Science.gov

Sample records for rectangular chamber study

  1. A study of mixed convection in large baffled rectangular chambers with and without internal heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerkes, K. L.

    1990-03-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation to determine the thermal effects on the development of the flow structure in large baffled rectangular chambers with and without internal heat sources was completed. Two- and three-dimensional numerical models were formulated using the time dependent laminar Navier-Stokes equations assuming a Boussinesq fluid with a Prandtl number of 0.7. Experiments were conducted using a scaled down model simulated the full size chamber enabling experimental data to be obtained and subsequently compared with numerical results. Flow visualization experiments were conducted using the larger, full size chamber. Internal horizontal baffles and heat sources were located symmetrically about the vertical centerline axis. Mixed convection without internal heat sources for both aided and opposed buoyant forces showed that the development of the flow structure was sensitive to small variations in the temperature difference between the inlet and the vertical walls. Mixed convection with internal heat sources showed the flow structure to develop through a series of bifurcations from steady state, to periodic, aperiodic and finally chaotic with increasing heat source temperature. Use of the scaled down laboratory experimental model as an indicator for the flow development in the larger full size chamber showed significant 3-D effects. Flow visualization in the larger full size chamber using Silahydrocarbon aerosol droplets showed good agreement with the 2-D numerical results.

  2. Turbulent particle deposition in a rectangular chamber: Study of the effect of particle size and ventilation regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Yoshio

    1996-04-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles with wall surfaces is important in modeling their behavior. This interaction is usually represented in theoretical models as a loss term. The loss rate is the rate at which particles deposit or react with the surfaces. This loss term is important in many branches of aerosol science including human health and indoor air quality. Increased surface deposition usually means lower concentrations of airborne particles and hence, lower exposure to the inhabitants. If the efficiency of the particle deposition is influenced by factors other than the particle size, such as a natural convection of the air, this has to be taken into account to evaluate the results. In this research, test aerosol sized from 15 nm to 3 μm are produced by several different aerosol generators; the gas burner, the Collison nebulizer, the condensation aerosol generator, the orifice atomizer and the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). A rectangular chamber whose dimensions are 75 x 75 x 180 cm3 was used in this study. The particles were injected into the chamber, with a known ventilation and the concentration decay was monitored by the Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC) and Optical Particle Counter (OPC). During the measurement, the air inside the chamber is moved by natural convection and ventilation effect. The results shows that the particle loss rate under the higher air exchange rate is larger and this is not only due to air exchange itself but also the wall deposition. The theoretical model presented by Benes and Holub (1996) agree with the experimental data better than the Crump and Seinfield (1981) model with the hypothesis of Plandtl`s mixing length. 118 refs.

  3. Efficient computation of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, David A.

    2016-09-01

    We study coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a perfectly conducting vacuum chamber of rectangular cross section, in a formalism allowing an arbitrary sequence of bends and straight sections. We apply the paraxial method in the frequency domain, with a Fourier development in the vertical coordinate but with no other mode expansions. A line charge source is handled numerically by a new method that rids the equations of singularities through a change of dependent variable. The resulting algorithm is fast compared to earlier methods, works for short bunches with complicated structure, and yields all six field components at any space-time point. As an example we compute the tangential magnetic field at the walls. From that one can make a perturbative treatment of the Poynting flux to estimate the energy deposited in resistive walls. The calculation was motivated by a design issue for LCLS-II, the question of how much wall heating from CSR occurs in the last bend of a bunch compressor and the following straight section. Working with a realistic longitudinal bunch form of r.m.s. length 10.4 μ m and a charge of 100 pC we conclude that the radiated power is quite small (28 W at a 1 MHz repetition rate), and all radiated energy is absorbed in the walls within 7 m along the straight section.

  4. Rectangular subsonic jet flowfield study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1987-01-01

    The flowfield of a rectangular jet with 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 127,000, using a three-dimensional laser anemometer. The flowfield surveys resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components for the major and minor axes. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flowfields.

  5. Effects of coating rectangular microscopic electrophoresis chamber with methylcellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the biggest problems in obtaining high accuracy in microscopic electrophoresis is the parabolic flow of liquid in the chamber due to electroosmotic backflow during application of the electric field. In chambers with glass walls the source of polarization leading to electroosmosis is the negative charge of the silicare and other ions that form the wall structure. It was found by Hjerten, who used a rotating 3.0 mm capillary tube for free zone electrophoresis, that precisely neutralizing this charge was extremely difficult, but if a neutral polymer matrix (formaldehyde fixed methylcellulose) was formed over the glass (quartz) wall the double layer was displaced and the viscosity at the shear plane increased so that electroosmotic flow could be eliminated. Experiments were designed to determine the reliability with which methylcellulose coating of the Zeiss Cytopherometer chamber reduced electroosmotic backflow and the effect of coating on the accuracy of cell electrophoretic mobility (EPN) determinations. Fixed rat erythrocytes (RBC) were used as test particles.

  6. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  7. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  8. Analysis of the longitudinal space charge impedance of a round uniform beam inside parallel plates and rectangular chambers

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, L.; Li, Y.

    2015-02-03

    This paper analyzes the longitudinal space charge impedances of a round uniform beam inside a rectangular and parallel plate chambers using the image charge method. This analysis is valid for arbitrary wavelengths, and the calculations converge rapidly. The research shows that only a few of the image beams are needed to obtain a relative error less than 0.1%. The beam offset effect is also discussed in the analysis.

  9. Columbium Chamber Fabrication Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    materials. Demonstrate CVO close-out of slotted, filled, C103 columbium alloy panels and subsequent removal of the filler materials. 1.0, Introduction...their removal subsequent to CV0 of a columbium close-out. C103 columbium alloy plate, procured to Aeronautical Materials Specification (SAE) -- AMS 7852...into the chamber. Surface oxygen contamination of the C103 columbium alloy wcs evident in all metallographic sections. 8.1 LOW TEMPERATURE DEPOSIT

  10. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-03-15

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  11. Numerical studies of a red blood cell in rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Shi, Huixin; Peng, Lina; Li, Yu

    2017-08-01

    The study of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through rectangular microchannels has attracted an increasing interest, because most of the current microfluidic chips are designed as rectangular microchannels for the purpose of easy fabrication. In this paper, we numerically investigate the 3D motion and deformation of a RBC in rectangular microchannels, by using the smoothed dissipative particle dynamics to model the fluid flow and coupling the immersed boundary method to treat the fluid-RBC interaction. We have considered several fundamental questions concerned in experiments, including the effect of the mechanical properties of RBC, the initial position and orientation of RBC, as well as the asymmetry of the microchannel. In addition, we have demonstrated the differences among the fully 3D, axisymmetric, and 2D simulations of a RBC in microchannels.

  12. Algorithm for Computation of Electromagnetic Fields of An Accelerated Short Bunch Inside a Rectangular Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    We discuss the feasibility of an application of an implicit finite-difference approximation to calculate the fields of a relativistic bunch moving with no restriction inside a vacuum chamber. We assume that a bunch trajectory is not straight but is inside a vacuum chamber or its branch. The bunch can be deflected by the fields of bending magnets. The bunch can be short enough to produce coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Accelerator physicists believe that electromagnetic phenomena of charged beams are governed by Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations for particle dynamics. To understand the behavior of the beams and radiated fields we just need to find a solution to these equations for the case, which can fully describe the real accelerator environment. So, at first we make a model, which contains all the necessary components, but at the same time can be easily 'inserts' into the equations. Sometimes, it is possible to find analytical solutions, but usually they are only work for one-dimensional cases and rarer for two-dimension cases. To find a solution in general we may transform the equations into a equivalent finite-difference form and solve them using computers. We can find a lot of finite-difference schemes, which approximate Maxwell's equations since the first one that was published in 1966. Most of them are so called explicit schemes. That means that the value of the field at the new time step is calculated only by the field values at the previous time step. Stability conditions for these schemes do not allow a time step to be greater than or equal to a space (mesh) step. This limitation brings an additional troublesome effect for short wavelengths compared a mesh step. We state that this effect works like a frequency dispersion media, which is 'hidden' in the finite-difference equation.

  13. Basic study on the rectangular numeric keys for touch screen.

    PubMed

    Harada, H; Katsuura, T; Kikuchi, Y

    1997-06-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the optimum inter-key spacing of numeric rectangular keys for touch screens. Six male students (22-25 years old) and three female students (21-24 years old) participated in the experiment. Each subject performed the data entry task using rectangular keys of touch devices. These keys were arranged in both horizontal and vertical layouts. The sizes of the rectangular keys in both layouts were 12 x 21 mm and 15 x 39 mm, and each of the inter-key spacing of each key was 0, 3, 6, 12 and 21 mm. The response time with inter-key spacing of 3 mm was significantly faster than with the inter-key spacing of 0, 12 and 21 mm (p < 0.05). Keys of vertical position produced faster response time than that of horizontal position. The subjective ratings showed that the inter-key spacing of 6 mm was significantly better than the inter-key spacing of 0, 3, 12 and 21 mm (p < 0.05).

  14. 3-D LDA study of a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry. The flow field survey resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components. This paper presents contour plots in the planes of the jet minor and major axes at different axial locations. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flow fields and will provide a valuable database for three-dimensional modeling.

  15. Critical current studies of a HTS rectangular coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Z.; Chudy, M.; Ruiz, H. S.; Zhang, X.; Coombs, T.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, superconducting high field magnets are used in numerous applications due to their superior properties. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are usually used for production of circular pancake or racetrack coils. However different geometries of HTS coils might be required for some specific applications. In this study, the HTS coil wound on a rectangular frame was fully characterized in homogeneous DC background field. The study contains measurements of critical current angular dependencies. The critical current of the entire coil and two selected strands under different magnitudes and orientations of external magnetic fields are measured. The critical regions of the coil in different angular regimes are determined. This study brings better understanding of the in- field performance of HTS coils wound on frames with right-angles.

  16. Tubular copper thrust chamber design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of copper tubular thrust chambers is particularly important in high performance expander cycle space engines. Tubular chambers have more surface area than flat wall chambers, and this extra surface area provides enhanced heat transfer for additional energy to power the cycle. This paper was divided into two sections: (1) a thermal analysis and sensitivity study; and (2) a preliminary design of a selected thrust chamber configuration. The thermal analysis consisted of a statistical optimization to determine the optimum tube geometry, tube booking, thrust chamber geometry, and cooling routing to achieve the maximum upper limit chamber pressure for a 25,000 pound thrust engine. The preliminary design effort produced a layout drawing of a tubular thrust chamber that is three inches shorter than the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) milled channel chamber but is predicted to provide a five percent increase in heat transfer. Testing this chamber in the AETB would confirm the inherent advantages of tubular chamber construction and heat transfer.

  17. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzuto, Domenico

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an RΦ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against γ → e + e- events.

  18. Studying Phototropism Using a Small Growth Chamber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maryanna, F.; Llewellyn, Gerald C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive way to construct two small growth chambers for studying phototropism in the science classroom. One chamber is designed to illustrate how plants grow around obstacles to reach light and the other to illustrate directional light responses. (HM)

  19. Study of intensification zones in a rectangular acoustic cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretti, Linda F.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1992-01-01

    The interior acoustic field of a rectangular acoustic cavity, which is excited by the structural vibration of one of its walls, or a portion of the wall, has been studied. Particularly, the spatial variations of sound pressure levels from the peak levels at the boundaries (intensification zones) to the uniform interior are considered. Analytical expressions, which describe the intensification zones, are obtained using the methodology of asymptotic modal analysis. These results agree well with results computed by a discrete summation over all of the modes. The intensification zones were also modeled as a set of oblique waves incident upon a surface. The result for a rigid surface agrees with the asymptotic modal analysis result. In the presence of an absorptive surface, the character of the intensification zone is dramatically changed. The behavior of the acoustic field near an absorptive wall is described by an expression containing the rigid wall result plus additional terms containing impedance information. The important parameter in the intensification zone analysis is the bandwidth to center frequency ratio. The effect of bandwidth is separated from that of center frequency by expanding the expression about the center frequency wave number. The contribution from the bandwidth is second order in bandwidth to center frequency ratio.

  20. Turbulence Studies of a Rectangular Slotted Noise-Suppressor Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurence, James C.

    1960-01-01

    The problem of noise suppression of turbojet engines has shown a need for turbulence data within the flow field of various types of nozzles used in ad hoc investigations of the sound power. The result of turbulence studies in a nozzle configuration of four parallel rectangular slots is presented in this report with special attention to the effect of the spacing of the nozzles on the intensity of turbulence, scale of turbulence, spectrum of turbulence, and the mean stream velocity. Taylor's hypothesis, which describes the convection of the turbulence eddies, was tested and found correct within experimental error and certain experimental and theoretical limitations. The convection of the pressure patterns was also investigated, and the value of the convection velocity was found to be about 0.43 times the central core velocity of the jets. The effect of the spacing-to-width ratio of the nozzles upon the turbulence intensity, the scale of turbulence, and the spectral distribution of the noise was found in general to produce a maximum change for spacing-to-width ratios of 1.5 to 2.0. These changes may be the cause of the reduction in sound power reported for similar full-scale nozzles and test conditions under actual (static) engine operation. A noise reduction parameter is defined from Lighthill's theory which gives qualitative agreement with experiments which show the noise reduction is greatest for spacing-to-width ratios of 1.5 to 2.0.

  1. Experimental study on mixing efficiency in water supply rectangular tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Medina, V.; Mujal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Phenomenon of mixing in drinking water storage tanks and reservoirs has a direct effect on the quality of water. Creation of poor mixing zones and volume stratification can have negative effects in public health. The design of a storage tank must consider the conditions of the inlet and outlets, and also their orientation (vertical or horizontal) to prevent the formation of these zones. Experiments done in a reduced scaled-model with a rectangular base and three different inlets (two waterfalls and a pipe inlet) had the objective to decide which of these inlets achieved the best mixing efficiency. Four situations were considered while three entrances, two unsteady: filling and drawing, and two steady with different outlets. Moreover the effects of columns that support the roof of the tank were studied by running the three entrances with and without columns in the four situations. Neglecting the viscous scale effects, the time taken to mix the volume stored depends on the distance between the inlet and the opposite wall as though as its orientation. Taking into account the whole tank columns have a negative effect on mixing efficiency although they divide the flux and create local zones of turbulence around them, increasing local mixing. Using a digital treating image technique the results are found in a quantitative way.

  2. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl {PCB} emissions ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber serving as a stable source of PCBs and building materials in the test chamber. During the tests, the PCB concentrations in the outlet air of the test chamber were monitored and the building materials were removed from the test chamber at different times to determine their PCB content. Among the materials tested, a petroleum-based paint, a latex paint, and a certain type of carpet were among the strongest sinks. Solvent-free epoxy coating, certain types of flooring materials, and brick were among the weakest sinks. For a given sink material, PCB congeners with lower vapor pressures were sorbed in larger quantities. Rough estimates of the partition and diffusion coefficients were obtained by applying a sink model to the data acquired from the chamber studies. A desorption test with the concrete panels showed that re-emission is a slow process, suggesting that PCB sinks, e.g. concrete, can release PCBs into the air for a prolonged period of time (years or decades). This study could fill some of the data gaps associated with the characterization of PCB sinks in contaminated buildings. This paper summarizes the laboratory research results for PCB transport from primary sources to PCB sinks, includ

  3. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) emissions ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber serving as a stable source of PCBs and building materials in the test chamber. During the tests, the PCB concentrations in the outlet air of the test chamber were monitored and the building materials were removed from the test chamber at different times to determine their PCB content. Among the materials tested, a petroleum-based paint, a latex paint, and a certain type of carpet were among the strongest sinks. Solvent-free epoxy coating, certain types of flooring materials, and brick were among the weakest sinks. For a given sink material, PCB congeners with lower vapor pressures were sorbed in larger quantities. Rough estimates of the partition and diffusion coefficients were obtained by applying a sink model to the data acquired from the chamber studies. A desorption test with the concrete panels showed that re-emission is a slow process, suggesting that PCB sinks, e.g. concrete, can release PCBs into the air for a prolonged period of time (years or decades). This study could fill some of the data gaps associated with the characterization of PCB sinks in contaminated buildings. This paper summarizes the laboratory research results for PCB transport from primary sources to PCB sinks, includ

  4. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  5. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio and number of control surfaces. A doublet lattice approach is taken to compute generalized forces. A rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. Although, all parameters can be easily modified if desired.The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification and validation. This process is carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool. Therefore the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using V-g and V-f analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind tunnel results for the same structure. Finally a case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to V-g and V-f analysis. This also includes the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  6. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard Jason; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this report is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the report. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  7. Crosstalk Studies of a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryer, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    The crosstalk between various pads of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) developed for the experiment MuSun was studied. Crosstalk between TPC pads must be studied and understood in order for proper muon path reconstruction to be obtained. A printed circuit board was developed to use capacitive coupling to transmit a signal pulse onto the TPC, where the crosstalk of the transmitted signal was studied.

  8. Quantitative study of rectangular waveguide behavior in the THz.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, Adam M.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement

    2009-10-01

    This report describes our efforts to quantify the behavior of micro-fabricated THz rectangular waveguides on a configurable, robust semiconductor-based platform. These waveguides are an enabling technology for coupling THz radiation directly from or to lasers, mixers, detectors, antennas, and other devices. Traditional waveguides fabricated on semiconductor platforms such as dielectric guides in the infrared or co-planar waveguides in the microwave regions, suffer high absorption and radiative losses in the THz. The former leads to very short propagation lengths, while the latter will lead to unwanted radiation modes and/or crosstalk in integrated devices. This project exploited the initial developments of THz micro-machined rectangular waveguides developed under the THz Grand Challenge Program, but instead of focusing on THz transceiver integration, this project focused on exploring the propagation loss and far-field radiation patterns of the waveguides. During the 9 month duration of this project we were able to reproduce the waveguide loss per unit of length in the waveguides and started to explore how the loss depended on wavelength. We also explored the far-field beam patterns emitted by H-plane horn antennas attached to the waveguides. In the process we learned that the method of measuring the beam patterns has a significant impact on what is actually measured, and this may have an effect on most of the beam patterns of THz that have been reported to date. The beam pattern measurements improved significantly throughout the project, but more refinements of the measurement are required before a definitive determination of the beam-pattern can be made.

  9. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  10. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  11. Optical design through optimization for rectangular apertures using freeform orthogonal polynomials: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milena; Benítez, Pablo; Narasimhan, Bharathwaj; Grabovickic, Dejan; Liu, Jayao; Miñano, Juan C.

    2016-07-01

    Several applications of freeform optics call for deeper analysis of systems with rectangular apertures. We study the behavior of a freeform mirror system by comparing four orthogonal polynomial surface representations through local optimization. We compare polynomials with different orthogonal areas (rectangular-circular) and different metrics (sag-gradient). Polynomials orthogonal inside a rectangle converge faster or to a better local minimum than those orthogonal inside a circle in the example considered. This is the most likely due to the loss of the good properties of orthogonality when the orthogonality area does not coincide with the surface area used.

  12. Study of proton radiation effects among diamond and rectangular gate MOSFET layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seixas, L. E., Jr.; Finco, S.; Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Gimenez, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental comparative study of proton ionizing radiation effects between the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) implemented with hexagonal gate shapes (diamond) and their respective counterparts designed with the classical rectangular ones, regarding the same gate areas, channel widths and geometrical ratios (W/L). The devices were manufactured by using the 350 nm bulk complementary MOS (CMOS) integrated circuits technology. The diamond MOSFET with α angles higher or equal to 90° tends to present a smaller vulnerability to the high doses ionizing radiation than those observed in the typical rectangular MOSFET counterparts.

  13. Experimental study of hollow rectangular bridge column performance under vertical and cyclically bilateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qiang; Du, Xiuli; Zhou, Yihui; Lee, George C.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of hollow reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns of rectangular cross section under constant axial load and cyclically biaxial bending, five specimens were tested. A parametric study is carried out for different axial load ratios, longitudinal reinforcement ratios and lateral reinforcement ratios. The experimental results showed that all tested specimens failed in the flexural failure mode and their ultimate performance was dominated by flexural capacity, which is represented by the rupture/buckling of tensile longitudinal rebars at the bottom of the bridge columns. Biaxial force and displacement hysteresis loops showed significant stiffness and strength degradations, and the pinching effect and coupling interaction effect of both directions severely decrease the structural seismic resistance. However, the measured ductility coefficient varying from 3.5 to 5.7 and the equivalent viscous damping ratio varying from 0.19 and 0.26 can meet the requirements of the seismic design. The hollow RC rectangular bridge columns with configurations of lateral reinforcement in this study have excellent performance under bidirectional earthquake excitations, and may be considered as a substitute for current hollow RC rectangular section configurations described in the Guideline for Seismic Design of Highway Bridges (JTG/T B02-01-2008). The length of the plastic hinge region was found to approach one sixth of the hollow RC rectangular bridge column height for all specimen columns, and it was much less than those specified in the current JTG/T. Thus, the length of the plastic hinge region is more concentrated for RC rectangular hollow bridge columns.

  14. Chamber studies of atmospheric iodine chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, J.; Nájera, J.; Schmitt, S.; Bleicher, S.; Pöhler, D.; Horbanski, M.; Platt, U.; Zetzsch, C.; Bloss, W. J.

    2012-12-01

    Iodine chemistry has been shown to occur through much of the marine boundary layer (MBL). It leads to significant impacts upon atmospheric oxidising capacity, ozone levels and particle number concentration; however, there are major uncertainties in our knowledge of the iodine chemical reaction system, which limit our ability to accurately quantify these impacts using atmospheric models. In this work we report the results of novel atmospheric simulation chamber experiments, to study aspects of the fast gas-phase inorganic iodine oxide chemistry. We consider two specific issues here: First, in the presence of moderate levels of NO2, most current models predict that most active iodine should exist as INO3 (whose lifetime is controlled primarily by photolysis) and that levels of IO and OIO should be minimal. This is in contrast to observations from recent field measurements from semi-polluted coastal MBL locations which find significant levels of IO in the presence of NOx. Explanations include possible reactions of INO3 with I or O3 regenerating IO, or errors in the INO3 photochemical parameters. Second, while ozone loss is almost universally cited as a reason to study atmospheric iodine chemistry, calculations of the actual ozone destruction rate which results from a given iodine source term are rather uncertain - as we do not have quantitative understanding of the fate of the many potential iodine oxide species formed. This limits our ability to predict the steady state IO levels which will exist in equilibrium with a given iodine source term, and the resulting ozone loss rate. Recent field measurements in the MBL struggle to reconcile the observed IO with the measured iodine sources - indicating that additional sources exist, or alternatively that the model representation of the gas-phase iodine sink via higher iodine oxides is incorrect. We report the results from experiments performed in a 3.5 m3 indoor PTFE atmospheric simulation chamber located at Bay

  15. Effects of perforated baffle on reducing sloshing in rectangular tank: Experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mi-an; Lin, Peng-zhi; Zheng, Jin-hai; Ma, Yu-xiang; Yuan, Xiao-li; Nguyen, Viet-Thanh

    2013-10-01

    A liquid sloshing experimental rig driven by a wave-maker is designed and built to study liquid sloshing problems in a rectangular liquid tank with perforated baffle. A series of experiments are conducted in this experimental rig to estimate the free surface fluctuation and pressure distribution by changing external excitation frequency of the shaking table. An in-house CFD code is also used in this study to simulate the liquid sloshing in three-dimensional (3D) rectangular tank with perforated baffle. Good agreements of free surface elevation and pressure between the numerical results and the experimental data are obtained and presented. Spectral analysis of the time history of free surface elevation is conducted by using the fast Fourier transformation.

  16. A Study of Mixed Convection in Large Baffled Rectangular Chambers with and without Internal Heat Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    consider some basic aerosol science to determine terminal settling ve- locities and the effects of thermophoresis induced velocities for the droplets...V = 1 d2gC0 ( _Pd ) (3.7) 18 Thermophoresis induced velocity must also be considered. This is the ve- locity induced by forces resulting in the

  17. A numerical study of the turbulent free convection in rectangular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrous, Abdelouahab

    1988-08-01

    The steady two-dimensional, laminar, and turbulant free convection in rectangular enclosures has been studied numerically. The physical model used was a 2-D model of a rectangular cavity with the vertical walls maintained at different, but constant temperatures and the horizontal walls either adiabatic or perfectly conductive. The turbulent shear stresses and heat fluxes appearing in the momentum and energy equations are modeled using a two-equation (kappa minus epsilon) turbulence model involving the solution of the differential equations for kappa, the kinetic energy of turbulence, and epsilon, its rate of dissipation. The continuity, two momentum, and energy equations, coupled with the two transport equations for kappa and epsilon constitute a closed system of six equations in six unknowns describing a turbulent, bouyancy-driven, two-dimensional flow. These equations are normalized and then solved for the mean values of the dependent variables (U,V,T,P, kappa, epsilon) using a numerical method based on a control volume finite difference approach. With this numerical technique, solutions for the two-dimensional buoyancy-induced flows inside rectangular cavities characterized by wide range of Rayleigh numbers (1000 is less than Ra is less than 10 to the 12th power) have been obtained. The effects of adiabatic and perfectly conductive horizontal boundary conditions on the mean flow parameters and turbulence fields inside the cavity are examined. Moreover, the effects of turbulence model constants were studied. The predictions of velocities, temperatures, and the Nusselt numbers are in good comparison with the numerical and experimental data. Applciations of the mumerical technique, simulate the effect of plumes, infiltration, and horizontal partitions on the basic flow pattern in occupied rooms.

  18. Extracorporeal hydroxyapatite-chamber for bone and biomaterial studies.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Luigi; Zaffe, Davide; Adani, Roberto; Krajewski, Adriano; Ravaglioli, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) spherules and autologous bone (AB) with a central vascular pedicle were housed inside an HA-chamber to form the skeletal segment of specific shape. Experimental chambers were then inserted in a pocket between medial thigh muscles in 13 New Zealand male rabbits for 3 months. Three graft group were scheduled: (A) HA and AB without vascular pedicle, (B) HA with vascular pedicle, (C) HA and AB with vascular pedicle. At term, histology showed tissue and cellular degeneration in group A chambers. Due to spherules coalescence, fibrous tissue is formed in group B chambers. Group C chambers contained living osteocytes in the implanted bone, several newly formed vessels in soft tissue, bone and partial hydroxyapatite erosions. New bone was formed in apposition to both autologous bone and hydroxyapatite. Our study suggests that this experimental model could be used to grow adequately sized vascularized skeletal segments.

  19. Dual-chamber versus single-chamber detection enhancements for implantable defibrillator rhythm diagnosis: the detect supraventricular tachycardia study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Paul A; McClelland, Robyn L; Bamlet, William R; Acosta, Helbert; Kessler, David; Munger, Thomas M; Kavesh, Neal G; Wood, Mark; Daoud, Emile; Massumi, Ali; Schuger, Claudio; Shorofsky, Stephen; Wilkoff, Bruce; Glikson, Michael

    2006-06-27

    Delivery of inappropriate shocks caused by misdetection of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) remains a substantial complication of implanted cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) therapy. Whether use of optimally programmed dual-chamber ICDs lowers this risk compared with that in single-chamber ICDs is not clear. Subjects with a clinical indication for ICD (n=400) at 27 participating centers received dual-chamber ICDs and were randomly assigned to strictly defined optimal single- or dual-chamber detection in a single-blind manner. Programming minimized ventricular pacing. The primary end point was the proportion of SVT episodes inappropriately detected from the time of programming until crossover or end of study. On a per-episode basis, 42% of the episodes in the single-chamber arm and 69% of the episodes in the dual-chamber arm were due to SVT. Mortality (3.5% in both groups) and early study withdrawal (14% single-chamber, 11% dual-chamber) were similar in both groups. The rate of inappropriate detection of SVT was 39.5% in the single-chamber detection arm compared with 30.9% in the dual-chamber arm. The odds of inappropriate detection were decreased by almost half with the use of the dual-chamber detection enhancements (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.30 to 0.94; P=0.03). Dual-chamber ICDs, programmed to optimize detection enhancements and to minimize ventricular pacing, significantly decrease inappropriate detection.

  20. CFD Simulation Studies on the Performance of Rectangular Coil Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudeen, N.; Anantharaman, N.; Raviraj, Pol.

    2010-10-01

    The simulation studies are made to understand the concept of heat transfer by convection in a rectangular coiled type heat exchanger. The rectangular coil heat exchanger consists of inner and outer coil arrangements with several straight portions and bends so that the exterior flow is very similar to flow within tube-bundles. The present work focuses mainly on exploring the various flow pattern and temperature distribution through the pipe. Computer simulation studies were performed for four different angle of tube bundle inclination (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°) with two set flow arrangements (inline and staggered arrangement) in the shell side of the heat exchanger. The simulation results show that the effect of the tube bundle inclination on the fluid velocity distribution and the heat transfer performance is observed maximum for the coil with tube bundle inclination angle between 30 degrees and 60 degrees with the staggered arrangement than with the inline arrangement due to proper mixing in the shell side and the outside flow over the tube bundle helps to create turbulence without increasing the velocity in the shell side of the heat exchanger.

  1. Verification of equations for incipient motion studies for a rigid rectangular channel.

    PubMed

    Bong, Charles Hin Joo; Lau, Tze Liang; Ghani, Aminuddin Ab

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to verify the existing equations for incipient motion for a rigid rectangular channel. Data from experimental work on incipient motion from a rectangular flume with two different widths, namely 0.3 and 0.6 m, were compared with the critical velocity value predicted by the equations of Novak & Nalluri and El-Zaemey. The equation by El-Zaemey performed better with an average discrepancy ratio value of 1.06 compared with the equation by Novak & Nalluri with an average discrepancy ratio value of 0.87. However, as the sediment deposit thickness increased, the equation by El-Zaemey became less accurate. A plot on the Shields Diagram using the experimental data had shown the significant effect of the sediment deposit thickness where, as the deposit becomes thicker, the dimensionless shear stress θ value also increased. A new equation had been proposed by incorporating the sediment deposit thickness. The new equation gave improved prediction with an average discrepancy ratio value of 1.02.

  2. Collective Interaction in a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: A Linear Spatial Instability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1999-01-01

    A linear spatial instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. It is assumed that in the region of interest a coherent wave can propagate. For the case studied large spatial growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech and edge tone feedback locked subsonic jets. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a coherent wave can propagate. The large spatial growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of spacial growth rates will be presented for a set of relative Mach numbers and spacings for which experimental measurements have been made. Calculations of spatial growth rates are presented for relative Mach numbers from 1.25 to 1.75 with ratios of nozzle spacing to nozzle width ratios from s/w(sub N) = 4 to s/w(sub N) = 13.7. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  3. An Environmentally Controlled Chamber for the Study of Radon Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    constant coefficients respectively. Concentrations calculated using this equation should be correct to within 2.8 pCi/liter. Radon Concentration (pCi/t...physical volume of the radon chamber is approximately one-half of the effective volume because of the delay in emanations of the radon from the dry...ENVIRONMENTALLY CONTROLLED CHAMBER FOR THE STUDY OF RADON DETECTION THESIS William R. Wharton, Jr, Capt, USAF AFIT/EN/GNE/9 IM-11 I I Approved for public release

  4. Performance studies of Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komai, H.; Ochi, A.; Homma, Y.; Edo, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2013-03-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC) is being developed as a muon chamber of the ATLAS experiment in an HL-LHC environment. In the ATLAS muon system, a high flux of fast neutron background causes instability operation of the detectors. We performed neutron irradiation tests with μ-PIC to optimize the operation gas and detector structure. In addition, we studied neutron interactions with the detector, in order to understand the effect of fast neutrons.

  5. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber serving as a stable source of PCBs and building materials in the test chamber. During the tests, the PCB concentrations in the outlet air of the test chamber were monitored and the building materials were removed from the test chamber at different times to determine their PCB content. Among the materials tested, a petroleum-based paint, a latex paint, and a certain type of carpet were among the strongest sinks. Solvent-free epoxy coating, certain types of flooring materials, and brick were among the weakest sinks. For a given sink material, PCB congeners with lower vapor pressures were sorbed in larger quantities. Rough estimates of the partition and diffusion coefficients were obtained by applying a sink model to the data acquired from the chamber studies. A desorption test with the concrete panels showed that re-emission is a slow process, suggesting that PCB sinks, e.g. concrete, can release PCBs into the air for a prolonged period of time (years or decades). This study could fill some of the data gaps associated with the characterization of PCB sinks in contaminated buildings. This paper summarizes the laboratory research results for PCB transport from primary sources to PCB sinks, includ

  6. A guide to Ussing chamber studies of mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Lane L.

    2009-01-01

    The Ussing chamber provides a physiological system to measure the transport of ions, nutrients, and drugs across various epithelial tissues. One of the most studied epithelia is the intestine, which has provided several landmark discoveries regarding the mechanisms of ion transport processes. Adaptation of this method to mouse intestine adds the dimension of investigating genetic loss or gain of function as a means to identify proteins or processes affecting transepithelial transport. In this review, the principles underlying the use of Ussing chambers are outlined including limitations and advantages of the technique. With an emphasis on mouse intestinal preparations, the review covers chamber design, commercial equipment sources, tissue preparation, step-by-step instruction for operation, troubleshooting, and examples of interpretation difficulties. Specialized uses of the Ussing chamber such as the pH stat technique to measure transepithelial bicarbonate secretion and isotopic flux methods to measure net secretion or absorption of substrates are discussed in detail, and examples are given for the adaptation of Ussing chamber principles to other measurement systems. The purpose of the review is to provide a practical guide for investigators who are new to the Ussing chamber method. PMID:19342508

  7. Experimental study of two-phase water flow in vertical thin rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Christopher T.; O'Brien, James E.; Anderson, Elgin A.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental heat transfer study of two-phase water flow in vertical thin rectangular channels with side vents is conducted. A multiple, heated channel configuration with up- and down-flow conditions is investigated. Parallel heated and unheated flow channels test the effects of cross flow on the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and critical heat flux (CHF). The test apparatus provides pressure and substrate temperature data and visual data of the boiling regimes and side-vent flow patterns. The objectives are to determine the two-phase, heat and mass transfer characteristics between adjacent channels as permitted by side-vent cross flow. These data will help develop ONB and CHF correlations for flow geometries typical of plate-type nuclear reactors and heat exchangers. Fundamentally, the data shows how the geometry, flow conditions, and channel configurations affect the heat transfer characteristics of interior channel flows, essential in understanding the ONB and CHF phenomena.

  8. Study of compressible flow through a rectangular-to-semiannular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Jeffry; Okiishi, Theodore H.; Wendt, Bruce J.; Reichert, Bruce A.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed flow field measurements are presented for compressible flow through a diffusing rectangular-to-semiannular transition duct. Comparisons are made with published computational results for flow through the duct. Three-dimensional velocity vectors and total pressures were measured at the exit plane of the diffuser model. The inlet flow was also measured. These measurements are made using calibrated five-hole probes. Surface oil flow visualization and surface static pressure data were also taken. The study was conducted with an inlet Mach number of 0.786. The diffuser Reynolds based on the inlet centerline velocity and the exit diameter of the diffuser was 3,200,000. Comparison of the measured data with previously published computational results are made. Data demonstrating the ability of vortex generators to reduce flow separation and circumferential distortion is also presented.

  9. Experimental study on the flame behaviors of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongliang; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Sining; Liu, Yi; Chu, Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame propagation characteristics and tulip flame formation mechanism of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts, the techniques of Schlieren and high-speed video camera are used to study the flame behaviors of the premixed gases in a closed duct and opened one respectively, and the propagation characteristics in both cases and the formation mechanism of the tulip flame are analyzed. The results show that, the propagation flame in a closed duct is prior to form a tulip flame structure than that in an opened duct, and the tulip flame structure formation in a closed duct is related to the flame propagation velocity decrease. The sharp decrease of the flame propagation velocity is one of the reasons to the tulip flame formation, and the decrease of the flame propagation velocity is due to the decrease of the burned product flow velocity mainly.

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Study of a Rectangular Wing in a Vortical Wake at Low Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Willard G.; Lazzeroni, Frank A.

    1960-01-01

    A systematic study has been made, experimentally and theoretically, of the effects of a vortical wake on the aerodynamic characteristics of a rectangular wing at subsonic speed. The vortex generator and wing were mounted on a reflection plane to avoid body-wing interference. Vortex position, relative to the wing, was varied both in the spanwise direction and normal to the wing. Angle of attack of the wing was varied from -40 to +60. Both chordwise and spanwise pressure distributions were obtained with the wing in uniform and vortical flow fields. Stream surveys were made to determine the flow characteristics in the vortical wake. The vortex-induced lift was calculated by several theoretical methods including strip theory, reverse-flow theory, and reverse-flow theory including a finite vortex core. In addition, the Prandtl lifting-line theory and the Weissinger theory were used to calculate the spanwise distribution of vortex-induced loads. With reverse-flow theory, predictions of the interference lift were generally good, and with Weissinger's theory the agreement between the theoretical spanwise variation of induced load and the experimental variation was good. Results of the stream survey show that the vortex generated by a lifting surface of rectangular plan form tends to trail back streamwise from the tip and does not approach the theoretical location, or centroid of circulation, given by theory. This discrepancy introduced errors in the prediction of vortex interference, especially when the vortex core passed immediately outboard of the wing tip. The wake produced by the vortex generator in these tests was not fully rolled up into a circular vortex, and so lacked symmetry in the vertical direction of the transverse plane. It was found that the direction of circulation affected the induced loads on the wing either when the wing was at angle of attack or when the vortex was some distance away from the plane of the wing.

  11. Experimental Study of Large-Amplitude Faraday Waves in Rectangular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Alexander, Iwan J.; Tin, Padetha; Adamovsky, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Experiment on single-mode Faraday waves having two, thee, and four wavelengths across a rectangular cylinder of high aspect ratio is the subject of discussion. Previous experiments recently done by Henderson & Miles (1989) and by Lei Jiang et. a1 (1996) focused on Faraday waves with one and two wavelengths across rectangular cylinders. In this experimental study the waves steepness ranges from small at threshold levels to a large amplitude which according to Penny & Price theory (1952) approaches the maximum sustainable amplitude for a standing wave. The waves characteristics for small amplitudes are evaluated against an existing well known linear theory by Benjamin & Ursell (l954) and against a weakly nonlinear theory by J. Miles (1984) which includes the effect of viscous damping. The evaluation includes the wave neutral stability and damping rate. In addition, a wave amplitude differential equation of a linear theory including viscous effect by Cerda & Tirapegui (1998) is solved numerically to yield prediction of temporal profiles of both wave damping and wave formation at the threshold. An interesting finding from this exercise is that the fluid kinematic viscosity needs to increase ten times in order to obtain good agreement between the theoretical prediction and the experimental data for both wave damping and wave starting. For large amplitude waves, the experimental data are evaluated against the theory of Penny & Price which predicts wave characteristics of any amplitude up to the point at which the wave reaches its maximum amplitude attainable for a standing wave. The theory yields two criteria to show the maximum wave steepness, the vertical acceleration at the wave crest of half the earth gravity field acceleration and the including angle at the crest of 90 degrees. Comparison with experimental data shows close agreement for the wave crest acceleration but a large discrepancy for the including angle. Additional information is included in the original

  12. Experimental Study of Large-Amplitude Faraday Waves in Rectangular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Alexander, Iwan J.; Tin, Padetha; Adamovsky, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Experiment on single-mode Faraday waves having two, thee, and four wavelengths across a rectangular cylinder of high aspect ratio is the subject of discussion. Previous experiments recently done by Henderson & Miles (1989) and by Lei Jiang et. a1 (1996) focused on Faraday waves with one and two wavelengths across rectangular cylinders. In this experimental study the waves steepness ranges from small at threshold levels to a large amplitude which according to Penny & Price theory (1952) approaches the maximum sustainable amplitude for a standing wave. The waves characteristics for small amplitudes are evaluated against an existing well known linear theory by Benjamin & Ursell (l954) and against a weakly nonlinear theory by J. Miles (1984) which includes the effect of viscous damping. The evaluation includes the wave neutral stability and damping rate. In addition, a wave amplitude differential equation of a linear theory including viscous effect by Cerda & Tirapegui (1998) is solved numerically to yield prediction of temporal profiles of both wave damping and wave formation at the threshold. An interesting finding from this exercise is that the fluid kinematic viscosity needs to increase ten times in order to obtain good agreement between the theoretical prediction and the experimental data for both wave damping and wave starting. For large amplitude waves, the experimental data are evaluated against the theory of Penny & Price which predicts wave characteristics of any amplitude up to the point at which the wave reaches its maximum amplitude attainable for a standing wave. The theory yields two criteria to show the maximum wave steepness, the vertical acceleration at the wave crest of half the earth gravity field acceleration and the including angle at the crest of 90 degrees. Comparison with experimental data shows close agreement for the wave crest acceleration but a large discrepancy for the including angle. Additional information is included in the original

  13. Treatment of mandibular angle fracture with a 2mm, 3 dimensional rectangular grid compression miniplates: A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mansuri, Samir; Abdulkhayum, Abdul Mujeeb; Gazal, Giath; Hussain, Mohammed Abid Zahir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of fracture mandible using an internal fixation has changed in the last decades to achieve the required rigidity, stability and immediate restoration of function. The aim of the study was to do a Prospective study of 10 patients to determine the efficacy of rectangular grid compression miniplates in mandibular fractures. Materials & Methods: This study was carried out using 2.0 rectangular grid compression miniplates and 8 mm multidirectional screws as a rigid internal fixation in 10 patients without post operative intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Follow up was done for period of 6 months. Results: All fractures were healed with an absolute stability in post operative period. None of the patient complained of post operative difficulty in occlusion. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that rectangular grid compression miniplates was rigid, reliable and thus can be recommended for the treatment of mandibular angle fractures. How to cite this article: Mansuri S, Abdulkhayum AM, Gazal G, Hussain MA. Treatment of mandibular angle fracture with a 2mm, 3 dimensional rectangular grid compression miniplates: A prospective clinical study. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):93-100 . PMID:24453452

  14. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  15. Precision expansion cloud chamber for homogeneous nucleation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, John L.

    1981-11-01

    The author describes an expansion cloud chamber for the study of the nucleation of a single component vapor (homogeneous nucleation). The design draws on the many years of experience in this Center in construction of chambers for homogeneous nucleation of water. Design features of the chamber are: exact control of temperature (±0.03 ° C), pressure (±0.5 mm Hg), and automatic control of cycling. Construction features are: all construction materials are stainless steel, glass, or fluorocarbon plastics; the piston seal is a very flexible welded stainless steel bellows; the chamber can be made very clean by heating under vacuum and it is compatible with many substances, e.g., ethanol, nonane, and toluene. Performance features are: excellent repeatability of the expansion cycle over a temperature range of 45° to —15 °C and in day to day operation. Safety features are: automatic detection and warning and inerting against fire and explosion from combustible vapor in the chamber enclosure. The determination of the gas temperature at the maximum expansion is discussed as well as the importance of the ''fast'' pulse technique for the measurement of high nucleation rates.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  17. Anterior chamber lenses. Part II: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Apple, D J; Hansen, S O; Richards, S C; Ellis, G W; Kavka-Van Norman, D; Tetz, M R; Pfeffer, B R; Park, R B; Crandall, A S; Olson, R J

    1987-03-01

    An analysis of 606 surgically removed anterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) specimens revealed that 351 or 58% of these were small-diameter, round loop, closed-loop styles. Because of the extremely high percentage of IOLs with this design received in our laboratory and the correlation of clinical histories with our histopathologic findings, we have concluded that such IOLs do not provide the safety and efficacy achieved by other anterior chamber lens designs. The finely polished, one-piece, all-PMMA styles fared well in our study. Although these one-piece styles comprise well over 50% of the American market share of anterior chamber IOLs, they comprise only 14% of all anterior chamber IOLs accessioned in our laboratory, compared to 58% for closed-loop designs. We believe that implantation of anterior chamber lenses with small-diameter, round, closed loops is no longer warranted. Patients in whom these IOLs have already been implanted should be carefully followed. It is our opinion that the FDA should recall or closely monitor all IOLs of this design and that implantation of closed-loop lenses should be discontinued in the United States. Furthermore, we believe that an IOL deemed to be not medically sound or worthy of implantation in the United States should not be marketed or donated outside of this country.

  18. Photochemistry of Glyoxal in Wet Aerosols: Smog Chamber Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Kim, H.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous chemistry is an important pathway for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Reaction vessel studies provide evidence that in the aqueous phase photooxidation of water soluble organic compounds (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal) form multifunctional organic products and oligomers. In this work, we extend this bulk-phase chemistry to the condensed-phase chemistry that occurs in/on aerosols by conducting smog chamber experiments — photooxidation of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols containing glyoxal and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NOx under dry/humid conditions. Particles were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). In the irradiated chamber, photooxidation products of glyoxal as seen in reaction vessel experiments (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were also formed in both ammonium sulfate aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols at humid and even dry conditions. However, the major products were organosulfurs (CHOS), organonitrogens (CHON), and nitrooxy-organosulfates (CHONS), which were also dominantly formed in the dark chamber. These products were formed via non-radical reactions, which depend on acidity and humidity. However, the real-time profiles in the dark chamber and the irradiated chamber were very different, suggesting photochemistry substantially affects non-radical formation in the condensed phase.

  19. Feasibility study for removing calcified material using a planar rectangular ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Damianou, Christakis; Couppis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the proposed study was to conduct a feasibility study using a flat rectangular (3 mm × 10 mm) MRI compatible transducer operating at 5.3 MHz for destroying calcified material in an in vitro model. The proposed method can be used in the future for treating atherosclerosis plaques of the coronary, carotid or peripheral arteries. The system was tested initially on calcium rods. Another test was performed in a hydroxyapatite-polylactide model. A parametric study was performed where the mass of calcified material removed was studied as a function of intensity, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), duty factor (DF) and presence of bubbles. The amount of calcified material removed is directly related to the intensity, PRF and DF. It was found that the presence of bubbles accelerates the removal of calcified material. In order to ensure that pure mechanical mode ultrasound was used, the protocols were designed so that the temperature does not exceed 1 °C.

  20. 59. Interior view, study chamber, from the north. The cabinet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Interior view, study chamber, from the north. The cabinet in the wall on the right was fitted into an original exterior window opening made obsolete with phase III construction. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Experimental study of cooling performance of pneumatic synthetic jet with singular slot rectangular orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Roger Ho Zhen; Ismail, Mohd Azmi bin; Ramdan, Muhammad Iftishah; Mustaffa, Nur Musfirah binti

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic Jet generates turbulence flow in cooling the microelectronic devices. In this paper, the experiment investigation of the cooling performance of pneumatic synthetic jet with single slot rectangular orifices at low frequency motion is presented. The velocity profile at the end of the orifice was measured and used as characteristic performance of synthetic jet in the present study. Frequencies of synthetic jet and the compressed air pressure supplied to the pneumatic cylinder (1bar to 5bar) were the parameters of the flow measurement. The air velocity of the synthetic jet was measured by using anemometer air flow meter. The maximum air velocity was 0.5 m/s and it occurred at frequency motion of 8 Hz. The optimum compressed air supplied pressure of the synthetic jet study was 4 bar. The cooling performance of synthetic jet at several driven frequencies from 0 Hz to 8 Hz and heat dissipation between 2.5W and 9W were also investigate in the present study. The results showed that the Nusselt number increased and thermal resistance decreased with both frequency and Reynolds number. The lowest thermal resistance was 5.25°C/W and the highest Nusselt number was 13.39 at heat dissipation of 9W and driven frequency of 8Hz.

  2. Study of An Extended Interaction Oscillator with A Rectangular Reentrance Coupled-cavity in Terahertz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaichun; Wu, Zhenhua; Liu, Shenggang

    2009-04-01

    An extended interaction oscillator (EIO) generating Terahertz (THz) wave is presented by theoretical study and simulation study in this paper. A rectangular reentrant coupled-cavity is proposed as its slow-wave structure (SWS). The equivalent circuit method (ECM) is adopted to calculate the dispersion relation and circuit parameters of the SWS. The beam-wave interaction of the EIO is theoretically studied in detail, including the beam loading conductance, the conversion efficiency and the optimal gap number. The dependence is investigated of the beam loading conductance and the conversion efficiency on the gap number and the beam velocity. Some properties of the cold circuit are simulated by CST software, including the dispersion relation and the filed distribution. These simulation results agree well with those of ECM. The operating mode of EIO is chosen very close to the β L = 2π point with corresponding frequency about 0.225 THz, when the beam voltage is 13 kV, the current 105 mA, the cavity was designed with the period 0.3 mm, 14-gap, the height 1.6 mm and the width 0.76 mm . Simulation results of beam-wave interaction with PIC codes show that the excited frequency is 0.225 THz and peak output power 44 W.

