected, no polyps were found in the rectum. A diagnosis of inflammatory polyposis and ulcerative colitis was made. The patient underwent total colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 8. Endoscopic surveillance after surgery is crucial as ulcerative colitis with polyposis is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Recognition of polyposis requires clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic correlation, and helps with chemoprophylaxis of colorectal cancer, as the drugs used postoperatively for colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis and polyposis are different.

  15. Stubborn rectal prolapse in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sven; Tobisch, Alexander; Puhl, Gero; Kötter, Ina; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder. Anorectal involvement might typically cause fecal incontinence and rarely rectal prolapse. Here we report three female patients, who were admitted with a mean history of 10 years suffering from SSc. All patients presented with the initial symptom of anal incontinence, in all cases this was associated with rectal intussusception or rectal prolapse. The three women faced prolapse recurrence, independent of the initial procedure. After surgical removal of the prolapse, the incontinence remained. In SSc rectal prolapse syndrome might occur at an earlier age, and a primary prolapse of the ventral aspect of the rectal wall seems to be typical for this disease. If patients with prior diagnosis of SSc appear with third degree of fecal incontinence, it is suspected to be associated with rectal prolapse. The prolapse recurrence rate after surgery in SSc patients is high.

  16. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Ulcerative colitis (UL-sur-uh-tiv koe-LIE-tis) is an inflammatory ... and ulcers (sores) in your digestive tract. Ulcerative colitis affects the innermost lining of your large intestine ( ...

  17. Histopathologic study of the rectum in 1,438 consecutive rectal specimens in a single Japanese hospital: I. benign lesions

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The author investigated histopathology of 1,438 consecutive rectal specimens in the last 10 years of our pathology laboratory in Japan. A computer review of pathologic reports was done. Observations of pathologic slides were performed, when appropriate. The rectal specimens were composed of 1,022 benign lesions and 416 malignant lesions. The 1,022 benign lesions were composed non-specific proctitis (n=460, 45%), adenoma (n=248, 24%), ulcerative colitis (n=98, 10%), hyperplastic polyp (n=54, 5%), carcinoma in adenoma (n=40, 4%), rectal ulcer (n=37, 4%), serrated adenoma (n=24, 2%), hyperplastic nodule (n=21, 2%), Crohn’s disease (n=9, 1%), ischemic proctitis (n=8, 0.8%), mucosal prolapse syndrome (n=7, 0.6%), juvenile polyp (n=6, 0.6%), lymphoid hyperplasia (n=5, 0.5%), lipoma (n=4, 0.4%) and amebic dysentery (n=2, 0.2%), and mature cystic teratoma (n=1, 0.1%). In this article, histopathological features of these benign lesions were described in details. In particular, adenomas were classified into adenomas with mild, moderate, and severe atypia, serrated adenoma, and carcinoma in adenoma. The later are mainly seen in large adenoma with severe atypia. Ulcerative colitis was characterized by continuous lesion, crypt abscess, abnormal branching, and deletion of goblet cells. Crohn’s disease was characterized by transmural inflammation and epithelioid granulomas. Ischemic colitis was characterized by ischemic necrotic changes and pseudomembrane formation. Mucosal prolapse syndrome was characterized by abnormal muscle in the mucosa (fibromuscular obliterance). Juvenile polyp was characterized by abnormal dilations of the crypts. Lymphoid hyperplasia must be differentiated from MALT lymphoma. Lipoma was ordinary lipoma without lipoblasts. Amebic dysentery was characterized by ulcer and presence of histiocyte-like entamoeba histolitica. Mature cystic teratoma was characterized by hairs and other elements of skin and mesodermal and endodermal components. PMID:23412670

  18. [A Case of Rectal Syphilis Incidentally Found at Regular Medical Check-up].

    PubMed

    You, Ji Hong; Cho, Ki Won; Cha, Yoon Jin; Park, Hyo Jin

    2016-10-25

    Syphilis is a rare disease in the rectum. It is difficult to diagnose because the characteristics of the rectal syphilis rectal lesion are highly varied. The endoscopic findings of rectal syphilis are proctitis, ulcers, and masses. If rectal syphilis is suspected to be the cause for rectal lesions, it is important for physicians to consider the sexual history and sexual orientation of the patient. We report a case of incidental rectal syphilis in a 41-year-old man diagnosed during a regular medical check-up.

  19. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Ryan K; Miller, Debra L; Vandersea, Mark W; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Schofield, Pamela J; Bennett, Wayne A

    2010-01-25

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  20. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saylor, Ryan K.; Miller, Debra L.; Vandersea, Mark W.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Bennett, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  1. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, Ryan; Miller, Debra; Vandersea, Mark; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Schofield, Pamela; Bennett, Wayne

    2010-02-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  2. Perioperative use of bispectral (BIS) monitor for a pressure ulcer patient with locked-in syndrome (LIS).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R; Bloom, Marc J; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure the depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anaesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anaesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. The goal of this study was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, i.e. anaesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses.

  3. Perioperative Use of Bispectral Monitor (BIS) for a Pressure Ulcer patient with Lock-In Syndrome (LIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R.; Bloom, Marc J.; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. Our goal was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, ie anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses. PMID:25252146

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of blood sucrose as a screening test for equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Hewetson, Michael; Sykes, Ben William; Hallowell, Gayle Davina; Tulamo, Riitta-Mari

    2017-03-11

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) is common in adult horses, particularly those involved in performance disciplines. Currently, detection of EGUS by gastroscopy is the only reliable ante mortem method for definitive diagnosis; however it is unsuitable as a screening test because it is expensive, time consuming, and is not readily available to most veterinarians. Sucrose permeability testing represents a simple, economical alternative to gastroscopy for screening purposes, and the feasibility of this approach in the horse has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of blood sucrose as a screening test for EGUS in a large group of adult horses with and without naturally occurring gastric disease. One hundred and one adult horses with or without naturally occurring gastric ulceration were studied. The diagnostic accuracy of blood sucrose for diagnosis of gastric lesions (GL), glandular lesions (GDL), squamous lesions (SQL), and clinically significant lesions (CSL) at 45 and 90 min after administration of 1 g/kg of sucrose via nasogastric intubation was assessed using receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves and calculating the area under the curve (AUC). For each lesion type, sucrose concentration in blood was compared to gastroscopy, as the gold standard, and sensitivities (Se) and specificities (Sp) were calculated across a range of sucrose concentrations. Ulcer grading was performed blindly by one observer; and the results were validated by comparing them with that of two other observers, and calculating the level of agreement. Cut-off values were selected manually to optimize Se. The prevalence of GL, GDL, SQL, and CSL was 83, 70, 53 and 58% respectively. At the selected cut-offs, Se ranged from 51 to 79% and Sp ranged from 43 to 72%, depending upon the lesion type and time of sampling. Blood sucrose is neither a sensitive or specific test for detecting EGUS in this population of adult horses with

  5. [Weighting coefficients of symptoms and signs in the diagnosis of corresponding TCM syndrome elements of ulcerative colitis based on expert questionnaire investigation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-jia; Wang, Tian-fang; Wu, Xiu-yan; Zhao, Yan; Xue, Xiao-lin; Wang, Qing-guo

    2012-04-01

    To define the weighting coefficients of the symptoms and signs in the diagnosis of corresponding traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome elements of ulcerative colitis based on expert questionnaire investigation. The questionnaire included eight syndrome elements of location and 11 syndrome elements relating to disease characteristics. Experts who answered the questionnaire were titled as associate chief physician or above, and had been practicing as professionals in general practice of medicine of digestive system for a long time. They came from 15 third-grade class-A hospitals (6 provinces and Beijing) in China. The weighting coefficients of the symptoms and signs in the diagnosis of corresponding TCM syndrome elements of ulcerative colitis were identified preliminarily based on consent degree of the experts (mean value and variation coefficient). There were 9, 6, 14, 5, 9, 8, 12 and 2 symptoms and signs corresponding to 8 TCM syndrome elements related to disease location and the ranges of weighting coefficients were listed as follows: liver, from 7.49 to 4.18; heart, from 6.90 to 5.51; spleen, from 7.96 to 5.55; lung, from 6.30 to 5.27; kidney, from 7.82 to 5.71; stomach, from 7.53 to 6.15; large intestine, from 8.40 to 6.70; bowel collaterals, from 8.49 to 6.41. Numbers of symptoms and signs corresponding to 11 TCM syndrome elements related to disease nature were 13, 8, 17, 18, 17, 18, 6, 11, 2, 10 and 11 and the ranges of weighting coefficients were listed as follows: qi deficiency, from 7.44 to 5.60; blood deficiency, from 7.90 to 5.59; yin deficiency, from 6.88 to 4.91; yang deficiency, from 7.54 to 5.57; dampness, from 7.91 to 4.96; excess heat (fire), from 7.13 to 5.69; excess cold, from 7.51 to 6.14; qi stagnation, from 7.38 to 5.88; qi sinking, from 7.65 to 7.43; blood stasis, from 7.60 to 5.79; fluid retention, from 7.08 to 4.46. On the basis of previous document research and clinical research in ulcerative colitis, the expert questionnaire can

  6. [Clinical thinking and decision making in practice. Unexplained rectal blood loss in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome].

    PubMed

    van den Born, B J H; Koopmans, R P; Fliers, E; Hart, W

    2002-04-13

    A 55-year-old woman, known with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1, had rectal bleeding and later haematemesis but colonoscopy and gastroduodenoscopy revealed no abnormalities. Due to the normal results for serum gastrin concentration, gastroduodenoscopy and CT scanning of the pancreas, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome was considered to be less likely. Yet the diagnosis could be established on the basis of persistent symptoms and a positive somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. The patient was treated with high doses of a proton pump inhibitor and temporary tube feeding due to weight loss. Follow-up will take place at the endocrinology outpatients' department. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a relatively common feature of patients with MEN-1. The diagnosis and localisation of the gastrinoma can be difficult: serum gastrin concentrations can be normal and the sensitivity of CT scanning is low. The primary aim of treating gastrinoma is to control gastric acid hypersecretion by means of high doses of a proton pump inhibitor. The question as to whether surgery is indicated remains controversial.

  7. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  8. [Peptic ulcer and insular carcinoma of the pancreas with hepatic metastasis (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Stoopen, M; Ize, L; Baz, G; Aguirre, J

    1975-01-01

    A Zollinger-Ellison syndrome case is reported. During arteriography and surgical treatment islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas with metastasis to the liver was found. After surgery, patient has presented several periods of hypoglicemia. Hence it was speculated that this type of neoplasm might have double endocrine function.

  9. Patients with longstanding ulcerative colitis in remission do not have more irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms than controls.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, D; Rutegård, J; Eklöf, V; Palmqvist, R; Karling, P

    2016-11-24

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is more common in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) than expected. The prevalence of IBS in patients with UC with longstanding disease is not known. We investigated the prevalence of IBS-like symptoms in patients with UC in remission and longstanding disease in comparison to control subjects. Sixty-eight patients with UC and 33 patients with hereditary familiar colon cancer and who underwent colonoscopy surveillance were included. Faecal calprotectin (FC), Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale-Irritable Bowel Syndrome (GSRS-IBS) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale were fulfilled prior to endoscopy. UC in remission was define by steroid-free clinical remission, a Mayo Score ≤ 1 on endoscopy, a FC ≤ 200 μg/g and no significant active inflammation on colon biopsies. Fifty-five UC patients met the criteria for being in remission. The median disease duration was 17 years. The patients with UC in remission tended to have lower scores on total GSRS-IBS score (6 vs 10.5; p = 0.062) and lower or equal scores on all specific IBS symptoms in comparison to controls. There was a moderate but significant correlation between diarrhoea scores and FC levels (in the span ≤ 200 μg/g) (rs 0.38; p = 0.004) in the UC in remission group. Patients with UC with longstanding disease and in remission do not have more IBS symptoms than controls. In UC patients in remission the FC level in the lower span showed a moderate correlation to symptoms of diarrhoea.

  10. Ulcerated yellow spot syndrome: implications of aquaculture-related pathogens associated with soft coral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi tissue lesions.

    PubMed

    Cervino, James M; Hauff, Briana; Haslun, Joshua A; Winiarski-Cervino, Kathryn; Cavazos, Michael; Lawther, Pamela; Wier, Andrew M; Hughen, Konrad; Strychar, Kevin B

    2012-12-27

    We introduce a new marine syndrome called ulcerated yellow spot, affecting the soft coral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi. To identify bacteria associated with tissue lesions, tissue and mucus samples were taken during a 2009 Indo-Pacific research expedition near the Wakatobi Island chain, Indonesia. Polymerase chain reaction targeting the 16S rDNA gene indicated associations with the known fish-disease-causing bacterium Photobacterium damselae, as well as multiple Vibrio species. Results indicate a shift toward decreasing diversity of bacteria in lesioned samples. Photobacterium damselae ssp. piscicida, formerly known as Pasteurella piscicida, is known as the causative agent of fish pasteurellosis and in this study, was isolated solely in lesioned tissues. Globally, fish pasteurellosis is one of the most damaging fish diseases in marine aquaculture. Vibrio alginolyticus, a putative pathogen associated with yellow band disease in scleractinian coral, was also isolated from lesioned tissues. Lesions appear to be inflicting damage on symbiotic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium sp.), measurable by decreases in mitotic index, cell density and photosynthetic efficiency. Mitotic index of zooxanthellae within infected tissue samples was decreased by ~80%, while zooxanthellae densities were decreased by ~40% in lesioned tissue samples compared with healthy coral. These results provide evidence for the presence of known aquaculture pathogens in lesioned soft coral and may be a concern with respect to cross-species epizootics in the tropics.

  11. Emergence of Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome in Native Fish of the Murray-Darling River System, Australia: Hosts, Distribution and Possible Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Boys, Craig A.; Rowland, Stuart J.; Gabor, Melinda; Gabor, Les; Marsh, Ian B.; Hum, Steven; Callinan, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is a fish disease of international significance and reportable to the Office International des Epizootics. In June 2010, bony herring Nematalosa erebi, golden perch Macquaria ambigua, Murray cod Maccullochella peelii and spangled perch Leiopotherapon unicolor with severe ulcers were sampled from the Murray-Darling River System (MDRS) between Bourke and Brewarrina, New South Wales Australia. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction identified the fungus-like oomycete Aphanomyces invadans, the causative agent of EUS. Apart from one previous record in N. erebi, EUS has been recorded in the wild only from coastal drainages in Australia. This study is the first published account of A. invadans in the wild fish populations of the MDRS, and is the first confirmed record of EUS in M. ambigua, M. peelii and L. unicolor. Ulcerated carp Cyprinus carpio collected at the time of the same epizootic were not found to be infected by EUS, supporting previous accounts of resistance against the disease by this species. The lack of previous clinical evidence, the large number of new hosts (n = 3), the geographic extent (200 km) of this epizootic, the severity of ulceration and apparent high pathogenicity suggest a relatively recent invasion by A. invadans. The epizootic and associated environmental factors are documented and discussed within the context of possible vectors for its entry into the MDRS and recommendations regarding continued surveillance, research and biosecurity are made. PMID:22558170

  12. Emergence of epizootic ulcerative syndrome in native fish of the Murray-Darling River System, Australia: hosts, distribution and possible vectors.

    PubMed

    Boys, Craig A; Rowland, Stuart J; Gabor, Melinda; Gabor, Les; Marsh, Ian B; Hum, Steven; Callinan, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is a fish disease of international significance and reportable to the Office International des Epizootics. In June 2010, bony herring Nematalosa erebi, golden perch Macquaria ambigua, Murray cod Maccullochella peelii and spangled perch Leiopotherapon unicolor with severe ulcers were sampled from the Murray-Darling River System (MDRS) between Bourke and Brewarrina, New South Wales Australia. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction identified the fungus-like oomycete Aphanomyces invadans, the causative agent of EUS. Apart from one previous record in N. erebi, EUS has been recorded in the wild only from coastal drainages in Australia. This study is the first published account of A. invadans in the wild fish populations of the MDRS, and is the first confirmed record of EUS in M. ambigua, M. peelii and L. unicolor. Ulcerated carp Cyprinus carpio collected at the time of the same epizootic were not found to be infected by EUS, supporting previous accounts of resistance against the disease by this species. The lack of previous clinical evidence, the large number of new hosts (n = 3), the geographic extent (200 km) of this epizootic, the severity of ulceration and apparent high pathogenicity suggest a relatively recent invasion by A. invadans. The epizootic and associated environmental factors are documented and discussed within the context of possible vectors for its entry into the MDRS and recommendations regarding continued surveillance, research and biosecurity are made.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Thigh Secondary to Radiation Colitis in a Rectal Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyun; Choi, Jung Ran; Song, Ji Young; Kang, Kyu Keun; Yoo, Woong Sun; Han, Sung Wan

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis usually occurs after dermal injury or through hematogenous spread. To date, few cases have been reported as necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh secondary to rectal perforation in rectal cancer patients. A 66-year-old male complained of pelvic and thigh pain and subsequently developed necrotizing fasciitis in his right thigh. Four years earlier, he had undergone a low anterior resection and radiotherapy due to of rectal cancer. An ulcerative lesion had been observed around the anastomosis site during the colonoscopy that had been performed two months earlier. Pelvic computed tomography and sigmoidoscopy showed rectal perforation and presacral abscess extending to buttock and the right posterior thigh fascia. Thus, the necrotizing fasciitis was believed to have occurred because of ulcer perforation, one of the complications of chronic radiation colitis, at the anastomosis site. When a rectal-cancer patient complains of pelvic and thigh pain, the possibility of a rectal perforation should be considered. PMID:23346513

  14. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  15. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  16. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  17. Differences in microbial signatures between rectal mucosal biopsies and rectal swabs.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Pérez, Félix; McCoy, Amber N; Okechukwu, Charles; Carroll, Ian M; Smith, Kevin M; Jeremiah, Kim; Sandler, Robert S; Asher, Gary N; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence the microbiota of the large bowel may influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other diseases including type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome. Current sampling methods to obtain microbial specimens, such as feces and mucosal biopsies, are inconvenient and unappealing to patients. Obtaining samples through rectal swabs could prove to be a quicker and relatively easier method, but it is unclear if swabs are an adequate substitute. We compared bacterial diversity and composition from rectal swabs and rectal mucosal biopsies in order to examine the viability of rectal swabs as an alternative to biopsies. Paired rectal swabs and mucosal biopsy samples were collected in un-prepped participants (n = 11) and microbial diversity was characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial community composition from swab samples was different from rectal mucosal biopsies (p = 0.001). Overall the bacterial diversity was higher in swab samples than in biopsies as assessed by diversity indexes such as: richness (p = 0.01), evenness (p = 0.06) and Shannon's diversity (p = 0.04). Analysis of specific bacterial groups by qPCR showed higher copy number of Lactobacillus (p < 0.0001) and Eubacteria (p = 0.0003) in swab samples compared with biopsies. Our findings suggest that rectal swabs and rectal mucosal samples provide different views of the microbiota in the large intestine.

  18. Colonic mucosal immune activity in irritable bowel syndrome: comparison with healthy controls and patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yong; Lee, Kyung Hun; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kim, Ju Wan; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kim, Mi Kyung; Kwon, Gui Young; Han, Seungbong; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Sung Min; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2014-05-01

    Mucosal immune activity may participate in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pathogenesis. Mast- and T cell numbers from patients with IBS or ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were determined. Between November 2007 and May 2012, patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS, n = 83), 49 patients with UC, and 25 healthy controls were recruited. Of the UC group, 28 were in remission and 21 had mildly active UC. Biopsies from each colon segment were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis. The mast cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), and lamina proprial lymphocytes (LPLs) were counted. Compared to the healthy controls, the patients with D-IBS, UC in remission, and mildly active UC had significantly higher mean colorectal mucosal mast-cell, IEL, and LPL counts. Comparison with the colon segments (ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid segments) that had once been involved in UC (in the patients with remission) revealed that the D-IBS colons had similar immune-cell counts. However, they had significantly fewer immune cells than the colon segments that presently showed involvement in the patients with mildly-activated UC. The mast-cell and IEL counts were similar in the D-IBS rectums and once-involved UC rectums but significantly higher in the presently-involved UC rectums. However, both the once-involved and presently-involved UC rectums had significantly higher LPL counts than the D-IBS rectums. Patients with D-IBS had significantly higher colonic mucosal immune-cell counts than healthy controls but had similar counts to patients with UC in remission. The symptoms in both conditions may originate from low-grade inflammation in the colonic mucosa.

  19. [Peptic ulcer

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A S

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a current review about pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children, based on the reviewed publications and the author personal experience. METHODS: We revised the most relevant articles about peptic ulcer in children, published from the last 20 years. RESULTS: The gastroduodenal peptic ulcer is very common in adults, mostly in the developing countries. Although it is less frequent in children, the optical fibroendoscopy has improved the number of diagnosed cases. The peptic ulcer is classified as its etiology in primary and secondary. The secondary peptic ulcer is related to a subjacent disease or use of drugs, while the primary ulcer happens in the absence of underlying systemic diseases The primary duodenal ulcer is the most common presentation, and there are strong evidences of the H. pylori association in the etiology. Clinical presentation changes with age and ulcer type. Secondary ulcers are mostly acute and sometimes dramatic, while the primary ones have a chronic evolution mostly similar to patients with functional recurrent abdominal pain, but the presence of epigastric pain, feeding-related pain, vomiting, bleeding, familiar history for peptic ulcer, nocturnal pain, and male gender are strongly related to peptic ulcer. The acid antisecretory agents have great efficacy on relieving symptoms and solving ulcerate lesion, although the H. pylori eradication itself prevents primary duodenal ulcer recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The primary peptic ulcer involve many factors in Its etiopathogenesis, being H. pylori the most important of them Although there isn t yet a ideal therapeutic course. The antibiotics play an important role in peptic ulcer and the H. pylori research must be done for na accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Kattan, Michael W.; Rancati, Tiziana; Yu Changhong; Vavassori, Vittorio; Fellin, Giovanni; Cagna, Elena; Gabriele, Pietro; Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela; Bianchi, Carla; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo F.; Stasi, Michele; Giganti, Maria Olga; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient's characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  1. Low anterior resection syndrome: a survey of the members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), the Spanish Association of Surgeons (AEC), and the Spanish Society of Coloproctology (AECP).

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Gomez, Luis Miguel; Espin-Basany, Eloy; Marti-Gallostra, Marc; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose Luis; Vallribera-Valls, Francesc; Armengol-Carrasco, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) is frequent following sphincter-sparing procedures for rectal cancer. This study aims to assess surgeons' awareness of LARS. This was a survey study. Members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), the Spanish Association of Surgeons (AEC), and the Spanish Society of Coloproctology (AECP). Three hundred thirty-four surgeons from the ASCRS and 150 from the Spanish Societies completed a 23-item electronic questionnaire. Surgeons' opinions regarding different aspects of LARS. The proportion of rectal cancer patients undergoing sphincter-sparing operations ranged between 71 and 90 %. Low anterior resection with end-to-end anastomosis was the most frequently cited procedure after mesorectal excision. More than 80 % of participants were recognized to be moderately or extremely aware of the condition, but regarding the method used to assess LARS, the majority relied on clinical manifestations. Around 35 % of surgeons considered that severe LARS developed in less than 40 % of patients. The most important factor related to defecatory function impairment in the surgeons' opinion was the distance from the anal margin to anastomosis. Other factors thought to be involved were anastomotic leakage, preoperative radiation therapy, age, and postoperative radiotherapy, with similar percentages in the two groups of surgeons. Lifestyle changes and dietary measures associated with or without drug treatment was the modality of choice. The experience with transanal irrigation or sacral nerve stimulation was limited. It was considered that <30 % of patients chronically suffer from severe LARS with significant quality of life impairment. The limitations of this study are the international mix and expert status of the specialists. The probability of patients suffering from LARS was underestimated despite reporting good knowledge of the syndrome. Validated methods for the assessment of LARS were rarely used. Deficient awareness

  2. Current concepts in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James W; Smallwood, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    The history of rectal cancer management informs current therapy and points us in the direction of future improvements. Multidisciplinary team management of rectal cancer will move us to personalized treatment for individuals with rectal cancer in all stages.

  3. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLA-DR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Shelly R; Gunn, G Gibson; Mueller, Francis W

    2016-05-11

    Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient's water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient's symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and may represent a treatable underlying disease etiology in a subset of genetically susceptible patients with RUC, CFS, and other immune disorders.

  4. Bladder urothelial carcinoma extending to rectal mucosa and presenting with rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Aneese, Andrew M; Manuballa, Vinayata; Amin, Mitual; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2017-01-01

    An 87-year-old-man with prostate-cancer-stage-T1c-Gleason-6 treated with radiotherapy in 1996, recurrent prostate cancer treated with leuprolide hormonal therapy in 2009, and bladder-urothelial-carcinoma in situ treated with Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin and adriamycin in 2010, presented in 2015 with painless, bright red blood per rectum coating stools daily for 5 mo. Rectal examination revealed bright red blood per rectum; and a hard, fixed, 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm mass at the normal prostate location. The hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL (iron saturation = 8.4%, indicating iron-deficiency-anemia). Abdominopelvic-CT-angiography revealed focal wall thickening at the bladder neck; a mass containing an air cavity replacing the normal prostate; and adjacent rectal invasion. Colonoscopy demonstrated an ulcerated, oozing, multinodular, friable, 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm mass in anterior rectal wall, at the usual prostate location. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of colonoscopic biopsies of the mass revealed poorly-differentiated-carcinoma of urothelial origin. At visceral angiography, the right-superior-rectal-artery was embolized to achieve hemostasis. The patient subsequently developed multiple new metastases and expired 13 mo post-embolization. Comprehensive literature review revealed 16 previously reported cases of rectal involvement from bladder urothelial carcinoma, including 11 cases from direct extension and 5 cases from metastases. Patient age averaged 63.7 ± 9.6 years (all patients male). Rectal involvement was diagnosed on average 13.5 ± 11.8 mo after initial diagnosis of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Symptoms included constipation/gastrointestinal obstruction-6, weight loss-5, diarrhea-3, anorexia-3, pencil thin stools-3, tenesmus-2, anorectal pain-2, and other-5. Rectal examination in 9 patients revealed annular rectal constriction-6, and rectal mass-3. The current patient had the novel presentation of daily bright red blood per rectum coating the stools simulating

  5. Multiple differential expression networks identify key genes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Li, Ping; Jia, Xiong-Jie; Zhang, Tao; Peng, Xin-Yu; Liu, Min-Di; Wang, Xu; Lang, Yan; Xue, Wei-Lan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is an important contributor to cancer mortality. The objective of this paper is to identify key genes across three phenotypes (fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer) of rectal cancer based on multiple differential expression networks (DENs). Differential interactions and non-differential interactions were evaluated according to Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) algorithm, and were selected to construct DENs. Topological analysis was performed for exploring hub genes in largest components of DENs. Key genes were denoted as intersections between nodes of DENs and rectal cancer associated genes from Genecards. Finally, we utilized hub genes to classify phenotypes of rectal cancer on the basis of support vector machines (SVM) methodology. We obtained 19 hub genes and total 12 common key genes of three largest components of DENs, and EGFR was the common element. The SVM results revealed that hub genes could classify phenotypes, and validated feasibility of DEN methods. We have successfully identified significant genes (such as EGFR and UBC) across fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer phenotype of rectal cancer. They might be potential biomarkers for classification, detection and therapy of this cancer.

  6. Martorell's ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, S. D.; Baragwanath, P.; Harding, K. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a rare form of ulceration of the lower leg and, as a result of subsequent investigations and literature review, readdresses a recent debate regarding the legitimate classification of these ulcers as a separate disease entity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8552533

  7. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  8. A new species of Henneguya, a gill parasite of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) affected with ulcerative disease syndrome from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Hemanand, Th; Meitei, N Mohilal; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mitra, Amlan K

    2008-01-01

    A new species of Henneguya parasitizing tissues affected by the ulcerative disease syndrome of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) from Khiodum and Pumlen lakes of Manipur state is described. Of the fishes examined 75% were found to be infested with this myxozoan parasite. Mature spores of the new species are elongated, biconvex, and oval with bluntly rounded anterior end and gradually tapering posterior end with a caudal prolongation, measuring 12.6-15.4 (14.0+/- 1.1) microm in length. Length of the caudal prolongation is 11.2-12.6 (11.7+/- 0.6) microm. The width of the spores is 5.6-7.0 (6.3+/- 0.5) microm. The length of the polar capsules is 5.6-6.3 (5.5+/- 0.3) microm.

  9. Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome: review of the literature and case report of chronic ulcer treatment with heparan sulphate (Cacipliq20®).

    PubMed

    Hayek, Shady; Atiyeh, Bishara; Zgheib, Elias

    2015-04-01

    Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome (SBS), also known as acroangiodermatitis or pseudo-Kaposi, is a condition rarely encountered. It involves skin lesions that are clinically similar to Kaposi sarcoma but are histologically different, and are usually secondary to an underlying arteriovenous fistula. Treatment of this disease usually involves the correction of the underlying vascular abnormality, with the mainstay of therapy ranging from compression devices for venous stasis, limited oral medications (dapsone and erythromycin) and local wound care including topical steroids. Different methods of treatment showed varied success but none is ideal. We report a case of a lower extremity ulcer in a 22-year-old male recently diagnosed with SBS successfully treated with heparan sulphate (Cacipliq20®).

  10. Surgery for constipation: systematic review and practice recommendations: Results II: Hitching procedures for the rectum (rectal suspension).

    PubMed

    Grossi, U; Knowles, C H; Mason, J; Lacy-Colson, J; Brown, S R

    2017-09-01

    To assess the outcomes of rectal suspension procedures (forms of rectopexy) in adults with chronic constipation. Standardised methods and reporting of benefits and harms were used for all CapaCiTY reviews that closely adhered to PRISMA 2016 guidance. Main conclusions were presented as summary evidence statements with a summative Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (2009) level. Eighteen articles were identified, providing data on outcomes in 1238 patients. All studies reported only on laparoscopic approaches. Length of procedures ranged between 1.5 to 3.5 h, and length of stay between 4 to 5 days. Data on harms were inconsistently reported and heterogeneous, making estimates of harm tentative and imprecise. Morbidity rates ranged between 5-15%, with mesh complications accounting for 0.5% of patients overall. No mortality was reported after any procedures in a total of 1044 patients. Although inconsistently reported, good or satisfactory outcome occurred in 83% (74-91%) of patients; 86% (20-97%) of patients reported improvements in constipation after laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy (LVMR). About 2-7% of patients developed anatomical recurrence. Patient selection was inconsistently documented. As most common indication, high grade rectal intussusception was corrected in 80-100% of cases after robotic or LVMR. Healing of prolapse-associated solitary rectal ulcer syndrome occurred in around 80% of patients after LVMR. Evidence supporting rectal suspension procedures is currently derived from poor quality studies. Methodologically robust trials are needed to inform future clinical decision making. © 2017 The Authors. Colorectal Disease published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Refractory Ulcerative Colitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jesse A.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common clinical challenge. In either acute or chronic refractory UC, the disease may continue to remain active, even though the patient is on appropriate therapy. It is important to reassess and characterize the patient's disease before adding new medications to the current medical regimen. After determining the current extent and severity of the UC—ruling out other causes of bloody diarrhea and determining what complications are present—new treatment approaches can then be started. It is critical to first optimize oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy combined with rectal 5-ASA or corticosteroid suppositories, plus corticosteroid or 5-ASA enemas or foam preparations. Oral or intravenous corticosteroids are appropriate to use if needed, but alternative approaches must be used for long-term maintenance. 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) or azathioprine can be very helpful for severe chronic refractory UC. In those patients who do not respond to 5-ASA medications, corticosteroids, and 6-MP or azathioprine, infliximab offers an important approach for induction and maintenance of remission for refractory chronic ulcerative colitis as well as for select cases of refractory acute UC. Cyclosporine use is an alternative medical approach for the refractory acute UC patient. Colectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis remains a valuable option for the refractory chronic or acute UC patient, because it can provide both a “cure” for the disease, as well as eliminate ineffective medications with their associated side effects. PMID:21960779

  12. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  13. A rectal neuroendocrine neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, Modesto J; Muñoz Agel, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of gastric and rectal carcinoids is increasing. This is probably due to endoscopic screening. The prognosis is primarily dependent upon tumor size, aggressiveness (pathology, Ki-67), metastatic disease and stage. However, neuroendocrine carcinoma usually behaves as an adenocarcinoma.

  14. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... proctocolectomy - discharge Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Internal review and ...

  15. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are absorbed in the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into ... wall of the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are ...

  16. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... become very limited, talk to a registered dietitian. Stress Although stress doesn't cause inflammatory bowel disease, ... al. Ulcerative colitis practice guidelines in adults: American College of Gastroenterology, Practice Parameters Committee. American Journal of ...

  17. Ugh! Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... sores, or ulcers, are caused. continue Who Has H. Pylori Infection? By testing someone's blood or bowel movements ( ... she has been exposed to and might have H. pylori . When tested, lots of people have H. pylori ...

  18. Ugh! Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or ulcers, are caused. continue Who Has H. Pylori Infection? By testing someone's blood or bowel movements ( ... has been exposed to and might have H. pylori . When tested, lots of people have H. pylori ...

  19. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  20. History, prevalence and assessment of limited joint mobility: from stiff hand syndrome to diabetic foot ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe; De Bellis, Alessandra; Gulisano, Massimo

    2017-08-16

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most important global public health problems. Patients with DM may develop different dreaded complications during their lifetime, one of which is limited joint mobility (LJM). Joint abnormalities and LJM are problems that can arise at disease onset, and progressively worsen together with the disease. Because LJM shares causal factors with other chronic diabetes-induced complications, its study has been considered useful for monitoring the risk of developing other chronic complications due to DM such as vascular disease or diabetic foot. Joint deficits have been investigated using several methods in populations of different ages and types of DM. As a result, its exact prevalence is still difficult to define which can hinder the definition of prevention strategies. The several studies carried out recently have underlined the relationship between joint mobility, glycemic control, and disease duration in addition to considering LJM as a major risk factor for the development of diabetic foot. More recently, it has been demonstrated that joint mobility can significantly improve after short-term exercise therapy protocols. Identifying the threshold values of joint mobility for the risk of developing foot ulcers has been an additional important result. Analyzing the history of the relationship between diabetes and LJM is essential for better understanding of its own complexity in order to define appropriate prevention and treatment. The main aim of this review is to describe and define the history of the relationship between DM and joint mobility in addition to explaining its prevalence, assessment and role in the development of diabetic foot ulcers for the aim of designing preventive treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may ... mouth Images Oral thrush Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Lichen planus on the oral mucosa Mouth sores References Daniels TE, Jordan RC. ...

