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Sample records for recurrent medullary thyroid

  1. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  2. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Medullary Carcinoma of Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, S; Chakrabarti, S; Mandal, P K; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been found to be associated with lymphoma, papillary carcinoma and Hürthle cell neoplasms of thyroid. In contrast, there are only a few reports of co-existence of HT with medullary carcinoma of thyroid. An overall prevalence of medullary carcinoma of only 0.35% has been reported in HT patients. Such a rare combination is being presented here. A 33 year old female presented with history of goiter for one year. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the swelling revealed cytological features suggestive of medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Histopathological examination of total thyroidectomy specimen revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis along with medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis can uncommonly co-exist with thyroid neoplasm, its association with medullary carcinoma is extremely rare and hence being presented.

  3. Medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leboulleux, Sophie; Baudin, Eric; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Schlumberger, Martin

    2004-09-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) arises from parafollicular or C cells that produce calcitonin (CT), and accounts for 5-10% of all thyroid cancers. MTC is hereditary in about 25% of cases. The discovery of a MTC in a patient has several implications: disease extent should be evaluated, phaeochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism should be screened for and whether the MTC is sporadic or hereditary should be determined by a direct analysis of the RET proto-oncogene. In this review, pathological characteristics, tumour markers and genetic abnormalities in MTC are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic modalities applied to patients with clinical MTC and those identified with preclinical disease through familial screening are also described. Progresses concerning genetics, initial treatment, follow-up, screening and treatment of pheochromocytoma have permitted an improvement in the long-term outcome. However, there is no effective treatment for distant metastases, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed.

  4. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  5. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  6. Somatic mutations of the ret Protooncogene in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma are not restricted to exon 16 and are associated with tumor recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Romei, C.; Elisei, R.; Pinchera, A.

    1996-04-01

    Germline point mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene have been identified as causative in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and in familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Somatic point mutations of the same gene, exclusively associated with codon 918 of exon 16, have also been reported in few cases of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma. We analyzed the blood and tumor DNA of 19 patients with sporadic MTC and 6 patients with primary parathyroid adenoma for point mutations at exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene by restriction analysis of the PCR-amplified product and by sequence analysis of exons 10 and 11. A Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Tyr mutation was found in both the tumoral and blood DNA of one patient, indicating that he was affected by an hereditary form of MTC, erroneously considered sporadic. In the other 18 patients with MTC, somatic point mutations of ret were found in 8 cases (44.4%). In 5 cases the mutation affected exon 16 (Met{sup 918}{r_arrow}Thr), and in 3 cases it affected exon 11 (Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Arg in 1 and Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Trp in 2); these 3 mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis. The remaining 10 patients had no mutation in exon 10 by either restriction analysis or sequence analysis. Clinical data showed that 75% of the patients whose tumor carried ret mutation had tumor recurrence and/or increased serum calcitonin concentrations during the postsurgical follow-up period as opposed to 10% of the patients without mutations (P < 0.02, by {chi}{sup 2} analysis). No ret mutation was found in the tumoral DNA from parathyroid adenomas. Our findings indicate that the somatic ret point mutation frequently found in sporadic MTC may affect not only exon 16 but also exon 11 and is associated with less favorable clinical outcome. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Bilateral Thyroid and Ultimobranchial Medullary Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Patey, Martine; Flament, Jean Bernard; Caron, Jean; Delisle, Marie Joelle; Delemer, Brigitte; Pluot, Michel

    1996-01-01

    The ultimobranchial bodies in human embryos develop from the fourth and fifth branchial pouch complexes along with thymic and parathyroid tissue. They become incorporated within the lateral thyroid lobes and are believed to be involved in the development of C-cells. We report a case of an unusual bilateral thyroid and neck prelaryngeal medullary carcinoma in a 23-year-old male patient who belongs to a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2a (MEN type 2a) family with thyroid tumors and pheochromocytomas. The medullary carcinoma was located in an abnormal cystic structure that seems to be a remnant of the ultimobranchial body (UBB) in the neck. Within the contralateral thyroid lobe, the medullary carcinoma was associated with C-cell hyperplasia.

  8. Medullary carcinoma in a lingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Yaday, S; Singh, I; Singh, J; Aggarwal, N

    2008-03-01

    Total ectopia of thyroid is a rare phenomenon and malignant change in an ectopic thyroid is even rarer. We report a case of medullary carcinoma in a total ectopic lingual thyroid occurring in a 45-year-old woman who presented with dysphagia, plummy voice and a round sessile mass at the base of the tongue. The mass was extirpated using Trotter's midline approach. Upon examination, it was found to be medullary carcinoma in an ectopic thyroid. Permanent substitution therapy with thyroxine secured the euthyroid status of the patient. The embrylogical basis and a review of literature regarding carcinomatous change in an ectopic thyroid are also discussed. There is a need to investigate for an ectopic thyroid, or even total ectopia, in the case of any smooth mass found at the base of the tongue.

  9. Association of the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Lei, Jianyong; Chen, Wenjie; Gong, Yanping; Luo, Han; Li, Zhihui; Gong, Rixiang; Zhu, Jingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are known to be prognostic factors in several cancers. However, no previous investigation has been performed to evaluate the significance of the NLR and PLR in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The aim of this study was to identify the ability of the preoperative NLR or PLR to predict lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. Data from all patients with MTC who had undergone surgery at our institution from May 2009 to May 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to identify optimal NLR and PLR cutoff points, and we assessed independent predictors of lymph node metastasis and recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The ideal cutoff points for predicting lymph node involvement were 2.7 for the NLR and 105.3 for the PLR. The optimal cutoff points of the NLR and PLR for predicting recurrence were 2.8 and 129.8, respectively. Using the cutoff values, we found that PLR>105.3 (odds ratio [OR] 4.782, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–16.7) was an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis and that PLR>129.8 (OR 3.838, 95% CI 1.1–13.5) was an independent predictor of recurrence. Our study suggests that the preoperative PLR, but not NLR, was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. PMID:27749581

  10. [Medullary thyroid carcinoma and other rare types of thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Obara, Takao

    2007-11-01

    Among 4 major traditional groups of thyroid carcinoma, papillary and follicular carcinomas are most common, and other forms, anaplastic and medullary carcinomas, are relatively rare. The 2003 WHO histological classification of thyroid tumor separated 7 other malignant thyroid tumors into distinct pathological entities, such as poorly differentiated, squamous cell, mucinous carcinomas, carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE), etc. Although they are also extremely rare, recognition of their clinicopathologic features are very important. In this review, not only diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the rare forms of thyroid carcinomas, specifically focussed on medullary carcinoma and CASTLE, but also their histogenetic abnormalities were discussed.

  11. A 9 years boy with MEN-2B variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sattar, M A; Hadi, H I; Ekramuddoula, F M; Hasanuzzaman, S M

    2013-04-01

    To highlight a rare disease like multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN)-2B variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma and to optimize the management option in such cases, we present a nine year old boy with thyroid swelling, cervical lymphadenopathy and thick lips. His calcitonin level was raised. Investigation's results of the boy were as following fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was medullary carcinoma of thyroid, preoperative calcitonin was >2000pg/ml, post operative histopathological report was medullary carcinoma. Total thyroidectomy with aggressive initial neck surgery may reduce the recurrence and increase better prognosis and survival rate. Calcitonin is used as diagnostic and follow-up marker.

  12. Bradshaw lecture, 1976. Thyroid medullary carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S.

    1977-01-01

    The main characteristics of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid are its non-follicular histological appearance, resulting from its origin from the parafollicular C cells, its secretion of calcitonin, providing a relatively simple diagnostic test, and its equal sex incidence, in contrast to all other diseases of the thyroid. Sporadic cases are seen and it occurs in familial groups, with autosomal dominant inheritance, when it is associated with phaeochromocytoma and parathyroid hyperplasia to form the second type of multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA2). These last features make it necessary in every case of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid to examine other members of the family and to investigate the possibility of concomitant adrenal and parathyroid disease. The priorities of treatment when these are present and the indications for total thyroidectomy are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:20027

  13. Recent Updates on the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor derived from the thyroid C cells producing calcitonin. MTC accounts for 0.6% of all thyroid cancers and incidence of MTC increased steadily between 1997 and 2011 in Korea. It occurs either sporadically or in a hereditary form based on germline rearranged during transfection (RET) mutations. MTC can be cured only by complete resection of the thyroid tumor and any loco-regional metastases. The most appropriate treatment is still less clear in patients with residual or recurrent disease after initial surgery or those with distant metastases because most patients even with metastatic disease have indolent courses with slow progression for several years and MTC is not responsive to either radioactive iodine therapy or thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression. Recently, two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), vandetanib and cabozantinib, are approved for use in patients with advanced, metastatic or progressive MTC. In this review, we summarize the current approach according to revised American Thyroid Association guidelines and recent advances in systemic treatment such as TKIs for patients with persistent or recurrent MTC after surgery. PMID:27586449

  14. The pathology of preclinical medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) occurs sporadically, or in familial forms in familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and multiple endocrine neoplasia types 2A and 2B. In the familial forms it is associated with well-characterized, germline mutations in the RET protooncogene. The mutation sites differ in MEN2A and MEN2B, and MTC develops at an earlier age and is more aggressive in MEN2B. Screening of relatives of affected individuals for such mutations can identify those at risk of developing MTC and total thyroidectomy can be carried out in the first decade of life before the development of clinical disease. Analysis of such removed thyroid glands shows abnormalities of the parafollicular C-cells in almost all cases. The abnormalities range from C-cell hyperplasia, either diffuse or nodular, to microcarcinoma and occasionally frank MTC. The abnormalities are bilateral and affect the upper two thirds of the thyroid lobes. Microcarcinomas may be visible with the naked eye, but often they are identified only on microscopy. Histopathological examination of the entire gland is essential.

  15. Treating medullary thyroid cancer in the age of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Hu, Mimi I; Jimenez, Camilo; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Cote, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor deriving from the thyroid parafollicular cell. Thyroidectomy continues to serve as the primary initial treatment for this cancer. Because standard cytotoxic chemotherapy has proven ineffective, reoperation and external beam radiation therapy had been the only tools to treat recurrences or distant disease. The discovery that aberrant activation of RET, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is a primary driver of MTC tumorigenesis led to clinical trials using RET-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The successes of those trials led to the approval of vandetanib and cabozantinib for treating patients with progressive or symptomatic MTC. The availability of these drugs, along with additional targeted therapies in development, requires a thoughtful reconsideration of the approach to treating patients with unresectable locally advanced and/or metastatic progressive MTC. PMID:25908961

  16. Hypercalcitoninemia is not Pathognomonic of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Sergio PA; Lourenço, Delmar M; Santos, Marcelo Augusto; Tavares, Marcos R; Toledo, Rodrigo A; de Menezes Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie

    2009-01-01

    Hypercalcitoninemia has frequently been reported as a marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma. Currently, calcitonin measurements are mostly useful in the evaluation of tumor size and progression, and as an index of biochemical improvement of medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although measurement of calcitonin is a highly sensitive method for the detection of medullary thyroid carcinoma, it presents a low specificity for this tumor. Several physiologic and pathologic conditions other than medullary thyroid carcinoma have been associated with increased levels of calcitonin. Several cases of thyroid nodules associated with increased values of calcitonin are not medullary thyroid carcinomas, but rather are related to other conditions, such as hypercalcemias, hypergastrinemias, neuroendocrine tumors, renal insufficiency, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas, and goiter. Furthermore, prolonged treatment with omeprazole (> 2–4 months), beta-blockers, glucocorticoids and potential secretagogues, have been associated with hypercalcitoninemia. An association between calcitonin levels and chronic auto-immune thyroiditis remains controversial. Patients with calcitonin levels >100 pg/mL have a high risk for medullary thyroid carcinoma (~90%–100%), whereas patients with values from 10 to 100 pg/mL (normal values: <8.5 pg/mL for men, < 5.0 pg/mL for women; immunochemiluminometric assay) have a <25% risk for medullary thyroid carcinoma. In multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), RET mutation analysis is the gold-standard for the recommendation of total preventive thyroidectomy to relatives at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation (50%). False-positive calcitonin results within MEN2 families have led to incorrect indications of preventive total thyroidectomy to RET mutation negative relatives. In this review, we focus on the differential diagnosis of hypercalcitoninemia, underlining its importance for the avoidance of misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma and

  17. Targeting medullary thyroid carcinomas with bispecific antibodies and bivalent haptens. Results and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Gautherot, E; Meyer, P; Barbet, J

    1997-01-01

    The present article reviews the clinical trials that have been performed in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma patients with the Affinity Enhancement System. This technique uses bispecific antibodies to target radiolabelled bivalent haptens to tumour cells. Its sensitivity in the detection of known tumour sites is high (90%) and this technique also achieves good sensitivity (61%) in the detection of occult disease as revealed by abnormal thyrocalcitonin blood levels. Due to its high targeting capacity, this technique is now considered for use as a therapeutic agent in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients.

  18. [Study of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma from a proband].

    PubMed

    Morlán Herrador, Laura; de Arriba, Antonio; Miguel, Gloria; Ferrera, Marta; Labarta, José I

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is an uncommon type of cancer, accounting less than 1% of all cancers in adults, and 0.5-3% of all cancers in children. There are four different types: papillary carcinoma (80-90% of cases), follicular (5-10%), medullary (5%) and anaplastic cell (2-3%). Eighty per cent of cases of medullary thyroid cancer are sporadic, but 20% are associated with an inherited syndrome that is divided into three groups: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. The inherited forms are caused by a disruption in the RET oncogene, which is located in the long arm of chromosome 10. A hereditary case of medullary thyroid carcinoma is presented. It was detected because of a familial genetic study. The purpose of the paper is emphasize the importance of the early diagnosis and the intervention of multidisciplinary teams of experts.

  19. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Modigliani, E; Franc, B; Niccoli-sire, P

    2000-12-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is a rare tumour derived from thyroid C cells with serum calcitonin as a specific and sensitive marker. MTC is inherited in 25% of cases, with an autosomal dominant transmission, age-related penetrance and variable expressivity. MTC is an obligatory component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), which comprises three well defined syndromes: MEN2A, which may be associated with pheochromocytoma and/or hyperparathyroidism; the much rarer MEN2B, which occurs early and is accompanied by developmental abnormalities; while in contrast, familial MTC (FMTC) is not associated with any endocrinopathy. The RET proto-oncogene is the causative gene of the MEN2 syndromes and mutations in this gene are found in >90% of inherited cases, allowing easier and more reliable family screening than pentagastrin stimulation tests. Nevertheless, the correlation between the genotype and the different clinical phenotypes is not perfect. The prognosis of MTC depends on its staging at presentation, and the early appearance of cervical lymph node metastases emphasizes the need for extensive surgery, although many patients still do not normalize calcitonin levels post-operatively, and they remain a challenge for the further management.

  1. Sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Clinical Data From A University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie M.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Imazawa, Alice T.; Lourenço, Delmar M.; Ezabella, Marilza C. L.; Tavares, Marcos R.; Toledo, Sergio P. A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medullary thyroid carcinoma may occur in a sporadic (s-medullary thyroid carcinoma, 75%) or in a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 form (MEN2, 25%). These clinical forms differ in many ways, as s-medullary thyroid carcinoma cases are RET-negative in the germline and are typically diagnosed later than medullary thyroid carcinoma in MEN2 patients. In this study, a set of cases with s-medullary thyroid carcinoma are documented and explored. PURPOSE: To document the phenotypes observed in s-medullary thyroid carcinoma cases from a university group and to attempt to improve earlier diagnosis of s-medullary thyroid carcinoma. Some procedures for diagnostics are also recommended. METHOD: Patients (n=26) with apparent s-medullary thyroid carcinoma were studied. Their clinical data were reviewed and peripheral blood was collected and screened for RET germline mutations. RESULTS: The average age at diagnosis was 43.9 years (± 10.82 SD) and did not differ between males and females. Calcitonin levels were increased in all cases. Three patients presented values that were 100-fold greater than the normal upper limit. Most (61.54%) had values that were 20-fold below this limit. Carcinoembryonic antigen levels were high in 70.6% of cases. There was no significant association between age at diagnosis, basal calcitonin levels or time of disease onset with thyroid tumor size (0.6–15 cm). Routine thyroid cytology yielded disappointing diagnostic accuracy (46.7%) in this set of cases. After total thyroidectomy associated with extensive cervical lymph node resection, calcitonin values remained lower than 5 pg/mL for at least 12 months in eight of the cases (30.8%). Immunocyto- and histochemistry for calcitonin were positive in all analyzed cases. None of the 26 cases presented germline mutations in the classical hotspots of the RET proto-oncogene. CONCLUSION: Our cases were identified late. The basal calcitonin measurements and immunostaining for calcitonin were

  2. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  3. 2012 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlumberger, M.; Bastholt, L.; Dralle, H.; Jarzab, B.; Pacini, F.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Distant metastases are the main cause of death in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). These 21 recommendations focus on MTC patients with distant metastases and a detailed follow-up protocol of patients with biochemical or imaging evidence of disease, selection criteria for treatment, and treatment modalities, including local and systemic treatments based on the results of recent trials. Asymptomatic patients with low tumor burden and stable disease may benefit from local treatment modalities and can be followed up at regular intervals of time. Imaging is usually performed every 6–12 months, or at longer intervals of time depending on the doubling times of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Patients with symptoms, large tumor burden and progression on imaging should receive systemic treatment. Indeed, major progress has recently been achieved with novel targeted therapies using kinase inhibitors directed against RET and VEGFR, but further research is needed to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:24782992

  4. Is Hashimoto's thyroiditis a risk factor for medullary thyroid carcinoma? Our experience and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Ayman A; Ali, Moaath K Mustafa; Jaber, Omar I; Suleiman, Moh'd J; Ashhab, Ashraf A; Al Shweiat, Wajdi Mohammed; Momani, Munther Suliaman; Shomaf, Maha; AbuRuz, Salah Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    The etiology of medullary thyroid carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between medullary thyroid carcinoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the histopathologic material of thyroidectomized patients. Retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study, we reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for different thyroid-related complaints between January 2000 and January 2012 at Jordan University Hospital-Amman, Jordan. To highlight relevant previously published studies addressing this topic, a literature search was conducted for English language studies reporting "medullary thyroid carcinoma" or "C-cell hyperplasia" in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Of the 863 patients with a mean age of 47.2 ± 12.3 years who underwent total thyroidectomy during the study period, 78 (9.04 %) were diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 15 (1.74 %) had medullary thyroid carcinoma, 3 (20 %) of whom had coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A total of 683 (79.1 %) patients had benign thyroid disease, 67 (9.8 %) of whom had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The difference between these rates was not statistically significant (p = 0.19). When examined by gender, 9 females had medullary thyroid carcinoma, 3 (33.3 %) of whom had coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis; by contrast, of 560 females with benign thyroid disease, 62 (11.1 %) had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (p = 0.04). Although this study population represents a small and single-institution experience, our results suggest that there might be an association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and medullary thyroid carcinoma only in female patients who undergo total thyroidectomy.

  5. Cabozantinib S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Childhood Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma

  6. C-cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Albores-Saavedra, J A; Krueger, J E

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the thyroid C-cell, considerable progress has been made regarding its origin, function, and pathology. In this article an attempt is made to summarize and update our knowledge about physiologic or reactive C-cell hyperplasia, neoplastic C-cell hyperplasia (medullary carcinoma in situ), and medullary microcarcinoma. Seldom recognized preoperatively, physiologic C-cell hyperplasia is associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and neoplastic thyroid disorders as well as with hypercalcemia. However, the pathogenesis is still unclear. Although physiologic C-cell hyperplasia may progress to medullary carcinoma, the full malignant potential is unknown. Problems related to the definition of physiologic C-cell hyperplasia are discussed. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative analysis are required for the diagnosis. By contrast, C-cell hyperplasia associated with MEN II syndromes or familial medullary carcinoma can be diagnosed preoperatively in asymptomatic children or adolescents by the detection of germline mutations of the RET protooncogene. Morphologic and genetic abnormalities support the idea that C-cells in the familial form of C-cell hyperplasia are neoplastic and can be recognized with conventional stains. Therefore, the number of C-cells is irrelevant for the diagnosis. Medullary microcarcinoma is a neoplasm that measures < 1 cm. The sporadic variant is usually an incidental microscopic finding, whereas the familial form can be diagnosed by genetic testing. Its morphologic features and biologic behavior differ from those of larger medullary carcinomas. The frequency of medullary microcarcinoma will probably increase with the use of genetic testing.