  3. Parametric experimental studies on mixing characteristics within a low area ratio rectangular supersonic gaseous ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, S. K.; Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2016-07-01

    We use the rectangular gaseous supersonic ejector as a platform to study the mixing characteristics of a confined supersonic jet. The entrainment ratio (ER) of the ejector, the non-mixed length (LNM), and potential core length (LPC) of the primary supersonic jet are measures to characterize mixing within the supersonic ejector. Experiments are carried out on a low area ratio rectangular supersonic ejector with air as the working fluid in both primary and secondary flows. The design Mach number of the nozzle (MPD = 1.5-3.0) and primary flow stagnation pressure (Pop = 4.89-9.89 bars) are the parameters that are varied during experimentation. Wall static pressure measurements are carried out to understand the performance of the ejector as well as to estimate the LNM (the spatial resolution is limited by the placement of pressure transducers). Well-resolved flow images (with a spatial resolution of 50 μm/pixel and temporal resolution of 1.25 ms) obtained through Planar Laser Mie Scattering (PLMS) show the flow dynamics within the ejector with clarity. The primary flow and secondary flow are seeded separately with acetone that makes the LNM and LPC clearly visible in the flow images. These parameters are extracted from the flow images using in-house image processing routines. A significant development in this work is the definition of new scaling parameters within the ejector. LNM, non-dimensionalized with respect to the fully expanded jet height hJ, is found to be a linear function of the Mach number ratio (Mach number ratio is defined as the ratio of design Mach number (MPD) and fully expanded Mach number (MPJ) of the primary jet). This definition also provides a clear demarcation of under-expanded and over-expanded regimes of operation according to [MPD/MPJ] > 1 and [MPD/MPJ] < 1, respectively. It is observed that the ER increased in over-expanded mode (to 120%) and decreased in under-expanded mode (to 68%). Similarly, LNM decreased (to 21.8%) in over-expanded mode

  4. Experimental study of an upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouidri, A.; Madani, B.; Roubi, B.; Hamadouche, A.

    2016-07-01

    The upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel is investigated experimentally. The aim of the present work is the studying of the local heat transfer phenomena. Concerning the experimentation: the n-pentane is used as a working fluid, the independent variables are: the velocity in the range from 0.04 to 0.086 m/s and heat flux density with values between 1.8 and 7.36 W/cm2. The results show that the local Nusselt number distribution is not uniform along the channel; however, uniformity is observed in the mean Nusselt number for Reynolds under 1600. On the other hand, a new correlation to predict the local fluid temperature is established as a function of local wall temperature. The wall's heat is dissipated under the common effect of the sub-cooled regime; therefore, the local heat transfer coefficient is increased. The study of the thermal equilibrium showed that for Reynolds less than 1500; almost all of the heat flux generated by the heater cartridges is absorbed by the fluid.

  5. A chamber for laboratory studies of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narus, M. L.; Schoenfelder, N. C.; Na, Y.; Chavasse, L. A.; Disselkamp, R. S.

    1996-12-01

    A stainless-steel chamber has been constructed and interfaced to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for the purpose of studying laboratory simulated atmospheric aerosols and clouds. The chamber is cylindrical in design and is comprised of a double-walled inner assembly that resides within an outer vacuum jacket. The volume of the aerosol sample region is 28 L. By circulating refrigerated methanol between the double walls of the inner assembly, constant temperature control of the sample region can be maintained between 187 and 300 K. A study of temperature uniformity within the chamber at 291, 240, and 187 K revealed a standard deviation in temperature of 1.6 K as determined from measurements made using five copper-constantan thermocouples. Good agreement is obtained between thermocouple measured temperatures and rotational temperatures computed from infrared absorption spectra of methane gas. The chamber described here has been used to examine heterogeneous chemistry of solid powder samples. A technique of generating an aerosol sample by rapidly dispersing a solid powder in a gas is presented. The half-life of a γ-alumina aerosol sample was measured to be 25 min.

  6. Clearance of viscoelastic mucus simulant with airflow in a rectangular channel, an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amgad A; Evrensel, Cahit A; Krumpe, Peter E

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of mucus simulant with airflow in a rectangular channel is investigated experimentally. Two different viscoelastic gel mucus simulants are prepared by cross linking Borax with Locust Bean Gum (LBG) solution; liquid-like (LM) with lower storage modulus and semi-solid (SM). The rheological difference between LM and SM represent the qualitative change from liquid-like healthy mucus to the one with higher storage modulus found in a person with lung disease. The study concentrates on the effect of viscoelastic layer thickness and rheology on the wave formation and clearance due to its interaction with airflow. The results indicate that the onset air velocity for wave initiation reduces by increasing layer thickness. This effect is more pronounced for SM. Slowly propagating waves initiate at a lower air velocity for LM compared to SM for thinner layer thickness and this behavior reverses for a thicker layer. Although SM clears at a critical air velocity, LM does not show clearance behavior, defined as separation of layer section from rest and movement in the downstream flow direction. This seems to suggest that thicker mucus with higher elastic modulus, similar to the mucus for a person with lung disease, may clear easier with a two-phase air-liquid flow, as in cough.

  7. Experimental study on the flow separation and self-excited oscillation phenomenon in a rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bing; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    To study the characteristics of flow separation and self-excited oscillation of a shock train in a rectangular duct, a simple test case has been conducted and analyzed. The high-speed Schlieren technique and high-frequency pressure measurements have been adopted to collect the data. The experimental results show that there are two separation modes in the duct under M3 incoming condition. The separation mode switch has great effects on the flow effects, such as the pressure distribution, the standard deviation distribution and so on. The separation mode switch can be judged by the history of pressure standard deviation. When it comes to the self-excited oscillation of a shock train, the frequency contents in the undisturbed region, the intermittent region, and the separated bubble have been compared. It was found that the low-frequency disturbance induced by the upstream shock foot motions can travel downstream and the frequency will be magnified by the separation bubble. The oscillation of the small shock foot and the oscillation of the large shock foot are associated with each other rather than oscillating independently.

  8. Numerical Study of the Buoyancy-Driven Flow in a Four-Electrode Rectangular Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhanyu; Agafonov, Vadim; Rice, Catherine; Bindler, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is done on the buoyancy-driven flow in a four-electrode rectangular electrochemical cell. Two kinds of electrode layouts, the anode-cathode-cathode-anode (ACCA) and the cathode-anode-anode-cathode (CAAC) layouts, are studied. In the ACCA layout, the two anodes are placed close to the channel outlets while the two cathodes are located between the two anodes. The CAAC layout can be converted from the ACCA layout by applying higher electric potential on the two middle electrodes. Density gradient was generated by the electrodic reaction I3^-+2e^- =3I^-. When the electrochemical cell is accelerated axially, buoyancy-driven flow occurs. In our model, electro-neutrality is assumed except at the electrodes. The Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and the Nernst-Planck equations are employed to model the momentum and mass transports, respectively. It is found that under a given axial acceleration, the electrolyte density between the two middle electrodes determines the bulk flow through the electrochemical cell. The cathodic current difference is found to be able to measure the applied acceleration. Other important electro-hydrodynamic characteristics are also discussed.

  9. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J.

    1995-05-01

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  10. Theoretical and numerical studies of plume flows in vacuum chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunpei

    This thesis consists of three parts: a study of facility effects on the background flow in large vacuum chambers; an analytical study of free molecular flows out of exits with different shape representing thruster plumes; and particle simulations of plasma plume flows from a cluster of Hall thrusters. The first part of this thesis discusses the facility effects on large vacuum chambers, which is quite important to the Electric Propulsion (EP) community. Based on the fact that the background flows in large vacuum chambers equipped with cryogenic pumps are free molecular, five models are proposed to study the average background pressure and flow velocity and their relation to several facility effects, such as pump sticking coefficient, pump size, wall and pump temperatures, and chamber sidewall length. The analysis are based on the mass flow rates into and out of the chamber, the fluxes along two directions and various number density relations at various stations such as chamber ends and vacuum pumps. The second part of the thesis develops several sets of analytical solutions to free molecular flows out of exits with different shapes. It is demonstrated that the plasma plume flows expanding into vacuum can be studied analytically as a combination of several free molecular flows, if the electric field and collision effects are omitted. There exists a unique relation of velocity and positions. The last part of the thesis presents several three-dimensional particle simulations of plasma plume flows from a cluster of Hall thrusters. A detailed electron fluid model is used to solve important electron properties such as plasma potential and electron temperature. A finite element solver is developed to solve the equations of the electron properties on unstructured meshes. Several important implementation issues are discussed and one significant finding is that the class of particle-to-node weighting schemes based on areas or volumes on an unstructured mesh is inaccurate

  11. Biomass production chamber air analysis of wheat study (BWT931)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, J. H.; Peterson, B. V.; Berdis, E.; Wheeler, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) biomass production chamber at John F. Kennedy Space Center provides a test bed for bioregenerative studies using plants to provide food, oxygen, carbon dioxide removal, and potable water to humans during long term space travel. Growing plants in enclosed environments has brought about concerns regarding the level of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) emitted from plants and the construction materials that make up the plant growth chambers. In such closed systems, the potential exists for some VOC's to reach toxic levels and lead to poor plant growth, plant death, or health problems for human inhabitants. This study characterized the air in an enclosed environment in which wheat cv. Yocora Rojo was grown. Ninty-four whole air samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry throughout the eighty-four day planting. VOC emissions from plants and materials were characterized and quantified.

  12. Study of vortex core precession in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of swirling flow of lean propane/air flame in a model combustion chamber at atmospheric pressure. To study the unsteady turbulent flow, the particle image velocimetry technique was used. It was concluded that dynamics of high swirl flows with and without combustion was determined by a global helical mode, complying with a precessing double-spiral coherent vortex structure. The studied low swirl flame had similar size and stability characteristics, but amplitude of the coherent helical structure substantially oscillated in time. The oscillations were associated with intermittently appearing central recirculation zone that was absent in the nonreacting flow. It is expected that the low swirl flow without the permanent central recirculation zone should be more sensitive to an external active control. In particular, this result may be useful for suppression of thermoacoustic resonance in combustion chambers.

  13. Study of vortex core precession in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of swirling flow of lean propane/air flame in a model combustion chamber at atmospheric pressure. To study the unsteady turbulent flow, the particle image velocimetry technique was used. It was concluded that dynamics of high swirl flows with and without combustion was determined by a global helical mode, complying with a precessing double-spiral coherent vortex structure. The studied low swirl flame had similar size and stability characteristics, but amplitude of the coherent helical structure substantially oscillated in time. The oscillations were associated with intermittently appearing central recirculation zone that was absent in the nonreacting flow. It is expected that the low swirl flow without the permanent central recirculation zone should be more sensitive to an external active control. In particular, this result may be useful for suppression of thermoacoustic resonance in combustion chambers.

  14. Study of Daedalus Interstellar Spacecraft Reaction Chamber and Thrust Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. K.; Benaroya, H.

    Project Daedalus was the 1978 trade study that proved the feasibility of space travel utilizing fusion-based propulsion (Inertial Confinement Fusion). This paper analyzes some of the key structural aspects of the Daedalus spacecraft, in particular, the reaction chamber and thrust structure that is integral to the Daedalus spacecraft, which supports the loads resulting from the fusion reactions. First, the reaction chamber is studied computationally in terms of static loading and vibrational characteristics utilizing the finite element method. Next, a proposed bracing system is integrated into the reaction chamber and the effects are studied. Lastly, the field coils with their supporting truss structure are added to the assembly. Concepts are introduced for actuators and course-correction mechanisms that ensure the spacecraft maintains the required trajectory to rendezvous with the target system. Present-day materials and manufacturing considerations are explored based on the assumptions made in the Daedalus study. Testing, qualification, and assembly of the spacecraft are also discussed. This paper is a summary of the first author's Master's Thesis at Rutgers University.

  15. Smoke density studies with the Arapahoe and NBS chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Smoke density studies on twelve cellulosic and five synthetic materials using the Arapahoe and NBS smoke chambers show an empirical relationship between smoke weight as per cent of initial weight in the Arapahoe test and maximum specific optical density under piloted conditions in the NBS test. The NBS optical density data under piloted conditions exhibited sensitivity to test artifacts such as type of pilot burner.

  16. Numerical study of conjugate heat transfer in rectangular microchannel heat sink with Al2O3/H2O nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Samanta, A. N.; Chakraborty, S.

    2009-08-01

    In the present paper, conjugate heat transfer approach has been used to numerically study laminar forced convective heat transfer characteristics of Al2O3/H2O nanofluid flowing in a silicon microchannel heat sink (MCHS) of rectangular cross-section using thermal dispersion model. Results are presented in terms of thermal resistance that characterizes MCHS performance. It is observed that use of nanofluid improves MCHS performance by reducing fin (conductive) thermal resistance.

  17. A New Chamber for Studying the Behavior of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jasper C.; Dickinson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Methods available for quickly and objectively quantifying the behavioral phenotypes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, lag behind in sophistication the tools developed for manipulating their genotypes. We have developed a simple, easy-to-replicate, general-purpose experimental chamber for studying the ground-based behaviors of fruit flies. The major innovative feature of our design is that it restricts flies to a shallow volume of space, forcing all behavioral interactions to take place within a monolayer of individuals. The design lessens the frequency that flies occlude or obscure each other, limits the variability in their appearance, and promotes a greater number of flies to move throughout the center of the chamber, thereby increasing the frequency of their interactions. The new chamber design improves the quality of data collected by digital video and was conceived and designed to complement automated machine vision methodologies for studying behavior. Novel and improved methodologies for better quantifying the complex behavioral phenotypes of Drosophila will facilitate studies related to human disease and fundamental questions of behavioral neuroscience. PMID:20111707

  18. Three-dimensional continuation study of convection in a tilted rectangular enclosure.

    PubMed

    Torres, J F; Henry, D; Komiya, A; Maruyama, S; Ben Hadid, H

    2013-10-01

    A continuation method developed from a three-dimensional spectral finite element code is used to study natural convection in a tilted rectangular cavity. The cavity has its length equal to two times the side of its square cross section and it contains a fluid with a Prandtl number Pr = 1. A detailed bifurcation diagram is first obtained in the case without inclination in order to get the sequence of the different branches of solutions and determine the stable solutions. The focus is then put on the stable solutions in the inclined cavity, when the tilt occurs around its longest axis. The subtle changes induced by the tilt on the convective system are clarified. Three different stable solutions are obtained: the longitudinal roll L- solution (with the same sense of rotation as the inclination angle), which develops smoothly from zero Rayleigh number on the leading branch; the longitudinal roll L+ solution (with a sense of rotation opposite to the inclination angle), which is on a disconnected branch and is stabilized beyond a secondary bifurcation point; the oblique roll O ± solutions (corresponding to transverse roll solutions perturbed by the longitudinal flow induced by the tilt), which quickly appear beyond saddle-node points on new disconnected branches. The domain of existence of these stable solutions is eventually obtained and described in the Rayleigh number-inclination parameter space. Finally, the Nusselt number is determined as a function of the inclination at a constant Rayleigh number for the different stable solutions. The Nusselt number is maximum at an inclination of 49.55° for the leading longitudinal roll L- solution.

  19. Aeroelastic Studies of a Rectangular Wing with a Hole: Correlation of Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conyers, Howard J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Two rectangular wing models with a hole have been designed and tested in the Duke University wind tunnel to better understand the effects of damage. A rectangular hole is used to simulate damage. The wing with a hole is modeled structurally as a thin elastic plate using the finite element method. The unsteady aerodynamics of the plate-like wing with a hole is modeled using the doublet lattice method. The aeroelastic equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's equation. The flutter boundary is found using the V-g method. The hole's location effects the wing's mass, stiffness, aerodynamics and therefore the aeroelastic behavior. Linear theoretical models were shown to be capable of predicting the critical flutter velocity and frequency as verified by wind tunnel tests.

  20. Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with a perforated screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Bernard; Remy, Fabien

    2013-11-01

    Rectangular tanks partially filled with water and fitted with vertical perforated screens have been proposed as Tuned Liquid Dampers to mitigate the vibratory response of land buildings, under wind or earthquake excitation. Similar devices are used as anti-rolling tanks aboard ships. Experiments are performed on a rectangular tank with one screen at mid length. The tank is subjected to forced horizontal and rolling motions, harmonic and irregular. The open-area ratio of the screen is kept constant while the motion amplitudes and frequencies are varied. The frequency range covers the first three natural sloshing modes of the clean tank (without screen). Force measurements are converted into matrices of added mass/inertia and damping coefficients. A simple numerical model is proposed, based on linearized potential flow theory and quadratic discharge equation at the screen, following earlier works by the first author. Good agreement is reported between experimental and numerical hydrodynamic coefficients.

  1. Experimental and analytical study of contact melting in a rectangular cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Z. F.; Chen, Z. Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Ebadian, M. A.

    1991-09-01

    A detailed investigation is presented of analytical and experimental findings for contact melting in a rectangular cavity for the phase change materials n-heptadecane and n-eicosane. The temperature of the two side walls and bottom surface of the cavity are maintained by circulating water through a highly sensitive thermostat. The other surfaces are subjected to adiabatic conditions. The time-dependent solid-liquid interface contour is measured photographically during the melting process. The experimental data, such as the melting rate and the dimensionless height of the solid, are compared with predicted values of the theoretical model, and good agreement is observed. It is demonstrated that the height of the microchannel at the bottom is constant. This shows that the heat transfer across the channel is dominated by conduction. Results also indicate that the melting on the vertical wall is controlled by conduction. It is concluded, therefore, that heat conduction is the main contact melting mechanism in a rectangular cavity.

  2. Rectangular diagrams of surfaces: representability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dynnikov, I. A.; Prasolov, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    Introduced here is a simple combinatorial way, which is called a rectangular diagram of a surface, to represent a surface in the three-sphere. It has a particularly nice relation to the standard contact structure on S^3 and to rectangular diagrams of links. By using rectangular diagrams of surfaces it is intended, in particular, to develop a method to distinguish Legendrian knots. This requires a lot of technical work of which the present paper addresses only the first basic question: which isotopy classes of surfaces can be represented by a rectangular diagram? Roughly speaking, the answer is this: there is no restriction on the isotopy class of the surface, but there is a restriction on the rectangular diagram of the boundary link arising from the presentation of the surface. The result extends to Giroux's convex surfaces for which this restriction on the boundary has a natural meaning. In a subsequent paper, transformations of rectangular diagrams of surfaces will be considered and their properties will be studied. By using the formalism of rectangular diagrams of surfaces an annulus in S^3 is produced here that is expected to be a counterexample to the following conjecture: if two Legendrian knots cobound an annulus and have zero Thurston-Bennequin numbers relative to this annulus, then they are Legendrian isotopic. Bibliography: 30 titles.

  3. Experimental study of the two-layer electromagnetically coupled rectangular patch antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Lee, Kai-Fong

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results on the characteristics of two-layer electromagnetically coupled rectangular patch antennas are presented. In addition to the relatively large bandwidth region that occurs when the separation between the two layers is less than 0.15 wavelength, a high-gain region is found when the separation exceeds 0.3 wavelength. The relative sizes of the parasitic and fed patches are found to have significant effects on the resonant input resistance and bandwidth.

  4. Numerical Study of Single-Chamber Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yong

    Single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SCFC) are ones in which the fuel and oxidizer are premixed, and selective electrode catalysts are used to generate the oxygen partial pressure gradient that in a conventional dual-chamber design is produced by physical separation of the fuel and oxidizer streams. The SCFC concept is a novel simplification of a conventional solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), and SCFCs have been shown capable of generating power densities high enough to make them potentially useful in many applications where the simplicity of a single gas chamber and absence of seals offsets the expected lower efficiency of SCFCs compared to dual-chamber SOFCs. SCFC performance is found to depend sensitively on cell microstructure, geometry, and flow conditions, and optimization of SCFC stacks requires considering complex, coupled chemical and transport processes. However, research activity in this area is far from sufficient and insights about SCFC systems are very limited. The understanding of many fundamental physical and chemical processes required for improving SCFC designs is often beyond the capability of modern experimental techniques, and efficient experimental studies are often held back by the lack of guidance from theoretical models due to the fact that modeling study about SCFC is very rare to date, and existing models about conventional SOFCs are not suitable for simulating SCFCs because of the inherent differences of single-chamber SOFCs from conventional ones. In order to systematically investigate these problems and optimize the electrical performance of SCFC systems, a 2D numerical model of a single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell (SCFC) operating on hydrocarbon fuels is developed and presented in this work. The model accounts for the coupled effects of gas channel fluid flow, heat transfer, porous media transport, catalytic reforming/shifting chemistry, electrochemistry, and mixed ionic-electronic conductivity. It solves for the velocity, temperature

  5. STUDIES OF 48Ni USING THE OPTICAL TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorski, M.; Pfutzner, Marek; Dominik, W.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Baumann, T.; Czyrkowski, H.; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Johnson, J.; Kaminski, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Maier, Karl; Mazzocchi, C.; Mianowski, S.; Miernik, K.; Pereira, J.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.; Suchyta, S.

    2012-01-01

    The decay of the extremely neutron deficient {sup 48}Ni was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber which allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Four decays with two-proton tracks clearly corresponding to two-proton radioactivity were registered, providing the first direct evidence for this decay mode in {sup 48}Ni. The half-life of {sup 48}Ni is determined to be T{sub 1/2} = 2.1{sub -0.4}{sup +1.4} ms. The measured decay energy is 1.28(6) MeV.

  6. Simulation study of multi-chamber rotary compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. D.; Lin, M.; Ooi, K. T.

    2017-08-01

    A new multi-chamber rotary compressor (MCRC) has been designed and the simulation result is presented in this paper. MCRC utilizes the space within the cylinder and it has the advantage of being more compact. Mathematical models which include geometrical, thermodynamics, mass flow and discharge valve have been formulated to evaluate the performance of MCRC. Parametric studies have also been carried out to determine the effects of design parameters such as suction and discharge ports size, valve length, valve thickness and valve width on compressor performance. In this paper, mathematical models will be presented and the predictions of the model will be shown and discussed.

  7. Design and use of an exposure chamber for air pollution studies on microarthropods

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, H.M.

    1982-10-01

    An exposure chamber for studying the effects of air pollution on microarthropods is described. The chamber was tested on a corticolous mite, Humerobates rostrolamellatus Grandjean (Acari: Oribatida). In the absence of pollutants, the overall mortality was about 2.5%.

  8. Study of an End-Fed Dipole Antenna Excited by a Rectangular Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhtiyarov, D. A.; Gorbachev, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of analysis of a dipole antenna fed via a rectangular waveguide and based on a recently proposed end-fed dipole. Both the radiation resistance and the complex input impedance of such an antenna are determined using the mirror image theory and the induced EMF method. The principles used for an optimal choice of the radius of the antenna conductors and the size of the wide wall of the waveguide are discussed. The experimental results indicate that the proposed approach is correct.

  9. Study on Pressure Wave Propagation in a Liquid Containing Spherical Bubbles in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Junya; Watanabe, Masao; Kobayashi, Kazumichi

    2015-12-01

    Pressure wave propagation in a liquid containing several bubbles is numerically investigated. We simulate liner plane wave propagation in a liquid containing 10 spherical bubbles in a rectangular duct with the equation of motion for N spherical bubbles. The sound pressures of the reflected waves from the rigid walls are calculated by using the method of images. The result shows that the phase velocity of the pressure wave propagating in the liquid containing 10 spherical bubbles in the duct agrees well with the low-frequency speed of sound in a homogeneous bubbly liquid.

  10. Experimental study of cross flow mixing in cylindrical and rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; Vranos, A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of non-reacting cross flow jet injection and mixing in cylindrical and rectangular ducts has been conducted with application to a low emissions combustor. Quantitative measurement of injectant concentration distributions perpendicular to the duct axis were obtained by planar digital imaging of the Mie-scattered light from an aerosol seed mixed with the injectant. The flowfield unmixedness was evaluated using (1) a mixing parameter derived from the ratio of the jet concentration fluctuations to the fully mixed concentration, and (2) probability density functions of the concentration distributions. Mixing rate was measured for 45 degree slant slot and round orifice injectors.

  11. Experimental Study of RC Rectangular Liquid Containing Structures Retrofitted with GFRP Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, R.; Ziari, A.; Kianoush, M. R.

    2010-04-01

    The continual functioning of Liquid Containing Structures “LCS” is necessary for the well being of a society. These structures are designed based on serviceability criteria such as cracking that leads to leakage. Cracks form in liquid containing structures (LCS) for different reasons such as restrained thermal and shrinkage deformations, applied external loads such as earthquake loads, etc. These cracks can create exposure condition to initiate the corrosion process in reinforcement. The effectiveness of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites in recovering the structural strength of damaged members is widely recognized by engineers. However, the effectiveness on the use of GFRP composites as a protecting layer to prevent the passage of liquid through the cracks has not yet been reported in the literature. This concept inspires the main purpose of the investigation in this experimental study. Cracked reinforced concrete specimens subjected to different conditions of loading such as direct tension and cyclic flexure are repaired externally using GFRP sheets. The specimens are then subjected to hydrostatic pressure using a water pressure chamber at the crack location. This study shows that the application of GFRP composites for crack remediation in liquid containing structures could be very effective under monotonic loading. However, the effectiveness under cyclic flexure especially under higher load levels is questionable.

  12. A Rectangular Loop Gap Resonator for EPR Studies of Aqueous Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Wojciech; Froncisz, Wojciech; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    1998-09-01

    A new rectangular geometry of the loop-gap resonator for the use with a flat cell has been developed. Maxwell's equations for the resonators with two, four, six, and eight gaps have been solved assuming the existence of only the magneticz-component. The formulas obtained were numerically solved for the electric and magnetic field distributions over the cross-sections of the resonators. The presence of a nodal plane for the electric field in the center of the resonator allows the use of a flat cell instead of a capillary for EPR measurements. Using the field distributions obtained, the quality factor and EPR signal amplitude for various shapes and gap numbers for the resonators containing a flat cell filled with water were examined numerically. This allowed finding the geometry that yields the maximum EPR signal intensity. Several X-band resonators were built in order to verify the results obtained theoretically. The experiments confirmed the ability of a novel resonant structure to accommodate a flat cell filled with an aqueous sample. It has been found that the optimum aqueous sample volume for the X-band rectangular loop-gap resonator equals 16 mm3. For a saturable aqueous sample this gives a fourfold improvement in theS/Nratio over the circular 1 mm i.d. loop-gap resonator equipped with 0.6 mm i.d. capillary.

  13. A Comparative Study of Strength of Two-Way Rectangular Slabs with and without Openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, M.; Rakesh, V.; Rambabu, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present work uses yield-line theory to find the strength of uniformly loaded rectangular reinforced concrete slabs with and without rectangular openings. Five positions of openings are considered, i.e. the slab centre, the slab corner, the centre of a short side, the centre of a long side and the opening eccentric to the slab centre. All possible admissible yield line patterns are considered for all given configurations of the slab subjected to uniformly distributed load keeping in view the basic principles of yield line theory. The ratios of the corresponding lengths of the sides of the opening and the slab are different and sizes of opening up to 0.4× the length of the slab sides are considered. Symmetric edge conditions like continuous slab, simply supported, two long sides continuous and two short sides continuous are considered for various sizes of openings in order to plot the design charts for isotropic reinforcement coefficients only. Affine transformation is also performed for slab with openings.

  14. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of the input impedance of the cylindrical cavity-backed rectangular slot antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ming-Yi; Hummer, Kenneth A.; Chang, Kai

    1991-01-01

    The authors study the input impedance of a cylindrical cavity-backed slot antenna based on mode matching and the complex Poynting theorem. Two cavity-backed slot antennas were fabricated to verify the theory. The numerical results agree very well with measurements. Two resonant frequencies were found from the input impedance. One resonant frequency is attributed to the rectangular slot and the other is due to the cavity. The slot length controls the first resonant frequency and has a much stronger effect on the input impedance at the antenna operating frequency as compared with the cavity length.

  16. Chamber study of PCBemissions from caulking materials and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from 13 caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 different models from five manufacturers were tested in 53-liter environmental chambers. The rates of PCB congener emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts were determined. Several factors that may have affected the emission rates were evaluated. The experimentally determined emission factors showed that, for a given PCB congener, there is a linear correlation between the emission factor and the concentration of the PCB congener in the source. Furthermore, the test results showed that an excellent log-linear correlation exists between the normalized emission factor and the vapor pressure (coefficient of determination, r2 ≥0.8846). The PCB congener emissions from ballasts at or near room temperature were relatively low with or without electrical load. However, the PCB congener emission rates increased significantly as the temperature increased. The results of this research provide new data and models for ranking the primary sources of PCBs and supports the development and refinement of exposure assessment models for PCBs. This study supplemented and complemented the field measurements in buildings conducted by U.S. EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory by providing a bette

  17. Airflow studies in a forced ventilated chamber with low partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.K.; Tsui, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    A climate chamber was used to study experimentally the airflow characteristics in a ventilated space with low partitions. Two types of commonly used air distribution devices were selected for the study--a ceiling diffuser and side grille systems. A total of 16 tests were performed using the two diffusers with partition heights varying up to 1.8 m (5.91 ft) above floor level. From the measured results, the thermal comfort indices were assessed. A stabilization effect of airflow was found when the partition height reached 1.8 m (5.91 ft). Local draft risk was located in the occupied zone. Also, the modified Archimedes number proposed by Jackman (1990) was used to describe the indoor airflow in the absence of a workable design guide for partitioned spaces.

  18. A numerical study of two-dimensional vortex shedding from rectangular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Sindir, Munir M.; Issa, R. I.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient time-marching, non-iterative calculation method is used to analyze time-dependent flows around rectangular cylinders. The turbulent flow in the wake region of a square section cylinder is analyzed using an anisotropic k-epsilon model. Initiation and subsequent development of the vortex shedding phenomenon is naturally captured once a perturbation is introduced in the flow. Transient calculations using standard eddy-viscosity and an anisotropic k-epsilon model averaged over an integral number of cycles to get the fluctuating energy (organized and turbulent) are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the anisotropic k-epsilon model resolves the anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses and gives mean energy distribution closer to the experiment than the standard k-epsilon model.

  19. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  20. Anterior chamber depth in elderly Chinese: the Liwan eye study.

    PubMed

    He, Mingguang; Huang, Wenyong; Zheng, Yingfeng; Alsbirk, Poul Helge; Foster, Paul J

    2008-08-01

    To assess the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and its variation with age, gender, and angle width in elderly Chinese in an urban area of southern China. Cross-sectional study. Adults 50 and older were identified using cluster random sampling in Liwan District, Guangzhou. Gonioscopy was performed before ACD measurements to estimate the geometric angle width according to the Shaffer system. ACD was measured using optical pachymetry. True ACD was calculated by subtracting central corneal thickness from the distance between the anterior corneal epithelium and the anterior lens capsule. Data were presented for the right phakic eyes. Anterior chamber depth and gonioscopy. Among 1405 participants in the study, data from 1248 right eyes were available for analysis. The mean ACD values for men and women were 2.59 mm (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.56-2.62; 25th-75th percentile, 2.37-2.82) and 2.42 mm (95% CI, 2.39-2.44; 25th-75th percentile, 2.21-2.63). Mean ACD declined by 0.09 mm (95% CI, -0.011 to -0.008) per decade (adjusted for gender) and was 0.18 mm (95% CI, -0.213 to -0.141) shallower in women than men (adjusted for age). The ACD was found to be monotonically associated with gonioscopic angle width, decreasing from 2.73 mm (standard deviation [SD], 0.26) in Shaffer grade 4 to 1.94 mm (SD, 0.27) in Shaffer grade 0. There was also a relationship between ACD and refractive error; mean spherical equivalent decreased by 0.030 mm ACD per diopter. This study confirms an inverse association between ACD and age, female gender, and spherical refractive error. Eyes with shallower ACDs had narrower angles.

  1. Potassium Rankine cycle vapor chamber (heat pipe) radiator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrels, E. E.; Killen, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A structurally integrated vapor chamber fin (heat pipe) radiator is defined and evaluated as a potential candidate for rejecting waste heat from the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant. Several vapor chamber fin geometries, using stainless steel construction, are evaluated and an optimum is selected. A comparison is made with an operationally equivalent conduction fin radiator. Both radiators employ NaK-78 in the primary coolant loop. In addition, the Vapor Chamber Fin (VCF) radiator utilizes sodium in the vapor chambers. Preliminary designs are developed for the conduction fin and VCF concepts. Performance tests on a single vapor chamber were conducted to verify the VCF design. A comparison shows the conduction fin radiator easier to fabricate, but heavier in weight, particularly as meteoroid protection requirements become more stringent. While the analysis was performed assuming the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant, the results are equally applicable to any system radiating heat to space in the 900 to 1400 F temperature range.

  2. A Study on Position Resolution within Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, Tyler

    2007-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment which operates at Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, explores the quark-gluon structure within the proton. An upgrade is currently underway to integrate Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) into the detector setup to act as a trigger for high transverse momentum muons that are often produced from the decay of W-bosons. To understand the performance of the RPCs before their production, a cosmic ray test stand has been assembled at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign to test small scale RPCs. This test stand allows for the measurement of signal strength, position resolution, timing resolution, and two-dimensional efficiencies of the avalanches formed within RPCs. Utilizing the position resolution capabilities of this test stand a variety of readout strip configurations were tested. The results of this study including the position resolution and cluster size of the avalanches produced will be presented.

  3. Laboratory aging studies for the HERA-B muon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    2002-11-01

    The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum accumulated charge on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm wire . For operation in this high-intensity environment, the main criteria for the gas choice turned out to be stability against aging. We report recent results of laboratory aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with Ar/CF 4/CH 4 (74:20:6), Ar/CF 4/CH 4 (67:30:3), and Ar/CF 4/CO 2 (65:30:5) mixtures. The penetration of water and oxygen through the walls of plastic tubes has also been investigated. Water can be introduced indirect to the gas mixture by using polyamide (nylon) pipes for gas supply lines.

  4. Resonant Interaction of a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: an Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Taghavi, Ray

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines a supersonic multi jet interaction problem that we believe is likely to be important for mixing enhancement and noise reduction in supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles. We demonstrate that it is possible to synchronize the screech instability of four rectangular jets by precisely adjusting the inter jet spacing. Our experimental data agrees with a theory that assumes that the phase-locking of adjacent jets occurs through a coupling at the jet lip. Although the synchronization does not change the frequency of the screech tone, its amplitude is augmented by 10 dB. The synchronized multi jets exhibit higher spreading than the unsynchronized jets, with the single jet spreading the least. We compare the nearfield noise of the four jets with synchronized screech to the noise of the sum of four jets operated individually. Our noise measurements reveal that the more rapid mixing of the synchronized multi jets causes the peak jet noise source to move up stream and to radiate noise at larger angles to the flow direction. Based on our results, we believe that screech synchronization is advantageous for noise reduction internal to a mixer-ejector nozzle, since the noise can now be suppressed by a shorter acoustically lined ejector.

  5. Numerical study of heat transfer enhancement of counter nanofluids flow in rectangular microchannel heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, H. A.; Bhaskaran, G.; Shuaib, N. H.; Saidur, R.

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports a numerical analysis of the performance of a counter-flow rectangular shaped microchannel heat exchanger (MCHE) using nanofluids as the working fluids. Finite volume method was used to solve the three-dimensional steady, laminar developing flow and conjugate heat transfer in aluminum MCHE. The nanofluids used were Ag, Al 2O 3, CuO, SiO 2, and TiO 2 and the performance was compared with water. The thermal, flow fields and performance of the MCHE were analyzed using different nanofluids, different Reynolds numbers and different nanoparticle concentrations. Temperature profile, heat transfer coefficient, pressure profile, and wall shear stress were obtained from the simulations and the performance was discussed in terms of heat transfer rate, pumping power, effectiveness, and performance index. Results indicated enhanced performance with the usage of nanofluids, and slight penalty in pressure drop. The increase in Reynolds number caused an increase in the heat transfer rate and a decrease in the overall bulk temperature of the cold fluid. The increase in nanoparticle concentration also yielded better performance at the expense of increased pressure drop.

  6. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-15

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  7. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  8. Study of the PTW microLion chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; González-Castaño, D.; Díaz-Botana, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-06-01

    The use of liquid ionization chambers in radiotherapy has grown during the past few years. While for air ionization chambers the kTP correction for air mass density due to pressure and temperature variations is well known, less work has been done on the case of liquid ionization chambers, where there is still the need to take into account the influence of temperature in the free ion yield. We have measured the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence in a ˜ ±10 °C interval around the standard 20 °C room temperature for three operation voltages, including the manufacturer recommended voltage, and two beam qualities, 60Co and 50 kV x-rays. Within the measured temperature range, the microLion signal exhibits a positive linear dependence, which is around 0.24% K-1 at 800 V with 60Co irradiation. This effect is of the same order of magnitude as the T dependence found in air ionization chambers, but its nature is completely different and its sign opposite to that of an air chamber. Onsager theory has been used to model the results and is consistent with this linear behaviour. However, some inconsistencies in the modelling of the 50 kV x-ray results have been found that are attributed to the failure of Onsager's isolated pair assumption for such radiation quality.

  9. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions.

    PubMed

    Timkovsky, J; Gankema, P; Pierik, R; Holzinger, R

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants, or to study the photochemistry of real plant emissions under polluted conditions without exposing the plants to pollutants. The main analytical tool is a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) which allows online monitoring of biogenic emissions and chemical degradation products. The identification of BVOCs and their oxidation products is aided by cryogenic trapping and subsequent in situ gas chromatographic analysis.

  10. Partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, T.G.

    1998-05-01

    The authors are interested in partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing. The partitioning problem has been well-studied in the square symmetric case, but the rectangular problem has received very little attention. They will formalize the rectangular matrix partitioning problem and discuss several methods for solving it. They will extend the spectral partitioning method for symmetric matrices to the rectangular case and compare this method to three new methods -- the alternating partitioning method and two hybrid methods. The hybrid methods will be shown to be best.

  11. Temperature study on PHENIX Resistive Plate Chamber 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Mathew

    2012-10-01

    The PHENIX collaboration is investigating the results of polarized proton + proton collisions generated by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Studying these collisions will help gain perspective on the overall spin structure of the proton. PHENIX has developed a trigger upgrade for the muon arms to select single high transverse momentum (p/T) muons. A major part of this upgrade is the inclusion of 2 stations of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in each arm of PHENIX. The RPCs are constructed with two gas gaps made of Bakelite and coated with linseed oil, which closely follows the CMS design. These materials are known to be sensitive to high temperatures and within PHENIX a station of RPC's are installed between two large magnets, which could cause the temperature environment to elevate. In order to gain a better understanding of the temperature of the gas gaps, we will compare the externally monitored temperature data from Run-12 to the temperatures acquired from a dedicated temperature profile study. Overall this will help the collaboration operate the RPCs in a manner that will improve their performance and extend their lifetime.

  12. Isotopic probes for chamber-based microphysics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, E. J.; Möhler, O.; Ebert, V.; Morong, C. P.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapor are an underutilized potential probe of processes of ice crystal nucleation and growth and cirrus cloud evolution. We discuss a new laser- based absorption spectroscopy instrument for measurement of gas-phase water isotopologues (H2O, HDO, and H218O) currently under construction for use at the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany, the largest such facility in the world and the only one suitable for isotopic measurements. We discuss proposed chamber experiments and show how isotopic measurements can help discriminate between many current hypotheses proposed to explain observed high supersaturation in cold cirrus, which include inactivation of aerosols by glassification, growth inhibition due to aerosol coating with organic material, ice in cubic rather than hexagonal phase, unexpectedly low temperature-dependent mass accommodation coefficients, and NAT deposition on ice. Chamber experiments offer several advantages over field sampling in the atmosphere from aircraft. First, the limitations of natural isotopic ratios (1:10000 for HDO:H2O) are not a constraint in controlled chamber experiments, because chamber water can be doped to reduce the difference between concentrations of common and rare isotopologues and allow increased measurement sensitivity. Second, different water sources can be isotopically labeled, allowing explicit measurement of fluxes. The combination allows the use of isotopic probes in novel ways for understanding microphysics in cold cirrus.

  13. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazines: Environmental chamber studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of fuel hydrazines were studied in a 6500-liter fluorocarbon-film chamber at 80 to 100 ppm concentrations. First-order rate constants for the reactions catalyzed by aluminum, water-damaged aluminum (Al/Al2O3), stainless steel 304L, galvanized steel and titanium plates with surface areas of 2 to 24 sq m were determined. With 23.8 sq m of Al/Al2O3 the surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazine had a half-life of 2 hours, diimide (N2H2) was observed as an intermediate and traces of ammonia were present in the final product mixture. The Al/Al2O3 catalyzed oxidation of monomethylhydrazine yielded methyldiazine (HN = NCH3) as an intermediate and traces of methanol. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine gave no detectable products. The relative reactivities of hydrazine, MMH and UDMH were 130 : 7.3 : 1.0, respectively. The rate constants for Al/Al2O3-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and MMH were proportional to the square of the surface area of the plates. Mechanisms for the surface-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and diimide and the formation of ammonia are proposed.

  14. An experimental and numerical study of heave added mass and damping of horizontally submerged and perforated rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Song; Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2013-05-01

    Forced harmonic heave motions of horizontally submerged and perforated rectangular plates are studied experimentally and numerically at both a deep and shallow submergence. The steady-state vertical forces are expressed in terms of added mass and damping coefficients. The numerical results are partly obtained by combining potential flow with linear free-surface conditions and a nonlinear viscous pressure loss condition at the mean oscillatory plate position. A domain decomposition technique is applied with a boundary element method in the inner domain and an analytical representation of the velocity potential in the outer domain. A drag term accounts for the vortex shedding at the outer plate edges. The numerically predicted Keulegan-Carpenter number dependent heave added mass and damping coefficients agree reasonably with experimental values, in particular for the deeper submergence.

  15. Experimental study of columnar recombination in fission chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Lamirand, V.; Geslot, B.; Jammes, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present experimental saturation curves of a small gap miniature fission chamber obtained in the MINERVE reactor. The chamber is filled with argon at various pressures, and the fissile material can be coated on the anode, cathode, or both. For analyzing the recombination regime, we consider a model of columnar recombination and discuss its applicability to our chamber. By applying this model to the data, it is possible to estimate the ratio between the recombination coefficient k and an effective column radius b, appearing in the model, to be k / b =(2.5 ± 0.9) ×10-6m2 / s for argon. From these results, a routine measurement of the recombination regime is proposed in order to detect gas leakage. This online diagnosis would be beneficial in terms of lifetime and reliability of the neutron instrumentation of nuclear reactors.

  16. Synchronizability of random rectangular graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, Ernesto Chen, Guanrong

    2015-08-15

    Random rectangular graphs (RRGs) represent a generalization of the random geometric graphs in which the nodes are embedded into hyperrectangles instead of on hypercubes. The synchronizability of RRG model is studied. Both upper and lower bounds of the eigenratio of the network Laplacian matrix are determined analytically. It is proven that as the rectangular network is more elongated, the network becomes harder to synchronize. The synchronization processing behavior of a RRG network of chaotic Lorenz system nodes is numerically investigated, showing complete consistence with the theoretical results.

  17. A Survey of Environmental Microbial Flora During Closed Chamber Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Groves, Theron O.; Bell-Robinson, Denetia; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Services, Inc. and NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX As NASA prepares for long-term missions aboard the International Space Station and the eventual exploration of Mars, closed-environment chambers on Earth have become important test beds for systems evaluations. During 2 separate studies of a selfcontained ecosystem containing 4 crewmembers, microbial surveys of samples from 13 surface and 3 air sites were performed. Microbial concentration of samples from surface sites with frequent water contact (e.g., urinal, sink) did not indicate significantly higher levels of contamination than drier areas, though surface cleaning by the crew may have influenced this conclusion. Changes in bacterial diversity on surface sites implied that the number of transient species was high, suggesting movement by crew activities, aerosols, or both. A non-linear relationship between bacterial diversity and enumeration from surface samples indicated that a rapid increase occurred in the number of species as cell concentration increased to 5 CFU/sq cm. Above this concentration, the number of different bacterial species varied between 11 and 16. Airborne bacteria and fungi averaged only 160 and 1 CFU/m3, respectively. Microbial contamination of the potable water system primarily consisted of 3 species of Gram negative bacteria; however, after 60 days during one study, several species of Bacillus became the dominant flora. This study suggests that under these conditions, microbial contamination in the air and water was suppressed by the life-support systems, though contamination was possible. Conversely, the crew and their activities controlled microbial levels on surfaces. Understanding the factors that affect microbial control will improve the design of microbial testing both during space flight and in analogous Earth-based environments.

  18. A Survey of Environmental Microbial Flora During Closed Chamber Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Groves, Theron O.; Bell-Robinson, Denetia; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Services, Inc. and NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX As NASA prepares for long-term missions aboard the International Space Station and the eventual exploration of Mars, closed-environment chambers on Earth have become important test beds for systems evaluations. During 2 separate studies of a selfcontained ecosystem containing 4 crewmembers, microbial surveys of samples from 13 surface and 3 air sites were performed. Microbial concentration of samples from surface sites with frequent water contact (e.g., urinal, sink) did not indicate significantly higher levels of contamination than drier areas, though surface cleaning by the crew may have influenced this conclusion. Changes in bacterial diversity on surface sites implied that the number of transient species was high, suggesting movement by crew activities, aerosols, or both. A non-linear relationship between bacterial diversity and enumeration from surface samples indicated that a rapid increase occurred in the number of species as cell concentration increased to 5 CFU/sq cm. Above this concentration, the number of different bacterial species varied between 11 and 16. Airborne bacteria and fungi averaged only 160 and 1 CFU/m3, respectively. Microbial contamination of the potable water system primarily consisted of 3 species of Gram negative bacteria; however, after 60 days during one study, several species of Bacillus became the dominant flora. This study suggests that under these conditions, microbial contamination in the air and water was suppressed by the life-support systems, though contamination was possible. Conversely, the crew and their activities controlled microbial levels on surfaces. Understanding the factors that affect microbial control will improve the design of microbial testing both during space flight and in analogous Earth-based environments.

  19. Hypobaric chamber for the study of oral health problems in a simulated spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A hypobaric chamber was constructed to house two marmo-sets simultaneously in a space-simulated environment for periods of 14, 28 and 56 days which coincided with the anticipated Skylab missions. This report details the fabrication, operation, and performance of the chamber and very briefly reviews the scientific data from nine chamber trials involving 18 animals. The possible application of this model system to studies unrelated to oral health or space missions is discussed.

  20. Hypobaric chamber for the study of oral health problems in a simulated spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A hypobaric chamber was constructed to house two marmo-sets simultaneously in a space-simulated environment for periods of 14, 28 and 56 days which coincided with the anticipated Skylab missions. This report details the fabrication, operation, and performance of the chamber and very briefly reviews the scientific data from nine chamber trials involving 18 animals. The possible application of this model system to studies unrelated to oral health or space missions is discussed.

  1. Chamber study of PCBemissions from caulking materials and light ballasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from 13 caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 di...

  2. Chamber study of PCBemissions from caulking materials and light ballasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from 13 caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 di...

  3. Can a novel rectangular footplate provide higher resistance to subsidence than circular footplates? An ex vivo biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Murat; McDonald, Erik; Kennedy, Abbey; Dedini, Russell; McClellan, Trigg; Ames, Christopher; Deviren, Vedat

    2012-09-01

    Ex vivo biomechanical evaluation using cadaveric vertebral bodies. To compare the subsidence characteristics of a novel rectangular footplate design with a conventional circular footplate design. Cage subsidence is a postoperative complication after reconstruction of corpectomy defects in the thoracolumbar spine and depends on factors, such as bone quality, adjunctive fixation, and the relationship between the footplate on the cage and the vertebral body endplate. Twenty-four cadaveric vertebrae (T12-L5) were disarticulated, potted in a commercial resin, loaded with either a circular or a rectangular footplate, and tested in a servo hydraulic testing machine. Twelve vertebral bodies were loaded with a circular footplate, and after subsidence the same vertebral bodies were loaded with a rectangular footplate. The second set of 12 vertebral bodies was loaded with a rectangular footplate only. Force-displacement curves were developed for the 3 groups, and the ultimate load to failure and stiffness values were calculated. The ultimate load to failure with the circular footplate was 1310 N (SD, 482). The ultimate load to failure with a rectangular footplate with a central defect and without a central defect was 1636 N (SD, 513) and 2481 N (SD, 1191), respectively. The stiffness of the constructs with circular footplate was 473 N/mm (SD, 205). The stiffness of the constructs with a rectangular footplate with a central defect and without a central defect was 754 N/mm (SD, 217) and 1054 N/mm (SD, 329), respectively. A rectangular footplate design is more resistant to subsidence than a circular footplate design in an ex vivo biomechanical model. The new design had higher load to failure even in the presence of a central defect. These findings suggest that rectangular footplates may provide better subsidence resistance when used to reconstruct defects after thoracolumbar corpectomy.

  4. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  5. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  6. Studies on degradation of lime mortars in atmospheric simulation chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ramirez, S.; Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.; Thompson, G.E.

    1997-05-01

    It is well known that the presence of pollution increases the degradation of some building materials. In order to understand the influence of individual pollutants as well as the role of oxidants and water in lime mortar degradation, those materials have been exposed in atmospheric simulation chambers. According to the pollutants used in the chambers (NO, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}), NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} have been analyzed and related with the reaction between the lime mortar and the pollutant. The reactivity order of the different pollutant (NO, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}), in presence and absence of water and/or oxidant has been determined.

  7. study on trace contaminants control assembly for sealed environment chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, L. P.; Wang, J.; Liu, L. K.; Liu, H.

    The biological and Physicochemical P C life support technologies are all important parts to establish a human Closed Ecological Life Support System CELSS for long-duration mission The latter has the advantages of lower power consumption lower mass and higher efficiency therefore researchers often incorporate the use of biological systems with P C life support technologies to continuously recycle air water and part of the solid waste stream generated such as the Russian BLSS and the NASA-sponsored Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project LMLSTP In short these tests were very successful in integrating biological and P C life support technologies for long-duration life support Therefore we should use a combination of integrated biological with P C life support technologies in a human CELSS Human construction materials plants animals and soils release much trace toxic gases in a CELSS and they will inhibit plant growth and badly affect human health when their concentrations rise over their threshold levels The effect of biological trace contaminant control technologies is slower especially for a human sealed chamber because human produce much more methane and other contaminants A regenerative Trace Contaminant Control Subsystem TCCS with P C technology is a more important part in this case to control quickly the airborne contaminants levels and assure human in good condition in a sealed chamber This paper describes a trace contaminant control test facility incorporated a 8 m3 sealed environment chamber a regenerative TCCS with P C

  8. A DUST-SETTLING CHAMBER FOR SAMPLING-INSTRUMENT COMPARISON STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Few methods exist that can evenly and reproducibly deposit dusts onto surfaces for surface-sampling methodological studies. A dust-deposition chamber was designed for that purpose.