  2. Ulcerative colitis: a challenge to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis.

  3. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  4. Systematic review: anal and rectal changes after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Krol, Robin; Smeenk, Robert Jan; van Lin, Emile N J T; Yeoh, Eric E K; Hopman, Wim P M

    2014-03-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy may lead to changes of anorectal function resulting in incontinence-related complaints. The aim of this study was to systematically review objective findings of late anorectal physiology and mucosal appearance after irradiation for prostate cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library were searched. Original articles in which anal function, rectal function, or rectal mucosa were examined ≥3 months after EBRT for prostate cancer were included. Twenty-one studies were included with low to moderate quality. Anal resting pressures significantly decreased in 6 of the 9 studies including 277 patients. Changes of squeeze pressure and rectoanal inhibitory reflex were less uniform. Rectal distensibility was significantly impaired after EBRT in 7 of 9 studies (277 patients). In 4 of 9 studies on anal and in 5 of 9 on rectal function, disturbances were associated with urgency, frequent bowel movements or fecal incontinence. Mucosal changes as assessed by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score revealed telangiectasias in 73 %, congestion in 33 %, and ulceration in 4 % of patients in 8 studies including 346 patients, but no strictures or necrosis. Three studies reported mucosal improvement during follow-up. Telangiectasias, particularly multiple, were associated with rectal bleeding. Not all bowel complaints (30 %) were related to radiotherapy. Low to moderate quality evidence indicates that EBRT reduces anal resting pressure, decreases rectal distensibility, and frequently induces telangiectasias of rectal mucosa. Objective changes may be associated with fecal incontinence, urgency, frequent bowel movements, and rectal bleeding, but these symptoms are not always related to radiation damage.

  5. Rectal contrast increases rectal dose during vaginal cuff brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Jimenez-Jimenez, Esther; Berenguer, Roberto; Sevillano, Marimar; Lopez-Honrubia, Veronica; Rovirosa, Angeles; Sanchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Arenas, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of rectal dose on rectal contrast use during vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). A retrospective review of gynecology patients who received some brachytherapy fractions with and without rectal contrast was carried out. Rectal contrast was instilled at the clinician's discretion to increase rectal visibility. Thirty-six pairs of CT scans in preparation for brachytherapy were analyzed. Pairs of CTs were segmented and planned using the same parameters. The rectum was always defined from 1 cm above the cylinder tip up to 1.5 cm below the last activated dwell source position. An individual plan was computed at every VCB fraction. A set of values (Dmax, D(0.1cc), D(1cc), and D(2cc)) derived from dose-volume histograms were extracted and compared according to the rectal status. Rectal volume was 26.7% larger in the fractions with rectal contrast. Such an increase in volume represented a significant increase from 7.7% to 10.4% in all parameters analyzed except Dmax dose-volume histogram. Avoiding rectal contrast is a simple way of decreasing the rectal dose parameters of VCB, which would mean a better therapeutic ratio. Results also suggest that action directed at maintaining the rectum empty might have the same effect. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and Dosimetric Predictors of Late Rectal Syndrome After 3D-CRT for Localized Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Multicenter Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, Claudio Fellin, Gianni; Rancati, Tiziana; Vavassori, Vittorio; Bianchi, Carla; Borca, Valeria Casanova; Girelli, Giuseppe; Mapelli, Marco; Menegotti, Loris; Nava, Simona; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the predictors of late rectal toxicity in a prospectively investigated group of patients treated at 70-80 Gy for prostate cancer (1.8-2 Gy fractions) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,132 patients were entered into the study between 2002 and 2004. Three types of rectal toxicity, evaluated by a self-administered questionnaire, mainly based on the subjective objective management, analytic late effects of normal tissue system, were considered: stool frequency/tenesmus/pain, fecal incontinence, and bleeding. The data from 506 patients with a follow-up of 24 months were analyzed. The correlation between a number of clinical and dosimetric parameters and Grade 2 or greater toxicity was investigated by univariate and multivariate (MVA) logistic analyses. Results: Of the 1,132 patients, 21, 15, and 30 developed stool frequency/tenesmus/pain, fecal incontinence, and bleeding, respectively. Stool frequency/tenesmus/pain correlated with previous abdominal/pelvic surgery (MVA, p = 0.05, odds ratio [OR], 3.3). With regard to incontinence, MVA showed the volume receiving {>=}40 Gy (V{sub 40}) (p = 0.035, OR, 1.037) and surgery (p = 0.02, OR, 4.4) to be the strongest predictors. V{sub 40} to V{sub 70} were highly predictive of bleeding; V{sub 70} showed the strongest impact on MVA (p = 0.03), together with surgery (p = 0.06, OR, 2.5), which was also the main predictor of Grade 3 bleeding (p = 0.02, OR, 4.2). Conclusions: The predictive value of the dose-volume histogram was confirmed for bleeding, consistent with previously suggested constraints (V{sub 50} <55%, V{sub 60} <40%, V{sub 70} <25%, and V{sub 75} <5%). A dose-volume histogram constraint for incontinence can be suggested (V{sub 40} <65-70%). Previous abdominal/pelvic surgery correlated with all toxicity types; thus, a modified constraint for bleeding (V{sub 70} <15%) can be suggested for patients with a history of abdominal/pelvis surgery, although

  7. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  8. [An Unusual Case of Proctitis and Rectal Abscess due to Irritants by Artemisia asiatica Smoke (Ssukjwahun)].

    PubMed

    Kim, Seunghyup; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Seo Hyun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Park, Se Jun; Yun, Seo Young; Kim, Dae Young; Lee, Jeonghun; Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-04-25

    Proctitis is an inflammatory change of rectal mucosa induced by various agents or stimulus. Among many etiologies, it may be caused by medical treatments such as radiation or antibiotics. Proctitis usually presents with rectal ulcer but abscess formation is uncommon. Therapy using Ssukjwahun exerts its effect by directly applying the smoke around genital area and anus with various medicinal brewed herbs, especially worm-wood. Secondary metabolite of this plant, monoterpene, is known to facilitate circulation, exert anti-inflammatory effect, and help control pain. Herein, we report an unusual case of infectious proctitis presenting with rectal ulcer and abscess formation after perianal application of warm steam made by Artemisia asiatica smoke for treatment of dysmenorrhea.

  9. Venous ulcer review

    PubMed Central

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  10. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  11. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  12. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint.

  13. Gasterophilosis: a major cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Adako Mulugeta; Innocent, Giles; Trawford, Andrew Francis; Reid, Stuart William James; Love, Sandy

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia. Analysis of data on rectal prolapse cases obtained from the Donkey Health and Welfare Project clinic at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Addis Ababa University, from 1995 to 2004 revealed that 83.6% (n = 177) of the cases were associated with Gasterophilus nasalis. The rest 10.7% and 5.7% were associated with work-related (overloading) cause and diarrhoea, respectively. The mean and median numbers of G. nasalis recovered from the rectum of infected donkeys were 66 and 64, respectively, with a range of 2-195. Over 100 G. nasalis larvae were recovered from the rectum of 22% of the donkeys. Circular demarcated ulcer-like and deep circumferential pits or ring-like mucosal lesions were found at the larval attachment sites. G. nasalis infection and the associated rectal prolapse were observed year round. However, the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse were significantly higher during the rainy season (P < 0.01). Age and sex of the donkeys had no significant effect on the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse (P > 0.05).

  14. Rectal stricture associated with the long-term use of ibuprofen suppositories.

    PubMed

    Alsalameh, S; al-Ward, R; Berg, P; Aigner, T; Ell, C

    2000-10-01

    Here, we report the case of a 64-year-old woman who suffered from chronic lower backache for which she received ibuprofen suppositories. The patient was admitted to the hospital with a suspected rectal tumor. Clinical examination did not reveal any abnormal finding apart from a mild, bilateral peritibial edema. On rectal examination, an area of stenosis was detected approximately 7 cm above the anal verge. All laboratory parameters, including different tumor markers, were within normal range. Pelvic CT scan and colonoscopy revealed a circular rectal stenosis with severe destruction of the rectal mucosa. The rectal biopsy taken during endoscopy showed severe acute and chronic ulceration, chronic granulation and fibrosis with lymphocytic infiltration. After exclusion of sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis and lymphogranuloma venerium or exposure to drugs as a possible cause of rectal stenosis, the history in this particular case suggests that the prolonged use of the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor "ibuprofen" as a suppository is the cause of mucosal destruction and rectal stenosis.

  15. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  16. Ileocolonic ulcer treated by endoscopic application of collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone

    PubMed Central

    de Hoyos Garza, Andrés; Aguilar, Edgar A Esparza; Checa Richards, Griselda

    2007-01-01

    Ulceration is a complication that may occur after an ileocolonic anastomosis. Most of the etiologies remain speculative. The case of a 33-year-old woman with eosinophilic colitis is reported, in whom a colectomy with an ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. After four months, the patient presented with a stenosis in the ileocolonic anastomosis, necessitating surgical restoration. Four weeks later, the patient presented with rectal bleeding, and a colonoscopy showed an ulcer in the anastomosis. Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone was applied into and on the surface of the ulcer, and five days later the procedure was repeated. Follow-up endoscopies at seven days and three months showed complete healing of the ulcer and the patient remained without bleeding throughout a further four weeks of follow-up tests. It was concluded that this biological product could be an excellent treatment for these lesions. PMID:17703251

  17. Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Elena; Siegmund, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is chronically present in patients throughout their lives. Hence, the chronic nature of the disease invariably requires continuous medical treatment. Advances in medical therapy over the last decades and current developments offer increasing options and are closely associated with a better life quality in patients. Recent developments in understanding the pathogenesis of UC are discussed. The current standard therapeutic regimens are outlined and recent developments and upcoming strategies introduced. (1) Environmental factors that are yet to be defined contribute to the pathogenesis of UC. (2) An accelerated step-up therapy represents the current standard in UC. (3) Anti-integrins represent the most recently introduced pharmacological class in the therapy of UC. (4) Novel strategies including Janus kinase inhibitors are in the near future. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Patterns of colonic involvement at initial presentation in ulcerative colitis: a retrospective study of 46 newly diagnosed cases.

    PubMed

    Robert, Marie E; Skacel, Mark; Ullman, Thomas; Bernstein, Charles N; Easley, Kirk; Goldblum, John R

    2004-07-01

    Studies have shown that rectal sparing and patchiness develop in treated and longstanding ulcerative colitis (UC), making the distinction from Crohn colitis increasingly difficult after treatment is initiated. However, no histologic studies of the incidence of rectal sparing in adults at UC onset have been performed. Colectomy specimens from 46 patients with classic UC histologic features and no Crohn disease features were identified. Biopsy specimens obtained before medical therapy were retrieved and examined blindly by 2 pathologists, along with appropriate control samples. Slides were scored for chronicity (crypt branching, subcryptal plasma cells, lamina propria plasma cells) and activity (cryptitis, crypt abscesses, epithelial injury). In 28 cases, only rectal biopsy specimens were taken; for 16, rectal and at least 1 proximal biopsy specimen were taken. All cases showed rectal involvement; none had rectal sparing at initial biopsy. Of 16 cases with rectal and more proximal biopsy specimens, 5 (31%) showed relative rectal sparing (lower scores in rectum than in more proximal sites). In 16 cases with rectal and more proximal biopsy specimens, chronicity and activity scores were higher in the rectum than in more proximal sites (P = .01; chronicity and activity). The mean overall chronicity score decreased in a linear manner from rectum to cecum. The rectum is involved and shows evidence of chronicity and activity at disease onset in UC, using colectomy as the gold standard for diagnosis. Because rectal sparing at UC onset has been reported, a prospective study using uniform biopsy protocols is needed to establish the true incidence of rectal sparing at presentation.

  19. Ano-Rectal Symptoms of Sexually Transmitted Disease

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    Diseases of the anus and rectum are frequently the outcome of proctogenital and oral-anal sexual activities. These sexually transmitted diseases are more common among homosexual and bisexual men than among heterosexuals. A variety of infectious agents are responsible including viruses, bacteria, spirochetes, helminths, and protozoa. Anal warts, herpetic ulcers, and syphilitic chancres are common anal STDs. Gonorrhea, herpes, and chlamydial organisms are common causes of venereal acute proctitis. Enteric infections such as shigellosis, amebiasis, giardiasis and pinworms can be transmitted by oral-anal contact. Aggressive sexual attempts at auto-eroticism using rectally inserted foreign bodies may cause traumatic proctitis complicated by bacterial peritonitis or perirectal abscesses. PMID:21263807

  20. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors.

  1. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  2. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  3. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  4. [Colonic ulcers associated with taking Kayexalate(®) (sodium polystyrene sulfonate): about two cases].

    PubMed

    Ponroy, Bérengère; Nadal, Marion; Nardoux, Julien; Kerdraon, Rémy; Lecointre, Claire; Michenet, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    We report two cases of patients with chronic renal failure showing rectal bleeding due to digestive ulcers, associated with Kayexalate(®) alone. Kayexalate(®) crystals correspond to a typical histological picture and it is important to know how to identify them in order to discuss a possible pathogenicity.

  5. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  6. [Prevention of leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Marinović Kulisić, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Lower leg ulcers is the most common form of ulceration of the lower extremities. The prevalence of leg ulcer varies among studies from 0.1% to 0.6%. In the majority of studies, 1% of the population develop leg ulcer at least once in lifetime. The prevalence is higher in elderly people. There are several hypotheses used to explain the pathophysiological steps leading from the popliteal venous hypertension in value. Currently, the treatment of leg ulcer relies on due knowledge of ulcer pathophysiology and making an accurate diagnosis. Venous disease has a significant impact on quality of life and work productivity. In addition, costs associated with the prevention and treatment of lower leg ulcers are significant.

  7. Management of leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, P; Ballantyne, S

    2000-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a leading cause of morbidity among older subjects, especially women in the Western world. About 400 years BC, Hippocrates wrote, "In case of an ulcer, it is not expedient to stand, especially if the ulcer be situated on the leg". Hippocrates himself had a leg ulcer. The best treatment of any leg ulcer depends upon the accurate diagnosis and the underlying aetiology. The majority of leg ulcers are due to venous disease and/or arterial disease, but the treatment of the underlying cause is far more important than the choice of dressing. The aetiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and the future trends in the management of the leg ulcers are discussed in this review.
 PMID:11060140

  8. Prevalence and consultation behavior of self-reported rectal bleeding by face-to-face interview in an Asian community.

    PubMed

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Celebi, Selman; Ataseven, Huseyin; Rahman, Suheyla; Deveci, S Erhan; Acik, Yasemin

    2008-01-01

    Although rectal bleeding is a common gastrointestinal symptom, there are very few community-based studies, and all of these studies were conducted in the West. So far the epidemiologic characteristics of rectal bleeding have not been defined in an Asian country. We aimed to characterize self-reported rectal bleeding and its association with functional bowel disorders in Turkey. Factors affecting healthcare-seeking behavior were reviewed as well. In this study, 760 subjects were chosen randomly. Questionnaires were completed by nurses during face-to-face interviews with each participant. Of the 707 (93%) subjects included in this study, 9.5% had functional dyspepsia, 8.6% had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 24.5% had functional constipation, and 13.8% had functional abdominal bloating. The prevalence of rectal bleeding in the previous year was 14.7%. The recent onset of rectal bleeding was 2.7%. Rectal bleeding was more common among subjects younger than 45 years. Subjects who had functional constipation or constipation-dominant IBS reported rectal bleeding more frequently than others. The rate of consultation was only 41.3% among the subjects with rectal bleeding. Subjects aged > or =45 years and who had marked bleeding or bleeding more than twice a day or fear of cancer sought healthcare more frequently than others. Rectal bleeding is as common a symptom in Turkey as in Western countries. Advanced age and fear of cancer were independent predictors of consultation behavior in this group. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources ASCRS Textbook, 3rd Edition CARSEP® CREST® Case Study Listserv International Colon and Rectal Societies and Organizations ... Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery CARSEP® Members Case Study Listserv CREST® Young Surgeons Listserv Quality Assessment and ...

  10. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  11. [Rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sierra-Montenegro, Ernesto; Sierra-Luzuriaga, Gastón; Calle-Loffredo, Daniel; Rodríguez Quinde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: el síndrome de Trousseau se describió por primera vez en 1865; es la relación entre tromboembolismo venoso y cáncer. Objetivo: informar el caso de una paciente con cáncer de recto y síndrome de Trousseau. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 40 años de edad que acudió al servicio de Coloproctología por rectorragia indolora. La TAC reportó un tumor de 5 por 6cm y del margen anal a 5cm. Se efectuó resección anterior ultrabaja, con reservorio colónico e ileostomía de protección. El reporte de patología fue de: adenocarcinoma semidiferenciado del recto, con clasificación T3N0M0. A las 72 horas del postoperatorio tuvo hipotensión arterial súbita y distensión abdominal dolorosa. En la reintervención quirúrgica se encontró: necrosis del colon desde el ángulo esplénico hasta el reservorio colónico, con trombos en meso, signos de isquemia en el útero, trompa de Falopio y ovarios, piso pélvico y 40 cm de intestino delgado, antes de la ileostomía e íleon. Se realizó hemicolectomía izquierda y colostomía. Se trasladó a la unidad de terapia intensiva donde continuó con la administración de heparina; falleció a los cinco días por insuficiencia multiorgánica. Conclusiones: el mecanismo de este síndrome se desconoce pero existen varias hipótesis: se ha sugerido que los cánceres hematológicos son los que tienen mayor riesgo de trombosis venosa profunda. El cáncer de páncreas se relaciona con este síndrome en 50% de los casos. Se sugiere continuar con las normas de prevención del tromboembolismo.

  12. Reaginic hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, D. P.; Truelove, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Reaginic hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis has been investigated in respect of a hypersensitivity to the cow's milk proteins and the frequency of atopic asthma, hay fever, and eczema. Intradermal tests were frequently positive, especially to casein, but the results did not differ from those found in healthy individuals and in groups of patients with Crohn's disease, hypolactasia, and the irritable colon syndrome. No circulating IgE-specific antibodies to the milk proteins were found. An increased frequency of atopic diseases was found in patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (15·7%) and Crohn's disease (13·3%) compared with the findings in a control group (1·2%). It is concluded that, if an allergy to milk proteins is a factor in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, it is not mediated by reaginic antibodies. It is possible, however, that the frequent occurrence of atopy indicates a susceptibility to develop reaginic responses even though this mechanism does not apply to the milk proteins. PMID:4646293

  13. [Quality radiotherapy in rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Capirci, C; Amichetti, M; De Renzis, C

    2001-01-01

    The quality of radiotherapy significantly impacts on the results of treatment, in patients with rectal carcinoma, especially in terms of acute and late toxicity. Based on this assumption, the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology (AIRO) formulated a document aimed to define the standards of radiation treatment for rectal carcinomas. Two different levels of standard were described: a first level, considered as "minimal requirement", and a second level, considered as "optimal treatment". A retrospective evaluation, based on a questionnaire, revealed that in 1996, in most Italian Centers, patients affected by rectal carcinoma received radiation treatment within the first level of proposed standards. A subsequent analysis concerned the evaluation of the level of treatments applied in 2000. In this paper the radiotherapy standards proposed by the AIRO are described in the different phases of the radiation treatment.

  14. Ulcerative Colitis: A Challenge to Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23189226

  15. Local management of rectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Touzios, John; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of rectal neoplasia, whether benign or malignant, challenges the surgeon. The challenge in treating rectal cancer is selecting the proper approach for the appropriate patient. In a small number of rectal cancer patients local excision may be the best approach. In an attempt to achieve two goals-cure of disease with a low rate of local failure and maintenance of function and quality of life-multiple approaches can be utilized. The key to obtaining a good outcome for any one patient is balancing the competing factors that impact on these goals. Any effective treatment aimed at controlling rectal cancer in the pelvis must take into account the disease in the bowel wall itself and the disease, or potential disease, in the mesorectum. The major downside of local excision techniques is the potential of leaving untreated disease in the mesorectum. Local management techniques avoid the potential morbidity, mortality, and functional consequences of a major abdominal radical resection and are thus quite effective in achieving the maintenance of function and quality of life goal. The issue for the transanal techniques is how they fare in achieving the first goal-cure of the cancer while keeping local recurrence rates to an absolute minimum. Without removing both the rectum and the mesorectum there is no completely accurate way to determine whether a rectal cancer has moved outside the bowel wall, so any decision on local management of a rectal neoplasm is a calculated risk. For benign neoplasia, the challenge is removing the lesion without having to resort to a major abdominal procedure.

  16. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal...

  18. Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  19. Surgery for constipation: systematic review and practice recommendations: Results III: Rectal wall excisional procedures (Rectal Excision).

    PubMed

    Mercer-Jones, M; Grossi, U; Pares, D; Vollebregt, P F; Mason, J; Knowles, C H

    2017-09-01

    To assess the outcomes of rectal excisional procedures in adults with chronic constipation. Standardised methods and reporting of benefits and harms were used for all CapaCiTY reviews that closely adhered to PRISMA 2016 guidance. Main conclusions were presented as summary evidence statements with a summative Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (2009) level. Forty-seven studies were identified, providing data on outcomes in 8340 patients. Average length of procedures was 44 min and length of stay (LOS) was 3 days. There was inadequate evidence to determine variations in procedural duration or LOS by type of procedure. Overall morbidity rate was 16.9% (0-61%), with lower rates observed after Contour Transtar procedure (8.9%). No mortality was reported after any procedures in a total of 5896 patients. Although inconsistently reported, good or satisfactory outcome occurred in 73-80% of patients; a reduction of 53-91% in Longo scoring system for obstructive defecation syndrome (ODS) occurred in about 68-76% of patients. The most common long-term adverse outcome is faecal urgency, typically occurring in up to 10% of patients. Recurrent prolapse occurred in 4.3% of patients. Patients with at least 3 ODS symptoms together with a rectocoele with or without an intussusception, who have failed conservative management, may benefit from a rectal excisional procedure. Rectal excisional procedures are safe with little major morbidity. It is not possible to advise which excisional technique is superior from the point of view of efficacy, peri-operative variables, or harms. Future study is required. © 2017 The Authors. Colorectal Disease published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine E; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the anatomy of the anorectum, the MRI protocol parameters required to optimize diagnosis of rectal cancer, and the diagnostic MRI criteria essential to stage rectal cancer accurately, using the TNM staging classification. A brief review of more emerging important aspects of rectal cancer staging, such as the circumferential resection margin, extramural vascular invasion, and the staging of low rectal cancers, will also be provided. Finally, the authors will touch upon the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in the setting of locally advanced rectal cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Rectosacropexy in rectal prolapse management].

    PubMed

    Titov, A Iu; Biriukov, O M; Fomenko, O Iu; Zarodniuk, I V; Voĭnov, M A

    2016-01-01

    To compare results of rectosacropexy and posterior-loop rectopexy in rectal prolapse management. Study included 122 patients operated for rectal prolapse for the period January 2007 to August 2014. Patients' age ranged from 19 to 85 years (mean 47.3±16.1). Main group consisted of 60 (49.2%) patients who underwent rectosacropexy (D'Hoore's procedure). Control group included 62 (50.8%) patients in whom posterior-loop rectopexy was applied (Wells's procedure). Long-term results were followed-up in 94 (77.0%) patients including 48 and 46 from main and control group respectively. Recurrent prolaple incidence after rectosacropexy and posterior-loop rectopexy was 2% and 8.7% respectively. Multivariant analysis statistically confirmed that postoperative impaired colon motility was independent risk factor of recurrence. Recurrent disease is observed 5.7 times more often in this case. Rectosacropexy does not significantly impair colon motility because of ileus occurs in 8.3% of operated patients. Impovement of anal continence does not depend on rectopexy method and occurs in all patients with degree 1-2 of anal sphincter failure. Rectosacropexy may be preferred in rectal prolapse. However, further highly significant studies are necessary to optimize rectal prolapse management.

  2. Incidence and risk factors for rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Cheol; Huh, Jung Wook; Lim, Hyun Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Hui Gyeong; Bang, Yu Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to investigate the incidence of and potential risk factors for rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from 300 patients who underwent laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We assessed the presence of rectal pain and categorized patients into Group N (no rectal pain) or Group P (rectal pain). Results In total, 288 patients were included. Of these patients, 39 (13.5%) reported rectal pain and 14 (4.9%) had rectal pain that persisted for >3 months. Univariate analysis revealed that patients in Group P had more preoperative chemoradiotherapy, more ileostomies, longer operation times, more anastomotic margins of <2 cm from the anal verge, more anastomotic leakage, and longer hospital stays. Multivariate analysis identified an anastomotic margin of <2 cm from the anal verge and a long operation time as risk factors. The presence of diabetes mellitus was a negative predictor of rectal pain. Conclusions In this study, the incidence of rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery was 13.5%. An anastomotic margin of <2 cm from the anal verge and a long operation time were risk factors for rectal pain. The presence of diabetes mellitus was a negative predictor of rectal pain. Thus, the possibility of postoperative rectal pain should be discussed preoperatively with patients with these risk factors. PMID:28415928

  3. Rectal microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Adam M.; Hand, Nicholas J.; Tsoucas, Daphne M.; Le Guen, Claire L.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Friedman, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in intestinal microRNAs have been reported in adult patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. The goal of this study was to identify changes in microRNA expression associated with colitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods Rectal mucosal biopsies (n=50) and blood samples (n=47) were collected from patients with known or suspected inflammatory bowel disease undergoing endoscopy. Rectal and serum microRNA levels were profiled using the human nCounter® platform and the TaqMan® low-density array platform, respectively. Significantly altered microRNAs were then validated in independent sample sets via quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro luciferase reporter assays were performed in the human colorectal Caco-2 cell line to determine the effect of miR-192 on NOD2 expression. Results Profiling of rectal RNA identified 21 microRNAs significantly altered between control, UC, and colonic CD sample groups. Nine of the ten microRNAs selected for validation were confirmed as significantly changed. Rectal miR-24 was increased 1.47-fold in UC compared to CD samples (p=0.0052) and was the only microRNA altered between IBD subtypes. Three colitis-associated microRNAs were significantly altered in the sera of disease patients and displayed diagnostic utility. However, no serum microRNAs were found to distinguish ulcerative colitis from Crohn’s colitis. Finally, miR-192 inhibition did not affect luciferase reporter activity, suggesting miR-192 does not regulate human NOD2. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that rectal and serum microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Future studies identifying the targets of inflammatory bowel disease-associated microRNAs may lead to novel therapies. PMID:24613022

  4. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis: 5-year analyses of the EUROKIDS Registry.

    PubMed

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Sladek, Malgorzata; Murphy, M Stephen; Escher, Johanna C

    2013-02-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification. Information was collected from the EUROKIDS Registry, an inception cohort of untreated pediatric IBD patients undergoing evaluation at diagnosis. Patients with IBD-unclassified were excluded. Patients with isolated Crohn's colitis served as a control group. Data from 898 pediatric patients (643 UC, 255 CD colitis) were included. Extensive or pancolitis was present in 77% of UC patients and macroscopic rectal sparing in 5%. Rectal sparing was inversely associated with age (mean age with rectal sparing 9.9 years vs. 11.8 without; P = 0.02). Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) involvement occurred in 4% of patients. Erosions in the stomach were present in 3.1% of children, but frank ulcerations in 0.4%; 0.8% of children had erosions or ulcerations limited to the esophagus or duodenum. The corresponding UGI involvement in Crohn's colitis was 22%. A cecal patch occurred in 2% of patients. Extensive disease and rectal sparing are age-dependent phenotypes in pediatric UC. Rectal sparing, cecal patch, backwash ileitis, and gastric erosions are not uncommon at diagnosis, while gastric ulcerations and erosions in the duodenum or esophagus are. Recognition of atypical phenotypes in pediatric-onset UC is crucial to prevent misclassification of IBD.

  5. [Abomasal ulcers in cattle].

    PubMed

    Hund, Alexandra; Wittek, Thomas

    2017-03-29

    Abomasal ulcers lead to several problems. They cause pain resulting in a decrease in productivity and even the possible loss of the animal. Because they are frequently difficult to diagnose, information on their prevalence is variable. Additionally, therapeutic options are limited. Abomasal ulcers are graded as type 1 through 4, type 1 being a superficial defect and type 2 an ulcer where a large blood vessel has been eroded, leading to substantial blood loss. Types 3 and 4 are perforated abomasal ulcers leading to local and diffuse peritonitis, respectively. Causes of abomasal ulcers are multifactorial, for example, mistakes in feeding that lead to gastrointestinal disturbances or other diseases that induce stress. Ulcers can also result from side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In principal, the pathophysiological cause is the disturbance of the balance between protective and aggressive mechanisms at the abomasal mucosa due to stress. Clinical symptoms vary and are mostly non-specific. Fecal occult blood tests, hematology and blood chemistry as well as ultrasonographic examination and abdominocentesis can help to establish the diagnosis. Ulcers can be treated symptomatically, surgically and medically. To prevent abomasal ulcers, animals should be kept healthy by providing adequate nutrition and housing as well as early and effective medical care. Stressful management practices, including transport and commingling, should be avoided.

  6. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  7. Proctocolectomy without ileostomy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, A G; Nicholls, R J

    1978-01-01

    An operation has been developed that permits total removal of all disease-prone mucosa in ulcerative colitis but avoids the need for a permanent ileostomy. The colon and upper half of the rectum are excised and the remaining inflamed mucosa is stripped from the rectal stump down to the dentate line of the anal canal. A pouch is fashioned from a triplicated loop of terminal ileum. This is drawn down through the denuded rectum and an anastomosis created, via the per-anal approach, between the ileum just distal to the pouch and the mid-anal canal. A temporary ileostomy is made. Out of eight patients so treated, five were available for assessment, and four of them were highly satisfied with the result in improved health and function. The remaining three were awaiting closure of their ileostomies. Images FIG 3 PMID:667572

  8. [Ulcers of lower limb veins: venous ulcers].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; Moraleja Millán, Tania; Mateos García, Marina; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; López Corral, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The lower extremity vascular ulcers currently represent a major public health problem, particularly because of different situations: the chronic nature of the injury, a poor response to treatment, recurrence rates, high absenteeism, poor training in some cases of the health staff that treats, etc. Lower extremity ulcers mean a serious personal, family, health and social problem, with a significant expenditure of human and material resources. Since the prevalence and incidence of lower extremity vascular ulcers is high worldwide, it is necessary to go into detail about the knowledge of the epidemiology and to favour, in different countries, the creation of interdisciplinary research groups that addresses issues related to risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment, health care costs, quality of life and, above all, specialized training aimed at health professionals.

  9. Peptic ulcer disease today.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhong; Padol, Ireneusz T; Hunt, Richard H

    2006-02-01

    Over the past few decades, since the introduction of histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors, cyclo-oxygenase-2-selective anti-inflammatory drugs (coxibs), and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection, the incidence of peptic ulcer disease and ulcer complications has decreased. There has, however, been an increase in ulcer bleeding, especially in elderly patients. At present, there are several management issues that need to be solved: how to manage H. pylori infection when eradication failure rates are high; how best to prevent ulcers developing and recurring in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and aspirin users; and how to treat non-NSAID, non-H. pylori-associated peptic ulcers. Looking for H. pylori infection, the overt or surreptitious use of NSAIDs and/or aspirin, and the possibility of an acid hypersecretory state are important diagnostic considerations that determine the therapeutic approach. Combined treatment with antisecretory therapy and antibiotics for 1-2 weeks is the first-line choice for H. pylori eradication therapy. For patients at risk of developing an ulcer or ulcer complications, it is important to choose carefully which anti-inflammatory drugs, nonselective NSAIDs or coxibs to use, based on a risk assessment of the patient, especially if the high-risk patient also requires aspirin. Testing for and eradicating H. pylori infection in patients is recommended before starting NSAID therapy, and for those currently taking NSAIDs, when there is a history of ulcers or ulcer complications. Understanding the pathophysiology and best treatment strategies for non-NSAID, non-H. pylori-associated peptic ulcers presents a challenge.

  10. Rectal dose to prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy with or without rectal spacer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Polf, Jerimy; Badiyan, Shahed; Biagioli, Matthew; Fernandez, Daniel; Latifi, Kujtim; Wilder, Richard; Mehta, Minesh; Chuong, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a spacer inserted in the prerectal space could reduce modeled rectal dose and toxicity rates for patients with prostate cancer treated in silico with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. A total of 20 patients were included in this study who received photon therapy (12 with rectal spacer (DuraSeal™ gel) and 8 without). Two PBS treatment plans were retrospectively created for each patient using the following beam arrangements: (1) lateral-opposed (LAT) fields and (2) left and right anterior oblique (LAO/RAO) fields. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the prostate, rectum, bladder, and right and left femoral heads. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model and compared between patients with and without the rectal spacer. A significantly lower mean rectal DVH was achieved in patients with rectal spacer compared to those without. For LAT plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 4.19 and 13.5%, respectively. For LAO/RAO plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 5.07 and 13.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found in any rectal dosimetric parameters between the LAT and the LAO/RAO plans generated with the rectal spacers. We found that ≥ 9 mm space resulted in a significant decrease in NTCP modeled for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity. Rectal spacers can significantly decrease modeled rectal dose and predicted ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated in silico with PBS. A minimum of 9 mm separation between the prostate and anterior rectal wall yields the largest benefit.