  7. Mixed medullary and follicular carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Pfaltz, M; Hedinger, C E; Mühlethaler, J P

    1983-01-01

    We report a case of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid which on light microscopy showed not only the well known arrangement of cells in sheets and nests but also unequivocal follicular structures. These follicular structures are present both in the primary tumor and in lymph node metastases. Immunohistochemical investigations revealed that the cells lining the follicles produce thyroglobulin, whereas the remaining tumor tissue is positive for calcitonin and carcinoembrionic antigen. This case represents a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid with an atypical pattern consisting of both thyroglobulin and calcitonin producing cells.

  8. Pretargeted immunoscintigraphy in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, P.; Paganelli, G.; Songini, C.; Samuel, A.; Sudati, F.; Siccardi, A. G.; Fazio, F.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the use of pretargeted immunoscintigraphy (ISG) in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we studied 25 patients with histologically proven disease; ISG was repeated after surgery in two patients. The antibody, either an anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or an antichromogranin A (CgA) biotinylated monoclonal antibody (MAb) or a cocktail of the two biotinylated MAbs was first injected. After 24 h, avidin was administrated i.v., followed by 111In-labelled biotin 24 h later. Fifty-two lesions were visualised. Six primary tumours, diagnosed by increased calcitonin levels, were all correctly diagnosed; 47 recurrences, also suspected by blood tumour markers, were detected and confirmed by cytology or histology. In one case, single photon emission tomography allowed the detection of small lymph nodes with a diameter of 4-7 mm. These lesions, not judged neoplastic by ultrasound, were confirmed to be neoplastic by fine needle aspiration. Pretargeted ISG correctly localises primary tumours and recurrences in MTC patients, when the only marker of relapse is serum elevation of calcitonin. With this three-step pretargeting method, cocktails of potentially useful MAbs can be used, avoiding false-negative studies that may occur when CEA or CgA are not expressed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8795589

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Imaging with [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-Exendin-4 for the Diagnosis of Recurrence or Dissemination of Medullary Thyroid Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pach, D.; Sowa-Staszczak, A.; Jabrocka-Hybel, A.; Stefańska, A.; Tomaszuk, M.; Mikołajczak, R.; Janota, B.; Trofimiuk-Müldner, M.; Przybylik-Mazurek, E.; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Epidemiological studies on medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) have shown that neither a change in stage at diagnosis nor improvement in survival has occurred during the past 30 years. In patients with detectable serum calcitonin and no clinically apparent disease, a careful search for local recurrence, and nodal or distant metastases, should be performed. Conventional imaging modalities will not show any disease until basal serum calcitonin is at least 150 pg/mL. The objective of the study was to present the first experience with labelled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 in the visualisation of MTC in humans. Material and Method. Four patients aged 22–74 years (two with sporadic and two with MEN2 syndrome-related disseminated MTC) were enrolled in the study. In all patients, GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed. Results. High-quality images were obtained in all patients. All previously known MTC lesions have been confirmed in GLP-1 scintigraphy. Moreover, one additional liver lesion was detected in sporadic MTC male patient. Conclusions. GLP-1 receptor imaging with [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 is able to detect MTC lesions. GLP-1 scintigraphy can serve as a confirmatory test in MTC patients, in whom other imaging procedures are inconsistent. PMID:23606839

  10. Systemic treatment and management approaches for medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ernani, Vinicius; Kumar, Mukesh; Chen, Amy Y; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2016-11-01

    Although rare, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) exemplifies the value that ever-expanding knowledge of molecular pathways and mechanisms brings to managing challenging cancers. Although surgery can be curative for MTC in many patients, a substantial proportion of patients present with locoregional or distant metastatic disease. Once distant disease occurs, treatment options are limited, and conventional cancer treatments such as cytotoxic chemotherapy are of minimal benefit. Biomarkers such as calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen are important correlates of disease burden as well as predictors of disease progress, including recurrence and survival. MTC is either sporadic (∼75%) or inherited (∼25%) as an autosomal dominant disease. Regardless, germline and somatic mutations, particularly in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene, are key factors in the neoplastic process. Gain-of-function RET mutations result in overactive proteins that lead to abnormal activation of downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in ligand-independent growth and resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Specific RET mutation variants have been found to correlate with phenotype and natural history of MTC with some defects portending a more aggressive clinical course. Greater understanding of the consequence of the aberrant signaling pathway has fostered the development of targeted therapies. Two small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are currently available as approved agents for the treatment of advanced or progressive MTC and provide significant increases in progression-free survival. Since there have been no head-to-head comparisons, clinicians often select between these agents on the basis of familiarity, patient characteristics, comorbidities, and toxicity profile.

  11. Revised American Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asa, Sylvia L.; Dralle, Henning; Elisei, Rossella; Evans, Douglas B.; Gagel, Robert F.; Lee, Nancy; Machens, Andreas; Moley, Jeffrey F.; Pacini, Furio; Raue, Friedhelm; Frank-Raue, Karin; Robinson, Bruce; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Santoro, Massimo; Schlumberger, Martin; Shah, Manisha; Waguespack, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The American Thyroid Association appointed a Task Force of experts to revise the original Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association. Methods: The Task Force identified relevant articles using a systematic PubMed search, supplemented with additional published materials, and then created evidence-based recommendations, which were set in categories using criteria adapted from the United States Preventive Services Task Force Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The original guidelines provided abundant source material and an excellent organizational structure that served as the basis for the current revised document. Results: The revised guidelines are focused primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and hereditary MTC. Conclusions: The Task Force developed 67 evidence-based recommendations to assist clinicians in the care of patients with MTC. The Task Force considers the recommendations to represent current, rational, and optimal medical practice. PMID:25810047

  12. Secretion of Parathyroid Hormone in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deftos, Leonard J.; Parthemore, Jacqueline G.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitonin (CT) was studied in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Most patients with elevated levels of CT were normocalcemic and also had normal basal levels of PTH. Five of six patients with associated hyperparathyroidism were hypercalcemic and had elevated basal PTH levels. Hormone secretion was also studied during infusions with standard and low doses of calcium. PTH unexpectedly increased during 12 of 18 calcium infusions. Such a paradoxical increase in PTH was seen in those patients with the greatest increase in CT and the least increase in calcium during the calcium infusion. Accordingly, increases in PTH concentration during the calcium infusions could be correlated directly with increases in CT and correlated inversely with increases in calcium. These observations suggest that, in some patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma, a further increase in the abnormally elevated CT levels may stimulate PTH secretion. Therefore, at least in acute studies, there may be a functional, as well as a genetic, relationship between the secretion of these two hormones in patients with this thyroid tumor. PMID:4847251

  13. Prognostic Influence of Clinical and Pathological Factors in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Study of 53 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Lenine G.; Cavalheiro, Beatriz G.; Junqueira, Consuelo R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES AND INTRODUCTION Medullary thyroid carcinoma, a neoplasia of intermediate prognosis and differentiation, does not always respond predictably to known treatments. This study aimed to correlate the clinical progression of surgically treated patients with clinical and pathological data. METHODS A total of 53 patients were followed for 75 months (mean average) in tertiary-care hospital. The clinical status of patients at the end of the study period was characterized to determine correlations with a range of disease aspects. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS Twenty-two patients (41.5%) were alive and disease-free at the end of the follow-up period; twenty-three patients (43.4%) had persistent disease; and eight patients (15.1%) had recurrent disease. Four patients (7.6%) died from medullary thyroid carcinoma with clinical and/or imaging evidence of neoplasia. The following aspects demonstrated statistically significant correlations with the final medical condition: positive initial cervical examination (p = 0.002); neoplastic extensions to the thyroid capsule (p = 0.004) and adjacent tissues (p = 0.034); cervical lymph node metastases (p < 0.001); diameter of neoplasia (p = 0.018); TNM (tumor, node and metastasis) Stage (p = 0.001) and evidence of distant and/or cervical diseases in the absence of a cure (p = 0.011). Through logistic regression, the presence of cervical lymph node metastases was considered an independent variable (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Clinical and pathological aspects of patients with surgically treated medullary thyroid carcinomas are predictors of disease progression. Specifically, even treated cervical lymph node metastases are significantly correlated with disease progression. PMID:19759878

  14. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Iodine I 131 and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  15. Genetic Alterations in Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers

    PubMed Central

    A, Taccaliti; F, Silvetti; G, Palmonella; M, Boscaro

    2011-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare calcitonin producing neuroendocrine tumour that originates from the parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid gland. The RET proto-oncogene encodes the RET receptor tyrosine kinase, with consequently essential roles in cell survival, differentiation and proliferation. Somatic or germline mutations of the RET gene play an important role in this neoplasm in development of sporadic and familial forms, respectively. Genetic diagnosis has an important role in differentiating sporadic from familiar MTC. Furthermore, depending on the location of the mutation, patients can be classified into risk classes. Therefore, genetic screening of the RET gene plays a critical role not only in diagnosis but also in assessing the prognosis and course of MTC. PMID:22654561

  16. Medullary thyroid carcinoma with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong Seok; Kim, Min Joo; Moon, Chae Ho; Yoon, Jong Ho; Ku, Ha Ra; Kang, Geon Wook; Na, Im Il; Lee, Seung-Sook; Lee, Byung-Chul; Park, Young Joo; Kim, Hong Il; Ku, Yun Hyi

    2014-03-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is caused most frequently by a bronchial carcinoid tumor or by small cell lung cancer. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare etiology of ectopic ACTH syndrome. We describe a case of Cushing syndrome due to ectopic ACTH production from MTC in a 48-year-old male. He was diagnosed with MTC 14 years ago and underwent total thyroidectomy, cervical lymph node dissection and a series of metastasectomies. MTC was confirmed by the pathological examination of the thyroid and metastatic mediastinal lymph node tissues. Two years after his last surgery, he developed Cushingoid features, such as moon face and central obesity, accompanied by uncontrolled hypertension and new-onset diabetes. The laboratory results were compatible with ectopic ACTH syndrome. A bilateral adrenalectomy improved the clinical and laboratory findings that were associated with Cushing syndrome. This is the first confirmed case of ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by MTC in Korea.

  17. Cytological aspects of melanotic variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M A; Dias Medeiros, J; Rodrigues Da Cunha, L; de Cássia Caldas Pessôa, R; Silveira Tavares, F; de Fátima Borges, M; Marinho, E O

    2001-03-01

    We had the opportunity to examine a case of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of a melanotic variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in a 20-yr-old man. The patient presented a single node, hardened and mobile upon deglutition, in the right lobe of the thyroid, for 9 mo, without symptoms of glandular dysfunction. Calcitonin (138 pg/ml), urinary calcium (177 mg/dl), and the carcinoembryonic antigen (341 ng/ml) were increased. The nodular aspirate, drawn by FNA, was represented by pleomorphic cells, with frequent intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions, sometimes bi- or multinucleated, with abundant, finely granular cytoplasm, sometimes containing a brown pigment resembling melanin. An immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies (Dako Corp., Carpinteria, CA) showed that the neoplastic cells were intensely and diffusely positive for calcitonin and chromogranin, and focally positive for HMB45. In view of these findings, the case was characterized as a melanotic variant of medullary carcinoma, a rare type of neoplasia, but having a prognosis similar to the classical variant of MTC.

  18. Kidney Involvement in Systemic Calcitonin Amyloidosis Associated With Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Timco; Niedlich-den Herder, Cindy; Stegeman, Coen A; Links, Thera P; Bijzet, Johan; Hazenberg, Bouke P C; Diepstra, Arjan

    2017-04-01

    A 52-year-old woman with widely disseminated medullary thyroid carcinoma developed nephrotic syndrome and slowly decreasing kidney function. A kidney biopsy was performed to differentiate between malignancy-associated membranous glomerulopathy and tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Surprisingly, the biopsy specimen revealed diffuse glomerular deposition of amyloid that was proved to be derived from the calcitonin hormone (Acal), produced by the medullary thyroid carcinoma. This amyloid was also present in an abdominal fat pad biopsy. Although local ACal deposition is a characteristic feature of medullary thyroid carcinoma, the systemic amyloidosis involving the kidney that is presented in this case report has not to our knowledge been described previously and may be the result of long-term high plasma calcitonin levels. Our case illustrates that systemic calcitonin amyloidosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of proteinuria in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma.

  19. Failure of pentagastrin-stimulated calcitonin testing in early manifestation of familial medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pirich, Christian; Rendl, Gundula; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Häusler, Ingrid

    2012-10-01

    This case report describes three generations of a family with familial medullary thyroid cancer (RET gene mutation L790F). One of the three siblings-all of them carrier of the respective mutation-exhibited the absence of pathological basal and pentagastrin-stimulated calcitonin levels in spite of multifocal medullary thyroid microcancer. This case illustrates the challenge to consider the biological diversity of RET gene mutations in the clinical management of affected gene carriers.

  20. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives.

  1. Medullary thyroid cancer: RET testing of an archival material.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Jørgensen, Gita; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Krogdahl, Annelise S; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nielsen, Finn C

    2010-04-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) might be sporadic (75%) or hereditary (25%). Until the mid nineties the diagnosis of hereditary MTC was based on family history, clinical evaluation, histological detection of C-cell hyperplasia and tumor multifocality. Patients and families with hereditary MTC might be missed? Today mutation analysis of the RET proto-oncogene is routinely performed on DNA. Departments of pathology often store tissue specimens from performed surgical procedures. The purpose of this study was to examine if analysis of DNA extracted from formalin fixed archival tissue might be a possible method to identify not previously known cases of hereditary MTC. In 23 cases, tissue analysis was performed, and in 2 patients (9%) a mutation was identified, but in both cases the most likely explanation was contamination with tumor tissue. The ability to detect RET mutations was confirmed by testing of non-tumor tissue from patients with known hereditary MTC. This study shows that genetic testing of archival MTC material is technically possible and might be a way of identifying patients with previously not recognized hereditary MTC.

  2. Shear wave elastography in medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gumińska, Anna; Bakuła-Zalewska, Elwira; Mlosek, Krzysztof; Słapa, Rafał Z.; Wareluk, Paweł; Krauze, Agnieszka; Ziemiecka, Agnieszka; Migda, Bartosz; Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dedecjus, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a modern method for the assessment of tissue stiffness. There has been a growing interest in the use of this technique for characterizing thyroid focal lesions, including preoperative diagnostics. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the clinical usefulness of SWE in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) diagnostics. Materials and methods A total of 169 focal lesions were identified in the study group (139 patients), including 6 MTCs in 4 patients (mean age: 45 years). B-mode ultrasound and SWE were performed using Aixplorer (SuperSonic, Aix-en-Provence), with a 4–15 MHz linear probe. The ultrasound was performed to assess the echogenicity and echostructure of the lesions, their margin, the halo sign, the height/width ratio (H/W ratio), the presence of calcifications and the vascularization pattern. This was followed by an analysis of maximum and mean Young's (E) modulus values for MTC (EmaxLR, EmeanLR) and the surrounding thyroid tissues (EmaxSR, EmeanSR), as well as mean E-values (EmeanLRz) for 2 mm region of interest in the stiffest zone of the lesion. The lesions were subject to pathological and/or cytological evaluation. Results The B-mode assessment showed that all MTCs were hypoechogenic, with no halo sign, and they contained micro- and/ or macrocalcifications. Ill-defined lesion margin were found in 4 out of 6 cancers; 4 out of 6 cancers had a H/W ratio > 1. Heterogeneous echostructure and type III vascularity were found in 5 out of 6 lesions. In the SWE, the mean value of EmaxLR for all of the MTCs was 89.5 kPa and (the mean value of EmaxSR for all surrounding tissues was) 39.7 kPa Mean values of EmeanLR and EmeanSR were 34.7 kPa and 24.4 kPa, respectively. The mean value of EmeanLRz was 49.2 kPa. Conclusions SWE showed MTCs as stiffer lesions compared to the surrounding tissues. The lesions were qualified for fine needle aspiration biopsy based on B-mode assessment. However, the diagnostic algorithm for MTC is based on the

  3. Medullary thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the pituitary gland: an unusual site of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D; Asa, Sylvia L; Fuller, Gregory N

    2008-06-01

    We present a case of metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma involving the pituitary gland of a 23-year-old woman with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b who presented with diabetes insipidus and visual loss. The diagnostic features, including cytomorphology and immunohistochemistry, used to differentiate pituitary adenoma from metastatic medullary carcinoma are discussed. Pituitary metastases and tumor-to-tumor metastases in this region are also highlighted.

  4. RET mutation and increased angiogenesis in medullary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Verrienti, Antonella; Tallini, Giovanni; Colato, Chiara; Boichard, Amélie; Checquolo, Saula; Pecce, Valeria; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Rosignolo, Francesca; de Biase, Dario; Rhoden, Kerry; Casadei, Gian Piero; Russo, Diego; Visani, Michela; Acquaviva, Giorgia; Ferdeghini, Marco; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo

    2016-08-01

    Advanced medullary thyroid cancers (MTCs) are now being treated with drugs that inhibit receptor tyrosine kinases, many of which involved in angiogenesis. Response rates vary widely, and toxic effects are common, so treatment should be reserved for MTCs likely to be responsive to these drugs. RET mutations are common in MTCs, but it is unclear how they influence the microvascularization of these tumors. We examined 45 MTCs with germ-line or somatic RET mutations (RETmut group) and 34 with wild-type RET (RETwt). Taqman Low-Density Arrays were used to assess proangiogenic gene expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess intratumoral, peritumoral and nontumoral expression levels of VEGFR1, R2, R3, PDGFRa, PDGFB and NOTCH3. We also assessed microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density (LVD) based on CD31-positive and podoplanin-positive vessel counts, respectively, and vascular pericyte density based on staining for a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA), a pericyte marker. Compared with RETwt tumors, RETmut tumors exhibited upregulated expression of proangiogenic genes (mRNA and protein), especially VEGFR1, PDGFB and NOTCH3. MVDs and LVDs were similar in the two groups. However, microvessels in RETmut tumors were more likely to be a-SMA positive, indicating enhanced coverage by pericytes, which play key roles in vessel sprouting, maturation and stabilization. These data suggest that angiogenesis in RETmut MTCs may be more intense and complete than that found in RETwt tumors, a feature that might increase their susceptibility to antiangiogenic therapy. Given their increased vascular pericyte density, RETmut MTCs might also benefit from combined or preliminary treatment with PDGF inhibitors.