    Methods: A 1-m3 Rochester-type chamber was modified to produce high airborne d...

  9. A DUST-SETTLING CHAMBER FOR SAMPLING-INSTRUMENT COMPARISON STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Few methods exist that can evenly and reproducibly deposit dusts onto surfaces for surface-sampling methodological studies. A dust-deposition chamber was designed for that purpose.

    Methods: A 1-m3 Rochester-type chamber was modified to produce high airborne d...

  10. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the ..lambda../sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a ..gamma..-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven.

  11. An aging study of wire chambers with dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Jibaly, M.; Chrusch, P. Jr.; Hilgenberg, G.; Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.; Sauli, F.; Gaudaen, J.

    1989-02-01

    The authors report results on the aging of different types of resistive and non-resistive wires in wire chambers filled with dimethyl ether (DME) of varying degrees of purity. Among the Freon impurities detected in our DME batches, only Freon-11 was found to contribute to the aging process. Of the resistive wires, Nicotin and Stablohm produced fast aging, whereas stainless steel withstood extended irradiation in purified DME (up to 1 C/cm) without any apparent damage. Gold-plated tungsten and molybdenum wires produced results comparable to those of the stainless steel.

  12. Wire chamber requirements and tracking simulation studies for tracking systems at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-02-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. Such computer simulation studies are necessary to determine the feasibility of wire chamber tracking systems for complex events in a high-rate environment such as the SSC. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. FLUIDS, PLASMAS AND ELECTRIC DISCHARGES: Study of a rectangular coupled cavity extended interaction oscillator in sub-terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai-Chun; Wu, Zhen-Hua; Liu, Sheng-Gang

    2008-09-01

    An extended interaction oscillator (EIO) generating 120 GHz wave in sub-terahertz waves is studied by using the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation software CST and PIC codes. A rectangular reentrant coupled-cavity is proposed as the slow-wave structure of EIO. By CST, the circuit parameters including frequency-phase dispersion, interaction impedance and characteristic impedance are simulated and calculated. The operation mode of EIO is chosen very close to the point where β L = 2π with corresponding frequency 120 GHz, the beam voltage 12 kV and the dimensions of the cavity with the period 0.5 mm, the height 3 mm and the width 1.4 mm. Simulation results of beam-wave interaction by PIC show that the exciting frequency is 120.85 GHz and output peak power 465 W with 12-period coupled-cavity with the perveance 0.17μP. Simulation results indicate that the EIO has very wide range of the operation voltage.

  14. Gas mixture studies for streamer operated Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, A.; Longhin, A.; Mengucci, A.; Pupilli, F.; Ventura, M.

    2016-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode are interesting detectors in neutrino and astro-particle physics applications (like OPERA and ARGO experiments). Such experiments are typically characterized by large area apparatuses with no stringent requirements on detector aging and rate capabilities. In this paper, results of cosmic ray tests performed on a RPC prototype using different gas mixtures are presented, the principal aim being the optimization of the TetraFluoroPropene concentration in Argon-based mixtures. The introduction of TetraFluoroPropene, besides its low Global Warming Power, is helpful because it simplifies safety requirements allowing to remove also isobutane from the mixture. Results obtained with mixtures containing SF6, CF4, CO2, N2 and He are also shown, presented both in terms of detectors properties (efficiency, multiple-streamer probability and time resolution) and in terms of streamer characteristics.

  15. Halogen Activation in Sea-Spray Aerosol, a Chamber Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, S.; Buxmann, J.; Sander, R.; Platt, U.; Zetzsch, C.

    2012-12-01

    Halogen Activation (HA) from sea-spray is known to be strongly dependent on pH. This dependence has been investigated in detail in our laboratory using aqueous salt aerosol and observing the bromine explosion by the consumption of ozone in a simulation chamber, made of FEP Teflon film and irradiated by a solar simulator under tropospheric conditions. At various relative humidities, initial concentrations of bromide and of injected NO2 we observed the intermediate formation and decay of BrO, ClO and OClO by DOAS. Time profiles of the pH and the species in solution and gas phase were calculated by an appropriate box model (CAABA/MECCA) considering the heterogeneous photochemistry of halogens. We observe an almost total HA of bromide and a significant HA of chloride.

  16. Study of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jinchan; Zhang Xiaobing; Mao Fuming; Xiao Mei; Cui Yunkang; Engelsen, Daniel den; Lei Wei

    2008-03-15

    The design of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer (MCQMS) having a small total volume of only 20 cm{sup 3}, including Faraday cup ion detector and ion source, is described. This MCQMS can resist a vacuum baking temperature of 400-500 deg. C. The quadrupole elements with a hyperbolic surface are made of a ceramic material and coated with a thin metal layer. The quadrupole mass filter has a field radius of 3 mm and a length of 100 mm. Prototypes of this new MCQMS can detect a minimum partial pressure of 10{sup -8} Pa, have a peak width of {delta}M=1 at 10% peak height from mass number 1 to 60, and show an excellent long-term stability. The new MCQMS is intended to be used in residual gas analyses of electron devices during a mutual pumping and baking process.

  17. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-butanol in helium: a comparative study of a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Zdímal, Vladimír; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2005-06-01

    Isothermal homogeneous nucleation rates of 1-butanol were measured both in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and in a laminar flow diffusion chamber built recently at the Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. The chosen system 1-butanol-helium can be studied reasonably well in both devices, in the overlapping range of temperatures. The results were compared with those found in the literature and those measured by Lihavainen in a laminar flow diffusion chamber of a similar design. The same isotherms measured with the thermal diffusion cloud chamber occur at highest saturation ratios of the three devices. Isotherms measured with the two laminar flow diffusion chambers are reasonably close together; the measurements by Lihavainen occur at lowest saturation ratios. The temperature dependences observed were similar in all three devices. The molecular content of critical clusters was calculated using the nucleation theorem and compared with the Kelvin equation. Both laminar flow diffusion chambers provided very similar sizes slightly above the Kelvin equation, whereas the thermal diffusion cloud chamber suggests critical cluster sizes significantly smaller. The results found elsewhere in the literature were in reasonable agreement with our results.

  18. Analytical study of temperature distribution in a rectangular porous fin considering both insulated and convective tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshamukhya, Tuhin; Bhanja, Dipankar; Nath, Sujit; Maji, Ambarish; Choubey, Gautam

    2017-07-01

    The following study is concerned with determination of temperature distribution of porous fins under convective and insulated tip conditions. The authors have made an effort to study the effect of various important parameters involved in the transfer of heat through porous fins as well as the temperature distribution along the fin length subjected to both convective as well as insulated ends. The non-linear equation obtained has been solved by Adomian Decomposition method and validated with a numerical scheme called Finite Difference method by using a central difference scheme and Gauss Siedel Iterative method.

  19. An Altitude Chamber for the Study and Calibration of Aeronautical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J E; Kirchner, Otto E

    1925-01-01

    The design and construction of an altitude chamber, in which both pressure and temperature can be varied independently, was carried out by the NACA at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the purpose of studying the effects of temperature and pressure on aeronautical research instruments. Temperatures from +20c to -50c are obtained by the expansion of CO2from standard containers. The chamber can be used for the calibration of research instruments under altitude conditions simulating those up to 45,000 feet. Results obtained with this chamber have a direct application in the design and calibration of instruments used in free flight research.

  20. Axial Length, Anterior Chamber Depth-A Study in Different Age Groups and Refractive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Veena; Rajeshbhai, Gandhi Parth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Axial length and anterior chamber depth play an important role in refractive status of the eye in different age groups. Material and Methods: The present study has been done on 240 patients (480 eyes) who attended eye OPD of Department of Ophthalmology at NIMS Medical College & Hospital Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. The patients attending eye OPD between July 2011 to December 2012 of different ages groups were without significant history of any ocular disease. The axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured and compared. Conclusion: Hypermetropic eyes have shallow anterior chamber depth and shorter axial length as compared to myopic and emmtropic eyes. PMID:24298478

  1. Indoor air pollution by organic emissions from textile floor coverings. Climate chamber studies under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollinger, S.; Levsen, K.; Wünsch, G.

    The time dependence of the emission of organic compounds from a polyamide floor covering with styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR) backing was studied in three climate chambers (0.03, 1.0 and 38 m 3) at 23°C 5nd 45% RH. While volatile compounds such as toluene reach a maximum concentration in the gas phase within 1 h and decrease in concentration to less than 2% within 60 h, the concentration of less volatile compounds, such as 4-phenylcyclohexene, decreases slowly over a period of months. If the chamber is well mixed and a defined chamber loading is maintained the observed concentrations do not depend on the chamber size, the wall material and air velocity. The concentration of the observed emissions is roughly proportional to the chamber loading. Surprisingly it is not inversely proportional to the air exchange rate. Rather, at high air exchange rates mass transfer from the carpet to the gas phase is enhanced. The "decreasing source models" of Dunn and Tichenor ( Atmospheric Environment22, 885-894, 1988) have been applied to the data. They allow the extrapolation of experimental data beyond the time available for measurement. The model calculations reveal the presence of sink effects. The role of the chamber walls as sinks can be determined more reliably if constant sources of an organic compound are placed into the chamber and their increase in concentration with time is compared with the theoretical predictions neglecting sink effects.

  2. A study of the pulsatile flow and its interaction with rectangular leaflets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, Rene; Zenit, Roberto; Pulos, Guillermo

    2009-11-01

    To avoid the complexity and limited understanding of the 3D pulsatile flow field through heart valves, a cardiac-like flow circuit and a test channel were designed to study the behavior of bidimensional leaflets made of hyperelastic materials. We study a simple 2D arrangement to understand the basic physics of the flow-leaflet interaction. Creating a periodic pressure gradient, measurements of leaflet deflection were obtained for different flow conditions, geometries and materials. Using PIV and Phase Locking techniques, we have obtained the leaflet motion and the time-dependent flow velocity fields. The results show that two dimensionless parameters determine the performance of a simple bi-dimensional valve, in accordance with the flow conditions applied: π1=f(sw)^1/2(E/ρ)^1/2 and π2=V/(2slw), where f is the pulsation frequency, V is the stroke volume, s, w and l are the dimensions on the leaftlet and E and ρ are the elastic modulus and density of the material, respectively. Furthermore, we have identified the conditions for which the fluid stresses can be minimized. With these results we propose a new set of parameters to improve the performance of prosthetic heart valves and, in consequence, to reduce blood damage.

  3. Numerical study on the mechanism of active interfacial debonding detection for rectangular CFSTs based on wavelet packet analysis with piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Chen, Hongbing; Xia, Song

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, Piezoelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based active interfacial debonding defect detection approach for concrete-filled steel tubular (CFST) columns has been proposed and validated experimentally. In order to investigate the mechanism of the PZT based interfacial debonding detection approach, a multi-physics coupling finite element model (FEM) composed of surface-mounted PZT actuator, embedded PZT sensor and a rectangular CFST column is constructed to numerically simulate the stress wave propagation induced by the surface-mounted PZT actuator under different excitation signals with different frequency and amplitude. The measurements of the embedded PZT sensor in concrete core of the CFST columns with different interfacial debonding defect lengths and depths are determined numerically with transient dynamic analysis. The linearity between the PZT response and the input amplitude, the effect of different frequency and measurement distance are discussed and the stress wave fields of CFST members without and with interface debonding defects are compared. Then, the response of the embedded PZT in concrete core is analyzed with wavelet packet analysis. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) of wavelet packet energy spectrum of the PZT measurement is employed as an evaluation index for the interfacial debonding detection. The results showed that the defined index under continuous sinusoidal and sweep frequency signals changes with the interfacial defects length and depth and is capable of effectively identifying the interfacial debonding defect between the concrete core and the steel tubular. Moreover, the index under sweep frequency signal is more sensitive to the interfacial debonding. The simulation results indicate that the interfacial debonding defect leads to the changes in the propagation path, travel time and the magnitude of stress waves. The simulation results meet the findings from the previous experimental study by the authors and help

  4. An experimental setup for the study of the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Joaquín; José Vega, Emilio; Castilla, Alejandro; Marcos, Alberto; María Montanero, José; Barrio, Raúl

    2012-04-01

    We present an experimental setup for studying the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber. An engine block containing the inlet manifold was placed on a test bench. A steady air stream crossed the inlet manifold and entered a glass chamber driven by a fan. A PIV system was set up around the bench to measure the in-chamber flow. An air spray gun was used as seed generator to producing sub-millimeter droplets, easily dragged by the air stream. Images of the in-flow chamber were acquired in the course of the experiments, and processed to measure the velocity field. The pressure drop driven the air current and the mass flow rate were also measured.

  5. Studies with cathode drift chambers for the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Pentchev, L.; Barbosa, F.; Berdnikov, V.; ...

    2017-04-22

    A drift chamber system consisting of 24 1 m-diameter chambers with both cathode and wire readout (total of 12,672 channels) is operational in Hall D at Jefferson Lab (Virginia). Two cathode strip planes and one wire plane in each chamber register the same avalanche allowing the study of avalanche development, charge induction process, and strip resolution. We demonstrate a method for reconstructing the two-dimensional distribution of the avalanche “center-of-gravity” position around the wire from an 55Fe source with resolutions down to 30 μm. We estimate the azimuthal extent of the avalanche around the wire as a function of the totalmore » charge for an Ar/CO2 gas mixture. By means of cluster counting using a modified 3 cm-gap chamber, we observe significant space charge effects within the same track, resulting in an extent of the avalanche along the wire.« less

  6. Studies with cathode drift chambers for the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentchev, L.; Barbosa, F.; Berdnikov, V.; Butler, D.; Furletov, S.; Robison, L.; Zihlmann, B.

    2017-02-01

    A drift chamber system consisting of 24 1 m-diameter chambers with both cathode and wire readout (total of 12,672 channels) is operational in Hall D at Jefferson Lab (Virginia). Two cathode strip planes and one wire plane in each chamber register the same avalanche allowing the study of avalanche development, charge induction process, and strip resolution. We demonstrate a method for reconstructing the two-dimensional distribution of the avalanche ;center-of-gravity; position around the wire from an 55Fe source with resolutions down to 30 μm. We estimate the azimuthal extent of the avalanche around the wire as a function of the total charge for an Ar/CO2 gas mixture. By means of cluster counting using a modified 3 cm-gap chamber, we observe significant space charge effects within the same track, resulting in an extent of the avalanche along the wire.

  7. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor [Manassas, VA

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  8. Characterization and testing of a new environmental chamber designed for emission aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskinen, A.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Kuuspalo, K.; Sippula, O.; Jalava, P.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Virtanen, A.; Komppula, M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2014-06-01

    A 29 m3 Teflon chamber, designed for aging studies of combustion aerosols, at the University of Eastern Finland is described and characterized. The chamber belongs to a research facility, called Ilmari, where small-scale combustion devices, a dynamometer for vehicle exhaust studies, dilution systems, the chamber, as well as cell and animal exposure devices are side by side under the same roof. The small surface-to-volume ratio of the chamber enables reasonably long experiment times, with particle wall loss rate constants of 0.088, 0.080, 0.045, and 0.040 h-1 for polydisperse, 50, 100, and 200 nm monodisperse aerosols, respectively. The NO2 photolysis rate can be adjusted from zero to 0.62 min-1. The irradiance spectrum is centered at 365 nm and the maximum irradiance, produced by 160 blacklight lamps, is 29.7 W m-2, which corresponds to the UV irradiance in Central Finland at noon on a sunny day in the midsummer. The temperature inside the chamber is uniform and can be kept at 25 ± 1 °C when half of the blacklights are on. The chamber is kept in an overpressure with a moving top frame, which prevents sample dilution and contamination from entering the chamber during an experiment. The functionality of the chamber was tested with oxidation experiments of toluene, resulting in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields of 33-44%, depending on the initial conditions, such as the NOx concentration. The highest gaseous oxidation product yields of 14.4-19.5% were detected with ions corresponding to 2-butenedial (m/z 73.029) and 4-oxo-2-pentenal (m/z 99.044). Overall, reasonable yields of SOA and gaseous reaction products, comparable to those obtained in other laboratories, were obtained.

  9. Use of subcutaneously implanted chambers in calves for in vivo study of isolates of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed

    Pugh, G W; Wilbur, L A; Beall, C W

    1986-10-01

    Selected cultures of Moraxella bovis were studied in calves, using chambers fabricated from a semipermeable membrane supported and protected by perforated plastic golf balls. Plain balls, semipermeable membrane-covered balls, and balls that contained bags fabricated from semipermeable membranes were surgically implanted subcutaneously in calves at a site approximately 25 cm ventral to the paralumbar fossa and cranial to the prefemoral lymph node. After calves recovered from surgery, chambers were inoculated with different cultures of M bovis. Cultural examination of samples taken from inoculated chambers indicated that M bovis cultures were maintained within the chambers for variable times, depending on the characteristics of the culture inoculated. A smooth (piliated) culture dissociated into a rough (nonpiliated) culture after 4 weeks of incubation within a chamber but none of the rough cultures became smooth. The technique offers a method to study the in vivo variations in a series of cultures or strains of microorganisms under the influence of the same host factors. The selective permeability of the chamber may be controlled by using membranes of different porosities to control the flow of entering or exiting dialysate.

  10. Studies of Cosmic Rays Using Proportional Wire Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Younan

    Project GRAND is an extensive air shower array using proportional wire chambers and is partially completed at the University of Notre Dame. At present, one fourth of the full array has been operating. A multi-processor controlled data acquisition system (DAS) has been designed and constructed. The DAS utilizes 68020 microprocessors designed by Advanced Computer Program group at Fermi National Laboratory, VMEbus system, 8 mm tape drive, VMEbus-SCSlbus interface and a number of custom designed electronics. The DAS can handle data acquisition at peak data rate 96 million -bit/second. The software has additional data compression and filtering capability at the system level, which makes the DAS especially efficient for the data acquisition of single tracks. The muon-electron identification experiment has been completed. The results show that the GRAND detectors can identify each recorded track as an electron or a muon. Misidentification is 3.4% and 4.4% for electrons and muons respectively. The angular correlation between single muons at sea level and their parent cosmic rays involves a number of physical processes. The first experimental investigation of this angular correlation by measuring the shadowing of primary cosmic rays by the moon, using single muons, has been performed. More than 75,000 muons per square degree in the vicinity of the moon have been accumulated during the last 12 months. The results show a deficit in a 14^circ times 14^circ aperture caused by the moon's shadow with a 3.3 sigma significance. A detailed chi-square-fitting results show the shadow of the moon matches standard two dimensional Gaussian distribution with sigma_{rm x} (east-west direction) = 5.70^circ + 1.20^circ -0.90^ circ and sigma_{ rm y} (north-south direction) = 3.00 ^circ + 0.35^ circ-0.40^circ. A smaller sigma is obtained from muons with a larger zenith angle (higher energies at birth). The added width in east-west direction is due to the deflection in the Earth's magnetic

  11. Experimental and Computational Study of Intraglottal Pressures in a Three-Dimensional Model with a Non-Rectangular Glottal Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkaman, Saeed

    2011-12-01

    applied to study the flow patterns exiting the glottis. The false vocal folds were not included in this study. The glottis with half-sinusoidal arcs makes a difference relative to intraglottal pressures at the anterior (1/4), middle, and posterior (3/4) planes for all cases. The amount of the pressure difference across the three locations varied based on the glottal angle and diameter; however, the maximum pressure differences did not rise above approximately 8% of the transglottal pressure, even in the presence of the arytenoid cartilages. There were pressure and velocity gradients in both the axial (upstream-downstream) and longitudinal (anterior-posterior) directions, with primary gradients axially and secondary gradients longitudinally. The flow in the M6 model was more stable than in the M5 model downstream of the vocal folds and it did not skew except for the smallest glottal diameter; however, in the M5 model, even for large glottal diameters, the flow skews randomly and creates two different pressure distributions. Flow contraction toward the midcoronal plane within and downstream of the glottis was a primary finding of this study, which was not seen in the rectangular models of the glottis. The arytenoid cartilages structure produced additional secondary flow only for the cases with the largest glottal diameter, which changed the intraglottal pressures along the longitudinal direction. The results of this study present initial information about the relationship among intraglottal pressures, flow patterns, and the three-dimensionality of the glottis. This study suggests that the pressures and flows within the glottis are three-dimensional, and flow contraction in the sagittal plane is to be expected and considered in future phonatory modeling. Non-rectangular laryngeal geometries need to be accurately specified and are required in research programs of basic laryngeal function to establish benchmark empirical data.

  12. Study of low speed flow cytometry for diffraction imaging with different chamber and nozzle designs.

    PubMed

    Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Jacobs, Kenneth M; Yang, Jun; Pan, Ran; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Lu, Jun Q; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Achieving effective hydrodynamic focusing and flow stability at low speed presents a challenging design task in flow cytometry for studying phenomena such as cell adhesion and diffraction imaging of cells with low-cost cameras. We have developed different designs of flow chamber and sheath nozzle to accomplish the above goal. A 3D computational model of the chambers has been established to simulate the fluid dynamics in different chamber designs and measurements have been performed to determine the velocity and size distributions of the core fluid from the nozzle. Comparison of the simulation data with experimental results shows good agreement. With the computational model significant insights were gained for optimization of the chamber design and improvement of the cell positioning accuracy for study of slow moving cells. The benefit of low flow speed has been demonstrated also by reduced blurring in the diffraction images of single cells. Based on these results, we concluded that the new designs of chamber and sheath nozzle produce stable hydrodynamic focusing of the core fluid at low speed and allow detailed study of cellular morphology under various rheological conditions using the diffraction imaging method.

  13. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 μm to 1.30 ± 0.02 μm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 μm to 0.91 ± 0.01 μm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating. PMID:25055842

  14. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J

    2014-08-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 1.30 ± 0.02 µm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 0.91 ± 0.01 µm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating.

  15. Colloidal liquid crystals in rectangular confinement: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexander H; Garlea, Ioana; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver J; Howell, Peter D; Majumdar, Apala; Mulder, Bela M; Lettinga, M P; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Aarts, Dirk G A L

    2014-10-21

    We theoretically and experimentally study nematic liquid crystal equilibria within shallow rectangular wells. We model the wells within a two-dimensional Oseen-Frank framework, with strong tangent anchoring, and obtain explicit analytical expressions for the director fields and energies of the 'diagonal' and 'rotated' solutions reported in the literature. These expressions separate the leading-order defect energies from the bulk distortion energy for both families of solutions. The continuum Oseen-Frank study is complemented by a microscopic mean-field approach. We numerically minimize the mean-field functional, including the effects of weak anchoring, variable order and random initial conditions. In particular, these simulations suggest the existence of higher-energy metastable states with internal defects. We compare our theoretical results to experimental director profiles, obtained using two types of filamentous virus particles, wild-type fd-virus and a modified stiffer variant (Y21M), which display nematic ordering in rectangular chambers, as found by confocal scanning laser microscopy. We combine our analytical energy expressions with experimentally recorded frequencies of the different equilibrium states to obtain explicit estimates for the extrapolation length, defined to be the ratio of the nematic elastic constant to the anchoring coefficient, of the fd-virus.

  16. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  17. Study of the effect of water vapor on a resistive plate chamber with glass electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, H.; Sakaue, H.; Teramoto, Y.; Nakano, E.; Takahashi, T.

    2002-05-01

    We studied the effects of water vapor on the efficiencies of resistive plate chambers with glass electrodes, operated in the streamer mode. With moisture in the chamber gas that has freon as a component (water vapor ˜1000 ppm), a decrease in the efficiency (˜20%) has been observed after operating for a period of several weeks to a few months. From our study, the cause of the efficiency decrease was identified as a change on the cathode surface. In addition, a recovery method was found: flushing for 1 day with argon bubbled through water containing ⩾3% ammonia, followed by a few weeks of training with dry gas.

  18. Photochemical transformation of flue gas from a coal-fired power plant: a smog chamber study

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna, K.J.; Luria, M.; Meagher, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the formation of sulfate aerosols and other secondary products and various environmental parameters is reported. Actual flue gas is used in these experiments which were conducted in smog chambers. Smog chamber techniques and instrumentation have progressed recently and are being utilized for the purposes of this study to simulate urban smog with emphasis on the photochemistry of sulfur dioxide. The purpose for examining the oxidation process of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate aerosols is because of the implication of sulfates in health effects, visibility degradation, and acidic precipitation.

  19. Calculation of wakefields in 2D rectangular structures

    DOE PAGES

    Zagorodnov, I.; Bane, K. L. F.; Stupakov, G.

    2015-10-19

    We consider the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by an electron bunch passing through a vacuum chamber structure that, in general, consists of an entry pipe, followed by some kind of transition or cavity, and ending in an exit pipe. We limit our study to structures having rectangular cross section, where the height can vary as function of longitudinal coordinate but the width and side walls remain fixed. For such structures, we derive a Fourier representation of the wake potentials through one-dimensional functions. A new numerical approach for calculating the wakes in such structures is proposed and implemented in themore » computer code echo(2d). The computation resource requirements for this approach are moderate and comparable to those for finding the wakes in 2D rotationally symmetric structures. Finally, we present numerical examples obtained with the new numerical code.« less

  20. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies, final rept (May 1997), Subcontract No. B291847

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Jin, H.; Scott, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. Various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the final optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 {Angstrom}) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change- outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. In addition to the work described briefly above, we performed extensive analysis of the target-chamber thermal response to in- chamber CO{sub 2} Cleaning and of work performed to model the behavior of silica vapor. The work completed this year has been published in several papers and a dissertation [1-6]. This report provides a summary of the work completed this year, as well as copies

  1. A Controlled-Environment Chamber for Atmospheric Chemistry Studies Using FT-IR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    A one-meter diameter, Teflon coated, stainless steel sph ere has been constructed as a tool for conducting studies of the atmospheric chemistry of...port to determine their effects on gases under study . The chamber is equipped with an in situ, multipass optical system which allows infrared path

  2. Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: A room-sized chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren M.; Sleiman, Mohamad; Dubowski, Yael; Gundel, Lara A.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2011-09-01

    Exposure to tobacco pollutants that linger indoors after smoking has taken place ( thirdhand smoke, THS) can occur over extended periods and is modulated by chemical processes involving atmospheric reactive species. This study investigates the role of ozone and indoor surfaces in chemical transformations of tobacco smoke residues. Gas and particle constituents of secondhand smoke (SHS) as well as sorbed SHS on chamber internal walls and model materials (cotton, paper, and gypsum wallboard) were characterized during aging. After smoldering 10 cigarettes in a 24-m 3 room size chamber, gas-phase nicotine was rapidly removed by sorption to chamber surfaces, and subsequently re-emitted during ventilation with clean air to a level of ˜10% that during the smoking phase. During chamber ventilation in the presence of ozone (180 ppb), ozone decayed at a rate of 5.6 h -1 and coincided with a factor of 5 less nicotine sorbed to wallboard. In the presence of ozone, no gas phase nicotine was detected as a result of re-emission, and higher concentrations of nicotine oxidation products were observed than when ventilation was performed with ozone-free air. Analysis of the model surfaces showed that heterogeneous nicotine-ozone reaction was faster on paper than cotton, and both were faster than on wallboard. However, wallboard played a dominant role in ozone-initiated reaction in the chamber due to its large total geometric surface area and sink potential compared to the other substrates. This study is the first to show in a room-sized environmental chamber that the heterogeneous ozone chemistry of sorbed nicotine generates THS constituents of concern, as observed previously in bench-top studies. In addition to the main oxidation products (cotinine, myosmine and N-methyl formamide), nicotine-1-oxide was detected for the first time.

  3. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  4. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  5. Lean stability augmentation study. [on gas turbine combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical conceptual design study and an experimental test program were conducted to investigate techniques and develop technology for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. The use of hot gas pilots, catalyzed flameholder elements, and heat recirculation to augment lean stability limits was considered in the conceptual design study. Tests of flameholders embodying selected concepts were conducted at a pressure of 10 arm and over a range of entrance temperatures simulating conditions to be encountered during stratospheric cruise. The tests were performed using an axisymmetric flametube test rig having a nominal diameter of 10.2 cm. A total of sixteen test configurations were examined in which lean blowout limits, pollutant emission characteristics, and combustor performance were evaluated. The use of a piloted perforated plate flameholder employing a pilot fuel flow rate equivalent to 4 percent of the total fuel flow at a simulated cruise condition resulted in a lean blowout equivalence ratio of less than 0.25 with a design point (T sub zero = 600k, Phi = 0.6) NOx emission index of less than 1.0 g/kg.

  6. Bacterial contamination of inhalation chambers: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Tjalling W; Rienstra, Siemon R; van der Vorm, Eric R

    2004-01-01

    Spacers are used in the treatment of children with asthma. It is advised to clean the spacers regularly. However, cleaning can influence drug delivery. One obvious reason to clean a spacer is prevention of bacterial contamination. Whether spacers are contaminated or not is unknown. We cultured spacers, brought in by children with asthma or recurrent wheeze who visited our outpatient clinic during a 4-month period. The spacers of 64 children were studied, and 24 (38%) were contaminated; most often (13 cases), Bacillus species were found. Only one spacer grew a potential pathogenic bacterium (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). No correlation with type of inhaler, duration of usage, drug, or visual aspect was found. Spacers, cleaned according to national guidelines, were not less contaminated. Bacterial contamination of spacers is frequent, but the bacteria cultured are not pathogenic. Intensive cleaning of spacers does not influence the level of contamination with environmental bacteria.

  7. Outdoor chamber study to test multi-day effects. Volume 2. Environmental chamber data tabulations. Final report, August 1982-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Dodd, M.C.; Long, W.D.; Atkinson, R.

    1984-12-01

    The smog chamber facilities of the University of California, Riverside were used to collect experimental data to assess the effects of multi-day irradiations on photochemical oxidant formation. This volume contains the printouts of all the data that were collected in the study. These data are suitable for use in developing and testing kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation.

  8. Reception and study of lunar surface material in inert gas medium. [considering laboratory vacuum receiving chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkov, Y. A.; Rudnitskiy, Y. M.; Glotov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    The reception and study of lunar material returned by the Luna 16 space station is described. The layout of a vacuum receiving chamber for working with material in a helium atmosphere is examined along with the main operations involved in extracting the material from the ampule and drill.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A SMALL CHAMBER METHOD FOR SVOC SINK EFFECT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the details of the improved chamber system and reports the sink effect study for organophosphorus flame retardants (OP-FRs), including tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate(TCEP), tris(1-chlor-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDC...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A SMALL CHAMBER METHOD FOR SVOC SINK EFFECT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the details of the improved chamber system and reports the sink effect study for organophosphorus flame retardants (OP-FRs), including tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate(TCEP), tris(1-chlor-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDC...

  11. Scanning electron microscopic study of an anterior chamber intraocular lens: latent endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Schémann, J F

    1987-01-01

    Two years after intracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation, an anterior chamber lens was removed. The lens was studied by scanning electron microscope which demonstrated the presence of colonies of cocci, a thin acellular membrane covering part of the lens and some modifications of the lens surface.

  12. Echocardiographic reference ranges for normal cardiac chamber size: results from the NORRE study

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Seisyou; Caballero, Luis; Dulgheru, Raluca; Voilliot, Damien; De Sousa, Carla; Kacharava, George; Athanassopoulos, George D.; Barone, Daniele; Baroni, Monica; Cardim, Nuno; Gomez De Diego, Jose Juan; Hagendorff, Andreas; Henri, Christine; Hristova, Krasimira; Lopez, Teresa; Magne, Julien; De La Morena, Gonzalo; Popescu, Bogdan A.; Penicka, Martin; Ozyigit, Tolga; Rodrigo Carbonero, Jose David; Salustri, Alessandro; Van De Veire, Nico; Von Bardeleben, Ralph Stephan; Vinereanu, Dragos; Voigt, Jens-Uwe; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Donal, Erwan; Lang, Roberto M.; Badano, Luigi P.; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Aims Availability of normative reference values for cardiac chamber quantitation is a prerequisite for accurate clinical application of echocardiography. In this study, we report normal reference ranges for cardiac chambers size obtained in a large group of healthy volunteers accounting for gender and age. Echocardiographic data were acquired using state-of-the-art cardiac ultrasound equipment following chamber quantitation protocols approved by the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. Methods A total of 734 (mean age: 45.8 ± 13.3 years) healthy volunteers (320 men and 414 women) were enrolled at 22 collaborating institutions of the Normal Reference Ranges for Echocardiography (NORRE) study. A comprehensive echocardiographic examination was performed on all subjects following pre-defined protocols. There were no gender differences in age or cholesterol levels. Compared with men, women had significantly smaller body surface areas, and lower blood pressure. Quality of echocardiographic data sets was good to excellent in the majority of patients. Upper and lower reference limits were higher in men than in women. The reference values varied with age. These age-related changes persisted for most parameters after normalization for the body surface area. Conclusion The NORRE study provides useful two-dimensional echocardiographic reference ranges for cardiac chamber quantification. These data highlight the need for body size normalization that should be performed together with age-and gender-specific assessment for the most echocardiographic parameters. PMID:24451180

  13. Thermal Studies of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Target during Injection into the Fusion Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R. R.; Havstad, M.; LeBlanc, M.; Chang, A.; Golosker, I.; Rosso, P.

    2014-09-09

    The tests of the external heat transfer coefficient suggests that the values used in the numerical analysis for the temperature distribution within the fusion fuel target following flight into the target chamber are probably valid. The tests of the heat transfer phenomena occurring within the target due the rapid heating of the LEH window for the hot gasses within the fusion chamber show that the heat does indeed convect via the internal helium environment of the target towards the capsule and that the pressure in the front compartment of the target adjacent to the LEH window increases such that t bypass venting of the internal helium into the second chamber adjacent to the capsule is needed to prevent rupture of the membranes. The bypass flow is cooled by the hohlraum during this venting. However, the experiments suggest that our internal heat flow calculations may be low by about a factor of 2. Further studies need to be conducted to investigate the differences between the experiment and the numerical analysis. Future studies could also possibly bring the test conditions closer to those expected in the fusion chamber to better validate the results. A sacrificial layer will probably be required on the LEH window of the target and this can be used to mitigate any unexpected target heating.

  14. Turbulence Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles with Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers particle image velocimetry measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratios 2, 4, and 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously, showed that increasing aspect ratios increased the high frequency noise, especially directed in the polar plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. The measurements presented here have important implications in the modeling of turbulent sources for acoustic analogy theories. While the nonaxisymmetric mean flow from the rectangular nozzles can be studied reliably using computational solutions, the nonaxisymmetry of the turbulent fluctuations, particularly at the level of velocity components, cannot; only measurements such as these can determine the impact of nozzle geometry on acoustic source anisotropy. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. The paper first documents the velocity fields, mean and variance, from the round, rectangular, and beveled rectangular nozzles at high subsonic speeds. A second section introduces measures of the isotropy of the turbulence, such as component ratios and lengthscales, first by showing them for a round jet and then for the rectangular nozzles. From these measures the source models of acoustic analogy codes can be judged or modified to account for these anisotropies.

  15. Discharge and stability studies for the new readout chambers of the upgraded ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deisting, A.; Garabatos, C.

    2017-05-01

    The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) at CERN LHC is presently equipped with Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs). A gating grid prevents ions produced during the gas amplification from moving into the drift volume. The maximum drift time of the electrons together with the closure time of the gating grid allows a maximum readout rate of about 3 kHz. After the Long Shutdown 2 (from 2021 onwards), the LHC will provide lead-lead collisions at an expected interaction rate of 50 kHz. To take data at this rate the TPC will be upgraded with new readout chambers, allowing for continuous read-out and preserving the energy and momentum resolution of the current MWPCs. Chambers with a stack of four Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) fulfil all the performance requirements, if the voltages applied to the GEMs are tuned properly. In order to ensure that these chambers are stable while being operated at the LHC, studies of the discharge behaviour were performed. We report on studies done with small prototypes equipped with one or two GEMs. Discharges were voluntarily induced by a combination of high-voltages across the GEM(s) and highly ionising particles. During these studies, the phenomenon of ``secondary discharges'' has been observed. These occur only after an initial discharge when the electric field above or below the GEM is high enough. The time between the initial and the secondary discharge ranges from several 10 μs to less than 1 μs, decreasing with increasing field. Using decoupling resistors in the high-voltage supply path of the bottom side of the GEM shifts the occurrence of these discharges to higher electric fields.

  16. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release with unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway

  17. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies. [ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate whether changes in performance are caused by changes in the loss rate of primary electrons to the anode or the loss rate of ions to discharge chamber walls or cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid; (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline; and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  18. Performance Studies of Micromegas Chambers for the New Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontsinis, S.; Ntekas, K.

    2016-11-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has chosen the Micromegas technology along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel upgrade project. It will employ eight layers of Micromegas and eight layers of small-strip Thin Gap Chambers per wheel. The New Small Wheel project requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of 15 kHz/cm2 featuring single plane spatial resolution better than 100 μm. The Micromegas detectors will cover a total active area of 1200 m2 and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field (≤ 0.3 T). Moreover, together with their precise tracking capability the New Small Wheel Micromegas chambers will contribute to the ATLAS Level-1 trigger system. Several studies have been performed on small (10 × 10 cm2) and medium (1 × 0.5 m2) size prototypes using medium (1 - 5 GeV/c) and high momentum (120 - 150 GeV/c) hadron beams at CERN. A brief overview of the results obtained is presented.

  19. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette

    DOEpatents

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

    2013-09-10

    Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

  20. Outdoor chamber study to test multi-day effects. Volume 3. Documentation for computer-readable environmental chamber data. Final report, August 1982-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Dodd, M.C.; Long, W.D.; Atkinson, R.

    1984-12-01

    The smog chamber facilities of the University of California, Riverside were used to collect experimental data to assess the effects of multi-day irradiations on photochemical oxidant formation. This volume includes documentation on the computer-readable magnetic tape that contains all the data collected in the study. The tape is suitable for use by modelers to develop and test kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation.

  1. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using portable Simulation chamber Study techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes, such as particle formation online, and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically, with a residence time xT (COMPASS1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min, at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a gas leak rate of (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Particle loss rates were found to be larger (due to the particles' stickiness to the chamber walls), with an extrapolated maximum of 1.8 × 10-3 s-1 at 1 nm, i.e. a hundredfold of the gas leak rate. This latter value is associated with sticky non-volatile gaseous compounds, too. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system, a set of experiments was conducted under different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhanced ozone and terpenes as well as reduced sunlight. In order to do so, an ozone lamp was applied to enhance ozone in one of two chambers; the measurement chamber was protected from radiation by a first-aid cover and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were added using a small additional flow and a temperature-controlled oven. During the elevated ozone period, ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions, but by a different intensity. Protection of solar radiation displayed a clear negative effect on particle number, while terpene addition did cause a distinct daily pattern. E.g. adding β pinene particle number concentration rose by 13% maximum at noontime, while no significant effect was observable during darkness. Therefore

  2. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.

  3. Echocardiographic reference ranges for normal cardiac chamber size: results from the NORRE study.

    PubMed

    Kou, Seisyou; Caballero, Luis; Dulgheru, Raluca; Voilliot, Damien; De Sousa, Carla; Kacharava, George; Athanassopoulos, George D; Barone, Daniele; Baroni, Monica; Cardim, Nuno; Gomez De Diego, Jose Juan; Hagendorff, Andreas; Henri, Christine; Hristova, Krasimira; Lopez, Teresa; Magne, Julien; De La Morena, Gonzalo; Popescu, Bogdan A; Penicka, Martin; Ozyigit, Tolga; Rodrigo Carbonero, Jose David; Salustri, Alessandro; Van De Veire, Nico; Von Bardeleben, Ralph Stephan; Vinereanu, Dragos; Voigt, Jens-Uwe; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Donal, Erwan; Lang, Roberto M; Badano, Luigi P; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-06-01

    Availability of normative reference values for cardiac chamber quantitation is a prerequisite for accurate clinical application of echocardiography. In this study, we report normal reference ranges for cardiac chambers size obtained in a large group of healthy volunteers accounting for gender and age. Echocardiographic data were acquired using state-of-the-art cardiac ultrasound equipment following chamber quantitation protocols approved by the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. A total of 734 (mean age: 45.8 ± 13.3 years) healthy volunteers (320 men and 414 women) were enrolled at 22 collaborating institutions of the Normal Reference Ranges for Echocardiography (NORRE) study. A comprehensive echocardiographic examination was performed on all subjects following pre-defined protocols. There were no gender differences in age or cholesterol levels. Compared with men, women had significantly smaller body surface areas, and lower blood pressure. Quality of echocardiographic data sets was good to excellent in the majority of patients. Upper and lower reference limits were higher in men than in women. The reference values varied with age. These age-related changes persisted for most parameters after normalization for the body surface area. The NORRE study provides useful two-dimensional echocardiographic reference ranges for cardiac chamber quantification. These data highlight the need for body size normalization that should be performed together with age-and gender-specific assessment for the most echocardiographic parameters. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Study on thermally induced vibration of flexible boom in various thermal environments of vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Changduk; Oh, Kyung-Won; Park, Hyun-Bum; Sugiyama, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In order to simulate the thermally-induced vibration phenomenon of the flexible thin boom structure of the spacecraft such as the thin solar panel and the flexible cantilever with the attached tip mass in space, the thermally-induced vibration including thermal flutter of the flexible thin boom with the concentrated tip mass was experimentally investigated at various thermal environments using a heat lamp and both vacuum and air condition using the vacuum chamber. In this experimental study, divergence speed, natural frequency and thermal strains of the thermally-induced vibration were comparatively evaluated at various thermal environment conditions. Finally the thermally-induced vibration of the flexible boom structure of the earth orbit satellite in solar radiation environment from the earth eclipse region including umbra and penumbra was simulated using the vacuum chamber and power control of the heating lamp.

  5. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  6. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  7. Comparative study on mode-identification algorithms using a phased-array system in a rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takao; Day, Benjamin J.

    2015-07-01

    To identify multiple acoustic duct modes, conventional beam-forming, CLEAN as well as L2 (i.e. pseudo-inverse) and L1 generalized-inverse beam-forming are applied to phased-array pressure data. A tone signal of a prescribed mode or broadband signal is generated upstream of a curved rectangular duct, and acoustic fields formed in both upstream and downstream stations of the test section are measured with identical wall-mounted microphone arrays. Sound-power distributions of several horizontal and vertical modes including upstream- and downstream-propagating waves can be identified with phased-array techniques, and the results are compared among the four approaches. The comparisons using synthetic data demonstrate that the L2 generalized-inverse algorithm can sufficiently suppress undesirable noise levels and detect amplitude distributions accurately in over-determined cases (i.e. the number of microphones is more than the number of cut-on modes) with minimum computational cost. As the number of cut-on modes exceeds the number of microphones (i.e. under-determined problems), the L1 algorithm is necessary to retain better accuracy. The comparison using test data acquired in the curved duct test rig (CDTR) at NASA Langley Research Center suggests that the L1 /L2 generalized-inverse approach as well as CLEAN can improve the dynamic range of the detected mode by as much as 10 dB relative to conventional beam-forming even with mean flow of M=0.5.

  8. The Chamber for Studying Rice Response to Elevated Nighttime Temperature in Field

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Dangying; Xu, Chunmei; Laza, Ma. Rebecca C.; Zhang, Xiufu

    2013-01-01

    An in situ temperature-controlled field chamber was developed for studying a large population of rice plant under different nighttime temperature treatments while maintaining conditions similar to those in the field during daytime. The system consists of a pipe hoop shed-type chamber with manually removable covers manipulated to provide a natural environment at daytime and a relatively stable and accurate temperature at night. Average air temperatures of 22.4 ± 0.3°C at setting of 22°C, 27.6 ± 0.4°C at 27°C, and 23.8 ± 0.7°C ambient conditions were maintained with the system. No significant horizontal and vertical differences in temperature were found and only slight changes in water temperatures were observed between the chambers and ambient conditions at 36 days after transplanting. A slight variation in CO2 concentration was observed at the end of the treatment during the day, but the 10-μmol CO2 mol−1 difference was too small to alter plant response. The present utilitarian system, which only utilizes an air conditioner/heater, is suitable for studying the effect of nighttime temperature on plant physiological responses with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors. At the same time, it will enable in situ screening of many rice genotypes. PMID:24089603

  9. Novel three-dimensional Boyden chamber system for studying transendothelial transport.

    PubMed

    Hebeiss, I; Truckenmüller, R; Giselbrecht, S; Schepers, U

    2012-02-21

    The rapid development in combinatorial chemistry of millions of novel potential drug candidates requires in vitro devices for reliable testing of their transendothelial transport and the uptake in specific cells. To date, this is often achieved in vitro by the use of regular planar Boyden chambers, which are not reflecting the three dimensionality of the blood vessel. This technical note describes the fabrication and biological validation of a novel three-dimensional Boyden chamber system for studying transendothelial transport. The key element of this new system is a porous thin-walled microchannel produced by a SMART (substrate modification and replication by thermoforming) process comprising a combination of microthermoforming and ion track technology. The membrane-like microstructure offers the opportunity to grow endothelial cells on the inner side of the channel resembling a more natural curved organization of vessels. After establishment of a confluent HUVECs layer in the porous microchannel this novel Boyden chamber was successfully applied to study the transendothelial transport of a polycationic cell penetrating peptoid through the 3D- or curved endothelial cell layer. Thus, this system will enable the investigation of such synthetic compounds as drug delivery systems with regard to their bioavailability and functionality under organotypic conditions.

  10. Experimental and numerical studies of a microfluidic device with compliant chambers for flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, V.; Raj, A.; Annabattula, R. K.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical studies of a passive microfluidic device that stabilizes a pulsating incoming flow and delivers a steady flow at the outlet. The device employs a series of chambers along the flow direction with a thin polymeric membrane (of thickness 75-250 µm) serving as the compliant boundary. The deformation of the membrane allows accumulation of fluid during an overflow and discharge of fluid during an underflow for flow stabilization. Coupled fluid-structure simulations are performed using Mooney-Rivlin formulations to account for a thin hyperelastic membrane material undergoing large deformations to accurately predict the device performance. The device was fabricated with PDMS as the substrate material and thin PDMS membrane as the compliant boundary. The performance of the device is defined in terms of a parameter called ‘Attenuation Factor (AF)’. The effect of various design parameters including membrane thickness, elastic modulus, chamber size and number of chambers in series as well as operating conditions including the outlet pressure, mean input flow rate, fluctuation amplitude and frequency on the device performance were studied using experiments and simulations. The simulation results successfully confront the experimental data (within 10%) which validates the numerical simulations. The device was used at the exit of a PZT actuated valveless micropump to take pulsating flow at the upstream and deliver steady flow downstream. The amplitude of the pulsating flow delivered by the micropump was significantly reduced (AF = 0.05 for a device with three 4 mm chambers) but at the expense of a reduction in the pressure capability (<20%). The proposed device could potentially be used for reducing flow pulsations in practical microfluidic circuits.

  11. Measurements of agricultural N2O: a comparative study of static chamber and eddy covariance fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodovskaya, M.; Warland, J.; Anderson, T. R.; Archibald, J. A.; Chiang, J.; Li, J.; Marjerison, R. D.; Sharma, A.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2009-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emitted from soils is a strong greenhouse gas and catalyst of ozone destruction by virtue of its long persistence in the atmosphere. Our understanding of both agricultural and natural N2O emissions has significantly improved over the past decade, but difficulties with precise soil N2O emission quantification still exist, related mostly to the large flux variability (both temporally and spatially) and the diversity of factors affecting N2O formation. The most commonly used methodologies for N2O measurements are conventional chambers and more recently-developed (and more expensive) micrometeorological methods. However, the differences in the flux-footprint between those two methods result in a large uncertainty in the integrated flux estimates, especially for areas with non-uniform land use and vegetation. In this study, comparative N2O flux measurements were performed on dairy manure fertilized cropland (on a field split between corn (Zea mays) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa)) in New York State. The field area was monitored simultaneously with (1) micrometeorological eddy covariance technique and (2) arrays of conventional static chambers. For eddy covariance measurements, a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas analyzer (TGA100a) and 3D sonic anemometer were used, with the high- frequency data averaged over 30 min periods. The chamber design included a set of 28 chambers (14 on the alfalfa, and 14 on the corn site), and the sampling was time-synchronized with TDLAS/TGA100 measurements. The comparative analysis of the two N2O emission data sets helped to estimate the agreement between the methodologies and the spatial distribution of integrated N2O flux formation.

  12. NASA's biomass production chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Sager, J. C.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Fortson, R. E.; Dreschel, T. W.; Knott, W. M.; Corey, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m^2 area, 113 m^3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days) were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests.

  13. Prevention of cartilage dehydration in imaging studies with a customized humidity chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ryan J.; Firminger, Colin; Müller, Ralph; Stok, Kathryn S.