  11. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  12. Incidence and prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Punjab, North India

    PubMed Central

    Sood, A; Midha, V; Sood, N; Bhatia, A S; Avasthi, G

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Ulcerative colitis occurs worldwide. It is considered common in most of Europe and North America and uncommon in most of the developing Asian countries. The incidence/prevalence of ulcerative colitis varies not only according to geographical region but also with race and ethnicity. There are no reported data from India on the incidence of the disease and its prevalence. Material and methods: A house to house survey was conducted by questionnaire, formulated to enquire about symptoms that are suggestive of ulcerative colitis. Those with prolonged diarrhoea with or without rectal bleeding were considered as suspected cases. These suspected cases were subjected to video sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy and rectal biopsy. In addition, patients already diagnosed and receiving treatment for ulcerative colitis, encountered during the survey, were reviewed. Resurvey of the same areas was conducted after a one year interval to detect new cases. Using direct methods, standardised rates were calculated using world standard population weights 22, 18, 16, 12, 12, 9, 7, 3, and 1 for each 10 year age group. Standardised rates were also obtained separately for males, females, and combined populations, using the Punjab state 1991 population census data. Rates were also estimated according to UK 2000 population data. Ninety five per cent confidence intervals (95% CI) of prevalence and incidence rates of ulcerative colitis were estimated under the assumption that the distribution of cases followed a Poisson probability model. Results: A total population of 51 910 were screened from January to March 1999. We identified 147 suspected cases and of these 23 were finally established as ulcerative colitis cases, giving a crude prevalence rate of 44.3 per 100 000 inhabitants (95% CI 29.4–66.6). A second visit to the same areas after one year identified 10 suspected cases in a population of 49 834. Of these, three were confirmed as “definite” ulcerative colitis giving a crude

  13. Abdominal and scrotal wall emphysema in a patient with severe ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manik; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Hilli, Shatha Al; Kaabi, Saad Al

    2014-07-01

    Severe ulcerative colitis can be associated with bowel perforation. Bowel perforation rarely leads on to abdominal wall and scrotal wall emphysema. Bowel perforation in such cases can be spontaneous or iatrogenic (colonoscopy-related). We report a rare scenario where a patient presented with abdominal wall and scrotal emphysema after topical corticosteroid enema-induced traumatic rectal perforation. Topical corticosteroids were stopped immediately after identification of rectal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics. With this report we intend to sensitise clinicians and topical enema manufacturers regarding this rare complication.

  14. Paraneoplastic leukocytosis associated with a rectal adenomatous polyp in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J P; Christopher, M M; Ellison, G W; Homer, B L; Buchanan, B A

    1992-09-01

    A dog with a rectal adenomatous polyp had extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, monocytosis, and eosinophilia consistent with a paraneoplastic syndrome. Resolution of the leukogram abnormalities after tumor excision supported this belief. Except for a lack of circulating myeloblasts, the dog had leukogram findings consistent with a neutrophilic leukemoid reaction.

  15. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  16. A practical guide to the management of distal ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ardizzone, S; Bianchi Porro, G

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the role of corticosteroids, sulfasalazine and mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid, mesalamine), immunosuppressive agents and alternative novel drugs for the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. Short cycles of traditional, rectally administered corticosteroids (methylprednisolone, betamethasone, hydrocortisone) are effective for the treatment of mild to moderately active distal ulcerative colitis. In this context, their systemic administration is limited to patients who are refractory to either oral 5-amino-salicylates, topical mesalazine or topical corticosteroids. Of no value in maintaining remission, the long term use of either or topical corticosteroids may be hazardous. A new class of topically acting corticosteroids [budesonide, fluticasone, beclomethasone dipropionate, prednisolone-21-methasulphobenzoate, tixocortol (tixocortol pivalate)] represents a valid alternative for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis, and may be useful in the treatment of refractory distal ulcerative colitis. Although there is controversy concerning dosage or duration of therapy, oral and topical mesalazine is effective in the treatment of mild to moderately active distal ulcerative colitis. Sulfasalazine and mesalazine remain the first-choice drugs for the maintenance therapy of distal ulcerative colitis. Evidence exists showing a trend to a higher remission rate with higher doses of oral mesalazine. Topical mesalazine (suppositories or enemas) also is effective in maintenance treatment. For patients with chronically active or corticosteroid-dependent disease, azathioprine and mercaptopurine are effective in reducing either the need for corticosteroids or clinical relapses. Moreover, they are effective for long term maintenance remission. Cyclosporin may be useful in inducing remission in patients with acutely severe disease who do not achieve remission with an intensive intravenous regimen. Existing data suggest that azathioprine and mercaptopurine may

  17. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-09-26

    Laparoscopic surgery has gained acceptance as a less invasive approach in the treatment of colon cancer. However, laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer, particularly cancer of the lower rectum, is still challenging because of limited accessibility. Robotic surgery overcomes the limitations of laparoscopy associated with anatomy and offers certain advantages, including 3-D imaging, dexterity and ambidextrous capability, lack of tremors, motion scaling, and a short learning curve. Robotic rectal surgery has been reported to reduce conversion rates, particularly in low anterior resection, but it is associated with longer operative times than the conventional laparoscopic approach. Postoperative morbidities are similar between the robotic and conventional laparoscopic approaches, and oncological outcomes such as the quality of the mesorectum and the status of resection margins are also equivalent. The possible superiority of robotic surgery in terms of the preservation of autonomic function has yet to be established in research based on larger numbers of patients. Although robotic rectal surgery is safe, feasible, and appears to overcome some of the technical limitations associated with conventional laparoscopic surgery, the advantages provided by this technical innovation are currently limited. To justify its expensive cost, robotic surgery is more suitable for select patients, such as obese patients, men, those with cancer of the lower rectum, and those receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Ulcerating type 1 lepra reaction mimicking lazarine leprosy: an unusual presentation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramesh; Pinto, Malcolm; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Kambil, Srinath

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy maybe "unmasked" in the context of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and treating dermatologists, particularly in highly endemic areas for Hansen's disease, need to be cognizant to this possibility. It may also reflect emergence of a previously clinically silent infection in the course of immunologic restoration.

  19. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, Peter; Chan, Francis K L; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2009-10-24

    Peptic ulcer disease had a tremendous effect on morbidity and mortality until the last decades of the 20th century, when epidemiological trends started to point to an impressive fall in its incidence. Two important developments are associated with the decrease in rates of peptic ulcer disease: the discovery of effective and potent acid suppressants, and of Helicobacter pylori. With the discovery of H pylori infection, the causes, pathogenesis, and treatment of peptic ulcer disease have been rewritten. We focus on this revolution of understanding and management of peptic ulcer disease over the past 25 years. Despite substantial advances, this disease remains an important clinical problem, largely because of the increasingly widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin. We discuss the role of these agents in the causes of ulcer disease and therapeutic and preventive strategies for drug-induced ulcers. The rare but increasingly problematic H pylori-negative NSAID-negative ulcer is also examined.

  20. Classification of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Yarkony, G M; Kirk, P M; Carlson, C; Roth, E J; Lovell, L; Heinemann, A; King, R; Lee, M Y; Betts, H B

    1990-09-01

    Several systems exist for classifying pressure ulcers, though none of them have been evaluated for interrater reliability. A new grading scale was compared with the commonly used Shea classification. This new scale was developed to provide a more complete description of pressure ulcer healing. The advantages of this scale include a classification of red areas as ulcers to help prevent further deterioration and classification of healed sores to note potential problems. The Yarkony-Kirk scale classifies a red area as a grade 1 ulcer, and involvement of the epidermis and dermis with no subcutaneous fat observed as a grade 2 ulcer. Grade 3 indicates exposed subcutaneous fat with no muscle observed. Exposed muscle without bone involvement is classified as a grade 4 ulcer, and grade 5 describes exposed bone with no joint space involvement. Grade 6 indicates joint space involvement. There is a classification of pressure sore healed to indicate a healed pressure ulcer. Interrater reliability was assessed by two nurses. In spite of an increased number of categories for the Yarkony-Kirk scale, there was no decline in reliability. Reliability was excellent with an interrater correlation of 0.90 for the Yarkony-Kirk scale and 0.86 for the Shea classification when measured for 72 patients. Eighty-five percent of the ratings for the Yarkony-Kirk scale were identical, whereas only 68% were identical for the Shea classification. Three percent of the ratings for the Shea classification were greater than +/- 1 category; 6% of the ratings for the Yarkony-Kirk scale were greater than +/- 1 category. This scale appears to possess good reliability and to describe pressure ulcers more completely. This scale may also be used to teach prevention activities as well as ulcer classification.

  1. Corneal ulcers in horses.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynn B; Pinard, Chantale L

    2013-01-01

    Corneal ulceration is commonly diagnosed by equine veterinarians. A complete ophthalmic examination as well as fluorescein staining, corneal cytology, and corneal bacterial (aerobic) and fungal culture and sensitivity testing are necessary for all infected corneal ulcers. Appropriate topical antibiotics, topical atropine, and systemic NSAIDs are indicated for all corneal ulcers. If keratomalacia (melting) is observed, anticollagenase/antiprotease therapy, such as autologous serum, is indicated. If fungal infection is suspected, antifungal therapy is a necessity. Subpalpebral lavage systems allow convenient, frequent, and potentially long-term therapy. Referral corneal surgeries provide additional therapeutic options when the globe's integrity is threatened or when improvement has not been detected after appropriate therapy.

  2. Hemoglobinopathies and Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-09-01

    Major hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell anemia, are becoming a global health issue. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of sickle cell disease and an important contributor to morbidity burden in this population. Leg ulcers following sickling disorders are extremely painful, and hard to heal. The clinical evidence for the optimal management of these ulcers is limited. Treating the cause and the strategies to prevent sickling are the mainstay of treatment. The basic principles of wound bed preparation and compression therapy is beneficial in these patients.

  3. Penile metastases of rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Persec, Z; Persec, J; Sovic, T; Rako, D; Savic, I; Marinic, D K

    2014-02-01

    Penile metastases are very rare and arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers. Penile metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma are less common and only 50 or so cases have been reported. We present a 43-year-old man with penile metastases from a rectal adenocarcinoma. Two years before admittance to our department, abdomino-perineal resection of the rectum (Miles operation) was performed for a Dukes B (T3N0M0) rectal adenocarcinoma; the surgical resection margins wee negative. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment were administered. One year after initial management, excision of a local recurrence was performed followed by further chemotherapy. The patient subsequently noticed lesions of the penis measuring up to 1.2 cm in diameter. Biopsy revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography showed normal structure of penis with subcutaneous nodular thickening. Soon thereafter, the entire shaft of the penis becomes indurated and the patient developed urinary obstruction. A suprapubic cystostomy was performed. The patient died within 6 months. Penile metastases arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers, primarily from the bladder and the prostate gland. Metastasis to the penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma occurs much less commonly. Other reported primary origins of penile metastases include malignancies of the lung, nasopharynx and melanoma. The major symptoms are penile nodular mass, malignant priapism, penile pain and tenderness, difficulty in micturition, and urinary retention. Possible routes of metastasis are arterial, retrograde venous spread, retrograde lymphatic spread, but direct tumor infiltration/extension is also possible. Penile metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma usually occur within 2 years after diagnosis of the primary tumor. The prognosis is very poor regardless of treatment modality. Treatment is more often palliative than curative. Survival usually varies from 7 months to 2 years. Long-term survival (9 years) has been

  4. Robotic rectal surgery: what are the benefits?

    PubMed

    Kim, C W; Baik, S H

    2013-10-01

    Robotic rectal surgery is not a rare event for colorectal surgeons any more. Even patients with colorectal diseases obtain information through the mass media and are asking surgeons about robotic surgery. Since laparoscopic rectal surgery has proved to have some benefits compared to open rectal surgery, many surgeons became interested in robotic rectal surgery. Some of them have reported the advantages and disadvantages of robotic rectal surgery over the last decade. This review will report on the outcomes of robotic rectal surgery. Robotic rectal surgery requires a longer operation time than laparoscopic or open surgery, but many authors reduced the gap as they were accustomed to the robotic system and used various additional techniques. The high cost for purchasing and maintaining the robotic system is still a problem, though. However, except for this reason, robotic rectal surgery shows comparable and even superior results in some parameters than laparoscopic or open surgery. They include pathologic and functional outcomes as well as short-term outcomes such as complication rates, length of hospital stay, time to recover normal bowel function or first flatus, time to start diet, and postoperative pain. Moreover, studies on oncologic outcomes show acceptable results. Robotic rectal surgery is safe and feasible and has a number of benefits. Therefore, it can be an alternative option to conventional laparoscopic and open surgery with strict indications.

  5. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  6. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  7. UNUSUAL CAUSES OF CUTANEOUS ULCERATION

    PubMed Central

    Panuncialman, Jaymie; Falanga, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Skin ulceration is a major source of morbidity and is often difficult to manage. Ulcers due to an inflammatory etiology or microvascular occlusion are particularly challenging in terms of diagnosis and treatment. The management of such ulcers requires careful assessment of associated systemic conditions and a thorough analysis of the ulcer's clinical and histologic findings. In this report, we discuss several examples of inflammatory ulcers and the approach to their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21074034

  8. Multiple colonic ulcers associated with trisomy 8: serial changes in colonoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shunichi; Nakamura, Shotaro; Kawasaki, Keisuke; Ito, Shigeki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2016-10-01

    We report a 54-year-old female patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with trisomy 8, who had multiple colonic ulcers. The patient had been diagnosed as having MDS of refractory cytopenia with trisomy 8 10 years previously. She underwent colonoscopy for abdominal pain, which revealed severe circumferential stenosis with multiple ulcers in the ileocecal region and a discrete excavating ulcer in the transverse colon. The patient had been free from any dermatological, oral, genital or ocular symptoms suggestive of Behçet's disease (BD). A diagnosis of multiple colonic ulcers associated with MDS with trisomy 8 was thus suggested. Follow-up colonoscopies 5 and 6 years later revealed progression of the ileocecal stenosis to a circumferential ulcer, while the ulcer in the transverse colon had not changed. Because our patient lacked extraintestinal symptoms of BD, trisomy 8 was presumed to be responsible for her colonic ulcers.

  9. Association between venous leg ulcers and sex chromosome anomalies in men.

    PubMed

    Gattringer, Cornelia; Scheurecker, Christine; Höpfl, Reinhard; Müller, Hansgeorg

    2010-11-01

    We report here two cases of men, aged 46 and 23 years, with refractory chronic venous leg ulcers in association with sex chromosome aberrations: one with a 47,XXY/48,XXXY karyotype (Klinefelter syndrome) and the other with a 47,XYY karyotype (Jacob syndrome). In both patients, the occurrence of leg ulcers was the reason for seeking medical care; their medical history was other-wise unremarkable. Chromosomal analyses were performed due to the unusually young age for development of venous leg ulcers. The pathophysiology behind the occurrence of venous leg ulcers in patients with numerical aberrations of the sex chromosomes is incompletely understood. Involvement of elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in the pathogenesis of venous leg ulcers has been reported in patients with Klinefelter syndrome. Notably, our patient with 47,XXY/48,XXXY presented with androgen deficiency but normal plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity.

  10. Rectal mucosal endometriosis primarily misinterpreted as adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Qiuping; Liu, Shaoyan; Xiong, Hanzhen; Jiang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis involving intestinal mucosa is relatively uncommon. It poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and pathologists. We herein report a case of colonoscopic specimen revealing rectal mucosal endometriosis. A 39-year-old woman complained of red rectal bleeding and intermittent abdominal pain. Colonoscopic examination showed a rectal mass with ulceration and circum wall involvement. Biopsy was processed in the suspicious of carcinoma. Morphologically, irregular glands replaced residual colorectal ones, displayed mucin depletion, nuclear stratification and subtile subnuclear vacuoles. The stroma was full of spindle cells with abundant pink cytoplasm and unclear boundary. Due to subjectively interpreting as dysplastic glands in desmoplastic setting, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was firstly raised. Immunohistochemically, CK7, ER and CD10 identified the essence of ectopic endometrium. CK20 and CDX2 highlighted residual glands. In case of misdiagnosis, any pathologists should be aware of intestinal endometriosis for each female’s colorectal biopsy, especially for that morphology not typical for primary adenocarcinoma or endometriosis. Reading slides carefully combined with a panel of immunomarkers would solve the pitfall. PMID:26191316

  11. Helical (spiral) CT in the evaluation of emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, S; Stuk, J L; Kaufman, J A

    1999-05-01

    For the near future, CT will play the critical and dominant role in the evaluation of patients presenting with emergent aortic syndromes. Its convenience, accuracy, and utility in the rapid evaluation of not just the aorta, but the entire thorax, make it ideally suited for use in emergency settings. Further benefits are likely to be realized in speed and resolution with multislice CT, although it is as yet not widely available.

  12. Homicide by decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vincent J M; Di Maio, Theresa G

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, the only penalties for poor treatment of nursing home patients have been civil lawsuits against nursing homes and their employees by families, or fines and license suspension by government organizations. Recently, government agencies have become much more aggressive in citing institutions for the development of decubitus ulcers (pressure sores) in their patients. A few government institutions have concluded that in some cases, the development of ulcers with resultant death is so grievous that there should be criminal prosecution of the individuals and/or institutions providing care. A leader in this concept has been the State of Hawaii. In November 2000, the State of Hawaii convicted an individual of manslaughter in the death of a patient at an adult residential care home (a form of nursing home) for permitting the progression of decubitus ulcers without seeking medical help, and for not bringing the patient back to a physician for treatment of the ulcers.

  13. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lose weight or your diet becomes very limited. Stress You may feel worried about having a bowel ... DB. Ulcerative colitis practice guidelines in adults: American College Of Gastroenterology, Practice Parameters Committee. Am J Gastroenterol . ...

  14. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  15. Esophageal ulcer of unknown origin complicated by left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamagami, Shinichiro; Hayakawa, Daisuke; Takashima, Shiori; Nomura, Osamu; Sai, Eiryu; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Matsuyama, Shujiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma induces the onset of paraneoplastic syndromes by excreting various humoral mediators and is therefore known to present with diverse symptoms. A 40-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of an esophageal ulcer, the cause of which could not be identified on various examinations. Notably, a left atrial tumor was incidentally found on chest enhanced computed tomography. The esophageal ulcer, which was intractable to conventional therapy, improved with the administration of 5-aminosalicylate, a drug known to inhibit IL-1β. This inhibitory action effectively suppressed the development of myxoma-induced paraneoplastic syndrome.

  16. Ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica as a rare cause for chronic leg ulcers: case report series of ten patients.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Cindy; Stoffels-Weindorf, Maren; Hillen, Uwe; Dissemond, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica is a rare granulomatous disorder of the skin. In up to 30% of the affected patients it can lead to ulcerations, which can impair the quality of life and are also very difficult to treat. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Only few studies focussing on necrobiosis lipoidica can be found, but none of them focus on ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica. Therefore, we collected demographic data and comorbidities and assessed treatment options for patients with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica. Data of patients who were treated in the wound care centre of the University Hospital of Essen for ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica over the past 10 years were retrospectively analysed. Hence, data of altogether ten patients (nine women and one man) with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica were collected. Of these, 70% of the patients had diabetes mellitus of which 30% had type I diabetes and 40% had type II diabetes; 60% of the patients suffered from arterial hypertension, obesity and hypercholesterolaemia; 40% of the patients suffered from psychiatric disorders such as depression and borderline disorder. Our clinical data demonstrate an association of ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica and aspects of metabolic syndrome. This leads to a conclusion that ulcerating necrobiosis lipoidica can be seen as part of a generalised inflammatory reaction similar to the inflammatory reaction already known in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid diseases or psoriasis. In patients with clinical atypical painful ulcerations, necrobiosis lipoidica should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Therapists should be aware of associated aspects in patients with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica who besides diabetes often suffer from other aspects of a metabolic syndrome with increased cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, these related comorbidities should also be diagnosed and treated.

  17. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  18. Multidisciplinary management in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervás Morón, Asunción; García de Paredes, María Luisa; Lobo Martínez, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of rectal cancer has evolved over the last few decades from surgery alone to treatments with trimodal therapy for high-risk patients. The involvement of a multidisciplinary team of radiologists, pathologists, surgeons, radiotherapists and medical oncologists is now fundamental for decision-making and outcomes. The evolution of different diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has optimised the therapeutic rate. Future studies will determine the optimal regimen for inducing complete responses in locally advanced disease and whether the intensification of local treatments could enable the use of more conservative treatments, as for other tumour locations. The study of biomarkers will be essential in this respect.

  19. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors.

  20. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  1. For your information: pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (also called bedsores) affect 3% to 11% of hospital and nursing home patients. Although most seen in the elderly, these ulcers can also occur in younger people who are unable to move about following musculoskeletal or neurological damage. Despite the belief that pressure ulcers are caused by neglect and inattention by hospital or nursing home personnel, even the most diligent nursing care may still not be able to prevent pressure ulcers. Increased understanding of the formation, treatment, and prevention of pressure ulcers by family members, home caregivers, and handicapped individuals can be a great help to those who suffer from these ulcers.

  2. Major Pelvic Bleeding Following a Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection: Use of Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Keane, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) and stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) are well-established techniques for treating rectal prolapse and obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Occasionally, they can be associated with severe complications. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent STARR for ODS and developed a postoperative pelvic hemorrhage. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast pelvic, retroperitoneal hematoma and free gas in the abdomen. Laparoscopy ruled out any bowel lesions, but identified a hematoma of the pelvis. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a small leakage of the rectal suture. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered completely. Surgeons performing STARR and SH must be aware of the risk of this rare, but severe, complication. If the patient is not progressing after a STARR or SH, a CT scan can be indicated to rule out intra-abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage. Laparoscopy is a diagnostic tool and should be associated with intraluminal exploration with flexible sigmoidoscopy. PMID:27847791

  3. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  4. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  5. [Rectal administration of anesthetic agents].

    PubMed

    Ceriana, P; Maurelli, M

    1995-05-01

    To collect data in the current literature dealing with the diffusion, the reliability and the effectiveness of the rectal administration of anaesthetic drugs. To evaluate differences with parenteral administration. Pharmacokinetics and clinical studies published in recent years in indexed journals. Based on the study methodology, drugs employed and pharmacokinetic parameters evaluated. Factors involved in absorption of drugs from the rectal mucosa, clinical effect and pharmacokinetic data of the following drugs: diazepam, flunitrazepam, midazolam, ketamin and methohexital, then a brief evaluation of other drugs: thiopental, etomidate, morphine and chloral hydrate. The most widely used drugs are benzodiazepines: they are safe, easy to manage and highly effective; among them midazolam has the best kinetic and dynamic pattern. Ketamin is useful during painful diagnostic procedures; with the use of barbiturates there is a greater risk of respiratory depression and more caution must be employed. Wide intervariability of rate of absorption, achievement of plasma levels and clinical effect is a relevant drawback of this technique, such to make it not preferable to the parenteral route, when both are feasible. It deserves, anyway, more consideration, and maintains its validity for the preparation of the paediatric patient to general anaesthesia.

  6. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  7. Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vuorisalo, S; Venermo, M; Lepäntalo, M

    2009-06-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are a major health care problem. Complications of foot ulcers are a leading cause of hospitalization and amputation in diabetic patients. Diabetic ulcers result from neuropathy or ischemia. Neuropathy is characterized by loss of protective sensation and biomechanical abnormalities. Lack of protective sensation allows ulceration in areas of high pressure. Autonomic neuropathy causes dryness of the skin by decreased sweating and therefore vulnerability of the skin to break down. Ischemia is caused by peripheral arterial disease, not by microangiopathy. Poor arterial inflow decreases blood supply to ulcer area and is associated with reduced oxygenation, nutrition and ulcer healing. Necrotic tissue is laden with bacteria apt to grow in such an environment, which also impairs general defence mechanisms against infection. Infections often complicate existing ulcers, but are seldom the cause for ulcers. Protective footwear helps to reduce ulceration in diabetic feet at risk. Relieving pressure on the ulcer area is necessary to allow healing. Blood supply needs to be improved by revascularisation whenever compromised. Systemic antibiotics are helpful in treating acute foot infections, but not uninfected ulcers. Osteomyelitis may underlie a diabetic ulcer and is often treated by resection of the infected bone and always by antibiotics, the mode and length of treatment depending on the adequacy of the debridement. The aim of ulcer bed preparation is to convert the molecular and cellular environment of the chronic ulcer to that of an acute healing wound by debridement, irrigating and cleaning. Moist dressings maintain wound environment favorable for healing. All attempts should be done to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and treat existing ulcers by multidisciplinary teams in order to decrease amputations. Indeed, improvement in ulcer healing has been observed with primary healing rates of 65-85% in mixed series. Even when healed, diabetic foot should be

  8. [A Case of Peristomal Cutaneous Ulcer Following Amebic Colitis Caused by Entamoeba histolytica].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Jun; Kobayashi, Seiki; Sato, Tomotaka

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese male with a history of a rectal ulcer and rectovesical fistula following brachytherapy and radiotherapy for prostate cancer, who had undergone colostomy and vesicotomy presented with a painful peristomal ulcer of approximately 5 x 2.5cm adjacent to the direction of 6 o'clock of the stoma in his left lower abdomen. Although he was admitted to be treated with intravenous antibiotics and topical debridement, the ulcer was rapidly increasing. In the laboratory findings, WBC was 12,400/μL, CRP was 16.9 mg/dL, ESR was 105mm in the first hour. Contrast enhanced CT images showed a wide high density area of skin and subcutaneous tissue around the stoma and dillitation of the transverse and descending colon. Colonoscopy showed furred profound ulcers in the rectum. A biopsy from the ulcer floor submitted to histopathology showed necrotic tissue with a mixed inflammatory infiltrates mainly composed of neutrophils and lymphocytes in the dermis. We suspected pyoderma gangrenosum with an inflammatory bowel disease in the beginning. Although he was started on oral prednisolone 60 mg daily, the ulcer did not respond to treatment. Additional methylprednisolone pulse therapy, intravenous cyclosporine and granulocytapheresis were also ineffective. A biopsy specimen from the skin ulcer margin showed erythrophagocytosis by trophozoites of amebae which were identified on PAS stained slides. The PCR method and stool examination showed positive for Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), but serum antibodies were negative. Within two weeks of treatment with oral metronidazole 2,250 mg/day and topical metronidazole ointment, resolution of the ulcer was observed, then the prednisolone dosage was tapered. A split-thickness skin graft was used to cover the ulcer with a successful result. Even though we originally misdiagnosed this case, we finally reached a diagnosis of amebiasis. It is important to take account of amebiasis in the differential diagnosis of intractable

  9. [Development of a perforated peptic ulcer in a child during high dose prednisolone treatment].

    PubMed

    Moll Harboe, Kirstine; Midtgaard, Helle; Wewer, Vibeke; Cortes, Dina

    2012-09-24

    Since perforated peptic ulcer is uncommon in children proton pump inhibitor prophylaxis is not routinely recommended when children are treated with high dose steroids. We describe a case of perforated ulcer in a six-year-old patient with nephrotic syndrome treated with high dose prednisolone. Initially, ulcer was not suspected due to uncharacteristic symptoms. The child developed peritoneal signs and surgery revealed a perforated peptic ulcer in the stomach. We recommend treatment with proton pump inhibitors if children, who are treated with high dose steroids develop abdominal symptoms, which can be caused by an ulcus.

  10. Colonic J pouch neo-rectum versus straight anastomosis for low rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Parray, F Q; Farouqi, U; Wani, M L; Chowdri, N A; Shaheen, F

    2014-01-01

    The development of sphincter saving procedures for low carcinoma rectum has been the consequence of oncological and technological factors. The major disadvantage associated with these procedures is the development of anterior resection syndrome because of the resection of rectal reservoir. Colonic J pouch (CJP) neorectum has been practiced as an antidote to overcome this problem. We are working at a tertiary care center, which is a high volume center for rectal cancers. We thought it worthwhile to assess the efficacy of J Pouch neorectum viz.-a-viz. a straight coloanal anastomosis for low rectal cancers. Hospital based prospective randomized study (June 2007-December 2009) low rectal cancers (4-12 cm from the anal verge). One group (20 patients) subjected to low/ultralow anterior resection with straight anastomosis (SA) and other group (22 patients) to CJP. The two groups were compared on the basis of functional outcome. Anastomotic leak, strictures, frequency of bowel movements, nocturnal bowel movements, use of retarding medication and incontinence to solids, liquids and gases were seen more in SA group. All these findings were statistically significant. We conclude that CJP has a significant functional advantage over SA and improves the overall quality-of-life in patients of low rectal cancers and the advantage persisted over a period of more than 30 months.

  11. Baseline Oral 5-ASA Use and Efficacy and Safety of Budesonide Foam in Patients with Ulcerative Proctitis and Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis: Analysis of 2 Phase 3 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandborn, William J.; Rubin, David T.; Harper, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rectal budesonide foam is a second-generation corticosteroid efficacious for active mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. This subgroup analysis examined the impact of baseline oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) on the efficacy and safety of budesonide foam in patients with mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis or ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. Methods: Patients received budesonide foam 2 mg/25 mL twice daily for 2 weeks, then once daily for 4 weeks, or placebo, with or without continued stable dosing of baseline oral 5-ASAs, for remission induction at week 6 (primary endpoint) in 2 identically designed, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 studies. Results: Of the 267 and 279 patients randomized to treatment with budesonide foam or placebo (pooled population), 55.1% and 55.2%, respectively, reported baseline 5-ASA use. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved remission with budesonide foam versus placebo, either with (42.2% versus 31.8%, respectively; P = 0.03) or without (40.0% versus 14.4%; P < 0.0001) baseline 5-ASA use at week 6. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved a Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index rectal bleeding subscale score of 0 at week 6, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use (5-ASA, 50.3% versus 35.7%; P = 0.003: no 5-ASA, 45.8% versus 19.2%; P < 0.0001). The frequency of adverse events was comparable between groups, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use. Conclusions: Budesonide foam was efficacious and safe for induction of remission of mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis in patients receiving oral 5-ASA at baseline and those who were not (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01008410 and NCT01008423). PMID:27416045

  12. Baseline Oral 5-ASA Use and Efficacy and Safety of Budesonide Foam in Patients with Ulcerative Proctitis and Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis: Analysis of 2 Phase 3 Studies.

    PubMed

    Bosworth, Brian P; Sandborn, William J; Rubin, David T; Harper, Joseph R

    2016-08-01

    Rectal budesonide foam is a second-generation corticosteroid efficacious for active mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. This subgroup analysis examined the impact of baseline oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) on the efficacy and safety of budesonide foam in patients with mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis or ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. Patients received budesonide foam 2 mg/25 mL twice daily for 2 weeks, then once daily for 4 weeks, or placebo, with or without continued stable dosing of baseline oral 5-ASAs, for remission induction at week 6 (primary endpoint) in 2 identically designed, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 studies. Of the 267 and 279 patients randomized to treatment with budesonide foam or placebo (pooled population), 55.1% and 55.2%, respectively, reported baseline 5-ASA use. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved remission with budesonide foam versus placebo, either with (42.2% versus 31.8%, respectively; P = 0.03) or without (40.0% versus 14.4%; P < 0.0001) baseline 5-ASA use at week 6. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved a Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index rectal bleeding subscale score of 0 at week 6, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use (5-ASA, 50.3% versus 35.7%; P = 0.003: no 5-ASA, 45.8% versus 19.2%; P < 0.0001). The frequency of adverse events was comparable between groups, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use. Budesonide foam was efficacious and safe for induction of remission of mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis in patients receiving oral 5-ASA at baseline and those who were not (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01008410 and NCT01008423).

  13. High risk of rectal cancer and of metachronous colorectal cancer in probands of families fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Laura; Urso, Emanuele Dl; Parrinello, Giovanni; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Moneghini, Dario; Agostini, Marco; Nitti, Donato; Nascimbeni, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the risk of metachronous colorectal cancer (CRC), its impact on survival, and the risk of rectal cancer in a cohort of probands meeting the Amsterdam criteria. Several determinants of decision-making for the management of CRC in patients with a putative diagnosis of Lynch syndrome are scarcely defined, and many of them undergo segmental bowel resection instead of the advised total colectomy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 65 probands of the Amsterdam-positive families who had surgery for primary CRC and at least 5-year surveillance thereafter. The rates of metachronous CRC and of rectal cancer were evaluated, together with their association with preoperatively available clinical predictors. Differences in overall survival between patients with and without metachronous CRC were evaluated using a time-dependent Cox model. Seventeen patients (26.2%) had metachronous CRC. No clinical feature was associated with an increased risk of its development. The risk of death in patients with metachronous CRC was 6-fold increased. Neither a 2-year interval endoscopic surveillance after surgery, nor total colectomy was associated with a significant reduction in metachronous CRC. Eighteen patients (23.7%) had rectal cancer at first presentation, 5 patients of the remainder (10.6%) developed rectal cancer after primary colon resection. Two patients undergoing total colectomy developed a metachronous rectal cancer (18.2%). A first-degree family history of rectal cancer was associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer. Probands of families fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria carry a high risk of rectal cancer and of metachronous CRC. Total proctocolectomy, or total colectomy and a 1-year interval of proctoscopic surveillance should be advised when a high risk of rectal cancer can be predicted.

  14. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  15. Ulcer disease of trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1934-01-01

    During the summer of 1933, lesions of a disease were noted among some fingerling brook, rainbow, blackspotted, and lake trout at the Cortland (New York) trout hatchery. Although these lesions bore a marked superficial resemblance to those of furunculosis, they were sufficiently atypical to warrant further investigation. A more detailed examination of the lesions proved them to be of a distinct disease, which for lack of a better name is herein called "ulcer disease," for the lesions closely resemble those described by Calkins (1899) under this name. Because of the marked resemblance to furunculosis, ulcer disease has not been generally recognized by trout culturists, and any ulcer appearing on fish has been ascribed by them to furunculosis without further question.

  16. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  18. Transanal endoscopic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manel; Caro-Tarrago, Aleidis; Gomez-Diaz, Carlos Javier; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2014-09-07

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for rectal cancer, but complications are frequent and rates of morbidity, mortality and genitourinary alterations are high. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows preservation of the anal sphincters and, via its vision system through a rectoscope, allows access to rectal tumors located as far as 20 cm from the anal verge. The capacity of local surgery to cure rectal cancer depends on the risk of lymph node invasion. This means that correct preoperative staging of the rectal tumor is necessary. Currently, local surgery is indicated for rectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa, but not beyond (T1). Here we describe the standard technique for TEM, the different types of equipment used, and the technical limitations of this approach. TEM to remove rectal adenoma should be performed in the same way as if the lesion were an adenocarcinoma, due to the high percentage of infiltrating adenocarcinomas in these lesions. In spite of the generally good results with T1, some authors have published surprisingly high recurrence rates; this is due to the existence of two types of lesions, tumors with good and poor prognosis, divided according to histological and surgical factors. The standard treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma T2N0M0 is TME without adjuvant therapy. In this type of adenocarcinoma, local surgery obtains the best results when complete pathological response has been achieved with previous chemoradiotherapy. The results with chemoradiotherapy and TEM are encouraging, but the scientific evidence remains limited at present.