  5. Hypervascularity is more frequent in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xingjian; Liu, Meijuan; Xia, Yu; Wang, Liang; Bi, Yalan; Li, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Meng; Dai, Qing; Jiang, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to retrospectively compare the sonographic features of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and the features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 97 patients with 127 MTCs between January 2000 and January 2016 and 107 consecutive patients with 132 PTCs were included in this study. Two radiologists retrospectively determined the sonographic features and compared the findings of MTCs and PTCs. Compared with the patients with PTCs, the patients with MTCs were older (46.9 years vs 42.9 years, P = 0.016) and the male proportion was higher (53.6% vs 33.6%, P = 0.005). Most of the MTCs had an irregular shape (72.4%), a length/width ratio <1 (75.6%), an unclear boundary (63.8%), no peripheral halo ring (93.7%), hypoechogenicity (96.9%), heterogeneous echotexture (76.4%), no cystic change (78.7%), calcification (63.8%), and hypervascularity (72.4%). There was no significant difference in the boundary, peripheral halo ring, echogenicity, and calcification between the MTCs and PTCs. However, compared with the PTCs, a larger size (2.2 vs 1.2 cm, P <0.001), a regular shape (27.6% vs 7.6%, P <0.001), a length/width ratio <1 (75.6% vs 51.5%, P<0.001), heterogeneous echotexture (76.4% vs 54.5%, P <0.001), cystic change (21.3 vs 8.3%, P = 0.005), and hypervascularity (72.4% vs 47.7%, P <0.001) were more frequent in the MTCs. The sonographic features with a higher likelihood of malignancy are common in MTCs, including a shape taller than the width, irregular infiltrative margins, an absent halo, hypoechogenicity, the presence of microcalcifications, and increased intranodular vascularity. However, MTCs tend to possess these suspicious sonographic features less often than PTCs, with the exception of hypervascularity, which was more frequent in MTCs. PMID:27930537

  6. Radioimmunoimaging of metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland using an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Watson, C.G.; Levine, G.; Tauxe, W.N.; Yousem, S.A.; Unger, M.; Kowal, C.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elevated levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or calcitonin after surgical therapy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) indicate the presence of residual or metastatic disease. CEA elevations appear to be prognostically more reliable in patients with metastatic disease and suggest a more virulent tumor. Attempts to stage the disease with use of conventional imaging techniques are usually inadequate, as is the therapy for disseminated or recurrent MCT. An indium-111-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ZCE-025) was used to image metastases in a patient with MCT. Potential applications of monoclonal antibody technology in the management of MCT would include (1) preoperative differentiation of unicentric from multicentric thyroid gland involvement, (2) detection of regional or distant metastases or both, (3) measurement of response to systemic therapy, and (4) the facilitation of radionuclide immunoconjugate therapy.

  7. A Genomic Alternative to Identify Medullary Thyroid Cancer Preoperatively in Thyroid Nodules with Indeterminate Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Robert J.; Traweek, S. Thomas; Lanman, Richard B.; Kennedy, Giulia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of calcitonin screening for the rare medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is controversial due to questions of efficacy, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. This study reports the results of a large prospective validation using a machine-trained algorithm (MTC Classifier) to preoperatively identify MTC in fine-needle aspiration biopsies in lieu of calcitonin measurements. Methods: Cytology analysis on a prospective consecutive series of 50,430 thyroid nodule biopsies yielded a total of 7815 indeterminate (Bethesda categories III/IV) cases, which were tested with the MTC classifier. A prospective, consecutively submitted series of 2673 Bethesda III–VI cases with cytology determined locally was also evaluated. RNA was isolated and tested for the MTC Classifier using microarrays. Results: Forty-three cases were positive by the MTC Classifier among 10,488 tested nodules (0.4%), consistent with the low prevalence of MTC. Of these, all but one was histologically or biochemically confirmed as MTC, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%. Of the positive cases, only 19 (44%) had been specifically suspected of MTC by cytology, highlighting the limitations of light microscopy to detect this disease. Three surgically confirmed MTC cases that were detected by the MTC Classifier had low basal serum calcitonin values, indicating these would have been missed by traditional calcitonin screening methods. A pooled analysis of three independent validation sets demonstrates high test sensitivity (97.9%), specificity (99.8%), PPV (97.9%), and negative predictive value (99.8%). Conclusions: A clinical paradigm is proposed, whereby cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules being tested for common malignancies using gene expression can be simultaneously tested for MTC using the same genomic assay at no added cost. PMID:26992356

  8. Exomic Sequencing of Medullary Thyroid Cancer Reveals Dominant and Mutually Exclusive Oncogenic Mutations in RET and RAS

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuchen; Sausen, Mark; Leary, Rebecca; Bettegowda, Chetan; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Bhan, Sheetal; Ho, Allen S.; Khan, Zubair; Bishop, Justin; Westra, William H.; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Tufano, Ralph P.; Robinson, Bruce; Dralle, Henning; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Morris, Luc G. T.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Fagin, James A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Nelkin, Barry D.; Ball, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare thyroid cancer that can occur sporadically or as part of a hereditary syndrome. Objective: To explore the genetic origin of MTC, we sequenced the protein coding exons of approximately 21,000 genes in 17 sporadic MTCs. Patients and Design: We sequenced the exomes of 17 sporadic MTCs and validated the frequency of all recurrently mutated genes and other genes of interest in an independent cohort of 40 MTCs comprised of both sporadic and hereditary MTC. Results: We discovered 305 high-confidence mutations in the 17 sporadic MTCs in the discovery phase, or approximately 17.9 somatic mutations per tumor. Mutations in RET, HRAS, and KRAS genes were identified as the principal driver mutations in MTC. All of the other additional somatic mutations, including mutations in spliceosome and DNA repair pathways, were not recurrent in additional tumors. Tumors without RET, HRAS, or KRAS mutations appeared to have significantly fewer mutations overall in protein coding exons. Conclusions: Approximately 90% of MTCs had mutually exclusive mutations in RET, HRAS, and KRAS, suggesting that RET and RAS are the predominant driver pathways in MTC. Relatively few mutations overall and no commonly recurrent driver mutations other than RET, HRAS, and KRAS were seen in the MTC exome. PMID:23264394

  9. Horner's Syndrome Incidental to Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Excision: Case Report and Brief Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mastronikolis, Nicholas S.; Spiliopoulou, Sofia P.; Zolota, Vassiliki; Papadas, Theodoros A.

    2016-01-01

    Horner's syndrome is characterized by a combination of ipsilateral miosis, blepharoptosis, enophthalmos, facial anhidrosis, and iris heterochromia in existence of congenital lesions. The syndrome results from a disruption of the ipsilateral sympathetic innervation of the eye and ocular adnexa at different levels. Though rare, thyroid and neck surgery could be considered as possible causes of this clinical entity. We present a case of Horner's syndrome in a patient after total thyroidectomy and neck dissection for medullary thyroid cancer with neck nodal disease and attempt a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:27200201

  10. Characterization of the Immunochemical Forms of Calcitonin Released by a Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma in Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Goltzman, David; Tischler, Arthur S.

    1978-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin released by a medullary thyroid carcinoma in tissue culture has been found to exhibit heterogeneity when analyzed by gel chromatography and radioimmunoassay, in a pattern analogous to that seen in the circulation of the patient from whom the neoplasm was removed. To examine the cause of the heterogeneity, the immunoreactive material released by the tumor into tissue culture medium was further analyzed by gel electrophoresis in the presence of the protein denaturant 8 M urea, by gel chromatography after reduction and alkylation, by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and by bioassay in a renal adenylyl cyclase system of enhanced sensitivity. The results suggest that the larger immunochemical forms of calcitonin described in the circulation of patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma may be released directly from the neoplasm and need not derive from peripheral metabolism of the monomer. It could be demonstrated that a major proportion of the immunochemical enlargement is dependent upon intermolecular disulfide bridge formation whereas aggregation or non-convalent protein binding account for a smaller component of the heterogeneity. In view of the absence of binding of the immunoreactive material to the lectin agarose, carbohydrate side chains, at least of the α-d glucosyl variety, do not seem to contribute significantly to calcitonin enlargement. Additionally, the studies indicate that, at least by in vitro assay, the larger immunochemical forms of calcitonin, representing the majority of the immunoreactivity released by a medullary thyroid carcinoma, are biologically inactive. PMID:621283

  11. Recurrent well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Magarey, Matthew J R; Freeman, Jeremy L

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of Well-differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (WDTC) has been increasing over the past several decades. Consequently, so has the incidence of recurrence, which ranges from 15% to 30%. Factors leading to increased risk of recurrence are well described. However, the impact of local and regional recurrence is not well understood, but distant recurrence dramatically reduces 10-year survival to 50%. Recurrent WDTC has several established options for treatment; Observation, Radioactive Iodine (RAI), Surgery and External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT). Novel treatments such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and percutaneous ultrasound-guided ethanol injection (PUEI) are beginning to gain popularity and have promising early results. A review of the current literature, outcome measurements and a strategy for revision surgery within the central neck compartment are discussed within this manuscript.

  12. The NANETS Consensus Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors: Pheochromocytoma, Paraganglioma & Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas, intra-adrenal paraganglioma, and extra-adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic paragangliomas are neuroendocrine tumors derived from adrenal chromaffin cells or similar cells in extra-adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia, respectively. Serious morbidity and mortality rates associated with these tumors are related to the potent effects of catecholamines on various organs, especially those of the cardiovascular system. Before any surgical procedure is done, pre-operative blockade is necessary to protect the patient against significant release of catecholamines due to anesthesia and surgical manipulation of the tumor. Treatment options vary with the extent of the disease with laparoscopic surgery being the preferred treatment for removal of primary tumors. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the thyroid C-cells or parafollicular cells. Thyroid c-cells elaborate a number of peptides and hormones, such as calcitonin, CEA, and chromogranin A. Some or all of these markers are elevated in patients with MTC and can be used to confirm the diagnosis as well as to follow patients longitudinally for recurrence. MTC consists of a spectrum of disease that ranges from extremely indolent tumors that are stable for many years to aggressive types associated with a high mortality rate. Genetic testing for RET mutations has allowed identification of familial cases and prophylactic thyroidectomy for cure. The only curative treatment is complete surgical resection. PMID:20664475

  13. Multiple endocrine neoplasia similar to human subtype 2A in a dog: Medullary thyroid carcinoma, bilateral pheochromocytoma and parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Arias, E.A. Soler; Castillo, V.A.; Trigo, R.H.; Caneda Aristarain, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Human multiple endocrine neoplasia subtype 2A (MEN 2A) is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma and parathyroid hyperplasia or adenoma in the same individual. In this report, a case of a female Rottweiler with medullary thyroid carcinoma, bilateral pheochromocytoma and parathyroid adenoma was described. Clinical manifestations of muscle weakness, polydipsia, polyuria, diarrhea and weight loss were observed. Two adrenal neoplasms were identified incidentally by ultrasonography, and tumor in the left thyroid lobe was identified by palpation. Primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed by biochemical testing. Histopathology report was consistent with diagnosis of bilateral pheochromocytoma and parathyroid adenoma. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for calcitonin and synaptophysin, and negative for thyroglobulin, which confirmed medullary thyroid carcinoma. This case in a dog is presenting neoplastic characteristics similar to human MEN 2A and emphasizing the importance of using immunohistochemistry for confirmation. PMID:27822452

  14. Targeting mTOR in RET mutant medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gild, Matti L; Landa, Iñigo; Ryder, Mabel; Ghossein, Ronald A; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by a gene that is frequently mutated in medullary thyroid cancer, have emerged as promising novel therapies for the disease. Rapalogs and other mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are effective agents in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which share lineage properties with medullary thyroid carcinomas. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of mTOR activity to RET-induced signaling and cell growth and to establish whether growth suppression is enhanced by co-targeting RET and mTOR kinase activities. Treatment of the RET mutant cell lines TT, TPC-1, and MZ-CRC-1 with AST487, a RET kinase inhibitor, suppressed growth and showed profound and sustained inhibition of mTOR signaling, which was recapitulated by siRNA-mediated RET knockdown. Inhibition of mTOR with INK128, a dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase inhibitor, also resulted in marked growth suppression to levels similar to those seen with RET blockade. Moreover, combined treatment with AST487 and INK128 at low concentrations suppressed growth and induced apoptosis. These data establish mTOR as a key mediator of RET-mediated cell growth in thyroid cancer cells and provide a rationale for combinatorial treatments in thyroid cancers with oncogenic RET mutations. PMID:23828865

  15. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  16. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Other Thyroid Cancers: Medullary, Anaplastic, Lymphoma and So Forth

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Çayır, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in staging, restaging, and evaluation of therapy response in many cancers as well as differentiated thyroid carcinomas especially in non-iodine avid variants. Its potential in less frequent thyroid tumors like medullary, anaplastic thyroid cancers, thyroid lymphoma and metastatic tumors of the thyroid however, is not well established yet. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the recent applications and indications of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these tumors and to focus on the controversies in the clinical setting. PMID:28291004

  17. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  18. Medullary Carcinoma of the Thyroid With Axillary Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Murat; Makay, Ozer; Simsir, Ilgin; Ertan, Yeşim; Icoz, Gokhan; Saygili, Füsun; Akyildiz, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of axillary lymph node metastasis as a consequence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in a 42-year-old man. On January 2009, the patient was referred to us for the management of right cervical lymph node enlargement. Total thyroidectomy was performed with right-sided functional neck dissection. Postoperative histopathology revealed MTC in the right lobe of the thyroid, with extrathyroidal extension and right-sided neck metastases. Multiple left cervical, mediastinal, and right axillary lymphadenopathies were detected at the third year follow-up exam. Left-sided functional neck dissection, axillary lymph node dissection, and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed, and the pathologic outcomes revealed as the metastatic dissemination of MTC. After a disease-free term for 1 year, multiple metastatic lesions were detected in the patient. PMID:25785315

  19. Circulating calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen m-RNA detected by RT-PCR as tumour markers in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bojunga, J; Dragan, C; Schumm-Draeger, P M; Usadel, K H; Kusterer, K

    2001-01-01

    Detection of local relapse or metastasis in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) continue to pose a major diagnostic challenge. Besides established diagnostic studies such as serum calcitonin (CT) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), molecular detection of circulating tumour cells may be an additional diagnostic tool for the early detection of disease recurrence. We performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on blood samples from patients diagnosed with MTC disease using primers specific for CT and CEA, respectively. CT mRNA was not detectable in peripheral blood of all patients with MTC (n = 11) and all controls (n = 32). CEA mRNA was significantly more often detected patients with MTC (72.7%) than in controls (34.4%; p = 0.038; Fisher exact test). With an example of a patient with MTC and massive tumour mass in the neck we demonstrate the failure of detection of CT mRNA over a period of 6 months, whereas CEA mRNA could be detected in peripheral blood of this patient. As a consequence, CT mRNA detected by RT-PCR in the peripheral blood can not be recommended as a tumour marker in MTC. However, the use of carcinoembryonic mRNA may provide a significant improvement in diagnosis of recurrent disease in MTC. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign   http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720443

  20. RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and associated cutaneous amyloidosis binding OSMR variant p.G513D.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Cao, Jin-Lin; Du, Juan; Liu, Nai-Fang; Li, Feng; Sheng, Mao; Fu, Er; Guo, Jian; Jia, Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ming; Ma, Ju-Ming

    2015-10-20

    There are no reports on the relationship between familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) associated with cutaneous amyloidosis (CA) and RET or OSMR/IL31RA gene mutations. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family with FMTC/CA and found a recurrent RET c.2671T>G (p.S891A) mutation in six of 17 family members. Three of the six p.S891A mutation carriers presented with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Of them, three (two with and one without MTC) were diagnosed as having combined lichen/macular biphasic CA. We also identified a novel RET variant, c.1573C>T (p.R525W) in five members. Of them, three carriers had no evidence of thyroid/skin or basal serum/stimulated calcitonin abnormalities. In vitro cell proliferation assay indicated that oncogenic activity of RET p.S891A was slightly enhanced by p.R525W, whereas p.R525W alone had no effect on cell proliferation. Meanwhile, we identified a novel OSMR variant, c.1538G>A (p.G513D) in seven members. We noticed that three OSMR p.G513D carriers presenting with CA also had the RET p.S891A mutation. Our investigation indicated that the RET p.S891A mutation combined with OSMR p.G513D may underlie a novel phenotype manifesting as FMTC and CA.

  1. Ectopic ACTH Production Leading to Diagnosis of Underlying Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Leslee N.; Wilson, Jessica R.; Baum, Howard B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has been described as a source of ectopic ACTH secretion in patients with Cushing’s syndrome. This is an infrequent association, occurring in less than 1% of MTC cases. Among these, it is even more unusual for an initial diagnosis of hypercortisolism to lead to the discovery of underlying MTC. Here we present a case of a patient with weakness, diarrhea, and hypokalemia who was found first to have Cushing’s syndrome and later diagnosed with metastatic MTC. The patient was treated initially with oral agents to control his hypercortisolism, then with an etomidate infusion after experiencing intestinal perforation. He also received vandetanib therapy targeting his underlying malignancy, as this has been shown to reverse clinical signs of Cushing’s syndrome in patients with MTC and subsequent ectopic ACTH secretion. Bilateral adrenalectomy was ultimately required. Medullary thyroid carcinoma should be considered in patients presenting with Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, and a multimodality treatment approach is often required. PMID:27141514

  2. Type 2 Iodothyronine Deiodinase Is Highly Expressed in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Erika L Souza; Goemann, Iuri M; Dora, José Miguel; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2008-01-01

    Summary Type II deiodinase (D2) plays a critical role in controlling intracellular T3 concentration and early studies indicated a follicular but not a parafollicular C-cell origin of D2 activity in the thyroid gland. Here, we show that D2 is highly expressed in human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a tumour that arises from the C-cells. D2 transcripts were detected in all MTC samples obtained from 12 unselected MTC patients and the levels of D2 activity were comparable to those found in surrounding normal follicular tissue (0.41±0.10 vs 0.43±0.41 fmol.min.mg.protein, P=0.91). Additional analysis in the TT cells, a human MTC cell line, demonstrated that the D2 expression is down regulated by thyroid hormones and enhanced by cAMP analogs and dexamethasone. The thyroid hormone receptor α1 and β isoforms were also detected in all MTC samples and in TT cells, thus suggesting a potential role of T3 locally produced by D2 in this neoplastic tissue. PMID:18514391

  3. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  4. Mutations of codon 918 in the RET proto-oncogene correlate to poor prognosis in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zedenius, J.; Svensson, A.; Baeckdahl, M.; Wallin, G.

    1995-10-01

    The hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes types 2A and B (MEN 2A and B) were recently linked to germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, altering one of five cysteine residues in exon 10 or 11 (MEN 2A), or substituting a methionine for a threonine at codon 918 in exon 16 (MEN 2B). The latter mutation also occurs somatically in some sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC), and has in a previous study been correlated with a less favorable clinical outcome. In the present study, 46 MTCs were selected for investigation of the codon 918 mutation. The mutation was found in 29 tumors (63%), and was significantly correlated with a poor outcome, with regard to distant metastasis or tumor recurrence (p<10{sup 4}). Two tumors showed multifocal growth and C-cell hyperplasia, and these patients were therefore also investigated for germline mutations in exons 10, 11 and 16. The codon 918 mutation was found only in the tumors, thus of somatic origin. The RET codon 918 mutation may have prognostic impact, and therefore preoperative assessment may influence decision-making in the treatment of patients suffering from MTC. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in relation to hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kameya, T.; Shimosato, Y.; Adachi, I.; Abe, K.; Kasai, N.; Kimura, K.; Baba, K.

    1977-01-01

    Eighteen cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid were analyzed immunohistochemically for calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells, and tumor cells in 8 cases were examined by an electron microscope and analyzed by manual and computer procedures with particular attention paid to the size and quality of secretory granules. Calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells were found singly or in clusters in 14 and 11 tumors, respectively. In 4 cases, calcitonin-positive cell clusters and an increase in number of singly scattered C cells were seen apart from the main tumor, suggesting a multicentric nature of certain medullary carcinomas. Some ACTH-containing cells were apparently also positive for calcitonin. In a case of familial Sipple disease, follicular lining cells were replaced in areas with ACTH-containing cells. Three to five frequency distribution curves of the size of secretory granules were obtained in all of 6 cases analyzed, and at least two different types of granule matrix were identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:202164

  6. Bone and liver images in medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.G.; Coleman, R.E.; McCook, T.A.; Dale, J.K.; Wells, S.A.

    1984-04-01

    Thirty-four patients with surgically documented medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MCT) and elevated serum calcitonin levels had Tc-99m phosphate bone and/or Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver images for suspected metastases. Liver images demonstrated metastatic lesions in nine of 32 patients (28%). Bone images were positive for metastases in eight of 30 patients (27%). Four of these eight abnormal bone studies detected only skeletal lesions, two demonstrated only extraosseous metastases, and two showed both kinds. This study demonstrates that radionuclide bone and liver images frequently detect metastatic lesions in patients with MCT and elevated serum calcitonin levels, and that some nonskeletal metastases in patients with this tumor display an unusual affinity for bone-seeking radiotracers.