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging methods such as micro-computed tomography (μCT) allow for the rapid and comprehensive evaluation of cartilage and bone in animal models, which can be used for drug development and related research in arthritis. However, when imaging fresh cartilage tissue in air, a common problem is tissue dehydration which causes movement artifact in the resulting images. These artifacts distort scans and can render them unusable, leading to a considerable loss of time and effort with sample preparation and measurement. The sample itself is also irretrievably damaged by the dehydration, often unable to return to its full tissue thickness upon rehydration. Additionally, imaging with ionic contrast agents such as HexabrixTM must be performed in air, otherwise the agent will be washed out if immersed in a liquid. The first goal of this study was to design a customized humidity chamber to maintain cartilage hydration without the need for immersion. Following this, the use of the humidity chamber during a synchrotron radiation-μCT scan was validated and its performance evaluated. Results showed that the loss of fluid film volume is associated with scanning at low humidity (87%), and can be avoided using the humidity chamber. Coupling this technology with advances in synchrotron imaging (e.g., phase contrast imaging) or contrast agents is promising.

  14. Chamber studies to simulate secondary organic aerosol formation from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daumit, K. E.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Cross, E. S.; Hunter, J. F.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Williams, L. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Because atmospheric organic species are generally emitted from a large number of sources, over wide spatial and temporal scales, it is generally challenging to ascribe ambient organic aerosol (OA) to the oxidation of specific secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors. However, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill (April 20-July 15, 2010), provided the unique circumstance of a large, well-defined source of gas-phase organics introduced into a relatively clean atmosphere. Here we describe a laboratory simulation of SOA formation downwind of the DWH spill, via the oxidation of South Louisiana-light (SL) crude oil by OH radicals in an environmental chamber. Intermediate and semi-volatile fractions of the SL crude oil are vaporized and oxidized by gas-phase OH radicals (formed from the photolysis of HONO). The chemical composition is monitored as a function of OH exposure. When OH exposures are approximately matched, laboratory-generated SOA and OA measured downwind of the oil spill exhibit extremely similar aerosol mass spectra, in strong support of the hypothesis that the OA measured downwind of the DWH oil spill was secondary in nature. More generally, this agreement indicates that in cases when SOA precursors are well-constrained, chamber experiments can reasonably reproduce key properties of ambient OA. Results of chamber studies on sub-fractions of the SL crude oil, aimed at identifying the classes of oil components most responsible for SOA formation, will be discussed.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

  16. Microbial volatile organic compounds in moldy interiors: a long-term climate chamber study.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Sven; Strube, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    The present study simulated large-scale indoor mold damage in order to test the efficiency of air sampling for the detection of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). To do this, a wallpaper damaged by condensation was stored in a climate chamber (representing a hypothetical test room of 40 m(3) volume) and was inoculated with 14 typical indoor fungal strains. The chamber ventilation conditions were adjusted to common values found in moldy homes, and the mold growth was allowed to continue to higher than average values. The MVOC content of the chamber air was analyzed daily for a period of 105 days using coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This procedure guarantees MVOC profiling without external factors such as outdoor air, building materials, furniture, and occupants. However, only nine MVOCs could be detected during the sampling period, which indicates that the very low concentrated MVOCs are hardly accessible, even under these favorable conditions. Furthermore, most of the MVOCs that were detected cannot be considered as reliable indicators of mold growth in indoor environments. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. NASA's Biomass Production Chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Sager, J. C.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Fortson, R. E.; Dreschel, T. W.; Knott, W. M.; Corey, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m2 area, 113 m3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests.

  18. NASA's Biomass Production Chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Sager, J. C.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Fortson, R. E.; Dreschel, T. W.; Knott, W. M.; Corey, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m2 area, 113 m3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests.

  19. NASA's Biomass Production Chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Mackowiak, C L; Stutte, G W; Sager, J C; Yorio, N C; Ruffe, L M; Fortson, R E; Dreschel, T W; Knott, W M; Corey, K A

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m2 area, 113 m3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests.

  20. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  1. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm.

  2. Rectangular Microstrip Antenna with Slot Embedded Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambresh, P. A.; Hadalgi, P. M.; Hunagund, P. V.; Sujata, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a novel design that improves the performance of conventional rectangular microstrip antenna is discussed. Design adopts basic techniques such as probe feeding technique with rectangular inverted patch structure as superstrate, air filled dielectric medium as substrate and slot embedded patch. Prototype of the proposed antenna has been fabricated and various antenna performance parameters such as impedance bandwidth, return loss, radiation pattern and antenna gain are considered for Electromagnetic-study. The antennas are designed for the wireless application operating in the frequency range of 3.3 GHz to 3.6 GHz, and UK based fixed satellite service application (3 GHz to 4 GHz), and are named as single inverted patch conventional rectangular microstrip antenna (SIP-CRMSA) and slots embedded inverted patch rectangular microstrip antenna (SEIP-RMSA), respectively. Measurement outcomes for SEIP-RMSA1 and SEIP-RMSA2 showed the satisfactory performance with an achievable impedance bandwidth of 260 MHz (7 %) and 250 MHz (6.72 %), with return loss (RL) of -11.06 dB and -17.98 dB, achieved gain of 8.17 dB and 5.17 dB with 10% and 8% size reduction in comparison with the conventional patch antenna.

  3. Conformal mapping of rectangular heptagons

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatyrev, Andrei B

    2012-12-31

    A new effective approach to calculating the direct and inverse conformal mapping of rectangular polygons onto a half-plane is put forward; it is based on the use of Riemann theta functions. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  4. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  5. A framework and experimental study of an improved VOC/formaldehyde emission reference for environmental chamber tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhao, Weiping; Zhang, Yinping

    2014-01-01

    Environmental chamber systems are usually employed in the testing of volatile organic compound (VOC) and formaldehyde emissions from building materials. The measurement accuracy of environmental chamber systems can be evaluated by VOC/formaldehyde emission references. However, the available VOC/formaldehyde emission references all have some limitations for applications to various scales of chambers. A framework for designing and using a target VOC/formaldehyde emission references to evaluate the performance of chamber systems for measuring VOC/formaldehyde emissions from building materials is studied. Liquid-inner tube diffusion-film-emission (LIFE) reference is improved in this study to meet the requirements of a target VOC/formaldehyde emission reference, such as reliability, similarity as building materials, efficiency for measurement. Equivalent emission characteristic parameters are designed for a toluene LIFE reference to perform similar to a building material. Chamber test of the LIFE reference is made in a 30 m3 stainless steel ventilated environmental chamber at 23 ± 1 °C and 50 ± 5% relative humidity. The experimental data match the predictions using LIFE emission model as well as building material emission model. The improvement of the LIFE reference enables its application for the evaluation of the performance of all kinds of environmental chambers as a general reference in tests of VOCs/formaldehyde emissions from building materials.

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Study of low momentum track reconstruction for the BESIII main drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lu-Kui; Mao, Ze-Pu; Li, Wei-Dong; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Deng, Zi-Yan; He, Kang-Lin; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Qiu-Guang; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wu, Ling-Hui; Yuan, Ye; Zang, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yao; Zhu, Kai; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2010-12-01

    In order to overcome the difficulty brought by the circling charged tracks with transverse momentum less than 120 MeV in the BESIII Main Drift Chamber (MDC), a specialized method called TCurlFinder was developed. This tracking method focuses on the charged track reconstruction under 120 MeV and possesses a special mechanism to reject background noise hits. The performance of the package has been carefully checked and tuned by both Monte Carlo data and real data. The study shows that this tracking method could obviously enhance the reconstruction efficiency in the low transverse momentum region, providing physics analysis with more and reliable data.

  7. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  8. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using Simulation chamber Study techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-06-01

    The anthropogenic influence on climate and environment has increased strongly since industrialization about 150 yr ago. The consequences for the atmosphere became more and more apparent and nowadays affect our life quality on Earth progressively. Because of that it is very important to understand the atmospheric processes, on which these effects are based on, in detail. In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes such as particle formation online and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically with a residence time (xT (COMPASS 1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS 2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min) at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a deposition rate (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system a set of experiments was conducted at different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhancing ozone and terpenes as well as reducing sunlight. In the ozone enhanced ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions in a different strength. Solar radiation displayed a clear positive effect on particle number as well as terpene addition did at remote conditions. Therefore the system is a useful tool to investigate local precursors, the details of ambient particle formation at surface locations as well as future feedback processes.

  9. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  10. Trade study comparing specimen chamber servicing methods for the Space Station Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvisi, Michael L.; Sun, Sidney C.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen Chamber Service Unit, a component of the Space Station Centrifuge Facility, must provide a clean enclosure on a continuing basis for the facility's plant, rodent and primate specimens. The specimen chambers can become soiled and can require periodic servicing to maintain a clean environment for the specimens. Two methods of servicing the specimen chambers are discussed: washing the chambers with an on-board washer, or disposing of the soiled chambers and replacing them with clean ones. Many of these issues are addressed by developing several servicing options, using either cleaning or replacement as the method of providing clean specimen chambers, and then evaluating each option according to a set of established quantitative and qualitative criteria. Disposing and replacing the Specimen Chambers is preferable to washing them.

  11. Trade study comparing specimen chamber servicing methods for the Space Station Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvisi, Michael L.; Sun, Sidney C.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen Chamber Service Unit, a component of the Space Station Centrifuge Facility, must provide a clean enclosure on a continuing basis for the facility's plant, rodent and primate specimens. The specimen chambers can become soiled and can require periodic servicing to maintain a clean environment for the specimens. Two methods of servicing the specimen chambers are discussed: washing the chambers with an on-board washer, or disposing of the soiled chambers and replacing them with clean ones. Many of these issues are addressed by developing several servicing options, using either cleaning or replacement as the method of providing clean specimen chambers, and then evaluating each option according to a set of established quantitative and qualitative criteria. Disposing and replacing the Specimen Chambers is preferable to washing them.

  12. Chamber bioaerosol study: outdoor air and human occupants as sources of indoor airborne microbes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Bhangar, Seema; Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward A; Taylor, John W; Lindow, Steven E; Nazaroff, William W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    Human occupants are an important source of microbes in indoor environments. In this study, we used DNA sequencing of filter samples to assess the fungal and bacterial composition of air in an environmental chamber under different levels of occupancy, activity, and exposed or covered carpeting. In this office-like, mechanically ventilated environment, results showed a strong influence of outdoor-derived particles, with the indoor microbial composition tracking that of outdoor air for the 2-hour sampling periods. The number of occupants and their activity played a significant but smaller role influencing the composition of indoor bioaerosols. Human-associated taxa were observed but were not particularly abundant, except in the case of one fungus that appeared to be transported into the chamber on the clothing of a study participant. Overall, this study revealed a smaller signature of human body-associated taxa than had been expected based on recent studies of indoor microbiomes, suggesting that occupants may not exert a strong influence on bioaerosol microbial composition in a space that, like many offices, is well ventilated with air that is moderately filtered and moderately occupied.

  13. Chamber Bioaerosol Study: Outdoor Air and Human Occupants as Sources of Indoor Airborne Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rachel I.; Bhangar, Seema; Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward A.; Taylor, John W.; Lindow, Steven E.; Nazaroff, William W.; Bruns, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Human occupants are an important source of microbes in indoor environments. In this study, we used DNA sequencing of filter samples to assess the fungal and bacterial composition of air in an environmental chamber under different levels of occupancy, activity, and exposed or covered carpeting. In this office-like, mechanically ventilated environment, results showed a strong influence of outdoor-derived particles, with the indoor microbial composition tracking that of outdoor air for the 2-hour sampling periods. The number of occupants and their activity played a significant but smaller role influencing the composition of indoor bioaerosols. Human-associated taxa were observed but were not particularly abundant, except in the case of one fungus that appeared to be transported into the chamber on the clothing of a study participant. Overall, this study revealed a smaller signature of human body-associated taxa than had been expected based on recent studies of indoor microbiomes, suggesting that occupants may not exert a strong influence on bioaerosol microbial composition in a space that, like many offices, is well ventilated with air that is moderately filtered and moderately occupied. PMID:26024222

  14. Pulp Chamber Heating: An In Vitro Study Evaluating Different Light Sources and Resin Composite Layers.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Lígia Maria Lima; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Prakki, Anuradha; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature variation inside the pulp chamber during light-activation of the adhesive and resin composite layers with different light sources. Cavities measuring 8x10 mm were prepared on the buccal surface of bovine incisors, leaving a remaining dentin thickness of 1 mm. Specimens were placed in a 37±1 °C water bath to standardize the temperature. The temperature in the pulp chamber was measured every 10 s during 40 s of light activation of the adhesive system (SBMP-3M/ESPE) and in the three consecutive 1-mm-thick layers of resin composite (Z250-3M/ESPE). Three light source devices were evaluated: Elipar 2500 (QTH), LD Max (LED low irradiance) and VALO (LED high irradiance). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey's test, both with p<0.001. The exothermic reaction warming was observed in the Z250 increments, but not in the SBMP. The high irradiance LED showed a higher temperature average (42.7±1.56 °C), followed by the quartz-tungsten-halogen light (40.6±0.67 °C) and the lower irradiance LED (37.8±0.12 °C). Higher temperature increases were observed with the adhesive and the first resin composite increment light-activation, regardless of the employed light source. From the second increment of Z250, the restorative material acted as a dispersive structure of heat, reducing temperature increases. Regardless the light source and restorative step, the temperature increased with the irradiation time. It may be concluded that the light source, irradiation time and resin composite thickness interfered in the temperature variation inside the pulp chamber.

  15. Study of transportation and distribution of PCBs using an ecologically simulated growth chamber.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yaw-Jian; Liu, Hsiang-Chao; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Wu, Wan-Jheng

    2006-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the transportation, distribution, and bioaccumulation of PCBs in various environmental media and compartments using an ecologically simulated growth chamber. Spatial and temporal trends of PCBs in the growth chamber were discussed. The release of PCB congeners in soil was affected by the amount of rainfall with the transporting direction moving away from PCBs contaminated point. Two pathways of PCBs accumulation in plants were the uptake of roots and the deposition on shoots/leaves. There were 29 PCB congeners been found in the lalang grass. Higher concentrations of lower chlorinated PCBs were identified than higher chlorinated PCBs because of relatively higher vapor pressure for lower chlorinated congeners. After 10months of monitoring, PCBs were detected in water samples which were contributed by the release of PCBs from leached soil. Analysis of sediment showed that the percentages of low- and mid-chlorinated biphenyls were decreased 1% and 13%, respectively compared to the increase (14%) of high-chlorinated biphenyls. The increase of high-chlorinated PCBs was possibly caused by their low hydrophilicity which had resulted higher adsorption rate in sediment. All of five species of fish had been found significant amount of PCBs accumulation ( summation operatorPCBs: 21.7-102.1 microg/g-lipid). The concentrations of PCBs in fish were varied significantly among species. The range of bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) among different species of fish could be as much as 5 times depending on the consumption habits of fish. The mass balance of PCBs distribution in the growth chamber was also discussed.

  16. Smog chamber study on the evolution of fume from residential coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chunmei; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Domestic coal stoves are widely used in countryside and greenbelt residents in China for heating and cooking, and emit considerable pollutants to the atmosphere because of no treatment of their exhaust, which can result in deteriorating local air quality. In this study, a dynamic smog chamber was used to investigate the real-time emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants during the combustion process and a static smog chamber was used to investigate the fume evolution under simulate light irradiation. The real-time emissions revealed that the total hydrocarbon (THC) and CO increased sharply after ignition, and then quickly decreased, indicating volatilization of hydrocarbons with low molecular weight and incomplete combustion at the beginning stage of combustion made great contribution to these pollutants. There was evident shoulder peak around 10 min combustion for both THC and CO, revealing the emissions from vitrinite combustion. Additionally, another broad emission peak of CO after 30 min was also observed, which was ascribed to the incomplete combustion of the inertinite. Compared with THC and CO, there was only one emission peak for NOx, SO2 and particular matters at the beginning stage of combustion. The fume evolution with static chamber simulation indicated that evident consumption of SO2 and NOx as well as new particle formation were observed. The consumption rates for SO2 and NOx were about 3.44% hr(-1) and 3.68% hr(-1), the new particle formation of nuclei particles grew at a rate of 16.03 nm/hr during the first reaction hour, and the increase of the diameter of accumulation mode particles was evident. The addition of isoprene to the diluted mixture of the fume could promote 03 and secondary particle formation.

  17. The role of extracellular matrix in peripheral nerve regeneration: a wound chamber study.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M

    1992-01-01

    A wound chamber model was used for the study of the interaction between axon, Schwann cell and extracellular matrix during peripheral nerve regeneration. Impermeable silicone tubes, 8 mm long and 1.4 mm in internal diameter were sutured to transected rat sciatic nerve and the contents of the tubes were removed at intervals for chemical, histological, immunocytochemical and electron microscopic studies. There was an initial phase of fluid accumulation and the formation of a fibrin/fibronectin clot or cable which connected the cut ends of the nerve. The chamber fluid was shown to have a protein profile similar to that of rat serum. Schwann cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts migrated first into the cable, apparently mediated by cell-fibrin interaction. Axons buried within the Schwann cell cytoplasm were led into the cable but an axon-fibrin interaction was not observed. After 1 week, the fibrin matrix underwent dissolution, with replacement by collagen. This marked the onset of myelination and the organization of nerve fibers into fascicles. The findings from the present study suggest that the interactions between axon and Schwann cell and between Schwann cell and a changing extracellular matrix are the essential driving force in nerve growth and differentiation during peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. IN VITRO STUDY OF THE PULP CHAMBER TEMPERATURE RISE DURING LIGHT-ACTIVATED BLEACHING

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)-laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38±0.66°C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29±0.13°C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35±0.15°C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41±0.64°C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33±0.12°C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44±0.11°C). LED and LED-laser system did not differ

  19. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38+/-0.66 degrees C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29+/-0.13 degrees C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35+/-0.15 degrees C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41+/-0.64 degrees C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33+/-0.12 degrees C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44+/-0.11 degrees C

  20. Using a new plateau hyperbaric chamber to alleviate high altitude hypoxia: Rabbit and human studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Ding, Meng-Jiang; Cai, Tian-Cai; Fan, Hao-Jun; Gao, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Jian-Peng

    2017-04-19

    To validate the effects of the new plateau hyperbaric chamber on alleviating high altitude hypoxia on Mount Kun Lun. A prospective, controlled study of rabbits and adult volunteers was conducted at altitudes of 355, 2880 and 4532m. We obtained arterial blood samples from rabbits and volunteers before and after hyperbaric treatment. The respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure (BP) of adult volunteers were monitored during hyperbaric treatment. The mean PaO2 levels of experimental group rabbits and volunteers increased significantly after 60min of hyperbaric treatment at 350, 2880 and 4532m. The mean PaCO2 and pH levels of rabbits were not significant different before and after hyperbaric treatment at each altitude. The mean PaCO2 and pH levels were not significant different at 355m in the human study. However, at 2880 and 4532m, pH fell with increasing PaCO2 levels in humans before and after hyperbaric treatment. The new multiplace plateau hyperbaric chamber may be used to alleviate plateau hypoxia by increasing patient PaO2. However, its value in treating AMS must be confirmed in field conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Survival of Coliform Bacteria in Natural Waters: Field and Laboratory Studies with Membrane-Filter Chambers

    PubMed Central

    McFeters, Gordon A.; Stuart, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Chambers with membrane-filter side walls were designed for studies of the survival of coliform bacteria in natural and artificial waters. Experiments were carried out in the field and in the laboratory. The initial uptake rate of inorganic ions, total carbon, and glucose into the chamber was greater than twice as fast as the accumulation of each into dialysis tubing. When the survival of a water-isolated fecal coliform bacterium was examined in two adjacent mountain streams, it was found that the organism persisted longer in Bozeman Creek than in Middle Creek. These data may be a reflection of the water chemistry because the concentration of inorganic constituents of the former was greater. Laboratory studies of the survival of a fecal coliform bacterium in artificial and natural water with continuous flow were used to determine the effect of chemical composition, temperature, and pH. The relation of this type of data to the use of fecal coliform bacteria as indicators of health hazard in water is discussed. Images PMID:4565639

  2. Environmental chamber studies of maximum incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Pierce, J.A.; Malkina, I.L.; Luo, D.; Long, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    The effects of 36 representative volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO on ozone formation, NO oxidation, and OH radical levels were measured in a series of environmental chamber experiments representing conditions where VOCs have the greatest effect on photochemical ozone formation. The experiments consisted of repeated 6-hour indoor chamber irradiations of a simplified mixture of ozone precursors with NOx in excess, alternating with runs with varying amounts of a test VOC added. The VOCs studied included representative alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, ethers, alcohol ethers, and siloxanes. CO, Acetone and 2-chloromethyl-3-chloropropene were also studied. Reactions of formaldehyde, acetone, the methylbenzenes and the alkenes had the largest positive effects on OH radical levels, and because of this they caused the most NO oxidation and ozone formation per molecule reacted. Reactions of the siloxanes and the C(6+) n-alkanes had the most inhibiting effects on radicals, causing them to inhibit NO oxidation and ozone formation under the conditions of these experiments. The other compounds had smaller and usually negative effects on OH radicals, and had moderate but positive effects on ozone formed and NO oxidized. Information was also obtained on amounts of NO oxidation caused directly by the reactions of the added VOCs or their products.

  3. The use of in situ benthic chambers to study the fate of oil in sublittoral sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. M.; Tibbetts, P. J. C.

    1987-02-01

    Twelve in situ benthic chambers (2·2 m in diameter) were used to study the weathering of topped crude oil coated onto a submerged marine sediment over a period of about 440 days. The bulk (⋍80%) of the oil coated onto the sediment was lost during the first 40 days from both open and closed chambers. It is suggested that this oil was lost from the sediment partly into solution (perhaps after partial oxidation) or more likely, by droplet formation associated with the workover of particles by physical and biological processes. The weathering pattern of the oil remaining on the sediment was studied for a further 400 days and showed that the alkane fraction was biodegraded more rapidly than the naphthalenes, in agreement with the results from the Amoco Cadiz oil spill (Boehm et al., 1981) and that the alkyl substituted PAH homologues were biodegraded in preference to the unsubstituted parent compound. The hopane and sterane fingerprints did not change significantly over the 440 days of exposure, thus reinforcing their usefulness as long term markers of soil spills. In general the rates of biodegradation of the various classes of compounds were similar to those observed in other locations and suggested that the polycyclic aliphatics and the PAHs are very slow to degrade and will remain in the sediment for a considerable period of time.

  4. Performance studies under high irradiation and ageing properties of resistive bulk Micromegas chambers at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulou, O.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Bianco, M.; Farina, E. M.; Iengo, P.; Longo, L.; Pfeiffer, D.; Wotschack, J.

    2017-02-01

    Resistive bulk Micromegas chambers, produced at CERN, have been installed at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) in order to study the effects of ageing and to evaluate the detector behaviour under high irradiation. The chambers have an active area of 10×10 cm2, strip pitch of 400 μm and an amplification gap of 128 μm. We present the detector performance as a function of the background rate of up to 20 MHz/cm2.

  5. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  6. Rectangular Drop Vehicle in the Zero Gravity Research Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-21

    A rectangular drop test vehicle perched above 450-foot shaft at the Zero Gravity Research Facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. The drop tower was designed to provide five seconds of microgravity during a normal drop, but had a pneumatic gun that could quickly propel the vehicle to the top of the shaft prior to its drop, thus providing ten seconds of microgravity. The shaft contained a steel-lined vacuum chamber 20 feet in diameter and 469 feet deep. The package was stopped at the bottom of the pit by a 15-foot deep deceleration cart filled with polystyrene pellets. During normal operations, a cylindrical 3-foot diameter and 11-foot long vehicle was used to house the experiments, instrumentation, and high speed cameras. The 4.5-foot long and 1.5-foot wide rectangular vehicle, seen in this photograph, was used less frequently. A 3-foot diameter orb was used for the ten second drops. After the test vehicle was prepared it was suspended above the shaft from the top of the chamber. A lid was used to seal the top of the chamber. The vacuum system reduced the pressure levels inside the chamber. The bolt holding the vehicle was then sheared and the vehicle plummeted into the deceleration cart.

  7. The Results of a Resistive Plate Chamber Study for the PHENIX Forward Muon Trigger Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Nathan

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the PHENIX Forward Muon Trigger Upgrade is to allow the use of W boson physics, specifically the non-invariance of W decay under parity reversal, to elucidate a better understanding of the spin structure of the proton. A fast muon trigger system will be assembled by adding three Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) stations to the existing PHENIX infrastructure at RHIC. There are a number of RPC prototypes being carefully studied to ensure that the upgrade succeeds. One such study is being conducted at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and involves the tracking of cosmic rays passing through an RPC test stand. The main objective of the study is to determine the cluster size, position resolution, efficiency, and rate capability of the RPCs. The analysis of the data collected during the study will be presented.

  8. Simulation studies on a prototype ionisation chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, J; Carvalho, A F; Oliveira, C

    2007-01-01

    A prototype ionisation chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), similar to the one developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesantalt (PTB), was designed and constructed by the Metrological Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation (LMRI) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN). Tests already performed have shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very similar to the PTB chamber, mainly the energy dependence for the X-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co. However, the results obtained also show a dependence on the energy and angles of incident radiation and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionisation chamber. In order to optimise the performance of the chamber, the LMRI initiated numerical simulation of this ionisation chamber by Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX code.

  9. UBM-guided chamber angle surgery for glaucoma management: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Dietlein, T S; Engels, B F; Jacobi, P C; Krieglstein, G K

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the potential of ultrasound bimicroscopy (UBM)-guided chamber angle surgery as an alternative or supplement to gonioscopy and intraocular microendoscopy for intraoperative control. In 15 porcine cadaver eyes, mechanical goniopuncture or punctual Er:YAG laser trabecular ablation was performed without operating microscope or gonioscopy, but with real-life ultrasound biomicroscopy monitoring with a 50 MHz transducer. Intraoperative localization of the microsurgical instruments and tissue-instrument contact were qualitatively evaluated. The instruments could be clearly visualized within the chamber angle and disturbing artefacts were only minimal when using mechanically fixed instruments in slow motion. Topographic localization, tissue contact, and penetration depth of the instruments entering the scleral were well illustrated as far as the technical resolution limits of UBM would allow. UBM can be used intraoperatively to monitor the correct manoeuvring of microsurgical instruments in selected ab interno procedures. Some adaptations and further modifications of the technique presented here will be necessary before UBM-guided surgery can be considered for clinical use in humans.

  10. Pressures generated within the chambers of the MagScrew TAH: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Flick, Christine R; Weber, Stephan; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Klatte, Ryan S; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Smith, William A

    2008-01-01

    Incompetent inflow valves have been reported with clinical pulsatile left ventricular assist devices that use bioprosthetic valves. Suspected as the cause of premature valve failure within these devices, absolute pressures and instantaneous pressure changes were evaluated in the MagScrew total artificial heart (TAH). The MagScrew TAH is a passively filling pulsatile pump which uses a reciprocating magnetic actuating mechanism under various control modes to propel blood into circulation. Both right and left ejection speeds were modulated and optimized at the onset of hydraulic eject. These various speed profiles were evaluated in vitro at 220 beats per minute (bpm), 100% pump fill, mean aortic pressure of 100 mm Hg and mean pulmonary artery pressure of 20 mm Hg. The pressure inside the left and right pump chambers was measured with Millar Mikro-Tip catheter and captured using Power Lab at a rate of 40 kHz. The pump chamber peak pressure, operating with unmodified eject speeds, measured on average 183 mm Hg for the left and 133 mm Hg for the right. Eject speed profiling for both pumps reduced the peak pressure by 10% and 28% for the left and right pump, respectively. Future studies will assess software controlled optimization of the eject speed profiles under any operating condition and how effective it is in vivo.

  11. Equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose of rectangular field from 6 MV therapeutic photon beam.

    PubMed

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the use of the equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose from a rectangular photon beam. A 6 MV therapeutic photon beam delivered from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was modeled using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo simulation package. It was then used to calculate the dose in the build-up region from both square and rectangular fields. The field patterns were defined by various settings of the X- and Y-collimator jaw ranging from 5 to 20 cm. Dose measurements were performed using a thermoluminescence dosimeter and a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber on the four square fields (5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, and 20 × 20 cm2). The surface dose was acquired by extrapolating the build-up doses to the surface. An equivalent square for a rectangular field was determined using the area-to-perimeter formula, and the surface dose of the equivalent square was estimated using the square-field data. The surface dose of square field increased linearly from approximately 10% to 28% as the side of the square field increased from 5 to 20 cm. The influence of collimator exchange on the surface dose was found to be not significant. The difference in the percentage surface dose of the rectangular field compared to that of the relevant equivalent square was insignificant and can be clinically neglected. The use of the area-to-perimeter formula for an equivalent square field can provide a clinically acceptable surface dose estimation for a rectangular field from a 6 MV therapy photon beam.

  12. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  13. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Hückel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects.

  14. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects.

  15. On rectangular HOMFLY for twist knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononov, Ya.; Morozov, A.

    2016-11-01

    As a new step in the study of rectangularly-colored knot polynomials, we reformulate the prescription [A. Morozov, arXiv:1606.06015v8] for twist knots in the double-column representations R = [rr] in terms of skew Schur polynomials. These, however, are mysteriously shifted from the standard topological locus, which makes further generalization to arbitrary R = [rs] not quite straightforward.

  16. Eddy viscosity measurements in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, David H.; Morrison, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Velocity gradients, Reynolds stress tensor components, and scalar eddy viscosities are presented for the major and minor axis planes of the jet. The eddy viscosity model was found to be applicable only in the direction of maximum mean velocity gradient.

  17. Experimental study on the 3D image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector and its image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daeki; Cho, Heemoon; Cho, Hyosung; Choi, Sungil; Je, Uikyu; Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we performed a feasibility study on the three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector for application to high-accurate, cost-effective dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray tube and a detector rotate together around the rotational axis several times and, concurrently, the detector moves horizontally in the detector coordinate at a constant speed to cover the whole imaging volume during the projection data acquisition. We established a table-top setup which mainly consists of an x-ray tube (60 kVp, 5 mA), a narrow CMOS-type detector (198-μm pixel resolution, 184 (W)×1176 (H) pixel dimension), and a rotational stage for sample mounting and performed a systematic experiment to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach to volumetric dental imaging. For the image reconstruction, we employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate reconstruction. We successfully reconstructed 3D images of considerably high quality and investigated the image characteristics in terms of the image value profile, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the spatial resolution.

  18. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  19. Multigap resistive plate chambers for EAS study in the EEE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, S.; Antolini, R.; Badalà, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Blanco, F.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Coccia, E.; de Pasquale, S.; di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Garbini, M.; Giuliano, A.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Imponente, G.; Kim, J.; La Rocca, P.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Menghetti, H.; Miozzi, S.; Moro, R.; Pace, E.; Panareo, M.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Sbarra, C.; Selvi, M.; Williams, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2007-10-01

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project, conceived by its leader Antonino Zichichi, is an experiment to study very high-energetic air showers (EAS) through the detection of the shower's muon component using a network of tracking detectors, installed in Italian high schools. The single tracking telescope is composed of three large area (˜2m) Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs). The data collected by the telescopes will be used for studies of air showers and also for the search of time correlations between sites which are far apart. The first telescope, recently installed in the Liceo B. Touschek in Grottaferrata (Rome), is successfully running, and other telescopes are going to be installed in a short time in other towns, opening up the way for the first search of long-distance coincidences over a total area of ˜10km.

  20. A new MBMS flame chamber for the study of molecular weight growth reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, L.I.; Creegan, K.M.

    1995-03-01

    A description of the new molecular beam/mass spectrometer flame chamber just constructed is given. The purpose of this system is to study molecular weight growth reactions leading to soot precursors as a function of flame conditions including fuel composition. Formation of the first aromatic rings is believed to be the bottleneck to soot formation and will be the focus of the authors initial studies. Because radicals are crucial to molecular weight growth reactions, this chamber has been designed to optimize radical detection from premixed flames. The chosen fuel, oxidant, and inert gases flow through MKS mass flow controllers to a sintered bronze McKenna burner. The diameter of the burner is 2.5 inches and the diameter of the concentric shroud ring is 2.9 inches. The pressure in this region is maintained at 30 torr using a Roots blower with choked flow as well as a feedback loop controlling a valve to an argon line. The burner is mounted on a movable bellows assembly with a travel of over 6 inches in the Z direction. This allows different positions in the flame to be sampled by a quartz cone custom made by Finkenbeiner. The cone is of the {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} shape with an angle of 40{degrees} near the tip and 90{degrees} at the base. The tip of the cone has a 115 {mu}m hole and a wall thickness of 50-100{mu}m. This serves as the nozzle for a supersonic expansion into the first differential pumping region. At this point, collisions cease allowing the very reactive radicals to survive in the molecular beam. The pressure in this first differential region is typically low 10{sup {minus}4} to high 10{sup {minus}5} torr when the main chamber is at 30 torr. The beam path in this region is defined on one end by the quartz cone and on the other by a movable skimmer. The skimmer is mounted on a bellows assembly allowing the nozzle-skimmer distance to vary from less than 1 inch to 2.7 inches. A schematic of the skimmer assembly is shown.

  1. Mutagenicity of organic emissions from unvented kerosene heaters in a chamber study.

    PubMed

    Mumford, J L; Lewtas, J; Williams, K; Tucker, W G; Traynor, G W

    1992-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the mutagenicity of semivolatile organics and particle-bound organics emitted from unvented kerosene space heaters. The units tested included a well-tuned radiant heater and a maltuned convective heater. The tests were conducted in a 27-m3 chamber with a prescribed on/off heater usage pattern. The organic emissions were collected on Teflon-coated glass filters backed by XAD-2 resin. The dichloromethane-extractable organics from both the filters and the XAD were analyzed for nitropolycyclic hydrocarbons using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and were bioassayed for mutagenicity in microsuspension assays using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 with and without S9 and TA98NR (a nitroreductase-deficient strain) without S9. The results showed that both the semivolatile and particle-bound organics emitted from the kerosene heaters were mutagenic, and the presence of nitropolycyclic hydrocarbons in these organic emissions substantiated these findings.

  2. Recent applications of multiwire proportional chambers for time resolved studies on muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Huxley, H. E.; Kress, M.

    1986-12-01

    The use of multiwire proportional chambers has played an important role in recording time resolved data from vertebrate muscle under various physiological conditions from which we have selected two examples from recent work. The first example describes the measurement of the equatorial pattern along with measurements of the muscle sarcomere length showing that the delay in tension development relative to changes in the X-ray intensity are not due to "internal" shortening in the muscle. The second example describes time-resolved measurements on the thin filament activation process, studied with both a linear and an area detector. The results show clearly that changes in thin filament structure precede cross-bridge formation producing further strong evidence for the "steric blocking model" for muscle contraction.

  3. An exposure chamber for studies on human perception of DC electric fields and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.H.; Maruvada, P.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Direct current (DC) transmission lines are often used, for technical and economic reasons, as interconnections in modern high voltage power systems, which are essentially of the alternating current (AC) type. Significant differences exist, however, between the field effects produced in the vicinity of AC and DC transmission lines. DC electric fields induce charges, on the surface of a conducting body such as a human being and may therefore be ''perceived'' by humans due to hair stimulation and other sensations experienced by the skin. A human being exposed to the ionized field of a DC transmission line experiences not only surface charges but also the conducted ion currents. A systematic laboratory study has been undertaken by Hydro Quebec to investigate human perception, using well established psycho physical techniques, of DC electric fields and ions. The design, construction and operation of an exposure chamber for this purpose, in the high voltage laboratory of IREQ, are described in this paper.

  4. Microbial ranking of porous packaging materials (exposure chamber method), ASTM method: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Placencia, A M; Peeler, J T

    1999-01-01

    A collaborative study involving 11 laboratories was conducted to measure the microbial barrier effectiveness of porous medical packaging. Two randomly cut samples from each of 6 commercially available porous materials and one positive and one negative control were tested by one operator in each of 11 laboratories. Microbial barrier effectiveness was measured in terms of logarithm reduction value (LRV), which reflects the log10 microbial penetration of the material being tested. The logarithm of the final concentration is subtracted from that of the initial concentration to obtain the LRV. Thus the higher the LRV, the better the barrier. Repeatability standard deviations ranged from 6.42 to 16.40; reproducibility standard deviations ranged from 15.50 to 22.70. Materials B(53), C(50), D(CT), and E(45MF) differ significantly from the positive control. The microbial ranking of porous packaging materials (exposure chamber method), ASTM method, has been adopted First Action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  5. [Effects of elevated ozone on Pinus armandii growth: a simulation study with open-top chamber].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Fu; Liu, Chen; He, Xing-Yuan; Ruan, Ya-Nan; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Ju; Peng, Jun-Jie; Li, Teng

    2013-10-01

    By using open-top chamber (OTC) and the techniques of dendrochronology, this paper studied the growth of Pinus armandii under elevated ozone, and explored the evolution dynamics and adaptation mechanisms of typical forest ecosystems to ozone enrichment. Elevated ozone inhibited the stem growth of P. armandii significantly, with the annual growth of the stem length and diameter reduced by 35.0% and 12.9%, respectively. The annual growth of tree-ring width and the annual ring cells number decreased by 11.5% and 54.1%, respectively, but no significant change was observed in the diameter of tracheid. At regional scale, the fluctuation of ozone concentration showed significant correlation with the variation of local vegetation growth (NDVI).

  6. Continuously perfused, non-cross-contaminating microfluidic chamber array for studying cellular responses to orthogonal combinations of matrix and soluble signals.

    PubMed

    Park, Edward S; Brown, Ashley C; DiFeo, Michael A; Barker, Thomas H; Lu, Hang

    2010-03-07

    We present a microfluidic cell culture array with unique versatility and parallelization for experimental trials requiring perfusion cultures. Specifically, we realize a rectangular chamber array in a PDMS device with three attributes: (i) continuous perfusion; (ii) flow paths that forbid cross-chamber contamination; and (iii) chamber shielding from direct perfusion to minimize shear-induced cell behaviour. These attributes are made possible by a bridge-and-underpass architecture, where flow streams travel vertically to pass over (or under) channels and on-chip valves. The array is also designed for considerable versatility, providing subarray, row, column, or single chamber addressing. It allows for incubation with adsorbed molecules, perfusion of differing media, seeding or extraction of cells, and assay staining. We use the device to characterize different phenotypes of alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells, particularly the extent of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a highly suspected pathway in tissue regeneration and fibrosis. Cells are cultured on combinations of matrix proteins (fibronectin or laminin by row) and soluble signals (with or without transforming growth factor-beta1 by column) with two repeats per chip. Fluorescent assays are performed in the array to assess viability, cytoskeletal organization, and cell-cell junction formation. Assay and morphological data are used to tease-out effects of cues driving each phenotype, confirming this as an effective and versatile combinatorial screening platform.

  7. Non-rectangular towpreg architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A shaped towpreg ribbon having a cross-sectional geometry which promotes intimate lateral contact between adjacent composite tows was prepared. The cross-sectional geometry is non-rectangular and promotes intimate lateral contact between adjacent towpreg ribbons during normal processing.

  8. Non-rectangular towpreg architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A shaped towpreg ribbon having a cross-sectional geometry which promotes intimate lateral contact between adjacent composite tows was prepared. The cross-sectional geometry is non-rectangular and promotes intimate lateral contact between adjacent towpreg ribbons during normal processing.

  9. Numerical study of three-dimensional detonation structure transformations in a narrow square tube: from rectangular and diagonal modes into spinning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ji, H.; Lien, F.; Tang, H.

    2014-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) detonation structure transformations from rectangular and diagonal modes into spinning modes in a narrow square tube are investigated by high-resolution simulation. Numerical simulations are performed with a Riemann solver of the HLLC-type, new cell-based structured adaptive mesh refinement data structure, high-order, parallel adaptive mesh refinement reactive flow code. A simplified one-step kinetic reaction model is used to reveal the 3-D detonation structure. The four different types of initial disturbances applied in the ZND profiles lead to the structures of rectangular in phase, rectangular out of phase, rectangular partial out of phase and diagonal, respectively, during the initial stages of detonation propagation. Eventually, all these detonation structures evolve into the self-sustained spinning detonations. The asymmetric disturbance leads to a stable spinning detonation much faster than the rest. The important features in the formation of spinning detonation are revealed using a 3-D visualization, and a remarkable qualitative agreement with experimental and numerical results is obtained with respect to the transverse wave dynamics and detonation front structures. The transverse wave collisions produce the unburnt gas pockets and the energy to sustain the detonation front propagation and distortion. The periodic pressure oscillation of front plays a complex role as it shifts the reaction zone structure with an accompanying change in the driving energy of transition and the detonation parameters which result in the more distorted front and the unstable detonation. Eventually, the unstable distorted detonation evolves into a spinning detonation.

  10. Phantom dosimetric study of nondivergent aluminum tissue compensator using ion chamber, TLD, and gafchromic film.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Upreti, Ritu R; Patkar, Sachin; Patil, Kalpana; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2008-01-01

    Anatomic contour irregularity and tissue inhomogeneity in head-and-neck radiotherapy can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity due to the presence of hot and cold spots across the treatment volumes. Missing tissue compensators (TCs) can overcome this dose inhomogeneity. The current study examines the capacity of 2-dimensional (2D) custom aluminum TCs fabricated at our hospital to improve the dose homogeneity across the treatment volume. The dosimetry of the 2D custom TCs was carried out in a specially designed head-and-neck phantom for anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) fields with an ion chamber, thermoluminscence dosimeters (TLDs), and film. The results were compared for compensated and uncompensated plans generated from the Eclipse treatment planning system. On average, open-field plans contained peak doses of 117%, optimally wedged-plans contained peak doses of 113%, and custom-compensated plans contained peak doses of 105%. The dose variation between prescribed and measured dose at midplane of the phantom was observed as high as 17%, which was reduced to 3.2% for the customized TC during ionometric measurements. It was further confirmed with TLDs, in a sagittal plane, that the high-dose region of 13.3% was reduced to 2.3%. The measurements carried out with the ion chamber, TLDs, and film were found in good agreement with each other and with Eclipse. Thus, a custom-made 2D TC is capable of reducing hot spots to improve overall dose homogeneity across the treatment volume.

  11. RF impedance studies of a beam chamber and longitudinally slot-coupled vacuum pumping antechamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.; Nicholls, G.L.; Kramer, S.L.; Khoe, T.K.; Cook, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The storage ring vacuum chamber of the proposed 7-GeV synchrotron light source at Argonne National Laboratory is planned to have a semi-elliptical beam chamber, with a longitudinal slot coupled to an antechamber containing NEG pumping strips. Concern over the RF impedance of this complex chamber has stimulated the need to understand the limitations it will have on the beam intensity, the RF acceleration system and on the beam lifetime. Calculations using numerical EM field programs have estimated the waveguide modes of this chamber and the impedance and loss parameter for the expected 1 to 2 cm beam bunch length. The loss parameter is shown to differ little from an elliptical beam chamber without the slot and antechamber. An experimental program has begun to verify the estimates of the impedance for these complex vacuum chamber components using laboratory methods. Preliminary results are presented for the measured loss parameter for a short length of beam vacuum chamber and for other components. These results are compared with their calculated values.

  12. Experimental study on a comparison of typical premixed combustible gas-air flame propagation in a horizontal rectangular closed duct.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiqiang; Duan, Qiangling; Liew, K M; Peng, Zhongjing; Gong, Liang; Sun, Jinhua

    2017-04-05

    Research surrounding premixed flame propagation in ducts has a history of more than one hundred years. Most previous studies focus on the tulip flame formation and flame acceleration in pure gas fuel-air flame. However, the premixed natural gas-air flame may show different behaviors and pressure dynamics due to its unique composition. Natural gas, methane and acetylene are chosen here to conduct a comparison study on different flame behaviors and pressure dynamics, and to explore the influence of different compositions on premixed flame dynamics. The characteristics of flame front and pressure dynamics are recorded using high-speed schlieren photography and a pressure transducer, respectively. The results indicate that the compositions of the gas mixture greatly influence flame behaviors and pressure. Acetylene has the fastest flame tip speed and the highest pressure, while natural gas has a faster flame tip speed and higher pressure than methane. The Bychkov theory for predicting the flame skirt motion is verified, and the results indicate that the experimental data coincide well with theory in the case of equivalence ratios close to 1.00. Moreover, the Bychkov theory is able to predict flame skirt motion for acetylene, even outside of the best suitable expansion ratio range of 6

  13. Development and validation of a behavioral acclimation protocol for cats to respiration chambers used for indirect calorimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Margaret A; Duncan, Ian J H; Atkinson, James L; Shoveller, Anna K

    2012-01-01

    Cats exposed to novel environments initiate stress responses by behavioral and physiological changes that modify metabolism and lead to the collection of unreliable data. Fourteen cats (10 ± 2 months) were subjected to an 11-week acclimation procedure to adapt to restriction within chambers used for indirect calorimetry studies. Cats were acclimated to chambers in their home environments, to chambers in the study room, and to increasing periods of restriction within chambers. Ten additional cats (11 ± 1 month), used as controls, were subjected to a single 5-hr restriction without any prior exposure. Stress level, feed intake, fearfulness, and eliminations were recorded. Latencies to approach a novel object peaked on Weeks 4 and 8 (p < .05). Cat-Stress-Scores (CSS) declined with exposure and on Week 11, stress levels were low and consistent (p < .05). CSS was greater in unacclimated versus acclimated cats (p < .05). In conclusion, acclimation protocols prepare cats for repeated, temporary restriction within chambers, whereas short acclimations do not. A step-up acclimation procedure with behavioral indices of stress should be utilized to prepare cats for research that necessitates restriction. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  14. Studying energy evolution in the discharge chamber of a multichamber lightning protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, M. E.; Budin, A. V.; Kumkova, I. I.; Chusov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental data on the distribution of energy deposition along the discharge chamber of a multichamber lightning protection system at the initial stage of a discharge process modeling a lightning current pulse with 10 kA amplitude. The multichamber system comprised serially connected gas-discharge chambers. The breakdown between electrodes situated on the bottom of a channel in each chamber induces the formation of a shock wave. Subsequent energy evolution during the development of discharge proceeds in the entire volume bounded by the shock wave.

  15. State-of-the-art chamber facility for studying atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cocker, D R; Flagan, R C; Seinfeld, J H

    2001-06-15

    A state-of-the-art chamber facility is described for investigation of atmospheric aerosol chemistry. Dual 28 m3 FEP Teflon film chambers are used to simulate atmospheric conditions in which aerosol formation may occur. This facility provides the flexibility to investigate dark, single oxidant reactions as well as full photochemical simulations. This paper discusses the environmental control implemented as well as the gas-phase and aerosol-phase instrumentation used to monitor atmospheric aerosol formation and growth. Physical processes occurring in the chamber and procedures for estimating secondary organic aerosol formation during reaction are described. Aerosol formation and evolution protocols at varying relative humidity conditions are presented.

  16. Studies of helium based drift chamber gases for high-luminosity low energy machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarski, A.; Briggs, D.; Burchat, P. R.

    1992-02-01

    Future high luminosity low energy machines will need low mass tracking chambers in order to minimize multiple scattering of the relatively low momentum tracks produced at these facilities. A drift chamber using a helium based gas rather than a conventional argon based gas would greatly reduce the amount of multiple scattering. This paper summarizes measurements of the drift velocity and position resolution for gas mixtures of helium with CO2 and isobutane and helium with DME. Good spatial resolutions are obtained. A design of a drift chamber with only 0.12 percent of a radiation length (gas plus wire) over a 60 cm tracking distance is presented.

  17. Studies of helium based drift chamber gases for high-luminosity low energy machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarski, Adam; Briggs, Don; Burchat, Patricia R.

    1992-12-01

    Future high luminosity low energy machines will need low mass tracking chambers in order to minimize multiple scattering of the relatively low momentum tracks produced at these facilities. A drift chamber using a helium based gas rather than a conventional argon based gas would greatly reduce the amount of multiple scattering. This paper summarizes measurements of the drift velocity and position resolution for gas mixtures of helium with CO 2 and isobutane and helium with DME. Good spatial resolutions are obtained. A design of a drift chamber with only 0.12% of a radiation length (gas plus wire) over a 60 cm tracking distance is presented.

  18. A numerical study of the effect of frequency of pulsed flow control applied to a rectangular cavity in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, Michael J.

    Stabilization of turbulent free shear flows is a poorly understood, and recently discovered flow phenomenon, not described in modern textbooks on fluid dynamics. This dissertation describes the design and large-scale experimental test of one type of flow control actuator, a rod in crossflow, which is shown to pulse at high frequency (relative to the dominant instabilities of a turbulent free shear layer), and in the process, locally stabilizes that shear layer. The shear layer in question spans a cavity (representative of a 1/10th scale modern aircraft weapons bay) in supersonic (Mach 1.2) crossflow. Without the high frequency flow control, the cavity experiences acoustic resonance (and the creation of large coherent vortical structures), which creates sound pressure levels high enough to fatigue aircraft components. With the high frequency control (and the local shear layer stabilization), the sound pressure levels are rendered benign. Evidence of suppression due to other types of high frequency pulsing devices (primarily resonance tube type designs) is also presented. A numerical study is undertaken to investigate the nature of the stabilization and acoustic suppression. An implicit, 2nd-order in space and time flow solver, coupled with a recently-developed hybrid RANS-LES turbulence model by Nichols, is utilized in a Chimera-based parallel format, to numerically simulate both the unsuppressed cavity in resonance, as well as the effect of pulsing flow control. Due to the limited ability to vary frequency using a rod in crossflow type device, a pulsed jet device is simulated instead. Frequency (and in a limited number of cases, amplitude) of pulse is varied, from 0 Hz (steady) up to 5000 Hz. The change in the character of the flow control effect as pulsing frequency is changed is described, and linked to changes in acoustic levels. The observed local stabilization of the cavity turbulent shear layer is shown in simulation to be the result of a violent instability

  19. Rotation of rectangular wire in rectangular molar tubes. Part I.

    PubMed

    Raphael, E; Sandrik, J L; Klapper, L

    1981-08-01

    The degree of angular rotation of rectangular orthodontic wires in rectangular molar tubes was measured using a rotatable mechanical stage on a Unitron metallograph and compared to theoretical data. It was found that square 0.016 inch wire did not bind in 0.018 by 0.022 inch or larger mandrel- or inconel-formed tubes, whereas rotations of 11 to 23 degrees were noted in cast tubes of this dimension. Although 0.016 by 0.022 inch wire did bind in these tubes, the degree of rotation was far greater than expected on the basis of theoretical calculations or clinical expectations. The results indicated that it was unrealistic to expect fine control of a few degrees of torque to occur as expected for delicate clinical control.