  19. Venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  20. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  1. Development of the American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) Rectal Cancer Surgery Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Sean C.; Morris, Arden M.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Fleshman, James W.; Alavi, Karim S.; Luchtefeld, Martin A.; Monson, John R. T.; Chang, George J.; Temple, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is excellent evidence that surgical safety checklists contribute to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective To develop a surgical checklist comprising the key phases of care for rectal cancer patients. Design Consensus-oriented decision-making model involving iterative input from subject matter experts under the auspices of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results The process generated a 25-item checklist covering the spectrum of care for rectal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Limitations Lack of prospective validation. Conclusions The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Rectal Cancer Surgery checklist comprises the essential elements of pre-, intra- and postoperative care that must be addressed during the surgical treatment of patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27270511

  2. Future of therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-06-01

    Since 2004, the standard of care for patients with cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer has been preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. A number of advances have occurred and are defining the future of rectal cancer therapy. Among these are short course radiation, the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, selective radiation and selective surgery, and new chemoradiation regimens with novel agents. This review will examine these developments and assess their impact on the future therapy of rectal cancer.

  3. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  4. Paediatric rectal prolapse in Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Duckett, J; Lewin, J

    1996-01-01

    During the 1994 crisis in Rwanda, a high incidence of full-thickness rectal prolapse was noted among the refugee children in the south-west of the country. The prolapses arose as a result of acute diarrhoeal illness superimposed on malnutrition and worm infestation. We used a modification of the Thiersch wire technique in 40 of these cases during two months working in a refugee camp. A catgut pursestring was tied around the anal margin under local, regional or general anaesthesia. This was effective in achieving short-term control of full-thickness prolapse until the underlying illness was corrected. Under the circumstances, no formal follow-up could be arranged; however, no complications were reported and only one patient presented with recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9014879

  5. Severe and refractory peptic ulcer disease: the diagnostic dilemma: case report and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, James L; Duncan, Mona; Bass, Barbara L; Bochicchio, Grant V; Napolitano, Lena M

    2005-11-01

    The recognition of Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of peptic ulcer disease, medical regimens to eradicate the organism, and the widespread use of proton pump inhibition to suppress gastric acid secretion have revolutionized the management of peptic ulcer disease. As a result, successful medical management of peptic ulcer disease has largely supplanted the need for gastric surgery by general surgeons. Surgery is reserved for complications of the disease, refractory disease, or rare causes of ulcer disease such as gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. In this report, we describe a case of intractable peptic ulcer disease that progressed to gastric outlet obstruction despite maximal medical therapy. We review the diagnostic studies utilized to evaluate the potential etiologies of peptic ulcer disease and the difficulty in diagnosing gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison in the setting of potent medical acid suppression therapy.

  6. Mechanical suture in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheregi, Cornel Dragos; Simon, Ioan; Fabian, Ovidiu; Maghiar, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent digestive malignancies, being the third cause of death by cancer, despite early diagnosis and therapeutic progress made over the past years. Standard treatment in these patients is to preserve the anal sphincter with restoration of intestinal function by mechanical colorectal anastomosis or coloanal anastomosis, and to maintain genitourinary function by preservation of hypogastric nerves. In order to emphasize the importance of this surgical technique in the Fourth Surgical Clinic of the CF Clinical Hospital Cluj-Napoca, we conducted a prospective observational interventional study over a 3-year period (2013-2016) in 165 patients hospitalized for rectal and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in various disease stages, who underwent Dixon surgery using the two techniques of manual and mechanical end-to-end anastomosis. For mechanical anastomosis, we used Covidien and Panther circular staplers. The patients were assigned to two groups, group A in which Dixon surgery with manual end-to-end anastomosis was performed (116 patients), and group B in which Dixon surgery with mechanical end-to-end anastomosis was carried out (49 patients). Mechanical anastomosis allowed to restore intestinal continuity following low anterior resection in 21 patients with lower rectal adenocarcinoma compared to 2 patients in whom intestinal continuity was restored by manual anastomosis, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.000001). The double-row mechanical suture technique is associated with a reduced duration of surgery (121.67 minutes for Dixon surgery with mechanical anastomosis, compared to 165.931 minutes for Dixon surgery with manual anastomosis, p<0.0001). The use of circular transanal staplers facilitates end-to-end anastomosis by double-row mechanical suture, allowing to perform low anterior resection in situations when the restoration of intestinal continuity by manual anastomosis is technically not possible, with the aim to

  7. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  8. Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor as an incidental finding in a patient with rectal polyps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xu-Dong; Fan, Ren-Gen; zha, Wen-Zhang; Xu, Yong-Hua; Qing, Cheng-Lin; Jia, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A patient who was diagnosed as rectal polyps in the local hospital went to our hospital for surgical treatment. Abdominal CT demonstrated a large irregular extra-luminal tumor of at least 5 cm cross-section on the ventral side of the lower rectal wall. Intraoperatively, a large irregular extra-luminal tumor (about 5×4.5×4 cm) was found. Anterior resection with end colostomy and rectal stump (Hartmann's procedure) was performed. Postoperative histological examination showed simultaneous development of rectal GIST and polyps.

  9. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as high heels, flip-flops, or sandals. Wound Care and Dressings Care for your wound as instructed by your provider. You'll likely ... Keep the ulcer clean and bandaged. Cleanse the wound daily, using a wound dressing or bandage. Try ...

  10. Gastroduodenal Stress Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, James S.; Coulson, Walter F.; Guth, Paul H.; Gray, Robert K.; Schwabe, Arthur D.; Ashley, Franklin L.; Batzdorf, Ulrich

    1972-01-01

    Gastroduodenal stress ulcers are frequent sources of massive bleeding and present difficult therapeutic problems. Pathologically, they are acute with minimal reactive fibrosis. Etiology appears related to mucosal vascular engorgement due to microvascular adjustments unrelated to total mucosal blood flow, and without disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier to acid diffusion. Selective intra-arterial injection of vasoconstrictor drugs may arrest bleeding from stress ulcers. Prevention of the many predisposing conditions such as shock, sepsis, and pulmonary insufficiency is the best medical treatment. Once bleeding begins, transfusion, iced saline solution lavage, and (later) antacids are indicated. If bleeding persists, vagotomy with pyloroplasty, vagotomy with subtotal gastrectomy, or total gastrectomy may be required to stop it, but there is disagreement concerning the best operation. Stress ulcers are frequent in association with severe burns and in patients with lesions of the central nervous system. Stress ulcers are appearing with rising frequency, the cause is obscure, and the treatment is unsatisfactory. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. AFigure 5. BFigure 5. CFigure 6. AFigure 6. BFigure 6. CFigure 6. D

  11. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  12. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer

  13. Venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E Andrea; Jones, June

    2008-09-15

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha(2) antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer injection of granulocyte-macrophage colony

  14. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  16. How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lubricate the suppository tip with a water-soluble lubricant such as K-Y Jelly, not petroleum jelly (Vaseline). If you do not have this lubricant, moisten your rectal area with cool tap water. ...

  17. Refractory duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, K D

    1984-01-01

    A refractory duodenal ulcer was arbitrarily defined as one that had failed to heal completely after treatment with cimetidine 1 g daily for three months. Of 66 patients with refractory duodenal ulcer, healing eventually occurred in 37 patients, after treatment for an average of 7.4 months. But 28 patients did not heal despite treatment for an average of 9.4 months; and one patient defaulted. In 41 patients the daily dose of cimetidine was increased to 2 g: the ulcers in 31 patients healed. In eight patients the daily dose was increased to 3 g and healing occurred in four patients. Eighteen patients required admission on 22 occasions because of severe symptoms despite treatment. Nine patients underwent surgery but in five the results were poor. Differences in clinical and endoscopic features between refractory and non-refractory ulcer patients were small. Acid and pepsin secretion were similar and gastrin concentrations normal. Blood levels of the drug and suppression of acid secretion were both satisfactory. Identification of refractory ulcer patients at the start of treatment was therefore not possible. Refractoriness could occur at any time during the course of the disease, previous treatment with cimetidine often having resulted in rapid healing, but subsequent relapses were also usually refractory. The cause of refractoriness remains unknown and the rather poor results of surgery in this series suggests that optimal management of these patients remains to be determined. Refractoriness probably indicates a changed natural history of the disease and in some patients a more poor prognosis. PMID:6428982

  18. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-11-15

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words "rectum", "rectal", "cancer", "laparoscopy", "robot". After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients.

  19. Primary rectal signet ring cell carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination and gastric secondaries

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hsien-Lin; Tan, Kok-Yang; Poon, Pak-Leng; Cheng, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Disseminated signet ring cell carcinomas frequently arise from the stomach. However, primaries in the colon and rectum have also been reported. We present a 68 year old lady who presented with a change in her bowel habit. Colonoscopy showed a stenosing rectal tumour at 7 cm to 8 cm from the anal verge. Multiple scattered ulcers were also noted along the entire length of the colon. Biopsy of the lesions revealed signet ring cell adenocarcinoma. Gastroscopy showed multiple nodules with ulceration over several areas of the stomach which were similar in appearance to the colonic lesions. However, no primary tumour of the stomach was seen. Biopsy of the gastric lesions also showed signet ring cell adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed circumferential tumour at the rectosigmoid junction with possible invasion into the left ischiorectal fossa. The overall picture was that of a primary rectal signet ring cell carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination. The patient was referred for palliative chemotherapy in view of the disseminated disease. In the present report, we discuss this interesting pathological entity and review the role of various histolological techniques in helping to identify the primary tumor. PMID:18395918

  20. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Williamson, Katherine K

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies.

  1. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  2. Histopathological features of equine superficial, nonhealing, corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Julie E; Clode, Alison B; Borst, Luke B; Gilger, Brian C

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate corneal changes associated with chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulcers in horses via common histopathological stains. Retrospective study. Twenty-four horses diagnosed with chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulceration. The medical records of horses evaluated at North Carolina State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital (NCSU-VTH) from 2005 to 2011, diagnosed with a chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulcer and treated with superficial keratectomy (SK) were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were superficial corneal ulceration, no cellular infiltration via slit-lamp biomicroscopy, no microorganisms evident on corneal cytology, and acquisition of samples for aerobic bacterial and common fungal cultures. Corneal tissue samples were evaluated histopathologically for the presence or absence of a nonadherent epithelial 'lip', epithelial dysmaturity, intraepithelial inflammatory cells, an acellular hyaline zone in the anterior stroma, and stromal inflammatory cells, fibrosis and vascularization. In the majority of analyzed samples, epithelial cells adjacent to the ulcerated site showed nonadherence to the basement membrane and dysmaturity. Intraepithelial inflammatory cell infiltration was uncommon. Histopathological features of an anterior stromal hyaline zone, intrastromal inflammation, fibrosis and vascularization were variably present. The most consistent histopathological characteristics of equine chronic, nonhealing, superficial, corneal ulcers include epithelial nonadherence, epithelial dysmaturity and mild to moderate stromal inflammation; however, one set of histopathological characteristics does not definitively define this syndrome in horses. Additionally, the anterior stromal acellular hyaline zone commonly cited in canine spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCED) is not a consistent finding in equine corneas. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  3. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  4. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  5. Management of sub-5 mm rectal carcinoids with lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Toh, James Wei Tatt; Henderson, Christopher; Yabe, Takako Eva; Ong, Evonne; Chapuis, Pierre; Bokey, Les

    2015-01-01

    Minute (<5 mm) and small (5–10 mm) rectal carcinoids discovered during colonoscopy are generally considered to be non-aggressive, and the management and surveillance of patients with this entity are usually limited. We present the case of a 61-year-old Chinese female with multiple sub-5 mm carcinoid tumours in the rectum without any computed tomography (CT) evidence of lymph node or distant metastases. She underwent an ultra-low anterior resection for a sessile rectal polyp with the histological appearance of a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Seven foci of minute carcinoids in the rectum and perirectal lymph node metastastic spread from the carcinoid tumours were also discovered on histopathology. There were no lymph node metastases originating from adenocarcinoma. This case report and review of the literature suggests that minute rectal carcinoids are at risk of metastasizing and that these patients should be investigated for lymph node and distant metastatic spread with CT and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy or its equivalent, as this would influence prognosis and surgical management of these patients. Findings relating to lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, high Ki-67, mitotic rate, depth of tumour invasion, central ulceration, multifocal tumours and size are useful in predicting metastases and may be used in scoring tools. Size alone is not a good predictor of metastastic spread. PMID:25342710

  6. Novel autoantibody against the β2-glycoprotein I/HLA-DR complex in patients with refractory cutaneous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Arase, N; Tanimura, K; Jin, H; Yamaoka, T; Kishibe, M; Nishioka, M; Kiyohara, E; Tani, M; Matsuoka, S; Ohmura, K; Takasugi, K; Yamamoto, T; Murota, H; Arase, H; Katayama, I

    2017-04-12

    Chronic skin ulcers in the lower legs, feet, toes, and digits are sometimes idiopathic and intractable, and occasionally cause limb gangrene. Although there are many conditions that can cause chronic limb ulcers, including primary or secondary vascular diseases, the reasons why specific patients develop chronic skin ulcers have still remained unclear.(1) Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired coagulation disorder occurring as vascular thrombosis or pregnancy complications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Raynaud's syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, D. G.; Dathan, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    We report three cases of Raynaud's syndrome with digital ischaemic ulceration, in association with carpal tunnel syndrome. In all cases, the aetiology of the Raynaud's syndrome was probably unrelated to the nerve compression. However, symptoms were worse on the side of the median nerve lesion in two patients and worse on the side with the most severe nerve dysfunction in the third; symptoms were relieved by carpal tunnel decompression in two patients. We suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome may exacerbate Raynaud's syndrome and should be considered particularly in patients with asymmetrical digital lesions. PMID:3983046

  8. Surgical management of rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Madiba, Thandinkosi E; Baig, Mirza K; Wexner, Steven D

    2005-01-01

    The problem of complete rectal prolapse is formidable, with no clear predominant treatment of choice. Surgical management is aimed at restoring physiology by correcting the prolapse and improving continence and constipation with acceptable mortality and recurrence rates. Abdominal procedures are ideal for young fit patients, whereas perineal procedures are reserved for older frail patients with significant comorbidity. Laparoscopic procedures with their advantages of early recovery, less pain, and possibly lower morbidity are recently added options. Regardless of the therapy chosen, matching the surgical selection to the patient is essential. To review the present status of the surgical treatment of rectal prolapse. Literature review using MEDLINE. All articles reporting on rectopexy were included. Articles reporting on prospective and retrospective comparisons were included. Case reports were excluded, as were studies comparing data with historical controls. The results were tabulated to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. Studies that did not report some of the outcomes were noted as "not stated." Abdominal operations offer not only lower recurrence but also greater chance for functional improvements. Suture and mesh rectopexy produce equivalent results. However, the polyvinyl alcohol (Ivalon) sponge rectopexy is associated with an increased risk of infectious complications and has largely been abandoned. The advantage of adding a resection to the rectopexy seems to be related to less constipation. Laparoscopic rectopexy has similar results to open rectopexy but has all of the advantages related to laparoscopy. Perineal procedures are better suited to frail elderly patients with extensive comorbidity. Abdominal procedures are generally better for young fit patients; the results of all abdominal procedures are comparable. Suture and mesh rectopexy are still popular with many surgeons-the choice depends on the surgeon's experience and preference

  9. Pyoderma Gangrenosum: A Commonly Overlooked Ulcerative Condition

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Daniel Zunsheng; Tan, Ki-Wei; Tay, Yong-Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pyoderma ga ngrenosum (PG) is a rare, inflammatory, destructive neutrophilic dermatosis, which mimics other ulcerative conditions. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study based on patients diagnosed with PG over a 3-year period (2010–2013), we evaluated demographics, anatomical sites, number of lesions, subtypes, histopathology, associated conditions, treatment regimens, healing time, and recurrence. Results: Of our five patients, there were three males and two females, age ranging between 19 and 58 years (mean age 38 years). Four had single lesions localized to the lower limbs while one had multiple lesions (more than five) over bilateral hands and legs. Ulcerative subtype was observed in all the patients. One exhibited pathergy. Skin biopsies were done in four patients, revealing dense neutrophilic infiltrates in three cases and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in one. Associated systemic diseases were observed in all patients, four having inflammatory bowel disease and one having both systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. The patients were all treated with systemic corticosteroids either alone or in combination with immunosuppressants (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus), and wound dressing. Split-thickness skin graft was done in one patient. Complete healing was achieved in all patients, ranging from one to 3 months after diagnosis. No recurrence was reported. Conclusions: Systemic corticosteroids, either alone or in combination with steroid-sparing agents are the mainstay of treatment. Should family physicians encounter a rapidly progressing ulcer that has poor response to usual wound management, timely referral to dermatology should be made. PMID:25657946

  10. Pyoderma gangrenosum: a commonly overlooked ulcerative condition.

    PubMed

    Tay, Daniel Zunsheng; Tan, Ki-Wei; Tay, Yong-Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma ga ngrenosum (PG) is a rare, inflammatory, destructive neutrophilic dermatosis, which mimics other ulcerative conditions. In a retrospective study based on patients diagnosed with PG over a 3-year period (2010-2013), we evaluated demographics, anatomical sites, number of lesions, subtypes, histopathology, associated conditions, treatment regimens, healing time, and recurrence. Of our five patients, there were three males and two females, age ranging between 19 and 58 years (mean age 38 years). Four had single lesions localized to the lower limbs while one had multiple lesions (more than five) over bilateral hands and legs. Ulcerative subtype was observed in all the patients. One exhibited pathergy. Skin biopsies were done in four patients, revealing dense neutrophilic infiltrates in three cases and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in one. Associated systemic diseases were observed in all patients, four having inflammatory bowel disease and one having both systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. The patients were all treated with systemic corticosteroids either alone or in combination with immunosuppressants (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus), and wound dressing. Split-thickness skin graft was done in one patient. Complete healing was achieved in all patients, ranging from one to 3 months after diagnosis. No recurrence was reported. Systemic corticosteroids, either alone or in combination with steroid-sparing agents are the mainstay of treatment. Should family physicians encounter a rapidly progressing ulcer that has poor response to usual wound management, timely referral to dermatology should be made.

  11. Reduced late rectal mucosal changes after prostate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with endorectal balloon as observed in repeated endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Emile van . E-mail: E.vanLin@rther.umcn.nl; Kristinsson, Jon; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Jong, Dirk J. de; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Leer, Jan Willem; Visser, Andries G.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the rectal wall (Rwall) spatial dose distribution, toxicity, and mucosal changes after prostate cancer radiotherapy with or without an endorectal balloon (ERB). Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients with ERB and 24 without ERB (No-ERB) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to a dose of 67.5 Gy. The Rwall was divided into 16 mucosal areas and Rwall dose surface maps were constructed. After 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years a rectosigmoidoscopy was performed, and each mucosal area was scored on telangiectasia, congestion, ulceration, stricture, and necrosis. Late rectal toxicity was correlated with the endoscopic findings. Results: The ERB significantly reduced the Rwall volume exposed to doses >40 Gy. Late rectal toxicity (grade {>=}1, including excess of bowel movements and slight rectal discharge) was reduced significantly in the ERB group. A total of 146 endoscopies and 2,336 mucosal areas were analyzed. Telangiectases were most frequently seen and appeared after 6 months. At 1 and 2 years, significantly less high-grade telangiectasia (T 2-3) was observed in the ERB group at the lateral and posterior part of the Rwall. In mucosal areas exposed to doses >40 Gy, less high-grade telangiectases (T 2-3) were seen in the ERB group compared with the No-ERB group. Conclusions: An ERB reduced the Rwall volume exposed to doses >40 Gy, resulting in reduction of late rectal mucosal changes and reduced late rectal toxicity. Although further analysis is needed, these data suggest an ERB-induced increased tolerance for late Rwall damage.

  12. Idiopathic esophageal ulcer as an initial manifestation of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lagos Maldonado, Alicia; Guilarte López-Mañas, Julio; Benavente Fernández, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    The esophageal ulcer us a common complication in people affected by the acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), especially in the final stages and in patients who develop an acute retroviral syndrome. Although, it can be caused by various infectious agents, such as species of candida, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV), no aetiological agent is successfully identified in a large proportion of patients and it is classified as idiopathic. We report the case of an idiopathic esophageal ulcer associated with the initial diagnosis of HIV-1.

  13. Another 'Cushing ulcer'.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Chisho; Satoh, Noriyuki; Narita, Masashi; Kikuchi, Akio; Inoue, Minoru

    2011-04-09

    The authors describe the case of a 39-year-old man who presented to our hospital with easy fatigability and malaise. On physical examination, hypertension was noted without any cushingoid appearance. Laboratory testing revealed normochromic-normocytic anaemia with positive results of occult blood in the stool, hyperglycaemia and hypokalemia. Upper endoscopy revealed active gastric ulcer with Helicobacter pylori infection, likely causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Endocrine examinations showed that both serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol were elevated with loss of diurnal variation. A diagnosis of Cushing's disease secondary to pituitary adenoma was made as results of brain MRI and blood sampling from inferior petrosal sinus. In a patient with peptic ulcer disease, physician should be alert to the possible endocrine background.

  14. Laparoscopic versus robotic rectal resection for rectal cancer in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ramiro; Anaya, Daniel A; Li, Linda T; Orcutt, Sonia T; Balentine, Courtney J; Awad, Samir A; Berger, David H; Albo, Daniel A; Artinyan, Avo

    2013-10-01

    Robotic rectal cancer resection remains controversial. We compared the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic vs robotic rectal cancer resection in a high-risk Veterans Health Administration population. Patients who underwent minimally invasive rectal cancer resection were identified from an institutional colorectal cancer database. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared between robotic and laparoscopic groups. The robotic group (n = 13) did not differ significantly from the laparoscopic group (n = 59) with respect to baseline characteristics except for a higher rate of previous abdominal surgery. Robotic patients had significantly lower tumors, more advanced disease, a higher rate of preoperative chemoradiation, and were more likely to undergo abdominoperineal resection. Robotic rectal resection was associated with longer operative time. There were no differences in blood loss, conversion rates, postoperative morbidity, lymph nodes harvested, margin positivity, or specimen quality between groups. The robotic approach for rectal cancer resection is safe with similar postoperative and oncologic outcomes compared with laparoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  16. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words “rectum”, “rectal”, “cancer”, “laparoscopy”, “robot”. After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients. PMID:27895814

  17. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  18. Clinical Features of Ulcerative Colitis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Mee; Han, Dong Soo; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Hong, Weon-Seon; Min, Young Il

    1996-01-01

    Objectives : This study was conducted to investigate the clinical features of ulcerative colitis in Korea and to evaluate the clinical course after medical therapy. Methods : Symptoms, signs and results of the treatment were retrospectively analyzed in 66 patients (male 32, female 34) diagnosed to have ulcerative colitis at the Asan Medical Center. Results : The median age of the beginning of symptoms was 36 years (range, 14–72). Diarrhea and rectal bleeding were observed in 95.1 and 91.4%, respectively, at the time of diagnosis, while extra-colonic manifestations were observed in 24.1%. In 41 patients (62.1%), colitis developed in the rectum and sigmoid colon, while left colitis and extensive colitis developed in 11 (16.7%) and 14 patients (21.2%), respectively. The severity of disease was determined according to the clinical criteria, resulting in 22 (33.3%) mild, 21 (31.8%) moderate and 23 (34.8%) severe diseases. The seventy was also classified as 1, 2 and 3 by sigmoido-colonoscopic findings: 1;17 patients(25.8%), 2;27(40.9%) and 22(33.3%). Among 23 patients with severe disease, 5 patients (7.6%) received total colectomy due to toxic megacolon, intractability to medical therapy, ileocolic fistula and intestinal stenosis. The severity determined by colonoscopic findings was well correlated with that determined clinically and was closely related to the severity of symptoms, levels of albumin, hemoglobin and the count of leukocyte. The median duration of symptoms before treatment was 4 weeks (range. 11–300). All patients were treated with sulfasalazine and prednisolone. All patients with medical therapy, except 2 patients (96. 7%), obtained clinical remission. The median days required for remission was 14 (range, 3–70). Relapse rates at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the initiation of treatment were 19.7, 34.1 and 49.3%, respectively. The median disease-free interval from the time of remission was 10 months (range, 2–60). After remission, the

  19. pANCA-vasculitis associated with rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hommel, C; Rihova, Z; Mokaddem, F; Libotte, B

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old male patient who was admitted for fever, dry cough, recurrent sinusitis with epistaxis, anorexia with weight loss of 20 kg over a 3-month period, myalgia, and mononeuritis multiplex. He was diagnosed with pANCA/anti-MPO associated vasculitis and rectal adenocarcinoma. The tumor was treated by surgical resection. Recurrence of vasculitis occurred during steroid tapering which prompted us to add Mycophenolate mofetyl. A complete remission was achieved. We conclude that in the present case the vasculitis was an independent disease, not a paraneoplastic phenomenon. We discuss the value of different ANCA serologies for diagnostics and follow-up, the epidemiology of vasculitis associated with malignancy, and the concept of vasculitis as a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  20. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  1. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  2. Intrarectal application of amifostine for the prevention of radiation-induced rectal injury.

    PubMed

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Han, Sue; Tobi, Martin; Vargas, Barbara J; Stamos, Beth; Kelly, Laura; Biggar, Sandra; Kaplan, Irving

    2002-01-01

    Clinically symptomatic late injury to the rectal wall occurs in about one third of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation. Reducing the physical dose to the anterior rectal wall without a similar reduction in the posterior peripheral zone is difficult because of the proximity of these structures. Based on our previous observations that intrarectal application of amifostine resulted in very high concentrations of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 in the rectal wall of Copenhagen rats, the authors initiated a phase I clinical trial in 1998. Twenty-nine patients with localized prostate cancer were accrued. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, a Karnofsky performance status of > or =70, and no pelvic lymphadenopathy or distant metastases. The total dose to the prostate was 70.2 Gy (20 patients) and 73.8 Gy (9 patients). Therapy was delivered using a 4-field axial technique and 3-dimensional conformal planning. Amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution 30 minutes before irradiation on the first 15 days of therapy. Amifostine dose was escalated, in cohorts, from 500 mg to 2,500 mg. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scale. All patients completed therapy with no amifostine-related toxicity at any dose level. The application was feasible and well tolerated. With a median follow-up time of 21 months, 9 patients (33%) had rectal bleeding (8 grade 1, 1 grade 2). Four patients (14%) had symptoms suggestive of radiation injury, which proved to be secondary to nonrelated processes. These included preexisting nonspecific proctitis (1 patient), diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon, rectal polyp (1 patient), and ulcerative colitis (1 patient). Symptoms developed significantly more often in patients receiving 500 to 1,000 mg than in patients receiving 1,500 to 2,500 mg amifostine (7 of 14 [50%] versus 2 of 13 [15%]; P =.0325, 1-sided

  3. Peptic ulcer disease in childhood in Zaria, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ameh, E A

    1999-03-01

    Over a 10-year period in a busy paediatric surgical unit, six children were operated upon for peptic ulcer disease, four of whom presented with complications (pyloric stenosis, two; perforation, one; bleeding, one). Truncal vagotomy with a drainage procedure was the operation of choice in five of the children in whom there were no complications. One child suspected of having Zollinger-Ellison syndrome had recurrence of symptoms. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease in children are non-specific, and in our environment such symptoms are frequently considered to be due to parasitic infestation. Barium meal is not very sensitive in diagnosis in children, and the relative lack of availability of endoscopic services limits pre-operative diagnosis. It is suggested that peptic ulcer disease be considered in children who have persistent or recurrent abdominal pain of obscure aetiology.

  4. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  5. c-Ki-ras gene mutations in dysplasia and carcinomas complicating ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, S. M.; Kelly, S. A.; Hoyle, J. A.; Lewis, F. A.; Taylor, G. R.; Thompson, H.; Dixon, M. F.; Quirke, P.

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nine samples comprising carcinomas, adenomas, dysplastic, inflamed and normal mucosa from patients with sporadic colon cancer and ulcerative colitis (UC) were analysed for c-Ki-ras mutations. DNA was extracted from archival paraffin-embedded material, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products analysed using restriction enzyme digestion. Forty-two per cent (14/33) of the sporadic carcinoma controls contained Ki-ras codon 12 mutations in contrast to 24% (8/33) of ulcerative colitis carcinomas. A significantly higher c-Ki-ras mutation rate was observed in rectal carcinomas (72%) in comparison to colonic carcinomas (28%) in control patients (P less than 0.04), while the opposite was observed in UC patients. The difference between the incidence of c-Ki-ras mutations in rectal carcinomas in UC (9%) and in sporadic rectal carcinomas (72%) was also significant (P less than 0.01). This lower prevalence rate and different site distribution of c-Ki-ras mutations in UC carcinomas compared to sporadic carcinomas suggests that specific genetic differences may underlie the causation of carcinomas arising in these situations. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1854618

  6. Assessing venous ulcer population characteristics and practices in a home care community.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Karen R; Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Friedberg, Elaine; Davies, Barbara

    2003-05-01

    To plan for a new community leg ulcer service in one Ontario region, venous ulcer population characteristics and current community care practices were obtained from a home care cohort of people with venous ulcers. A secondary analysis was conducted on the venous ulcer cohort using data collected during a Regional Prevalence and Profile Study. Patients were identified based on the clinical syndrome for venous disease criteria described in the Royal College of Nurses clinical practice guidelines and by the presence of an ankle-brachial pressure index 0.8. The Regional Prevalence and Profile Study identified 263 people with leg ulcers for a rate of 2.0 per 1,000 people >25 years of age. One hundred, seven ulcers (41%) were the result of venous disease; of these, 83 (78% of cases) were associated with a single nursing agency and formed the study cohort. Most patients (51, 61%) were female and 65 years old. Thirty-eight (46%) had 4 comorbid conditions, 63 spoke English, 29 lived alone, 38 did not require physical aids or assistance for mobility, and 81 (98%) were able to travel outside of their home. The current ulcer had been present for an average of 15 months (median 6 months), 51 participants had a previous leg ulcer, and 22 had episodes of ulceration for > 5 years. Of the 121 ulcers in the study, 48 (41%) were located at the ankle, and the majority (85%) were > 1 cm2. General practitioners were the main medical care providers for 48 participants, and 52 (62%) had seen a specialist physician for their current ulcer. These findings are similar to large studies conducted in other industrialized countries and confirm that venous ulcers are a chronic problem in a population with complex health needs.

  7. Novel radiation techniques for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concepts for management of rectal cancer have changed drastically over the past few years. Through national bowel cancer screening programmes in the Western countries and the increasing use of endoscopic procedures as diagnostic tool, there is increase in detection of rectal cancer in early stages. There is increase in ageing population worldwide but more so in Western countries. In addition, there is realisation of harm from extirpative surgical procedures which are directed towards managing advanced rectal cancer in the past. Increase in cost of health care burden has also led the investigators to seek alternative treatment options which are effective, safe and cost effective. There are several modern radiation techniques which fits this bill and we need to be aware of newer novel radiation techniques to fulfil this gap. PMID:24982769

  8. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  9. Biased JH usage in plasma cell immunoglobulin gene sequences from colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis but not in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Walters, D; Boursier, L; Hackett, M; Spencer, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease of the colonic and rectal mucosa. Autoantibodies have been observed in ulcerative colitis which may have a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Evidence also suggests that there is an hereditary predisposition towards the disease, although no individual genes have been identified. 
AIMS—This is a pilot study of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgH) in ulcerative colitis to determine whether they have any particular genetic characteristics which may lead to a better understanding of the disease aetiology. 
SUBJECTS—Colonic or rectal tissue was obtained from five children with ulcerative colitis. Tissue was also obtained from five children with Crohn's disease and five children who did not have inflammatory bowel disease as controls. 
METHODS—B cells and IgD+ B cells were identified by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections. Areas of lamina propria containing plasma cells, and areas of IgD+ B cells were microdissected. The immunoglobulin genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Sequences were analysed for content of somatic mutations and composition of heavy chain. 
RESULTS—An increase in the use of JH6 and DXP'1, and a decrease in the use of JH4, gene segments in immunoglobulin genes from lamina propria plasma cells, and from virgin IgD+ B cells, was found in patients with ulcerative colitis. These biases were not present in the control groups. 
CONCLUSIONS—There is a fundamental difference in the immunoglobulin genes from patients with ulcerative colitis. Whether this is caused by a difference in content of immunoglobulin gene segments in the germline or a difference in the recombination mechanism is not known. 

 Keywords: ulcerative colitis; immunoglobulin heavy chain gene; joining region; diversity region; repertoire; Crohn's disease PMID:10026325

  10. Use of anti tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibody for ulcerative jejunoileitis

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Gulseren; Assaad, Adel; Biehl, Thomas; Kozarek, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative jejunoileitis is an uncommon clinical syndrome consisting of abdominal pain, weight loss associated with diarrhea, and multiple inflammatory ulcerations and strictures of the small bowel. Ulcerative jejunoileitis can complicate established celiac disease or develop in patients de novo. Increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the small intestine of patients with untreated celiac disease are associated with a role in the immune pathogenesis of this disorder. No specific therapy has been shown to change the course of ulcerative jejunoileitis. We report a case of severe ulcerative jejunoileitis previously unresponsive to traditional therapies, including high dose corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The patient had a dramatic resolution of symptoms and a complete normalization of endoscopic findings after anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, infliximab (Remicade®). PMID:23049226

  11. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  12. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route.

  13. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  14. Transanal Approach to Rectal Polyps and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Mishra, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    A transanal approach to rectal polyp and cancer excision is often an appropriate alternative to conventional rectal resection, and has a lower associated morbidity. There has been a steady evolution in the techniques of transanal surgery over the past 30 years. It started with traditional transanal excision and was revolutionized by introduction of transanal endoscopic microsurgery in early 1980s. Introduction of transanal minimally invasive surgery made it more accessible to surgeons around the world. Now robotic platforms are being tried in certain institutions. Concerns have been raised about recurrence rates of cancers with transanal approach and success of subsequent salvage operations. PMID:26929754

  15. [Adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Qvortrup, Camilla; Mortensen, John Pløen; Pfeiffer, Per

    2013-09-09

    A new Cochrane meta-analysis evaluated adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based, not modern combination chemotherapy) in almost 10,000 patients with rectal cancer and showed a 17% reduction in mortality corresponding well to the efficacy observed in recent studies, which reported a reduction in mortality just about 20%. The authors recommend adjuvant chemotherapy which is in accordance with the Danish national guidelines where 5-FU-based chemotherapy is recommended for stage III and high-risk stage II rectal cancer.

  16. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  17. [Peptic ulcer in children].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Atsushi

    2004-03-01

    H. pylori infection is the main cause of peptic ulcer in children. Japan pediatric H. pylori research meeting made the guideline for diagnosis and eradication therapy for H. pylori. This guideline showed the methods for diagnose and the eradication therapy for children with H. pylori infection. Many pediatric patients have been free from some abdominal symptoms after eradication therapy for H. pylori. However we need endoscopy for diagnose in spite of children. And recently new non-invasive diagnostic devices are developed and some species acquired tolerance for clarithromycin. Therefore we hope that a new guideline for children will be written soon.