  7. Vandetanib Successfully Controls Medullary Thyroid Cancer-Related Cushing Syndrome in an Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nella, A. A.; Fox, E.; Balis, F. M.; Quezado, M. M.; Whitcomb, P. O.; Derdak, J.; Kebebew, E.; Widemann, B. C.; Stratakis, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ectopic Cushing syndrome due to ACTH secretion from metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe the first case of Cushing syndrome associated with MTC in a pediatric patient and the successful reversal of Cushing syndrome with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (vandetanib) therapy. Patient and Methods: A 17-year-old Brazilian adolescent presented with metastatic MTC and associated ACTH-dependent ectopic Cushing syndrome in the context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. When the patient was treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, rapid decrease in serum cortisol and improvement of clinical symptoms were observed. Conclusion: We describe the first pediatric case of clinical and biochemical improvement of paraneoplastic MTC-related Cushing syndrome after treatment with vandetanib. Vandetanib and possibly other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be a novel beneficial option in patients with neuroendocrine tumor-related ectopic Cushing syndrome. PMID:24617713

  8. New radionuclide tracers for the diagnosis and therapy of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Delprat, C.C.; Zanin, D.; van der Schoot, J.B.

    1988-03-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a calcitonin-producing tumor that occurs in familial and sporadic forms, can be monitored satisfactorily with measurements of calcitonin and CEA in serum. However, locating the tumor site may be difficult. In the current review of the experience with four new radionuclide tracers for MTC, the relative value of each of these procedures is outlined. Total body imaging using TI-201 chloride and Tc-99m(V) DMSA are both sensitive techniques that can be used for the detection and follow-up of MTC. Imaging using I-131 MIBG and I-131 anti-CEA antibodies/fragments should be performed once the diagnosis and the tumor site have been established, to evaluate if patients might be amenable for therapy with one of these radiopharmaceuticals.

  9. Digitalis-like Compounds Facilitate Non-Medullary Thyroid Cancer Redifferentiation through Intracellular Ca2+, FOS, and Autophagy-Dependent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tesselaar, Marika H; Crezee, Thomas; Swarts, Herman G; Gerrits, Danny; Boerman, Otto C; Koenderink, Jan B; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Netea, Mihai G; Smit, Johannes W A; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Plantinga, Theo S

    2017-01-01

    Up to 20%-30% of patients with metastatic non-medullary thyroid cancer have persistent or recurrent disease resulting from tumor dedifferentiation. Tumor redifferentiation to restore sensitivity to radioactive iodide (RAI) therapy is considered a promising strategy to overcome RAI resistance. Autophagy has emerged as an important mechanism in cancer dedifferentiation. Here, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of autophagy activators for redifferentiation of thyroid cancer cell lines. Five autophagy-activating compounds, all known as digitalis-like compounds, restored hNIS expression and iodide uptake in thyroid cancer cell lines. Upregulation of hNIS was mediated by intracellular Ca(2+) and FOS activation. Cell proliferation was inhibited by downregulating AKT1 and by induction of autophagy and p21-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Digitalis-like compounds, also designated as cardiac glycosides for their well-characterized beneficial effects in the treatment of heart disease, could therefore represent a promising repositioned treatment modality for patients with RAI-refractory thyroid carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 169-81. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Expression of sex steroid hormone receptors in C cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bléchet, Claire; Lecomte, Pierre; De Calan, Loïc; Beutter, Patrice; Guyétant, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that C cells are twice as numerous in male than in female thyroids and that C cell hyperplasia (CCH) is much more frequent in men. These findings suggest regulation involving sex steroid hormones through the expression of sex steroid hormone receptors on C cells. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed an immunohistochemical study of estrogen receptors alpha (ER alpha) and beta (ER beta), progesterone receptors (PR), and androgen receptors (AR) on specimens from a series of 40 patients operated on for a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC; n=28; female 18, male 10) and/or CCH (n=19; female 6, male 13). ER beta was the only receptor to be consistently expressed in CCH (100%) and MTC (96.5%), whereas ER alpha was never expressed. PR and AR were rarely expressed in MTC (7 and 14%, respectively). AR was expressed in half the CCH cases (53%), with a trend to male predominance (61% in men vs 33% in women). Our study is the first to describe ER beta expression in CCH. In addition, our findings suggest that CCH, and possibly MTC, might be influenced by sex steroid hormones, namely, estrogens and androgens, through the expression of ER beta and AR on C cells.

  11. Targeted DNA Sequencing Detects Mutations Related to Susceptibility among Familial Non-medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Dong, Li; Li, Dapeng; Chuai, Shaokun; Wu, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiangqian; Cheng, Yanan; Han, Lei; Yu, Jinpu; Gao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that familial non-medullary thyroid cancer (FNMTC) has a more aggressive clinical behavior compared to sporadic NMTC (SNMTC). However, FNMTC is difficult to differentiate from SNMTC by the morphology and immunohistochemistry. Although genes responsible for FNMTC were unclear, screening for rare germline mutations on known important tumor suppressor genes might offer more insights on predicting susceptibility to FNMTC. Here, a customized panel was designed to capture all exons of 31 cancer susceptive genes possibly related to FNMTC. Using next-generation sequencing we performed deep sequencing to achieve 500× coverage of the targeted regions. At the end 45 variants were identified in 29 of 47 familial patients and 6 of 16 sporadic patients. Notably, several germline mutations were found matching between paired FNMTC patients from the same family, including APC L292F and A2778S, BRAF D22N, MSH6 G355S and A36V, MSH2 L719F, MEN1 G508D, BRCA1 SS955S, BRCA2 G2508S, and a GNAS inframe insertion. We demonstrated a novel approach to help diagnose and elucidate the genetic cause of the FNMTC patients, and assess whether their family members are exposed to a higher genetic risk. The findings would also provide insights on monitoring the potential second cancers for thyroid cancer patients. PMID:26530882

  12. Ursolic acid from Trailliaedoxa gracilis induces apoptosis in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    AGUIRIANO-MOSER, VICTOR; SVEJDA, BERNHARD; LI, ZENG-XIA; STURM, SONJA; STUPPNER, HERMANN; INGOLIC, ELISABETH; HÖGER, HARALD; SIEGL, VERONIKA; MEIER-ALLARD, NATHALIE; SADJAK, ANTON; PFRAGNER, ROSWITHA

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the C-cells of the thyroid and is not sensitive to radiation or chemotherapy. Therefore, surgical removal of the tumor tissue in its entirety is the only curative treatment for MTC. The present study aimed to examine the potential mechanisms of action of extracts of Trailliaedoxa gracilis (TG; WW Smith & Forrest), a plant from the province of Sichuan, China, and of ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpen present in TG, on the MTC-SK MTC cell line. A total of 13 TG fractions and UA were examined in vitro for their effects on cell morphology, cell number, proliferation and rates of apoptosis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of nuclear factor-κB essential modifier (NEMO) was performed to delineate the role of the apoptotic pathway following treatment with UA. TG and UA were examined in vivo in xenotransplanted MTC-bearing severe combined immunodeficient mice. The TG fractions exhibited antiproliferative effects, with inhibition of mitochondrial activity in the tumor cells at concentrations, which caused no impairment of the normal control cells. The apoptotic rates of the MTC-SK cells treated with the TG fractions and UA were determined, in which no marked tumor inhibition was observed in the treated MTC-mice, and no change in the expression of NEMO was detected in the treated MTC-SK cells. The observation of early-onset activation of caspase 8 suggested that the responsible factor was linked to NEMO, an anti-apoptotic protein. However, no differences in the mRNA transcription levels of NEMO were detected in MTC-SK cells treated with UA, suggesting that this protein was not associated with the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. PMID:26151624

  13. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: a 30-year experience at one institution in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cho Rok; Lee, Sohee; Son, Haiyoung; Ban, Eunjeong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Lee, Jandee; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to review the clinical outcome and prognosis of patients with sporadic and hereditary medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) who were treated at a single tertiary hospital in Korea. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the case files of 85 patients treated from August 1982 to February 2012. Results In all, 65 patients (76.5%) had sporadic MTC and 20 patients (23.5%) had hereditary MTC. Patients in the sporadic group were older than in the hereditary group (P < 0.001). However, the hereditary group had more tumor multiplicity (P < 0.001) and bilaterality (P < 0.001). Neither survival rate was significantly different between the sporadic and hereditary groups (P = 0.775 and P = 0.866). By multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was a significant prognostic factor for overall and progression-free survival. Conclusion In general, patients with MTC have favorable outcomes. Distant metastasis appears to be the strongest predictor of overall and progression-free survival. PMID:27904849

  14. The molecular biology of medullary thyroid carcinoma: A model for cancer development and progression

    SciTech Connect

    Nelkin, B.D.; de Bustros, A.C.; Mabry, M.; Baylin, S.B. )

    1989-06-02

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an important human cancer for the study of molecular abnormalities that underlie initiation of neoplasia and subsequent cellular changes during tumor progression. Thus tumor can occur in different inherited forms, each mediated by autosomal dominant genetic events. Germline abnormalities on chromosome 10 are linked to at least one type of genetic MTC, multiple endocrine neoplasia type II. These studies of chromosome 10 in DNA from MTC tumors failed to detect frequent loss of polymorphic DNA markers, suggesting that the genetic mechanisms involved in MTC development may be different from those for other inherited cancers such as retinoblastoma. During tumor progression of MTC, abnormalities develop in expression of the mature phenotype of the endocrine cell from which the tumor arises. In cell culture, chemical modulation or gene insertion can lead to partial correction of these defects in differentiation capacity by activating cellular signaling processes. These studies offer opportunities to dissect the molecular events that regulate endocrine cell differentiation, to determine the precise abnormalities that may underlie the initiation and tumor progression events in MTC and related cancers, and, thereby, to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Overview and Management of Dermatologic Events Associated with Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciccolini, Kathryn; Kloos, Richard T.; Agulnik, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment options for patients with advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) have, in recent years, expanded with the approval of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs): vandetanib and cabozantinib. Other agents, including TKIs, are under clinical investigation for MTC. Although patients treated with TKIs are at risk of developing dermatologic adverse events (AE), these untoward events may be mitigated through AE-driven algorithms. Summary: AE-driven algorithms combine effective nonpharmaceutical and pharmaceutical treatment modalities implemented by a multidisciplinary effort that incorporates nursing interventions, patient education, and referrals to pain-management specialists, podiatrists, and dermatologists, as appropriate. Effective AE prevention and management reduce the need for dose interruptions and modifications, allowing patients the opportunity to derive the maximal benefit from TKI therapy, while maintaining quality of life. Conclusions: Optimal use of targeted therapies in the treatment of MTC depends on careful patient selection, interdisciplinary communication, and patient education and encouragement to enhance compliance and safety, optimize consistent dosing, and maximize the use of effective therapies. PMID:24902006

  16. Diagnostic and therapeutic potential of new radiopharmaceutical agents in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Troncone, L.; Rufini, V.; De Rosa, G.; Testa, A.

    1989-01-01

    Recently developed radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for imaging medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with some having therapeutic potential. This study compares the imaging results obtained with radioiodinated meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA, and {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in a group of MTC patients. In 23 patients {sup 131}I MIBG imaging showed a high specificity (no false-positive results) but a less satisfactory sensitivity (50%). In 12 patients {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA revealed a better sensitivity (77%) but a lower specificity (three false-positive results). Positive results were obtained in two of three patients studied with {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-CEA. These data suggest that the highly sensitive {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA should be considered as a first choice procedure followed by the highly specific radioiodinated MIBG to confirm the initial results. Since radioiodinated MIBG imaging may have therapeutic usefulness, {sup 131}I MIBG was evaluated in an integrated treatment protocol in four cases of proven MTC. The preliminary results obtained were encouraging.

  17. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na’ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  18. Results of a screening program for C-cell disease (medullary thyroid cancer and C-cell hyperplasia).

    PubMed

    Simpson, W J; Carruthers, J S; Malkin, D

    1990-04-01

    In the authors' Medullary Screening Clinic, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) or C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) has been identified in 26 relatives of 12 apparently "sporadic" patients from 56 families in which calcitonin (CT) testing has been performed. The interpretation of stimulated test results was sometimes difficult: elevated basal levels without a significant increase after the injection of secretagogues; basal levels in the normal range with considerable increases after stimulation but not exceeding two or three times the upper limit of normal; elevated basal or stimulated CT levels that slowly decreased to normal or near-normal levels over relatively short periods of time. The latter results suggest the possibility of CCH disappearing spontaneously in some patients.

  19. Effect of an Outreach Programme on Vandetanib Safety in Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bastholt, Lars; Kreissl, Michael C.; Führer, Dagmar; Maia, Ana L.; Locati, Laura D.; Maciel, Léa; Wu, Yi; Heller, Kevin N.; Webster, Alan; Elisei, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Effective management of adverse events (AEs) following vandetanib treatment is important to maximize clinical benefits. We examined whether more frequent contact with vandetanib-treated patients reduced AEs of CTCAE grade 2 or higher. Study Design In this open-label, multicentre, phase III study, patients with locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer were randomized to a patient outreach programme (outreach) or a standard AE monitoring schedule (vandetanib control) for 52 weeks. In addition to standard AE monitoring, patients in the outreach arm were contacted every 2 weeks by telephone/during their clinic visit for specific AE questioning related to diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, headache and rash. Patients received vandetanib at 200 or 300 mg/day, depending on the creatinine levels at screening. Results Altogether, 205 patients were randomized (outreach, n = 103; vandetanib control, n = 102). This study did not meet its primary objective; the mean percentage of time patients experienced at least one AE of grade 2 or higher was higher for the outreach group (51.65%) than for the vandetanib control group (45.19%); the difference was not statistically significant (t statistic: 1.29; 95% CI −3.44 to 16.37%; p = 0.199). The most frequently reported AEs were diarrhoea (56.9% for the outreach group vs. 46.6% for the vandetanib controls), hypertension (36.3 vs. 31.1%), rash (25.5 vs. 24.3%) and nausea (25.5% vs. 18.4%), and the most frequently reported AEs of grade 2 or higher were hypertension (33.3 vs. 23.3%), diarrhoea (26.5 vs. 24.3%) and dermatitis acneiform (11.8 vs. 9.7%). Conclusions Additional outreach to patients treated with vandetanib had no impact on the rate or severity of AEs compared to the standard AE monitoring schedule. AEs were consistent with the known safety profile of vandetanib. PMID:27843809

  20. Preclinical testing of selective Aurora kinase inhibitors on a medullary thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Tuccilli, Chiara; Baldini, Enke; Prinzi, Natalie; Morrone, Stefania; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio; Alessandrini, Stefania; Rendina, Roberta; Coccaro, Carmela; D'Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    Deregulated expression of the Aurora kinases (Aurora-A, B, and C) is thought to be involved in cell malignant transformation and genomic instability in several cancer types. Over the last decade, a number of small-molecule inhibitors of Aurora kinases have been developed, which have proved to efficiently restrain malignant cell growth and tumorigenicity. Regarding medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we previously showed the efficacy of a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor (MK-0457) in impairing growth and survival of the MTC-derived cell line TT. In the present study, we sought to establish if one of the Aurora kinases might represent a preferential target for MTC therapy. The effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) were analyzed on TT cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and ploidy. The two inhibitors reduced TT cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC50 of 19.0 ± 2.4 nM for MLN8237 and 401.6 ± 44.1 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that AZD1152 inhibited phosphorylation of histone H3 (Ser10) by Aurora-B, while it did not affect Aurora-A autophosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited Aurora-A autophosphorylation as expected, but at concentrations required to achieve the maximum antiproliferative effects it also abolished H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation. Cytofluorimetry experiments showed that both inhibitors induced accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and increased the subG0/G1 fraction and polyploidy. Finally, both inhibitors triggered apoptosis. We demonstrated that inhibition of either Aurora-A or Aurora-B has antiproliferative effects on TT cells, and thus it would be worthwhile to further investigate the therapeutical potential of Aurora kinase inhibitors in MTC treatment.

  1. Multi-step approach in a complex case of Cushing's syndrome and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Parenti, G; Nassi, R; Silvestri, S; Bianchi, S; Valeri, A; Manca, G; Mangiafico, S; Ammannati, F; Serio, M; Mannelli, M; Peri, A

    2006-02-01

    The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome (CS) may sometimes be cumbersome. In particular, in ACTH-dependent CS it may be difficult to distinguish between the presence of an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma and ectopic ACTH and/or CRH secretion. In such instances, the etiology of CS may remain unknown despite extensive diagnostic workout, and the best therapeutic option for each patient has to be determined. We report here the case of a 54-yr-old man affected by ACTH-dependent CS in association with a left adrenal adenoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). He presented with clinical features and laboratory indexes of hypercortisolism associated with elevated levels of calcitonin. Ectopic CS due to MTC was reported previously. In our case hypercortisolism persisted after surgical treatment of MTC. Thorough diagnostic assessment was performed, in order to define the aetiology of CS. He was subjected to basal and dynamic hormonal evaluation, including bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling. Extensive imaging evaluation was also performed. Overall, the laboratory data together with the results of radiological procedures suggested that CS might be due to inappropriate CRH secretion. However, the source of CRH secretion in this patient remained unknown. It was then decided to remove the left adenomatous adrenal gland. Cortisol level fell and has remained within the normal range nine months after surgery. This case well depicts the complexity of the diagnostic workout, which is needed sometimes to correctly diagnose and treat CS, and suggests that monolateral adrenalectomy may represent, at least temporarily, a reasonable therapeutic option in occult ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism.

  2. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). PMID:26487970

  3. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC).

  4. Distribution of RET Mutations and Evaluation of Treatment Approaches in Hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Yüksel, Bağdagül; Tuna, Mazhar Müslüm; Navdar Başaran, Mehtap; Akkurt Kocaeli, Ayşen; Ertörer, Melek Eda; Aydın, Kadriye; Güldiken, Sibel; Şimşek, Yasin; Cihan Karaca, Züleyha; Yılmaz, Merve; Aktürk, Müjde; Anaforoğlu, İnan; Kebapçı, Nur; Duran, Cevdet; Taşlıpınar, Abdullah; Kulaksızoğlu, Mustafa; Gürsoy, Alptekin; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective multicenter study, centrally conducted and supported by the Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism of Turkey, aimed to evaluate the impact of free RET proto-oncogene testing in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) patients. Surgical timing, adequacy of the treatment, and frequency of prophylactic thyroidectomy (PTx) in mutation carriers were also assessed. Methods: Genetic testing for MTC and pheochromocytoma was conducted between July 2008 and January 2012 in 512 patients. Application forms and RET mutation analyses of these patients whose blood samples were sent from various centers around Turkey were assessed retrospectively. An evaluation form was sent to the physicians of the eligible 319 patients who had confirmed sporadic MTC, familial MTC (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), or who were mutation carriers. Physicians were asked to give information about the surgical history, latest calcitonin levels, morbidity, mortality, genetic screening, and PTx among family members. Twenty-five centers responded by filling in the forms of 192 patients. Results: Among the 319 patients, RET mutation was detected in 71 (22.3%). Cys634Arg mutation was the most prevalent mutation (43.7%), followed by Val804Met in 18 patients (25.4%), and Cys634Tyr in 6 patients (8.5%). Among 192 MTC patients, the diagnosis was sporadic MTC in 146 (76.4%), FMTC in 14 (7.3%), MEN2A in 15 patients (7.9%), and MEN2B in one patient. The number of mutation carriers among 154 apparently sporadic MTC patients was 8 (5.2%). Ten patients were submitted to PTx out of twenty-four mutation carriers at a mean age of 35±19 years. Conclusion: Turkish people have a similar RET proto-oncogene mutation distribution when compared to other Mediterranean countries. Despite free RET gene testing, the number of the PTx in Turkey is limited and relatively late in the life span of the carriers. This is mainly due to patient and family incompliance and incomplete family

  5. Pembrolizumab and Lenvatinib in Treating Metastatic or Recurrent Differentiated Thyroid Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Columnar Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Follicular Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  6. Succinate dehydrogenase D variants do not constitute a risk factor for developing C cell hyperplasia or sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cascon, Alberto; Cebrian, Arancha; Pollan, Marina; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Leton, Rocio; Gutierrez, Ruth; Lesueur, Fabienne; Milne, Roger L; Gonzalez-Albarran, Olga; Lucas-Morante, Tomas; Benitez, Javier; Ponder, Bruce A J; Robledo, Mercedes

    2005-04-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a tumor that arises from parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. MTC can occur sporadically (75%) or as part of inherited cancer syndromes (25%). In most cases, hereditary MTC evolves from preneoplastic C cell hyperplasia (CCH), so early detection of this pathology would evidently be critical. A recent study reports that alterations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) D are responsible for familial non-RET CCH. First, we studied SDHD in two families with hereditary non-RET CCH and found no alterations related to the inheritance of this disease. Then, we investigated whether the H50R variant could be a risk factor in the sporadic development of MTC in both Spanish and English patients. We found no evidence that the presence of the H50R is strongly associated with the risk of sporadic MTC, although we did observe an association with age at diagnosis of MTC in Spanish H50R carriers that we did not find in English patients. Finally, we looked for evidence of CCH or any other thyroid disease in a panel of germ-line SDH (B or D) mutation carriers and found none. We conclude that SDHD variants do not constitute a risk factor for developing CCH or sporadic MTC.