  20. A chamber system for maintaining a hyperbaric environment for long-term animal studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, P C; Ross, J A; Luff, N P; Halsey, M J; Monk, S

    1991-01-01

    An experimental hyperbaric chamber system is described whereby animals, including nonhuman primates, can be cared for under altered environmental conditions for periods in excess of 1 wk. The chamber itself is capable of a working pressure of 200 atm abs, used with various mixtures of gases which can be varied independently. The novel approach of vertical mounting enables cages to be lowered into position, and food and water can be supplied from above while excreta can be removed from below, irrespective of the internal pressure. The chamber has an integrated life support system such that temperature, both of the chamber and of the mass of gas inside, humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and noise levels can be accurately and finely controlled, all within a pathogen-free environment.

  1. Study of HF production in BaBar Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, H. R.; Bellini, F.; Covarelli, R.; Di Marco, E.; D'Orazio, A.; Ferroni, F.; Li Gioi, L.; Lopez, L.; Polci, F.

    2008-08-01

    The BaBar detector has operated over 200 2nd generation Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the forward endcap since 2002. Many chambers have increased noise rates and high-voltage currents. These aging symptoms are correlated with the integrated RPC current as expected, but also depend on the rate and direction of the gas flow, indicating that pollutants produced in the gas can accelerate aging of downstream RPC surfaces. HF produced by decomposition of the Freon 134a component of the BaBar RPC gas in electric discharges has been proposed as the main pollutant. This paper presents measurements of HF production and absorption rates in BaBar RPCs. Since many of the highest rate chambers in the forward endcap were converted to avalanche mode operation, a comparison of HF production in streamer and avalanche mode RPCs is made. Correlations between the HF production rate and other chamber operating conditions were also explored.

  2. A new pressure chamber to study the biosynthetic response of articular cartilage to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Steinmeyer, J; Torzilli, P A; Burton-Wurster, N; Lust, G

    1993-01-01

    A prototype chamber was used to apply a precise cyclic or static load on articular cartilage explants under sterile conditions. A variable pressure, pneumatic controller was constructed to power the chamber's air cylinder, capable of applying, with a porous load platen, loads of up to 10 MPa at cycles ranging from 0 to 10 Hz. Pig articular cartilage explants were maintained successfully in this chamber for 2 days under cyclic mechanical loading of 0.5 Hz, 0.5 MPa. Explants remained sterile, viable and metabolically active. Cartilage responded to this load with a decreased synthesis of fibronectin and a small but statistically significant elevation in proteoglycan content. Similar but less extensive effects on fibronectin synthesis were observed with the small static load (0.016 MPa) inherent in the design of the chamber.

  3. An Implantable Wireless Interstitial Pressure Sensor With Integrated Guyton Chamber: in vivo Study in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Song, Seung Hyun; Kim, Albert; Brown, Marcus; Jung, Chaeyong; Ko, S; Ziaie, Babak

    2016-11-01

    A wireless implantable interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) sensor with an integrated Guyton chamber is presented. This implantable device enables noninvasive and continuous measurements of IFP. The Guyton chamber allows for an accurate measurement of IFP without the interference from various cellular/tissue components. The sensor consists of a coil, an air chamber, a silicone membrane embedded with a nickel plate, and a Guyton chamber. The fabricated device is 3 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness. The sensor shows a linear response to the pressure with a sensitivity of 60 kHz/mmHg and a resolution of 1 mmHg. Experiments in human prostate cancer tumors grown in mice confirm the sensor's capability to operate in vivo and provide continuous wireless measurement of IFP, a surrogate parameter indicating the "window of opportunity" for delivering chemo- and radio-therapeutic agents.

  4. Rectangular beam (5 X 40 cm multipole ion source). M.S. Thesis - Nov. 1979; [applications to electron bombardment in materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A 5 x 40 cm rectangular-beam ion source was designed and fabricated. A multipole field configuration was used to facilitate design of the modular rectangular chamber, while a three-grid ion optics system was used for increased ion current densities. For the multipole chamber, a magnetic integral of 0.000056 Tesla-m was used to contain the primary electrons. This integral value was reduced from the initial design value, with the reduction found necessary for discharge stability. The final value of magnetic integral resulted in discharge losses at typical operating conditions which ranged from 600 to 1000 eV/ion, in good agreement with the design value of 800 eV/ion. The beam current density at the ion optics was limited to about 3.2 mA/sq cm at 500 eV and to about 3.5 mA/sq cm at 1000 ev. The effects of nonuniform ion current, dimension tolerance, and grid thermal warping were considered. The use of multiple rectangular-beam ion sources to process wider areas than would be possible with a single source (approx. 40 cm) was also studied. Beam profiles were surveyed at a variety of operating conditions and the results of various amounts of beam overlap calculated.

  5. The use of honeybees reared in a thermostatic chamber for aging studies.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Yuan; Chan, Yu-Pei

    2013-02-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are an attractive model system for studying aging. However, the aging level of worker honeybees from the field hive is in dispute. To eliminate the influence of task performance and confirm the relationship between chronological age and aging, we reared newly emerged workers in a thermostat at 34°C throughout their lives. A survivorship curve was obtained, indicating that workers can be reared away from the field hive, and the only difference between these workers is age. To confirm that these workers can be used for aging studies, we assayed age-related molecules in the trophocytes and fat cells of young and old workers. Old workers expressed more senescence-associated β-galactosidase, lipofuscin granules, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation than young workers. Furthermore, cellular energy metabolism molecules were also assayed. Old workers exhibited less ATP concentration, β-oxidation, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) than young workers. These results demonstrate that honeybees reared in a thermostatic chamber can be used for aging studies and cellular energy metabolism in the trophocytes and fat cells of workers changes with advancing age.

  6. Chamber studies of SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: observation of limited glyoxal uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Liu, Y.; Tang, P.; Chen, C.-L.; Zhang, J.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluates the significance of glyoxal acting as an intermediate species leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation under humid conditions. Rapid SOA formation from glyoxal uptake onto aqueous (NH4)2SO4 seed particles is observed in agreement with previous studies; however, glyoxal did not partition significantly to SOA (with or without aqueous seed) during aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation within an environmental chamber (RH less than 80%). Rather, glyoxal influences SOA formation by raising hydroxyl (OH) radical concentrations. Four experimental approaches supporting this conclusion are presented in this paper: (1) increased SOA formation and decreased SOA volatility in the toluene + NOx photooxidation system with additional glyoxal was reproduced by matching OH radical concentrations through H2O2 addition; (2) glyoxal addition to SOA seed formed from toluene + NOx photooxidation did not increase SOA volume under dark; (3) SOA formation from toluene + NOx photooxidation with and without deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 seed resulted in similar SOA growth, consistent with a minor contribution from glyoxal uptake onto deliquesced seed and organic coatings; and (4) the fraction of a C4H9+ fragment (observed by Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS) in SOA from 2-tert-butylphenol (BP) oxidation was unchanged in the presence of additional glyoxal despite enhanced SOA formation. This study suggests that glyoxal uptake onto aerosol during the oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons is more limited than previously thought.

  7. A study of the dentinal permeability of the pulp chamber floor of human lower molars with separate roots.

    PubMed

    Pécora, J D; Costa, W F; Maia Campos, G

    1990-01-01

    The permeability of the dentin of the pulp chamber floor of lower molars with separate roots was studied, after instrumentation of the root canals by manual or ultrasonic techniques. The dentinal permeability was evaluated by the degree of penetration of copper ions in the tissue and quantified by methods used in morphometry. None of the combinations of irrigating solution/instrumentation technique caused an increase in the permeability of dentinal tissue in the pulp chamber region, probably because the dentin is reparative dentin, which is more amorphous and less tubular than primary dentin.

  8. Chemical aging of m-xylene secondary organic aerosol: laboratory chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loza, C. L.; Chhabra, P. S.; Yee, L. D.; Craven, J. S.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can reside in the atmosphere for a week or more. While its initial formation from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds tends to take place in the first few hours after emission, SOA can continue to evolve chemically over its atmospheric lifetime. Simulating this chemical aging over an extended time in the laboratory has proven to be challenging. We present here a procedure for studying SOA aging in laboratory chambers that is applied to achieve 36 h of oxidation. The formation and evolution of SOA from the photooxidation of m-xylene under low-NOx conditions and in the presence of either neutral or acidic seed particles is studied. In SOA aging, increasing molecular functionalization leads to less volatile products and an increase in SOA mass, whereas gas- or particle-phase fragmentation chemistry results in more volatile products and a loss of SOA. The challenge is to discern from measured chamber variables the extent to which these processes are important for a given SOA system. In the experiments conducted, m-xylene SOA mass, calculated under the assumption of size-invariant particle composition, increased over the initial 12-13 h of photooxidation and decreased beyond that time, suggesting the existence of fragmentation chemistry. The oxidation of the SOA, as manifested in the O:C elemental ratio and fraction of organic ion detected at m/z 44 measured by the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, increased continuously starting after 5 h of irradiation until the 36 h termination. This behavior is consistent with an initial period in which, as the mass of SOA increases, products of higher volatility partition to the aerosol phase, followed by an aging period in which gas- and particle-phase reaction products become increasingly more oxidized. When irradiation is stopped 12.4 h into one experiment, and OH generation ceases, minimal loss of SOA is observed, indicating that the loss of SOA is either light- or OH

  9. Chemical aging of m-xylene secondary organic aerosol: laboratory chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loza, C. L.; Chhabra, P. S.; Yee, L. D.; Craven, J. S.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-09-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can reside in the atmosphere for a week or more. While its initial formation from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds tends to take place in the first few hours after emission, SOA can continue to evolve chemically over its atmospheric lifetime. Simulating this chemical aging over an extended time in the laboratory has proven to be challenging. We present here a procedure for studying SOA aging in laboratory chambers that is applied to achieve 36 h of oxidation. The formation and evolution of SOA from the photooxidation of m-xylene under low-NOx conditions and in the presence of either neutral or acidic seed particles is studied. In SOA aging, increasing molecular functionalization leads to less volatile products and an increase in SOA mass, whereas gas-phase or particle-phase fragmentation chemistry results in more volatile products and a loss of SOA. The challenge is to discern from measured chamber variables the extent to which these processes are important for a given SOA system. In the experiments conducted, m-xylene SOA mass increased over the initial 12-h of photooxidation and decreased beyond that time. The oxidation of the SOA, as manifested in the O:C elemental ratio and fraction of organic ion detected at m/z 44 measured by the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, decreased during the first 5 h of reaction, reached a minimum, and then increased continuously until the 36 h termination. This behavior is consistent with an initial period in which, as the mass of SOA increases, products of higher volatility partition to the aerosol phase, followed by an aging period in which gas- and particle-phase reaction products become increasingly more oxidized. After about 12-13 h, the SOA mass reaches a maximum and decreases, suggesting the existence of fragmentation chemistry. When irradiation is stopped 12.4 h into one experiment, and OH generation ceases, no loss of SOA is observed, indicating that the loss of SOA is

  10. Design and experimental study of an integrated vapor chamber-thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Krishna M.

    Future defense, aerospace and automotive technologies involve electronic systems that release high pulsed waste heat like during high power microwave and laser diode applications in tactical and combat aircraft, and electrical and electronic systems in hybrid electric vehicles, which will require the development of an efficient thermal management system. A key design issue is the need for fast charging so as not to overheat the key components. The goal of this work is to study the fabrication and technology implementation feasibility of a novel high energy storage, high heat flux passive heat sink. Key focus is to verify by theory and experiments, the practicability of using phase change materials as a temporary storage of waste heat for heat sink applications. The reason for storing the high heat fluxes temporarily is to be able to reject the heat at the average level when the heat source is off. Accordingly, a concept of a dual latent heat sink intended for moderate to low thermal duty cycle electronic heat sink applications is presented. This heat sink design combines the features of a vapor chamber with rapid thermal energy storage employing graphite foam inside the heat storage facility along with phase change materials and is attractive owing to its passive operation unlike some of the current thermal management techniques for cooling of electronics employing forced air circulation or external heat exchangers. In addition to the concept, end-application dependent criteria to select an optimized design for this dual latent heat sink are presented. A thermal resistance concept based design tool/model has been developed to analyze and optimize the design for experiments. The model showed that it is possible to have a dual latent heat sink design capable of handling 7 MJ of thermal load at a heat flux of 500 W/cm2 (over an area of 100 cm 2) with a volume of 0.072 m3 and weighing about 57.5 kg. It was also found that with such high heat flux absorption capability

  11. Development of a material with reproducible emission of selected volatile organic compounds - μ-Chamber study.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Wiegner, Katharina; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2014-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found indoors have the potential to affect human health. Typical sources include building materials, furnishings, cleaning agents, etc. To address this risk, chemical emission testing is used to assess the potential of different materials to pollute indoor air. One objective of the European Joint Research Project "MACPoll" (Metrology for Chemical Pollutants in Air) aims at developing and testing a reference material for the quality control of the emission testing procedure. Furthermore, it would enable comparison of measurement results between test laboratories. The heterogeneity of the majority of materials makes it difficult to find a suitable reference sample. In the present study, styrene, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, N-methyl-α-pyrrolidone, lindane, n-hexadecane, 1,2-dimethyl- and 1,2-di-n-butyl-phthalate were added to 12 commercially available lacquers (6 alkyd and 6 acrylic polymer based lacquers) serving as carrier substrate. After homogenization, the mixtures were loaded into a Markes Micro-Chamber/Thermal Extractor (μ-CTE™) for curing and investigation of the emission behavior for each compound. For almost all of the investigated chemicals, the preferred glossy acrylic lacquer showed emissions that were reproducible with a variation of less than 20% RSD. Such lacquer systems have therefore been shown to be good candidates for use as reference materials in inter-laboratory studies.

  12. Effect of nitrous acid on lung function in asthmatics: a chamber study.

    PubMed

    Beckett, W S; Russi, M B; Haber, A D; Rivkin, R M; Sullivan, J R; Tameroglu, Z; Mohsenin, V; Leaderer, B P

    1995-04-01

    Nitrous acid, a component of photochemical smog and a common indoor air pollutant, may reach levels of 100 ppb where gas stoves and unvented portable kerosene heaters are used. Nitrous acid is a primary product of combustion and may also be a secondary product by reaction of nitrogen dioxide with water. Because the usual assays for nitrogen dioxide measure several oxides of nitrogen (including nitrous acid) together, previous studies of indoor nitrogen dioxide may have included exposure to and health effects of nitrous acid. To assess the respiratory effects of nitrous acid exposure alone, we carried out a double-blinded crossover chamber exposure study with 11 mildly asthmatic adult subjects. Each underwent 3-hr exposures to 650 ppb nitrous acid and to filtered room air with three 20-min periods of moderate cycle exercise. Symptoms, respiratory parameters during exercise, and spirometry after exercise were measured. A statistically significant decrease in forced vital capacity was seen on days when subjects were exposed to nitrous acid. This effect was most marked at 25 min and 85 min after exposure began. Aggregate respiratory and mucous membrane symptoms were also significantly higher with nitrous acid. We conclude that this concentration and duration of exposure to nitrous acid alters lung mechanics slightly, does not induce significant airflow obstruction, and produces mild irritant symptoms in asthmatics.

  13. Genetic covariance between central corneal thickness and anterior chamber volume: a Hungarian twin study.

    PubMed

    Toth, Georgina Zsofia; Racz, Adel; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Szekelyhidi, Zita; Littvay, Levente; Suveges, Ildiko; Nemeth, Janos; Nagy, Zoltan Zsolt

    2014-10-01

    Few, and inconsistent, studies have showed high heritability of some parameters of the anterior segment of the eye; however, no heritability of anterior chamber volume (ACV) has been reported, and no study has been performed to investigate the correlation between the ACV and central corneal thickness (CCT). Anterior segment measurements (Pentacam, Oculus) were obtained from 220 eyes of 110 adult Hungarian twins (41 monozygotic and 14 same-sex dizygotic pairs; 80% women; age 48.6 ± 15.5 years) obtained from the Hungarian Twin Registry. Age- and sex-adjusted heritability of ACV was 85% (bootstrapped 95% confidence interval; CI: 69% to 93%), and 88% for CCT (CI: 79% to 95%). Common environmental effects had no influence, and unshared environmental factors were responsible for 12% and 15% of the variance, respectively. The correlation between ACV and CCT was negative and significant (r ph = -0.35, p < .05), and genetic factors accounted for the covariance significantly (0.934; CI: 0.418, 1.061) based on the bivariate Cholesky decomposition model. These findings support the high heritability of ACV and central corneal thickness, and a strong genetic covariance between them, which underscores the importance of identification of the specific genetic factors and the family risk-based screening of disorders related to these variables, such as open-angle and also angle closure glaucoma and corneal endothelial alterations.

  14. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments.

    PubMed

    Syam Kumar, S A; Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2012-01-01

    The recalculation of 1 fraction from a patient treatment plan on a phantom and subsequent measurements have become the norms for measurement-based verification, which combines the quality assurance recommendations that deal with the treatment planning system and the beam delivery system. This type of evaluation has prompted attention to measurement equipment and techniques. Ionization chambers are considered the gold standard because of their precision, availability, and relative ease of use. This study evaluates and compares 5 different ionization chambers: phantom combinations for verification in routine patient-specific quality assurance of RapidArc treatments. Fifteen different RapidArc plans conforming to the clinical standards were selected for the study. Verification plans were then created for each treatment plan with different chamber-phantom combinations scanned by computed tomography. This includes Medtec intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom with micro-ionization chamber (0.007 cm(3)) and pinpoint chamber (0.015 cm(3)), PTW-Octavius phantom with semiflex chamber (0.125 cm(3)) and 2D array (0.125 cm(3)), and indigenously made Circular wax phantom with 0.6 cm(3) chamber. The measured isocenter absolute dose was compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) plan. The micro-ionization chamber shows more deviations when compared with semiflex and 0.6 cm(3) with a maximum variation of -4.76%, -1.49%, and 2.23% for micro-ionization, semiflex, and farmer chambers, respectively. The positive variations indicate that the chamber with larger volume overestimates. Farmer chamber shows higher deviation when compared with 0.125 cm(3). In general the deviation was found to be <1% with the semiflex and farmer chambers. A maximum variation of 2% was observed for the 0.007 cm(3) ionization chamber, except in a few cases. Pinpoint chamber underestimates the calculated isocenter dose by a maximum of 4.8%. Absolute dose measurements using the semiflex

  15. An experimental study of recombination and polarity effect in a set of customized plane parallel ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Kron, T; McNiven, A; Witruk, B; Kenny, M; Battista, J

    2006-12-01

    magnitude of the absolute difference between charge collected at positive and negative polarity was found to correlate with the area of the collecting electrode which is consistent with the explanation that differences in thickness of the collecting electrodes and the number of electrons stopped in them contribute significantly to the polarity effect. Overall, the polarity effects found in the present study would have a negligible effect on electron beam calibration at a measurement depth recommended by most calibration protocols. However, the present work tested the corrections under extreme conditions thereby aiming at greater understanding of the mechanism underlying the correction factors for these chambers. This may lead to better chamber design for absolute dosimetry and electron beam characterization with less reliance on empirical corrections.

  16. Field Penetration in a Rectangular Box Using Numerical Techniques: An Effort to Obtain Statistical Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Yu, Shih-Pin

    2006-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the application of numerical methods to explore the ideas related to shielding effectiveness from a statistical view. An empty rectangular box is examined using a hybrid modal/moment method. The basic computational method is presented followed by the results for single- and multiple observation points within the over-moded empty structure. The statistics of the field are obtained by using frequency stirring, borrowed from the ideas connected with reverberation chamber techniques, and extends the ideas of shielding effectiveness well into the multiple resonance regions. The study presented in this paper will address the average shielding effectiveness over a broad spatial sample within the enclosure as the frequency is varied.

  17. Study of Track Ambiguities and Wire Plane Orientation in Single Phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Brendon; Zhang, Chao; Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is currently in development and will utilize a ten-kiloton scale liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) to observe neutrinos from a beam produced using protons from the Main Injector at Fermilab. It is difficult to accurately reconstruct tracks traveling nearly parallel to the LArTPC wire planes due to the finite time resolution of the detector and the limitations of using projective wire geometries. Such reconstructed tracks exhibit degeneracy to varying degrees and could have a large enough effect on primary signals and backgrounds to warrant a design change in the DUNE TPCs. We simulated charged current signal and neutral pion decay background events in order to understand the impact on signal efficiency and background rejection in a LArTPC using wire readout planes situated parallel or perpendicular to the neutrino beam. We found that using a perpendicular wire plane significantly reduces the degeneracy problem for both lepton and hadrons. Other aspects of perpendicular TPC design including signal processing are still under study. Department of Energy.

  18. Environmental chamber study of maximum incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, William P. L.; Pierce, John A.; Luo, Dongmin; Malkina, Irina L.

    The effects of 26 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on ozone formation, NO oxidation, and OH radical levels were measured by adding them to reactive organic gas (ROG)-NO x-air environmental chamber irradiations representing a simplified model photochemical smog system. These experiments had relatively low ROG/NOx ratios to represent conditions where ozone formation is most sensitive to VOC additions. The compounds studied included representative alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, and CO. The addition of formaldehyde, methylbenzenes, alkenes and methanol all caused increased integrated OH radical concentrations, and caused the most NO oxidation and ozone formation per molecule reacted. The C 6+n-alkanes had the most inhibiting effects on OH radicals, and caused reduced NO oxidation and ozone formation in these experiments. The other compounds had smaller negative effects on OH radicals, but moderate positive effects on ozone formed and NO oxidized. The implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric reaction mechanisms of these compounds are discussed.

  19. Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for EAS study in the EEE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; An, S.; Antolini, R.; Badala, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Blanco, F.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Chiri, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Coccia, E.; de Pasquale, S.; di Giovanni, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Imponente, G.; Kim, J.; La Rocca, P.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Menghetti, H.; Miozzi, S.; Moro, R.; Panareo, M.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Romano, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Sbarra, C.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Williams, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyenski, R.

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Event) Project is an extensive air shower experiment devoted to the study of very high energy events through the detection at ground of the muon component of the shower. The detectors are installed inside many Italian High Schools, involving students in the experiment. The detector used is a tracking telescope made of 3 planes of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs), a simplified, large and cheap version of the detector designed for the time of flight measurements (TOF) of the ALICE experiment at LHC. Exploiting the concept of the multiple small gas gaps combined with the use of high gain and fast gas mixture (Freon and SF6 based), the MRPCs show an overall time resolution of 100 ps. The particle tracking is performed equipping MRPCs with 24 copper strips read at both ends by front end electronics based on NINO ASIC and using commercial multi-hit TDCs. The MRPCs for the EEE experiment are built at CERN by Italian High School students and teachers under the supervision of INFN and Centro “E. Fermi” experts. After construction they are shipped to Italy and after preliminary tests they are installed inside the schools. Here we present the status and first results of the already operating stations.

  20. Simulation chamber studies on the NO3 chemistry of atmospheric aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossmeyer, J.; Brauers, T.; Richter, C.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.

    2006-09-01

    Absolute reaction rate studies of NO3 radicals with 4 aldehydes were performed in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Center Jülich. Rate coefficients (ethanal: 2.6 +/- 0.5, propanal: 5.8 +/- 1.0, butanal: 11.9 +/- 1.4, benzaldehyde: 2.2 +/- 0.6; in 10-15 cm3 s-1 at 300 K) were determined from measured concentration-time profiles of aldehydes and NO3 at near ambient conditions. The values for the aliphatic aldehydes are in good agreement with the most recent recommendations (IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry: Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry, 2005, available at http://www.iupac-kinetic.ch.cam.ac.uk). The measured concentration-time profiles of precursor aldehydes, NO3, NO2, and of product aldehydes were compared to model calculations based on the MCM v3 (Jenkin et al., 2003; Saunders et al., 2003). Differences between measurements and model are attributed to a major interference of the GC system to peroxyacyl nitrates. In addition modifications to the rate constants in the MCM are suggested.

  1. Development studies for the ILC: Measurements and simulations for a time projection chamber with GEM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermann, Bernhard; Kaminski, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Müller, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology is well suited for usage as central tracker at the International Linear Collider (ILC). To study the high potential of this detector type a small prototype of 25 cm length was built in Karlsruhe and used in several experimental setups. In this publication the results of these measurements and of additional Monte Carlo simulations are presented. By introducing the so-called equivalent drift distance a combination of all results was possible leading to a recommended configuration of the multi-GEM tower for the ILC-TPC. It will be shown that for conditions considered in the TESLA-TDR the transverse spatial resolution will be able to reach 65 μm for 10 cm and 190 μm for 200 cm drift at the ILC. This as well as the expectations for longitudinal spatial resolution, for energy resolutions of the specific ionization, and for single pad row efficiency should be able to meet the requirements of a future ILC-TPC.

  2. Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo studies of electron transport in resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjaković, D.; Petrović, Z. Lj; White, R. D.; Dujko, S.

    2014-10-01

    A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique are used to investigate electron transport in Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments at CERN and elsewhere. Using cross sections for electron scattering in C2H2F4, iso-C4H10 and SF6 as an input in our Boltzmann and Monte Carlo codes, we have calculated data for electron transport as a function of reduced electric field E/N in various C2H2F4/iso-C4H10/SF6 gas mixtures used in RPCs in the ALICE, CMS and ATLAS experiments. Emphasis is placed upon the explicit and implicit effects of non-conservative collisions (e.g. electron attachment and/or ionization) on the drift and diffusion. Among many interesting and atypical phenomena induced by the explicit effects of non-conservative collisions, we note the existence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component in the ALICE timing RPC system. We systematically study the origin and mechanisms for such phenomena as well as the possible physical implications which arise from their explicit inclusion into models of RPCs. Spatially-resolved electron transport properties are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique in order to understand these phenomena.

  3. Studies of material and process compatibility in developing compact silicon vapor chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qingjun; Bhunia, Avijit; Tsai, Chialun; Kendig, Martin W.; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.

    2013-06-01

    The performance and long-term reliability of a silicon vapor chamber (SVC) developed for thermal management of high-power electronics critically depend on compatibility of the component materials. A hermetically sealed SVC presented in this paper is composed of bulk silicon, glass-frit as a bonding agent, lead/tin solder as an interface sealant and a copper charging tube. These materials, in the presence of a water/vapor environment, may chemically react and release noncondensable gas (NCG), which can weaken structural strength and degrade the heat transfer performance with time. The present work reports detailed studies on chemical compatibility of the components and potential solutions to avoid the resulting thermal performance degradation. Silicon surface oxidation and purification of operating liquid are necessary steps to reduce performance degradation in the transient period. A lead-based solder with its low reflow temperature is found to be electrochemically stable in water/vapor environment. High glazing temperature solidifies molecular bonding in glass-frit and mitigates PbO precipitation. Numerous liquid flushes guarantee removal of chemical residual after the charging tube is soldered to SVC. With these improvements on the SVC material and process compatibility, high effective thermal conductivity and steady heat transfer performance are obtained.

  4. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  5. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  6. A comprehensive study on different modelling approaches to predict platelet deposition rates in a perfusion chamber

    PubMed Central

    Pallarès, Jordi; Senan, Oriol; Guimerà, Roger; Vernet, Anton; Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Vilahur, Gemma; Badimon, Lina; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Cito, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Thrombus formation is a multiscale phenomenon triggered by platelet deposition over a protrombotic surface (eg. a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque). Despite the medical urgency for computational tools that aid in the early diagnosis of thrombotic events, the integration of computational models of thrombus formation at different scales requires a comprehensive understanding of the role and limitation of each modelling approach. We propose three different modelling approaches to predict platelet deposition. Specifically, we consider measurements of platelet deposition under blood flow conditions in a perfusion chamber for different time periods (3, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes) at shear rates of 212 s−1, 1390 s−1 and 1690 s−1. Our modelling approaches are: i) a model based on the mass-transfer boundary layer theory; ii) a machine-learning approach; and iii) a phenomenological model. The results indicate that the three approaches on average have median errors of 21%, 20.7% and 14.2%, respectively. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an empirical data set as a proxy for a real-patient scenario in which practitioners have accumulated data on a given number of patients and want to obtain a diagnosis for a new patient about whom they only have the current observation of a certain number of variables. PMID:26391513

  7. Note: Sample chamber for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, CJ; Timofeeva, EV; Katsoudas, JP; Segre, CU

    2014-12-01

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides element-specific characterization of both crystalline and amorphous phases and enables direct correlations between electrochemical performance and structural characteristics of cathode and anode materials. In situ XAS measurements are very demanding to the design of the experimental setup. We have developed a sample chamber that provides electrical connectivity and inert atmosphere for operating electrochemical cells and also accounts for x-ray interactions with the chamber and cell materials. The design of the sample chamber for in situ measurements is presented along with example XAS spectra from anode materials in operating pouch cells at the Zn and Sn K-edges measured in fluorescence and transmission modes, respectively. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Controlled environment fumigation chambers for the study of reactive air pollutant effects on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, N. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Nicholas Hewitt, C.

    The design and construction of eight 1-m 3 fumigation chambers for exposing plants to reactive air pollutants at low concentrations are reported. Teflon surfaces are used where possible to minimize the adsorption, absorption, desorption and chemical reaction of the pollutants. A purified ambient air supply, to which metered quantities of gaseous pollutants are added, is used to give two air changes per minute at constant, low, pollutant concentrations. Comparative analysis of the chambers indicates that conditions may be maintained with a significant degree of precision, i.e. temperature ±0.3°C, RH ±6%, light intensity ±5 μmol m -2 s -1. Boundary layer analysis from models of cherry tree ( Prunus avium) leaves indicate that the minimum conductance value within these chambers is 2 cm s -1.

  9. Development of customised environmental chambers for time-resolved in situ diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styles, M. J.; Riley, D. P.

    2010-11-01

    In an effort to mitigate the expense and broaden the applicability of customised environment chambers, researchers at the University of Melbourne and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have designed and are currently commissioning a modular reaction chamber, capable of separating the necessities of diffraction methodologies from those of the desired sample environment. The In Situ Reaction Chamber (ISRC) abstracts many of the details intrinsic to the diffractometer, allowing users to design inexpensive environmental inserts that may be readily customised to their individual needs. The first insert to be developed for use with the ISRC is a high temperature furnace capable of providing an oxidising sample environment up to 1600°C.

  10. Volatile organic compounds from used building materials in a simulated chamber study

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, B. ); Johansson, I.; Lindvall, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Building materials emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indoors. They may also adsorb compounds so that an equilibrium with indoor air is reached. Samples were taken from the floor, walls, and ceiling of one room in a seven-year-old preschool building. They were placed in a small climate chamber for a period of 41 days. Samples from the air in the room and the chamber were analysed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, and about 60 compounds were identified. The composition of organics in the room air was reestablished in the chamber the first day. Since most of the compounds disappeared within 2 to 23 days, they are believed to have been adsorbed from the room air onto the material surfaces. During the last 10 days, 17 compounds remained at constant concentrations, implying that they are representative of the building material samples.

  11. Test Outline for Flutter Analysis of Rectangular Panels in Rarefied Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, Fred A.

    1996-01-01

    Jet plume impingement forces acting on large flexible space structures may precipitate dynamically unstable behavior during space flights. Typical operating conditions in space involve rarefied gas flow regimes which are intrinsically distinct from continuum gas flow and are normally modeled using the kinetic theory of gas flow. Docking and undocking operations of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Mir space laboratory represent a scenario in which the stability boundaries of solar panels may be of interest. Extensive literature review of research work on the dynamic stability of rectangular panels in rarefied gas flow conditions indicated the lack of published reports dealing with this phenomenon. A recently completed preliminary study for NASA JSC dealing with the mathematical analysis of the stability of two-degree-of-freedom elastically supported rigid panels under the effect of rarefied gas flow was reviewed. A test plan outline is prepared for the purpose of conducting a series of experiments on four rectangular rigid test articles in a vacuum chamber under the effect of continuous and pulsating Nitrogen jet plumes. The purpose of the test plan is to gather enough data related to a number of key parameters to allow the validation of the two-degree-of-freedom mathematical model. The hardware required careful design to select a very lightweight material while satisfying rigidity and frequency requirements within the constraints of the test environment. The data to be obtained from the vacuum chamber tests can be compared with the predicted behavior of the theoretical two-degree-of-freedom model. Using the data obtained in this study, further research can identify the limitations of the mathematical model. In addition modifications to the mathematical model can be made, if warranted, to accurately predict the behavior of rigid panels under rarefied gas flow regimes.

  12. The position- and lymphatic lumen-controlled tissue chambers to study live lymphatic vessels and surrounding tissues ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Daisuke; Nagai, Takashi; Bridenbaugh, Eric A; Cromer, Walter E; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2014-09-01

    Until now, there has been no tool available to provide lymphatic researchers the ability to perform experiments in tissue explants containing lymphatic vessels under tissue position- and lymphatic lumen-controlled conditions. In this article we provide technical details and description of the method of using the newly developed and implemented the position- and lymphatic lumen-controlled tissue chambers to study live lymphatic vessels and surrounding tissues ex vivo. In this study, we, for the first time, performed detailed comparative analysis of the contractile and pumping activity of rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) situated within tissue explants mounted in new tissue chambers and isolated, cannulated, and pressurized rat MLVs maintained in isolated vessel setups. We found no significant differences of the effects of both transmural pressure- and wall shear stress sensitivities of MLVs in tissue chambers and isolated MLVs. We conclude that this new experimental tool, a position- and lymphatic lumen-controlled tissue chamber, allows precise investigation of lymphatic function of MLVs interacting with elements of the tissue microenvironment. This method provides an important new set of experimental tools to investigate lymphatic function.

  13. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The mouse dorsal skinfold chamber as a model for the study of thrombolysis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Lamrani, Lamia; Rouzaud, Marie-Catherine; Loyau, Stéphane; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Although intravital microscopy models of thrombosis in mice have contributed to dissect the mechanisms of thrombus formation and stability, they have not been well adapted to study long-term evolution of occlusive thrombi. Here, we assessed the suitability of the dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) for the study of thrombolysis and testing of thrombolytic agents by intravital microscopy. We show that induction of FeCl3-induced occlusive thrombosis is achievable in microvessels of DSCs, and that thrombi formed in DSCs can be visualized by intravital microscopy using brightfield transmitted light, or fluorescent staining of thrombus components such as fibrinogen, platelets, leukocytes, and von Willebrand factor. Direct application of control saline or recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rtPA) to FeCl3-produced thrombi in DSCs did not affect thrombus size or induce recanalization. However, in the presence of hirudin, rtPA treatment caused a rapid dose-dependent lysis of occlusive thrombi, resulting in recanalization within 1 hour after treatment. Skin hemorrhage originating from vessels located inside and outside the FeCl3-injured area was also observed in DSCs of rtPA-treated mice. We further show that rtPA-induced thrombolysis was enhanced in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient (PAI-1−/−) mice, and dropped considerably as the time between occlusion and treatment application increased. Together, our results show that by allowing visualization and measurement of thrombus lysis and potential bleeding complications of thrombolytic treatments, the DSC provides a model for studying endogenous fibrinolysis and for first-line screening of thrombolytic agents. Furthermore, using this system, we found that thrombin and clot aging impair the thrombolytic action of rtPA towards FeCl3-produced thrombi. PMID:22552380

  15. An Experimental Study of the Flowfield on a Semispan Rectangular Wing with a Simulated Glaze Ice Accretion. Ph.D. Thesis, 1993 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah

    1994-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted in order to study the effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the flowfield of a semispan, reflection-plane, rectangular wing at Re = 1.5 million and M = 0.12. A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to map the flowfield on the upper surface of the model in both the clean and iced configurations at alpha = 0, 4, and 8 degrees angle of attack. At low angles of attack, the massive separation bubble aft of the leading edge ice horn was found to behave in a manner similar to laminar separation bubbles. At alpha = 0 and 4 degrees, the locations of transition and reattachment, as deduced from momentum thickness distributions, were found to be in good agreement with transition and reattachment locations in laminar separation bubbles. These values at y/b = 0.470, the centerline measurement location, matched well with data obtained on a similar but two dimensional model. The measured velocity profiles on the iced wing compared reasonably with the predicted profiles from Navier-Stokes computations. The iced-induced separation bubble was also found to have features similar to the recirculating region aft of rearward-facing steps. At alpha = 0 degrees and 4 degrees, reverse flow magnitudes and turbulence intensity levels were typical of those found in the recirculating region aft of rearward-facing steps. The calculated separation streamline aft of the ice horn at alpha = 4 degrees, y/b = 0.470 coincided with the locus of the maximum Reynolds normal stress. The maximum Reynolds normal stress peaked at two locations along the separation streamline. The location of the first peak-value coincided with the transition location, as deduced from the momentum thickness distributions. The location of the second peak was just upstream of reattachment, in good agreement with measurements of flows over similar obstacles. The intermittency factor in the vicinity of reattachment at alpha = 4 degrees, y/b = 0.470, revealed the time-dependent nature of

  16. Eccentric electrophoretic motion of a rectangular particle in a rectangular microchannel.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongquing; Daghighi, Yasaman

    2010-02-15

    Understanding of the effects of the boundary - the channel walls - on the electrophoretic motion of particles in microchannels is very important. This paper developed an analytical solution of the electrophoretic mobility for eccentric motion of a rectangular particle in a rectangular microchannel. The simple geometry of the system does not limit the generality of the qualitative prediction of the model and the analytical solution. Several special cases are studied, and the effects of the degree of the eccentricity, the particle's size relative to the channel's size, and the relative zeta potentials on the particle's mobility are discussed. For the case where the particle's cross-section area is close to the cross-section area of the microchannel, the model's predictions are compared with the published experimental results and good agreement was found.

  17. Single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a biomechanical cadaveric study of a rectangular quadriceps and bone--patellar tendon--bone graft configuration versus a round hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Mirco; Tecklenburg, Katja; Zantop, Thore; Raschke, Michael J; Hoser, Christian; Schulze, Martin; Petersen, Wolf; Fink, Christian

    2013-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate anterior tibial translation under loading conditions after single-bundle (SB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using a rectangular tunnel placement strategy with quadriceps and bone--patellar tendon--bone (BPTB) graft and to compare these data with a SB hamstring reconstruction with a round tunnel design. In 9 human cadaveric knees, the knee kinematics were examined with robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing. Within the same specimen, the knee kinematics under simulated pivot-shift and KT-1000 arthrometer (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA) testing were determined at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion under different conditions: intact knee, ACL-deficient knee, and SB ACL-reconstructed knee. For the SB ACL-reconstructed knee, 3 different SB reconstruction techniques were used: a rectangular tunnel strategy (9 × 5 mm) with quadriceps graft, a rectangular tunnel strategy with BPTB graft, and a round tunnel strategy (7 mm) with hamstring graft. In a simulated Lachman test, a statistically significant difference was found at 0° and 15° of knee flexion between the rectangular reconstruction with quadriceps graft (5.1 ± 1.2 mm and 8.3 ± 2 mm, respectively) or BPTB graft (5.3 ± 1.5 mm and 8 ± 1.9 mm, respectively) and the reconstruction using hamstring graft (7.2 ± 1.4 mm and 12 ± 1.8 mm, respectively) (P = .032 and P = .033, respectively, at 0°; P = .023 and P = .02, respectively, at 15°). On the simulated pivot-shift test at 0° and 15°, rectangular ACL reconstruction with quadriceps graft (3.9 ± 2.1 mm and 6.5 ± 1.7 mm, respectively) or BPTB graft (4.2 ± 1.8 mm and 6.7 ± 1.7 mm, respectively) showed a significantly lower anterior tibial translation when compared with round tunnel reconstruction (5.5 ± 2.1 mm and 7.9 ± 1.9 mm, respectively) (P = .03 and P = .041, respectively, at 0°; P = .042 and P = .046, respectively, at 15°). Under simulated Lachman testing and pivot

  18. A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

    1955-03-01

    The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

  19. Heavy ion beam studies and imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-03-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber is used to accurately measure intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. An imaging capability has now been developed for the system, allowing for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of radiological objects using heavy ion beams.

  20. Long term performance studies of large oil-free bakelite resistive plate chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganai, R.; Roy, A.; Shiroya, M. K.; Agarwal, K.; Ahammed, Z.; Choudhury, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-09-01

    Several high energy physics and neutrino physics experiments worldwide require large-size RPCs to cover wide acceptances. The muon tracking systems in the Iron calorimeter (ICAL) experiment in the India based Neutrino Observatory (INO), India and the near detector in Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) at Fermilab are two such examples. A single gap bakelite RPC of dimension 240 cm × 120 cm, with gas gap of 0.2 cm, has been built and tested at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, using indigenous materials procured from the local market. No additional lubricant, like oil has been used on the electrode surfaces for smoothening. The chamber is in operation for > 365 days. We have tested the chamber for its long term operation. The leakage current, bulk resistivity, efficiency, noise rate and time resolution of the chamber have been found to be quite stable during the testing peroid. It has shown an efficiency > 95% with an average time resolution of ~ 0.83 ns at the point of measurement at ~ 8700 V throughout the testing period. Details of the long term performance of the chamber have been discussed.

  1. Chamber personnel's use of Nitrox 50 during hyperbaric oxygen treatment: a quality study--research report.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marco B; Jansen, Tejs; Sifakis, Michael B; Hyldegaard, Ole; Jansen, Erik C

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of using Nitrox 50 as breathing gas during attendance in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber. Paper logs between Jan.-Dec. 2011 were reviewed to analyze nitrogen gas-loading, actual bottom time, total bottom time and surface interval time. With the use of the Norwegian Diving Tables nitrogen gas-loading was converted to Repetitive Group Letters. Symptoms of decompression sickness and health problems related to hyperbaric exposures were registered at weekly staff meetings. The chamber personnel breathed chamber air or Nitrox 50. 1,207 hyperbaric exposures were distributed to five chamber attendants and technicians, 14 doctors, and six nurses. Nitrox 50 was inhaled on 978 occasions (81.0%). Median nitrogen gas-loading after first pressurization complied with Repetitive Group Letter A (range A-E), second to C (range A-F), third to D (range A-F), fourth to E (range C-H), fifth to F (range C-H), and sixth to E (range B-G). No symptoms of decompression sickness were reported (95% CI 0.00-0.33%). Breathing Nitrox 50 during repetitive hyperbaric sessions seems to be feasible and safe while meeting high demands in number of treatment sessions and patient flow and with fewer people employed in the hyperbaric unit.

  2. Inconsistency of mesophyll conductance estimate causes the inconsistency for the estimates of maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation among the linear, rectangular and non-rectangular hyperbola biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis--a case study of CO₂ enrichment and leaf aging effects in soybean.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jindong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Leakey, Andrew D B; Zhu, Xinguang; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The responses of CO2 assimilation to [CO2] (A/Ci) were investigated at two developmental stages (R5 and R6) and in several soybean cultivars grown under two levels of CO2, the ambient level of 370 μbar versus the elevated level of 550 μbar. The A/Ci data were analyzed and compared by either the combined iterations or the separated iterations of the Rubisco-limited photosynthesis (Ac) and/or the RuBP-limited photosynthesis (Aj) using various curve-fitting methods: the linear 2-segment model; the non-rectangular hyperbola model; the rectangular hyperbola model; the constant rate of electron transport (J) method and the variable J method. Inconsistency was found among the various methods for the estimation of the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax), the mitochondrial respiration rate in the light (Rd) and mesophyll conductance (gm). The analysis showed that the inconsistency was due to inconsistent estimates of gm values that decreased with an instantaneous increase in [CO2], and varied with the transition Ci cut-off between Rubisco-limited photosynthesis and RuBP-regeneration-limited photosynthesis, and due to over-parameters for non-linear curve-fitting with gm included. We proposed an alternate solution to A/Ci curve-fitting for estimates of Vcmax, Rd, Jmax and gm with the various A/Ci curve-fitting methods. The study indicated that down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity by elevated [CO2] and leaf aging was due to partially the decrease in the maximum rates of carboxylation and partially the decrease in gm. Mesophyll conductance lowered photosynthetic capacity by 18% on average for the case of soybean plants.

  3. μ-Slide Chemotaxis: a new chamber for long-term chemotaxis studies.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Pamela; Nguyen-Hoang, Anna; Schildhammer, Christoph; Zantl, Roman; Kahl, Valentin; Horn, Elias

    2011-05-18

    Effective tools for measurement of chemotaxis are desirable since cell migration towards given stimuli plays a crucial role in tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. As for now, the Boyden chamber assay is the longstanding "gold-standard" for in vitro chemotaxis measurements. However, support for live cell microscopy is weak, concentration gradients are rather steep and poorly defined, and chemotaxis cannot be distinguished from migration in a single experiment. Here, we describe a novel all-in-one chamber system for long-term analysis of chemotaxis in vitro that improves upon many of the shortcomings of the Boyden chamber assay. This chemotaxis chamber was developed to provide high quality microscopy, linear concentration gradients, support for long-term assays, and observation of slowly migrating cells via video microscopy. AlexaFluor 488 dye was used to demonstrate the establishment, shape and time development of linear chemical gradients. Human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 and freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used to assess chemotaxis towards 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and FaDu cells' supernatant. Time-lapse video microscopy was conducted for 48 hours, and cell tracking and analysis was performed using ImageJ plugins. The results disclosed a linear steady-state gradient that was reached after approximately 8 hours and remained stable for at least 48 hours. Both cell types were chemotactically active and cell movement as well as cell-to-cell interaction was assessable. Compared to the Boyden chamber assay, this innovative system allows for the generation of a stable gradient for a much longer time period as well as for the tracking of cell locomotion along this gradient and over long distances. Finally, random migration can be distinguished from primed and directed migration along chemotactic gradients in the same experiment, a feature, which can be qualified via cell morphology imaging.

  4. μ-Slide Chemotaxis: A new chamber for long-term chemotaxis studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective tools for measurement of chemotaxis are desirable since cell migration towards given stimuli plays a crucial role in tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. As for now, the Boyden chamber assay is the longstanding "gold-standard" for in vitro chemotaxis measurements. However, support for live cell microscopy is weak, concentration gradients are rather steep and poorly defined, and chemotaxis cannot be distinguished from migration in a single experiment. Results Here, we describe a novel all-in-one chamber system for long-term analysis of chemotaxis in vitro that improves upon many of the shortcomings of the Boyden chamber assay. This chemotaxis chamber was developed to provide high quality microscopy, linear concentration gradients, support for long-term assays, and observation of slowly migrating cells via video microscopy. AlexaFluor 488 dye was used to demonstrate the establishment, shape and time development of linear chemical gradients. Human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 and freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used to assess chemotaxis towards 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and FaDu cells' supernatant. Time-lapse video microscopy was conducted for 48 hours, and cell tracking and analysis was performed using ImageJ plugins. The results disclosed a linear steady-state gradient that was reached after approximately 8 hours and remained stable for at least 48 hours. Both cell types were chemotactically active and cell movement as well as cell-to-cell interaction was assessable. Conclusions Compared to the Boyden chamber assay, this innovative system allows for the generation of a stable gradient for a much longer time period as well as for the tracking of cell locomotion along this gradient and over long distances. Finally, random migration can be distinguished from primed and directed migration along chemotactic gradients in the same experiment, a feature, which can be qualified via cell

  5. [Studies of ozone formation potentials for benzene and ethylbenzene using a smog chamber and model simulation].

    PubMed

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu

    2014-02-01

    Ozone formation potentials from irradiations of benzene-NO(x) and ethylbenzene-NO(x) systems under the conditions of different VOC/NO(x) ratios and RH were investigated using a characterized chamber and model simulation. The repeatability of the smog chamber experiment shows that for two sets of ethylbenzene-NO(x) irradiations with similar initial concentrations and reaction conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity and relative light intensity, the largest difference in O3 between two experiments is only 4% during the whole experimental run. On the basis of smog chamber experiments, ozone formation of photo-oxidation of benzene and ethylbenzene was simulated in terms of the master chemical mechanism (MCM). The peak ozone values for benzene and ethylbenzene simulated by MCM are higher than the chamber data, and the difference between the MCM-simulated results and chamber data increases with increasing RH. Under the conditions of sunlight irradiations, with benzene and ethylbenzene concentrations being in the range of (10-50) x 10(-9) and NO(x) concentrations in the range of (10-100) x 10(-9), the 6 h ozone contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were obtained to be (3.1-33) x 10(-9) and (2.6-122) x 10(-9), whereas the peak O3 contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were (3.5-54) x 10(-9) and (3.8-164) x 10(-9), respectively. The MCM-simulated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values for benzene and ethylbenzene were 0.25/C and 0.97/C (per carbon), respectively. The maximum ozone reactivity (MOR) values for these two species were obtained to be 0.73/C and 1.03/C, respectively. The MOR value of benzene from MCM is much higher than that obtained by carter from SAPRC, indicating that SAPRC may underestimate the ozone formation potential of benzene.