  18. Refractory peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lena

    2009-06-01

    Refractory PUD is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Optimal management of severe or refractory PUD requires a multidisciplinary team approach, using primary care providers, gastroenterologists, and general surgeons. Medical management has become the cornerstone of therapy. Identification and eradication of H pylori infection combined with acid reduction regimens can heal ulceration and also prevent recurrence. Severe, intractable or recurrent PUD and associated complications mandates a careful and methodical evaluation and management strategy to determine the potential etiologies and necessary treatment (medical or surgical) required.

  19. Disodium cromoglycate in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, V; Elsborg, L; Greibe, J; Hendriksen, C; Høj, L; Jensen, K B; Kristensen, E; Madsen, J R; Marner, B; Riis, P; Willumsen, L

    1981-01-01

    A controlled clinical study on disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) at a dose of 800 mg per day versus placebo was carried out in 141 patients with ulcerative colitis and 25 patients with Crohn's disease. Those of the ulcerative colitis patients who had been on sulphasalazine treatment continued that treatment during the trial (101 patients). Forty patients were intolerant of sulphasalazine. No patient received steroids during the last month before the study. Patients with Crohn's disease had their possible sulphasalazine treatment stopped before the trial. No beneficial effect of DSCG as compared with placebo was found, as the DSCG and the placebo group showed the same number of relapses in patients with a clinically inactive ulcerative colitis at the start of the trial and the same number of patients improving, deteriorating, and maintaining steady state in patients with clinically active ulcerative colitis at the start of the trial. There was no difference between relapse rate in DSCG and placebo groups in patients with Crohn's disease. No correlation between the eosinophil count in rectal mucosa and the outcome of the attack of ulcerative colitis could be demonstrated. PMID:6780414

  20. Resveratrol abrogates adhesion molecules and protects against TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Dalaal M; Ismael, Naglaa R

    2011-11-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol compound with anti-inflammatory properties, has been previously evaluated for its beneficial effects in several ulcerative colitis models. However, the current study elucidates the effect of resveratrol on adhesion molecules, as well as its antioxidant efficacy in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced ulcerative-colitis model. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of TNBS, followed by daily per os administration of either sulphasalazine (300 mg/kg) or resveratrol (2 and 10 mg/kg) for 7 days. Administration of resveratrol decreased the ulcerative area and colon mass index; these effects were further supported by the reduction in colon inflammation grades, as well as histolopathological changes, and reflected by the stalling of body mass loss. The anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol were indicated by lowered myeloperoxidase activity, and by suppressing ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels in the colon and serum. In addition, it restored a reduced colonic nitric oxide level and reinstated its redox balance, as evidenced by the suppression of lipid peroxides and prevention of glutathione depletion. The anti-ulcerative effect of the higher dose of resveratrol was comparable with those of sulphasalazine. The study confirms the anti-ulcerative effect of resveratrol in TNBS-induced experimental colitis via reduction of neutrophil infiltration, inhibition of adhesive molecules, and restoration of the nitric oxide level, as well as the redox status.

  1. [Rectal stenosis due to Schnitzler metastasis following surgery for gastric cancer--a case successfully treated with TS-1 and CDDP combination chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Niinobu, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Sumiko; Itani, Yutaka; Nishikawa, Yasuaki; Amano, Masahiro; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hiroto; Sakon, Masato

    2005-10-01

    The patient, a 40-year-old woman, underwent total gastrectomy and excision of the pancreatic tail, spleen and gallbladder for gastric cancer in September 2000. The lesion was judged to be P1, SE, H0, N2 and Stage IV and the patient was managed on a regular schedule as an outpatient. In September 2004, she passed blood-stained feces and rectal palpation detected a hard nodule at the anterior rectal wall. A fiber optic examination of the sigmoid colon detected an ulcerous lesion with a hemorrhage at the anterior rectal wall. A biopsy revealed the lesion to be Group V poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Starting in October 2004, 100 mg/day of TS-1 was administered for 3 weeks; intravenous drip infusion of 100 mg/body of CDDP was conducted in the second week for a period of 24 hours. After 3 courses of this regimen, a fiber optic examination of the colon conducted in February 2005 no longer detected the rectal tumor, leaving only a cicatrix. Upon a CT examination, the para-aortic lymph nodes that had been enlarged were notably reduced in size and an improvement was eminent in the hypertrophic rectal wall. The patient no longer experienced constipation or melena. Her clinical course is being observed while an oral administration of 100 mg/day of TS-1 continues.

  2. Peptic ulcer disease in children.

    PubMed

    Dohil, R; Hassall, E

    2000-02-01

    A peptic ulcer in a child looks the same as it does in an adult, and many of the aetiologies of peptic ulcer disease in children are similar to those in adults. However, there are many differences between children and adults, especially in the areas of clinical presentation, the prevalences of different types of ulcer disease, and the prevalence of complications of ulcer disease. Therefore the approach to diagnosis and management in children is often at variance with that in adults. One important example is the approach to suspected Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) disease in children, in which consensus groups have advised a considerably different approach in children. While the chapter deals with the full range of peptic ulcer disease in children, the focus is on those aspects in which there are differences between adults and children.

  3. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis G.; ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D.; Tatiersky, Laetitia; DeLay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  4. Evaluation of the risk factors associated with rectal neuroendocrine tumors: a big data analytic study from a health screening center.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Chang, Dong Kyung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae Jun; Choi, Sun Kyu; Jung, Sin-Ho; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is the most common NET in Asia. The risk factors associated with rectal NETs are unclear because of the overall low incidence rate of these tumors and the associated difficulty in conducting large epidemiological studies on rare cases. The aim of this study was to exploit the benefits of big data analytics to assess the risk factors associated with rectal NET. A retrospective case-control study was conducted, including 102 patients with histologically confirmed rectal NETs and 52,583 healthy controls who underwent screening colonoscopy at the Center for Health Promotion of the Samsung Medical Center in Korea between January 2002 and December 2012. Information on different risk factors was collected and logistic regression analysis applied to identify predictive factors. Four factors were significantly associated with rectal NET: higher levels of cholesterol [odds ratio (OR) = 1.007, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.001-1.013, p = 0.016] and ferritin (OR = 1.502, 95 % CI, 1.167-1.935, p = 0.002), presence of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.768, 95 % CI, 1.071-2.918, p = 0.026), and family history of cancer among first-degree relatives (OR = 1.664, 95 % CI, 1.019-2.718, p = 0.042). The findings of our study demonstrate the benefits of using big data analytics for research and clinical risk factor studies. Specifically, in this study, this analytical method was applied to identify higher levels of serum cholesterol and ferritin, metabolic syndrome, and family history of cancer as factors that may explain the increasing incidence and prevalence of rectal NET.

  5. A pilot randomized control study to evaluate endoscopic resection using a ligation device for rectal carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Hiroyuki; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ootani, Akifumi; Tsunada, Seiji; Ogata, Shinichi; Ootani, Hibiki; Shimoda, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Amemori, Sadahiro; Mannen, Kotaro; Mizuguchi, Masanobu; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Rectal carcinoid tumors smaller than 10 mm can be resected with local excision using endoscopy. In order to remove rectal carcinoid tumors completely, we evaluated endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device in this pilot control randomized study. METHODS: Fifteen patients were diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumor (less than 10 mm) in our hospital from 1993 to 2002. There were 9 males and 6 females, with a mean age 61.5 years (range, 34-77 years). The patients had no complaints of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Fifteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: 7 carcinoid tumors were treated by conventional endoscopic resection, and 8 carcinoid tumors were treated by endoscopic resection using a ligation device. RESULTS: All rectal carcinoid tumors were located at the middle to distal rectum. The size of the tumors varied from 3 mm to 10 mm and background characteristics of the patients were not different in the two groups. The rate of complete removal of carcinoid tumors using a ligation device (100%, 8/8) was significantly higher than that of conventional endoscopic resection (57.1%, 4/7). The three patients had tumor involvement of deep margin, for which additional treatment was performed. No complications occurred during or after endoscopic resection using a ligation device. All patients in the both groups were alive during the 3-year observation period. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic resection using a ligation device is a useful and safe method for resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors. PMID:16810752

  6. Lipschütz ulcer in a 17-month-old girl: a rare manifestation of Epstein-Barr primoinfection.

    PubMed

    Burguete Archel, Edurne; Ruiz Goikoetxea, Maite; Recari Elizalde, Eva; Beristain Rementería, Xabier; Gómez Gómez, Lourdes; Iceta Lizarraga, Ainhoa

    2013-08-01

    Lipschütz ulcer is an uncommon entity that is clinically characterised by a flu-like syndrome accompanied by an acute painful necrotic vulvar ulcer. It typically occurs in young women with no sexual contact history, and it is very rare among children. The aetiology is unknown, although recently several reports have related Epstein-Barr virus primary infection with this entity. We report a 17-month-old girl with fever and an acute genital ulcer. All the complementary tests for the most frequent causes of vulvar ulcers yielded negative results, whereas viral serology and polymerase chain reaction technique confirmed the presence of an acute Epstein-Barr virus infection. When main causes of genital ulcer have been excluded, and there is no history of sexual contact, Lipschütz ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome by polymerase chain reaction can lead to an earlier diagnosis.

  7. Study between axillary and rectal temperature measurements in children.

    PubMed

    Haddadin, R B; Shamo'on, H I

    2007-01-01

    We compared axillary and rectal temperatures in 216 patients to assess the reliability of axillary temperature for determining fever in children under 14 years of age. Beyond the neonatal period, the mean rectal temperature was significantly higher than the axillary temperature. The sensitivity of axillary temperature in detecting fever was 87.5% among neonates but only 46% among older children. Axillary temperature correlated well with rectal temperature in neonates but not older children. There was no direct mathematical relationship between axillary and rectal temperature. Axillary temperature should be taken in neonates as it is less hazardous; rectal temperature should be used beyond this age.

  8. Distribution of fibronectin in the rectal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Scott, D L; Morris, C J; Blake, A E; Low-Beer, T S; Walton, K W

    1981-07-01

    Fibronectin is a glycoprotein of high molecular weight present in tissues, plasma, and tissue fluids. Its distribution in the rectal mucosa was studied by immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase techniques using a monospecific antiserum. Immunofluorescent reactivity for fibronectin was present in the normal rectal mucosa of control subjects in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and as a loose cribriform network of extracellular reactivity in the lamina propria that codistributed with histochemically demonstrable reticulin. Fibronectin was demonstrated immunoelectromicroscopically on collagen fibres, on smooth muscle cells and within and between columnar epithelial cells. In the rectal mucosa of patients with colitis with marked inflammatory changes, fibronectin appeared thickened and more prominent when present on basement membranes and as sparse strands between inflammatory cells infiltrating the lamina propria. In patients with longstanding colitis and less inflammatory cell infiltration there was a diffuse increase in fibronectin which was densely and uniformly present throughout the lamina propria. Fibronectin is a structural component of the rectal mucosa and changes in its distribution may form an important part of the local reaction to inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Rectal bezoars due to pumpkin seeds.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Mohammad Salman; Al-Wahibi, Khalifa; Baloch, Shafiq; Al-Qadhi, Hani

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bezoars commonly occur due to seeds, especially in children living in countries south of the Mediterranean and in the Middle-East. Dried seeds are considered a delicacy and consumed widely. Inadequate chewing or hastily eating without removing the hull may lead to their impaction as bezoars, which may require manual removal under general anaesthesia.

  10. Combined radical retropubic prostatectomy and rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Klee, L W; Grmoljez, P

    1999-10-01

    To present our experience with a small series of men who underwent simultaneous radical retropubic prostatectomy and rectal resection. Three men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer were found to have concurrent rectal tumors requiring resection. All three men underwent non-nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy and abdominoperineal resection (APR) or low anterior resection (LAR) of the rectum at the same operation. In the 2 patients undergoing APR, the levators were approximated posterior to the urethra, and the bladder was secured to the pubis. The patient undergoing LAR had urinary diversion stents placed and a diverting transverse loop colostomy. All 3 patients had excellent return of urinary continence. One patient required reoperation in the early postoperative period for small bowel adhesiolysis and stoma revision. Another patient had a mild rectal anastomotic stricture and a bladder neck stricture; both were successfully treated with a single dilation. No other significant complications occurred in these patients. Radical retropubic prostatectomy can safely be performed with partial or complete rectal resection in a single operation. A few minor modifications of the standard radical retropubic prostatectomy in this setting are suggested.

  11. [Rectal cancer: diagnosis, screening and treatment].

    PubMed

    Decanini-Terán, César Oscar; González-Acosta, Jorge; Obregón-Méndez, Jorge; Vega-de Jesús, Martín

    2011-01-01

    Rectal cancer is one of the primary malignant neoplasms occurring in Mexican patients of reproductive age. Unfortunately, randomized studies in rectal cancer do not exist as they do with well-recognized colon cancer. We must individualize the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnostic approach, staging and treatment because management is different in rectal cancers affecting the mid- and lower third of the rectum than in the upper third and in colon cancers. Histological staging is the primary prognostic factor. TNM staging (tumor, node, and metastasis) is used internationally by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). Staging is done with the assistance of endorectal ultrasound, which is best used in early-stage cancer; however, there are certain disadvantages in detecting node involvement. Magnetic resonance, on the other hand, allows for the evaluation of stenotic tumors and node involvement. Once the correct diagnosis and staging have been made, the next step is correct treatment. Neoadjuvant treatment has demonstrated to be better than adjuvant treatment. Abdominoperineal resection is rarely practiced currently, with sphincter preservation being the preferred procedure. Laparoscopic approach has conferred the advantages of the approach itself when performed by experts in the procedure but there is insufficient evidence to make it the "gold standard." Rectal cancer is a complex pathology that must be considered totally different from colon cancer for diagnosis and treatment. The patient must be staged completely and appropriately for individualizing correct treatment. More long-term studies are needed for optimizing treatment modalities.

  12. [Electronic rectal temperature measurement. A clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Ottesen, S; Nielsen, F T; Lund, H

    1993-05-24

    Rectal measurement of body temperature with an electronic device (Ivac) was compared to measurement with mercury thermometers in 157 adult patients on a medical ward. The electronic thermometers were less accurate, giving 3.6 times as many febrile patients. This was reduced to 1.6 after thermometer calibration. It is necessary to make regular calibrations of Ivac thermometers.

  13. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. DNA flow cytometric evaluation of cell cycle distribution in ulcerative colitis: a proposed method for assessing severity of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, F; Valentini, M; Cernigoi, C; Toffoli, G; Boiocchi, M; Poletti, M; Sozzi, M; Fornasarig, M; Cannizzaro, R; Bertolissi, E

    1995-01-01

    The assessment of disease severity in ulcerative colitis depends mainly on subjective variables, and an objective method of assessing mucosal inflammation is needed. Determination of the synthetic phase of the cell cycle is an accurate expression of inflammatory activity in the colonic mucosa. The aim of the study was to find out if the proliferative index or the synthetic phase (S phase) of the colonic mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis, as evaluated by DNA flow cytometry, is a reliable and reproducible marker of disease activity. Sixty consecutive patients with ulcerative colitis of different degrees of activity were entered into the study and submitted to colonoscopy plus multiple rectal biopsies. Disease severity was defined for each patient by means of a clinical, endoscopic, and histological score. Flow cytometry was used to calculate the proliferative index and the S phase of the cell cycle. A statistically significant correlation (p < 0.001) was found between all indices of severity. It is suggested that flow cytometric evaluation of the cell cycle in the rectal mucosa may be an efficient method of assessing severity of disease and efficacy of medical treatment in ulcerative colitis. PMID:7890236

  15. Adenocarcinoma of the ileoanal pouch for ulcerative colitis--a complication of severe chronic atrophic pouchitis?

    PubMed

    Knupper, N; Straub, E; Terpe, H J; Vestweber, K H

    2006-07-01

    The appearance of a carcinoma in the ileal pouch after restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative proctocolitis is rare. Most of these adenocarcinomas previously described in literature develop from residual viable rectal mucosa. We report a case of an adenocarcinoma arising in all probability from the ileal pouch after malignant transformation of the ileal pouch mucosa based on a chronic atrophic pouchitis. A 34-year-old man developed an adenocarcinoma after a double-stapled ileorectal J-pouch for ulcerative colitis (UC) proceeded from malignant ileal transformation. Before surgery, he had a 20-year history of UC refractory to medical therapy, but no occurrence of backwash ileitis, dysplasia or colitis-associated illness. He experienced severe pouchitis after IPAA since the ileostomy closure. Carcinoma was ensured by endoscopy, and the patient underwent an abdominoperineal pouch extirpation combined with excision of perirectal tissues and anal canal. Histology after surgery showed a pT4,pN2(4/16)pM0,G3 adenocarcinoma with global severe chronic atrophic pouchitis (CAP), villous atrophy and malignant ileal transformation. No metaplasia of the rectal mucosa was found, not even malignant epithelial transformation of the anal canal. This case suggests that a malignant transformation of the ileal pouch mucosa may occur as a pure complication of severe CAP, even in the absence of backwash ileitis or a previous history of cancer. The absence of metaplasia of the rectal mucosa revealed the passage from CAP to dysplastic epithelium and to cancer. A multifactorial development of carcinogenesis is supposed, but we emphasize the importance of severe CAP, and that careful surveillance is needed in patients after IPAA. We must submit that this is just a case report and cannot stand for general cancer development in ulcerative colitis, but it may point out the risk factor of chronic inflammation and leads the surgeon to skillful working

  16. [Management of perforative gastroduodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Sovtsov, S A

    2015-01-01

    To study the immediate results of surgical treatment of patients with perforative gastroduodenal ulcer. It was analyzed immediate results of surgical treatment of 646 patients with perforative gastroduodenal ulcer. Ulcer suturing predominated as surgical technique (358 patients, 55.5%), in other observations there were different types of vagotomy (215 cases, 33.3%), partial gastrectomy in 73 (11.2%) patients. In early postoperative period 36 (5.62%)patients died, incidence of complications was 6.2%. Following aspects effect on choice of surgical techbique including laoarotomy or minimally invasive approach, conventional suturing, vagotomy, partial gastrectomy: 1. presence of shock or unstable hemodynamics; 2. life-threating comorbidities (ASA class 3 and higher); 3. degree of abdominal bacterial contamination; 4. pre-hospital duration of disease; 5. dimension and type of ulcer; 6. ulcerative history or intraoperative evidence of chronic ulcer. Implementation or absolute predominance of surgery of the same type (suturing of perforative ulcer) leads to great number of poor long-term results (up to 60-70%) and requires repeated interventions.

  17. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan.

  18. [Stress or trigger situation. 2 notions illustrated by a comparison of stress ulcer to triggering of attacks of gastroduodenal ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Gfeller, R

    1977-01-01

    The author attempts to show the fundamental difference existing between the two often confused concepts of "stress" and "trigger-situation", using the example of "stress ulcer" and "trigger-situation" of the outbursts of the ulcer disease. The stress ulcer or acute ulcer is compared to a door forcefully kicked in. It is unspecific like the adaptation syndrome of Selye. The trigger-situation as we understand it is a current conflict situation, i.e. a well-defined and specific event that is only conflictual for a very specific personality structure (one of the four psychosomatic types according to M'Uzan). In contrast to the picture of the door forcefully kicked in as in the stress ulcer, for the trigger-situation of the outbursts of the ulcer disease, we have used a picture of Beck: a key perfectly fitting the lock. All case records show that while an event can become the trigger-situation for one of the four psychosomatic types according to M'Uzan, it will not be for a different type. The specificity resides in the fact that this trigger-situation is a current conflict situation. The present conflict corresponds to a transfer of the infantile intra-psychic conflict to the present situation. When this current conflict reaches a sufficient intensity, the defence system built up by the patient is thereby decompensated--through frustration either of the neurotic activity or passivity desire of the patient and the conflict triggers the symptom, the ulcer attack.

  19. Peripheral corneal ulceration associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karampatakis, Vasileios; Konidaris, Vasileios; Michailidou, Maria; Gerofotis, Antonios; Daniilidis, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Corneal ulceration Symptoms: Blurred vision Medication: Abatacept Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Ophthalmology Objective: Management of emergency care Background: To report a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and associated peripheral corneal ulceration. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with RA diagnosed 15 years ago, under immunosuppressive therapy (IV abatacept 250 mg/month), demonstrated blurring of vision in her RE (right eye). Visual acuity was 6/10 in the RE and 10/10 in the LE. Slit lamp examination revealed a paracentral superior corneal melt in the RE. Anterior chamber reaction was 2+. Laboratory investigations revealed positive anti-Ro and anti-La, anti-Extractable Nuclear Antigens (anti-ENA, ELISA), while anti-Sm, anti-Rnp, anti-Jo1 and anti-Scl70 were found negative. IgG and IgA serum immunoglobulins were found elevated, but IgE and IgM were within normal levels. Further evaluation for the underlying disease revealed highly elevated rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. The patient, who had been receiving anti-TNF during the last 6 months, underwent treatment with topical tobramycin and lubricants and oral prednisone 60 mg/day with tapering doses, to which methotrexate p.os. 15 mg/week was added. The condition improved within a few days after the initiation of prednisone treatment. Re-epithelization occurred 1 week after the onset of the immunosuppressive treatment. Only punctate fluorescein dye uptake was detected in the margins of the lesion. Conclusions: The effective control of the underlying disease and early diagnosis of the dry eye syndrome in RA patients may prevent serious corneal complications such as corneal ulceration. The initiation of treatment with steroids and immunosuppresants was found to halt the progression of keratolysis, and assisted re-epithelization. PMID:23986797

  20. Peripheral corneal ulceration associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Karampatakis, Vasileios; Konidaris, Vasileios; Michailidou, Maria; Gerofotis, Antonios; Daniilidis, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Female, 60 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Corneal ulceration Symptoms: Blurred vision Medication: Abatacept Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Ophthalmology. Management of emergency care. To report a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and associated peripheral corneal ulceration. A 60-year-old woman with RA diagnosed 15 years ago, under immunosuppressive therapy (IV abatacept 250 mg/month), demonstrated blurring of vision in her RE (right eye). Visual acuity was 6/10 in the RE and 10/10 in the LE. Slit lamp examination revealed a paracentral superior corneal melt in the RE. Anterior chamber reaction was 2+. Laboratory investigations revealed positive anti-Ro and anti-La, anti-Extractable Nuclear Antigens (anti-ENA, ELISA), while anti-Sm, anti-Rnp, anti-Jo1 and anti-Scl70 were found negative. IgG and IgA serum immunoglobulins were found elevated, but IgE and IgM were within normal levels. Further evaluation for the underlying disease revealed highly elevated rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. The patient, who had been receiving anti-TNF during the last 6 months, underwent treatment with topical tobramycin and lubricants and oral prednisone 60 mg/day with tapering doses, to which methotrexate p.os. 15 mg/week was added. The condition improved within a few days after the initiation of prednisone treatment. Re-epithelization occurred 1 week after the onset of the immunosuppressive treatment. Only punctate fluorescein dye uptake was detected in the margins of the lesion. The effective control of the underlying disease and early diagnosis of the dry eye syndrome in RA patients may prevent serious corneal complications such as corneal ulceration. The initiation of treatment with steroids and immunosuppresants was found to halt the progression of keratolysis, and assisted re-epithelization.

  1. Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses: 74 cases (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    Nucci, Daniel J; Liptak, Julius M; Selmic, Laura E; Culp, William T N; Durant, April M; Worley, Deanna; Maritato, Karl C; Thomson, Maurine; Annoni, Maurizio; Singh, Ameet; Matz, Brad; Benson, John; Buracco, Paolo

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence of and factors associated with complications following rectal pull-through (RPT) surgery and the outcome for dogs with rectal tumors. Retrospective case series. 74 dogs with rectal masses. Information regarding signalment, history, diagnostic testing, type of rectal disease, surgical details, and postoperative complications, treatments, and outcomes was obtained from medical records and follow-up communications. Survival times were calculated. Descriptive statistics were generated. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of various variables on the development of postsurgical complications and survival time. 58 (78.4%) dogs developed postsurgical complications, the most common of which was fecal incontinence with 42 (56.8%) dogs affected, of which 23 (54.8%) developed permanent incontinence. Other complications included diarrhea (n = 32), tenesmus (23), stricture formation (16), rectal bleeding (8), constipation (7), dehiscence (6), and infection (4). The rectal tumor recurred in 10 dogs. The median survival time was 1,150 days for all dogs and 726 days for dogs with malignant tumors. The 2 most common rectal masses were rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma in situ, and the dogs with these tumors had median survival times of 696 and 1,006 days, respectively. Dogs with rectal diseases that underwent RPT surgery had a high incidence of complications; however, those dogs had good local tumor control and survival times. The risk and impact of postsurgical complications on the quality of life and oncological outcomes should be discussed with owners before RPT surgery is performed in dogs with rectal masses.

  2. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, S B

    2000-07-01

    Last year was not a banner year for developments in medical therapy for ulcerative colitis. In contrast to the expansion of therapies for Crohn disease, treatment for ulcerative colitis was evolutionary, at best, leading many patients to seek alternative medical approaches. Nevertheless, there have been advances in the application of aminosalicylates and immune modifiers for ulcerative colitis. Additional, nonconventional approaches include nicotine, probiotics, dietary therapies, and heparins. Several novel approaches have arisen from animal models, including additional means of inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB and targeting of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  3. Clinical management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2013-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are chronic and difficult to heal. Pressure-reducing devices are clearly superior to a standard hospital mattress in preventing pressure ulcers, but only limited evidence and clinical intuition supports pressure-reducing devices in improving the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Local wound treatment should aim at maintaining a moist wound environment. The choice of a particular dressing depends on wound characteristics, such as the amount of exudate, dead space, or wound location. Nutritional status should be addressed as a process of good care. Debridement may improve time to a clean wound bed, but no clearly superior approach has been demonstrated.

  4. [Psychological differences between ulcer and non-ulcer dyspeptic patients].

    PubMed

    Slepoy, V; Pezzotto, S; Pedrana, R; Gatto, A; Poletto, L

    1994-01-01

    The existence of differences in the psychological profile of 39 endoscopically evaluated patients with ulcer (U) and non ulcer (NU) dyspepsia were examined. There were 21 U and 18 NU subjects. Cigarette smoking, intake of alcohol, coffee, mate, aspirin and NSAID were recorded, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Personality traits were determined by the Rorschach Test, considering psychological profile (introversive, extroversive, self-restrained), impulse and emotion control (do not allow their expression, impulsive, adequately conveyed) and level of social adaptation (low, normal, high). U and NU subjects experienced a similar number of potentially stressful life events. However, U patients perceived their events more negatively. Although no one type of "ulcer personality" was found consistently, ulcer patients tended to be more introversive and they had a better social adaptation than NU.

  5. Primary enteric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the urethra in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Patsouras, Dimitrios; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Charalampoudis, Petros; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Primary carcinoma of the male urethra accounts for less than 1% of malignancies in men. Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the urethra is extremely rare, and its biologic behavior is poorly understood. We present herein a rare case of mucinous urethral adenocarcinoma in a male patient with longstanding ulcerative colitis and multiple sclerosis. The patient presented with a voluminous pelvic mass; core biopsy of the lesion demonstrated a mucus-producing adenocarcinoma. Given the patient's history of subtotal colectomy, preoperative diagnosis was oriented towards a rectal stump adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent a pelvic exenteration: surprisingly, histology marked the prostatic urethra as the primary lesion site.

  6. Review article: the long-term management of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, S B

    2004-10-01

    After the induction of remission, the second priority of therapy for ulcerative colitis is sustained clinical remission, defined as the absence of inflammatory symptoms (diarrhoea, bleeding, rectal urgency) and the maintenance of an intact mucosa, with the absence of ulcers, friability or significant granularity at endoscopy. The 'optimal' maintenance strategy will depend on the therapy needed to induce remission. Thus, the transition from induction to maintenance therapy will be determined by the intensity of acute therapy necessary to induce remission and the duration of therapy required to complete the resolution of clinical symptoms. There are few controlled clinical trials pertaining to maintenance after each induction regimen. However, experience dictates that aminosalicylates are efficacious after aminosalicylate-induced remissions, that steroids should be tapered according to the time required to induce remission, that patients requiring ciclosporin will benefit from the addition of long-term immunomodulation with azathioprine or mercaptopurine, and that many patients with distal colitis who require topical mesalazine (mesalamine) will continue to need topical therapy to maintain remission, albeit at reduced frequency. The expectations for maintenance therapy require patient adherence to the prescribed treatment regimen. Patients require education with regard to the long-term goals of maintenance therapy (e.g. prevention of relapse, reduction of long-term complications of disease activity or risks of acute therapy with steroids), and should be warned against the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cautioned about the cessation of smoking, when applicable, due to potential risks of relapse or chronic activity.

  7. Fecal microbiota in pouchitis and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai-Yu; Wang, Jian-Lin; Wei, Jiang-Peng; Gao, Sen-Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Li-Tian; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the changes in microbiota in feces of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and pouchitis using genomic technology. METHODS Fecal samples were obtained from UC patients with or without an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) procedure, as well as healthy controls. The touchdown polymerase chain reaction technique was used to amplify the whole V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, which was transcribed from DNA extracted from fecal samples. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to separate the amplicons. The band profiles and similarity indices were analyzed digitally. The predominant microbiota in different groups was confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. RESULTS Microbial biodiversity in the healthy controls was significantly higher compared with the UC groups (P < 0.001) and IPAA groups (P < 0.001). Compared with healthy controls, the UC patients in remission and those in the mildly active stage, the predominant species in patients with moderately and severely active UC changed obviously. In addition, the proportion of the dominant microbiota, which was negatively correlated with the disease activity of UC (r = -6.591, P < 0.01), was decreased in pouchitis patients. The numbers of two types of bacteria, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Eubacterium rectale, were reduced in UC. Patients with pouchitis had an altered microbiota composition compared with UC patients. The microbiota from pouchitis patients was less diverse than that from severely active UC patients. Sequencing results showed that similar microbiota, such as Clostridium perfringens, were shared in both UC and pouchitis. CONCLUSION Less diverse fecal microbiota was present in patients with UC and pouchitis. Increased C. perfringens in feces suggest its role in the exacerbation of UC and pouchitis. PMID:27833384

  8. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael S.; Williamson, Katherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  9. Diabetic ulcers: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Sage, R A

    1987-04-01

    Four factors are necessary for healing any diabetic ulceration. First, the vascular supply must be adequate. Second, any infection must be controlled. Third, pressure that is contributing to the formation of the ulceration must be eliminated. Lastly, adequate nutritional status must be maintained. With the variety of ulcer treatments that appear on a regular basis, it is frequently difficult to evaluate one method versus another. Any treatment regimen that is advised must ultimately depend on these basic building blocks for success. It is frequently difficult and sometimes impossible to control each of these factors, but an understanding of their mechanisms and contribution to ulcer healing allows the clinician to plan therapy and develop an ultimate prognosis for each case he encounters. Tables 1 and 2 contain guidelines for evaluation and treatment based on these principles.

  10. Neuropathic ulcers of the foot.

    PubMed

    Lang-Stevenson, A I; Sharrard, W J; Betts, R P; Duckworth, T

    1985-05-01

    We report a prospective study of the causes and treatment of 26 long-standing neuropathic ulcers of the foot in 21 patients. The most important causal factor, well illustrated by pressure studies, was the presence of a dynamic or static deformity leading to local areas of peak pressure on insensitive skin. All but one of the 26 ulcers had healed after an average of 10 weeks of treatment in a light, skin-tight plaster cast, with the prohibition of weight-bearing. Recurrent ulceration was prevented in all but one foot by early operation to correct the causative deformity; this was performed after the ulcer had healed and before allowing weight-bearing on the limb. Pressure studies after operation confirmed that pressure points had been relieved.

  11. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  12. [Nursing care of pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Hautin, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The definition of a pressure ulcer remains very academic. It results from tissue necrosis following ischemia through prolonged arteriolar constriction between two hard surfaces progressing in stages. The nursing care and the use of dressings are therefore adapted to each stage. Today, the treatment of pressure ulcers is complex due to the large number of categories of dressings available. Moreover, the choice of the dressing must take into account the specificities of elderly patients. However, certain basic principles remain essential.

  13. [Ulcer of the transverse colon].

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, C; Stoichiţa, S; Vasilescu, D; Strutenschi, T; Lake, D

    1979-01-01

    This very rare affection of unknown origin, achieves a macroscopic and microscopic aspect similar to that described by Cruveillhier at the level of the stomach. The authors present a case of ulcer located on the transverse colon, at the free margin, with stenosing evolution and coexisting with duodenal ulceration of chronic character. The patient also had portal hypertension in the third stage and arteriopathy that had been diagnosed previously.

  14. Aortic hammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komen, Niels; Vercauteren, Sven; de Roover, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    To present a case of penetrating aortic ulcer with extraordinary etiology. A 57-year-old man was admitted with acute retrosternal and interscapular pain. He was a demolition worker and often used a pneumatic drill to which he pressed his chest as he drilled. Clinical examination showed previously undiagnosed hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography disclosed a penetrating aortic ulcer in the descending thoracic aorta without any sign of atherosclerosis. Initial treatment consisted of blood pressure control. However, due to progression of the lesion, endovascular treatment was performed to implant a covered endoprosthesis. We hypothesize that the etiology of the ulcer was the shear forces developed by incorrect, repetitive use of the pneumatic hammer in combination with the untreated hypertension. This is analogous to the hypothenar hammer syndrome, and we propose naming this the "aortic hammer syndrome."

  15. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  16. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  17. Clinical course of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Cottone, M; Scimeca, D; Mocciaro, F; Civitavecchia, G; Perricone, G; Orlando, A

    2008-07-01

    To provide a review of studies on prognosis in ulcerative colitis by reviewing the relevant population-based cohort studies. On the basis of incidence and population studies, ulcerative colitis has a favourable clinical course, with good quality of life, a chronic course characterized by at least one relapse, and a surgery rate of 30% after 10 years from diagnosis. Patients affected by severe ulcerative colitis have a higher risk of colectomy, and some clinical variables may predict the disease's clinical course. Most patients respond to steroids and only a low percentage become dependent, or non-responders to steroids. Patients who have a long-lasting ulcerative colitis (>10 years) or are affected by an extensive disease have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, while those treated with immunosuppressants for long period of time may have an increased risk of developing lymphomas. Data on mortality in ulcerative colitis patients are not homogeneous, but if a real risk exists it is in patients with extensive or severe disease. The evidence that patients with severe ulcerative colitis are often non-smokers may explain why in one study the mortality rate was lower.