  7. Mild to moderate increase of serum calcitonin levels only in presence of large medullary thyroid cancer deposits.

    PubMed

    Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Da Roit, A; Merante Boschin, I; Chondrogiannis, S; Rampin, L; Colletti, P M; Vinjamury, S; Perkins, A J; Rubello, D

    2015-01-01

    Many open questions remain to be elucidated about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). The most intriguing concerns the outcome of MTC patients after surgery. Great importance is usually given to serum calcitonin (Ct) and carcinoembryonic (CEA) levels. It is commonly believed that the higher are the levels of these tumor markers and their kinetics (double time and velocity of markers levels) the worst is the prognosis. However, this is not the rule, as there are huge MTC metastatic deposits characterized by low serum Ct and CEA levels, and this condition is not closely related to the outcome of the disease during post-surgical follow-up. A series is reported here of patients who have these characteristics, as well as a description of their prognosis and clinical outcome.

  8. Bystander cytotoxicity in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells mediated by fusion yeast cytosine deaminase and 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Matuskova, Miroslava; Hlubinova, Kristina; Bohovic, Roman; Feketeova, Lucia; Janega, Pavol; Babal, Pavel; Poturnajova, Martina

    2011-12-01

    In our work, we have evaluated efficiency of gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT) based on combination of fusion yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) on model human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line TT. We determined the efficiency of this GDEPT approach in suicide and bystander cytotoxicity induction. We have shown significant bystander effect in vitro and 5FC administration resulted in potent antitumor effect in vivo. Furthermore, we have unraveled high efficiency of cell-mediated GDEPT, when human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were used as delivery vehicles in direct cocultures in vitro. Nevertheless, effector MSC exhibited inhibitory effect on TT cell proliferation and abrogated TT xenotransplant growth in vivo. We suggest that yCD/5FC combination represents another experimental treatment modality to be tested in MTC and our data further support the exploration of MSC antitumor potential for future use in metastatic MTC therapy.

  9. Case of multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B with probable ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting liver metastasis from medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Akira; Okada, Yosuke; Arao, Tadashi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    A 31 year old woman was diagnosed with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2B at 10 years old. Dark pigmentation gradually developed on her skin and her serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) was high, suggesting concurrent ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) loading test ruled out Cushing's disease and supported the diagnosis of EAS. Multiple low attenuation mass in the liver was observed in a computed tomography (CT) scan, and was suspected as ectopic ACTH-secreting metastatic tumor from medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). ACTH production by MTC is relatively rare, particularly in patients with MEN; patients with ectopic ACTH-secreting liver metastatic tumor from MTC in MEN 2B have never been reported previously.

  10. Functional significance of the novel H-RAS gene mutation M72I in a patient with medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Barollo, S; Pezzani, R; Cristiani, A; Bertazza, L; Rubin, B; Bulfone, A; Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Mantero, F; Pennelli, G; Moro, S; Mian, C

    2013-10-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts for around 5-10% of all thyroid cancers. Though usually sporadic, 1 in 4 cases are of genetic origin, with germinal mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in familial forms and somatic mutations both in RET and in the RAS family genes in sporadic ones.This study aimed to characterize a rare H-RAS sequence variant -M72I- in a patient with sporadic MTC, focusing on its functional significance.Mutation analysis was performed for the RET, N-RAS, K-RAS and H-RAS genes by direct sequencing. Western blot analysis was done on 4 thyroid tissues from 1 patient carrying the M72I mutation in H-RAS, 1 with the Q61R mutation in H-RAS, 1 with no RET, H-RAS, K-RAS or N-RAS gene mutations, and 1 normal thyroid, using different antibodies against Erk1/2, phospho-Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), Akt and phospho-Akt (Ser473). Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were completed for H-RAS wt and H-RAS M72I.Western blot analysis demonstrated that both MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways were activated in the MTC patient carrying the M72I variant. In silico results showed conformational changes in H-RAS that could influence its activation by Sos and phosphate binding. Results of molecular dynamics were consistent with Western blot experiments.The M72I mutation may contribute effectively to proliferation and survival signaling throughout the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. This work underscores the importance of studying genetic alterations that may lead to carcinogenesis.

  11. Genetic and epigenetic background and protein expression profiles in relation to telomerase activation in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Kjellin, Hanna; Sofiadis, Anastasios; Fotouhi, Omid; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Bäckdahl, Martin; Zedenius, Jan; Xu, Dawei; Lehtiö, Janne; Larsson, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTCs) exhibit telomerase activation in strong association with shorter patient survival. To understand the background of telomerase activation we quantified TERT copy numbers and TERT promoter methylation in 42 MTCs and normal thyroid references. Gain of TERT was demonstrated by quantitative PCR in 5/39 sporadic MTC. Increased methylation index (MetI) for CpG methylation at the TERT promoter was found in sporadic MTCs (P < 0.0001) and in MEN 2 associated MTCs (P = 0.011) vs. normal thyroid tissues. MetI correlated positively with TERT gene expression (r = 0.432, P = 0.006) and negatively with telomere length (r = −0.343, P = 0.032). MTC cases with MetI above the median of 52% had shorter survival as compared to cases with lower MetI (P = 0.005 for overall survival and P = 0.007 for disease-related survival). Protein expression profiles obtained by mass spectrometry were then studied in relation to telomerase activation in MTCs. Comparing protein levels between tumors defined by telomerase activity status, 240 proteins were associated with telomerase activity. Among telomerase activation positive cases a set of proteins was found to discriminate between MTCs with high and low TERT gene expression with enrichment for proteins involved in telomerase regulation. XRCC5 mRNA expression was found increased in MTCs vs. normal thyroid (P = 0.007). In conclusion the findings suggest a role for TERT copy number gain, TERT promoter methylation and XRCC5 expression in telomerase activation and telomere maintenance of MTC. PMID:26870890

  12. Results and summary of voting among the audience during presentation and discussion of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma clinical guidelines prepared by American Thyroid Association.

    PubMed

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Soderstrom, Folke

    2013-03-14

    The one-day ETA-CRN meeting, preceding the ETA meeting in Lisbon, was planned in advance to provide a thorough assessment of the European response to the published American Thyroid Association MTC guidelines. During the meeting, following each of the European speakers, a series of questions, related to the specific aspect, were presented to the audience. The responses from the audience were collected by an AudioResponseSystem (ARS voting system). The results of the voting showed in summary that European expert opinion leaders and an audience of specialists in treatment of Medullary Carcinoma welcomes the American Guidelines on the management of MTC, but simultaneously only partially agrees with some of the statements in the guidelines.

  13. Differences in the transcriptome of medullary thyroid cancer regarding the status and type of RET gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oczko-Wojciechowska, Malgorzata; Swierniak, Michal; Krajewska, Jolanta; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Kowal, Monika; Stokowy, Tomasz; Wojtas, Bartosz; Rusinek, Dagmara; Pawlaczek, Agnieszka; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Gawlik, Tomasz; Chmielik, Ewa; Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Nikiel, Barbara; Lange, Dariusz; Jarzab, Michal; Wiench, Malgorzata; Jarzab, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) can be caused by germline mutations of the RET proto-oncogene or occurs as a sporadic form. It is well known that RET mutations affecting the cysteine-rich region of the protein (MEN2A-like mutations) are correlated with different phenotypes than those in the kinase domain (MEN2B-like mutations). Our aim was to analyse the whole-gene expression profile of MTC with regard to the type of RET gene mutation and the cancer genetic background (hereditary vs sporadic). We studied 86 MTC samples. We demonstrated that there were no distinct differences in the gene expression profiles of hereditary and sporadic MTCs. This suggests a homogeneous nature of MTC. We also noticed that the site of the RET gene mutation slightly influenced the gene expression profile of MTC. We found a significant association between the localization of RET mutations and the expression of three genes: NNAT (suggested to be a tumour suppressor gene), CDC14B (involved in cell cycle control) and NTRK3 (tyrosine receptor kinase that undergoes rearrangement in papillary thyroid cancer). This study suggests that these genes are significantly deregulated in tumours with MEN2A-like and MEN2B-like mutations; however, further investigations are necessary to demonstrate any clinical impact of these findings. PMID:28181547

  14. Composite paraganglioma-ganglioneuroma concomitant with adrenal metastasis of medullary thyroid carcinoma in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Mutsushi; Sato, Yoshiyasu; Nomura, Takeo; Sato, Fuminori; Uchino, Shinya; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2017-02-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome with major components of medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and hyperparathyroidism. MEN2B is the most aggressive and rarest of the MEN2 variants. Pheochromocytoma in MEN2 is virtually always located in the adrenal medulla, but MEN2-associated extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas (paraganglioma) are rare. A 59-year-old man who has been diagnosed with MEN2B consulted our hospital for surgical treatment of a 10-mm left adrenal mass and a 30-mm retroperitoneal mass. He had paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure and in urinary metanephrine and vanillylmandelic acid values. Laparoscopic excision of the left adrenal gland and retroperitoneal mass was performed. We experienced an extremely rare case of composite paraganglioma-ganglioneuroma concomitant with adrenal metastasis of medullary thyroid carcinoma in a patient with MEN2B.

  15. New Treatment of Medullary and Papillary Human Thyroid Cancer: Biological Effects of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Loaded With Quercetin Alone or in Combination to an Inhibitor of Aurora Kinase.

    PubMed

    Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Armenia, Emilia; Aurilio, Caterina; Rosso, Francesco; Clemente, Ottavia; de Sena, Gabriele; Barbarisi, Manlio; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is based on the use of a hyaluronic acid hydrogel of Quercetin tested alone and in combination to an inhibitor of Aurora Kinase type A and B (SNS-314) on human medullary and papillary thyroid cancer cells. Biological investigations were focused on the cellular uptake of the hydrogel, cell viability, antioxidant, and cytokines secretion studies. Quercetin delivered from hydrogel show a time and CD44 dependent interaction with both cell lines with significant anti-inflammatory effects. Combination of Quercetin and SNS-314 leads to a synergistic cytotoxic effect on medullary TT and papillary BCPAP cell lines with a significant reduction of the IC50 value. These results, highlights the importance of synergistic effect of the hyaluronic acid hydrogel of Quercetin with SNS-314 in the regulation of human thyroid cancer cell proliferation and emphasize the anti-tumor activity of these molecules. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1784-1795, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Search of the p.M918T Mutation in the RET Oncogene in Mexican Adult Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Garcia, Erika; Vidal-Millan, Silvia; Lopez-Yañez, Alicia; Torres, José Antonio Posada; Guadarrama-Orozco, Jorge Alberto; Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saul; Meneses-Garcia, Abelardo; Astudillo-de la Vega, Horacio; Garcia, Martin Granados

    2017-02-06

    Inherited mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, predispose individuals to the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) cancer syndromes. The major component tumor of these syndromes is medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). To date, somatic mutations in RET have been identified in tumors from individuals with MEN 2 finding. RET M918T mutation is present in 95% of the MEN2B cases, and approximately 50% of sporadic MTCs harbor this mutation. We performed a mutational analysis in 17 cases of Medullary thyroid carcinoma, the somatic missense mutation at codon 918 of RET was found in 2 of the 17 MTCs, and one case presented MEN2 phenotype including MTC. The percentage of RET M918T mutation is similar in Mexican MTC patients to other series, although other mutations could be implicated in our population.

  17. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  18. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  19. Medullary and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland occurring as a collision tumour: report of three cases with molecular analysis and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Fugazzola, L; De Pasquale, L; Braidotti, P; Cirello, V; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bosari, S; Bastagli, A

    2005-06-01

    We report the simultaneous occurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), presenting as spatially distinct and well-defined tumour components, in three cases. In the first patient, histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy demonstrated an MTC in the one nodule and PTC in two additional lesions. Non-neoplastic thyroid parenchyma separated the three nodules. Metastasis from PTC was diagnosed in a regional lymph node. Genetic analysis of both tumour components showed a distinctive mutational pattern: in the MTC a Cys634Arg substitution in exon 11 of the RET gene and in the two PTC foci a Val600Glu substitution in exon 15 of the BRAF gene. The other two patients are members of a large multigenerational family affected with familial MTC due to a germline mutation of the RET gene (Ala891Ser). Both patients harboured, besides medullary cancer and C-cell hyperplasia, distinct foci of papillary thyroid cancer, which was positive for Val600Glu BRAF mutation. Review of the literature disclosed 18 similar lesions reported and allowed the identification of different patterns of clinical presentation and biological behaviour. So far, the pathogenesis of these peculiar cases of thyroid malignancy has been completely unknown, but an underlying common genetic drive has been hypothesised. This is the first report in which two mutations, in the RET and BRAF genes, have been identified in three cases of MTC/PTC collision tumour, thus documenting the different genetic origin of these two coexisting carcinomas.

  20. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  1. Routine exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery can prevent nerve injury★

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenling; Xiang, Mingliang; Wu, Hao; Ma, Yan; Chen, Li; Cheng, Lan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the value of dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery with respect to preventing recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 5 344 patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Among these cases, 548 underwent dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while 4 796 did not. There were 12 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection (injury rate of 2.2%) and 512 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in those not undergoing nerve dissection (injury rate of 10.7%). This difference remained statistically significant between the two groups in terms of type of thyroid disease, type of surgery, and number of surgeries. Among the 548 cases undergoing recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection, 128 developed anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (incidence rate of 23.4%), but no recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was found. In addition, the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was significantly lower in patients with the inferior parathyroid gland and middle thyroid veins used as landmarks for locating the recurrent laryngeal nerve compared with those with the entry of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx as a landmark. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve are common, and that dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery is an effective means of preventing nerve injury. PMID:25206452

  2. The expression of the truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor subtype 5 associates with aggressiveness in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molè, Daniela; Gentilin, Erica; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Gagliano, Teresa; Gahete, Manuel D; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Pansini, Giancarlo; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; degli Uberti, Ettore; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2015-11-01

    The truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 associates with increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast cancer. We previously found that sst5 activation may counteract sst2 selective agonist effects in a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, the TT cells, and that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate sst5TMD4 expression in a series of human MTC and to explore the functional role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells. We evaluated sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression in 36 MTC samples. Moreover, we investigated the role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells evaluating cell number, DNA synthesis, free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), calcitonin and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, cell morphology, protein expression, and invasion. We found that in MTC the balance between sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression influences disease stage. sst5TMD4 overexpression in TT cells confers a greater growth capacity, blocks sst2 agonist-induced antiproliferative effects, modifies the cell phenotype, decreases E-cadherin and phosphorylated β-catenin levels, increases vimentin, total β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK3B levels (in keeping with the development of epithelial to mesenchymal transition), and confers a greater invasion capacity. This is the first evidence indicating that sst5TMD4 is expressed in human MTC cells, where it associates with more aggressive behavior, suggesting that sst5TMD4 might play a functionally relevant role.

  3. Prognostic value of codon 918 (ATG-->ACG) RET proto-oncogene mutations in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schilling, T; Bürck, J; Sinn, H P; Clemens, A; Otto, H F; Höppner, W; Herfarth, C; Ziegler, R; Schwab, M; Raue, F

    2001-01-20

    We have determined the frequency of 918 RET proto-oncogene mutations (ATG-->ACG) in primary MTC tumors and metastases and correlated the presence or absence of this mutation with the clinical outcome of patients suffering from sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A total of 197 samples, consisting of both primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 34 patients with sporadic MTC, were collected for PCR analysis of the RET 918 mutation. In 75 of the samples (38%), codon 918 (ATG-->ACG) mutations could be detected. The mutations showed a heterogeneous distribution: 21/34 patients (62%) had mutations in at least 1 tumor sample, and in 13 patients (38%) the mutation was present in all examined samples. Patients were considered 918mt when at least 1 tumor sample showed the RET 918 mutation. These 918mt and 918 wild-type (918wt) patients did not differ significantly concerning sex, age at diagnosis, TNM stage at diagnosis, number of examined tumor samples or follow-up time. However, 918mt patients showed more aggressive development of distant metastases during follow-up (p = 0.032, Fisher's exact test) with decreased metastases-free survival (p < 0.005, log-rank test). Furthermore, 918mt patients had a significantly lower survival rate than 918wt patients (p = 0.048, log-rank test). These data show that the RET codon 918 mutation has a prognostic impact on patients with sporadic MTC which may influence follow-up treatment.

  4. Metastatic lymph node ratio can further stratify risk for mortality in medullary thyroid cancer patients: A population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhong-wu; Liao, Tian; Wen, Duo; Sun, Guo-hua; Li, Duan-shu; Ji, Qing-hai

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) has a propensity to cervical lymph node metastases (LNM). Recent studies have shown that both the number of involved lymph nodes (LNs) and the metastatic lymph node ratio (MLNR) confer prognostic information. This study was to determine the predictive value of MLNR on cancer-specific survival (CSS) in SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-registered MTC patients treated with thyroidectomy and lymphadenectomy between 1991 and 2012, investigate the cutoff points for MLNR in stratifying risk of mortality and provide evidence for selection of appropriate treatment strategies. X-tile program determined 0.5 as optimal cut-off value for MLNR in terms of CSS in 890 MTC patients. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, MLNR (0.50–1.00) is a significant independent prognostic factor for CSS (hazard ratio 2.161, 95% confidence interval 1.327–3.519, p=0.002). MLNR (0.50–1.00) has a greater prognostic impact on CSS in female, non-Hispanic white, T3/4, N1b and M1 patients. The lymph node yield (LNY) influences the effect of MLNR on CSS; LNY ≥9 results in MLNR (0.50–1.00) having a higher HR for CSS than MLNR (0.00-0.49). In conclusion, higher MLNRs predict poorer survival in MTC patients. Eradication of involved nodes ensures accurate staging and maximizes the ability of MLNR to predict prognosis. PMID:27588396

  5. Uptake and localization of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-calcitonin immunoglobulins in rat medullary thyroid carcinoma tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gautvik, K.M.; Svindahl, K.; Skretting, A.; Stenberg, B.; Myhre, L.; Ekeland, A.; Johannesen, J.V.