  6. Numerical Method for the Design of Healing Chamber in Additive-Manufactured Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien; Tsai, Pei-I; Huang, Chih-Chieh; Chen, San-Yuan; Chao, Chuen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of a healing chamber in dental implants has been shown to promote biological healing. In this paper, a novel numerical approach to the design of the healing chamber for additive-manufactured dental implants is proposed. This study developed an algorithm for the modeling of bone growth and employed finite element method in ANSYS to facilitate the design of healing chambers with a highly complex configuration. The model was then applied to the design of dental implants for insertion into the posterior maxillary bones. Two types of ITI® solid cylindrical screwed implant with extra rectangular-shaped healing chamber as an initial design are adopted, with which to evaluate the proposed system. This resulted in several configurations for the healing chamber, which were then evaluated based on the corresponding volume fraction of healthy surrounding bone. The best of these implants resulted in a healing chamber surrounded by around 9.2% more healthy bone than that obtained from the original design. The optimal design increased the contact area between the bone and implant by around 52.9%, which is expected to have a significant effect on osseointegration. The proposed approach is highly efficient which typically completes the optimization of each implant within 3–5 days on an ordinary personal computer. It is also sufficiently general to permit extension to various loading conditions. PMID:28293628

  7. Numerical Method for the Design of Healing Chamber in Additive-Manufactured Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien; Tsai, Pei-I; Huang, Chih-Chieh; Chen, San-Yuan; Chao, Chuen-Guang; Tsou, Nien-Ti

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of a healing chamber in dental implants has been shown to promote biological healing. In this paper, a novel numerical approach to the design of the healing chamber for additive-manufactured dental implants is proposed. This study developed an algorithm for the modeling of bone growth and employed finite element method in ANSYS to facilitate the design of healing chambers with a highly complex configuration. The model was then applied to the design of dental implants for insertion into the posterior maxillary bones. Two types of ITI® solid cylindrical screwed implant with extra rectangular-shaped healing chamber as an initial design are adopted, with which to evaluate the proposed system. This resulted in several configurations for the healing chamber, which were then evaluated based on the corresponding volume fraction of healthy surrounding bone. The best of these implants resulted in a healing chamber surrounded by around 9.2% more healthy bone than that obtained from the original design. The optimal design increased the contact area between the bone and implant by around 52.9%, which is expected to have a significant effect on osseointegration. The proposed approach is highly efficient which typically completes the optimization of each implant within 3-5 days on an ordinary personal computer. It is also sufficiently general to permit extension to various loading conditions.

  8. Computation of leaky guided waves dispersion spectrum using vibroacoustic analyses and the Matrix Pencil Method: a validation study for immersed rectangular waveguides.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, M; Bartoli, I; Castellazzi, G; Marzani, A

    2014-09-01

    The paper aims at validating a recently proposed Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) formulation coupled with a 2.5D Boundary Element Method (2.5D BEM) for the extraction of dispersion data in immersed waveguides of generic cross-section. To this end, three-dimensional vibroacoustic analyses are carried out on two waveguides of square and rectangular cross-section immersed in water using the commercial Finite Element software Abaqus/Explicit. Real wavenumber and attenuation dispersive data are extracted by means of a modified Matrix Pencil Method. It is demonstrated that the results obtained using the two techniques are in very good agreement.

  9. Spectroscopic study of perchlorates and other oxygen chlorides in a Martian environmental chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongchen; Wang, Alian; Ling, Zongcheng

    2016-10-01

    We report a study where the molecular spectral features of nine anhydrous and hydrous oxygen chlorides were analyzed both under Mars atmospheric pressure and temperature conditions in a Planetary Environment and Analysis Chamber (PEACh) and, for comparison, under ambient laboratory conditions. The goal is to understand the effect of Mars environmental conditions (mainly temperature T and CO2 pressure P) on their spectral features as determined by both Raman and NIR spectroscopy. These results will be used for in situ simultaneous identification of the Cl O4- and other intermediate oxygen chloride products generated during a dynamic electrostatic discharge (ESD) experiment. We have three major findings from the first phase of this study: (1) the ν1 Raman peak position is the most sensitive parameter for identifying the cation speciation in perchlorates (e.g., Na, Mg, Ca), the hydration state of magnesium perchlorate (e.g., Mg(ClO4)2 ṡ xH2O, x = 0 , 2 , 4 , 6), and the degree of oxidation of sodium oxygen chlorides (e.g., NaClOy, y = 1 , 2 , 3 , 4); (2) ν1 Raman peak positions of most tested hydrous and anhydrous oxygen chlorides show no detectable changes within the tested T and P ranges relevant to the environmental conditions at Mars surface and shallow subsurface, but water Raman peaks of the hydrated salts change following T decreases; (3) under the P &T conditions relevant to current surface and shallow subsurface at Mars mid-latitude regions, both Mg(ClO4)2 ṡ 6H2O and Ca(ClO4)2 ṡ 2H2O are stable against dehydration, while NaClO4 ṡ H2O dehydrates, with a dehydration rate that is a function of T which was quantified by in situ NIR spectroscopy. These results are useful for the interpretations of the data from current orbital remote sensing (Vis-NIR spectra) and from future landed missions (Raman spectra). Furthermore, we have designed a set of systematic ESD experiments to be conducted in PEACh for studying the pathways and the rates of oxygen chloride

  10. Human cardiac tissue in a microperfusion chamber simulating extracorporeal circulation - ischemia and apoptosis studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background After coronary artery bypass grafting ischemia/reperfusion injury inducing cardiomyocyte apoptosis may occur. This surgery-related inflammatory reaction appears to be of extreme complexity with regard to its molecular, cellular and tissue mechanisms and many studies have been performed on animal models. However, finding retrieved from animal studies were only partially confirmed in humans. To investigate this phenomenon and to evaluate possible therapies in vitro, adequate human cardiomyocyte models are required. We established a tissue model of human cardiomyocytes preserving the complex tissue environment. To our knowledge human cardiac tissue has not been investigated in an experimental setup mimicking extracorporeal circulation just in accordance to clinical routine, yet. Methods Cardiac biopsies were retrieved from the right auricle of patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting before cardiopulmonary bypass. The extracorporeal circulation was simulated by submitting the biopsies to varied conditions simulating cardioplegia (cp) and reperfusion (rep) in a microperfusion chamber. Cp/rep time sets were 20/7, 40/13 and 60/20 min. For analyses of the calcium homoeostasis the fluorescent calcium ion indicator FURA-2 and for apoptosis detection PARP-1 cleavage immunostaining were employed. Further the anti-apoptotic effect of carvedilol [10 μM] was investigated by adding into the perfusate. Results Viable cardiomyocytes presented an intact calcium homoeostasis under physiologic conditions. Following cardioplegia and reperfusion a time-dependent elevation of cytosolic calcium as a sign of disarrangement of the calcium homoeostasis occurred. PARP-1 cleavage also showed a time-dependence whereas reperfusion had the highest impact on apoptosis. Cardioplegia and carvedilol could reduce apoptosis significantly, lowering it between 60-70% (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our human cardiac preparation served as a reliable cellular model tool to study

  11. Secondary organic aerosol formation from propylene irradiations in a chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shuangshuang; Xu, Yongfu; Jia, Long

    2017-05-01

    Some studies have shown that low-molecular-weight VOCs such as ethylene and acetylene can form SOA. However, so far propylene (C3H6) has not been studied. The current work systematically investigates irradiations of propylene in the presence of NOx (x = 1, 2) in a self-made indoor chamber. Only a small amount of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was formed under 5% and 80% RH conditions without sodium chloride (NaCl) seed particles or in the presence of solid NaCl. When NaCl was in the form of droplets, liquid water content (LWC) increased from 34.5 to 169.8 μg m-3 under different initial NaCl concentrations, and correspondingly the amount of SOA linearly increased from 5.9 to 29.8 μg m-3 (SOA = 0.0164 × LWC+1.137, R2 = 0.97) at the C3H6/NOx ratio of 32.2-44.9 (ppbC/ppb). The initial C3H6/NOx concentration ratio considerably impacted the formation of SOA, in which the amount of SOA increased from 12.1 to 47.9 μg m-3 exponentially as the ratio decreased from 46.5 to 6.3 with an important point of the ratio value of 11. At the ratio of less than 11 in the regime under the control of C3H6, SOA concentrations decreased considerably with increasing ratio, whereas at the ratio value of larger than 11 in the NOx controlled regime, SOA slightly decreased with increasing ratio. From combination of the analysis of different functional groups of particles by IR spectra and ESI-Exactive-Orbitrap mass spectrometer, the constituents of SOA were identified to be hydroperoxides (e.g. HOCH2CCl(CH3)OOH), esters (e.g. CH2ClC(O)OCHClCHO), organic nitrates (e.g. HO2CH(CH2Cl)C(O)OCCl(CH2Cl)C(O)OCHClCH2ONO2), etc. Furthermore, a liquid-phase mechanism of SOA formation has been proposed in this study.

  12. Experimental study of heat transfer enhancement in a rectangular duct distributed by multi V-perforated baffle of different relative baffle width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raj; Kumar, Anil; Sharma, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Ranchan; Sethi, Muneesh

    2017-04-01

    The current research deals with the experimental investigation of the heat transfer behavior and optimum relative width parameter of the multi V-down pattern perforated baffle rectangular duct. The 60° angled multi V-down perforated pattern baffle are attached on the lower duct wall having an aspect ratio ( W D / H D ) of 10.0 and a Reynolds number ( Re) ranging from 4000 to 9000. The experiment was conducted by varying the relative baffle width ( W D / W B ) ranging from 1.0 to 6.0, relative baffle height ( H B / H D ) was 0.5, relative baffle pitch ( P B / H B ) was 10.0, relative hole position ( O B / H B ) was 0.44, open area ratio ( β O ) was 12 %. The experimental investigation shows that at a relative baffle width of 5.0 the thermal performance was maximized. Thermo-hydraulic performance ( η p ) comparison shows that multi V-down pattern perforated baffle has better outcomes as compared to other baffles shaped rectangular duct.

  13. Experimental study on burning rates of square/rectangular gasoline and methanol pool fires under longitudinal air flow in a wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Hu, L H; Liu, S; Peng, W; Huo, R

    2009-09-30

    Square pool fires with length of 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 cm and rectangular pool fires with dimensions of 10 cm x 20 cm and 10 cm x 40 cm were burned in a wind tunnel, under a longitudinal air flow ranged from 0 to 3m/s with incremental change of about 0.5m/s. Methanol and gasoline were burned and compared, with results indicated that their burning rates showed different response to the longitudinal air flow. With the increase of the longitudinal air flow speed, the burning rates of methanol pool fires, except the 5 cm square one, first decreased and then increased, but those of the 5 cm methanol square one and the gasoline pool fires increased monotonously. The burning rate of smaller square pool fires increased more significantly than that of the larger ones, as well as the enlargement of their flame attachment length along the ground. The burning rate of a rectangular pool fire with longer rim parallel to the longitudinal flow increased faster, but the flame attachment length seemed to increase more gradually, with the increase of the longitudinal air flow speed than that perpendicular to.

  14. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; ...

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features ismore » 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.« less

  15. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  16. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features is 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.

  17. SOYCHMBR.I - A model designed for the study of plant growth in a closed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1982-01-01

    The analytical model SOYCHMBER.I, an update and alteration of the SOYMOD/OARDC model, for describing the total processes experienced by a plant in a controlled mass environment is outlined. The model is intended for use with growth chambers for examining plant growth in a completely controlled environment, leading toward a data base for the design of spacecraft food supply systems. SOYCHMBER.I accounts for the assimilation, respiration, and partitioning of photosynthate and nitrogen compounds among leaves, stems, roots, and potentially, flowers of the soybean plant. The derivation of the governing equations is traced, and the results of the prediction of CO2 dynamics for a seven day experiment with rice in a closed chamber are reported, together with data from three model runs for soybean. It is concluded that the model needs expansion to account for factors such as relative humidity.

  18. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  19. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, V. V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, L.; Zihlmann, B.

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC's are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ∼200mkm accuracy with angles from 20 ̊up to 1 ̊. One of the detector features is 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.

  20. SOYCHMBR.I - A model designed for the study of plant growth in a closed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1982-01-01

    The analytical model SOYCHMBER.I, an update and alteration of the SOYMOD/OARDC model, for describing the total processes experienced by a plant in a controlled mass environment is outlined. The model is intended for use with growth chambers for examining plant growth in a completely controlled environment, leading toward a data base for the design of spacecraft food supply systems. SOYCHMBER.I accounts for the assimilation, respiration, and partitioning of photosynthate and nitrogen compounds among leaves, stems, roots, and potentially, flowers of the soybean plant. The derivation of the governing equations is traced, and the results of the prediction of CO2 dynamics for a seven day experiment with rice in a closed chamber are reported, together with data from three model runs for soybean. It is concluded that the model needs expansion to account for factors such as relative humidity.

  1. Theoretical study of piezoelectrochemical reactions in molecular compression chambers: In-situ generation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen-containing molecular compression chambers (MCCs) undergo stepwise protonation followed by a 2-electron reduction step which affords molecular hydrogen in situ. This piezoelectrochemical reaction is favored by the high compression that characterizes the molecular skeleton of MCC and its fluorinated analogue. Besides H2, the MCCs are also capable of trapping molecular fluorine and the small monoatomic gases helium and neon. A topological analysis of the electronic charge density reveals the presence of closed-shell interactions between hosts and guests.

  2. Formation of secondary aerosols from biomass burning plumes: chamber simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hu, Q.; Fang, Z.; Deng, W.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning contributed substantially to carbonaceous aerosols in China's ambient air, even in its highly industrialized megacities, based on recent source attributions by receptor modeling or by molecular and isotopic tracers. Although chemical evolution of biomass burning plumes in the ambient is a vital issue for the study of climatic and health effects, the understanding of secondary pollutants formation during the aging of biomass burning plumes is far from complete. Here we collected typical agriculture residues and forest plant branches in the Pearl River Delta in south China, and got them burned in laboratory-controlled conditions and introduced the plumes from burning these biomass directly into the GIGCAS indoor smog chamber with a reactor of 30 m3 to investigate the photochemical aging of the plumes. The inorganic trace gases, including SO2, NOx, NH3 and O3, were monitored online with chemiluminescence gas analyzers, precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitor online with a PTR-ToF-MS and offline by a preconcentrator coupled with a gas chromatography-mass selective detector/flame ionization detector/electron capture detector (GC-MSD/FID/ECD), particle number concentrations and size distributions were obtained using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) was used to measure the chemical compositions and evolutions of submicron aerosols and to trace the change in the average element ratios of organics, like H/C, O/C, and N/C. The results from the study were summarized in the following aspects: 1) primary emission factors of gaseous and particulate pollutants from burning of typical biomass including agricultural remains and forest wood plants; 2) yields of secondary pollutants, including secondary inorganic and organic aerosols and gaseous products (like O3) during photochemical aging of biomass burning plumes; 3) relationship between the formed secondary

  3. Analysis of cell flux in the parallel plate flow chamber: implications for cell capture studies.

    PubMed

    Munn, L L; Melder, R J; Jain, R K

    1994-08-01

    The parallel plate flow chamber provides a controlled environment for determinations of the shear stress at which cells in suspension can bind to endothelial cell monolayers. By decreasing the flow rate of cell-containing media over the monolayer and assessing the number of cells bound at each wall shear stress, the relationship between shear force and binding efficiency can be determined. The rate of binding should depend on the delivery of cells to the surface as well as the intrinsic cell-surface interactions; thus, only if the cell flux to the surface is known can the resulting binding curves be interpreted correctly. We present the development and validation of a mathematical model based on the sedimentation rate and velocity profile in the chamber for the delivery of cells from a flowing suspension to the chamber surface. Our results show that the flux depends on the bulk cell concentration, the distance from the entrance point, and the flow rate of the cell-containing medium. The model was then used in a normalization procedure for experiments in which T cells attach to TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC monolayers, showing that a threshold for adhesion occurs at a shear stress of about 3 dyn/cm2.

  4. VOC and carbonyl emissions from carpets: a comparative study using four types of environmental chambers.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Leva, Paolo; Kotzias, Dimitrios

    2008-04-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from carpets of different type (wool, synthetic) over a time period of three days at 23 degrees C, at 45% relative humidity, 0.5 air change rate and a loading factor of 0.4 m(2) m(-3) were measured. The experiments were carried out at four different environmental chambers (volumes of 0.02/0.28/0.45/30 m(3)). For TVOCs, maximum concentrations up to 2300 microg m(-3) (for carpet with synthetic backing) were found. Aromatic compounds e.g. benzene, toluene, the xylenes and styrene are emitted in relatively low concentrations, while for 4-phenylcyclohexene and 2, 2-butoxyethoxy-ethanol concentrations up to 170 and 320 microg m(-3), respectively, were measured. In all experiments, emission rates reached the maximum value within few hours from the beginning of the experiment. The emission rates of TVOCs from the same type of carpet measured with various types of chambers (0.02/0.28/0.45/30 m(3)), exhibited differences of up to 75%. Chamber concentrations of carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone and propanale) are of a few microg m(-3). Acetone and formaldehyde reach concentrations up to 15 and 10 microg m(-3), respectively.

  5. Resonance in cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound microstrip structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Sami M.; Kong, Jin AU; Habashy, Tarek M.; Kiang, Jean-Fu

    1989-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of the resonance frequency problem of both the cylindrical-rectangular and the wraparound microstrip structure is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of a set of vector integral equations. Using Galerkin's method to solve the integral equations, the complex resonance frequencies are studied with sinusoidal basis functions which incorporate the edge singularity. The complex resonance frequencies are computed using a perturbation approach. Modes suitable for resonator or antenna applications are investigated. The edge singularity of the patch current is shown to have no significant effect on the accuracy of the results. It is shown that the HE10 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches are more appropriate for resonator applications. The HE01 and TE01 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches, respectively, are efficient radiating modes.

  6. Surface plasmon mode analysis of nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanmin; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-09-17

    A detailed study of guided modes in a nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide is presented by using the effective dielectric constant approach. The guided modes, including both traditional waveguide mode and surface plasmon mode, are investigated for the silver rectangular waveguide. The mode evolution in narrow waveguide is also discussed with the emphasis on the dependence of mode dispersion with waveguide height. Finally, the red-shift of the cutoff wavelength of the fundamental mode is observed when the waveguide height decreases, contrary to the behavior of regular metallic waveguide with PEC boundary. The comprehensive analysis can provide some guideline in the design of subwavelength optical devices based on the dispersion characteristics of metallic rectangular bore.

  7. Transfer characteristics of rectangular phase gratings in interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Xie, Weichang; Niehues, Jan

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, the transfer characteristics of rectangular periodic phase objects are studied. It turns out that there are significant differences compared to amplitude objects. The imaging of an amplitude object can be understood as a linear process, whereas phase objects behave nonlinearly. It is shown that under certain conditions the correct shape of a rectangular phase grating can be obtained by an interference microscope as long as the first order diffraction component passes the optical imaging system. This result is in a good agreement with experimental observations and computer simulation results.

  8. Design Study Conducted of a Stirred and Perfused Specimen Chamber for Culturing Suspended Cells on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Kizito, John P.

    2003-01-01

    A tightly knit numerical/experimental collaboration among the NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Payload Systems, Inc., was formed to analyze cell culturing systems for the International Space Station. The Cell Culture Unit is a facility scheduled for deployment on the space station by the Cell Culture Unit team at Ames. The facility houses multiple cell specimen chambers (CSCs), all of which have inlets and outlets to allow for replenishment of nutrients and for waste removal. For improved uniformity of nutrient and waste concentrations, each chamber has a pair of counterrotating stir bars as well. Although the CSC can be used to grow a wide variety of organic cells, the current study uses yeast as a model cell. Previous work identified groundbased protocols for perfusion and stirring to achieve yeast growth within the CSC that is comparable to that for yeast cultures grown in a shaken Ehrlenmeyer flask.

  9. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  10. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams.

    PubMed

    Zink, K; Czarnecki, D; Looe, H K; von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Harder, D

    2014-11-01

    The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known "inscattering effect," whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in-out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in-out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the

  11. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the

  12. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  13. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  14. Free vibrations of rectangular orthotropic shallow shells with varying thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budak, V. D.; Grigorenko, A. Ya.; Puzyrev, S. V.

    2007-06-01

    The paper proposes a numerical-analytic approach to studying the free vibrations of orthotropic shallow shells with double curvature and rectangular planform. The approach is based on the spline-approximation of unknown functions. Calculations are carried out for different types of boundary conditions. The influence of the mid-surface curvature and variable thickness on the behavior of dynamic characteristics is studied

  15. Mapping from rectangular to harmonic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.; Bateman, G.

    1986-08-01

    An algorithm is developed to determine the Fourier harmonics representing the level contours of a scalar function given on a rectangular grid. This method is applied to the problem of computing the flux coordinates and flux surface average needed for 1-1/2-D transport codes and MHD stability codes from an equilibrium flux function given on a rectangular grid.

  16. Buckling Analysis of Rectangular Plates With Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    BUCKO is computer program developed to predict buckling of rectangular compression-loaded orthotropic plate with centrally located cutout. Plate assumed balanced, symmetric laminate of uniform thickness. Cutout shape elliptical, circular, rectangular, or square. Package includes sample data demonstrating essence of program and ease of use. Written in FORTRAN V.

  17. Mapping from rectangular to harmonic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.; Bateman, G.

    1987-07-01

    An algorithm is developed to determine the Fourier harmonics representing the level contours of a scalar function given on a rectangular grid. This method is applied to the problem of computing the flux coordinates and flux surface averages needed for 11/2D transport codes and MHD stability codes from an equilibrium flux function on a rectangular grid. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  18. An analytic study on the effect of alginate on the velocity profiles of blood in rectangular microchannels using microparticle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Katie L; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    It is desired to understand the effect of alginic acid sodium salt from brown algae (alginate) as a viscosity modifier on the behavior of blood in vitro using a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV) system. The effect of alginate on the shape of the velocity profile, the flow rate and the maximum velocity achieved in rectangular microchannels channels are measured. The channels were constructed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone. Porcine blood cells suspended in saline was used as the working fluid at twenty percent hematocrit (H = 20). While alginate was only found to have minimal effect on the maximum velocity and the flow rate achieved, it was found to significantly affect the shear rate at the wall by between eight to a hundred percent.

  19. An Analytic Study on the Effect of Alginate on the Velocity Profiles of Blood in Rectangular Microchannels Using Microparticle Image Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, Katie L.; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    It is desired to understand the effect of alginic acid sodium salt from brown algae (alginate) as a viscosity modifier on the behavior of blood in vitro using a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV) system. The effect of alginate on the shape of the velocity profile, the flow rate and the maximum velocity achieved in rectangular microchannels channels are measured. The channels were constructed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone. Porcine blood cells suspended in saline was used as the working fluid at twenty percent hematocrit (H = 20). While alginate was only found to have minimal effect on the maximum velocity and the flow rate achieved, it was found to significantly affect the shear rate at the wall by between eight to a hundred percent. PMID:24023655

  20. Feasibility study of the dual-chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) lift device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntz, Jonathan E.; Brei, Diann; Ypma, Joe; Young, Jonathan R.; Radice, Joshua; Johnson, Nancy L.; Browne, Alan L.; Strom, Kenneth A.

    2007-04-01

    Pedestrian protection is a major focus of automotive crashworthiness with new regulations taking effect worldwide. While there are many approaches to reducing the head-injury-criteria (HIC), a leading approach is to actively lift the hood to increase the crush distance to rigid underhood components. Most current lift devices are single-use, requiring the hood to be manually returned to a drivable position, and may damage the hood during lift due to inappropriate lift rates. This paper addresses these issues with an alternative approach using stored energy marrying conventional (pneumatic) and smart materials (Shape Memory Alloy) actuation. The SMART (SMA ReseTtable) hood lift device comprises a dual chamber cylinder which releases stored pneumatic energy via an ultra-fast SMA exhaust valve, raising a piston attached to the hood. The device can be automatically reset and rearmed through pressurization of the chambers and the energy dissipated for service by evacuating both chambers. This approach is unique in that several design parameters such as pressure and valve opening/timing profile can be altered in the field to compensate for temperature, added mass (such as snow) or platform changes. This paper presents the concept of this device and the parametric design of the pneumatic cylinder and valve orifice based on an analytical performance model. Two valve concepts are presented: direct and indirect, where the direct valve is simpler and more controllable, but the indirect valve can provide larger orifices (and therefore faster lift times) with reduced actuation requirements. Using a combination of analytical model-based and experimental methods, the SMART lift device with each valve approach was designed, and a full-scale prototype built and experimentally characterized validating the model and successfully demonstrating feasibility of each system to meet and exceed the pedestrian protection specifications. This new set of technologies enables the hood lift

  1. Reverse pupillary block after implantation of a scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens: a retrospective, open study.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Pil; Joo, Choun-Ki; Jun, Jong Hwa

    2017-03-29

    To report the clinical features of patients with reverse pupillary block (RPB) after scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) implantation and biometric changes after laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI). Eight patients attending our hospital's ophthalmology outpatient clinic, who developed RPB after implantation of a scleral-sutured PC IOL due to subluxation of the crystalline lens or IOL, were investigated in this retrospective, observational study. Preoperative evaluations showed angle pigmentation in all cases and iridodonesis in 2 cases. Two subjects had used an α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Pars plana or anterior partial vitrectomy was performed in all cases. All eyes showed an extremely deep anterior chamber, a concave iris configuration, and contact between the IOL optic and the iris at the pupillary margin. Pupil capture was detected in 2 cases. The mean (± SD) anterior chamber angle (ACA) was 89.91 ± 10.06°, and the anterior chamber depth (ACD) was 4.42 ± 0.16 mm before LPI. After LPI, the iris immediately became flat with a decreased ACA (51.70 ± 2.59°; P = 0.018) and ACD (4.14 ± 0.15 mm; P = 0.012). After LPI, the intraocular pressure decreased from 19.75 ± 3.77 mmHg to 15.63 ± 4.30 mmHg (P = 0.011), and the spherical equivalent decreased from -0.643 ± 0.385 D to - 0.875 ± 0.505 D (P = 0.016). Concomitant vitrectomy, angle pigmentation, and iridodonesis may be risk factors for RPB after scleral-sutured PC IOL implantation. LPI is effective for relieving the RPB.

  2. Retrospective Study of Vitreous Tap Technique Using Needle Aspiration for Management of Shallow Anterior Chamber during Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Ewais, Wael Ahmed; Ali, Lamia Samy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the technique of vitreous tap using needle aspiration for management of anterior chamber shallowness during phacoemulsification. Methods A retrospective study included 26 eyes of 17 patients who underwent phacoemulsification in which vitreous tap was performed using a 27-gauge needle attached to a 5 ml syringe, inserted 3.5 mm from the limbus to aspirate 0.2 ml of liquefied vitreous if a cohesive (OVD) failed to sufficiently deepen the anterior chamber. Results Preoperative anterior chamber depth was 2.31 ± 0.26 mm, axial length was 21.7 ± 0.67 mm, lens thickness was 4.5 ± .19 mm, and cataract grade was 3.77 ± 1.4. Preoperative CDVA in LogMAR units was 0.98 ± 0.75. Coexisting angle closure glaucoma was present in 7 patients (26.92%) preoperatively. Vitreous needle tap was successful in vitreous removal on the first attempt in 26 eyes (100%). Postoperative follow-up period was 22.88 ± 10.24 (4–39) months. The final postoperative CDVA in LogMAR units was 0.07 ± 0.1, while the final postoperative IOP was 16.54 ± 1.45 mmHg. No complications related to vitreous tap were noted. Conclusion Vitreous needle tap is a simple, cost-effective, and safe technique for management of shallow anterior chamber in phacoemulsification. PMID:28607771

  3. A Numerical Study of Combined Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer in a Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    wall CO2 38% H2O 43% CO 12% Other 7% 53 temperature ratio at a chamber pressure of 35 atmosphere. The blue line is for black inlet & outlet...0.0000E+00 * Radiation Summary Convention is +ve if emmitting , -ve if absorbing. * Cond+Conv Summary...homogeneous elements, n line 2: pathlength (m), temperature (K), CO2 (kPa), H2O, CH4, CO, O2, N2, fv lines 3 through n+1: same as line 2 for the

  4. Performance and Aging Studies of BaBar Resistive Plate Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, H.R.; Hollar, J.; Tan, P.; Anulli, F.; Baldini, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Cheng, C.H.; Lange, D.J.; Wright, D.M.; Messner, R.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Pappagallo, M.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; /Wisconsin U., Madison /Frascati /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Oregon U. /UC, Riverside

    2006-10-13

    The BaBar detector is currently operating nearly 200 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), constructed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detector in 2002. Although the average RPC efficiency remains high, numerous changes in the RPC performance (increased currents and rates) have been observed. A few of the highest rate RPCs have suffered efficiency losses of more than 15%. Several types of efficiency loss have been observed. Tests with humidified gas have shown that some of the lost efficiency is recoverable. However, efficiency losses in the highest rate regions have not yet improved with humid gases.

  5. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. II. Microdosimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    A low-pressure cloud chamber has been adapted to operate with pure water vapor. Photographs were obtained of tracks arising from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Distributions of lineal energy, radial distances around an ion track, and interdroplet distances were measured and compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. After allowing for diffusion and the limitations of the geometry of the system, the measured and calculated distributions were found to be in good agreement.

  6. Aging study for resistive plate chambers of the CMS muon trigger detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Guida, R.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.

    2003-12-01

    A long-term aging test of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was carried out with an intense gamma 137Cs source. The detector was operated in avalanche mode and had the bakelite surface treated with linseed oil. After the irradiation the estimated dose, charge and fluence were approximately equal to the expected values after 10 years of operation in the CMS barrel region. During and after the irradiation, the RPC performance was monitored with cosmic muons and showed no relevant aging effects. Moreover, no variation of the bakelite resistance was observed.

  7. Spectrophotometric evaluation of peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber from whitening strips and gel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, KK

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate pulp chamber penetration of different concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were taken and grouped into five (n = 10). All teeth were cut approximately 3 mm apical to the cemento-enamel junction. Pulp was removed and the pulp chamber filled with acetate buffer. Buccal crown surfaces of teeth in the experimental groups were subjected to whitening strip and paint on whitener gel. Control group teeth were exposed to distilled water. The acetate buffer solution in each tooth was then transferred to a glass test tube after 30 min. Leuco-crystal violet dye and enzyme horse radish peroxidase were added. The optical density of resultant blue color in the tubes was measured by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The values were converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Results: The results were evaluated statistically using nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test. Whitening strip showed the lowest pulpal peroxide penetration whereas paint on whitener gel showed highest pulpal peroxide penetration. Conclusion: This study demonstrate that peroxide is readily penetrate into the pulp chamber of teeth. PMID:23716964

  8. The Lateral Instability of Deep Rectangular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, C; Hill, H N

    1937-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were made of solid and hollow deep rectangular beams to study their lateral instability under various conditions of loading and restraint. The tests were made on bars and tubes of 17ST aluminum alloy. Failure by lateral buckling occurred only in tests on the solid beams. It was found that, within the elastic range, the test results were in agreement with the classical theory for the lateral buckling of deep beams as given by Prandtl, Mitchell, and Timoshenko. The tests were extended to the inelastic range, where it was found that the substitution for Young's modulus of an average modulus of elasticity derived from the stress-strain curve made it possible to predict instability at high stresses.

  9. Laboratory study on "intracranial hypotension" created by pumping the chamber of a hydrocephalus shunt

    PubMed Central

    Bromby, Adam; Czosnyka, Zofia; Allin, David; Richards, Hugh K; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been reported that pumping a shunt in situ may precipitate a proximal occlusion, and/or lead to ventricular over-drainage, particularly in the context of small ventricles. In the laboratory we measured the effect of pumping the pre-chamber of hydrocephalus shunts on intracranial hypotension. Materials and methods A simple physical model of the CSF space in a hydrocephalic patient was constructed with appropriate compliance, CSF production and circulation. This was used to test eleven different hydrocephalus shunts. The lowest pressure obtained, the number of pumps needed to reach this pressure, and the maximum pressure change with a single pump, were recorded. Results All models were able to produce negative pressures ranging from -11.5 mmHg (Orbis-Sigma valve) to -233.1 mmHg (Sinu-Shunt). The number of pumps required reaching these levels ranged from 21 (PS Medical LP Reservoir) to 315 (Codman Hakim-Programmable). The maximum pressure change per pump ranged from 0.39 mmHg (Orbis-Sigma valve) to 23.1 (PS Medical LP Reservoir). Conclusion Patients, carers and professionals should be warned that 'pumping' a shunt's pre-chamber may cause a large change in intracranial pressure and predispose the patient to ventricular catheter obstruction or other complications. PMID:17386089

  10. Geophysical study of a magma chamber near Mussau Island, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dadisman, Shawn V.; Marlow, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of a 24-channel seismic-reflection data collected near Mussau Island, Papua New Guinea, shows a high-amplitude, negative-polarity reflection that we believe is from the top of a magma chamber.  The reflecting horizon lies at a depth of about 4.4 s subbottom and can be traced laterally for 2.6 km.  On shot gathers, the reflection demonstrates normal moveout appropriate for an in-place event.  The frequency spectrum of the reflection shows a decrease in high-frequency content when compared to the sea floor reflection, as would be expected for a deep subsurface event.  The polarity of the reflection event is negative, suggesting that the reflection horizon is the top of a low-velocity zone.  Magnetic data indicate that the ridge containing the reflecting horizon is magnetic, and the geology of Massau Island suggests that the ridge is volcanic in its origin.  We speculate that the high-amplitude reflection is from the top of a magma chamber some 7-11 km deep.

  11. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  12. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. I. Macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    Techniques have been developed to operate a low-pressure cloud chamber with pure water vapor. Photographs have been obtained of the tracks arising in this medium from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Track lengths of the electrons were similar to those found previously in tissue-equivalent gas. W values of 35.6 +/- 0.4 and 32.6 +/- 0.6 eV per ion pair for carbon and aluminum X rays also compare closely with those in tissue-equivalent gas, but are somewhat higher than the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. Differential w values were obtained: for alpha particles of energy 5.3 MeV the value was 33.0 +/- 3.0 eV per ion pair; for protons of energy 390, 230, and 85 keV the values were 30.6 +/- 1.9, 31.9 +/- 2.0, and 33.6 +/- 3.4 eV per ion pair. The energy losses of protons in water vapor were measured in a second (dummy) chamber used for energy calibration. Results support Janni's values of stopping power for protons in the energy range 40-480 keV.

  13. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H; Roache, Nancy F

    2015-10-01

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from thirteen caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 different models from five manufacturers were tested in 53-L environmental chambers. The rates of PCB congener emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts were determined. Several factors that may have affected the emission rates were evaluated. The experimentally determined emission factors showed that, for a given PCB congener, there is a linear correlation between the emission factor and the concentration of the PCB congener in the source. Furthermore, the test results showed that an excellent log-linear correlation exists between the normalized emission factor and the vapor pressure (coefficient of determination, r(2)⩾0.8846). The PCB congener emissions from ballasts at or near room temperature were relatively low with or without electrical load. However, the PCB congener emission rates increased significantly as the temperature increased. The results of this research provide new data and models for ranking the primary sources of PCBs and supports the development and refinement of exposure assessment models for PCBs.

  14. Restoring contaminated wires, removing gas contaminants, and aging studies of drift tube chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    The original muon detection system of the Fermilab D0 colliding beam experiment contained 12,000 drift cells 10 cm×5 cm in cross-section and up to 580 cm in length. The gas mixture used was Ar/CF 4/CO 2 (90:6:4). There was one recycling gas system for all the chambers. During the first year of operation, it was discovered that inefficient cells, all in regions of high radiation, had a contaminating shell of crud coating their wires. The source of the contaminant was outgassing of the cathode pads, which were made from a laminate of fiberglass and epoxy/polyester resin, with a copper cladding on one surface. The vapor formed a brittle sheath on the wires, but only in regions of high current discharge due to radiation from the accelerator and colliding beams. A method for cleaning wires in place was devised. By heating the wire quickly to a temperature close to the melting temperature of gold, the sheath was ripped to shreds and blown away. The procedure for "zapping" wires and for removing the contaminating vapor is presented. The upgraded D0 experiment now uses Iarocci-type mini-drift tubes for the forward muon system. The results of aging tests for these chambers are also presented.

  15. Twin chamber sample assembly in DAC and HPHT studies on GaN nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Balmukund; Shekar, N. V. Chandra; Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Ravindran, T. R.; Sahoo, P.; Dhara, S.; Sahu, P. Ch

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we have suggested a novel idea of twin chamber sample assembly for separating ruby from the sample to overcome certain problems during high pressure-high temperature experiments using diamond anvil cell. Two holes of diameter 70μm were drilled symmetrically about the centre of the preindented area (500 μm diameter) in a stainless steel gasket using EDM. Using ruby pressure calibration, good pressure correlation between these two holes was established up to about 15GPa. Also, high pressure - high temperature (HPHT) experiments on the III-V compound semiconductor GaN were performed up to ~ 3GPa and 2000K using the two chamber sample assembly and a laser heated diamond anvil cell facility. NaCl, both hydrous and anhydrous, were used as the pressure transmitting media in two separate experiments. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to characterise the HPHT treated samples. While GaN remained stable in its wurtzite phase when heated in anhydrous NaCl medium, it transformed to Ga2O3 with rocksalt structure in the hydrous NaCl medium.

  16. Aperture coupling measurement in a test chamber for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Zhou, J.H.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Aperture coupling measurements have been made using two identical rectangular chambers. A common wall between them has holes of various size, thickness, shape and number. The transverse electromagnetic (TEM) wave, which propagates in one rectangular chamber, couples through the aperture and radiates into the other chamber. The measured results are compared with the diffraction model and used to estimate the coupling impedance of a circulating beam. The results of these measurements was applied to the detailed design of some of the vacuum components in the Advanced Photon Source.

  17. Aperture coupling measurement in a test chamber for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Zhou, J.H.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Aperture coupling measurements have been made using two identical rectangular chambers. A common wall between them has holes of various size, thickness, shape and number. The transverse electromagnetic (TEM) wave, which propagates in one rectangular chamber, couples through the aperture and radiates into the other chamber. The measured results are compared with the diffraction model and used to estimate the coupling impedance of a circulating beam. The results of these measurements was applied to the detailed design of some of the vacuum components in the Advanced Photon Source.

  18. Effect of concave rectangular winglet vortex generator on convection coefficient of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaiful, Sugiri, Gladys; Soetanto, Maria F.; Bae, Myung-whan

    2017-01-01

    This study shows an experimental result of effects of concave rectangular winglet vortex generator on convection heat transfer coefficient. There are two types of vortex generator those are rectangular winglet and concave rectangular winglet. The aim of this study is to observe effects of geometry and numbers of vortex generator to the increase of heat transfer coefficient. This experiment was done in a glass rectangular channel. Overall, this experiment was conducted with (rectangular and concave rectangular winglets) and without (baseline) vortex generator. Both types of vortex generator were placed at a 30° angle of attack, in an inline position, and variation numbers of vortex generator row of 1, 2 and 3 rows. Vortex generators were mounted on an aluminum plate which was mounted on a heater with 35 watts of heat, inside the rectangular channel. Airflow passed through vortex generators was varied by its inlet velocity to be 0.4 m/s to 2.0 m/s with an interval of 0.2 m/s. The experimental result shows that 3 row of concave rectangular winglet gives the highest heat transfer coefficient enhancement. Nusselt number and j-factor increase but thermal resistance decrease. Experiment results that Nusselt number and j-factor increase up to 205% while thermal resistance decreases up to 67% compared to baseline for the highest Reynolds number.

  19. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts.

  20. X-ray diffraction from rectangular slits.

    PubMed

    Le Bolloc'h, D; Livet, F; Bley, F; Schulli, T; Veron, M; Metzger, T H

    2002-07-01

    It is shown that for micrometre-sized beams the X-ray diffraction from slits is a source of strong parasitic background, even for slits of high quality. In order to illustrate this effect, the coherent diffraction from rectangular slits has been studied in detail. A large number of interference fringes with strong visibility have been observed using a single set of slits made of polished cylinders. For very small apertures, asymmetrical slits generate asymmetrical patterns. This pattern is calculated from the theory of electromagnetic field propagation and compared with experiment in the far-field regime. The use of guard slits to remove Fraunhofer diffraction from the beam-defining slits is treated theoretically. Numerical simulations yield the optimum aperture of the guard slits with respect to the distance to the primary slits. Diffraction theory is shown to be essential to understand how to reduce the background-to-signal ratio in high-resolution experiments.

  1. A study of cavitating and non-cavitating performances of valveless micropump through dynamic measurement of chamber pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arvind; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2015-03-01

    A lot of work has gone into the study of valveless micropumps for various applications. However, the complex fluid-structure interactional physics and associated phenomena such as cavitation affects the characterization of valveless micropumps, for applying them reliably in any real-time applications. This paper presents a method of characterization of valveless micropump performance through dynamic measurement of chamber pressure. Experimental investigation has been carried out to study the micropump behavior through pressure measurement under both cavitation and non-cavitation conditions, and the results show that this technique is useful for the characterization of micropump.

  2. Study of swirling gas-dispersed flows in vortex chambers of various structures in the presence and absence of combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, É. P.; Dvornikov, N. A.; Lukashov, V. V.; Borodulya, V. A.; Teplitskii, Yu. S.; Pitsukha, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    Consideration is given to swirling gas-dispersed flows in the cylindrical combustion chamber with a lateral swirler, in the conical combustion chamber with a nonflow bed of a dispersed material, and in the cylindrical combustion chamber with lower end injection of the gas through a slot swirler.

  3. SπRIT: A time-projection chamber for symmetry-energy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, R.; McIntosh, A. B.; Isobe, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Baba, H.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Estee, J.; Famiano, M.; Hong, B.; Ieki, K.; Jhang, G.; Lemmon, R.; Lu, F.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Nishimura, M.; Olsen, R.; Powell, W.; Sakurai, H.; Taketani, A.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Usukura, T.; Wang, R.; Yennello, S. J.; Yurkon, J.

    2015-06-01

    A time-projection chamber (TPC) called the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (SπRIT) has recently been constructed at Michigan State University as part of an international effort to constrain the symmetry-energy term in the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). The SπRIT TPC will be used in conjunction with the SAMURAI spectrometer at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN to measure yield ratios for pions and other light isospin multiplets produced in central collisions of neutron-rich heavy ions, such as 132Sn+124Sn. The SπRIT TPC can function both as a TPC detector and as an active target. It has a vertical drift length of 50 cm, parallel to the magnetic field. Gas multiplication is achieved through the use of a multi-wire anode plane. Image charges, produced in the 12096 pads, are read out with the recently developed Generic Electronics for TPCs.

  4. Atmospheric behaviour of oil-shale combustion fly ash in a chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teinemaa, Erik; Kirso, Uuve; Strommen, Michael R.; Kamens, Richard M.

    There are huge world deposits of oil shale, however, little is known about the fate of atmospheric oil-shale combustion fly ash. In the present work, oil-shale combustion fly-ash aerosol was investigated under simulated daytime and nighttime conditions. Fly-ash particles collected from the Baltic Power Plant (Estonia) were injected directly to a 190 m 3 outdoor Teflon film chamber. The initial concentration of particles was in the range from 15 to 20 mg/m 3. Particle size distributions were monitored continuously by various optical and electrical devices. During the course of an experiment the particle phase was collected on filters, and the gas phase was collected using denuders. The initial aerosol mass concentration decreased quickly due to the deposition of larger particles. Since fine particles dominated the count distribution, the change in aerosol number concentration was less significiant than the mass concentration over time. Experimental data showed a bimodal particle size distribution with maximums at about 0.07 and 4 μm. SEM images of aerosol particles also provided particle shape and size distribution information. The respirable fraction of particles, which contributes most to the health effects of the aerosol, significantly increased during the experiment, being 25% by mass immediately after the injection of fly ash and achieving 65% at the end of the experiment. Results of CG/MS analysis confirm the presence of different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the particle phase of the aerosol. Some of the individual compounds included phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Several PAHs were found in the gas phase of the chamber after fly ash had aged for 2 h, indicating that PAHs desorbed from the particles over time.

  5. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  6. Modeling of Ultrasonic Signals from a Side-Drilled Hole Captured By a Rectangular Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Song, Sung-Jin; Schmerr, Lester W.

    2006-03-01

    In ultrasonic nondestructive testing an angle beam transducer with a rectangular piezoelectric element is often adopted in practice to detect flaws. Also, a side-drilled hole (SDH) is very widely used as a standard reflector in ultrasonic testing. For proper interpretation of the measurement results from a SDH using a rectangular transducer, it is very helpful to have a complete ultrasonic measurement model including an ultrasonic beam model of the rectangular transducer, a scattering model of the SDH, and an ultrasonic system model. Recently, a highly efficient ultrasonic beam model of the rectangular transducer and an accurate scattering model of the SDH have been proposed. Thus, in this study, by combining those components with a system efficiency factor for a rectangular transducer, we develop a complete ultrasonic measurement model to predict ultrasonic signals from a SDH. Based on this model, we have calculated the ultrasonic signals from a SDH at different transducer orientations. The predicted results are compared with the experiments.

  7. Studies of Chamber Organic Aerosol Using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, Puneet Singh

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributes a substantial fraction to total ambient particulate mass. SOA is a complex mixture of different organic species formed via many gas- and particle-phase reaction pathways. The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) has become a standard tool in measuring the bulk chemical composition of SOA in realtime. In addition to acquiring mass spectra of SOA, the high-resolution time-of-flight AMS, or HR-ToF-AMS, can distinguish and quantify ions with the same nominal mass but different elemental compositions. This thesis presents results from several studies in which the HR-ToF-AMS is used to chemically characterize SOA generated in chamber experiments. Glyoxal is a common oxidation product of both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and is known to partition into wet inorganic aerosol. Chamber studies of glyoxal uptake onto ammonium sulfate aerosol are conducted to better understand the mechanisms controlling glyoxal uptake onto ambient aerosol. Organic growth due to glyoxal uptake was found to be reversible under dark conditions. HR-ToF-AMS spectra provide evidence for glyoxal dimers and trimers existing in the particle phase. HR-ToF-AMS spectra indicate the irreversible formation of carbon-nitrogen compounds in the aerosol. Organosulfates are not detected under dark conditions; however, active photochemistry was found to occur within aerosol during irradiated experiments. Carboxylic acids and organic esters are identified within the aerosol. An organosulfate, which had been previously assigned as glyoxal sulfate in ambient samples and chamber studies of isoprene oxidation, is observed only in the irradiated experiments. Comparison with a laboratory-synthesized standard and chemical considerations strongly suggest that this organosulfate is glycolic acid sulfate, an isomer of the previously proposed glyoxal sulfate. Developments in HR-ToF-AMS data analysis have allowed for the measurement of the

  8. Light-induced multiphase chemistry of gas phase ozone on aqueous pyruvic and oxalic acids: Aerosol chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Grgic, I.; Net, S.; Böge, O.; Iinuma, Y.; Kahnt, A.; Scheinhardt, S.; Herrmann, H.; Wortham, H.

    2010-12-01

    The light-absorbing organic compounds present in and on condensed aerosol particles interacting with trace gases such as ozone can initiate a new and potentially important photo-induced multiphase chemistry. However, investigations of light induced multiphase processes are very scarce at present. We have launched the idea of pyruvic acid (PA) acting as a photosensitizer in the multiphase reactions between gas-phase ozone and aqueous oxalic acid (OA). The performed photochemical batch experiments yielded a complex suite of organic molecules which resulted primarily from the oligomerization of OA/PA and subsequent reactions, including decarboxylation and cycloadition (Grgic et al., 2010). In the atmosphere, pyruvic acid will always be accompanied by other carboxylic acids (and also other organics) which are constituents of either aerosol particles or aqueous droplets the effects of a possible photochemistry triggered by pyruvic acid should be experimentally studied in depth and under natural conditions as far as possible. Hence, in a very recent study experiments in the aerosol chamber facility LEAK at IFT, Leipzig, were performed to verify the influence of pyruvic on the multiphase (photo)oxidation of oxalic acid. The aim of these experiments was to study the multiphase photo-induced oxidation reactions with airborne deliquescent particles to demonstrate the applicability of the reactions mentioned above under more realistic conditions than in a batch reactor. State of the art sampling and analytical tools were applied for the analysis of the ongoing chamber runs and the formed particulate products which include denuder sampling, carbonyl compound derivatisation, PTR-MS measurements, GC-MS measurements and HPLC-MS and CE-MS for the particle phase. First results from these joint complex chamber experiments will be presented and discussed. Reference: Grgić I., Nieto-Gligorovski L.I., Net S., Temime-Roussel B., Gligorovski S., Wortham H. Light induced multiphase

  9. Chamber for Growing and Observing Fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Molina, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    A chamber has been designed to enable growth and observation of microcolonies of fungi in isolation from the external environment. Unlike prior fungus-growing apparatuses, this chamber makes it possible to examine a fungus culture without disrupting it. Partly resembling a small picture frame, the chamber includes a metal plate having a rectangular through-thethickness opening with recesses for a top and a bottom cover glass, an inlet for air, and an inlet for water. The bottom cover glass is put in place and held there by clips, then a block of nutrient medium and a moisture pad are placed in the opening. The block is inoculated, then the top cover glass is put in place and held there by clips. Once growth is evident, the chamber can be sealed with tape. Little (if any) water evaporates past the edges of the cover glasses, and, hence there is little (if any) need to add water. A microscope can be used to observe the culture through either cover glass. Because the culture is sealed in the chamber, it is safe to examine the culture without risking contamination. The chamber can be sterilized and reused.