  18. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  19. [Fatal intoxication following rectal instillation of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Nadjem, H; Ropohl, D; Werp, J

    1990-01-01

    A 62-year old man who had been living on a remote farm was found dead in his bed. Inserted in his rectum was a synthetic flexible tube filled with brandy (43 vol. %) and connected to a bicycle pump. Samples taken during autopsy from 3 different parts of the body showed ethanol concentrations from 4.87% to 5.35% in the blood and 6.73% in the urine. The ethanol concentrations in the small and large intestine were considerably higher (more than 29%) than in the stomach (9%). The decreased had a tumor as large as a tennis ball on the base of his tongue, almost completely filling the oropharynx, making swallowing very difficult, which probably was the reason of the rectal instillation of alcohol. The report deals with this unusual case of rectal alcohol instillation, and with the different ethanol and congener alcohol concentrations in the body fluids.

  20. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre.

  1. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  2. [Peritonitis following gastroduodenal ulcer perforation disease in children: report of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Ndour, O; Bansouda, J; Fall, A F; Alumeti, D M; Diouf, C; Ngom, G; Ndoye, M

    2012-10-01

    Peritonitis due to gastroduodenal ulcer perforation disease is a rare entity in pediatric surgery. In Senegal, no study has been dedicated to ulcer complications in children. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of perforated peptic ulcer in patients less than 15 years old. This retrospective study was conducted in the Surgical Emergencies and Paediatric Surgery Department at Aristide Le Dantec University Hospital Center in Dakar, Senegal, during a period of 11 years (January 1999 to December 2010). We found 4 children who presented perforated gastroduodenal ulcer: 3 females and 1 male. The average age of these patients was 9 years (range, 7-14 years). No family history was found. We noted 3 cases of perforated duodenal ulcer and one perforated gastric ulcer. The clinical diagnosis was suspected based on a peritoneal irritation syndrome. A plain x-ray of the abdomen was taken in all patients, which objectified a pneumoperitoneum image in 3 cases. The leukocytosis was constant. Treatment in all patients consisted on pre-, intra-, and postoperative intensive care, supra- and infraumbilical midline laparotomy, which allowed us to perform a debridement-suture of the gap followed by epiploplasty and extensive washing with lukewarm physiologic serum. Adjuvant therapy based on anti-ulcer and antibiotic therapy was initiated. Bacteriological examination of peritoneal fluid isolated a polymicrobial flora. Helicobacter pylori was not isolated. Histological examination of the biopsied perforation edges showed a benign ulcer in all cases. The follow-up endoscopy was performed 4 weeks after surgery and showed cicatrization of the ulcer in all patients. After a mean of 2 years, no recurrence was noted. The gastric or duodenal ulcer in children is rare. It is often discovered at the stage of perforation, a complication for which the essential treatment is surgery. Routine screening would certainly help to reduce the risk of this

  3. [Reiter's syndrome oral manifestations].

    PubMed

    Fotiou, G; Laskaris, G

    1988-01-01

    Reiter's syndrome is characterized by arthritis, non-gonococcal urethritis, conjunctivitis and mucocutaneous lesions. Oral lesions occur in 20-40% of the cases. They appear as papules and ulcerations on the buccal mucosa, gingiva and lips. Lesions on the tongue resemple "geographic tongue". One case of Reiter's syndrome is described. The significance of the clinical lesions, their microscopic appearance and the differential diagnosis are discussed.

  4. Altemeier operation for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Abdelhedi, Cherif; Frikha, F; Bardaa, S; Kchaw, A; Mzali, R

    2014-08-08

    A stranguled rectal prolapse is a rare cause of intestinal occlusion. It requires emergency surgery. A patient who underwent emergency perineal proctectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy is described. The postoperative course was uneventful, with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual scenario of bowel incarceration.

  5. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  6. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2017-09-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies traditionally used a 4-field box technique. Later trials have shown the feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) instead. But vaginal movement between fractions is concerning when using IMRT due to greater conformality of the isodose curves to the target and the resulting possibility of missing the target while the vagina is displaced. In this study, we showed that the use of a rectal balloon during treatment can decrease vaginal displacement, limit rectal dose, and limit acute and late toxicities. Little is known regarding the use of a rectal balloon (RB) in treating patients with IMRT in the posthysterectomy setting. We hypothesize that the use of an RB during treatment can limit rectal dose and acute and long-term toxicities, as well as decrease vaginal cuff displacement between fractions. We performed a retrospective review of patients with gynecological malignancies who received postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB from January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2015. Rectal dose constraint was examined as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1203 and 0418. Daily cone beam computed tomography (CT) was performed, and the average (avg) displacement, avg magnitude, and avg magnitude of vector were calculated. Toxicity was reported according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Acute toxicity was defined as less than 90 days from the end of radiation treatment. Late toxicity was defined as at least 90 days after completing radiation. Twenty-eight patients with postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB were examined and 23 treatment plans were reviewed. The avg rectal V40 was 39.3% ± 9.0%. V30 was65.1% ± 10.0%. V50 was 0%. Separate cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images (n = 663) were reviewed. The avg displacement was as follows: superior 0.4 + 2.99 mm, left 0.23 ± 4.97 mm, and anterior 0.16 ± 5.18 mm. The avg magnitude of displacement was superior

  7. Venous ulcer: epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Lastória, Sidnei

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and current therapeutic options for venous ulcer. Venous ulcer is a severe clinical manifestation of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). It is responsible for about 70% of chronic ulcers of the lower limbs. The high prevalence of venous ulcer has a significant socioeconomic impact in terms of medical care, days off work and reduced quality of life. Long-term therapeutics are needed to heal venous ulcers and recurrence is quite common, ranging from 54 to 78%. Thrombophlebitis and trauma with long-term immobilization predisposing to deep venous thrombosis are important risk factors for CVI and venous ulcer. The most recent theories about pathogenesis of venous ulcer have associated it with microcirculatory abnormalities and generation of an inflammatory response. Management of venous leg ulcers is based on understanding the pathogenesis. In recent years novel therapeutic approaches for venous ulcers have offered valuable tools for the management of patients with this disorder.

  8. [Guidelines of diagnosis for peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jae Gyu; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seol, Sang Young

    2009-11-01

    Peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent diseases in gastrointestinal field. Recently, evolution was made for pathophysiology of peptic ulcer from "no acid, no ulcer" to Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is estimated about 10% in Korea, and has declined due to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Peptic ulcer has the cycle of exacerbation and improvement in the clinical course, and has not occasionally any clinical symptom. Helicobacter pylori eradication has made the marked reduction of relapse of peptic ulcer disease. Although nationwide endoscopic screening has enabled accurate diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, general guideline for diagnosis of peptic ulcer has not made in Korea. Herein, we propose a guideline for the diagnosis of peptic ulcer according to domestic, international clinical studies, and experts opinions with level of evidence and grade of recommendation.

  9. [Peptic ulcer disease etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bak-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy; Płaneta-Małecka, Izabela

    2004-01-01

    Authors in this article present etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children and adults. Increased gastric acid output, Helicobacter pylori, NSAIDs and stress are the basic risk factors in peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori infection is a widely known risk factor in peptic ulcer disease and influences diagnostic and treatment procedures. Primary ulcer disease concerns mainly duodenum and is accompanied by H. pylori infection. Gastroscopy and Helicobacter tests are the only reliable procedures to diagnose peptic ulcer disease. Nowadays the most important aim in peptic ulcer treatment is the H. pylori eradication. Therapy with two antibiotics and a protein pomp inhibitor eradicates the bacteria, treats the ulceration and lowers the number of ulcer recurrence. In non-infected H. pylori ulcers or in a long-term treatment protein pomp inhibitors and H2-inhibitors are effective as well in gastroprotective therapy.

  10. Increasing trend in retained rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Unluer, Zynep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To highlight the rising trend in hospital presentation of foreign bodies retained in the rectum over a 5-year period. METHODS Retrospective review of the cases of retained rectal foreign bodies between 2008 and 2012 was performed. Patients’ clinical data and yearly case presentation with data relating to hospital episodes were collected. Data analysis was by SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, United States. RESULTS Twenty-five patients presented over a 5-year period with a mean age of 39 (17-62) years and M: F ratio of 2:1. A progressive rise in cases was noted from 2008 to 2012 with 3, 4, 4, 6, 8 recorded patients per year respectively. The majority of the impacted rectal objects were used for self-/partner-eroticism. The commonest retained foreign bodies were sex vibrators and dildos. Ninty-six percent of the patients required extraction while one passed spontaneously. Two and three patients had retrieval in the Emergency Department and on the ward respectively while 19 patients needed examination under anaesthesia for extraction. The mean hospital stay was 19 (2-38) h. Associated psychosocial issues included depression, deliberate self-harm, illicit drug abuse, anxiety and alcoholism. There were no psychosocial problems identified in 15 patients. CONCLUSION There is a progressive rise in hospital presentation of impacted rectal foreign bodies with increasing use of different objects for sexual arousal. PMID:27830039

  11. Wound cleansing for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Z E H; Cowman, S

    2005-10-19

    Pressure ulcers (also called pressure sores, bed sores and decubitus ulcers) are areas of tissue damage that occur in the very old, malnourished or acutely ill, who cannot reposition themselves. Pressure ulcers impose a significant financial burden on health care systems and negatively affect quality of life. Wound cleansing is considered an important component of pressure ulcer care. This systematic review seeks to answer the following question:What is the effect of wound cleansing solutions and wound cleansing techniques on the rate of healing of pressure ulcers? We searched the Specialised Trials Register of the Cochrane Wounds Group (up to August 2005), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2005). We searched bibliographies of relevant publications retrieved. We contacted drug companies and experts in the field to identify studies missed by the primary search. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing wound cleansing with no wound cleansing, or different wound cleansing solutions, or different cleansing techniques, were eligible for inclusion if they reported an objective measure of pressure ulcer healing. Two authors extracted data independently and resolved disagreements through discussion and reference to the Cochrane Wounds Group editorial base. A structured narrative summary of the included studies was conducted. For dichotomous outcomes, relative risk (RR), plus 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated; for continuous outcomes, weighted mean difference (WMD), plus 95% CI were calculated. Meta analysis was not conducted, because of the small number of diverse RCTs identified. No studies compared cleansing with no cleansing. Two studies compared different wound cleansing solutions: a statistically significant improvement in Pressure Sore Status Tool scores occurred for wounds cleansed with saline spray containing Aloe vera, silver chloride and decyl glucoside (Vulnopur) compared to isotonic saline (P

  12. Recovery from activity-stress ulcer by ad lib feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirao, M; Tanaka, M; Emoto, H; Ishii, H; Yokoo, H; Yoshida, M; Tsuda, A

    1997-12-31

    In order to investigate the recovery from activity-stress ulcers by ad lib-feeding and/or cessation of running, male Wistar rats were exposed to the activity-stress paradigm, and the rats that revealed hypothermia (their rectal temperature fell below 36 degrees C) were sacrificed either immediately or after several 24 h periods of healing. Rats that were sacrificed immediately after the appearance of hypothermia and those that were exposed to restricted feeding plus cessation of running revealed severe activity-stress ulcers, whereas few ulcers were observed in rats given ad lib-feeding and those that were given ad lib-feeding plus cessation of running. Although no significant differences in relative weights of spleen and thymus were obtained among the different recovery conditions, the relative weights of the adrenal glands were highest in the restricted feeding plus cessation of running group, whereas, the other animals exposed to the activity-stress paradigm showed no differences. These results indicate that activity-stress ulcers recover under conditions of ad lib-feeding within 24 h, but they are not influenced by cessation of running. These data also suggest that organ weights are not affected by any manipulations employed in the present study.

  13. A controlled trial of azathioprine in the management of chronic ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J L; Wall, A J; Levin, B; Binder, H J; Kirsner, J B

    1975-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of azathioprine in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, a 6-month double blind trial was carried out. Thirty patients with chronic ulcerative colitis who required the equivalent of at least 10 mg of prednisone per day over the 3 months prior to entering the study were randomized into placebo and azathioprine (1.5 mg per kg) treatment groups. Reduction of steriods was a major objective of the trial. Age and sex distribution, number of bowel movements, sense of well being, steroid dosage, and findings on proctoscopy, rectal biopsy, and colon X-ray initially were similar in the two groups. No side effects were associated with azathioprine. Although steroid dose was lower (p less than 0.05) in the azathioprine group at the termination of the study, no difference between the two groups could be detected in the number of bowel movements, sense of well being, and findings on proctoscopy during the first 3 weeks compared with the last 3 and during the first 3 months compared with the last 3. Although azathioprine does not confer dramatic benefit upon patients with chronic ulcerative colitis who require steroids, it does permit reduction of steroid dosage without apparent worsening of the disease. Its major value in ulcerative colitis may be in facilitating significant decreases or complete discontinuance of steroids.

  14. Rebamipide enema therapy for left-sided ischemic colitis patients accompanied by ulcers: Open label study

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Satohiro; Tsuji, Kenichiro; Shirahama, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To attempt rectal administration of rebamipide in the treatment of ischemic colitis patients with ulcers, and evaluate its effects. METHODS: We compared 9 ischemic colitis patients (2 men, 7 women) with ulcers treated by bowel rest only from 2000 to 2005 (conventional therapy group), with 6 patients (2 men, 4 women) treated by rebamipide enema therapy in 2006 (rebamipide enema therapy group) and analyzed the mean duration of fasting and hospitalization, degree of ulcer healing, and decrease in WBC count for the two groups. RESULTS: The mean duration of fasting and hospitalization were 2.7 ± 1.8 d and 9.2 ± 1.5 d in the rebamipide group and 7.9 ± 4.1 d and 17.9 ± 6.8 d in the control group, respectively, and significantly reduced in the rebamipide group (t = -2.915; P = 0.0121 and t = -3.054; P = 0.0092). As for the degree of ulcer healing at 7 d after admission, the ulcer score was reduced by 3.5 ± 0.5 (points) in the rebamipide group and 2.8 ± 0.5 (points) in the control group (t = 1.975; P = 0.0797), while the decrease in WBC count was 120.0 ± 55.8 (× 102/μL) in the rebamipide group and 85.9 ± 56.8 (× 102/μL) in the control group (t = 1.006; P = 0.3360). CONCLUSION: In left-sided ischemic colitis patients with ulcers, rebamipide enema therapy significantly reduced the duration of fasting and hospitalization, recommending its use as a new and effective therapeutic alternative. PMID:18609691

  15. Giant rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Alder, L.S.; Elver, G.; Foo, F.J.; Dobson, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST are the most common mesenchymal tumours; however, rectal GISTs account for <5%. In the pelvis they represent a diagnostic challenge with giant GISTs likely to be malignant. They may present with urological, gynaecological or rectal symptoms. Sphincter-preserving surgery can be aided by neoadjuvant therapy. We present an uncommon case of giant rectal GIST masquerading as acute urinary retention. PMID:24968434

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic.

  17. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  18. [Ventral rectal sacropexy (colpo-perineal) in the treatment of rectal and rectogenital prolapse].

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Elósegui, José L; Apeztegui, Francisco J; Placer, Carlos; Borda, Nerea; Irazusta, Martín; Múgica, José A; Murgoitio, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Ventral sacral-rectopexy with mesh corrects rectal prolapse and minimises rectal dissection. Subsequent colpopexy corrects apical and posterior prolapses of the vagina. The combination of both procedures can lead to the simultaneous correction of pelvic organ prolapses (POP). To present the results of a patient series with several types of POP treated using the same approach and operation. A total of 57 patients diagnosed with any type of POP were operated on between January 2005 and August 2008 using ventral rectal-colpo-sacropexy, who were grouped into three types: A, total rectal prolapse isolated or combined with a hysterocele or colpocele (11 patients); B, rectoenterocele with internal rectal invagination and/or descending perineum (4 patients); and C, middle and posterior genital compartment prolapse (42 patients). The laparoscopic approach was used in the 15 patients of groups A and B and 11 from group C. A biological mesh was used in 41 patients and a macroporous synthetic one in the rest. The mean age of the patients in the series was 66 (19-81) years, with 55 females and 2 males. The median follow up was 25 (4-48) months. There were no major post-surgical complications. A recurrence of prolapse was recorded in one patient in group A (1/11); the 7 patients who suffered from incontinence improved after the surgery, no case of de novo constipation being recorded and an improvement in 8 of the 9 patients from groups A and B with obstructive defaecation. There were 9 (21%) recurrences detected in group C, but only 4 (9%) required reintervention. In all the recurrences a biological mesh had been used. Laparoscopic ventral rectal-colpo-pexy is an effective technique to correct POP. Although safe and innocuous, the results with biological meshes did not last as long.

  19. Comparison of the preventive analgesic effect of rectal ketamine and rectal acetaminophen after pediatric tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Heidari, S Morteza; Mirlohi, S Zahra; Hashemi, S Jalal

    2012-03-01

    There is a little data about rectal administration of Ketamine as a postoperative analgesic, so we compared the efficacy of rectal ketamine with rectal acetaminophen, which is applied routinely for analgesia after painful surgeries like tonsillectomy. In this single-blinded comparative trial, we enrolled 70 children undergoing elective tonsillectomy, and divided them randomly in two groups. Patients received rectal ketamine (2 mg / kg) or rectal acetaminophen (20 mg / kg) at the end of surgery. The children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain scale was used to estimate pain in children. Also the vital signs, Wilson sedation scale, and side effects in each group were noted and compared for 24 hours. The ketamine group had a lower pain score at 15 minutes and 60 minutes after surgery in Recovery (6.4 ± 0.8, 7.4 ± 1 vs. 7.1 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05) and one hour and two hours in the ward (7.2 ± 0.7, 7 ± 0.5 vs. 7.9 ± 1.2, 7.5 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05), with no significant differences till 24 hours. Dreams and hallucinations were not reported in the ketamine group. Systolic blood pressure was seen to be higher in the ketamine group (104.4 ± 7.9 vs. 99.8 ± 7.7 in the acetaminophen group) and nystagmus was reported only in the ketamine group (14.2%). Other side effects were equivalent in both the groups. With low complications, rectal ketamine has analgesic effects, especially in the first hours after surgery in comparison with acetaminophen, and it can be an alternative analgesic with easy administration in children after tonsillectomy.

  20. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Woo; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hyeong Rok

    2011-12-01

    Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection (ISR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation is helpful in the management of patients with low rectal cancer. With the advent of this technique, the need for performance of abdominoperineal resection seems to have decreased in patients with very low rectal tumors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility, the functional outcome, and the short-term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic ISR for low rectal adenocarcinoma at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 111 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic ISR for low rectal adenocarcinoma between July 2005 and December 2009. Demographic status, surgical outcomes, functional outcome data, and oncologic outcome data were collected. The mean distance of the tumor from the anal verge was 3.4 cm (range: 1-5 cm). The mean operative time was 214.7 min (range, 150-450 min). The mean distal resection margin was 1.3 ± 1.1 cm. Morbidity occurred in 24 patients (21.6%), including anastomotic leakage in 2 patients (1.8%). The mean Wexner continence score after stoma repair was 7.5 ± 2.7 (range: 2 ~ 19), and 9.8 in total ISR, 7.3 in partial ISR (P = 0.071). The 3-year overall survival rate was 92.8%, and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 73.0%. Local recurrence was noted in 6 of the 111 patients with TNM stage I to III (5.4%). The patients with lesions at 2 cm to the dentate line had a 7.07-fold greater risk of local recurrence, including a 13.42-fold greater risk of lateral pelvic wall recurrence and perineal recurrence (95% Confidence interval [CI], 1.141-158.006; P = 0.009) than in those who had lesions more than 2 cm from the anal verge (95% CI, 1.290-38.832; P = 0.011). Laparoscopic ISR after neoadjuvant chemoradiation can be recommended as a technically feasible, minimally invasive, and a sphincter-saving procedure with acceptable functional and short-term oncologic outcomes in patients with very low rectal cancer.

  1. Medical therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, K R; Isenberg, J I

    1992-04-01

    The gastric duodenal mucosa normally is protected from the damaging effects of gastric acid and pepsin by ill-defined mechanisms. Ulcers may arise when there is an imbalance between the aggressive and defensive factors that renders the mucosa susceptible to damage. A variety of factors have been identified that may favor the development of peptic ulcers, but no single pathophysiologic defect applies in all ulcer patients. In duodenal ulcers, gastric acid hypersecretion is observed in as many as one third of patients; however, most patients with duodenal ulcers secrete normal amounts of gastric acid. Decreased mucosal bicarbonate secretion may be important in at least some duodenal ulcer patients. Use of NSAIDs may cause either gastric or duodenal ulcers, probably through the inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis and disruption of mucosal defenses. Finally, a recently identified bacterium, H. pylori, causes a chronic gastritis that is found in the overwhelming majority of patients with duodenal ulcers and non-NSAID-associated gastric ulcers. This bacterium may play a pivotal role in ulcer pathogenesis and, especially, in ulcer recurrences. A number of drugs of proved efficacy are available for the treatment of acute duodenal and gastric ulcers. The H2 receptor antagonists administered once daily remain the mainstay of ulcer therapy because of their efficacy, ease of use, and excellent safety profile. More thorough and long-lasting acid inhibition is afforded by the H+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor omeprazole. This agent also promotes more rapid ulcer healing, but in most patients, this minor advantage may not justify the higher cost. It is not known whether more rapid healing will translate into lower ulcer complication rates. Until further data are available, this drug may be preferable in patients with large or complicated ulcers. In patients with refractory ulcers, omeprazole is clearly superior to other available agents. Agents that promote mucosal defense

  2. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  3. Active Pedicle Epithelial Flap Transposition Combined with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Treatment of Nonhealing Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yuexin; Jia, Yanni; Liu, Dongle; Li, Suxia; Shi, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of active pedicle epithelial flap transposition combined with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) in treating nonhealing corneal ulcers. Material and Methods. Eleven patients (11 eyes) with nonhealing corneal ulcer who underwent the combined surgery were included. Postoperatively, ulcer healing time was detected by corneal fluorescein staining. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, surgical complications, and recurrence were recorded. Corneal status was inspected by the laser scanning confocal microscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Results. The primary diseases were herpes simplex keratitis (8 eyes), corneal graft ulcer (2 eyes), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye). All epithelial flaps were intact following surgery, without shedding or displacement. Mean ulcer healing time was 10.8 ± 3.1 days, with a healing rate of 91%. Vision significantly improved from 1.70 to 0.82 log MAR (P = 0.001). A significant decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and corneal stromal edema was revealed 2 months postoperatively by confocal microscopy and AS-OCT. Corneal ulcer recurred in 1 eye. None of the patients developed major complications. Conclusion. Active pedicle epithelial flap transposition combined with AMT is a simple and effective treatment for nonhealing corneal ulcers. PMID:27830086

  4. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  5. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for the treatment of uncommon rectal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Márquez, Manuel; Rubio-Gil, Francisco; Ortega-Ruiz, Sofía; Blesa-Sierra, Isabel; Álvarez-García, Antonio; Jorge-Cerrudo, Jaime; Vidaña-Márquez, Elisabet; Belda-Lozano, Ricardo; Reina-Duarte, Ángel

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed as a less aggressive alternative treatment for rectal lesions (mainly adenomas and adenocarcinomas). However, its use for other rectal lesions has become more frequent, trying to reduce the morbidity associated with more invasive techniques. The aim of this study is to describe our experience in the use of TEM in other rectal lesions. Retrospective and descriptive study including patients operated with TEM (from June 2008 to December 2016) for the treatment of rectal lesions different from adenomas or adenocarcinomas. Among the 138 patients treated by TEM in our department, 10 patients were operated on for rectal lesions other than adenomas or adenocarcinomas. Rectal lesions were 3neuroendocrine tumours, a neuroendocrine tumour metastasis, a rectal stenosis, a cloacogenic polyp, an endometrioma, a retrorrectal tumour, a presacral abscess and a lesion in the rectovaginal septum. Mean operative time was 72min and postoperative stay was 4.2 days. Only one patient needed a reoperation, due to rectal bleeding. TEM could be a useful tool for the treatment of rectal lesions different from adenomas or adenocarcinomas, potentially decreasing the morbidity associated with more aggressive surgical techniques. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Rectal transmission of bovine leukemia virus in cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Henry, E T; Levine, J F; Coggins, L

    1987-04-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was transmitted by rectal inoculation of BLV-infective whole blood into cattle and sheep. Two cows and 2 sheep each were given 500 ml and 50 ml of blood, respectively, by rectal infusion. Two sheep which served as positive controls each were given 1 ml of the same blood, IV. All animals became seropositive to BLV by postinoculation week 5. Although relatively large volumes of blood were used for rectal inoculation, a base line for infectivity was established for the rectal route.

  7. Circulating antibodies to cow's milk proteins in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, D. P.; Truelove, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Sera from patients with ulcerative colitis (51), Crohn's disease (30), hypolactasia (13), untreated adult coeliac disease (11), irritable colon syndrome (24), and sera from 38 healthy control subjects were tested for antibodies to the principal cow's milk proteins—casein, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin. The red-cell-linked antigen-antiglobulin reaction was used to determine the titres of direct agglutinating antibodies and IgA and IgG incomplete antibodies. Apart from patients with coeliac disease, direct agglutinating antibodies were found infrequently and then in low titres. Approximately 50% of subjects had low titres of IgA and IgG antibodies. However, the titres found in sera from patients with ulcerative colitis did not differ from those found in the control subjects or in patients with Crohn's disease, hypolactasia, or irritable colon syndrome. Patients with untreated coeliac disease frequently had high antibody titres to the milk proteins. In all subjects tested, incomplete antibodies of IgA or IgG immunoglobulin class occurred with equal frequency. The frequent occurrence in adults of low titres of antibodies to the milk proteins may be due to continued absorption of minute amounts of protein. Absorption of allergens may be facilitated by mucosal damage, such as that of coeliac disease, with stimulation of antibody production. At the present time, however, there is little evidence to suggest that milk allergy is a factor in the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. PMID:5087069

  8. Genital Aphthous Ulcers and a Case of Suspected Chikungunya: A Short Clinical Case.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Díaz, Frances A

    2017-09-01

    Genital aphthous ulcers can result from multiple conditions including febrile syndromes. Chikungunya infection manifests mainly as fever accompanied by polyarthralgia and pruritic rash. Nevertheless, healthcare providers should be alert to additional presentations. This is the case of a young woman presenting with painful genital ulcers after a three day prodome of fever and polyarthralgia. As a suspected case of Chikungunya infection and a clinical diagnosis of aphthae, treatment with oral prednisone for two weeks produced complete resolution of ulcers with no scarring. It is important to recognize that genital aphthous ulcers can develop in a febrile presentation such as that with Chikungunya. Although sexually transmitted diseases should be ruled out as a more common diagnosis in cases of genital lesions, knowledge about this unusual dermatological presentation would represent not only adequate prompt treatment but will minimize equivocal diagnosis as a sexually transmitted disease.

  9. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  10. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  12. Hallux ulceration in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    ElMakki Ahmed, Mohamed; Tamimi, Abdulhakim O; Mahadi, Seif I; Widatalla, Abubakr H; Shawer, Mohamed A

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a prospective cohort study to assess risk factors associated with hallux ulceration, and to determine the incidence of healing or amputation, in consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus who were treated over the observation period extending from September 2004 to March 2005, at the Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre, Khartoum City, Sudan. There were 122 diabetic patients in the cohort (92 males and 30 females) with an overall mean age of 58 +/- 9 years. Fifty-three percent of patients had complete healing within 8 weeks and 43% healed within 20 weeks. The overall mean time to healing was 16 +/- 8 weeks. In 32 (26.2%) patients, osteomyelitic bone was removed, leaving a healed and boneless hallux. The hallux was amputated in 17 (13.9%) patients; in 2 (1.6%) patients it was followed by forefoot amputation and in 7 (5.7%) patients by below-the-knee amputation. In 90 (73.8%) patients the initial lesion was a blister. In conclusion, hallux ulceration is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and is usually preceded by a blister. Neuropathy, foot deformity, and wearing new shoes are common causative factors; and ischemia, osteomyelitis, any form of wound infection, and the size of the ulcer are main outcome determinants. Complete healing occurred in 103 (85%) of diabetic patients with a hallux ulcer. Vascular intervention is important relative to limb salvage when ischemia is the main cause of the ulcer.

  13. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  14. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  15. Antral function in duodenal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, F. I.; Parker, K.; Swaminathan, M.; Daniell, A.

    1969-01-01

    A dye-dilution technique is used to compare the concentration and output of acid, chloride and pepsin in duodenal ulcer patients and controls following stimulation of the antrum with alcohol, sodium bicarbonate and peptone with the response to insulin hypoglycaemia and maximal histamine stimulation. The mean secretory rate was higher in response to all the stimuli in duodenal ulcer patients except to sodium bicarbonate. Following antral stimulation by peptone and sodium bicarbonate the acid and chloride concentrations rose to very high levels. The mean outputs were the same as those following maximal histamine stimulation although there were wide individual variations. There was no difference between duodenal ulcer patients and controls. The ‘neutral chloride’ concentration was much less than in the other phases. The basal secretion and the secretions in response to insulin and histamine stimulation showed higher concentrations, as well as higher outputs of acid and chloride in duodenal ulcer patients. Pepsin concentration in response to the various stimuli showed no difference between duodenal ulcer patients and controls and the pepsin output reflected the changes in secretory volume. PMID:4892935

  16. Laparoscopic rectopexy for full-thickness rectal prolapse: a single-institution retrospective study evaluating surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Lechaux, D; Trebuchet, G; Siproudhis, L; Campion, J P

    2005-04-01

    The laparoscopic approach promises to become the gold standard for the transabdominal management of full-thickness rectal prolapse. The aim of this study was to review our experience and to highlight the functional results achieved with this new technique. Forty-eight patients with full-thickness external prolapse underwent laparoscopic repair between February 1997 and February 2003. All patients underwent preoperative evaluation of their rectal function. Patients with isolated rectal ulcer without prolapse or with internal prolapse and patients deemed by the anesthesiologist to be unfit for general anesthesia were excluded from the study. The laparoscopic technique was either a mesh rectopexy without resection (n = 35) or a suture rectopexy with sigmoid resection (n = 13). Patients with intractable constipation preceding the development of the rectal prolapse were advised to have a resection-rectopexy. In the postoperative follow-up, attention was paid to mortality, morbidity, recurrent prolapse, incontinence, and constipation. Follow-up was done by clinical review and postal questionnaire. There were no deaths and no septic or anastomotic complications. The postoperative morbidity rate was 5%. Oral intake was started on postoperative day 1. Discharge from the hospital was on postoperative day 4 in patients without sigmoid resection and on postoperative day 7 in patients with sigmoid resection. Two patients (4%) developed recurrent total prolapse during a median follow-up period of 36 +/- 15 months (range, 7-77). The functional results were good or excellent in 72% of the cases, without digitations or dyschesia. Continence was improved in 31% of the patients and remains unchanged in 64% of them. In 11 patients (23%), constipation was worsened by the procedure. Laparoscopic rectopexy with or without resection is both safe and effective. Advantages include low-morbidity, improved cosmesis, the rapid return of intestinal function, early discharge from hospital, and a

  17. Invasive amebiasis and ameboma formation presenting as a rectal mass: An uncommon case of malignant masquerade at a western medical center

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Rosemarie E; Ferzli, George S; Zenilman, Michael E; Gadangi, Pratap K; Bowne, Wilbur B

    2007-01-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with rectal pain and bleeding secondary to ulcerated, necrotic rectal and cecal masses that resembled colorectal carcinoma upon colonoscopy. These masses were later determined to be benign amebomas caused by invasive Entamoeba histolytica, which regressed completely with medical therapy. In Western countries, the occurrence of invasive protozoan infection with formation of amebomas is very rare and can mistakenly masquerade as a neoplasm. Not surprisingly, there have been very few cases reported of this clinical entity within the United States. Moreover, we report a patient that had an extremely rare occurrence of two synchronous lesions, one involving the rectum and the other situated in the cecum. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis of invasive E. histolytica infection and ameboma formation, as well as management of this rare disease entity at a western medical center. PMID:17948943

  18. Chronic Tender Ulcers on the Calf and Both Forearms.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Michael C; Katayama, Mitsuya; Patel, Nishit S; Shenefelt, Philip D; Somboonwit, Charurut

    2017-01-01

    An elderly woman presented with a 3-month history of nonhealing, tender ulcers involving the right calf and both forearms. She denied any history of similar lesions or trauma. Two trials of oral antibiotics had led to no improvement. Her medical history was significant for rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate, hydroxychloroquine, and prednisone. A review of clinical manifestations was otherwise negative for disease. Physical examination of the patient's right calf revealed two punched-out ulcers with central necrotic black eschars, underlying retiform purpuric pattern, and mild fibrinopurulent drainage (Figure 1). Similar lesions were present on her forearms (Figures 2 and 3). No other remarkable skin changes were noted. The differential diagnosis included polyarteritis nodosa, cutaneous necrosis secondary to antiphospholipid syndrome, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, and an atypical presentation of pyoderma gangernosum.

  19. Rectal sensation test helps avoid pain of apical prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, J Stephen; Zippe, Craig D

    2003-12-01

    Apical cores obtained during transrectal prostate biopsy are associated with greater pain than cores obtained from the remainder of the gland. We present a method to minimize this pain. During 30 consecutive apical biopsies the needle was purposefully placed above all rectal pain fibers, which are anatomically present only below the dentate line. All patients received a periprostatic nerve block prior to biopsy. The patient was asked if he felt the sharp sensation of the needle as it was placed lightly against the rectal mucosa when the needle was aimed at apex (the rectal sensation test). If so, the needle was advanced cranially 2 to 3 mm or until he could no longer detect its light touch. The probe handle was then rotated dorsally, pulling the rectal mucosa downward until the needle was again aimed at the apex. Patients were asked to report a visual analog pain score for each biopsy. These results were compared to those obtained when doing 30 consecutive apical biopsies without the rectal sensation test. The average visual analog pain score for apical biopsy was 1.25 (range 0 to 2.2) for patients in whom the rectal sensation test was used to bypass rectal pain sensory fibers. The average score in control patients in whom the rectal sensation test was not used was higher at 2.28 (range 0.3-6.2). These results were statistically significant (p > 0.0005). Increased sensitivity to apical prostate biopsy is due to rectal pain fibers located below the dentate line. These fibers and the associated pain may be safely avoided by passing through the rectal wall above the dentate line. The rectal sensation test easily identifies the sensate area below the dentate line. Painless apical biopsy can then be achieved by rotating the ultrasound probe to aim the biopsy needle in the desired path.