    1982-09-15

    A medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) which has been transplanted repeatedly under the kidney capsule of Wag/Rij rats secretes calcitonin (CT) spontaneously. From 10--20 weeks after transplantation, immunoreactive serum calcitonin (iCT) is abnormally elevated and continues to rise parallel to tumor growth. The immunoglobulin fraction of the rabbit anti-CT antiserum raised against intact synthetic hormone, was purified and iodinated electrolytically. Specific activities of /sup 131/I-labeled immunoglobulin of 0.008--0.014 mCi/microgram protein were obtained with 80% preservation of CT binding activity. Wag/Rig rats with MCT tumor and increased serum iCT concentrations received intravenous injections of /sup 131/I-labeled immunoglobulins (0.054--0.811 mCi). The distribution of radioactivity in the rats was followed for 14 days using external scintigraphy in combination with radioactivity measurements of blood and different organs at the end of the observation period. The distribution of /sup 113/mIn was used as a marker for blood distribution. When the radioactivity ratios (/sup 131/I//sup 113/mIn) in tumor and different organs were related to that of blood which was set equal to unity, tumor tissue contained 3--6 times higher activity. Nonhyperimmune rabbit immunoglobulins or rabbit antirat prolactin immunoglobulins were not concentrated in MCT tissue, nor did anti-CT immunoglobulins localize in rat prolactin adenomas.

  6. Genetic and Clinical Features of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: The Experience of a Single Center in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Torrealba, Gabriel; Sáenz, Adriana; Santamaría, Carlos; Morera, Estela; Alvarado, Silvia; Roa, Yolanda; González, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background. Activating mutations in the RET gene leads to medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Guidelines encourage performing RET analysis in subjects with hereditary and sporadic disease. Materials and Methods. Design. Observational, case series report study. Patients. Subjects diagnosed with MTC, with a thyroidectomy performed in a single center in Costa Rica between the years 2006 and 2015. Diagnosis and Follow-Up. Pre- and postoperative calcitonin, RET mutation, and neck ultrasound and tomography were obtained. Results. 21 subjects with histological diagnosis of MTC were followed up. The average age at diagnosis was 52.0 ± 15.7 years. The preoperative mean value of calcitonin was 1340 ± 665 pg/mL. Evidence of RET mutation was found in 26.3% of the patients, with only 2 of them grouped in the same kindred. We found statistically significant differences in mean ages between mutated (38.4 ± 20.2 y) versus nonmutated RET gene (54.6 ± 11.8 y, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences regarding tumor size, metastases, and surgical reintervention. Conclusions. We report the results of RET mutation analysis in subjects with MTC in a single center of Costa Rica. The availability of this tool increases the probability of identifying familial MTC, with the benefit of detecting affected subjects and their relatives at an earlier age. PMID:28018431

  7. Medullary Thyroid Cancer in the Era of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: To Treat or Not to Treat—and With Which Drug—Those Are the Questions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mimi I.; Jimenez, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Context: Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare form of thyroid cancer comprising approximately 4% of all thyroid cancers. The majority of patients have a relatively good prognosis; however, a subgroup of patients will require systemic therapy. Large phase III randomized trials led to the approval of two drugs—vandetanib and cabozantinib—for progressive or symptomatic MTC. The decision regarding which drug to initiate first is not entirely clear and is a common concern amongst treating physicians. Evidence Acquisition and Synthesis: A review of the literature in English was conducted, and data were summarized and integrated into a decision matrix. Conclusions: The decision regarding which drug to initiate first for progressive MTC should be based on a careful review of the medical history, physical examination findings, medication list, electrocardiogram, laboratory results, and tumor characteristics. It is necessary to consider the relative contraindications when choosing which drug to initiate first. PMID:25238206

  8. Calcitonin measurement in fine-needle aspirate washouts vs. cytologic examination for diagnosis of primary or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Crea, C; Raffaelli, M; Maccora, D; Carrozza, C; Canu, G; Fadda, G; Bellantone, R; Lombardi, C P

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy cytology (FNAB-C) is able to detect approximately 63% of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The measurement of calcitonin in the needle washout (FNAB-CT) could improve its accuracy. Sixty-two FNAB-C were performed in 38 patients. Serum calcitonin (sCT) was measured before performing FNAB-C. After obtaining a FNAB-C specimen, the needle was washed with 0.5 ml of saline solution to obtain the CT washouts. Receiver operating characteristic (RO C) analysis identified the cut-offs of FNAB-CT and FNAB-CT/sCT. Eighteen MTC were found at final histology. RO C analysis indicated FNAB-CT > 10.4 pg/ml and FNABCT/ sCT > 1.39 as more accurate cut-off values. Overall accuracy, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 85%, 100 and 83%, respectively, for FNAB-C, 97%, 100%, 96% for FNAB-CT and 90%, 83% and 93% for FNAB-CT/sCT. The integration of FNAB-C and FNAB-CT resulted in 98% overall accuracy, 100% PPV and 98% NPV; the integration of FNAB-C and FNAB-CT/sCT in 90% overall accuracy, 80% PPV and 95% NPV. One of 2 false negative FNAB-CT and one of 3 false negative FNAB CT/sCT were correctly diagnosed by FNAB-C. Eight of 9 non-diagnostic FNAB-C were correctly classified by FNAB-CT and 7 by FNAB CT/sCT. FNAB-CT should integrate but not replace FNAB-C. FNAB-CT is particularly useful in the presence of non-diagnostic FNAB-C.

  9. Selective Mitochondrial Uptake of MKT-077 Can Suppress Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Survival In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Starenki, Dmytro

    2015-01-01

    Background Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine tumor mainly caused by mutations in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene. Not all patients with progressive MTC respond to current therapy inhibiting RET, demanding additional therapeutic strategies. We recently demonstrated that disrupting mitochondrial metabolism using a mitochondria-targeted agent or by depleting a mitochondrial chaperone effectively suppressed human MTC cells in culture and in mouse xenografts by inducing apoptosis and RET downregulation. These observations led us to hypothesize that mitochondria are potential therapeutic targets for MTC. This study further tests this hypothesis using1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride (MKT-077), a water-soluble rhodocyanine dye analogue, which can selectively accumulate in mitochondria. Methods The effects of MKT-077 on cell proliferation, survival, expression of RET and tumor protein 53 (TP53), and mitochondrial activity were determined in the human MTC lines in culture and in mouse xenografts. Results MKT-077 induced cell cycle arrest in TT and MZ-CRC-1. Intriguingly, MKT-077 also induced RET downregulation and strong cell death responses in TT cells, but not in MZ-CRC-1 cells. This discrepancy was mainly due to the difference between the capacities of these cell lines to retain MKT-077 in mitochondria. The cytotoxicity of MKT-077 in TT cells was mainly attributed to oxidative stress while being independent of TP53. MKT-077 also effectively suppressed tumor growth of TT xenografts. Conclusion MKT-077 can suppress cell survival of certain MTC subtypes by accumulating in mitochondria and interfering with mitochondrial activity although it can also suppress cell proliferation via other mechanisms. These results consistently support the hypothesis that mitochondrial targeting has therapeutic potential for MTC. PMID:26485469

  10. Comprehensive assessment of the disputed RET Y791F variant shows no association with medullary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Hatakana, Roxanne; Lourenço, Delmar M; Lindsey, Susan C; Camacho, Cleber P; Almeida, Marcio; Lima, José V; Sekiya, Tomoko; Garralda, Elena; Naslavsky, Michel S; Yamamoto, Guilherme L; Lazar, Monize; Meirelles, Osorio; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Lebrao, Maria Lucia; Duarte, Yeda A O; Blangero, John; Zatz, Mayana; Cerutti, Janete M; Maciel, Rui M B; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2015-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of germline mutations of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene is vital for the proper recommendation of preventive thyroidectomy in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-prone carriers. To gain information regarding the most disputed variant of RET, ATA-A Y791F, we sequenced blood DNA samples from a cohort of 2904 cancer-free elderly individuals (1261 via Sanger sequencing and 1643 via whole-exome/genome sequencing). We also accessed the exome sequences of an additional 8069 individuals from non-cancer-related laboratories and public databanks as well as genetic results from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) project. The mean allelic frequency observed in the controls was 0.0031, with higher occurrences in Central European populations (0.006/0.008). The prevalence of RET Y791F in the control databases was extremely high compared with the 40 known RET pathogenic mutations (P=0.00003), while no somatic occurrence has been reported in tumours. In this study, we report new, unrelated Brazilian individuals with germline RET Y791F-only: two tumour-free elderly controls; two individuals with sporadic MTC whose Y791F-carrying relatives did not show any evidence of tumours; and a 74-year-old phaeochromocytoma patient without MTC. Furthermore, we showed that the co-occurrence of Y791F with the strong RET C634Y mutation explains the aggressive MTC phenotypes observed in a large affected family that was initially reported as Y791F-only. Our literature review revealed that limited analyses have led to the misclassification of RET Y791F as a probable pathogenic variant and, consequently, to the occurrence of unnecessary thyroidectomies. The current study will have a substantial clinical influence, as it reveals, in a comprehensive manner, that RET Y791F only shows no association with MTC susceptibility. PMID:25425582

  11. Trends in the Presentation, Treatment, and Survival of Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer over the past 30 Years

    PubMed Central

    Randle, Reese W.; Balentine, Courtney J.; Leverson, Glen E.; Havlena, Jeffrey A.; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Schneider, David F.; Pitt, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of recent medical advances on disease presentation, extent of surgery, and disease specific survival (DSS) for patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is unclear. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry to compare trends over three time periods, 1983–1992, 1993–2002, and 2003–2012. Results There were 2,940 patients diagnosed with MTC between 1983 and 2012. The incidence of MTC increased during this time period from 0.14 to 0.21 per 100,000 population, and mean age at diagnosis increased from 49.8 to 53.8 (p<0.001). The proportion of tumors ≤1cm also increased from 11.4% in 1983–1992, 19.6% in 1993–2002, to 25.1% in 2003–2012 (p<0.001), but stage at diagnosis remained constant (p=0.57). In addition, the proportion of patients undergoing a total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection increased from 58.2% to 76.5% during the study period (p<0.001). In the most recent time interval, 5-year DSS improved from 86% to 89% in all patients (p<0.001), but especially for patients with regional (82% to 91%, p=0.003) and distant (40% to 51%, p=0.02) disease. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the extent of surgery is increasing for patients with MTC. DSS is also improving, primarily in patients with regional and distant disease. PMID:27842913

  12. The cAMP analogs have potent anti-proliferative effects on medullary thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dicitore, Alessandra; Grassi, Elisa Stellaria; Caraglia, Michele; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Gaudenzi, Germano; Hofland, Leo J; Persani, Luca; Vitale, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic activation of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene has a main role in the pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Several lines of evidence suggest that RET function could be influenced by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity. We evaluated the in vitro anti-tumor activity of 8-chloroadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP) and PKA type I-selective cAMP analogs [equimolar combination of the 8-piperidinoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-PIP-cAMP) and 8-hexylaminoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-HA-cAMP) in MTC cell lines (TT and MZ-CRC-1)]. 8-Cl-cAMP and the PKA I-selective cAMP analogs showed a potent anti-proliferative effect in both cell lines. In detail, 8-Cl-cAMP blocked significantly the transition of TT cell population from G2/M to G0/G1 phase and from G0/G1 to S phase and of MZ-CRC-1 cells from G0/G1 to S phase. Moreover, 8-Cl-cAMP induced apoptosis in both cell lines, as demonstrated by FACS analysis for annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide, the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. On the other hand, the only effect induced by PKA I-selective cAMP analogs was a delay in G0/G1-S and S-G2/M progression in TT and MZ-CRC-1 cells, respectively. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that cAMP analogs, particularly 8-Cl-cAMP, significantly suppress in vitro MTC proliferation and provide rationale for a potential clinical use of cAMP analogs in the treatment of advanced MTC.

  13. Novel withanolides target medullary thyroid cancer through inhibition of both RET phosphorylation and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Bazzill, Joseph; Zhang, Xuan; Gallagher, Rob; Zhang, Hauping; Gollapudi, Rao; Kindscher, Kelly; Timmermann, Barbara; Cohen, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite development of current targeted therapies for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), long-term survival remains unchanged. Recently isolated novel withanolide compounds from Solanaceae physalis are highly potent against MTCs. We hypothesize that these withanolides uniquely inhibit RET phosphorylation and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in MTC cells as a mechanism of antiproliferation and apoptosis. Methods MTC cells were treated with novel withanolides and MTC-targeted drugs. In vitro studies assessed cell viability and proliferation (MTS; trypan blue assays), apoptosis (flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI staining; confirmed by Western blot analysis), long-term cytotoxic effects (clonogenic assay), and suppression of key regulatory proteins such as RET, Akt, and mTOR (by Western blot analysis). Results The novel withanolides potently reduced MTC cell viability (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50], 270–2,850 nmol/L; 250–1,380 nmol/L for vandetanib; 360–1,640 nmol/L for cabozantinib) with induction of apoptosis at <1,000 nmol/L of drug. Unique from other targeted therapies, withanolides suppressed RET and Akt phosphorylation and protein expression (in a concentration- and time-dependent manner) as well as mTOR activity and translational activity of 4E-BP1 and protein synthesis mediated by p70S6kinase activation at IC50 concentrations. Conclusion Novel withanolides from Physalis selectively and potently inhibit MTC cells in vitro. Unlike other MTC-targeted therapies, these compounds uniquely inhibit both RET kinase activity and the Akt/mTOR prosurvival pathway. Further translational studies are warranted to evaluate their clinical potential. PMID:23158190

  14. Impending Atypical Femoral Fracture in Patients With Medullary Thyroid Cancer With Skeletal Metastasis Treated With Long-term Bisphosphonate and Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Mitsuru; Gokita, Tabu; Toda, Kazuhisa

    2017-02-24

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) occur in osteoporosis patients receiving long-term bisphosphonate. Atypical femoral fractures also occur in cancer patients receiving long-term bisphosphonate or denosumab, but the prevalence is low. We describe a 53-year-old woman with a history of medullary thyroid cancer and skull metastasis who was prescribed bisphosphonate for 6 years and denosumab for 1.5 years, consecutively. Bone scintigraphy performed because of spontaneous groin pain showed uptake in the lateral aspect of the left femur, which was confirmed as impending AFF. In oncological patients receiving long-term bisphosphonate or denosumab, AFF should be included as a differential diagnosis with focal femoral findings.

  15. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  16. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in treatment of recurrent nodular goiter and thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Demidov, A. K.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy was performed in 29 patients with recurrent nodular and multinodular goiter, and in 3 patients with recurrent inoperable thyroid cancer. There were used transcutaneous puncture under ultrasonic control, diode lasers with wavelength 805, 980, and 1060 nm, quartz monofibers, special computerized thermometer with microthermocouples. Disappearance or significant reduction of nodes in the most goiter cases, and regress of tumor in the cancer cases were marked during observation period (0.5 - 2.5 years).

  17. [Method of detection of residual tissues in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Gostimskiĭ, A V; Romanchishen, A F; Zaĭtseva, I V; Kuznetsova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    A search of residual tissues is complicated in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland. The Saint-Petersburg Centre of Surgery of the Endocrine System and Oncology developed the method of detection of residual tissues of the thyroid gland with the aim of preoperative chromothyroidolymphography under control of ultrasound. The method consisted of US performance during 15-20 minutes before the operation and an introduction of 1% sterile water solution of methylene blue in revealed residual tissues of the thyroid gland. The volume of injected coloring agent was 0.5-2 ml in the residual tissue volume smaller than 9 cm3 and 2-3 ml injected in case of more than 9 cm3. The residual tissues of the thyroid gland accurately visualized during the following operation. Described method gives the possibility to detect all regions of residual tissues which should be removed and at the same time it shortens a revision and surgery trauma.

  18. Cervix carcinoma and incidental finding of medullary thyroid carcinoma by 18F-FDG PET/CT--clinical case.

    PubMed

    Chaushev, Borislav; Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Anelia; Yordanov, Kaloyan; Encheva, Elitsa; Dancheva, Jivka; Yordanova, Cvetelina; Hristozov, Kiril; Krasnaliev, Ivan; Radev, Radoslav; Nenkov, Rumen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are encountered in clinical practice during the diagnostic procedures or patients' follow-up due to other diseases quite far from the thyroid gland with prevalence 4-50% in general population, depending on age, diagnostic method and race. The prevalence of thyroid nodules increases with age and their clarification should be done for their adequate treatment. An 18F-FDG PET/CT was done with a PET/CT scanner (Philips Gemini TF), consisting of dedicated lutetium orthosilicate full ring PET scanner and 16 slice CT. The PET/CT scan of the whole-body revealed on the CT portion a hypodense nodular lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid gland with increased uptake of 18F-FDG on the PET with SUVmax 10.3 and demonstrated a complete response to the induction therapy of the main oncological disease of the patient--squamous cell carcinoma. This clinical case demonstrates that whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/CT has an increasingly important role in the early evaluation of thyroid cancer as a second independent malignant localization. Focal thyroid lesion with high risk of thyroid malignancy was incidentally found on 18F-FDG PET/CT.

  19. Electrophysiologic nerve stimulation for identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: review of 70 consecutive thyroid surgeries.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, A; Flexon, P B

    1998-04-01

    To describe a simple technique for identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) with a nerve stimulator to prevent damage to the nerve during thyroid surgery. A retrospective review of 70 thyroidectomies performed from October 1989 to January 1995 by one surgeon using electrophysiologic nerve stimulation to identify the RLN was conducted. The technique is described. Outpatient flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy was performed preoperatively and postoperatively in all patients. From 70 thyroidectomies, 80 RLNs were identified to be at risk for injury. Five patients had transient unilateral vocal cord paresis postoperatively. No RLN transection or permanent vocal cord paralysis occurred. This is the first large series of patients undergoing the use of electrophysiologic nerve stimulation for identifying the RLN during thyroid surgery. We found the technique to be useful and safe for identifying the RLN. We present this technique as a less costly and time-consuming alternative to intraoperative RLN monitoring.

  20. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  1. Are there disparities in the presentation, treatment and outcomes of patients diagnosed with medullary thyroid cancer?—An analysis of 634 patients from the California Cancer Registry

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christine; Chen, Yingjia; Cress, Rosemary; Semrad, Alison M.; Semrad, Thomas; Gosnell, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Race, gender and socioeconomic disparities have been suggested to adversely influence stage at presentation, treatment options and outcomes in patients with cancer. Underserved minorities and those with a low socioeconomic status (SES) present with more advanced disease and have worse outcomes for differentiated thyroid cancer, but this relationship has never been evaluated for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Methods We used the California Cancer Registry (CCR) to evaluate disparities in the presentation, treatment and outcomes of patients diagnosed with MTC. Results We identified 634 patients with MTC diagnosed between 1988 and 2011. Almost everyone (85%) underwent thyroidectomy with 50% having a central lymph node dissection (CLND). There were no statistically significant differences by age, race or SES in mean tumor size or the proportion of patients diagnosed with localized disease, but men were diagnosed with larger tumors than women and were less likely to be diagnosed at a localized stage. Younger patients and women were more likely to be treated with a thyroidectomy. There were no statistically significant differences in surgical treatment by race or SES. Patients in the highest SES category had a better overall survival, but not disease specific survival, than those in the lowest SES (HR =0.3, CI =0.1–0.7). Patients treated with thyroidectomy had a better overall and cause specific survival, but the effect of CLND was not statistically significant after adjustment for other factors. Conclusions In MTC, we did not find that race, gender or SES influenced the presentation, treatment or outcomes of patients with MTC. Men with MTC present with larger tumors and are less likely to have localized disease. Half of the MTC patients in California do not undergo a CLND at the time of thyroidectomy, which may suggest a lack appropriate care across a range of healthcare systems. PMID:27563561

  2. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  3. Targeting of RET oncogene by naphthalene diimide-mediated gene promoter G-quadruplex stabilization exerts anti-tumor activity in oncogene-addicted human medullary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tortoreto, Monica; Doria, Filippo; Beretta, Giovanni L.; Zuco, Valentina; Freccero, Mauro; Borrello, Maria Grazia; Lanzi, Cinzia; Richter, Sara N.; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Folini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) relies on the aberrant activation of RET proto-oncogene. Though targeted approaches (i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors) are available, the absence of complete responses and the onset of resistance mechanisms indicate the need for novel therapeutic interventions. Due to their role in regulation of gene expression, G-quadruplexes (G4) represent attractive targets amenable to be recognized or stabilized by small molecules. Here, we report that exposure of MTC cells to a tri-substituted naphthalene diimide (NDI) resulted in a significant antiproliferative activity paralleled by inhibition of RET expression. Biophysical analysis and gene reporter assays showed that impairment of RET expression was consequent to the NDI-mediated stabilization of the G4 forming within the gene promoter. We also showed for the first time that systemic administration of the NDI in mice xenotransplanted with MTC cells resulted in a remarkable inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Overall, our findings indicate that NDI-dependent RET G4 stabilization represents a suitable approach to control RET transcription and delineate the rationale for the development of G4 stabilizing-based treatments for MTC as well as for other tumors in which RET may have functional and therapeutic implications. PMID:27351133

  4. Evaluation of germline sequence variants of GFRA1, GFRA2, and GFRA3 genes in a cohort of Spanish patients with sporadic medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Salud; Fernández, Raquel M; Dziema, Heather; Japón, Miguel A; Marcos, Irene; Eng, Charis; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2002-11-01

    The etiology of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (sMTC) remains elusive. While germline gain-of-function mutations in the RET proto-oncogene cause hereditary MTC, somatic RET mutations have been described in a variable number of sMTC. So far, S836S of RET, is the only variant whose association with sMTC has been found in several European cohorts. Because RET variants seem to be associated with MTC, it is plausible that variants in genes encoding for RET coreceptors may play a role in the pathogenesis of sMTC. Recently, we described two possible low penetrance susceptibility alleles in the gene encoding RET coreceptor GFRalpha1, -193C > G and 537T > C, in a German series of sMTC. In this study, we have genotyped nine polymorphisms within GFRA1-3 genes for 51 Spanish sMTC, and 100 normal controls. Our results show that no statistical signification was found when Spanish sMTC patients were compared to controls. Taken together with the observations in the German sMTC series, the present findings suggest that GFRA1-193C > G and 537T > C could be in linkage disequilibrium with other loci responsible for the disease with a founder effect in Germany. Alternatively, the combined observations might also suggest that, if indeed the polymorphisms are functional, the effect is small.