  10. Echocardiographic measurements in normal chinese adults focusing on cardiac chambers and great arteries: a prospective, nationwide, and multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gui-Hua; Deng, Yan; Liu, Yan; Xu, Ming-Jun; Zhang, Cheng; Deng, You-Bin; Ren, Wei-Dong; Li, Zhi-An; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Quan-Bin; Mu, Yu-Ming; Fang, Li-Gang; Zhang, Mei; Yin, Li-Xue; Zhang, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Currently available echocardiographic reference values are derived mainly from North American and European population studies, and no echocardiographic reference values are available for the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to establish normal values of echocardiographic measurements of the cardiac chambers and great arteries in a nationwide, population-based cohort of healthy Han Chinese adults. A total of 1,586 healthy Han Chinese volunteers aged 18 to 79 years were screened at 43 collaborating laboratories throughout China. Standard M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography was performed to obtain measurements of the cardiac chambers and great arteries. The impacts of gender and age on all echocardiographic measurements were analyzed. A total of 1,394 qualified healthy subjects (mean age, 47.3 ± 16.0 years; 678 men) were ultimately enrolled. Except for left ventricular ejection fraction, values of cardiac chamber and great arterial dimensions were significantly higher in men than in women. Most measurements of the atrial and great arterial dimensions, left ventricular wall thickness, and left ventricular mass increased with age in both men and women. Normal reference values of cardiac dimensional parameters were established for the first time in a nationwide, population-based cohort of healthy Han Chinese adults. Because most of these parameters were found to vary with gender and age, reference values stratified for gender and age should be used in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In-vitro Study on Temperature Changes in the Pulp Chamber Due to Thermo-Cure Glass Ionomer Cements.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Raimond Nb; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert; Glavina, Domagoj

    2016-12-01

    The application of the Glass Ionomer Cements in clinical dentistry is recommended due to properties such as fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth, negligible setting shrinkage, and coefficient of thermal expansion close to tooth, low creep, and good color stability. However, the cement is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture due to slow setting characteristics. The uses of external energy such as ultrasound and radiant heat (Thermo-curing) have been reported to provide acceleration of the setting chemistry and enhance physical properties. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze temperature changes in the pulpal chamber when using radiant heat to accelerate the setting of GICs. Material and Methods:The encapsulated GIC Equia Forte was used for this study. The temperature changes in the pulp were measured using thermocouple in the cavities which were 2,6 and 4,7mm deep with and without filling. Results:The results showed that a temperature rise (ΔT) in the pulp chamber was 3,7°C. ΔT for the 2.6mm and 4.7mm deep cavity and without placing any restoration the temperature was 4,2°C and 2,6°C respectively. After the restoration has been placed, the ΔT range in the pulp chamber was lower ranging from 1.9°C to 2.4°C. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Thermo-curing of the GIC during the setting is safe for the pulp and can be recommended in clinical practice.

  12. The design, construction, and operation of a whole-body inhalation chamber for use in avian toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Olsgard, Mandy L; Smits, Judit E G

    2008-01-01

    Environmental risk assessments are broadening to include evaluations of avian species exposed to gaseous and particulate materials (Mineau, 2002b; Irvine, 2004; Carmalt, 2005). Since the avian respiratory tract is fundamentally different from the respiratory tract of rodents, the effects of gaseous materials on birds cannot validly be extrapolated from data derived from rodent exposure studies (Briant & Driver, 1992; Brown et al., 1997). To address the lack of avian-specific lowest observable effect levels used to calculate reference concentrations for airborne pollutants, a system was designed to facilitate research on inhalation toxicology in small birds. Birds have long been used as early indicators of poor air quality (Brown et al., 1997), and various chambers have been designed for head only exposures of larger birds (Briant & Driver, 1992). Smaller birds with short tracheal lengths and hooked beaks however require less restrictive exposure apparatus, thus warranting the proposed design. The chamber described in this article was designed to accommodate a small falcon, the American kestrel, a species frequently used in toxicological risk assessments (Wiemeyer & Lincer, 1987a; Smits & Bortolotti, 2001; Bortolotti et al., 2003; Fisher et al., 2006). To accomplish this, a 41-L closed inhalation system capable of exposing 12 adult American kestrels was constructed primarily of galvanized steel, polyvinyl chloride, and copper tubing. Humidified air was passed over the birds and subsequently decontaminated by an activated carbon filter and released to a HEPA filtration system. The proposed inhalation chamber was successfully used in 2005 and 2006 to expose a total of 55 male American kestrels to benzene and toluene. Measurements of various biochemical endpoints associated with benzene and toluene toxicity allowed us to study the effects of airborne pollutants on small nondomesticated birds in a controlled laboratory setting.

  13. In-vitro Study on Temperature Changes in the Pulp Chamber Due to Thermo-Cure Glass Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    van Duinen, Raimond NB; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Glass Ionomer Cements in clinical dentistry is recommended due to properties such as fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth, negligible setting shrinkage, and coefficient of thermal expansion close to tooth, low creep, and good color stability. However, the cement is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture due to slow setting characteristics. The uses of external energy such as ultrasound and radiant heat (Thermo-curing) have been reported to provide acceleration of the setting chemistry and enhance physical properties. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze temperature changes in the pulpal chamber when using radiant heat to accelerate the setting of GICs. Material and Methods:The encapsulated GIC Equia Forte was used for this study. The temperature changes in the pulp were measured using thermocouple in the cavities which were 2,6 and 4,7mm deep with and without filling. Results:The results showed that a temperature rise (ΔT) in the pulp chamber was 3,7°C. ΔT for the 2.6mm and 4.7mm deep cavity and without placing any restoration the temperature was 4,2°C and 2,6°C respectively. After the restoration has been placed, the ΔT range in the pulp chamber was lower ranging from 1.9°C to 2.4°C. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Thermo-curing of the GIC during the setting is safe for the pulp and can be recommended in clinical practice. PMID:28275275

  14. Effect of propafenone on the contractile activity of Latissimus dorsi muscle isolated in an organ chamber: experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Simões, Ricardo; Machado, Eduardo Luis Guimarães; Freitas, Odilon Gariglio de Alvarenga; Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira; Gomes, Otoni Moreira

    2002-03-01

    To study the effect of propafenone on the contractile function of latissimus dorsi muscle isolated from rats in an organ chamber. We studied 20 latissimus dorsi muscles of Wistar rats and divided them into 2 groups: group I (n=10), or control group - we studied the feasibility of muscle contractility; group II (n=10), in which the contralateral muscles were grouped - we analyzed the effect of propafenone on muscle contractility. After building a muscle ring, 8 periods of sequential 2-minute baths were performed, with intervals of preprogrammed electrical stimulation using a pacemaker of 50 stimuli/min. In group II, propafenone, at the concentration of 9.8 microgram/mL, was added to the bath in period 2 and withdrawn in period 4. In group I, no significant depression in muscle contraction occurred up to period 5 (p>0.05). In group II, a significant depression occurred in all periods, except between the last 2 periods (p<0.05). Comparing groups I and II only in period 1, which was a standard period for both groups, we found no significant difference (p>0.05). Propafenone had a depressing effect on the contractile function of latissimus dorsi muscle isolated from rats and studied in an organ chamber.

  15. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion.

  16. Increases of Chamber Height and Base Diameter Have Contrasting Effects on Grazing Rate of Two Cladoceran Species: Implications for Microcosm Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying; Zhang, Yunshu; Peng, Yan; Zhao, Qinghua; Sun, Shucun

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic microcosm studies often increase either chamber height or base diameter (to increase water volume) to test spatial ecology theories such as “scale” effects on ecological processes, but it is unclear whether the increase of chamber height or base diameter have the same effect on the processes, i.e., whether the effect of the shape of three-dimensional spaces is significant. We orthogonally manipulated chamber height and base diameter and determined swimming activity, average swimming velocity and grazing rates of the cladocerans Daphnia magna and Moina micrura (on two algae Scenedesmus quadricauda and Chlorella vulgaris; leading to four aquatic algae-cladoceran systems in total) under different microcosm conditions. Across all the four aquatic systems, increasing chamber height at a given base diameter significantly decreased the duration and velocity of horizontal swimming, and it tended to increase the duration but decrease the velocity of vertical swimming. These collectively led to decreases in both average swimming velocity and grazing rate of the cladocerans in the tall chambers (at a given base diameter), in accordance with the positive relationship between average swimming velocity and grazing rate. In contrast, an increase of base diameter at a given chamber height showed contrasting effects on the above parameters. Consistently, at a given chamber volume increasing ratio of chamber height to base diameter decreased the average swimming velocity and grazing rate across all the aquatic systems. In general, increasing chamber depth and base diameter may exert contrasting effects on zooplankton behavior and thus phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions. We suggest that spatial shape plays an important role in determining ecological process and thus should be considered in a theoretical framework of spatial ecology and also the physical setting of aquatic microcosm experiments. PMID:26273836

  17. Effect of shell drilling stiffness on response calculations of rectangular plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section under compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Jhana; Hales, Jason Dean; Corona, Edmundo

    2010-05-01

    This report considers the calculation of the quasi-static nonlinear response of rectangular flat plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section subjected to compressive loads using quadrilateralshell finite element models. The principal objective is to assess the effect that the shell drilling stiffness parameter has on the calculated results. The calculated collapse load of elastic-plastic tubes of rectangular cross-section is of particular interest here. The drilling stiffness factor specifies the amount of artificial stiffness that is given to the shell element drilling Degree of freedom (rotation normal to the plane of the element). The element formulation has no stiffness for this degree of freedom, and this can lead to numerical difficulties. The results indicate that in the problems considered it is necessary to add a small amount of drilling tiffness to obtain converged results when using both implicit quasi-statics or explicit dynamics methods. The report concludes with a parametric study of the imperfection sensitivity of the calculated responses of the elastic-plastic tubes with rectangular cross-section.

  18. The Resistive Plate Chambers of the ATLAS experiment:. performance studies on Calibration Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaferro, Luca

    2012-08-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the four experiments installed on the hadron-hadron collider LHC at CERN. It is a general purpose experiment, with a physics program which spans from the search for the Higgs Boson to the search of physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). An integrated luminosity of about 5 fb-1 is expected to be reached by the end of 2011. The Resistive Plate Chambers, installed in the barrel region, are used to provide the first muon level trigger, and cover an area of 16000 m2, readout by about 350000 electronic channels. To ensure optimal trigger performance, the RPC operational parameters like cluster size, efficiency and spatial resolution are constantly monitored. In order to achieve the desired precision, the data used for the analysis are extracted directly from the second level of the trigger, hence assuring very high statistics. This dedicated event stream, called Calibration Stream, is sent automatically to the RPC Calibration Center in Naples. Here the analysis is performed using an automatic tool tightly integrated in the ATLAS GRID environment, the Local Calibration Data Splitter (LCDS), which configures and manages all the operations required by the analysis (e.g. software environment initialization, grid jobs configuration and submission, data saving and retrieval, etc). The monitored RPC operational parameters, the performance analysis and the LCDS will be presented.

  19. Biologically and Acoustically Compatible Chamber for Studying Ultrasound-Mediated Delivery of Therapeutic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Carugo, Dario; Owen, Joshua; Crake, Calum; Lee, Jeong Yu; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound (US), in combination with microbubbles, has been found to be a potential alternative to viral therapies for transfecting biological cells. The translation of this technique to the clinical environment, however, requires robust and systematic optimization of the acoustic parameters needed to achieve a desired therapeutic effect. Currently, a variety of different devices have been developed to transfect cells in vitro, resulting in a lack of standardized experimental conditions and difficulty in comparing results from different laboratories. To overcome this limitation, we propose an easy-to-fabricate and cost-effective device for application in US-mediated delivery of therapeutic compounds. It comprises a commercially available cell culture dish coupled with a silicon-based "lid" developed in-house that enables the device to be immersed in a water bath for US exposure. Described here are the design of the device, characterization of the sound field and fluid dynamics inside the chamber and an example protocol for a therapeutic delivery experiment.

  20. Full System Model of Magnetron Sputter Chamber - Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C; Gilmer, G; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Wemhoff, A; Barbee, T

    2007-05-04

    The lack of detailed knowledge of internal process conditions remains a key challenge in magnetron sputtering, both for chamber design and for process development. Fundamental information such as the pressure and temperature distribution of the sputter gas, and the energies and arrival angles of the sputtered atoms and other energetic species is often missing, or is only estimated from general formulas. However, open-source or low-cost tools are available for modeling most steps of the sputter process, which can give more accurate and complete data than textbook estimates, using only desktop computations. To get a better understanding of magnetron sputtering, we have collected existing models for the 5 major process steps: the input and distribution of the neutral background gas using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), dynamics of the plasma using Particle In Cell-Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC), impact of ions on the target using molecular dynamics (MD), transport of sputtered atoms to the substrate using DSMC, and growth of the film using hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and MD methods. Models have been tested against experimental measurements. For example, gas rarefaction as observed by Rossnagel and others has been reproduced, and it is associated with a local pressure increase of {approx}50% which may strongly influence film properties such as stress. Results on energies and arrival angles of sputtered atoms and reflected gas neutrals are applied to the Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of film growth. Model results and applications to growth of dense Cu and Be films are presented.

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Differences in aerosolization of Rift Valley fever virus resulting from choice of inhalation exposure chamber: implications for animal challenge studies

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Laura M.; Powell, Diana S.; Caroline, Amy L.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aerosol characteristics of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) were evaluated to achieve reproducible infection of experimental animals with aerosolized RVFV suitable for animal efficacy studies. Spray factor (SF), the ratio between the concentrations of the aerosolized agent to the agent in the aerosol generator, is used to compare performance differences between aerosol exposures. SF indicates the efficiency of the aerosolization process; a higher SF means a lower nebulizer concentration is needed to achieve a desired inhaled dose. Relative humidity levels as well as the duration of the exposure and choice of exposure chamber all impacted RVFV SF. Differences were also noted between actual and predicted minute volumes for different species of nonhuman primates. While NHP from Old World species (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops) generally had a lower actual minute volume than predicted, the actual minute volume for marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) was higher than predicted (150% for marmosets compared with an average of 35% for all other species examined). All of these factors (relative humidity, chamber, duration, and minute volume) impact the ability to reliably and reproducibly deliver a specific dose of aerosolized RVFV. The implications of these findings for future pivotal efficacy studies are discussed. PMID:24532259

  3. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber. Task 13: Subscale helium ingestion and two dimensional heating test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Descriptions are given of the test hardware, facility, procedures, and results of electrically heated tube, channel and panel tests conducted to determine effects of helium ingestion, two dimensional conduction, and plugged coolant channels on operating limits of convectively cooled chambers typical of space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine designs. Helium ingestion in froth form, was studied in tubular and rectangular single channel test sections. Plugged channel simulation was investigated in a three channel panel. Burn-out limits (transition of film boiling) were studied in both single channel and panel test sections to determine 2-D conduction effects as compared to tubular test results.

  4. Partial rectangular metric spaces and fixed point theorems.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satish

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of partial rectangular metric spaces as a generalization of rectangular metric and partial metric spaces. Some properties of partial rectangular metric spaces and some fixed point results for quasitype contraction in partial rectangular metric spaces are proved. Some examples are given to illustrate the observed results.

  5. Design and assembly of an experimental laboratory for the study of atmosphere-plant interactions in the system of fumigation chambers.

    PubMed

    Souza, S R; Pagliuso, J D

    2009-11-01

    An experimental laboratory was designed and assembled at the Botanical Institute of São Paulo, Brazil, in order to research atmosphere-plant interactions through the use of a system of fumigation chambers. A system of three "closed" fumigation chambers was designed to be used inside or outside the laboratory. The system was built to be used with a single pollutant or a mix of them. The innovation in this system is to allow chemical reactions inside the chambers that simulate atmospheric chemistry, especially photochemical processes involving high levels of ozone. Assessment of the performance and applicability of the system was based on the response of Nicotiana tabacum Bel W3 exposed to ozone produced alternatively by a generator and inside the chamber by reactions of its precursors. The results showed that the system can be well applied to the study of atmospheric chemistry interactions and the effects on plants.

  6. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  7. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  8. Atmospheric fate of hymexazol (5-methylisoxazol-3-ol): Simulation chamber studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Teresa; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Vázquez, Mónica; Borrás, Esther; Marqués, Maria; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Treacy, Jack; Sidebottom, Howard

    2011-07-01

    The gas-phase degradation of hymexazol (5-methylisoxazol-3-ol), a widely used fungicide, was investigated under atmospheric conditions at the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain, a large outdoor simulation chamber. The rate coefficient for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with hymexazol was measured using a conventional relative rate technique. A value of the rate coefficient for the reaction of OH radicals with hymexazol, kOH(hymexazol) = (4.9 ± 0.4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was determined at 300 ± 5 K and atmospheric pressure. Rate coefficient data for the reaction of OH radicals with isoxazole, the unsubstituted analogue of hymexazol, was also obtained using the relative rate method, kOH (isoxazole) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1. The rate coefficients for photolysis of hymexazol, J(hymexazol) < 5 × 10 -6 s -1, and reaction of ozone with hymexazol, k (hymexazol) = (3.2 ± 0.6) × 10 -19 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, under atmospheric conditions were also determined. The results showed that removal of hymexazol from the atmosphere by photolysis or by reaction with ozone is slow compared to loss by reaction with OH radicals. The available kinetic data suggest that the gas-phase tropospheric degradation of hymexazol will be mainly controlled by reaction with OH and possibly NO 3 radicals. The data provide the basis of an estimate for the tropospheric lifetime of approximately 1 day. The atmospheric implications of the use of hymexazol as a fungicide are discussed.

  9. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  10. Knudsen cell and smog chamber study of the heterogeneous uptake of sulfur dioxide on Chinese mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Weigang; Gai, Yanbo; Ge, Maofa

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous uptake processes of sulfur dioxide on two types of Chinese mineral dust (Inner Mongolia desert dust and Xinjiang sierozem) were investigated using both Knudsen cell and smog chamber system. The temperature dependence of the uptake coefficients was studied over a range from 253 to 313 K using the Knudsen cell reactor, the initial uptake coefficients decreased with the increasing of temperature for these two mineral dust samples, whereas the steady state uptake coefficients of the Xinjiang sierozem increased with the temperature increasing, and these temperature dependence functions were obtained for the first time. In the smog chamber experiments at room temperature, the steady state uptake coefficients of SO2 decreased evidently with the increasing of sulfur dioxide initial concentration from 1.72 × 10¹² to 6.15 × 10¹² mol/cm³. Humid air had effect on the steady state uptake coefficients of SO₂onto Inner Mongolia desert dust. Consequences about the understanding of the uptake processes onto mineral dust samples and the environmental implication were also discussed.

  11. Chambered cuticle, pellicles, strange sensilla, and extraordinary muscle arrangements: a study of the micropterigid larval trunk (Lepidoptera: Micropterigidae).

    PubMed

    Dupont, Steen T K

    2014-07-01

    The larvsal trunk wall of Sabatinca chalcophanes (Meyrick, 1885), representing the "sabatincoid morphotype," is described (brightfield and polarization microscopies, scanning and transmission electron microscopies). Eight sensillum types are identified, including four previously undescribed subventral and ventral kinds. The cuticle is nonsolid, the exocuticle being chambered in a honeycomb-like fashion with chamber walls apparently secreted along epidermal cells boundaries. The chamber contents open to the exterior via minute pores in the chamber roofs. A space between endo and exocuticle communicates with the chamber interiors via pores in the chamber floors; the dense endocuticular surface in places form thickened domes. On the lower trunk region, lateral chamber walls are highly porous (lattice like), hence their contents are continuous; individual chamber roofs here are markedly convex, and the external trunk surface, therefore, papillate. The trunk surface is more or less completely covered by a pellicle, likely formed by exudates from the exocuticular chambers. Unusually for Lepidoptera all trunk muscles are slender strands covering a modest proportion of the inner trunk surface. Conspicuous insertion "nodes" are located at lateral and ventral segmental boundaries, ventromedially near segmental midlengths, and paramedially on the dorsum behind segmental midlengths. Overall similar cuticular specializations are also present in the distantly related Micropterix, strongly supporting micropterigid monophyly.

  12. The effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in high-energy radiotherapy photon beams—an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2012-07-01

    The present investigation is a continuation of a previous study on the effect of the diameter of the air cavity in cylindrical ionization chambers on perturbation correction factors. Measurements were made using high-energy radiotherapy photon beams (4, 6 and 15 MV) in a water phantom. Two different pairs of cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical materials and construction but different air cavity diameters. The same methods were employed as in our previous investigation. The diameter of the air cavity in cylindrical ionization chambers influences the mass ionization (the measured ionization expressed per unit mass of air in the chamber air cavity) at the depth where the maximum ionization is observed and a normalization at this depth is therefore not correct. The corrections obtained at depths of 50 and 100 mm in the phantom showed that the air cavity diameter in cylindrical ionization chambers has a greater effect on the perturbation effects than the photon beam quality. The corrections found at depths of 50 and 100 mm are smaller than those currently used in dosimetry protocols.

  13. An instrument employing electronic counters and an emulsion chamber for studying heavy cosmic ray interactions (JACEE-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Selig, W. J.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Iwai, J.; Lord, J. J.; Strauscz, S.; Wilkes, R. J.; hide

    1983-01-01

    A JACEE-3 instrument was flown on a balloon in June 1982 for 6.1 sq m sr hr exposure at an average atmospheric depth of 5 gm/sq cm in order to study the cosmic ray spectra, composition, and interactions above 1 TeV. The nucleus-nucleus interactions were studied above 20 GeV/amu from z = 6 to z = 26. The electronic counters contained gas Cerenkov structures with a 1.0-cm thick lead glass and a 1.27-cm thick Teflon radiator. A comparison to the instrument prototype is made. Based on the electronic counter event data, the finding efficiency of the hodoscope is noted to be near 100 percent for z greater than or equal to 22. A comparison is made between the hodoscope-predicted position and track found at P3 in an emulsion chamber.

  14. AEROSOL GROWTH IN A STEADY-STATE, CONTINUOUS FLOW CHAMBER: APPLICATION TO STUDIES OF SECONDARY AEROSOL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical solution for the steady-state aerosol size distribution achieved in a steady-state, continuous flow chamber is derived, where particle growth is occurring by gas-to-particle conversion and particle loss is occurring by deposition to the walls of the chamber. The s...

  15. AEROSOL GROWTH IN A STEADY-STATE, CONTINUOUS FLOW CHAMBER: APPLICATION TO STUDIES OF SECONDARY AEROSOL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical solution for the steady-state aerosol size distribution achieved in a steady-state, continuous flow chamber is derived, where particle growth is occurring by gas-to-particle conversion and particle loss is occurring by deposition to the walls of the chamber. The s...

  16. Improved Bakeout Chambers Within Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Taylor, Daniel M.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.; Anderson, Mark R.

    1995-01-01

    Improved bakeout chamber incorporates hardware features that, in conjunction with improved bakeout procedure, reduce spurious contamination and increase accuracy of contamination measurements. When operated according to revised bakeout procedure, they yield measurements of contamination on vacuum-bake test articles more accurate than available previously, and potential for post-bake recontamination of vacuum-baked articles reduced. These chambers improved versions of one described in "Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber" (NPO-18959). By enclosing test article in enclave and keeping walls of enclave hotter than test article during bakeout, one prevents condensation of contaminants on inner walls of enclave.

  17. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  18. Analysis of a cylindrical-rectangular microstrip structure with an airgap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kin-Lu; Cheng, Yuan-Tung; Row, Jeen-Sheen

    1994-06-01

    The resonance problem of the cylindrical-rectangular microstrip structure with an airgap between the substrate layer and the ground conducting cylinder is studied by using a rigorous full-wave approach and a moment method calculation.

  19. Shock Train/Boundary-Layer Interaction in Rectangular Scramjet Isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Jonathan Simon

    Numerous studies of the dual-mode scramjet isolator, a critical component in preventing inlet unstart and/or vehicle loss by containing a collection of flow disturbances called a shock train, have been performed since the dual-mode propulsion cycle was introduced in the 1960s. Low momentum corner flow and other three-dimensional effects inherent to rectangular isolators have, however, been largely ignored in experimental studies of the boundary layer separation driven isolator shock train dynamics. Furthermore, the use of two dimensional diagnostic techniques in past works, be it single-perspective line-of-sight schlieren/shadowgraphy or single axis wall pressure measurements, have been unable to resolve the three-dimensional flow features inside the rectangular isolator. These flow characteristics need to be thoroughly understood if robust dual-mode scramjet designs are to be fielded. The work presented in this thesis is focused on experimentally analyzing shock train/boundary layer interactions from multiple perspectives in aspect ratio 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 rectangular isolators with inflow Mach numbers ranging from 2.4 to 2.7. Secondary steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics studies are performed to compare to the experimental results and to provide additional perspectives of the flow field. Specific issues that remain unresolved after decades of isolator shock train studies that are addressed in this work include the three-dimensional formation of the isolator shock train front, the spatial and temporal low momentum corner flow separation scales, the transient behavior of shock train/boundary layer interaction at specific coordinates along the isolator's lateral axis, and effects of the rectangular geometry on semi-empirical relations for shock train length prediction. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  20. Freeform LED lens for rectangularly prescribed illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Fei; Qin, Zong; Liu, Zongyuan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2009-10-01

    Freeform lenses are playing a more and more important role in LED secondary optics design. In this study, based on the new light energy mapping relationship, edge ray principle, Snell's law and error control of surface construction, a modified discontinuous freeform lens design method was presented for rectangularly prescribed illumination, with the advantages of a flexible energy mapping relationship, accurate light irradiation control and easier to manufacture. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) discontinuous freeform lens was designed as an example for LED tunnel illumination according to this method. The numerical simulation results demonstrated that the light pattern of the lens was in good agreement with the expected illumination performance when using a point source. Tolerance analyses were also conducted. An extended light source had little effect on the light output efficiency (LOE) of the lens but significantly decreased the effective illumination area. Installation errors had more effect on the uniformity and shape of the light pattern than the LOE of the lens. The tolerances of vertical, horizontal and rotational deviation of this lens were 0.4 mm, 0.4 mm and 2°, respectively.

  1. Study of particle correlations in high energy S + Pb and Pb + Pb interactions with a magnetic-interferometric-emulsion-chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1991-04-01

    Exploratory investigations were made in 1986 with 200 GeV/AMU O-16, followed by the second phase experiments with S-32 ions in 1987, and again in 1990, by using the SPS accelerator of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve, Switzerland. The UAH experimental nuclear group of the present project carries out studies on collisions of these heavy nuclei with target lead nucleus, using a newly invented instrument. This instrument, composed of emulsion films with spacer materials in a high magnetic field, provides spectroscopic details of particles produced in a collision. The instrument is called the Magnetic-Interferometric-Emulsion-Chamber, and has evolved further as a hybrid detector coupled with microstrip silicone ring counters. Within the past year a new, improved run with a 200 GeV/n sulfur beam was successfully carried out at the H3 beam line in the West Hall at CERN. The SPS Supercycle, being installed after July 1989, had caused some timing conflicts of heavy-ion run with LEP operation. Due to the very limited kicker timing allowed, kicking out the unwanted beam particles after irradiating specified number of ions at each pulse was not perfectly achieved. Consequently, kicker failures frequently occurred for about 40 percent of the run. Nevertheless, the EMU05 provided a sufficiently large number of chambers to save the experiments from overdose damage. The EMU05 run used improved MAGIC detector, which gives a momentum resolution to 5.2 percent, while previous detectors were limited to 14 percent accuracy.

  2. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control over the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.

  3. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; ...

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Equation On a 2D Rectangular Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzidi, MHamed; DHumieres, Dominique; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We construct a multi-relaxation lattice Boltzmann model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The model is partly inspired by a previous work of Koelman to construct a lattice BGK model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The linearized dispersion equation is analyzed to obtain the constraints on the isotropy of the transport coefficients and Galilean invariance for various wave propagations in the model. The linear stability of the model is also studied. The model is numerically tested for three cases: (a) a vortex moving with a constant velocity on a mesh periodic boundary conditions; (b) Poiseuille flow with an arbitrasy inclined angle with respect to the lattice orientation: and (c) a cylinder &symmetrically placed in a channel. The numerical results of these tests are compared with either analytic solutions or the results obtained by other methods. Satisfactory results are obtained for the numerical simulations.

  5. IR photodetector based on rectangular quantum wire in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Nandan

    2014-04-24

    In this paper we study rectangular quantum wire based IR detector with magnetic field applied along the wires. The energy spectrum of a particle in rectangular box shows level repulsions and crossings when external magnetic field is applied. Due to this complex level dynamics, we can tune the spacing between any two levels by varying the magnetic field. This method allows user to change the detector parameters according to his/her requirements. In this paper, we numerically calculate the energy sub-band levels of the square quantum wire in constant magnetic field along the wire and quantify the possible operating wavelength range that can be obtained by varying the magnetic field. We also calculate the photon absorption probability at different magnetic fields and give the efficiency for different wavelengths if the transition is assumed between two lowest levels.

  6. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Chambers, D. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Britten, J. A.; Shore, B. W.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The application of specialized rectangular relief transmission gratings to coherent lidar beam scanning is presented. Two types of surface relief transmission grating approaches are studied with an eye toward potential insertion of a constant thickness, diffractive scanner where refractive wedges now exist. The first diffractive approach uses vertically oriented relief structure in the surface of an optical flat; illumination of the diffractive scanner is off-normal in nature. The second grating design case describes rectangular relief structure slanted at a prescribed angle with respect to the surface. In this case, illumination is normal to the diffractive scanner. In both cases, performance predictions for 2.0 micron, circularly polarized light at beam deflection angles of 30 or 45 degrees are presented.

  7. Topology optimization design of space rectangular mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yanjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Bei; Li, Xupeng

    2016-10-01

    A conceptual lightweight rectangular mirror is designed based on the theory of topology optimization and the specific structure size is determined through sensitivity analysis and size optimization in this paper. Under the load condition of gravity along the optical axis, compared with the mirrors designed by traditional method using finite element analysis method, the performance of the topology optimization reflectors supported by peripheral six points are superior in lightweight ratio, structure stiffness and the reflective surface accuracy. This suggests that the lightweight method in this paper is effective and has potential value for the design of rectangular reflector.

  8. The anterior chamber of the eye as a clinical transplantation site for the treatment of diabetes: a study in a baboon model of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Perez, V. L.; Caicedo, A.; Berman, D. M.; Arrieta, E.; Abdulreda, M. H.; Rodriguez-Diaz, R.; Pileggi, A.; Hernandez, E.; Dubovy, S. R.; Parel, J. M.; Ricordi, C.; Kenyon, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of this study was to provide evidence that the anterior chamber of the eye serves as a novel clinical islet implantation site. Methods In a preclinical model, allogeneic pancreatic islets were transplanted into the anterior chamber of the eye of a baboon model for diabetes, and metabolic and ophthalmological outcomes were assessed. Results Islets readily engrafted on the iris and there was a decrease in exogenous insulin requirements due to insulin secretion from the intraocular grafts. No major adverse effects on eye structure and function could be observed during the transplantation period. Conclusions/interpretation Our study demonstrates the long-term survival and function of allogeneic islets after transplantation into the anterior chamber of the eye. The safety and simplicity of this procedure provides support for further studies aimed at translating this technology into the clinic. PMID:21360190

  9. Böhm extrapolation chamber: Study of its behavior in beta radiation fields at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) is going to establish a Böhm extrapolation chamber as a primary standard system for the dosimetry and calibration of beta radiation sources and detectors. This chamber was already tested in beta radiation beams with an aluminized Mylar entrance window, and now, it was characterized with an original Hostaphan entrance window. A comparison between the results of the extrapolation chamber with the two entrance windows was performed. The results showed that this extrapolation chamber presents the same effectiveness in beta radiation fields as a primary standard system with both entrance windows, showing that any one of them may be utilized.

  10. Spectrum analysis of rectangular pulse in the atmospheric turbulence propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Ni, Xiaolong; Jiang, Huilin; Wang, Junran; Liu, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric turbulence has a great influence on the performance of the atmospheric laser communication system reducing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and increasing the bit error rate (BER). However, there is rarely study on the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the power spectrum of the rectangular pulse. In this paper, a spectral analyzing method is used to analyze the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the signal. An experiment of laser beam propagation characteristic is carried out on a 6km horizontal atmospheric link, the wavelength is 808 nm. The signal is 100MHz rectangular pulse. The waveform of the rectangular pulse is collected by the oscilloscope, and the power spectral density of the signal is calculated and analyzed by the method of periodogram. Experimental results show that the response and noise characteristics of the laser and photoelectric detector have a great influence on the signal power spectrum distribution which can increase the noise component in the 10^6 Hz frequency range. After the atmospheric turbulence propagation, the signal power decreases in the whole frequency range. However, as the existence of atmospheric turbulence, the signal power increases in the atmospheric turbulence characteristic frequency (tens to hundreds of Hz). The noise power increases in the high frequency range (10^7 10^8 Hz).

  11. Melting Process of Clathrate in a Rectangular Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Takashi; Okada, Masashi; Matsumoto, Koji

    In order to clarify the mechanism of heat transfer during melting of a clathrate in rectangular cells, two melting processes, namely, two-dimensional melting process with natural convection from a vertical wall and one-dimensional melting process by heat conduction from an upper horizontal wall, are studied experimentally. The R-141b was used for generating clathrate. One experiment was carried out by melting the clathrate filled into a 150mm high and 100mm wide rectangular cell from a vertical wall. And in the other experiment, the clathrate was melted from the upper horizontal wall of a rectangular cell with 88mm height and 180mm width. The temperature distributions in cells were measured. The melting front was measured by pictures taken on fixed times. The concentration of freon in the melt was measured by gas-chromatography. The following results are obtained. (1) In the melting process, the clathrate decomposes into an emulsion region which is a water-freon mixture and a liquid freon region under the emulsion. (2) Concentration gradient of freon in the emulsion plyas an important role in the natural convection in the melt. The Nusselt number on the heated vertical wall is depressed by the concentration gradients.

  12. Simulation of wavefront reconstruction in beam reshaping system for rectangular laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Wenguang; Jiang, Zongfu

    2014-05-01

    A new method to calculating the wavefront of slap laser is studied in this paper. The method is based on the ray trace theory of geometrical optics. By using the Zemax simulation software and Matlab calculation software, the wavefront of rectangular beam in beam reshaping system is reconstructed. Firstly, with the x- and y-slope measurement of reshaping beam the direction cosine of wavefront can be calculated. Then, the inverse beam path of beam reshaping system is built by using Zemax simulation software and the direction cosine of rectangular beam can be given, too. Finally, Southwell zonal model is used to reconstruct the wavefront of rectangular beam in computer simulation. Once the wavefront is received, the aberration of laser can be eliminated by using the proper configuration of beam reshaping system. It is shown that this method to reconstruct the wavefront of rectangular beam can evidently reduce the negative influence of additional aberration induced by beam reshaping system.

  13. Is acute mountain sickness related to trait anxiety? A normobaric chamber study.

    PubMed

    Niedermeier, Martin; Waanders, Robb; Menz, Verena; Wille, Maria; Kopp, Martin; Burtscher, Martin

    2017-03-15

    Some mountaineers are more prone to the occurrence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) than others. State anxiety during altitude exposure might be associated with AMS development. We hypothesized that trait anxiety might be higher in AMS cases compared to non-AMS cases. The aim of the present study was to study the relationship between AMS development and trait anxiety. In an observational study design, AMS incidence during a 12-hour exposure to normobaric hypoxia (FiO2=12.6%, equivalent to 4500m) was determined by the Lake Louise Scoring System. Trait anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory) and confounding variables were assessed in a follow-up questionnaire (37months after hypoxic exposure). Twenty nine participants returned the follow-up questionnaire. AMS incidence was 38%. Both unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analyses did not reveal trait anxiety as a significant variable in relation to AMS. Based on the findings of this preliminary study, there is no evidence that AMS development under normobaric conditions is related to trait anxiety. Differences to previous studies might be explained by the type of hypoxia, by different sample characteristics and by considering sleep disturbances in the calculation of the AMS score. However, future studies with larger sample sizes may help to clear the relationship between AMS development and the personality factor anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acoustic force measurement in a dual-temperature resonant chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robey, Judith L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1987-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force was measured for a dual-temperature resonant chamber. This rectangular chamber has its long dimension approximately 8.5 times the square cross-sectional dimension, and the opposite ends are at widely different temperatures. Force profiles were obtained for two hot end temperatures of 520 C and 760 C, while the cool end remained at approximately room temperature. Force magnitudes as high as 17 dyn for a sample 1.2 cm in diameter at 760 C and at 162-dB input level were measured.

  15. Transverse instability of a rectangular bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    Transverse instability of a rectangular bunch is investigated. Known theory of bunched beam instability is modified to take into account 100% spread of synchrotron frequency. Series of equations adequately describing the instability is derived and solved analytically and numerically. The theory is applied to the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  16. Comparing the Volumes of Rectangular Prisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assuah, Charles K.; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2010-01-01

    Can middle-grades students determine which of two rectangular prisms has a larger volume? Can they do so without using a formula? Geometry, and particularly the concept of volume, is important in many subjects, such as physics and chemistry. Students greatly enhance their mathematics knowledge when they make generalizations and construct arguments…

  17. Comparing the Volumes of Rectangular Prisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assuah, Charles K.; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2010-01-01

    Can middle-grades students determine which of two rectangular prisms has a larger volume? Can they do so without using a formula? Geometry, and particularly the concept of volume, is important in many subjects, such as physics and chemistry. Students greatly enhance their mathematics knowledge when they make generalizations and construct arguments…

  18. Normal-Pressure Tests of Rectangular Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramberg, Walter; Mcpherson, Albert E; Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of normal-pressure tests made of 56 rectangular plates with clamped edges and of 5 plates with freely supported edges. Pressure was applied and the center deflection and the permanent set at the center were measured. For some of the plates, in addition, strains and contours were measured.

  19. Ducted combustion chamber for direct injection engines and method

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Charles

    2015-03-03

    An internal combustion engine includes an engine block having a cylinder bore and a cylinder head having a flame deck surface disposed at one end of the cylinder bore. A piston connected to a rotatable crankshaft and configured to reciprocate within the cylinder bore has a piston crown portion facing the flame deck surface such that a combustion chamber is defined within the cylinder bore and between the piston crown and the flame deck surface. A fuel injector having a nozzle tip disposed in fluid communication with the combustion chamber has at least one nozzle opening configured to inject a fuel jet into the combustion chamber along a fuel jet centerline. At least one duct defined in the combustion chamber between the piston crown and the flame deck surface has a generally rectangular cross section and extends in a radial direction relative to the cylinder bore substantially along the fuel jet centerline.

  20. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  1. [Studies on the lymph drainage of the eye. 2. Drainage of lymph-dependent radioactive substances from the anterior chamber. (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grüntzig, J; Schicha, H; Becker, V; Kiem, J; Feinendegen, L E

    1977-10-01

    In order to study lymph drainage from the eye colloid solutions (198Au-colloid and 99mTc-sulfur-colloid) were injected into the right anterior chamber of the eye in 12 rabbits. The distribution of the radioactivity was measured in vivo with an Anger-type camera and in vitro with a sodium iodine crystal well-counter after dissection. The drainage of radioactivity from the anterior chamber had an average half-life of 36 min. The drained activity could be found mainly in blood, liver, kidney, and bone tissue. Moreover, a concentration of radioactivity significantly surpassing the concentration in blood was measured in the right retrobulbar space in 75% of the cases and in the cervical lymph nodes in 50% of the cases. These findings substantiate a communication between the anterior chamber of the eye and the retrobulbar space in the form of a lymphatic or a prelymphatic-lymphatic flow.

  2. Comparative study of IQ-ultra and Finn Chambers test methodologies in detecting 10 common standard allergens that cause allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Doumit, Joseph; Pratt, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Patch testing is routinely used in contact dermatitis clinics because it is the gold standard for the evaluation of potential allergic contact dermatitis. The study was undertaken to evaluate possible differences in reactivity between the Finn Chamber and IQ-Ultra patch-testing methodologies. Patients were patch-tested simultaneously with the Finn Chamber and IQ-Ultra patch tests. Ten standard allergens set by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group were used for both techniques. Both patch tests had a significant agreement in detecting all of the allergens. An "almost perfect agreement" was noted for ethylenediamine dihydrochloride, quaternium-15, mercapto mix, black rubber mix, balsam of Peru, and nickel sulfate; "substantial agreement" for formaldehyde, bisphenol A epoxy resin, and 4-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin; and "moderate agreement" for potassium dichromate. The Finn Chamber and IQ-Ultra patch tests had a good agreement in the detection of the 10 standard allergens that were tested.

  3. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  4. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  5. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chambers of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  6. Study on the influence of the B4C layer thickness on the neutron flux and energy distribution shape in multi-electrode ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tymińska, K; Maciak, M; Ośko, J; Tulik, P; Zielczyński, M; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A model of a multi-electrode ionisation chamber, with polypropylene electrodes coated with a thin layer of B4C was created within Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) and Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) codes. The influence of the layer thickness on neutron absorption in B4C and on the neutron spectra in the consecutive intra-electrode gas volumes has been studied using the MCNPX and FLUKA codes. The results will be used for designing the new type of the ionisation chamber.

  7. Changes in pulmonary function in hyperbaric chamber inside attendants: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Adem; Uzun, Gunalp; Turker, Turker; Turker, Turker; Ucar, Ergun; Yildiz, Senol

    2016-01-01

    Inside attendants (IAs) [are] exposed to high pressure during hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations of pulmonary functions in IAs over time. IAs in our hyperbaric center constituted the IA group (n=11). A sex- and age-matched control group (n=15) was constituted from hospital staff who had not dived or been exposed to hyperbaric environments before. We measured the respiratory function of all subjects at two time points: 1) at the start of the study; and 2) 12 months after the first measurement. The following parameters were recorded: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), rate of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1/FVC%), forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% vital capacity (FEF25-75%), forced expiratory flow at 50% vital capacity (FEF50%), forced expiratory flow at 25% vital capacity (FEF25%). Both groups were similar in terms of age, sex, smoking and body mass index. We found that FEV1, FEV1/FVC%, FEF25-75% and FEF50% significantly reduced in both groups after 12 months (p⟨0.05). However, the rate of change in all parameters was similar in both groups (p⟩0.05). In the IA group, the total number of exposures within the 12 months was positively correlated with the rate of reduction in FEF25% (r=0.788, p=0.004). Working as an IA does not deteriorate pulmonary function in the short term. However, there is a need for long-term follow-up studies.

  8. Simulation study on ablation and evacuation of liquid metal in laser fusion reaction chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabetani, Masato; Yamamoto, Keiji; Nagatomo, Hideo; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Johzaki, T.; Kozaki, Yasuji

    2000-01-01

    Using the theories of photon count statistic and test data of the ultraweak photon emission from biological system, the biophoton field's spectra distribution properties were studied in this paper. An experimental setup for testing UPE in different spectral region were designed. The test data proved UPE of living biological system exists in wide spectra region from UV-visible to IR. Using the test data, we can obtain important conclusions that is UPE almost has nothing to do with wavelength. The conclusion has important significance for proving the bio-photon coherence. In the end of this paper, the medical applications of UPE in 21st century were discussed simply.

  9. Characterization of indoor sources of fine and ultrafine particles: a study conducted in a full-scale chamber.

    PubMed

    Afshari, A; Matson, U; Ekberg, L E

    2005-04-01

    Humans and their activities are known to generate considerable amounts of particulate matter indoors. Some of the activities are cooking, smoking and cleaning. In this study 13 different particle sources were for the first time examined in a 32 m3 full-scale chamber with an air change rate of 1.7 +/- 0.1/h. Two different instruments, a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an optical particle counter (OPC) were used to quantitatively determine ultrafine and fine particle emissions, respectively. The CPC measures particles from 0.02 microm to larger than 1.0 microm. The OPC was adjusted to measure particle concentrations in eight fractions between 0.3 and 1.0 microm. The sources were cigarette side-stream smoke, pure wax candles, scented candles, a vacuum cleaner, an air-freshener spray, a flat iron (with and without steam) on a cotton sheet, electric radiators, an electric stove, a gas stove, and frying meat. The cigarette burning, frying meat, air freshener spray and gas stove showed a particle size distribution that changed over time towards larger particles. In most of the experiments the maximum concentration was reached within a few minutes. Typically, the increase of the particle concentration immediately after activation of the source was more rapid than the decay of the concentration observed after deactivation of the source. The highest observed concentration of ultrafine particles was approximately 241,000 particles/cm3 and originated from the combustion of pure wax candles. The weakest generation of ultrafine particles (1.17 x 10(7) particles per second) was observed when ironing without steam on a cotton sheet, which resulted in a concentration of 550 particles/cm3 in the chamber air. The highest generation rate (1.47 x 10(10) particles per second) was observed in the radiator test. Humans and their activities are known to generate substantial amounts of particulate matter indoors and potentially they can have a strong influence on short-term exposure

  10. Fog chamber studies of soot-catalyzed SO/sub 2/ oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W.H.; Brodzinsky, R.; Novakov, T.

    1980-11-01

    The oxidation of SO/sub 2/ by wet soot particles has been suggested as an important reaction pathway for the production of particulate sulfate in the ambient atmosphere. We studied this reaction in two systems. The first consisted of a flask-type reaction study. H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ (diluted final concentration between 7 x 10/sup -8/ M and 1 x 10/sup -3/ M) was added to a flask containing several hundred milliliters of a constantly stirred aqueous suspension of Nuchar-SN in which the soot particle concentration was between 0.002 and 0.32% w/v carbon. For H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ concentrations less than 10/sup -4/ M, sulfite and sulfate were determined by ion chromatography. Above 10/sup -4/ M H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/, sulfite concentration was determined by iodometric titrations while sulfate was measured turbidometrically only in selected runs. The pH of a soot suspension was controlled by the buffering capacity of the SO/sub 2/.H/sub 2/O, HSO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup =/ system.

  11. Study of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions with a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, M. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Dickerson, C.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Pardo, R. C.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Talwar, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2017-07-01

    A large number of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions are known to play a fundamental role in nuclear astrophysics. This work presents a novel technique to study these reactions with the active target system MUSIC whose segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range of the excitation function with a single beam energy. In order to verify the method, we performed direct measurements of the previously measured reactions 17O (α , n) 20Ne, 23Na (α , p) 26Mg, and 23Na (α , n) 26Al. These reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using 4He gas in the detector to study the excitation functions in the energy range of about 2-6 MeV in the center of mass. We found good agreement between the cross sections of the 17O (α , n) 20Ne reaction measured in this work and previous measurements. Furthermore we have successfully performed a simultaneous measurement of the 23Na (α , p) 26Mg and 23Na (α , n) 26Al reactions.

  12. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of Seabird Guano Fertilization: Results from Growth Chamber Studies with Maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; White, Christine D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration) in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ15N). Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and vital data for maize (Zea mays) fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of 15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ15N values ranged between −0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. Conclusions/Significance The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs). Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level marine resource, which must

  13. Experimental and numerical study of flashback in the SimVal Combustion Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Eggenspieler, G.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen addition on a lean-premixed swirl-stabilized combustor operating on natural gas and air were studied. Measurements of equivalence ratio and hydrogen concentration at flame flashback have been made at pressures ranging from 1 to 8 atmospheres, hydrogen concentration in the fuel of 60 to 100% and inlet velocities of 10, 20, 40 and 80 m/s. Increasing the hydrogen concentration in the fuel was found to significantly lower the equivalence ratio at flashback. This was believed to be the result of the much higher flame speed for hydrogen compared to methane. Increasing pressure was found to also decrease the equivalence ratio at flashback, while increasing the inlet velocity was found to increase the equivalence ratio at flashback. Two of these experiments were reproduced numerically using the FLUENTTM software. Numerical data were found to be in good agreement with experimental data at atmospheric pressure. The flashback process was investigated using the numerical data.

  14. Study of timing response and charge spectra of glass based Resistive Plate Chamber detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, A.; Kumar, A.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2017-03-01

    Resistive Plate chambers (RPCs) are robust and affordable gaseous detectors that combine low cost with excellent timing, good spatial resolution and fast response to the incoming particles. The India Based Neutrino Observatory is an approved project aimed at building a magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study Neutrino physics and related issues. The ICAL experiment will utilize about 29000 RPC's as active detector elements, sandwiched between alternate plates of thick iron. The RPC detectors will be used to detect muons produced from the atmospheric neutrinos interaction with an iron target. The spatial information of the muons will be extracted from the two dimensional readout and the hit position in the respective layers. The up going and down going directionality will be obtained using the time stamp of hits in the active detectors. The charge induced by the particle and its behaviour with respect to the applied voltage play a significant role in designing the readout electronics for the detector. In this paper, we present the timing and charge measurement of single gap glass based RPC detectors. We will also report about studies on the dependence of the timing and charge response of these RPC detectors as a function of the gas composition.