  20. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  1. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... as aspirin and ibuprofen an infection with the bacteria Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) rare cancerous and noncancerous ... peptic ulcer disease? H. pylori are spiral-shaped bacteria that can cause peptic ulcer disease by damaging ...

  2. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. [Psychological factors in duodenal ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bauer, B; Bergmann, M

    1981-01-01

    With the aid of a clinical questionnaire and the I-N-R-personality test of Eysenck (as modified by Böttcher), we examined 127 male patients with clinically and radiologically proven ulcer compared to 145 age-matched persons without gastric affections. The features extraversion, neuroticism (emotional lability) and rigidity were determined and the question of an association with symptoms, age at onset of disease as well as occupational and familial factors statistically analyzed. With high significance, duodenal ulcer patients are more often emotionally labile and psychically more rigid. In the event the disease manifests under the age of 30, in ulcer patients introversion too is pronounced with highly significant frequency. Those patients complaining of conflicts with collaborators, lack of sleep, occupational overexertion, noise, draught at work place, present, compared to others without these complaints, a frequently emotional lability with high significance.

  4. Wound cleansing for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Zena E H; Cowman, Seamus

    2013-03-28

    Pressure ulcers (also called pressure sores, bed sores and decubitus ulcers) are areas of tissue damage that occur in the elderly, malnourished or acutely ill, who cannot reposition themselves. Pressure ulcers impose a significant financial burden on health care systems and negatively affect quality of life. Wound cleansing is considered an important component of pressure ulcer care. This systematic review seeks to answer the following question: what is the effect of wound cleansing solutions and wound cleansing techniques on the rate of healing of pressure ulcers? For this third update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 3 January 2013); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12); Ovid MEDLINE (2010 to November Week 3 2012); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations December 31, 2012); Ovid EMBASE (2010 to 2012 Week 52); and EBSCO CINAHL (2010 to 21 December 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing wound cleansing with no wound cleansing, or different wound cleansing solutions, or different cleansing techniques, were eligible for inclusion if they reported an objective measure of pressure ulcer healing. Two review authors extracted data independently and resolved disagreements through discussion. A structured narrative summary of the included studies was conducted. For dichotomous outcomes, risk ratio (RR), plus 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated; for continuous outcomes, mean difference (MD), plus 95% CI were calculated. Meta analysis was not conducted because of the small number of diverse RCTs identified. Two review authors independently assessed each included study using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. One additional eligible study was identified from the updated searches, one study was added to the table of excluded studies. A total of three studies (169 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the

  5. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  6. [Compression therapy in leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Protz, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Stücker, M; Kröger, K

    2016-04-01

    Compression therapy is well-tried treatment with only few side effects for most patients with leg ulcers and/or edema. Despite the very long tradition in German-speaking countries and good evidence for compression therapy in different indications, recent scientific findings indicate that the current situation in Germany is unsatisfactory. Today, compression therapy can be performed with very different materials and systems. In addition to the traditional bandaging with Unna Boot, short-stretch, long-stretch, or multicomponent bandage systems, medical compression ulcer stockings are available. Other very effective but far less common alternatives are velcro wrap systems. When planning compression therapy, it is also important to consider donning devices with the patient. In addition to compression therapy, intermittent pneumatic compression therapy can be used. Through these various treatment options, it is now possible to develop an individually accepted, geared to the needs of the patients, and functional therapy strategy for nearly all patients with leg ulcers.

  7. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  8. [Surgical treatment of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Lese, M; Naghi, I; Pop, C

    2001-01-01

    The medical and endoscopic treatment of duodenal ulcer are decreasing the frequency of surgical treatment in this disease. The authors study the operations performed for duodenal ulcer within the period 1989-1999 in the County Hospital Baia Mare. The decrease of the rate of surgical interventions is the pure effect of the medical treatment, as long as the endoscopic treatment is not yet available in our service. The rate of ulcer--induced perforations remained, however, unmodified (48% of total operatory indications), as well as the postoperative morbidity and--mortality (18% respectively 9%). The last category seems not to be influenced by the type of chosen surgical procedure, but by the patient's age, duration of the disease, and associated pathology.

  9. Impact of protein deficiency on venous ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Cécile; Debure, Clélia; Meaume, Sylvie; Lok, Catherine; Golmard, Jean Louis; Senet, Patricia

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence of protein deficiency and its impact on wound healing is not known for leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of protein deficiency in outpatients presenting with leg ulcers and the parameter's prognostic value for wound outcome. Prospective controlled observational study. Ambulatory patients referred for chronic wounds to four university hospitals. Consecutive out-patients with a leg ulcer present for at least 2 months, related to venous insufficiency, associated or not with moderate peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial pressure index > 0.7), were included in a prospective study. Wound evaluation (area and occurrence of complications) was performed at baseline and at 12 weeks of follow-up. Biologic nutrition assessment (serum albumin, transthyretin, c-reactive protein) was performed at baseline. The control group consisted of consecutive patients free of leg ulceration and attending the dermatology outpatient clinic for remissive skin cancer or miscellaneous skin disorders. Forty one patients and 43 controls were included. Serum albumin level was under 35 g/L (normal values: 36-44 g/L) in 27% of the patients and 2% of the controls (P < .001). At 12 weeks, 34% of the patients had an increase in wound area. Wound infections occurred in 12% (n = 5) of the patients. Protein deficiency was independently associated with an increase in wound area at 12 weeks (P = .034) and the presence of an inflammatory syndrome was associated with the occurrence of wound complications (wound infection or hospitalization) during follow-up (P < .001). The prevalence of protein deficiency in out-patients with leg ulcers is high and significantly associated with a poor healing prognosis.

  10. Misoprostol in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, G; Akbar, F A

    1987-01-01

    Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) methyl ester analog has potent antisecretory and cytoprotective effects on the gastric and duodenal mucosa which should make it an effective drug in the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcer. In two multicenter, randomised, double-blind, controlled studies involving over 900 patients with endoscopically proven benign gastric ulcer and in six similar studies involving over 2000 patients with active duodenal ulcers, differing doses of misoprostol have been compared with either placebo therapy or with conventional doses of cimetidine. In these studies misoprostol 800 mcg daily given as two or four divided doses has been shown to produce rates of complete ulcer healing and pain relief which were significantly superior to placebo therapy and comparable to those achieved with cimetidine. Drug related adverse effects were infrequent. A dose related diarrhea occurred in a small proportion of patients which seldom necessitated suspension of therapy. Because of the known uterotropic effect of prostaglandins the drug should not be used in pregnant women or women of child bearing age unless they are using adequate contraceptive measures. No clinically significant adverse, hematological or biochemical effects have been reported. Two studies suggested that misoprostol reduced the adverse effect of smoking on the healing of duodenal ulcer. In addition, misoprostol has been shown to protect the gastro-duodenal mucosa from the damaging effects of alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This action may prove of value in the treatment of ulcer patients who are inveterate smokers, alcohol users or who are compelled to consume non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief from rheumatic and allied diseases.

  11. Preventing venous ulcer recurrence: a review.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2006-03-01

    This review article examines the available evidence on both the primary and secondary prevention of venous ulceration, exploring both the individual, social and financial implications of system failures that allow patients to remain at increased risk of recurrent ulceration. The role of both venous disease assessment and corrective superficial venous surgery are discussed in the light of recently published randomised controlled studies on the role of superficial venous surgery as both an adjunct to ulcer healing and ulcer prevention.

  12. Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis are frequent manifestations of patients with systemic sclerosis. Digital ulcers are seen in more than half of the patients with scleroderma. Hospitalizations, ischemic complications and impairment of hand function are frequently observed in patients with digital ulcers, especially if treatment is delayed. Rapid and intensive treatment escalation in patients with scleroderma and refractory Raynaud's phenomenon is one of the most effective preventive action available in order to avoid the development of digital ulcers and tissue loss.

  13. Lubricant Provides Poor Rectal Mucosal HIV Coverage.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Eugenie C; Weld, Ethel D; Fuchs, Edward J; Hiruy, Hiwot; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Breakey, Jennifer; Hendrix, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Given the rising HIV incidence in men who have sex with men (MSM) despite repeatedly proven effectiveness of oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, behaviorally congruent periodic dosing strategies, such as dosing microbicides as lubricants, are now in demand. Rectal microbicide gel studies largely administer gels using vaginal applicators, which have not been well received and do not mimic lubricant use. We compared rectal gel manually dosed as lubricant with applicator dosing in five healthy, HIV-negative MSM who received 10 or 3.5 ml of (99m)Tc-DTPA-radiolabeled hydroxyethyl cellulose universal placebo gel intrarectally. After washout, participants received 10 ml of radiolabeled Wet(®) Original(®) lubricant to apply to the anus with fingers and/or a phallus in a manner typical of sexual lubricant use with a partner, followed by simulated receptive anal intercourse. Single-photon emission computed tomography with transmission computed tomography was performed 4 h after each gel administration. Manual dosing was associated with more variable rectosigmoid distribution, 4.4-15.3 cm from the anorectal junction, compared with more uniform distribution, 5.9-7.4 and 5.3-7.6 cm after 10 and 3.5 ml applicator dosing, respectively. A significantly smaller fraction of the initial 10 ml dose was retained within the colon after manual dosing, 3.4%, compared with 94.9% and 88.4% after 10 and 3.5 ml applicator dosing, respectively (both p < .001). Manual dosing of a sexual lubricant delivered a small, variable fraction of the dose with variable rectosigmoid distribution compared with applicator dosing. These results raise concern that dosing a rectal microbicide gel as a sexual lubricant may not provide adequate or predictable mucosal coverage for HIV protection.

  14. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  15. [Robotic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gustavo; Alvarez, Fernando A; Mentz, Ricardo; Vaccaro, Carlos A; Im, Víctor; Quintana, Guillermo Ojea

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) has proven to be feasible and safe. However, it represents a major technical challenge, since it involves the dissection of the rectum in a confined space such as the bony pelvis using un-ergonomic surgical devices. This difficulty is accentuated in patients with distal tumors and high body mass index (BMI), in which the surgical margins and the hypogastric nerves may be affected. Therefore, robotic surgery aims to overcome these limitations that conspire against the mininvasive surgical approach of rectal cancer. We present an obese (BMI = 32 kg/m2) 82-year-old man with a history of smoking and prostate cancer that was recently diagnosed with a middle rectal adenocarcinoma at 9 cm from the anal verge. Rectal examination evidenced a mobile lesion. Computed tomography scan ruled out metastases and at the local staging by MRI, the tumor was considered as T3-N0 with free circumferential margins. Surgical treatment was decided and a hybrid technique was used combining an initial laparoscopic approach followed by the robotic TME. The patient had a full recovery and was discharged three days after surgery without complications. Pathological examination revealed a low-grade adenocarcinoma with mesorectal invasion, free circumferential and distal margins, and 24 negative lymph nodes (pT3-pN0-pM0/Stage II). Robotic TME was performed safely in an obese patient. It facilitated dissection maneuvers in a confined space with proper identification and preservation of the hypogastric nerves, allowing retrieving an intact mesorectum. Prospective randomized trials will define the role of this new technology.

  16. [Prevention of pressure ulcer (bedsore)].

    PubMed

    Sedmak, Dijana; Vrhovec, Marina; Huljev, Dubravko

    2013-10-01

    Although progress in many fields of science, medicine and technology is evident, we are still witnessing the appearance of bedsores and its consequences. However, in the last fifty years there has been considerable progress in the understanding of its causes, prevention and treatment. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers are complicated by the many misconceptions. However, with due knowledge of the process of healing of acute and chronic wounds and of the pathophysiological processes, in many cases chronic wounds, like pressure ulcers, can now be prevented and cured, and thus reduce the cost of treatment, as well as the mortality rate.

  17. Acupuncture treatment for duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Debreceni, L; Denes, L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acupuncture therapy for duodenal ulcer was investigated in 21 male and female patients. The diagnosis and healing were verified by gastroscopy. It was found that the needle therapy for 3 weeks led to complete recovery in 76 percent of the patients. Diet, alcohol and cigarette abstinency were necessary for healing. Cuti-visceral reflex activation eliciting the improvement of the secretory and motor function of the gastrointestinal tract and effects in the CNS leading to analgesia and tranquilization may play a role in the mechanism of action. Our conclusion is that acupuncture can be satisfactory method to cure duodenal ulcer.

  18. A new 'enterocompressor' to facilitate rectal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Barraza, R P

    1990-02-01

    A newly devised enterocompressor facilitates low rectal anastomosis in children with Hirschsprung's disease. This simple surgical instrument, composed of two semicylindrical valves, a hinge, and a regulating screw, maintains intestinal anastomoses properly placed and produces spur crushing. In addition, it is inexpensive and reusable. The enterocompressor, used in 33 primary and 15 secondary Duhamel operations, and applied to normalize intestinal transit in 10 colectomies, provided adequate anastomosis and prevented leakage of intestinal contents. This enterocompressor can be used safely in children as young as six months of age.

  19. Combined modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Röedel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients and whether the type of surgery after chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  20. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  1. Rectal and appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Sanae, Shahram; Nikkhoo, Bahram

    2006-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are neoplasms characterized by spindle cell proliferation and a fiboinflammatory vascular stroma. Herein, we presented the successful treatment of a rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an 11-year-old boy who presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain of 1(1/2) months duration and an appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a 29-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain of two months duration with associated tenderness and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Histologically, our cases had inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors very similar to that of other sites; the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and muscle-specific actin.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren; Seraj, Samina

    2010-04-15

    Venous ulcer, also known as stasis ulcer, is the most common etiology of lower extremity ulceration, affecting approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population. Possible causes of venous ulcers include inflammatory processes resulting in leukocyte activation, endothelial damage, platelet aggregation, and intracellular edema. The primary risk factors for venous ulcer development are older age, obesity, previous leg injuries, deep venous thrombosis, and phlebitis. On physical examination, venous ulcers are generally irregular, shallow, and located over bony prominences. Granulation tissue and fibrin are typically present in the ulcer base. Associated findings include lower extremity varicosities, edema, venous dermatitis, and lipodermatosclerosis. Venous ulcers are usually recurrent, and an open ulcer can persist for weeks to many years. Severe complications include cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and malignant change. Poor prognostic factors include large ulcer size and prolonged duration. Evidence-based treatment options for venous ulcers include leg elevation, compression therapy, dressings, pentoxifylline, and aspirin therapy. Surgical management may be considered for ulcers that are large in size, of prolonged duration, or refractory to conservative measures.

  3. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  4. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  5. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  6. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  7. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  8. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  9. Gastric ulceration in an equine neonate

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A 24-hour-old colt presented with clinical signs consistent with gastric ulceration. Treatment was initiated with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist and clinical signs resolved. Gastroscopy at 16 d confirmed the presence of a gastric ulcer. Although gastric ulceration is common in foals, it is rarely reported in foals this young. PMID:12757136

  10. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  11. A tertiary care hospital's 10 years' experience with rectal ultrasound in early rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ahmed; Walker, Andrew; Heise, Charles P; Kennedy, Gregory D; Benson, Mark E; Pfau, Patrick R; Johnson, Eric A; Frick, Terrence J; Gopal, Deepak V

    2017-08-24

    Rectal endoscopic ultrasound (RUS) has become an essential tool in the management of rectal adenocarcinoma because of the ability to accurately stage lesions. The aim of this study was to identify the staging agreement of early RUS-staged rectal adenocarcinoma with surgical resected pathology and ultimately determine how this impacts the management of early rectal cancer (T1-T2). Retrospective chart review was performed from November 2002 to November 2013 to identify procedure indication, RUS staging data, surgical management, and postoperative surgical pathology data. There were a total of 693 RUS examinations available for review and 282 of these were performed for a new diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma. There was staging agreement between RUS and surgical pathology in 19 out of 20 (95%) RUS-staged T1 cases. There was staging agreement between RUS and surgical pathology in 3 out of 9 (33%) RUS-staged T2 cases. There was significantly better staging agreement for RUS-staged T1 lesions compared to RUS staged T2 lesions (P = 0.002). Nearly 60% of T1N0 cancers were referred for transanal excisions (TAEs), and 78% of T2N0 cancers underwent low anterior resection. This study identified only a small number of T1-T2 adenocarcinomas. There was good staging agreement between RUS and surgical pathology among RUS-staged T1 lesions whereas poor staging agreement among RUS-staged T2 lesions. Although TAE is largely indicated by the staging of a T1 lesion, this approach may be less appropriate for T2 lesions due to high reported local recurrence.

  12. Locally advanced rectal cancer: Preliminary results of rectal preservation after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Carlos Alberto; Yazyi, Federico Julio; Ojra Quintana, Guillermo; Santino, Juan Pablo; Sardi, Mabel Edith; Beder, Damián; Tognelli, Joaquin; Bonadeo, Fernando; Lastiri, José María; Rossi, Gustavo Leandro

    2016-05-01

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision. However, organ preservation has been proposed for tumors with good response to neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic results of this strategy. This is a retrospective cohort study (2005-2014) including a consecutive series of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma with complete or almost complete clinical response after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, that were treated according to a strategy of preservation of the rectum. A total of 204 patients with rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty (14.7%) had a good response and were treated with rectal preservation (23 «Watch and Wait» and 7 local resections). Median follow-up was 46 months (interquartile range: 30-68). In the group of «Watch & Wait», 4 patients had local recurrence before 12 months (actuarial local recurrence rate=18.5%). All of them underwent salvage surgery (2 with radical surgery and 2 local resections) without any further recurrence. Disease-free survival actuarial rate at 3 years follow-up was 94.1% (95% CI 82.9-100). None of the 7 patients that were treated by local excision had local recurrence. The organ preservation rate for the whole group was 93%. The strategy of organ preservation in locally advanced rectal cancer is feasible in cases with good response to neoadjuvant therapy. When implemented in a highly selected group of patients this strategy is associated with satisfactory oncologic results. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-12-01

    An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes.

  14. Rectal gonorrhoea in male homosexuals. Presentation and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fluker, J L; Deherogoda, P; Platt, D J; Gerken, A

    1980-12-01

    In a review of rectal gonorrhoea 73 episodes were studied in 65 homosexual men. The presenting signs and symptoms were carefully noted. Treatment with a single injection of spectinomycin hydrochloride 2 g resulted in a cure rate of 94.5%. The relatively high treatment failure rate associated with rectal gonorrhoea may possibly be due to microbial mechanisms.

  15. Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?

    PubMed

    Andersson, Nirina; Boman, Jens; Nylander, Elisabet

    2017-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Europe and has large impacts on patients' physical and emotional health. Unidentified asymptomatic rectal Chlamydia trachomatis could be a partial explanation for the high Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence. In this study, we evaluated rectal Chlamydia trachomatis testing in relation to symptoms and sexual habits in women and men who have sex with men. Rectal Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was 9.1% in women and 0.9% in men who have sex with men. None of the patients reported any rectal symptoms; 59.0% of the women with a rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection denied anal intercourse and 18.8% did not have a urogenital infection; 9.4% did neither have a urogenital infection nor reported anal sex. We suggest that rectal sampling should be considered in women visiting sexually transmitted infection clinics regardless of rectal symptoms and irrespective of anal intercourse, since our data suggest that several cases of rectal Chlamydia trachomatis otherwise would be missed, thus enabling further disease transmission.

  16. Recurrent and other new foot ulcers after healed plantar forefoot diabetic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication in patients with diabetes. In most outcome studies of this condition, there is a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. Plantar ulcers are usually localized to the forefoot, and constitute a quarter of all diabetic foot ulcers. There are a limited number of studies regarding development of new ulcers following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer, and there are no uniform definitions of recurrent and other new ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients with diabetes mellitus and a healed planter forefoot ulcer (n=617) with regard to development, characteristics, and outcome of recurrent and other new ulcers. Patients were followed consecutively and prospectively with a two-year follow-up, according to a pre-set protocol. Out of 617 patients, 250 (41%) did not develop any new ulcer, 262 (42%) developed a new ulcer, 87 (14%) died and 18 (3%) were lost at two years following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer. Thirty-four per cent developed other new ulcers (112 on the same foot and 99 on the contralateral foot), whereas 51 patients (8%) developed a recurrent ulcer (at the same site and foot). Of the patients who died within two years, 30 patients had developed other new ulcers. The risk of a recurrent ulcer in patients with diabetes and a healed plantar forefoot ulcer was only eight per cent within two years, whereas other new ulcers, on the same foot or on the contralateral foot, was seen in 4 out of 10 patients indicating the need for further preventive measures and surveillance in these patients. We suggest a concise definition for new ulcer to be used in future research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  18. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  19. Immunological Landscape and Clinical Management of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, Elísabeth; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of rectal cancer and colon cancer differs due to increased local relapses in rectal cancer. However, the current molecular classification does not differentiate rectal cancer and colon cancer as two different entities. In recent years, the impact of the specific immune microenvironment in cancer has attracted renewed interest and is currently recognized as one of the major determinants of clinical progression in a wide range of tumors. In colorectal cancer, the density of lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better overall survival. Due to the need for biomarkers of response to conventional treatment with chemoradiotherapy in rectal tumors, the immune status of rectal cancer emerges as a useful tool to improve the management of patients. PMID:26941741

  20. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  1. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  2. [Local diagnostics for rectal cancer. What is realistic?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, H; Gastinger, I; Lippert, H

    2012-05-01

    Accurate pretherapeutic staging of rectal cancer is crucial for further therapeutic management and important for prognosis. The most accurate diagnostic tools in the assessment of T and N categories of rectal cancer are endorectal ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, MRI can accurately predict the distance of the tumor to the colorectal membrane (CRM) and computed tomography (CT) is more suitable for detecting distant metastases. In the routine care of rectal cancer EUS is the most frequently used diagnostic tool for local staging. The achieved accuracy for determining T category by EUS in routine clinical staging is lower than results reported in the literature. Furthermore, the accuracy of EUS depends on the experience of the examiner. Currently the frequency of using MRI for routine clinical staging of rectal cancer is low and in one out of five cases the local staging of rectal cancer is exclusively carried out by CT.

  3. Pressure ulcers in four Indonesian hospitals: prevalence, patient characteristics, ulcer characteristics, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Amir, Yufitriana; Lohrmann, Christa; Halfens, Ruud Jg; Schols, Jos Mga

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this article was to study characteristics of pressure ulcer patients and their ulcers, pressure ulcer preventive and treatment measures in four Indonesian general hospitals. A multicentre cross-sectional design was applied to assess pressure ulcers and pressure ulcer care in adult patients in medical, surgical, specialised and intensive care units. Ninety-one of the 1132 patients had a total of 142 ulcers. Half (44·0%) already had pressure ulcers before admission. The overall prevalence of category I-IV pressure ulcers was 8·0% (95% CI 6·4-9·6), and the overall nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence was 4·5% (95% CI 3·3-5·7). Most pressure ulcer patients had friction and shear problems, were bedfast, had diabetes and had more bedridden days. Most ulcers (42·3%) were category III and IV. One third of the patients had both pressure ulcers and moisture lesions (36·3%) and suffered from pain (45·1%). The most frequently used prevention measures were repositioning (61·5%), skin moisturising (47·3%), patient education (36·3%) and massage (35·2%). Most pressure ulcer dressings involved saline-impregnated or antimicrobial gauzes. This study shows the complexities of pressure ulcers in Indonesian general hospitals and reveals that the quality of pressure ulcer care (prevention and treatment) could be improved by implementing the recent evidence-based international guideline. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of cimetidine on the healing and recurrence of duodenal ulcers and gastric ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Okuda, S

    1986-01-01

    The effects of cimetidine on the healing and recurrence of duodenal ulcers and gastric ulcers were compared. The extent of the acid secreting areas was examined by the endoscopic Congo red methylene blue test. Using the extent of acid secreting areas gastric ulcers were classified into ulcers with and without extensive acid secreting areas. Duodenal ulcers were all associated with extensive acid secreting areas. The gastric acid outputs in the basal state and after maximal stimulation with gastrin were highest in duodenal ulcers, and lowest in gastric ulcers without extensive acid secreting areas. Cimetidine treatment significantly promoted the healing of duodenal ulcers and gastric ulcers with extensive acid secreting areas when compared with placebo, but not of the gastric ulcers without extensive acid secreting areas. Cimetidine also significantly diminished the recurrence of duodenal ulcers, but not gastric ulcers with and without extensive acid secreting areas. These findings indicate that in Japan cimetidine promotes the healing of duodenal and gastric ulcers associated with high gastric acid production and prevents recurrence of duodenal ulcers, but has little or no influence on the healing and recurrence of gastric ulcers associated with low acid secretion. PMID:3781336

  5. Van Gogh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roka, Y B; Thapa, R; Puri, P R; Aryal, S

    2011-04-01

    Self injury is the intentional and direct injury to self that include bite, burn, ulceration and head banging. These injuries are rarely fatal and are usually not suicidal in nature. This behavior is common among adolescents, psychiatric patients and in females. Bipolar disorder, drug abuse and metabolic syndromes like LeschNyhan and Munchausen's syndrome are often associated with this disorder. Repetitive self mutilation is termed the Van Gogh syndrome after the famous painter who cut off his ear and gave it to a prostitute. We describe two such cases of self mutilation in schizophrenic patients.

  6. Comparison of rectal and axillary temperatures in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Goic, Joana B; Reineke, Erica L; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2014-05-15

    To compare rectal versus axillary temperatures in dogs and cats. Prospective observational study. 94 dogs and 31 cats. Paired axillary and rectal temperatures were measured in random order with a standardized method. Animal signalment, initial complaint, blood pressure, blood lactate concentration, and variables associated with vascular perfusion and coat were evaluated for associations with axillary and rectal temperatures. Axillary temperature was positively correlated with rectal temperature (ρ = 0.75 in both species). Median axillary temperature (38.4°C [101.1°F] in dogs, and 38.4°C [101.2°F] in cats) was significantly different from median rectal temperature in dogs (38.9°C [102.0°F]) but not in cats (38.6°C [101.5°F]). Median rectal-axillary gradient (difference) was 0.4°C (0.7°F; range, -1.3° to 2.3°C [-2.4° to 4.1°F]) in dogs and 0.17°C (0.3°F; range -1.1° to 1.6°C [-1.9° to 3°F]) in cats. Sensitivity and specificity for detection of hyperthermia with axillary temperature were 57% and 100%, respectively, in dogs and 33% and 100%, respectively, in cats; sensitivity and specificity for detection of hypothermia were 86% and 87%, respectively, in dogs and 80% and 96%, respectively, in cats. Body weight (ρ = 0.514) and body condition score (ρ = 0.431) were correlated with rectal-axillary gradient in cats. Although axillary and rectal temperatures were correlated in dogs and cats, a large gradient was present between rectal temperature and axillary temperature, suggesting that axillary temperature should not be used as a substitute for rectal temperature.

  7. An isolated vaginal metastasis from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadatomo, Ai; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan K; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-02-01

    Isolated vaginal metastases from colorectal cancer are extremely rare. There are only a few reported cases in the English literature, and the characteristics of such cases of metastasis remain relatively unknown. We present a case of isolated vaginal metastasis from rectal cancer in a 78-year-old female patient. The patient had no symptoms related to vaginal tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed thickening of the middle rectum and a vaginal tumor. Biopsy from the vaginal tumor showed adenocarcinoma, similar to the rectal lesion. Low anterior resection with ileostomy, hystero-oophorectomy, and transvaginal tumor resection was performed. After nineteen months, computed tomography scan revealed multiple lung metastases and recurrent tumor in the pelvis. The patient refused chemotherapy and is alive three months after developing recurrent disease. Most cases of primary vaginal carcinoma are squamous cell carcinoma. Other histologic types such as adenocarcinoma are usually metastatic lesions. Primary lesions associated with metastatic vaginal adenocarcinoma are most often the uterus, and are very rarely from the colon or rectum. We review previous case reports of isolated vaginal metastases from colorectal cancer and discuss their symptoms, treatments, and outcomes. We should keep the vagina within the field of view of pelvic MRI, which is one of the preoperative diagnostic tools for colorectal cancer. If female patients show gynecological symptoms, gynecological examination should be recommended. Isolated vaginal metastases are an indication for surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy is also recommended.

  8. [Radiotherapy in pelvic recurrences of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Morganti, A G; Santoni, R; Osti, M F

    2001-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma have an unfavourable prognosis for the high incidence of distant metastases, the infrequent feasibility of radical surgical resection, and, in these last cases, the high incidence of re-recurrences. Based on the low resectability rate of pelvic recurrences, the clear impact of tumor diameter on resectability and outcome, and the documented possibility to achieve a significant tumor downstaging and downsizing with the use of concurrent chemoradiation, it is evident that the most promising treatment several authors have considered concurrent chemoradiation followed, if feasible, by radical resection. Furthermore, based on the high local and distant failure rate after surgery, the utilization of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and adjuvant chemotherapy seems justified. Some published comparisons between patients treated with and without IORT seems to suggest the possible improvement in both local control and survival in these patients. Particularly interesting issues in this field are: 1) the definition of the most effective treatment modality (both in terms of radiation dose, fractionation and techniques, and drugs to be used concurrently to radiotherapy); 2) the analysis of the prognostic impact of several factors, with the aim of designing and validating staging systems of local rectal recurrences; 3) the possibility to treat with relatively high doses also patients previously irradiated on the pelvis.

  9. Focusing the management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dbeis, Rachel; Smart, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer treatment has undergone major changes over the last 15 years with a focus on individualized care based around MRI assessment of the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia, improved surgical techniques and targeted use of pre-operative oncological therapies in patients with locally advanced disease. The recognition that some tumours responded completely to pre-operative chemoradiotherapy, and the selective use of a non-operative policy has led to a quest to further identify those patients and their tumour in whom this approach could be used, irrespective of MRI stage. With no clear patient factors identified, the tumour and its gene expression has become a target for research to identify individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which may indicate a response to specific treatment, or not. To date some agents have been identified and trialed, such as cetuximab, with individual tumours being assessed for response allowing directed treatment. The reviewed paper by Sebio and colleagues report a study that links polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 with response to neoadjuvant 5-Fluorouracil treatment in rectal cancer patients. However, genetic heterogeneity alone may not explain the variations of drug response and environmental factors may lead to epigenetic effects and therefore alter responses. Therefore whilst this study demonstrates the impact of different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is only one step forward, but perhaps a step in the right direction. PMID:28149883

  10. [Ulcerative colitis and cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Tárraga Rodríguez, I; Ferreras Fernández, P; Vicente Gutiérrez, M; de Arriba, J J; García Mouriño, M L

    2003-02-01

    Colitis ulcerous and citomegalovirus infection association have been reported in medical literature in sometimes, althougth this prevalence have lately increased. We report a case record of this association and do a review of this subject. It is not clear what factors are involved in this association, being necessary hore studies to know them.

  11. Amoebic ulcer of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Satya; Ananthakrishnan, N.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Topno, Margaret; Aurora, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report of a rare entity—an amoebic ulcer of the penis. The gross loss of glans and terminal urethra was repaired by a new technique using an island based anterolateral dartos flap. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:7122377

  12. Lingual ulceration in disseminated histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Kruthika S; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Bathi, Renuka J; Rao, Ravikala

    2010-03-01

    Histoplasmosis is a rare systemic fungal infection commonly presenting as mucosal ulceration of the oral cavity. It has been increasingly reported in India as disseminated disease with lesions in the oral cavity as a consequence of rapid spread of HIV infection. The authors report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with oral manifestation in a 40-year-old male patient.

  13. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  14. Recording pressure ulcer risk assessment and incidence.

    PubMed

    Plaskitt, Anne; Heywood, Nicola; Arrowsmith, Michaela

    2015-07-15

    This article reports on the introduction of an innovative computer-based system developed to record and report pressure ulcer risk and incidence at an acute NHS trust. The system was introduced to ensure that all patients have an early pressure ulcer risk assessment, which prompts staff to initiate appropriate management if a pressure ulcer is detected, thereby preventing further patient harm. Initial findings suggest that this electronic process has helped to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data on pressure ulcer risk and incidence. In addition, it has resulted in a reduced number of reported hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  15. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  16. Activation of colo-rectal high-threshold afferent nerves by Interleukin-2 is tetrodotoxin-sensitive and upregulated in a mouse model of chronic visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Campaniello, M A; Harrington, A M; Martin, C M; Ashley Blackshaw, L; Brierley, S M; Hughes, P A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain is a defining feature of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS patients often show alterations in innate and adaptive immune function which may contribute to symptoms. Immune mediators are known to modulate the activity of viscero-sensory afferent nerves, but the focus has been on the innate immune system. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is primarily associated with adaptive immune responses but its effects on colo-rectal afferent function in health or disease are unknown. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity determined the extent of inflammation in health, acute trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis, and in our post-TNBS colitis model of chronic visceral hypersensitivity (CVH). The functional effects of IL-2 on high-threshold colo-rectal afferents and the expression of IL-2R and NaV 1.7 mRNA in colo-rectal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were compared between healthy and CVH mice. MPO activity was increased during acute colitis, but subsided to levels comparable to health in CVH mice. IL-2 caused direct excitation of colo-rectal afferents that was blocked by tetrodotoxin. IL-2 did not affect afferent mechanosensitivity in health or CVH. However, an increased proportion of afferents responded directly to IL-2 in CVH mice compared with controls (73% vs 33%; p < 0.05), and the abundance of IL-2R and NaV 1.7 mRNA was increased 3.5- and 2-fold (p < 0.001 for both) in colo-rectal DRG neurons. IL-2, an immune mediator from the adaptive arm of the immune response, affects colo-rectal afferent function, indicating these effects are not restricted to innate immune mediators. Colo-rectal afferent sensitivity to IL-2 is increased long after healing from inflammation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    PubMed

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates.

  18. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  19. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings.