  5. A rapid screening method for the detection of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma families

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, D.J.; Andrew, S.; Richardson, A.L. |

    1994-09-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndromes with incomplete penetrance. Following the identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene that segregate with the disease phenotype in MEN2A, MEN2B, and FMTC, genetic screening of individuals with mutations in RET may be performed. The authors have employed restriction endonuclease digestion of polymerase chain reaction products as an alternative to sequence analysis for rapid identification of mutant gene carriers in families in which MEN2A and RMTC are segregating. Twenty-one Australasian MEN2A and FMTC families have been screened for mutations in a cysteine-rich region of the RET proto-oncogene. Seven independent mutations were identified in key individuals in 16 of these families. The authors have identified a mutation in codon 620, 2053 T {r_arrow}C (Cys620Arg), and two mutations in codon 634 of exon 11 of RET, 2095 T {r_arrow} C (Cys634Arg) and 2096 G {r_arrow} A (Cys634Tyr), all three of which were present in both MEN2A and FMTC families. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Radioactive Iodine Therapy Decreases Recurrence in Thyroid Papillary Microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Creach, Kimberly M.; Siegel, Barry A.; Nussenbaum, Brian; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The most appropriate therapy for papillary microcarcinoma (PMC) is controversial. Methods. We reviewed the therapy and outcome of 407 patients with PMC. Results. Three hundred-eighty patients underwent total thyroidectomy, and 349 patients received I-131 therapy. The median followup was 5.3 years. Forty patients developed recurrent disease. On univariate analysis, development of disease recurrence was correlated with histological tumor size > 0.8 cm (P = 0.0104), age < 45 years (P = 0.043), and no I-131 therapy (P < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, histological tumor size > 0.8 cm, positive lymph nodes, and no I-131 therapy were significant. The 5-year RFS for patients treated with I-131 was 95.0% versus 78.6% (P < 0.0001) for patients not treated with I-131. Patients with lymph node metastasis who did not receive I-131 had a 5-year RFS of 42.9% versus 93.2% (P < 0.0001) for patients who received I-131. Conclusions. Recommend I-131 remnant ablation for patients with PMC, particularly patients with lymph node metastasis. PMID:22462017

  7. MiR-9 and miR-21 as prognostic biomarkers for recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sondermann, Adriana; Andreghetto, Flavia Maziero; Moulatlet, Ana Carolina Bernardini; da Silva Victor, Elivane; de Castro, Marilia Germanos; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; Severino, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Despite low mortality rates, nodal recurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma occurs in up to 20 % of patients. Emerging evidences indicate that dysregulated microRNAs are implicated in the process of metastasis. In the present study, we investigated whether miR-9, miR-10b, miR-21 and miR-146b levels are predictive of papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence. Using macro-dissection followed by quantitative real-time PCR, we measured miR-9, miR-10b, miR-21 and miR-146b expression levels in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 66 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma categorized into two groups: the recurrent group (n = 19) and the non-recurrent group (n = 47). All patients underwent total thyroidectomy and were followed for at least 120 months after surgery to be considered recurrence-free. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model in order to identify associations between multiple clinical variables and microRNA expression levels and papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence. MiR-9 and miR-21 expression levels were found to be significant prognostic factors for recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (HR = 1.48; 95 % CI 1.24-1.77, p < 0.001; and HR = 1.52; 95 % CI 1.18-1.94, p = 0.001; respectively). Multivariate analysis involving the expression level of miR-9 and miR-21 and various clinical parameters identified the expression of these microRNAs as independent prognostic factors for papillary thyroid cancer patients. In conclusion, our results support the potential clinical value of miR-9 and miR-21 as prognostic biomarkers for recurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  8. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and RET proto-oncogene: mutation spectrum in the familial cases and a meta-analysis of studies on the sporadic form.

    PubMed

    Figlioli, Gisella; Landi, Stefano; Romei, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella; Gemignani, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an uncommon malignant tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells (C cells) of thyroid. It accounts for 5-10% of all thyroid cancers, and it mostly occurs as a sporadic entity (sMTC), but a familial pattern (fMTC) is also possible. RET proto-oncogene germline mutations are crucial for the onset and the progression of fMTC, and the occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms could predispose to the sporadic form. In order to clarify the role of this gene in MTC, we carefully reviewed the PubMed database using appropriate terms. First, we summarized current knowledge of the germline RET mutations, mutation spectrum, and prevalence. We then performed a meta-analysis on the available case-control association studies for sMTC. Finally, we carried out in silico predictions of the best associated variants in the attempt to better define their role in the disease. To date, a total of 39 different RET germline mutations have been identified in fMTC families. The most affected codons are 609, 611, 618, 620 (exon 10) and 634 (exon 11), encoding for the extracellular cysteine-rich domain, and codons 768 (exon 13) and 804 (exon 14) of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Six polymorphisms with at least three studies were included in the meta-analysis (A45A [rs1800858], G691S [rs1799939], L769L [rs1800861], S836S [rs1800862], S904S [rs1800863], and IVS1-126G>T [rs2565206]). The meta-analysis demonstrated a modest association of sMTC susceptibility with S836S and a strong association with the IVS1-126G>T polymorphism. Besides RET polymorphisms, we also investigated the role of a few other low-penetrance alleles of genes involved in the RET pathway or in xenobiotic metabolism, but none of these were confirmed. Thus, despite the well-known molecular basis of fMTC, the genetic variants of the sporadic form are still poorly understood, and functional analyses are needed to better understand the consequence of such RET

  9. Charcoal tattoo localization for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence in the central compartment of the neck.

    PubMed

    Soprani, F; Bondi, F; Puccetti, M; Armaroli, V

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer can often require further surgical options. Reoperations may carry significant risk of surgical complications; additionally, as the anatomy is subverted, there is the possibility of leaving residual neoplasm. In order to avoid such problems during reoperation for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence, we have introduced the technique of preoperative ultrasound-guided tattooing localization of the lymphatic structure to be removed with a 4% solution of active charcoal. Using ultrasound guidance, the lesion is identified and 0.5-2 ml of colloidal charcoal is injected near the lesion. The extraction of the needle is accompanied by injection at constant pressure of other charcoal as to leave a trace of colouring along the path of the needle up to the skin. The preoperative injection was well tolerated in all cases. In the last 5 years, we have used this technique in 13 patients with suspected recurrence in the central compartment (all from papillary carcinomas). Postoperative ultrasound and histological examination confirmed the removal of the lesion in all patients; in one case, the lesion was a parathyroid cyst. Complications were observed in two of 13 (15.4%) cases (one transitory hypoparathyroidism, and one transitory vocal cord paresis). Considering our experience, charcoal tattoo localization can be considered a safe, low-cost technique that is extremely useful for facilitating surgical procedures, and reduces the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  10. All in the family? Analyzing the impact of family history in addition to genotype on medullary thyroid carcinoma aggressiveness in MEN2A patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin L; Etzel, Carol; Rich, Thereasa; Hyde, Samuel; Perrier, Nancy D; Graham, Paul H; Lee, Jeffrey E; Hu, Mimi I; Cote, Gilbert J; Gagel, Robert; Grubbs, Elizabeth G

    2017-04-01

    Several guidelines for patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A (MEN2A) take into account genotype and family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) disease aggressiveness. We sought to determine if an association exists independent of genotype, which could provide important information for counseling MEN2A patients in management of their MTC. Pedigrees of patients with ≥5 family members with MEN2A were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was performed among kindreds with the most frequently observed codon mutation (RET 634). Familial MTC disease aggressiveness was evaluated using: (1) mean age at diagnosis of MTC, (2) current mean age of carriers without MTC, (3) proportion of kindred with MTC with metastatic disease at diagnosis, (4) proportion of kindred with MTC with metastasis/death from MTC as worst outcome, and (5) proportion of kindred with disease progression. 170 affected patients from 12 different MEN2A kindreds met inclusion criteria. The number of affected family members available for study per kindred ranged from 8 to 43 individuals. A difference in mean age of MTC diagnosis was found in screened patients (p = 0.01); mean age of MTC-free patients did not differ (p = 0.93). No differences were noted among kindreds in disease stage at presentation, worst outcome, or progression; marked variation in these measures was noted within families. In conclusion, a difference in age of MTC diagnosis among different RET 634 kindreds was identified. In contrast, notable intra-familial variability in disease aggressiveness was observed. Based on these findings, we recommend counseling patients with codon 634 mutations that their MTC disease course cannot be predicted by that of their relatives.

  11. Multilayer OMIC Data in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Identifies the STAT3 Pathway as a Potential Therapeutic Target in RET(M918T) Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mancikova, Veronika; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Perales-Paton, Javier; Fernandez, Agustin; Santacana, María; Jodkowska, Karolina; Inglada-Pérez, Lucia; Castelblanco, Esmeralda; Borrego, Salud; Encinas, Mario; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Fraga, Mario; Robledo, Mercedes

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare disease with few genetic drivers, and the etiology specific to each known susceptibility mutation remains unknown. Exploiting multilayer genomic data, we focused our interest on the role of aberrant DNA methylation in MTC development.Experimental Design: We performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling assessing more than 27,000 CpGs in the largest MTC series reported to date, comprising 48 molecularly characterized tumors. mRNA and miRNA expression data were available for 33 and 31 tumors, respectively. Two human MTC cell lines and 101 paraffin-embedded MTCs were used for validation.Results: The most distinctive methylome was observed for RET(M918T)-related tumors. Integration of methylation data with mRNA and miRNA expression data identified genes negatively regulated by promoter methylation. These in silico findings were confirmed in vitro for PLCB2, DKK4, MMP20, and miR-10a, -30a, and -200c. The mutation-specific aberrant methylation of PLCB2, DKK4, and MMP20 was validated in 25 independent MTCs by bisulfite pyrosequencing. The methylome and transcriptome data underscored JAK/Stat pathway involvement in RET(M918T) MTCs. Immunostaining [immunohistochemistry (IHC)] for the active form of signaling effector STAT3 was performed in a series of 101 MTCs. As expected, positive IHC was associated with RET(M918T)-bearing tumors (P < 0.02). Pharmacologic inhibition of STAT3 activity increased the sensitivity to vandetanib of the RET(M918T)-positive MTC cell line, MZ-CRC-1.Conclusions: Multilayer OMIC data analysis uncovered methylation hallmarks in genetically defined MTCs and revealed JAK/Stat signaling effector STAT3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of RET(M918T) MTCs. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1334-45. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Recurrent EZH1 mutations are a second hit in autonomous thyroid adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Elisa S.; Eszlinger, Markus; Ronchi, Cristina L.; Godbole, Amod; Bathon, Kerstin; Guizzardi, Fabiana; de Filippis, Tiziana; Krohn, Knut; Jaeschke, Holger; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Gozu, Hulya Iliksu; Sancak, Seda; Niedziela, Marek; Strom, Tim M.; Fassnacht, Martin; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous thyroid adenomas (ATAs) are a frequent cause of hyperthyroidism. Mutations in the genes encoding the TSH receptor (TSHR) or the Gs protein α subunit (GNAS) are found in approximately 70% of ATAs. The involvement of other genes and the pathogenesis of the remaining cases are presently unknown. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 19 ATAs that were paired with normal DNA samples and identified a recurrent hot-spot mutation (c.1712A>G; p.Gln571Arg) in the enhancer of zeste homolog 1 (EZH1) gene, which codes for a catalytic subunit of the polycomb complex. Targeted screening in an independent cohort confirmed that this mutation occurs with high frequency (27%) in ATAs. EZH1 mutations were strongly associated with known (TSHR, GNAS) or presumed (adenylate cyclase 9 [ADCY9]) alterations in cAMP pathway genes. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that the p.Gln571Arg EZH1 mutation caused increased histone H3 trimethylation and increased proliferation of thyroid cells. In summary, this study revealed that a hot-spot mutation in EZH1 is the second most frequent genetic alteration in ATAs. The association between EZH1 and TSHR mutations suggests a 2-hit model for the pathogenesis of these tumors, whereby constitutive activation of the cAMP pathway and EZH1 mutations cooperate to induce the hyperproliferation of thyroid cells. PMID:27500488

  13. Pattern of neck recurrence after lateral neck dissection for cervical metastases in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, William F.; Wang, Laura Y.; Palmer, Frank L.; Nixon, Iain J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the rate and pattern of nodal recurrence in patients who underwent a therapeutic, lateral neck dissection (LND) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with clinically evident cervical metastases and to determine if there was any correlation between the extent of initial dissection and the rate and pattern of neck recurrence. Methods A total of 3,664 patients with PTC treated between 1986 and 2010 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were identified from our institutional database. Tumor factors, patient demographics, extent of initial LND, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Patterns of recurrent lateral neck metastases by level involvement were recorded and outcomes calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A total of 484 patients had an LND for cervical metastases; 364 (75%) had a comprehensive LND (CLND) and 120 (25%) had a selective neck dissection (SND). The median duration of follow-up was 63.5 months. As expected, patients with CLND had a greater number of nodes removed as well as a greater number of positive nodes (P < .001). There was no difference in overall lateral neck recurrence-free status (CLND 94.4% vs SND 89.4%, P = .158), but in the dissected neck, the ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence-free status was superior in the CLND patients (97.7% vs 89.4%, P < .001). Conclusion Patients with clinically evident neck metastases from PTC managed by CLND have lesser rates of recurrence in the dissected neck compared with patients managed by SND. SND should only be done in highly selected cases with small volume disease. PMID:26994486

  14. The Delayed Risk Stratification System in the Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Walczyk, Agnieszka; Pałyga, Iwona; Gąsior-Perczak, Danuta; Gadawska-Juszczyk, Klaudia; Szymonek, Monika; Trybek, Tomasz; Lizis-Kolus, Katarzyna; Szyska-Skrobot, Dorota; Mikina, Estera; Hurej, Stefan; Słuszniak, Janusz; Mężyk, Ryszard; Góźdź, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Context There has been a marked increase in the detection of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) over the past few years, which has improved the prognosis. However, it is necessary to adjust treatment and monitoring strategies relative to the risk of an unfavourable disease course. Materials and Methods This retrospective study examined data from 916 patients with DTC who received treatment at a single centre between 2000 and 2013. The utility of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the European Thyroid Association (ETA) recommended systems for early assessment of the risk of recurrent/persistent disease was compared with that of the recently recommended delayed risk stratification (DRS) system. Results The PPV and NPV for the ATA (24.59% and 95.42%, respectively) and ETA (24.28% and 95.68%, respectively) were significantly lower than those for the DRS (56.76% and 98.5%, respectively) (p<0.0001). The proportion of variance for predicting the final outcome was 15.8% for ATA, 16.1% for ETA and 56.7% for the DRS. Recurrent disease was rare (1% of patients), and was nearly always identified in patients at intermediate/high risk according to the initial stratification (9/10 cases). Conclusions The DRS showed a better correlation with the risk of persistent disease than the early stratification systems and allows personalisation of follow-up. If clinicians plan to alter the intensity of surveillance, patients at intermediate/high risk according to the early stratification systems should remain within the specialized centers; however, low risk patients can be referred to endocrinologists or other appropriate practitioners for long-term follow-up, as these patients remained at low risk after risk re-stratification. PMID:27078258

  15. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  16. Serial Thyroglobulin Variation Trend Shortly after Radioiodine Therapy in Poorly to Moderately Differentiated Recurrent Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To dynamically observe the early change of thyroglobulin(Tg) levels after (131)I therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer(DTC) patients. Methods The study enrolled 22 post-total-thyroidectomy DTC patients and they were stratified as low to intermediate recurrence according to the 2009 American Thyroid Association Guidelines. The clinical data including pre-ablation stimulated Tg (ps-Tg),corresponding thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH),anti-thyroglobulin (TgAb) values,and the afterwards parameters were dynamically measured each week in the first month after (131)I therapy. Values collected at the first time were defined as Tg 0 and TSH0,while Tg1 and TSH1 were collected at the first week after (131)I therapy respectively. Then the variation trend curves of Tg were drawn,and factors influencing the variation of Tg were analyzed. Two groups were divided according to Tg levels:G1 (Tg≤0.1 ng/ml,n=9) and G2(Tg>0.1 ng/ml,n=13). Results The rates of negative Tg were 4.5%,18.0%,27.0%,36.0%,and 41.0%,respectively,exactly before (131)I therapy and the 1(st),2(nd),3(rd),and 4(th) week after the therapy. One-way analysis of variance showed that the two groups statistically differed in age (F=3.182,P=0.04) and remnant thyroid (U=4.849,P=0.026). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that early negative Tg was related to remnant thyroid tissue (OR:2.132;95%Cl:1.418-6.532,P=0.009).Conclusions Negative Tg can be achieved in nearly half of DTC patients by the end of first month after (131)I therapy. The negative conversion is closely related with the volume of remnant thyroid tissue.

  17. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  18. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  19. Somatostatin receptor expression in vivo and response to somatostatin analog therapy with or without other antineoplastic treatments in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vainas, I; Koussis, Ch; Pazaitou-Panayiotou, K; Drimonitis, A; Chrisoulidou, A; Iakovou, I; Boudina, M; Kaprara, A; Maladaki, A

    2004-12-01

    The long-term treatment of metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with somatostatin (SST) analogs was evaluated in 22 patients with persistant or relapsed disease and with in vivo positive SST receptor (SSTR) tumors. After surgical intervention all patients but one, initially or at a later time, had persistenly (15) or after relapse (7) elevated serum calcitonin (CT, 252-69482 pg/ml) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 8-1130 ng/ml) concentrations; also, all of them showed positive uptake in 111In-pentetreotide scanning. Daily doses of 0.4-1.0 mg octreotide subcutaneously, or monthly doses of 20-30 mg long-acting octreotide (LAR) intramuscularly for 3-21 months were administered. Systemic chemotherapy (Ch) with or without external radiotherapy (eRT) was given to 13 patients simultaneously. A beneficial effect on pre-existing diarrhea was observed in 8 patients (subjective partial remmission, sPR 36.4%); 10 other patients showed stable disease, while in 4 a worsening of pre-existing diarrhea was observed. CT and CEA concentrations decreased more than 25% in 4 out of 22 patients (18%) and 11 patients showed a decrease of less than 25% (biological SD). No objective response in tumour growth was demonstrated. Patients (10 survivors in group B) treated with Ch+eRT plus Octerotide showed higher sR (92.5%), lower mortality (23.1%), longer mean time to death (130 months) and longer mean total survival (mts) time (145 months) in comparison to group A patients who had 66.7% sR, 33.3% mortality, only 88.5 months mean time to death and 101 months mts-time. Long-term octreotide and octreotide-LAR treatment offers a subjective and biological partial remission in one third and in one fourth of the MTC patients respectively, but it does not improve the natural course of the tumor. It remains to be answered if these drugs, combined with other antineoplastic therapies, have a synergistic effect relating to treatment response and to patient survival and mortality.