  15. Design and Fabrication of Low-Cost 1536-Chamber Microfluidic Microarrays for Mood-Disorders-Related Serological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders are common mental diseases, but physiological diagnostic methods are still lacking. Since much evidence has implied a relationship between mood disorders and the protein composition of blood sera, it is conceivable to develop a serological criterion for assisting diagnosis of mood disorders, based on a correlative database with enough capacity and high quality. In this pilot study, a low-cost microfluidic microarray device for quantifying at most 384 serological biomarkers at the same time was designed for the data acquisition of the serological study. The 1,536-chamber microfluidic device was modeled on a 1,536-well microtiter plate in order to employ a common microplate reader as the detection module for measuring the chemiluminescent immunoassay tests on the chips. The microfluidic microarrays were rapidly fabricated on polymethylmethacrylate slides using carbon dioxide laser ablation, followed by effective surface treatment processing. Sixteen types of different capture antibodies were immobilized on the chips to test the corresponding hormones and cytokines. The preliminary tests indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio and the limit of detection of microfluidic microarrays have reached the level of standard ELISA tests, whereas the operation time of microfluidic microarrays was sharply reduced. PMID:24169541

  16. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifeng Hu, Haiyan

    2014-06-21

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  17. Teleseismic studies indicate existence of deep magma chamber below Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iyer, H.M.

    1974-01-01

    The secrets of Yellowstone National Park's spectacular geysers and other hot water and steam phenomena are being explored by the U.S Geological Survey with the aid of distant earthquakes (teleseisms). For some time geologists have known that the remarkable array of steam and hot water displays, for which the park is internationally famous, is associated with intense volcanic activity that occurred in the reigon during the last 2 million years. The most recent volcanic eruption took place about 600,000 years ago creating a large caldera, or crater, 75 kilometers long and 50 kilometers wide. This caldera occupies most of the central part of the present-day park. geologists knew from studies of the surface geology that the volcanic activity which creates the present caldera was caused the present caldera was caused by a large body of magma, a mixture composed of molten rock, hot liquids, and gases, that had forced its way from the deep interior of the Earth into the upper mantle and crust below the Yellowstone area. The dimensions and depth below the surface of this magma body were largely unknown, however, because there was no way to "see" deep below the surface. A tool was needed that would enable earth scientists to look into the curst and upper mantle of the Earth. Such a tool became availabe with the installation by the Geological Survey of a network of seismograph stations in the park. 

  18. Performance study of the effective gain of the double phase liquid Argon LEM Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, C.; Epprecht, L.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Periale, L.; Murphy, S.; Natterer, G.; Regenfus, C.; Resnati, F.; Sergiampietri, F.; Rubbia, A.; Viant, T.; Wu, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Large Electron Multipliers (LEMs) are key components of double phase liquid argon TPCs. The drifting charges after being extracted from the liquid are amplified in the LEM positioned half a centimeter above the liquid in pure argon vapor at 87 K. The LEM is characterised by the size of its dielectric rim around the holes, the thickness of the LEM insulator, the diameter of the holes as well as their geometrical layout. The impact of those design parameters on the amplification were checked by testing seven different LEMs with an active area of 10×10 cm2 in a double phase liquid argon TPC of 21 cm drift. We studied their response in terms of maximal reachable gain and impact on the collected charge uniformity as well as the long-term stability of the gain. We show that we could reach maximal gains of around 150 which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of about 800 for a minimal ionising particle (MIP) signal on 3 mm readout strips. We could also conclude that the dielectric surfaces in the vicinity of the LEM holes charge up with different time constants that depend on their design parameters. Our results demonstrate that the LAr LEM TPC is a robust concept that is well-understood and well-suited for operation in ultra-pure cryogenic environments and that can match the goals of future large-scale liquid argon detectors.

  19. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism.

  20. Eigenvalues of Rectangular Waveguide Using FEM With Hybrid Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.; Hall, John M.

    2002-01-01

    A finite element analysis using hybrid triangular-rectangular elements is developed to estimate eigenvalues of a rectangular waveguide. Use of rectangular vector-edge finite elements in the vicinity of the PEC boundary and triangular elements in the interior region more accurately models the physical nature of the electromagnetic field, and consequently quicken the convergence.

  1. Feasibility study of monitoring of plasma etching chamber conditions using superimposed high-frequency signals on rf power transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasashima, Y.; Uesugi, F.

    2015-10-01

    An in situ monitoring system that can detect changes in the conditions of a plasma etching chamber has been developed. In the system, low-intensity high-frequency signals are superimposed on the rf power transmission line used for generating plasma. The system measures reflected high-frequency signals and detects the change in their frequency characteristics. The results indicate that the system detects the changes in the conditions in etching chambers caused by the changes in the electrode gap and the inner wall condition and demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. The system can easily be retrofitted to mass-production equipment and it can be used with or without plasma discharge. Therefore, our system is suitable for in situ monitoring of mass-production plasma etching chambers. The system is expected to contribute to development of predictive maintenance, which monitors films deposited on the inner wall of the chamber and prevents equipment faults caused by misalignment of chamber parts in mass-production equipment.

  2. Feasibility study of monitoring of plasma etching chamber conditions using superimposed high-frequency signals on rf power transmission line.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Y; Uesugi, F

    2015-10-01

    An in situ monitoring system that can detect changes in the conditions of a plasma etching chamber has been developed. In the system, low-intensity high-frequency signals are superimposed on the rf power transmission line used for generating plasma. The system measures reflected high-frequency signals and detects the change in their frequency characteristics. The results indicate that the system detects the changes in the conditions in etching chambers caused by the changes in the electrode gap and the inner wall condition and demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. The system can easily be retrofitted to mass-production equipment and it can be used with or without plasma discharge. Therefore, our system is suitable for in situ monitoring of mass-production plasma etching chambers. The system is expected to contribute to development of predictive maintenance, which monitors films deposited on the inner wall of the chamber and prevents equipment faults caused by misalignment of chamber parts in mass-production equipment.

  3. Simulated Altitude Performance of Combustors for the 24C Turbojet Engine. III - Performance of Rectangular-Slot Baskets. 3; Performance of Rectangular-Slot Baskets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Adelbert O.

    1948-01-01

    The performance of an annular combustion chamber from a 24C turbojet engine was investigated over a range of simulated altitudes from 20,000 to 55,000 feet and corrected engine rotor speeds from 6000 to 13,000 rpm at a simulated ram-pressure ratio of 1.04. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects on the altitude operational limits, combustor-outlet gas temperature distribution, combustion efficiencies, and combustor inlet-to-outlet total-pressure drops of two changes in the 24C-4B basket air-passage arrangements that were designed to improve combustor-outlet temperature distribution. These changes were: (a) replacement of the downstream secondary air holes with large rectangular slots further upstream (rectangular-slot basket), and (b) enlargement of anticoking holes in the rectangular-slot basket (modified rectangular-slot basket). The results indicate that improved outlet-gas temperature distribution of each succeeding combustor basket investigated was attained at a sacrifice in the altitude limit of operation. The altitude limits of operation of the combustor with the original basket ranged from 34,000 feet at a corrected engine speed of 6000 rpm to a maximum of 52,000 feet at 12 ' 500 rpm. The altitude limits of the rectangular-slot basket were about 2000 feet lower throughout the engine speed range than those of the original basket. The altitude limits of the combustor with the modified rectangular-slot basket were about equivalent to those of the other baskets in the corrected-engine-speed range from 12,000 to 12,500 rpm but were about 10,000 feet lower than those of the original basket in the corrected-engine-speed range from 6000 to 9000 rpm. For the same inlet-air conditions, the combustion efficiencies were highest for the original basket and progressively lower for each of the other two baskets. The combustor inlet-to-outlet pressure drops of all three combustor baskets at the same operating conditions were within +/- 10 percent of

  4. Mobilization and entry of DNAPL pools into finer sand media by cosolvents: two-dimensional chamber studies.

    PubMed

    Van Valkenburg, Michael E; Annable, Michael D

    2002-12-01

    Two-dimensional chamber studies were conducted to determine qualitative and quantitative performance of cosolvents targeted at pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) (perchlorethylene, PCE) residing above a fine-grain capillary barrier. Downward mobilization of DNAPL, up gradient along an overriding cosolvent front, was observed. This produced significant pooling above a fine-grain layer that in some cases lead to entry into the capillary barrier beneath. Entry pressure calculations using physical and hydrogeologic parameters provided an excellent prediction of breakthrough of DNAPL into the capillary barrier. Calculations predict approximately 0.5 m of DNAPL would be necessary to enter a Beit Netofa clay, under extreme cosolvent flooding conditions (100% ethanol). Gradient injection of cosolvent did not appear to provide any benefit suggesting a rapid decrease in interfacial tension (IFT) compared to the rate of DNAPL solubilization. Use of a partitioning alcohol (tertiary butyl alcohol, TBA) resulted in DNAPL swelling and reduced entry into the capillary barrier. However, the trapping of flushing solution, containing PCE, could potentially lead to longer remediation times.

  5. Heterogeneous uptake of ozone on reactive components of mineral dust aerosol: an environmental aerosol reaction chamber study.

    PubMed

    Mogili, Praveen K; Kleiber, Paul D; Young, Mark A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2006-12-28

    We have undertaken a kinetic study of heterogeneous ozone decomposition on alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) and alpha-Al2O3 (corundum) aerosols under ambient conditions of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity in order to better understand the role of mineral dust aerosol in ozone loss mechanisms in the atmosphere. The kinetic measurements are made in an environmental aerosol reaction chamber by use of infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopic probes. The apparent heterogeneous uptake coefficient, gamma, for ozone reaction with alpha-Fe2O3 and alpha-Al2O3 surfaces is determined as a function of relative humidity (RH). The uptake of ozone by the iron oxide surface is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that by the aluminum oxide sample, under dry conditions. At the pressures used, alpha-Fe2O3 shows clear evidence for catalytic decomposition of ozone while alpha-Al2O3 appears to saturate at a finite ozone coverage. The measured uptake for both minerals decreases markedly as the RH is increased. Comparison with other literature reports and the atmospheric implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Influence of soil conditions on dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils: a controlled growth chamber study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Oh, Hae Sung; Hur, Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of various soil conditions, including drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise, on the quantities and the composition of dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils. A set of forest and wetland soils with and without the nitrogen deposition were incubated in the growth chambers under three different temperatures. The moisture contents were kept constant, except for two-week drying intervals. Comparisons between the original and the treated samples revealed that drying-rewetting was a crucial environmental factor driving changes in the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The DOC was also notably increased by the nitrogen deposition to the dry forest soil and was affected by the temperature of the dry wetland soil. A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified three sub-fractions of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and their compositions depended on drying-rewetting. The data as a whole, including the DOC and PARAFAC components and other optical indices, were possibly explained by the two main variables, which were closely related with the PARAFAC components and DOC based on principal component analysis (PCA). Our results suggested that the DOC and PARAFAC component information could provide a comprehensive interpretation of the changes in the soil-leached DOM in response to the different environmental conditions.

  7. Study of the single cluster response of a helium-isobutane drift chamber prototype using 8 keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Dabagov, S.; Hampai, D.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2015-03-01

    The identification of single clusters in the electronic signals produced by ionizing particles within a drift chamber is expected to significantly improve the performances of this kind of detectors in terms of particle identification capabilities and space resolution. In order to develop refined cluster recognition algorithms, it is essential to measure the response of the chamber and its electronics to single ionization clusters. This can be done by irradiating the chamber with X-rays. We report here on the studies performed on a drift chamber prototype for the MEG-II experiment at the X-ray facility of the INFN Frascati's National Laboratories ``XLab Frascati''. The prototype is operated with a helium-isobutane mixture and instrumented with high bandwidth custom pre-amplifiers. The results of this study have been used to develop an innovative method for cluster recognition, based on the Wiener filter technique, which has been tested on data collected at the Frascati's Beam Test Facility. As a side measurement, we also performed a study of the gas gain in a configuration which is similar to that of the MEG-II experiment.

  8. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  9. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  10. A study of the control problem of the shoot side environment delivery system of a closed crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, C. C.; Blackwell, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The details of our initial study of the control problem of the crop shoot environment of a hypothetical closed crop growth research chamber (CGRC) are presented in this report. The configuration of the CGRC is hypothetical because neither a physical subject nor a design existed at the time the study began, a circumstance which is typical of large scale systems control studies. The basis of the control study is a mathematical model which was judged to adequately mimic the relevant dynamics of the system components considered necessary to provide acceptable realism in the representation. Control of pressure, temperature, and flow rate of the crop shoot environment, along with its oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water concentration is addressed. To account for mass exchange, the group of plants is represented in the model by a source of oxygen, a source of water vapor, and a sink for carbon dioxide. In terms of the thermal energy exchange, the group of plants is represented by a surface with an appropriate temperature. Most of the primitive equations about an experimental operating condition and a state variable representation which was extracted from the linearized equations are presented. Next, we present the results of a real Jordan decomposition and the repositioning of an undesirable eigenvalue via full state feedback. The state variable representation of the modeling system is of the nineteenth order and reflects the eleven control variables and eight system disturbances. Five real eigenvalues are very near zero, with one at zero, three having small magnitude positive values, and one having a small magnitude negative value. A Singular Value Decomposition analysis indicates that these non-zero eigenvalues are not results of numerical error.

  11. Impregnation of bone chips with alendronate and cefazolin, combined with demineralized bone matrix: a bone chamber study in goats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone grafts from bone banks might be mixed with bisphosphonates to inhibit the osteoclastic response. This inhibition prevents the osteoclasts to resorb the allograft bone before new bone has been formed by the osteoblasts, which might prevent instability. Since bisphosphonates may not only inhibit osteoclasts, but also osteoblasts and thus bone formation, we studied different bisphosphonate concentrations combined with allograft bone. We investigated whether locally applied alendronate has an optimum dose with respect to bone resorption and formation. Further, we questioned whether the addition of demineralized bone matrix (DBM), would stimulate bone formation. Finally, we studied the effect of high levels of antibiotics on bone allograft healing, since mixing allograft bone with antibiotics might reduce the infection risk. Methods 25 goats received eight bone conduction chambers in the cortical bone of the proximal medial tibia. Five concentrations of alendronate (0, 0.5 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, 2 mg/mL, and 10 mg/mL) were tested in combination with allograft bone and supplemented with cefazolin (200 μg/mL). Allograft not supplemented with alendronate and cefazolin served as control. In addition, allograft mixed with demineralized bone matrix, with and without alendronate, was tested. After 12 weeks, graft bone area and new bone area were determined with manual point counting. Results Graft resorption decreased significantly (p < 0.001) with increasing alendronate concentration. The area of new bone in the 1 mg/mL alendronate group was significantly (p = 0.002) higher when compared to the 10 mg/mL group. No differences could be observed between the group without alendronate, but with demineralized bone, and the control groups. Conclusions A dose-response relationship for local application of alendronate has been shown in this study. Most new bone was present at 1 mg/mL alendronate. Local application of cefazolin had no effect on bone remodelling. PMID:22443362

  12. Enhanced Mixing in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mixing of non-reacting opposed rows of jets injected normal to a confined rectangular crossflow has been conducted. Planar Mie-scattering was used to measure the time-average concentration distribution of the jet fluid in planes perpendicular to the duct axis. Particular emphasis was placed on the study of closely spaced orifice configurations applicable to the mixing zone of an RQL combustor. Baseline studies were performed of mixing under "ideal" conditions, i.e., plenum fed jets injecting into a crossflow uniform in velocity and turbulence intensity. In addition, more practical ("non-ideal") issues encountered during hardware design were also studied. As in other studies, mixing effectiveness, determined using a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of mean jet concentration distributions, was found to be optimum when the spacing-to-duct-height ratio was inversely proportional to the square root of the jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio. This relationship is suitable for design under ideal flow conditions. Inlet flow boundary conditions of the jet and approach flow (mainstream) were found to strongly influence mixing performance, but no attempt was made to determine optimum performance under non-ideal conditions. The tests performed do offer some guidance as to expected mixing behavior for several common variables likely to be imposed by hardware constraints. Additionally, in this study it was found that for rows of orifices with opposite centerlines inline, mixing was similar for blockages up to 89 percent (previous crossflow mixing studies concerned with dilution zone configurations, blockages were typically less than 50 percent). Lower levels of unmixedness were obtained as a function of downstream location when axial injection length was minimized. Mixing may be enhanced if orifice centerlines of opposed rows are staggered, but blockage must be =50 percent in this configuration. Round hole and "square

  13. Modal characteristics of crossed rectangular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F.-L. C.

    1977-01-01

    An integral-eigenvalue problem is formulated for a crossed rectangular waveguide and solved numerically by applying the Ritz-Galerkin method. Theoretical formulas for determining cutoff frequencies and modal-field expressions are obtained for the specific case of a symmetrical rectangular waveguide, cutoff frequencies are calculated numerically, and the results are verified by comparison with available experimental data. The modal fields are expressed in terms of Fourier series for both TE and TM modes. It is found that the bandwidth can be increased to a maximum of 38% when the waveguide dimensions are properly selected and that the numerical results are in agreement with those computed by the method of partial regions. Some practical applications of the modal-field equations are briefly noted.

  14. Rectangular coils optimization for wireless power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhu; Guo, Yong-Xin; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Wirelessly coupled coils are crucial for efficient power transmission in various applications. Previous design methods are only eligible for improving the efficiency of circular or square coils. This paper presents a method of characterizing and optimizing rectangular coils used in inductively coupled systems. After setting up a lumped component model for inductive coils, the efficiency can be expressed in terms of geometrical parameters of the coils. Subsequently, the power efficiency can be plotted versus these parameters in Matlab, thus getting the desired coils for optimum power transfer. With this design procedure from mathematical optimization, we eventually designed two rectangular coils spaced 10 mm apart, which achieves a power transmission efficiency of 46.4% at a frequency of 3 MHz. The design methodology is verified by simulation and measurement.

  15. Bending of rectangular plates with large deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    The solution of Von Karman's fundamental equations for large deflections of plates is presented for the case of a simply supported rectangular plate under combined edge compression and lateral loading. Numerical solutions are given for square plates and for rectangular plates with a width-span ratio of 3:1. The effective widths under edge compression are compared with effective widths according to Von Karman, Bengston, Marguerre, and Cox and with experimental results by Ramberg, Mcpherson, and Levy. The deflections of a square plate under lateral pressure are compared with experimental and theoretical results by Kaiser. It is found that the effective widths agree closely with Marguerre's formula and with the experimentally observed values and that the deflections agree with the experimental results and with Kaiser's work.

  16. Flow of bovine collagen in rectangular slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočilas, Jan; Žitný, Rudolf; Štancl, Jaromír; Solnař, Stanislav; Landfeld, Aleš; Houška, Milan

    2017-05-01

    This contribution deals with the investigation of the bovine collagen flow in the rectangular slit. The slightly compressible collagen liquid (9.5% mass fraction of native bovine collagen in water) was extruded by capillary rheometer of given geometry. A piston pushed the collagen sample from a container to the rectangular capillary. The extrusion rheometer is equipped by pressure sensors mounted at wall of capillary and manually adjusted hydraulic drive enables continuous variation of the piston velocity. The pressure profiles are measured in five places along the capillary simultaneously with increasing shear rate within the range from 1500 to 5000 s-1. It is possible to identify non-elastic shear flow characteristic and the compressibility of collagen matter.

  17. Engineering Design and Assembly of a Surface Methane and Carbon Dioxide Gas Flux Measurement Chamber With a Case Study on the University of Utah Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Amanda K.

    The purpose of this study was to develop a direct flux emissions measurement method based on existing technology, soil flux chambers, for CH4 and CO2 using lab calibration and field testing. Such chambers were designed for measuring diffuse soil fluxes exclusively, and decades of such measurements indicate the validity of the approach. In this thesis study, the soil chamber was used as a basis for designing a larger chamber capable of handling relatively larger magnitude point fluxes from sewer access covers. The University of Utah campus consists of a series of mixed gravity sewer designs and ages, spanning the past century. Assuming this system was representative of the range of urban gravity sewer infrastructure typical to U.S. cities, a case study was done as part of this thesis. For this work, 11 sewer access covers were analyzed using a specifically designed flux chamber to measure gas fluxes directly from the sewer access covers. Based on these surveys, a preliminary estimate of annual carbon emissions from these 11 access points was determined to be 1.066 Metric Tons CO2 equivalent per year (Mt CO2e). It is recommended that more calibration and continuous surveys of these, and all other sewer access points on campus, are done to facilitate the calculation and cumulative "carbon footprint" of the campus sewer system. Ultimately, the technology developed as part of this thesis work can form the basis of an effective methodology to measure CH4 and CO 2 emissions from sewer lines and possibly other urban infrastructure, and quantify the relative major GHG emissions or "carbon footprint" of such emission sources. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  18. Efficient Algorithm for Rectangular Spiral Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Breckenridge, William

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm generates grid coordinates for a computationally efficient spiral search pattern covering an uncertain rectangular area spanned by a coordinate grid. The algorithm does not require that the grid be fixed; the algorithm can search indefinitely, expanding the grid and spiral, as needed, until the target of the search is found. The algorithm also does not require memory of coordinates of previous points on the spiral to generate the current point on the spiral.

  19. Rectangular Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kishida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masahiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki

    2010-10-13

    Experimental investigation of impulse-bit and propellant consumption rate, or mass shot, per single pulse discharge was conducted to characterize the thrust performance of the rectangular laser-electromagnetic hybrid acceleration thruster with various propellant materials. From the result, alumina propellant showed significantly superior performance. The largest values of the measured impulse-bit, specific impulse and thrust efficiency were 49 {mu}Nsec, 6,200 sec and 22%, respectively.

  20. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  1. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles with Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  2. Comparative study of collagen hydrogels modified in two ways using the model of ectopic cartilage construction with diffusion-chamber in immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Sun, Jin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Wen; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-06-12

    For scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering, it is the principle to design the materials with both favorable mechanical and biological property. In this article, collagen hydrogels modified by two ways to improve mechanical strength were applied for in vivo cartilage reconstruction: one is collagen-alginate hydrogel (CAH) representative of mixture, the other is collagen hydrogel crosslinked by genipin (CGH). To investigate the biological activities of the two materials, it was designed as: scaffolds loaded with allogenous chondrocytes were encased in diffusion chamber, and then implanted subcutaneously in SD rats for 8 weeks. Histologic, immunohistochemical, and RT-PCR results showed that collagen type Ⅱ and GAG, indicator of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) was highly expressed in constructs of chondrocyte-CAH. Significantly lower cell density and expression of cartilage specific protein were shown in constructs of chondrocyte-CGH than that in chondrocyte-CAH. This demonstrated that CAH may provide a more favorable environment for cartilage reconstruction. In addition, the model with diffusion chamber technique was viable for evaluation of scaffolds in vivo cartilage engineering in immunocompetent host. Instead, directly reconstruction of ectopic cartilage without diffusion chamber suffered from damaged tissue and less neo-cartilage matrix formed. In conclusion, CAH is realistic as scaffold for in vivo cartilage tissue engineering with both satisfactory mechanical properties and biomimetic activity. And the model with diffusion chamber to reconstruct ectopic cartilage in immunocompetent animals is promising for evaluation of scaffolds. This study provided a new insight for in vivo cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Heyman, C.; Esteban-Betegón, F.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10-10-3x103 mbar) "baby chamber", specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  4. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  5. Study of Damage of Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber by 8 GeV Electron Beam Abort at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Ohishi, Masaya; Kumagai, Noritaka; Ohkuma, Haruo; Yonehara, Hiroto; Schimizu, Jun; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    The 8 GeV electron beam stored on the SPring-8 storage ring finally hits the vacuum chamber wall, especially stainless steel chamber wall of 0.7 mm thickness in the injection section, when the operation is suddenly stopped by interlock system for safety. At that time the localized heat load is generated in the stainless steel material as a result of the dense electro-magnetic shower. Because of the several times such heat loads, the stainless steel chamber has been broken and vacuum also has. On the cross section of the broken stainless steel wall, one can see the evidence of the degeneration or melting down of the stainless steel which is well described by the cascade calculation for the high energy electro-magnetic events using GEANT31). To avoid such a vacuum break, a thicker stainless steel chamber has been installed and an Al damper, in which density of electro-magnetic shower is low because of its small atomic number, has been developed.

  6. Dual chamber shape memory alloy unplugging and mixing system coupled to a high pressure optical cell for biophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leist, Steven K.; Kunkle, Claire; Lee-Gau Chong, Parkson; Zhou, Jack

    2015-03-01

    High pressure optical measurements are useful for understanding structure and function of biological molecules. Commonly used high-pressure optical cells can only observe a single sample under elevated pressure. If researchers wish to observe the interaction between different biological samples, they must mix the samples at atmospheric pressure, place the mixture within the pressure chamber, and wait until the desired pressure is reached. In many cases, researchers want to observe the initial reaction between two separate biological samples; however, the sample mixing and the assembly of the high pressure optical cell coupled with a spectrometer at desired pressures can take several minutes or longer. Our current design uses a shape memory alloy (SMA) spring actuator to seal a dual chamber cuvette for separation of two different biological samples. Once the desired pressure is reached, power is applied to the system that activates the SMA to unplug and mix the two samples using a micro dc-motor. During the mixing efficiency tests, deionized water was placed in the top chamber of the cuvette and an aqueous solution of carboxyfluorescein (a fluorescent dye) placed in the bottom chamber. Based on this design, we were able to achieve a total unplugging and mixing time within a few seconds (at atmospheric pressure). Quicker mixing means researchers will have more reliable data for analyzing the initial reactions between two different biological samples. Future tests on this new actuator will be conducted at elevated pressures.

  7. Feasibility study on oil droplet flow investigations inside aero engine bearing chambers -- PDPA techniques in combination with numerical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Kurreck, M.; Willmann, M.; Wittig, S.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper deals with oil droplet flow phenomena in aero engine bearing chambers. An experimental investigation of droplet sizes and velocities utilizing a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) has been performed for the first time in bearing chamber atmospheres under real engine conditions. Influences of high rotational speeds are discussed for individual droplet size classes. Although this is an important contribution to a better understanding of the droplet flow impact on secondary air/oil system performance, an analysis of the droplet flow behavior requires an incorporation of numerical methods because detailed measurements as performed here suffer from both strong spatial limitations with respect to the optical accessibility in real engine applications and constraints due to the extremely time-consuming nature of an experimental flow field analysis. Therefore, further analysis is based on numerical methods. Droplets characterized within the experiments are exposed to the flow field of the gaseous phase predicted by use of the well-known CFD code EPOS. The droplet trajectories and velocities are calculated within a Lagrangian frame of reference by forward numerical integration of the particle momentum equation. This paper has been initiated rather to show a successful method of bearing chamber droplet flow analysis by a combination of droplet sizing techniques and numerical approaches than to present field values as a function of all operating parameters. However, a first insight into the complex droplet flow phenomena is given and specific problems in bearing chamber heat transfer are related to the droplet flow.

  8. Study on the stability of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W. C.; Yang, J. D.; Chen, J. P.; Teng, Y.

    2014-03-01

    According to the fact that the effects of penstock, unit and governor on stability of water level fluctuation for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber are neglected in previous researches, in this paper, Thoma assumption is broken through, the complete mathematical model of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber is established, and the comprehensive transfer function and linear homogeneous differential equation that characterize the dynamic characteristics of system are derived. The stability domain that characterizes the good or bad of stability quantitatively is drawn by using the stability conditions. The effects of the fluid inertia in water diversion system, the air cushion surge chamber parameters, hydraulic turbine characteristics, generator characteristics, and regulation modes of governor on the stability of waterpower-speed control system are analyzed through stability domain. The main conclusions are as follows: The fluid inertia in water diversion system and hydraulic turbine characteristics have unfavorable effects on the system while generator characteristics have favorable effect. The stability keeps getting better with the increase of chamber height and basal area and the decrease of air pressure and air polytropic exponent. The stability of power regulation mode is obviously better than that of frequency regulation mode.

  9. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution.

  10. Clinical Variability in Arch Wires: A Preliminary Study Evaluating Mechanical and Surface Characteristics of Two Different Sized Rectangular Stainless Steel Wires

    PubMed Central

    Vena, Alessandro; Carey, Jason; Badawi, Hisham

    2007-01-01

    Experimental characterization of arch wires has been performed in many previous studies; however with the advent of new arch wire materials being introduced, some new experimental methods and characterization are required. Since literature is available for comparison, this paper examines mechanical and physical characteristics of steel arch wires to quantify their variability in engineering terms. Furthermore, the effect of wire size on properties was evaluated using two of the most common wire sizes. Finally, manufacturing consistency was verified by testing samples from different lots. PMID:19662123

  11. Development of a configurable growth chamber with a computer vision system to study circadian rhythm in plants.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Pedro J; Fernández, Carlos; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2012-11-09

    Plant development is the result of an endogenous morphogenetic program that integrates environmental signals. The so-called circadian clock is a set of genes that integrates environmental inputs into an internal pacing system that gates growth and other outputs. Study of circadian growth responses requires high sampling rates to detect changes in growth and avoid aliasing. We have developed a flexible configurable growth chamber comprising a computer vision system that allows sampling rates ranging between one image per 30 s to hours/days. The vision system has a controlled illumination system, which allows the user to set up different configurations. The illumination system used emits a combination of wavelengths ensuring the optimal growth of species under analysis. In order to obtain high contrast of captured images, the capture system is composed of two CCD cameras, for day and night periods. Depending on the sample type, a flexible image processing software calculates different parameters based on geometric calculations. As a proof of concept we tested the system in three different plant tissues, growth of petunia- and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) flowers and of cladodes from the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica. We found that petunia flowers grow at a steady pace and display a strong growth increase in the early morning, whereas Opuntia cladode growth turned out not to follow a circadian growth pattern under the growth conditions imposed. Furthermore we were able to identify a decoupling of increase in area and length indicating that two independent growth processes are responsible for the final size and shape of the cladode.

  12. Development of a Configurable Growth Chamber with a Computer Vision System to Study Circadian Rhythm in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pedro J.; Fernández, Carlos; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Plant development is the result of an endogenous morphogenetic program that integrates environmental signals. The so-called circadian clock is a set of genes that integrates environmental inputs into an internal pacing system that gates growth and other outputs. Study of circadian growth responses requires high sampling rates to detect changes in growth and avoid aliasing. We have developed a flexible configurable growth chamber comprising a computer vision system that allows sampling rates ranging between one image per 30 s to hours/days. The vision system has a controlled illumination system, which allows the user to set up different configurations. The illumination system used emits a combination of wavelengths ensuring the optimal growth of species under analysis. In order to obtain high contrast of captured images, the capture system is composed of two CCD cameras, for day and night periods. Depending on the sample type, a flexible image processing software calculates different parameters based on geometric calculations. As a proof of concept we tested the system in three different plant tissues, growth of petunia- and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) flowers and of cladodes from the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica. We found that petunia flowers grow at a steady pace and display a strong growth increase in the early morning, whereas Opuntia cladode growth turned out not to follow a circadian growth pattern under the growth conditions imposed. Furthermore we were able to identify a decoupling of increase in area and length indicating that two independent growth processes are responsible for the final size and shape of the cladode. PMID:23202214

  13. Width of anterior chamber angle determined by OCT, and correlation to refraction and age in a German working population: the MIPH Eye&Health Study.

    PubMed

    Vossmerbaeumer, Urs; Schuster, Alexander K; Fischer, Joachim E

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the anterior segment allows quantitative analysis of the geometry of the chamber angle. We performed bilateral spectral-domain OCT measurements in healthy, emmetropic, hyperopic, and myopic subjects to establish correlations between the width of the angle, the refraction, and intraocular pressure of the test persons. Out of 4,617 eyes (2,309 subjects), those with refractive errors of < -4 or > +3 diopters were identified by objective refraction measurement (KR-8800 Kerato-Refractometer, Topcon Inc., Japan) and examined using the anterior segment mode of a spectral-domain 3D OCT-2000 (Topcon Inc., Japan). Non-contact tonometry was performed (CT-80, Topcon Inc., Japan). One hundred and eight eyes of 54 emmetropic subjects (± 0.5 dpt) served as reference group. Previous ocular surgery was exclusion criterion in all groups. Width of the chamber angle was determined using semi-automated software tools and statistical analysis of the data (Pearson correlation, ANOVA with post-hoc test and Bonferroni correction, regression analysis) was performed using SPSS software (SPSS 19.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Six hundred and sixty-eight eyes of 398 persons (292 male, 96 female) were included in the study. Mean hyperopic refraction was +4.24 (+3  to +7.75) dpt, mean myopic refraction was -5.86 (-4 to -11.75) dpt. Valid chamber angle OCT measurements could be obtained from 50 (69.4 %) hyperopic and 400 (71.4 %) myopic eyes meeting the inclusion criteria. The mean width of the chamber angle was determined as 31.8° (range: 13.5 to 45.6, SD 7.49) in the hyperopic group, 40.8° (range: 19.3 to 66.0, SD 8.1) in the myopic group, and 36.3° (range: 21.1 to 51.8, SD 6.8) in the emmetropic reference group. Correlation was highly significant (p > 0.001) between refractive error and the aperture of the chamber angle as measured from OCT. The association of the intraocular pressure and the refraction was also highly significant (p > 0.001) for the

  14. Ageing and hygroscopicity variation of black carbon particles in Beijing measured by a quasi-atmospheric aerosol evolution study (QUALITY) chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Jun; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yusheng; Collins, Don; Zhang, Renyi

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of ageing and hygroscopicity variation of black carbon (BC) particles in Beijing were conducted using a 1.2 m3 quasi-atmospheric aerosol evolution study (QUALITY) chamber, which consisted of a bottom flow chamber through which ambient air was pulled continuously and an upper reaction chamber where ageing of BC particles occurred. Within the reaction chamber, transmission of the solar ultraviolet irradiation was approximately 50-60 %, wall loss of primary gaseous pollutants was negligible, and BC exhibited a half-lifetime of about 3-7 h. Typically, equilibrium for the primary gases, temperature and relative humidity between the reaction chamber and ambient air was established within 1 h. Rapid growth of BC particles occurred, with an average total growth of 77 ± 33 nm and average growth rate of 26 ± 11 nm h-1. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) accounted for more than 90 % of the coating mass. The O / C ratio of SOA was 0.5, lower than the ambient level. The hygroscopic growth factor of BC particles decreased slightly with an initial thin coating layer because of BC reconstruction, but subsequently increased to 1.06-1.08 upon further ageing. The κ (kappa) values for BC particles and coating materials were calculated as 0.035 and 0.040 at the subsaturation and supersaturation conditions, respectively, indicating low hygroscopicity of coated SOA on BC particles. Hence, our results indicate that initial photochemical ageing of BC particles leads to considerable modifications to morphology and optical properties but does not appreciably alter the particle hygroscopicity in Beijing.

  15. Width effects in transonic flow over a rectangular cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; ...

    2015-07-24

    A previous experiment by the present authors studied the flow over a finite-width rectangular cavity at freestream Mach numbers 1.5–2.5. In addition, this investigation considered the influence of three-dimensional geometry that is not replicated by simplified cavities that extend across the entire wind-tunnel test section. The latter configurations have the attraction of easy optical access into the depths of the cavity, but they do not reproduce effects upon the turbulent structures and acoustic modes due to the length-to-width ratio, which is becoming recognized as an important parameter describing the nature of the flow within narrower cavities.

  16. Improved approximate formulas for flux from cylindrical and rectangular sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, O.J.; Bokharee, S.A.

    1993-03-01

    This report provides two new approximate formulas for the flux at detector points outside the radial and axial extensions of a homogeneous cylindrical source and improved approximate formulas for the flux at points opposite rectangular surface sources. These formulas extend the range of geometries for which analytic approximations may be used by shield design engineers to make rapid scoping studies and check more extensive calculations for reasonableness. These formulas can be used to support skeptical, independent evaluations and are also valuable teaching tools for introducing shield designers to complex shield analyses.

  17. Instability of modes in a partially hinged rectangular plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Vanderley; Gazzola, Filippo; Moreira dos Santos, Ederson

    2016-12-01

    We consider a thin and narrow rectangular plate where the two short edges are hinged whereas the two long edges are free. This plate aims to represent the deck of a bridge, either a footbridge or a suspension bridge. We study a nonlocal evolution equation modeling the deformation of the plate and we prove existence, uniqueness and asymptotic behavior for the solutions for all initial data in suitable functional spaces. Then we prove results on the stability/instability of simple modes motivated by a phenomenon which is visible in actual bridges and we complement these theorems with some numerical experiments.

  18. Normal waves in elastic bars of rectangular cross section.

    PubMed

    Krushynska, Anastasiia A; Meleshko, Viatcheslav V

    2011-03-01

    This paper addresses a theoretical study of guided normal waves in elastic isotropic bars of rectangular cross-section by an analytical superposition method. Dispersion properties of propagating and evanescent modes for four families are analyzed in detail at various geometric and physical parameters of the bar. A comparison of the obtained results with the well-known properties for waves in infinite plates and circular cylinders is provided. The complicated structure of dispersion spectra is explained. High-frequency limiting values for phase and group velocities of normal waves are established for the first time. Calculated data agree well with the available experimental results.

  19. A Study of Dean Vortex Development and Structure in a Curved Rectangular Channel with Aspect Ratio of 40 at Dean Numbers up to 430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligrani, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Flow in a curved channel with mild curvature, an aspect ratio of 40 to 1, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979 is studied at Dean numbers De ranging from 35 to 430. For positions from the start of curvature ranging from 85 to 145 degrees, the sequence of transition events begins with curved channel Poiseuille flow at De less than 40-64. As the Dean number increases, observations show initial development of Dean vortex pairs, followed by symmetric vortex pairs which, when viewed in spanwise/radial planes, cover the entire channel height (De=90-100). At De from 40 to 125-130, the vortex pairs often develop intermittent waviness in the form of vortex undulations. Splitting and merging of vortex pairs is also observed over the same experimental conditions as well as at higher De. When Dean numbers range from 130 to 185-200, the undulating wavy mode is replaced by a twisting mode with higher amplitudes of oscillation and shorter wavelengths. The twisting wavy mode results in the development of regions where turbulence intensity is locally augmented at Dean numbers from 150 to 185-200, principally in the upwash regions between the two individual vortices which make up each vortex pair. These turbulent regions eventually increase in intensity and spatial extent as the Dean number increases further, until individual regions merge together so that the entire cross section of the channel contains chaotic turbulent motions. When Dean numbers then reach 400-435, spectra of velocity fluctuations then evidence fully turbulent flow.

  20. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  1. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  2. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  3. Photoneutron production of a Siemens Primus linear accelerator studied by Monte Carlo methods and a paired magnesium and boron coated magnesium ionization chamber system.

    PubMed

    Becker, J; Brunckhorst, E; Schmidt, R

    2007-11-07

    When radiotherapy with photon energies greater than 10 MV is performed neutrons contaminate the photon beam. In this paper the neutron contamination of the 15 MV photon mode of the Siemens Primus accelerator was studied. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for the description of the treatment head and treatment room. The Monte Carlo results were verified by studying the photon depth dose curve and beam profiles in a water phantom. After these verifications the locations of neutron production were studied and the neutron source spectrum and strength were calculated. The neutron response of the paired Mg/Ar and MgB/Ar ionization chamber system was calculated and experimentally verified for two experimental set-ups. The paired chamber system allowed us to measure neutrons inside the field borders and allowed rapid and point wise measurement in contrast to other methods of neutron detection.

  4. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chambers during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Y.; Karakurt Cevik, B.; Hernandez, C.; Griffin, R. J.; Taylor, N.; Matus, J.; Collins, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) represents a large portion of sub-micron particulate matter on a global scale. The composition of SOA and its formation processes are heavily influenced by anthropogenic and biogenic activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted naturally from forests or from human activity serve as precursors to SOA formation. Biogenic SOA (BSOA) is formed from biogenic VOCs and is prevalent in forested regions like the Southeastern United States. The formation and enhancement of BSOA under anthropogenic influences such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and oxygen radicals are still not well understood. The lack of information on anthropogenic BSOA enhancement and the reversibility of SOA formation could explain the underprediction of SOA in current models. To address some of these gaps in knowledge, this study was conducted as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL during the summer of 2013. SOA growth experiments were conducted in two Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) outdoor chambers located at the SEARCH site. Ambient trace gas concentrations were maintained in these chambers using semi-permeable gas-exchange membranes, while studying the growth of injected monodisperse seed aerosol. The control chamber was operated under ambient conditions; the relative humidity and oxidant and NOx levels were perturbed in the second chamber. This design allows experiments to capture the natural BSOA formation processes in the southeastern atmosphere and to study the influence of anthropogenic activity on aerosol chemistry. Chamber experiments were periodically monitored with physical and chemical instrumentation including a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA), and an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The CAGE experiments focused on SOA

  6. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Chikahiro; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Harada, Iki; Ma, David C.

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m x 3 m x 2 m (length x width x height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  7. Investigation of imaging properties for submillimeter rectangular pinholes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Dan; Moore, Stephen C. E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu Park, Mi-Ae E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu Cervo, Morgan E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Recently, a multipinhole collimator with inserts that have both rectangular apertures and rectangular fields of view (FOVs) has been proposed for SPECT imaging since it can tile the projection onto the detector efficiently and the FOVs in transverse and axial directions become separable. The purpose of this study is to investigate the image properties of rectangular-aperture pinholes with submillimeter apertures sizes. Methods: In this work, the authors have conducted sensitivity and FOV experiments for 18 replicates of a prototype insert fabricated in platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir) alloy with submillimeter square-apertures. A sin{sup q}θ fit to the experimental sensitivity has been performed for these inserts. For the FOV measurement, the authors have proposed a new formula to calculate the projection intensity of a flood image on the detector, taking into account the penumbra effect. By fitting this formula to the measured projection data, the authors obtained the acceptance angles. Results: The mean (standard deviation) of fitted sensitivity exponents q and effective edge lengths w{sub e} were, respectively, 10.8 (1.8) and 0.38 mm (0.02 mm), which were close to the values, 7.84 and 0.396 mm, obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the parameters of the designed inserts. For the FOV measurement, the mean (standard deviation) of the transverse and axial acceptances were 35.0° (1.2°) and 30.5° (1.6°), which are in good agreement with the designed values (34.3° and 29.9°). Conclusions: These results showed that the physical properties of the fabricated inserts with submillimeter aperture size matched our design well.

  8. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    SciTech Connect

    Minowa, C.; Ogawa, N.; Harada, I.; Ma, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m {times} 3 m {times} 2 m length {times} width {times} height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  9. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  10. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  11. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  12. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  14. Thermal quenching sample chamber for grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering studies of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Singh, M A; Groves, M N; Müller, M S; Stahlbrand, I J; Smilgies, D-M

    2007-11-01

    The second generation of a sample chamber designed for in situ measurement of temperature- and time-dependent polymer film nanostructure using the method of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering is presented. An increased operating temperature limit (from 260 to 400 degrees C) with precise control (+/-0.1 degrees C) at fixed temperatures as well as a fourfold increase in maximum instantaneous cooling rate (up to 73 degrees C/s) relative to the first generation chamber [M. N. Groves et al, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 39, 120 (2006)] are reported. Thermal quenches from 220 to 90 degrees C are shown to be reproducible to within +/-1 degrees C of the final temperature. Experimental tests on spin-coated films of symmetric diblock styrene-butadiene copolymer demonstrate the ability to resolve the kinetics of orientation of lamellar domains parallel to the silicon substrate, distinct from the initial formation of randomly oriented lamellar domains immediately following the thermal quench.

  15. Development and application of noninvasive technology for study of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.; Abramchuk, T. V.; Shipigusev, V. A.; Andreeva, T. P.; Gumerov, A. R.; Ilyin, A. N.; Gubaidullin, I. T.

    2015-05-01

    The paper formulates the issue of development of experimental base with noninvasive optical-electronic tools for control of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine. The design and specifications of a pilot sample of optronic system are explained; this noninvasive system was created in the framework of project of development of main critical technologies for designing of aviation gas turbine engine PD-14. The testbench run data are presented.

  16. A Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Study of Sea Salt Particles Acting as Cloud Seeds: Deliquescence, Ice Nucleation and Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Wolf, M. J.; Garimella, S.; Roesch, M.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Sea Salt Aerosols (SSA) are abundant in the atmosphere, and important to the Earth's chemistry and energy budget. However, the roles of sea salts in the context of cloud formation are still poorly understood, which is partially due to the complexity of the water-salt phase diagram. At ambient temperatures, even well below 0°C, SSA deliquesces at sub-water saturated conditions. Since the ratio of the partial pressure over ice versus super-cooled water continuously declines with decreasing temperatures, it is interesting to consider if SSA continues to deliquesce under a super-saturated condition of ice, or if particles act as depositional ice nuclei when a critical supersaturation is reached. Some recent studies suggest hydrated NaCl and simulated sea salt might deliquesce between -35°C to -44°C, and below that deposition freezing becomes possible. Deliquesced droplets can subsequently freeze via the immersion or homogenous freezing mode, depending on if the deliquescence processes is complete. After the droplets or ice particles are formed, it is also interesting to consider how the different processes influence physical properties after evaporation or sublimation. This data is important for climate modeling that includes bromine burst observed in Antarctica, which is hypothesized to be relevant to the sublimation of blowing snow particles. In this study we use a SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN; DMT, Inc., Boulder, CO) to perform experiments over a wide range of temperature and RH conditions to quantify deliquescence, droplet formation and ice nucleation. The formation of droplets and ice particles is detected by an advanced Optical Particle Counter (OPC) and the liquid/solid phases are distinguished by a machine learning method based on laser scattering and polarization data. Using an atomizer, four different sea salt samples are generated: pure NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, synthetic seawater, and natural seawater. Downstream of the SPIN chamber, a Pumped

  17. Laser-filament-induced snow formation in a subsaturated zone in a cloud chamber: experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Sridharan, Aravindan; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2013-12-01

    1 kHz, 2 mJ, 45 fs, 800 nm laser pulses were fired into a laboratory diffusion cloud chamber through a subsaturated zone (relative humidity ∼73%, T ∼ 4.3 °C). After 60 min of laser irradiation, an oval-shaped snow pile was observed right below the filament center and weighed ∼12.0 mg. The air current velocity at the edge of the vortices was estimated to be ∼16.5 cm/s. Scattering scenes recorded from the side show that filament-induced turbulence were formed inside the cloud chamber with two vortices below the filament. Two-dimensional simulations of the air flow motion in two cross sections of the cloud chamber confirm that the turbulent vortices exist below the filament. Based upon this simulation, we deduce that the vortices indeed have a three-dimensional elliptical shape. Hence, we propose that inside vortices where the humidity was supersaturated or saturated the condensation nuclei, namely, HNO(3), N(2)(+), O(2)(+) and other aerosols and impurities, were activated and grew in size. Large-sized particles would eventually be spun out along the fast moving direction towards the cold plate and formed an oval-shaped snow pile at the end.

  18. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  19. Time projection chambers for the T2K near detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Andrieu, B.; Baron, P.; Bene, P.; Berardi, V.; Beucher, J.; Birney, P.; Blaszczyk, F.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Boyer, M.; Cadoux, F.; Calvet, D.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Colas, P.; De La Broise, X.; Delagnes, E.; Delbart, A.; Di Marco, M.; Druillole, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Emery, S.; Escudero, L.; Faszer, W.; Ferrere, D.; Ferrero, A.; Fransham, K.; Gaudin, A.; Giganti, C.; Giomataris, I.; Giraud, J.; Goyette, M.; Hamano, K.; Hearty, C.; Henderson, R.; Herlant, S.; Ieva, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jover-Mañas, G.; Karlen, D.; Kato, I.; Konaka, A.; Laihem, K.; Langstaff, R.; Laveder, M.; Le Coguie, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Ross, M.; Lenckowski, M.; Lux, T.; Macaire, M.; Mahn, K.; Masciocchi, F.; Mazzucato, E.; Mezzetto, M.; Miller, A.; Mols, J.-Ph.; Monfregola, L.; Monmarthe, E.; Myslik, J.; Nizery, F.; Openshaw, R.; Perrin, E.; Pierre, F.; Pierrepont, D.; Poffenberger, P.; Popov, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ravonel, M.; Reymond, J.-M.; Ritou, J.-L.; Roney, M.; Roth, S.; Sánchez, F.; Sarrat, A.; Schroeter, R.; Stahl, A.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Terhorst, D.; Terront, D.; Tvaskis, V.; Usseglio, M.; Vallereau, A.; Vasseur, G.; Wendland, J.; Wikström, G.; Zito, M.

    2011-05-01

    The T2K experiment is designed to study neutrino oscillation properties by directing a high intensity neutrino beam produced at J-PARC in Tokai, Japan, towards the large Super-Kamiokande detector located 295 km away, in Kamioka, Japan. The experiment includes a sophisticated near detector complex, 280 m downstream of the neutrino production target in order to measure the properties of the neutrino beam and to better understand neutrino interactions at the energy scale below a few GeV. A key element of the near detectors is the ND280 tracker, consisting of two active scintillator-bar target systems surrounded by three large time projection chambers (TPCs) for charged particle tracking. The data collected with the tracker are used to study charged current neutrino interaction rates and kinematics prior to oscillation, in order to reduce uncertainties in the oscillation measurements by the far detector. The tracker is surrounded by the former UA1/NOMAD dipole magnet and the TPCs measure the charges, momenta, and particle types of charged particles passing through them. Novel features of the TPC design include its rectangular box layout constructed from composite panels, the use of bulk micromegas detectors for gas amplification, electronics readout based on a new ASIC, and a photoelectron calibration system. This paper describes the design and construction of the TPCs, the micromegas modules, the readout electronics, the gas handling system, and shows the performance of the TPCs as deduced from measurements with particle beams, cosmic rays, and the calibration system.

  20. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.