  20. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) for rectal cancer: effects on patient-reported quality of life and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Koedam, T W A; van Ramshorst, G H; Deijen, C L; Elfrink, A K E; Meijerink, W J H J; Bonjer, H J; Sietses, C; Tuynman, J B

    2017-01-01

    Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) has rapidly become an important component of the treatment of rectal cancer surgery. Cohort studies have shown feasibility concerning procedure, specimen quality and morbidity. However, concerns exist about quality of life and ano(neo)rectal function. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate quality of life in patients following TaTME for rectal cancer with anastomosis. Consecutive patients who underwent restorative TaTME surgery for rectal adenocarcinoma in an academic teaching center with tertiary referral function were evaluated. Validated questionnaires were prospectively collected. Quality of life was assessed by the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer's QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 and low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) scale. Outcomes of the questionnaires at 1 and 6 months were compared with preoperative (baseline) values. Thirty patients after restorative TaTME for rectal cancer were included. Deterioration for all domains was mainly observed at 1 month after surgery compared to baseline, but most outcomes had returned to baseline at 6 months. Social function and anal pain remained significantly worse at 6 months. Major LARS (score >30) was 33% at 6 months after ileostomy closure. No end colostomies were required. TaTME is associated with acceptable quality of life and functional outcome at 6 months after surgery comparable to published results after conventional laparoscopic low anterior resection.

  1. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health.

  2. [Quality of Life after colectomy due to ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Gudlaugsdottir, Katrin; Valsdottir, Elsa B; Stefansson, Tryggvi B

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) undergo colectomy. The aim was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of these patients. All patients with UC who underwent colectomy at The National University Hospital of Iceland or Akureyri Hospital 1995-2009 were included. 106 patients received three questionnaires. SF-36v2 and EORTC are standardised QOL-questionnaires. The third contained functional questions designed by the researchers. Eighty-three patients replied (78%), 45 men (54%) and 38 women (46%). Average age at operation was 45 years (10-91 years). Forty-four (53%) had ileostomy, 28 (34%) ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) and 11 (13%) ileorectal anastomosis. Among patients who had the rectum removed 37% described changes in urinary habits and 46% in sexual life after surgery. Among patients with IPAA 75% admitted to faecal incontinence but this was mild according to Wexner's scale in 83% of the cases. According to SF-36v2 there was no significant difference in the QOL of colectomy patients compared to the general population. Patients generally felt good about their health, body image and weight and had mild symptoms according to EORTC QLQ-CR29. Urinary habits and sexual life were commonly affected after rectal removal. Faecal incontinence among IPAA-patients was much more common than expected. There was not much difference in quality of life compared to the general population. The results of the study are important for patient education and may aid them in their decision making since removing the colon or having a stoma does not seem to affect quality of life. Key words: Quality of life, ulcerative colitis, ileostomy, colectomy. Correspondence: Elsa B. Valsdottir, elsava@landspitali.is.

  3. A Case of Rectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Metachronous Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in an HIV-Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heun; Lee, Hye Won; Ann, Hea Won; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kang, Hua Pyong; Kim, Sun Wook; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the most common acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and rectal cancer has recently emerged as a prevalent non-AIDS-defining malignancy. We report a case of rectal squamous cell carcinoma that was metachronous with DLBCL in an HIV-infected patient who was receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patient was diagnosed with DLBCL and showed complete remission after chemotherapy. Follow-up imaging showed increased uptake at the rectum, previously treated as lymphoma. Repeated biopsy was performed and squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum was reported. After concurrent chemoradiation therapy, curative resection was performed.

  4. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  5. Microscopy detection of rectal gonorrhoea in asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Forni, J; Miles, K; Hamill, M

    2009-11-01

    This audit aimed to determine the usefulness of microscopy to detect presumptive rectal gonorrhoea (GC) infection in asymptomatic men. We retrospectively audited more than 400 male patients attending a London genitourinary medicine clinic from January 2005 to March 2007 who tested rectal culture positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and compared this with the microscopy detection rate. In total, 123/423 (29%) of culture positive samples were microscopy positive. Of those that tested microscopy negative (300/423), 64 (21%) were symptomatic and 236 (79%) asymptomatic. In addition, a time and motion study examined 81 rectal slides over a two-week period to identify microscopy reading time required to make a presumptive diagnosis of GC. Three slides were positive, resulting in six hours and 45 minutes to detect one positive sample. Given the low sensitivity for rectal microscopy coupled with the length of time required to obtain a presumptive positive rectal GC result, we believe rectal microscopy is no longer a cost-effective tool screening for asymptomatic men, and this report supports the BASHH guideline that it is not recommended in the management of asymptomatic rectal infection.

  6. Postembryonic development of rectal pads in bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina Gonçalves; Neves, Clóvis Andrade; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2009-10-01

    The morphology and development of the digestive tract of insects has been extensively studied, but little attention has been given to the development of the rectal pads. These organs are responsible for absorption of water and salts. In insects where they occur, there are usually six ovoid rectal pads located in the medial-anterior portion of the rectum. The rectal pad has three types of cells: principal, basal, and junctional. The arrangement of these three cell types delimits an intrapapillary lumen. The aim of the current study is to describe the development of the rectal pads during postembryonic development of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides and Melipona scutellaris. Specimens were analyzed at the following developmental stages: white-, pink-, brown-, and black-eyed pupae, and adult workers. The development of the rectal pad begins as a thickening of the epithelium in white-eyed pupae at 54 hr. At this stage, there is neither a basal cell layer nor intrapapillary lumen. The basal layers begin to form in the pink-eyed pupa and are completely formed at the end of the development of the brown-eyed pupa. In the brown-eyed pupal stage, the intrapapillary lumen is formed and the junctional cells are positioned and completely differentiated. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death were detected along with cell proliferation in the whole rectum during pupal development, suggesting that the development of the rectal pads involves cell proliferation, death, and differentiation. The rectal pads originate only from the ectoderm.

  7. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Increases Rectal Activity in Children.

    PubMed

    Moeller Joensson, Iben; Hagstroem, Soren; Siggaard, Charlotte; Bower, Wendy; Djurhuus, Jens Christian; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Neurostimulation is increasingly used in treating bladder and bowel dysfunction, but its effect on rectal motility is obscure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the acute effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on rectal motility in children with overactive bladder (OAB). In this double-blind placebo-controlled study in 20 children with OAB (mean age 8.6 ± 1.8 years; 7 girls), 48-hour urodynamic monitoring including rectal manometry was performed. After 24-hours of baseline investigation without stimulation the children were randomised to either active TENS (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10). Surface electrodes were placed over the sacral bone. The exterior of active and placebo stimulators was identical. Starting in the morning, the children received either continuous TENS stimulation or placebo until bedtime. Rectal contractions were defined as pressure runs exceeding 5 cm H2O and lasting ≥3 minutes. At baseline there was no significant difference in proportion of time with rectal contractions in the 2 groups (TENS group median 31% [range 12%-66%] vs placebo group median 31% [range 10%-66%]; P = 0.75); however, on the day of stimulation there was more time with rectal contractions in the group receiving TENS (median 51% [range 25%-78%]) compared with placebo (median 32% [range 4%-68%]; P = 0.02). Also, there was an increase in time with rectal contractions in the TENS group (P = 0.007) but not in the placebo group (P = 0.39). The night after the TENS was disabled, rectal activity in both groups returned to baseline level. TENS acutely increases time with rectal contractions in children undergoing urodynamic investigation. The effect disappears when the stimulator is turned off.

  8. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  9. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  10. Development of ulcerative colitis during the course of rheumatoid arthritis: Association with selective IgA deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Yuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Shikuwa, Saburo; Wen, Chun Yang; Fukuda, Eiichiro; Miyazato, Masaru; Okamoto, Kenta; Nakamura, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hitoshi; Mizuta, Yohei; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman with a 29-year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was admitted to the hospital, complaining of high fever, abdominal pain and severe bloody diarrhea. Colonoscopy revealed friable and edematous mucosa with spontaneous bleeding, diffuse erosions and ulcers extending from the rectum to the distal transverse colon. Histopathological findings of rectal biopsies were compatible with ulcerative colitis (UC). Being diagnosed as having severe active left-side UC, she was successfully treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by prednisolone and leukocytapheresis. Laboratory tests revealed low serum and saliva IgA levels, which might play a role in the development of UC. To our knowledge, this is the first case of UC occurring during the course of RA, accompanied by selective IgA deficiency. PMID:16937542

  11. Clinical observations on 100 cases of ulcerative colitis treated with the method of clearing away heat, expelling dampness, promoting blood circulation and healing ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bai; Shen, Hong; Lu, Yue; Wang, Ya-qi

    2010-06-01

    To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of the method of clearing away heat, expelling dampness, promoting blood circulation and healing ulcer on ulcerative colitis. The 100 cases were randomly divided into a control group of 45 cases treated with retention enema of the enterosoluble tablet sulfasalazine once every evening and a treatment group of 55 cases treated with retention enema of the decoction for clearing away heat, expelling dampness, promoting blood circulation and healing ulcer once every evening. The patients in both groups orally took Chinese drug for basic treatment for 30 days as a course. After treatment, the clinical therapeutic effects in the 2 groups were compared and changed symptoms in intestinal mucosa were observed under endoscope. The total effective rate of treatment group was better in relieving symptoms of TCM syndrome (90.9%) and intestinal mucosa (83.3%) than that of control group (68.9%, 56.3%) (P<0.01 or P<0.05). With good therapeutic effect on ulcerative colitis, Qinghua Huoxue Lianyang therapy (clearing away heat, expelling dampness, promoting blood circulation and healing ulcer) can obviously repair intestinal mucosa.

  12. Death by Disimpaction: A Bradycardic Arrest Secondary to Rectal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal examination and fecal disimpaction are common procedures performed in the Emergency Department on a daily basis. Here, we report a rare case of a patient suffering a cardiac arrest and ultimately death likely due to rectal manipulation. A 66-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a complaint of abdominal distention and constipation. A rectal exam was performed. During the examination the patient became apneic. On the cardiac monitor the patient was found to be in pulseless electrical activity with a bradycardic rate. Our recommendation would be to provide adequate analgesia and close patient monitoring of those undergoing this procedure especially patients with significant stool burdens. PMID:28116179

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic. PMID:28879206

  14. Perineal Rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier Procedure) as Treatment of Strangulated Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cernuda, Ricardo Baldonedo; Ángel, Janet Pagnozzi; Fernández, Nuria Truan; Sánchez-Farpón, José Herminio; Pérez, Jose Antonio Álvarez

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration of a rectal prolapse is an unusual entity that represents a surgical emergency. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, requiring emergency surgery. When surgery becomes inevitable, the choice of procedure varies. A 57-year-old man who presented with strangulated rectal prolapse is described. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. After a 6-month follow-up, there was no recurrence, but the patient continued with fecal incontinence. This case underlines the importance of the Altemeier procedure as treatment in the patient with a strangulated prolapsed rectal segment.

  15. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  16. Proforma-based reporting in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, F; Mangat, N; Swift, I R; Brown, G

    2010-10-04

    The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans. For many solid tumours, including rectal cancer, validated techniques have emerged in identifying prognostic factors pre-operatively. In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors. This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions. In this review, we describe the proforma-based reporting tool that enables a systematic approach to the interpretation of the magnetic resonance images, thereby enabling all the clinically relevant features to be adequately assessed.

  17. Rectal versus non-rectal primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum: a retrospective survival analysis controlled for confounders.

    PubMed

    Ciarrocchi, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the outcomes of rectal and non-rectal primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the colorectum. A retrospective survival analysis was performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database between 2004 and 2009 on subjects who were diagnosed as having a primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis controlled for confounders was used to assess overall survival comparing rectal and non-rectal cancers. Our population was composed of 1,484 patients: 200 affected by rectal cancer and 1,284 by non-rectal cancer. Unadjusted survival curves resulted to be almost superimposable (P = 0.916). After controlling for age, gender, race, tumor stage, grade, and size, tumor location demonstrated a statistically significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.032; 95% confidence interval 0.640-0.980; hazard ratio 0.792). On the basis of analysis of information from the SEER database, the signet ring cell carcinoma of the rectum was associated to a worse prognosis as compared to non-rectal cancer.

  18. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  19. [Strangled rectal prolapse in young adults: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bayar, Rached; Djebbi, Achref; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Talbi, Ghofrane; Gharbi, Lassaad; Arfa, Nafaa; Mestiri, Hafedh; Khalfallah, Mohamed Taher

    2016-01-01

    Rectal prolapse is a rectal static disorder which involves rectal wall intussusception inducing its externalization through the anus. It usually affects children and the elderly. Its occurrence in young adults is rare. Strangulated rectal prolapse is also a rare complication. We report the case of a 30-year old patient who underwent emergency surgery for strangulated rectal prolapse. Emergency perineal rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier repair) was performed with simple outcome.

  20. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti phospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miah, M T; Hoque, M A; Sutradhar, S R; Mahmood, T; Tarafder, B K

    2009-01-01

    Anti Phospholipid Syndrome (APS) is a relatively new conception of syndrome complex first noticed in 1983. It may be primary or secondary to other diseases like SLE, RA, Systemic sclerosis, behchet's syndrome, temporal arteritis, sjogren's syndrome psoriatic arthropathy etc. Clinical manifestations are consequences of vascular thrombosis and embolism like DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, TIA, complication of pregnancy with pregnancy loss. We report a 34 years married female housewife who presented with sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, vertigo, dysphagia, dysarthria and ataxia. She had a chronic leg ulcer. Neurological findings were consistent with lateral medullary syndrome due to stroke though she was normotensive, nondiabetic with normal lipid profile. She had history of two abortions in last three years. Investigations were done accordingly and she fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of APS. No secondary cause was detected after thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. She was treated symptomatically along with oral anticoagulation. She improved slowly but steadily.

  2. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  3. Polymyositis associated with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, S; Dilawari, J B; Sawhney, I M; Dang, N; Radotra, B D; Chawla, Y K

    1993-01-01

    An elderly woman with chronic ulcerative colitis who developed proximal muscle weakness, increased serum creatine phosphokinase activity, and histological and electromyographic abnormalities characteristic of polymyositis is described. Treatment with corticosteroids and 5-acetylsalicylic acid was followed by a remission in bowel symptoms, improvement in muscle power, and reversal of electromyographic changes. An autoimmune link between the two disorders seems likely. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8491410

  4. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES IN ULCERATIVE COLITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lagercrantz, R.; Hammarström, S.; Perlmann, P.; Gustafsson, B. E.

    1968-01-01

    The incidence and height of antibody titers to colon, assayed by indirect hemagglutination with a heat stable colon extract from germ free rats, is significantly higher in sera from patients with ulcerative colitis than in those from healthy controls or from patients with amebic liver abscess or dysentery. While sera from ulcerative colitis patients and controls are indistinguishable in regard to incidence and height of antibody titers to Forsman antigen, Staphylococcus aureus S 209, Clostridium difficile, and several common strains of E. coli, they have elevated titers and increased incidence of antibodies to a heat stable antigen of E. coli O14. Patients with amebic dysentery have normal titers of such antibodies. Absorption of patients' sera with E. coli O14 antigen inhibits the colon directed hemagglutination reaction in approximately 30% of the cases tested. Likewise, the anti-E. coli O14 reaction can sometimes be inhibited with the colon extract. Other E. coli strains and other bacteria are inactive or have only weak inhibitory activity. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments show that germ free rat colon and E. coli O14 contain common structures, depicted by antibodies in the patients' sera. This pattern of reactivity closely resembles that seen in rats made autoimmune to colon by injection of newborn rabbit colon. E. coli O14 is known to carry a heterogenetic antigen present in lower concentration (or activity) in most Enterobacteriaceae. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments with rabbit antisera to E. coli O14 suggest that the antigen common for E. coli O14 and colon is related to this heterogenetic antigen. The findings imply that this antigen, which is constantly present in low concentrations in the human colon, may give rise to anticolon antibody formation in ulcerative colitis through breakage of tolerance. Since this antigen is present in healthy individuals as well, additional factors are required to explain the induction of anti

  5. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  6. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease.

  7. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer. PMID:28138363

  8. Approach to infected skin ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Bayoumi, Imaan; Westendorp, Claire

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the diagnosis and management of infected chronic skin ulcers. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Cochrane database, MEDLINE, and Google were searched for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for wound care. Most recommendations found in the CPGs had level II or III evidence. Expert and consensus opinion from the Canadian Chronic Wound Advisory Board and the International Wound Bed Preparation Advisory Board were also used. MAIN MESSAGE Bacteria in skin ulcers act along a continuum from contamination through colonization and critical colonization to infection. Critical colonization is not always associated with overt signs of infection but can result in failure to heal, poor-quality granulation tissue, increased wound friability, and increased drainage. Good-quality swab samples should be an adjunct to clinical acumen, not a primary strategy for diagnosis. Iodine and silver-based dressings, topical antibiotics, and systemic antibiotics can be helpful. CONCLUSION Diagnosis of chronic wound infection is based on clinical signs and a holistic approach to patients. More research into assessment and treatment of skin ulcer infection is needed. PMID:16250422

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of dysbiosis in ulcerative colitis during remission.

    PubMed

    Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Shanahan, Fergus; Guarner, Francisco; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-03-01

    Presence of intestinal microbes is a prerequisite for the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), although deviation of the normal intestinal microbiota composition, dysbiosis, is presumably implicated in the etiology of UC. The fecal microbiota of 30 UC samples obtained from 15 patients who were sampled twice and from 15 healthy control subjects originating from 2 geographic locations was analyzed using highly reproducible phylogenetic microarray that has the capacity for detection and quantification of more than 1000 intestinal bacteria in a wide dynamic range. The fecal microbiota composition is not significantly influenced by geographic location, age, or gender, but it differs significantly between the patients with UC and the control subjects (P = 0.0004). UC-associated microbiota is stable during remission and similar among all patients with UC. Significant reduction of bacterial diversity of members of the Clostridium cluster IV and significant reduction in the abundance of bacteria involved in butyrate and propionate metabolism, including Ruminococcus bromii et rel. Eubacterium rectale et rel., Roseburia sp., and Akkermansia sp. are markers of dysbiosis in UC. Increased abundance of (opportunistic) pathogens including Fusobacterium sp., Peptostreptococcus sp., Helicobacter sp., and Campylobacter sp. as well as Clostridium difficile were found to be associated with UC. Dysbiosis in UC is stable in time and shared between patients from different geographic locations. The microbial alterations offer a mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of the disease.

  10. Nicotine: therapeutic potential for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Green, J T; Thomas, G A; Rhodes, J

    1997-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is predominantly a disease of non-smokers, and nicotine may be the agent responsible for this association. Transdermal nicotine has been shown to improve disease activity and sigmoidoscopic appearance in the active disease but in one study had no effect on maintenance of remission. Since side-effects with nicotine patches occur in up to two thirds of patients, attempts to reduce systemic levels and improve drug tolerance have been developed with colonic delivery systems of nicotine. Preliminary observations with nicotine enemas in UC have shown clinical benefit, but controlled trials are needed. Mechanisms responsible for the association of smoking with colitis and for the therapeutic effect of nicotine remain an enigma; possibilities include: modulation of the immune response, alterations of colonic mucus and eicosanoid production, changes in rectal blood flow, decreased intestinal permeability and the release of endogenous glucocorticoids. With current treatment for UC limited to corticosteroids and formulations of 5-aminosalicylic acid, alternative treatments are required and nicotine may fulfil this role.

  11. Co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon ulceration of acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis via facilitation of NO/COX-2/miR-210 cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Saad, Evan I; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; Ibrahim, Einas R

    2015-11-01

    In this work, α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine demonstrated significant protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. We proposed that α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine co-administration might modulate their individual effects. Induction of ulcerative colitis in rats was performed by intra-rectal acetic acid (5% v/v) administration for 3 consecutive days. Effects of individual or combined used of α-lipoic acid (35 mg/kg ip) or cyclosporine (5mg/kg sc) for 6 days starting 2 days prior to acetic acid were assessed. Acetic acid caused colon ulceration, bloody diarrhea and weight loss. Histologically, there was mucosal atrophy and inflammatory cells infiltration in submucosa, associated with depletion of colon reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and elevated colon malondialdehyde, serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Colon gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 was also elevated. These devastating effects of acetic acid were abolished upon concurrent administration of α-lipoic acid. Alternatively, cyclosporine caused partial protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis. Cyclosporine did not restore colon reduced glutathione, catalase activity, serum C-RP or TNF-α. Unexpectedly, co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravated colon ulceration. Concomitant use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine significantly increased nitric oxide production, cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 gene expression compared to all other studied groups. The current findings suggest that facilitation of nitric oxide/cyclooxygenase-2/miR-210 cascade constitutes, at least partially, the cellular mechanism by which concurrent use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon damage. Collectively, the present work highlights the probable risk of using α-lipoic acid/cyclosporine combination in ulcerative colitis patients.

  12. Robot-Assisted Ventral Mesh Rectopexy for Rectal Prolapse: A 5-Year Experience at a Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Jan J; Formijne Jonkers, Hendrik A; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Draaisma, Werner A; Consten, Esther C J; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2017-11-01

    Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy is being increasingly performed internationally to treat rectal prolapse syndromes. Robotic assistance appears advantageous for this procedure, but literature regarding robot-assisted ventral mesh rectopexy is limited. The primary objective of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of robot-assisted ventral mesh rectopexy in the largest consecutive series of patients to date. This study is a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data. The study was conducted in a tertiary referral center. All of the patients undergoing robot-assisted ventral mesh rectopexy for rectal prolapse syndromes between 2010 and 2015 were evaluated. Preoperative and postoperative (mesh and nonmesh) morbidity and functional outcome were analyzed. The actuarial recurrence rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 258 patients underwent robot-assisted ventral mesh rectopexy (mean ± SD follow-up = 23.5 ± 21.8 mo; range, 0.2 - 65.1 mo). There were no conversions and only 5 intraoperative complications (1.9%). Mortality (0.4%) and major (1.9%) and minor (<30 d) early morbidity (7.0%) were acceptably low. Only 1 (1.3%) mesh-related complication (asymptomatic vaginal mesh erosion) was observed. A significant improvement in obstructed defecation (78.6%) and fecal incontinence (63.7%) were achieved for patients (both p < 0.0005). At final follow-up, a new onset of fecal incontinence and obstructed defecation was induced or worsened in 3.9% and 0.4%. The actuarial 5-year external rectal prolapse and internal rectal prolapse recurrence rates were 12.9% and 10.4%. This was a retrospective study including patients with minimal follow-up. No validated scores were used to assess function. The study was monocentric, and there was no control group. Robot-assisted ventral mesh rectopexy is a safe and effective technique to treat rectal prolapse syndromes, providing an acceptable recurrence rate and good

  13. A Hydroxyurea-induced Leg Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon-Wook; Hong, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Jong-Keun; Sung, Ho-Suk

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a cytostatic agent that has recently become the drug of choice in the treatment of various myeloproliferative diseases. The cutaneous side effects of hydroxyurea include xerosis, hyperpigmentation, nail discoloration, and scaling. Leg ulcers have only rarely been reported in association with hydroxyurea treatment. A 75-year-old woman presented with leg ulcers, nail discoloration, and xerosis. The leg ulcers were refractory to conventional treatment. She had been taking oral hydroxyurea since being diagnosed with essential thrombocytosis in 2002. Hence, we suspected hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers and discontinued her hydroxyurea treatment; the ulcers gradually healed thereafter. We present a rare case of hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers in Korea. PMID:20548853

  14. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-06

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  15. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  16. Rectal tuberculosis in an HIV-infected patient: case report

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Marcos dos Santos Vieira; Christiano, Celso Guilherme; Lovisolo, Silvana Maria; Rosa, Vladimir Mulele Pinto Santa

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has been increasingly affected by tuberculosis, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although strict rectal involvement is rare, the GI site mostly affected is the ileocecal region. Thus, tuberculosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of perianal and rectal lesions, and more so in patients infected by the HIV virus. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old man presenting a long-term history of fever, night sweats, weight loss, bloody diarrhea, fecal incontinence, tenesmus, and rectal pain. HIV serology was positive. The patient underwent anoscopy and biopsy, which disclosed the diagnosis of rectal tuberculosis. Thus the patient was referred to an outpatient clinic to follow the standard treatment. PMID:28573121

  17. Tailoring treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma: immunohistochemistry for predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Payal

    2011-04-01

    Over the past couple of decades, multimodality treatment for the management of resectable rectal cancer has substantially improved the outcome of affected patients. However, the broad and unpredictable response to tumor of patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapeutic interventions shows that our understanding of the molecular events leading to radioresistance in patients affected with this malignancy remains sparse. Multiple attempts by individual molecular markers in gene array and tissue microarray studies have emerged with the goal of identifying predictors of a response to chemoradiation in patients with rectal cancer. In this report, we discuss the status of the markers currently available in an attempt to tailor specific targeted therapies for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant setting.

  18. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  19. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-05-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecific symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient with the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion.

  20. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecifi c symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient w ith the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion. PMID:26034324

  1. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2011-11-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

  2. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon

    2011-01-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema. PMID:22148129

  3. Enhancing Documentation of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions: A Quality Improvement Strategy to Reduce Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese M; Thompson, Susan L; Halvorson, Anna M; Zeitler, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers requires the implementation of evidence-based interventions. A quality improvement project was conducted to provide nurses with data on the frequency with which pressure ulcer prevention interventions were performed as measured by documentation. Documentation reports provided feedback to stakeholders, triggering reminders and reeducation. Intervention reports and modifications to the documentation system were effective both in increasing the documentation of pressure ulcer prevention interventions and in decreasing the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  4. Ulcerative necrobiosis lipoidica responsive to colchicine.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Clare; Sladden, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica is an uncommon granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Few treatments have emerged with consistent efficacy and the ulcerated form of necrobiosis lipoidica can be particularly difficult to treat. A 56-year-old non-diabetic woman with chronic ulcerative necrobiosis lipoidica unresponsive to other therapies was commenced on colchicine treatment. Complete resolution of the ulcers was observed after 2 months' therapy with colchicine 500 µg twice daily.

  5. Recurrence of Mooren's ulcer after lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J

    1989-09-01

    A 45-year-old man with unilateral Mooren's ulcer in a quiescent state underwent annular lamellar keratoplasty after corneal rupture due to minor trauma. Postoperatively, he did well until 8 months later when a recurrence of the Mooren's ulceration occurred, involving the central island of the patient's original corneal stroma. The stroma of the lamellar graft was uninvolved. This unusual occurrence lends support to the concept that there is a specific immunologic reaction to the cornea in patients with Mooren's ulcer.

  6. [Treatment of severe ulcerative colitis flares].

    PubMed

    Aceituno, Montserrat; Montserrat, Aceituno; Zabana, Yamile; Yamile, Zabana; Esteve, Maria; Maria, Esteve

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of severe ulcerative colitis remains a challenge for gastroenterologists. A not inconsiderable number of patients will experience severe flares throughout their lives and will require hospitalization. Mortality in severe ulcerative colitis is still high and consequently treatment must be aggressive, avoiding delays in rescue therapies or even surgery. The aim of this review was to describe the medical treatment of severe ulcerative colitis, highlighting recent therapeutic advances.

  7. Three cases of Lipschutz vulval ulceration.

    PubMed

    Alés-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-Pichardo, A; García-Bravo, B; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L; Camacho-Martínez, F M

    2010-05-01

    A Lipschütz ulcer or 'ulcus vulvae acutum' is an acute simple ulceration of the vulva or vagina of non-venereal origin which can be associated with lymphadenopathy. Three cases are described with accompanying clinical photographs. Two cases refer to adolescents, one an infant, all without any history of sexual contact. The cases serve to illustrate a little known but potentially important differential diagnosis of vulval ulceration.

  8. A crunching colon: rectal bezoar caused by pumpkin seed consumption.

    PubMed

    Manne, Janaki R; Rangu, Venu M; Motapothula, Uma Maheswara R; Hall, Matthew C

    2012-05-01

    Rectal seed bezoars are an uncommon cause of fecal impaction, particularly in the United States. Although the literature has reported several cases of phytobezoars composed of various types of seeds, bezoars formed of pumpkin seeds have rarely been reported. We report a case of a man, aged 62 years, with a rectal bezoar composed of pumpkin seeds with complications necessitating extensive treatment, including manual disimpaction and colonoscopy.

  9. Bioavailabilities of rectal and oral methadone in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ola; Sheffels, Pamela; Kharasch, Evan D

    2004-01-01

    Aims Rectal administration of methadone may be an alternative to intravenous and oral dosing in cancer pain, but the bioavailability of the rectal route is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the absolute rectal bioavailability of methadone with its oral bioavailability in healthy humans. Methods Seven healthy subjects (six males, one female, aged 20–39 years) received 10 mg d5-methadone-HCl rectally (5 ml in 20% glycofurol) together with either d0-methadone intravenously (5 mg) or orally (10 mg) on two separate occasions. Blood samples for the LC-MS analyses of methadone and it's metabolite EDDP were drawn for up to 96 h. Noninvasive infrared pupillometry was peformed at the same time as blood sampling. Results The mean absolute rectal bioavalability of methadone was 0.76 (0.7, 0.81), compared to 0.86 (0.75, 0.97) for oral administration (mean (95% CI)). Rectal absorption of methadone was more rapid than after oral dosing with Tmax values of 1.4 (0.9, 1.8) vs. 2.8 (1.6, 4.0) h. The extent of formation of the metabolite EDDP did not differ between routes of administration. Single doses of methadone had a duration of action of at least 10 h and were well tolerated. Conclusions Rectal administration of methadone results in rapid absorption, a high bioavailability and long duration of action. No evidence of presystemic elimination was seen. Rectal methadone has characteristics that make it a potential alternative to intravenous and oral administration, particularly in cancer pain and palliative care. PMID:15255797

  10. Combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer using irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative or postoperative pelvic radiation plus concurrent fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is standard adjuvant treatment for patients with T3 and/or N1/2 rectal cancer. Newer chemotherapeutic regimens have been developed for the treatment of patients with metastatic disease. Irinotecan (CPT-11, Camptosar)-based regimens have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease and are being actively investigated in combination with pelvic radiation therapy for patients with rectal cancer.

  11. Gastroduodenal ulcer treated by pylorus and pyloric vagus-preservinggastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun-Fu; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Zhao, Ge; Zhu, Qing-Hua

    1999-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the curative effect of pylorus and pyloric vagus-preserving gastrectomy (PPVPG) on peptic ulcer. METHODS Treating 132 cases of GU and DU with PPVPG, and com parative studies made with 24 cases treated with Billroth I (B I) and 20 cases with Billroth II (B II); advantages and shortcomings evaluated. RESULTS Not a single death after PPVPG. No recurrence of the disorder in the subsequent follow-up for an average of 6.5 years. Curative effect (visik I-&-II) 97.7%. Acidity reduction similar to that found in B I and B II, but 97.7% of the B I and all B II cases having more than second degree intestinal fluid reflux, in contrast to 7.1% in PPVPG cases. Dumping syndrome occurred in the B I and B II cases, none in PPVPG cases. With regard to gastric emptying, food digestion, absorption, body weight and life quality, PPVPG proved to be superior to Billroth procedure. CONCLUSION PPVPG has the advantages of conventional Billroth gastrectomy in reducing acid, removing ulcer focus, and at the same time preserves the pylorus and pyloric vagus for maintaining the normal gastric physiological function. Dumping syndrome, intestinal fluid reflux and other complications of conventional gastrectomy may be avoided. PMID:11819417

  12. Basaloid large cell lung carcinoma presenting as cutaneous metastasis at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, Vicente; García-García, José Angel; Roig-Vila, José Vicente

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of a tumor at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma is rare and it may be related to a previously resected carcinoma or another primary tumor. We report a 61-year-old man who developed an ulcerated skin nodule at her colostomy site 6 years after resection of a rectal adenocarcinoma. Histopathologically, the skin nodule was composed of atypical large and pleomorphic cells with high mitotic rate and they were arranged in nests and within lymphatic channels in the dermis. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin (CK) AE1/3, CK7, CK34ßE12, epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin while detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA was negative. A diagnosis of basaloid large cell carcinoma of pulmonary origin was suggested and it was confirmed by computed tomography-guided fine needle aspiration of a right subpleural mass. A metastatic tumor at the colostomy site is an exceptional finding and may be the first manifestation of lung cancer, especially if it consist of pleomorphic large cells with high mitotic rate and basaloid immunophenotype.

  13. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  14. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir; Khoury, Tawfik

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  15. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  16. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2006-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are complex chronic wounds for which no gold standard for prevention or treatment has yet been established. Several attempts at developing guidelines has been undertaken by different organizations. Pressure ulcers are devastating comorbidities for patients and difficult to prevent or manage. Whether or not pressure ulcers are preventable remains controversial. The strategy for prevention includes recognizing the risk, decreasing the effects of pressure, assessing nutritional status, avoiding excessive bed rest and prolonged sitting, and preserving the integrity of the skin. The principles of treatment of pressure ulcers include assessing severity, reducing pressure, friction and shear forces, optimizing local wound care, removing necrotic debris, managing bacterial contamination, and correcting nutritional deficits.

  17. [Peptic ulcer disease. Clinical evaluation in 2006].

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, P; Bellutti, M

    2006-06-01

    Treatment of peptic ulcer disease has undergone a radical change due to the discovery of its main cause, the Helicobacter pylori infection. The management of the chronic infection is now the primary aim. Treatment of peptic ulcer essentially consists of eradicating H. pylori. A current problem is the resistance developed by H. pylori to the antibiotics used in eradication regimen. Ulcers that are induced by nonsteroidal antirheumatic (NSAR) agents and acetylsalicylic acid are gaining in importance. Optimized inhibition of acid secretion with proton pump inhibitors has made it possible to both prevent and cure ulcers in the stomach and duodenum caused by NSAR agents.

  18. [Peptic ulcer: facts and questions -- 2010].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-06-27

    Etiology and clinical manifestation of the peptic ulcer keep changes nowadays. Helicobacter pylori-infection, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and small dosage acetic acid treatment are the main etiological factors. Helicobacter pylori positive peptic ulcer can be treated with eradication of the bacterium. Prevention of the NSAID-ulcer and the prescription of the acid suppressive therapy depend on the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk factors of patient. Despite of the effective therapies, there are still questions to answer. The number of Helicobacter pylori and NSAID negative ulcers is likely to increase, their therapy must be clarified. There's a fall in the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori infection, the optimal treatment is missing.

  19. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments.

  20. Current Medical Management of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukie, Bryan E.

    1989-01-01

    Peptic ulceration occurs when the digestive action of gastric secretions overcomes gastroduodenal mucosal defences. The therapeutic strategy used to correct this imbalance uses drugs that either reduce gastric secretion or increase mucosal resistance. Traditional therapies of dietary manipulation and antacid administration no longer play major roles in peptic ulcer therapy. Uncomplicated peptic ulcers respond quite well to drug treatment, although recurrences are common and may require long-term maintenance therapy. Drug-induced gastric ulcers have represented a challenging problem, for which effective therapy is now available. PMID:21249091