  20. Effect of 3′UTR RET Variants on RET mRNA Secondary Structure and Disease Presentation in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Romitti, Mirian; Rodrigues Siqueira, Débora; Vaz Ferreira, Carla; Oliboni Scapineli, Jessica; Assis-Brazil, Beatriz; Vieira Maximiano, Rodolfo; Dias Amarante, Tauanne; de Souza Nunes, Miriam Celi; Weber, Gerald; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Background The RET S836S variant has been associated with early onset and increased risk for metastatic disease in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). However, the mechanism by which this variant modulates MTC pathogenesis is still open to discuss. Of interest, strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between RET S836S and 3'UTR variants has been reported in Hirschsprung's disease patients. Objective To evaluate the frequency of the RET 3’UTR variants (rs76759170 and rs3026785) in MTC patients and to determine whether these variants are in LD with S836S polymorphism. Methods Our sample comprised 152 patients with sporadic MTC. The RET S836S and 3’UTR (rs76759170 and rs3026785) variants were genotyped using Custom TaqMan Genotyping Assays. Haplotypes were inferred using the phase 2.1 program. RET mRNA structure was assessed by Vienna Package. Results The mean age of MTC diagnosis was 48.5±15.5 years and 57.9% were women. The minor allele frequencies of RET polymorphisms were as follows: S836S, 5.6%; rs76759170, 5.6%; rs3026785, 6.2%. We observed a strong LD among S836S and 3’UTR variants (|D’| = -1, r2 = 1 and |D’| = -1, r2 = 0,967). Patients harboring the S836S/3’UTR variants presented a higher percentage of lymph node and distant metastasis (P = 0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). Accordingly, RNA folding analyses demonstrated different RNA secondary structure predictions for WT(TCCGT), S836S(TTCGT) or 3’UTR(GTCAC) haplotypes. The S836S/3’UTR haplotype presented a greater number of double helices sections and lower levels of minimal free energy when compared to the wild-type haplotype, suggesting that these variants provides the most thermodynamically stable mRNA structure, which may have functional consequences on the rate of mRNA degradation. Conclusion The RET S836S polymorphism is in LD with 3’UTR variants. In silico analysis indicate that the 3’UTR variants may affect the secondary structure of RET mRNA, suggesting that these variants might play a

  1. Usefulness of PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent or metastasized differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LU, CUN-ZHI; CAO, SU-SHENG; WANG, WEI; LIU, JUN; FU, NING; LU, FENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the usefulness of the positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrence or metastasization of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative findings on the 131I-diagnostic whole-body scanning (dWBS). Fifteen patients with DTC, abnormal thyroglobulin levels, and negative 131I-dWBS findings were scanned using the 18F-FDG PET/CT. Positive diagnosis was based on postoperative histologic findings, and clinical and imaging follow-up results obtained in the subsequent 6 months. In addition, preoperative and postoperative thyroglobulin levels were compared. Using the findings of 18F-FDG PET/CT and data on confirmed positive diagnosis, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated. Sensitivity and PPV of PET/CT in detecting recurrence or metastasisization of DTC were 93.30 and 91.40%, respectively. Furthermore, postoperative thyroglobulin levels were markedly lower compared to the preoperative levels (respectively, 4.67±1.71 vs. 58.53±18.34 ng/ml; p<0.05). PET/CT scan with 18F-FDG is an informative technique for the detection of recurrent or metastasized DTC in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative 131I-dWBS findings. PMID:27073490

  2. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC. PMID:27679545

  3. Continuous intraoperative neural monitoring of the recurrent nerves in thyroid surgery: a quantum leap in technology

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gregory W.; Barczynski, Marcin; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Wu, Che-Wei; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Machens, Andreas; Kamani, Dipti; Dralle, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The continuous intraoperative neural monitoring (CIONM) technique is increasingly acknowledged as a useful tool to recognize impending nerve injury and to abort the related manoeuvre to prevent nerve injury during thyroid surgery. CIONM provides valuable real-time information constantly, which is really useful during complex thyroid surgeries especially in the settings of unusual anatomy. Thus, CIONM overcomes the key methodological limitation inherent in intermittent nerve monitoring (IINOM); which is allowing the nerve to be at risk in between the stimulations. The clinically important combined electromyographic (EMG) event, indicative of impending recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, prevents the majority of traction related injuries to the anatomically intact RLN enabling modification of the causative surgical manoeuvre in 80% of cases. These EMG changes can progress to loss of EMG signal with postoperative vocal cord palsy (VCP) if corrective action is not taken. As a further extension, CIONM also helps to identify intraoperative functional nerve recovery with restitution of amplitude to ≥50% of initial baseline; this allows continuing of resection of contralateral side. CIONM facilitates for early corrective action before permanent damage to the nerve has been done. CIONM is a recent but rapidly evolving technique, constantly being refined by various studies focusing on improvement in its implementation and interpretation, as well as on the elimination of the technical snags. PMID:28149807

  4. Recurrence Incidence in Differentiated Thyroid Cancers and the Importance of Diagnostic Iodine-131 Scintigraphy in Clinical Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoğlu, Filiz; Karapolat, İnanç; Ömür, Özgür; Akgün, Ayşegül; Yanarateş, Ahmet; Kumanlıoğlu, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC) are tumors with good prognosis. However, local recurrence or distant metastasis can be observed. In our study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of recurrence and the importance of diagnostic iodine-131 whole body scan (WBS) in clinical follow-up in patients with DTC. Methods: The clinical data of 217 patients with DTC who were followed-up more than 3 years were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of recurrence was investigated in a group of patients who had radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment and showed no sign of residual thyroid tissue or metastasis with diagnostic WBS that was performed at 6-12 months after therapy and had a thyroglobulin (Tg) level lower than 2 ng/dl. Results: At the time of diagnosis, ten cases had thyroid capsule invasion, 25 cases had extra-thyroid soft tissue invasion, 11 patients showed lymph node metastasis and four patients had distant organ metastasis. One hundred forty-five patients had RAI treatment at ablation dose (75-100 mCi), whereas 35 patients had RAI treatment at metastasis dose (150-200 mCi). Thirty-seven patients with papillary microcarcinoma did not receive RAI treatment. In 12 (%7.5) of the 160 patients who were considered as “successful ablation”, a recurrence was identified. Recurrence was detected by diagnostic WBS in all cases and stimulated Tg level was <2 ng/dL with the exception of the two cases who had distant metastasis. Conclusion: Identification of pathological findings with WBS in patients who developed local recurrence in the absence of elevated Tg highlights the importance of diagnostic WBS in clinical follow-up. PMID:27277325

  5. Vandetanib for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Katherine; Kim, Geoffrey; Maher, V Ellen; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Moon, Young Jin; Song, Pengfei; Marathe, Anshu; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Zhu, Hao; Garnett, Christine; Liu, Qi; Booth, Brian; Gehrke, Brenda; Dorsam, Robert; Verbois, Leigh; Ghosh, Debasis; Wilson, Wendy; Duan, John; Sarker, Haripada; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Skarupa, Lisa; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Murgo, Anthony; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-07-15

    On April 6, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved vandetanib (Caprelsa tablets; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP) for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic disease. Vandetanib is the first drug approved for this indication, and this article focuses on the basis of approval. Approval was based on the results of a double-blind trial conducted in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to vandetanib, 300 mg/d orally (n = 231), or to placebo (n = 100). The primary objective was demonstration of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with vandetanib compared with placebo. Other endpoints included evaluation of overall survival and objective response rate. The PFS analysis showed a marked improvement for patients randomized to vandetanib (hazard ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate for the vandetanib arm was 44% compared with 1% for the placebo arm. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities (>5%) were diarrhea and/or colitis, hypertension and hypertensive crisis, fatigue, hypocalcemia, rash, and corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation. This approval was based on a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS. Given the toxicity profile, which includes prolongation of the QT interval and sudden death, only prescribers and pharmacies certified through the vandetanib Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy Program are able to prescribe and dispense vandetanib. Treatment-related risks should be taken into account when considering the use of vandetanib in patients with indolent, asymptomatic, or slowly progressing disease.

  6. BRAF V600E mutation in prognostication of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Barczyński, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) offers excellent prognosis, however relapse risk or persistent disease is related to ~30%. Currently, attention is paid to the possibility of patient group selection of different risk of unfavorable outcome to match a particular therapeutic approach. Therefore, interest in new prognostic and predictive markers known preoperatively is observed. BRAF V600E mutation is such a marker. Many studies analyzing the prevalence of the mutation and its relationship with other clinico-pathological risk factors were reported but with controversial conclusions. The prognostic significance of BRAF mutation was confirmed by some single centre studies, a few meta-analyses and a large multicenter retrospective international study. They confirmed a correlation between the mutation and the risk of recurrence. The strongest argument against using BRAF mutation as an independent prognostic and predictive factor in PTC is its high prevalence (30–80%). At present it seems that BRAF mutation is one of the factors influencing the prognosis and it should be analyzed in correlation with other prognostic factors. The most recent ATA recommendations do not indicate a routine application of BRAF status for initial risk stratification in differentiated thyroid cancer due to a lack of evident confirmation of a direct influence of mutation on the increase in relapse risk. However, ATA demonstrates the continuous risk scale for the relapse risk assessment, considering BRAF and/or TERT status. At present, researchers are working on determining the role of BRAF mutation in patients from a low-risk group and its correlations with others molecular events. Currently, BRAF mutation cannot be used as a single, independent predictive factor. However, its usefulness in the context of other molecular and clinico-pathological risk factors cannot be excluded. They may be used to make modern prognostic scales of relapse risk and be applied to individualized diagnostic and

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  8. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  9. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  10. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    PubMed

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries.

  11. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  12. Thyroid cancer in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlin, J.B.; Sallan, S.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The incidence, clinical presentation, and types of thyroid cancers presenting in childhood are reviewed. The role of antecedent radiation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and genetics of medullary thyroid carcinoma are discussed. Unique aspects of therapy and prognosis for the pediatric patient with thyroid carcinoma are addressed as well as a diagnostic approach to the child who presents with a neck mass.59 references.

  13. Protective effect of intraoperative nerve monitoring against recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during re-exploration of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery induces scarring or distorts anatomy, and increases the risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury for a reoperation. The benefit of intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) for re-exploration (a second nerve exploration) and reoperation has not been established. Methods Two hundred and ten patients were given a thyroid or parathyroid reoperation at our hospital between 2001 and 2010. Using IONM, we re-explored 56 patients who had been operated on before June 2007. The injury rate in these patients was compared with that of the 15 patients re-explored without IONM between 2001 and 2006. Results Of the 70 nerves that were re-explored using IONM, only one was incidentally injured, significantly fewer than the three injured in the 15 nerves re-explored without using IONM (1.43% vs. 20%, P = 0.0164). Conclusions IONM helped prevent RLN damage when re-exploring nerves during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. We recommend the routine use of IONM in thyroid and parathyroid reoperations. PMID:23618223

  14. A meta-analysis on the effect of operation modes on the recurrence of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiao; Sang, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Whether total thyroidectomy reduces the recurrence rate in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) is currently controversy. Conclusions of sporadic, inconsistent, and mono-institutional studies need a meta-analysis to evaluate. 525 relevant studies were obtained from initial search on PubMed, 511 studies were excluded by inclusion and exclusion criteria. Eligible data were extracted from each included study. The Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the difference in the recurrence rates between PTMC patients treated with total thyroidectomy and non-total thyroidectomy. OR and 95% CI were calculated using a fixed-effects or a random-effects model. The Q statistic was used to evaluate homogeneity and Beggs test was used to assess publication bias. 14 studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. The over all recurrence rates of pooled patients with total thyroidectomy and non-total thyroidectomy were 2.83% and 2.84% respectively. Primary random-effects model analysis showed, no significant difference of recurrence rates existed between two operation modes (OR = 0.732, 95% CI: 0.444 - 1.208), while, high heterogeneity among studies was found, I-squared index (I2) = 40.2%. After remove one study with high heterogeneity, the OR of the pooled recurrence rates of the total thyroidectomy and the non-total thyroidectomy groups was 0.786 (95% CI: 0.363 - 1.701), further suggesting no significant difference of the recurrence rate exists between two operation modes. Our meta-analysis demonstrated postoperative recurrence of PTMC is not reduced by total thyroidectomy, non-total thyroidectomy is also a good choice to treat PTMC patients. PMID:27756889

  15. Construction of human single-chain variable fragment antibodies of medullary thyroid carcinoma and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Pang, Hua; Hu, Xiaoli; Li, Wenbo; Xi, Jimei; Xu, Lu; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare tumor of the endocrine system with poor prognosis as it exhibits high resistance against conventional therapy. Recent studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies labeled with radionuclide have become important agents for diagnosing tumors. To elucidate whether single-chain fragment of variable (scFv) antibody labeled with 131I isotope is a potential imaging agent for diagnosing MTC. A human scFv antibody library of MTC using phage display technique was constructed with a capacity of 3x10(5). The library was panned with thyroid epithelial cell lines and MTC cell lines (TT). Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to identify the biological characteristics of the panned scFv. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay was also used to explore the optimal concentration of the TT cell proliferation inhibition rate. They were categorized into TT, SW480 and control groups using phosphate-buffered saline. Western blotting showed that molecular weight of scFv was 28 kDa, cell ELISA showed that the absorbance of TT cell group was significantly increased (P=0.000??) vs. the other three groups, and MTT assay showed that the inhibition rate between the two cell lines was statistically significantly different (P<0.05) when the concentration of scFv was 0.1, 1 and 10 µmol/l. The tumor uptake of 131I-scFv was visible at 12 h and clear image was obtained at 48 h using the single photon emission computed tomography. scFv rapidly and specifically target MTC cells, suggesting the potential of this antibody as an imaging agent for diagnosing MTC.

  16. Pentavalent (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA, (/sup 131/I)MIBG, and (/sup 99m/Tc)MDP--an evaluation of three imaging techniques in patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.E.; Lazarus, C.R.; Wraight, P.; Sampson, C.; Maisey, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    Nine patients with histologically proven medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MCT) were imaged using pentavalent (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercaptosuccinic acid ((V)DMSA), (/sup 131/I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and (/sup 99m/Tc)methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Technetium-99m (V)DMSA demonstrated most of the tumor sites in eight patients with proven metastases, with an overall sensitivity of 95% in lesion detection. Iodine-131 MIBG showed definite uptake in some of the tumor sites in three of the nine patients imaged, with equivocal uptake seen in a further one patient, with sensitivity of only 11% for lesion detection. Technetium-99m MDP demonstrated bony metastases only, in four of the patients imaged yielding a sensitivity of 61%. Technetium-99m (V)DMSA has been demonstrated in this study to be a useful imaging agent in patients with MCT, showing uptake in significantly more lesions and with better imaging qualities than (/sup 131/I)MIBG, and with the ability to detect soft tissue as well as bony metastases.

  17. Usefulness of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using CyberKnife for Recurrent Lymph Node Metastasis of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higashiyama, Shigeaki; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Yoshida, Atsushi; Shiomi, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    A woman in her 60s presented with a recurrent lymph node metastasis from a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right parapharyngeal space. She had already undergone total thyroidectomy, five resections for cervical lymph node metastases, and right carotid rebuilding. Surgical resection of the current metastasis was impossible. 131I-radioiodine therapy (RIT) with 3.7 GBq 131I was not effective; therefore, stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) using a CyberKnife radiotherapy system was scheduled. The prescription dose was 21 Gy, and a dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions was administered. The PTV was 4,790 mm3. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging conducted 3 and 12 months after the SRT demonstrated a remarkable and gradual reduction of the recurrent lymph node metastasis in the right parapharyngeal space and no evidence of recurrence. For multidisciplinary therapy of unresectable and/or RIT unresponsive locoregional lymph node metastases and recurrences of DTC, SRT using the CyberKnife system should be considered.

  18. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  20. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  1. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Because medullary thyroid cancer cells do not absorb iodine, radioiodine scans are not used for this cancer. For this test, a small amount of radioactive iodine (called I-131 ) is swallowed (usually as a ...

  2. Recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a focal neurologic deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.N.; Wu, S.Y.; Kim, D.D.; Kollin, J.; Prasasvinichai, S.

    1986-10-01

    Papillary-follicular thyroid carcinoma usually remains localized to the thyroid bed and, in cases of metastasis, almost always involves the lung, bone, or liver. The two patients described here presented with papillary carcinoma and neurologic dysfunction. Total body iodine 131 scans disclosed cerebral uptake, and cerebral masses were confirmed by computed tomographic scan. Both patients presented diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas, and ultimately underwent craniotomy. One patient's cerebral metastasis recurred and was treated by a second craniotomy. The other patient received postoperative external cerebral radiotherapy and a novel intraoperative treatment: implantation of 22 iodine 125 seeds in the tumor bed, estimated to yield 16,000 rad (160 Gy) in one year. To date, cerebral metastases have not recurred in the latter patient, although tumor has reappeared in other sites. There is little reported in the medical literature concerning cerebral metastases of thyroid carcinoma, and the present report reviews this experience and discusses treatment alternatives.

  3. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  4. Analysis of predictability of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in the recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Kyeong; So, Young; Chung, Hyun Woo; Yoo, Young Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Hwang, Tae Sook; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-10-01

    Whether preoperative F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can predict recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remains unclear. Herein, we evaluated the potential of primary tumor FDG avidity for the prediction of tumor recurrence in PTC patients. A total of 412 PTC patients (72 males, 340 females; age: 47.2 ± 12.2 years; range: 17-84 years) who underwent FDG-PET/CT prior to total thyroidectomy (n = 350), subtotal thyroidectomy (n = 2), or lobectomy (n = 60) from 2007 to 2011 were analyzed. The predictive ability for recurrence was investigated among various clinicopathological factors, BRAF(V)(600E) mutation, and preoperative FDG avidity of the primary tumor using Kaplan-Meier (univariate) and Cox proportional hazards regression (multivariate) analyses. Of the 412 patients, 19 (4.6%) experienced recurrence, which was confirmed either by pathology (n = 17) or high serum thyroglobulin level (n = 2), during a mean follow-up period of 43.9 ± 16.6 months. Of the 412 patients, 237 (57.5%) had FDG-avid tumors (maximum standardized uptake value, 7.1 ± 7.0; range: 1.6-50.5). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that tumor size (P = 0.0054), FDG avidity of the tumor (P = 0.0049), extrathyroidal extension (P = 0.0212), and lymph node (LN) stage (P < 0.0001) were significant predictors for recurrence. However, only LN stage remained a significant predictor in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Patients with FDG-avid tumors had higher LN stage (P < 0.0001), larger tumor size (P < 0.0001), and more frequent extrathyroidal extension (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, FDG avidity of the primary tumor in preoperative FDG-PET/CT could not predict the recurrence of PTC. LN stage was the only identified predictor of PTC recurrence.

  5. [Monitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury using an electromyographic endotracheal tube in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Anesthetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Martín Jaramago, J; Tamarit Conejeros, M; Escudero Torrella, M; Solaz Roldán, C

    2013-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury remains one of the main complications in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. When this injury is bilateral, an acute upper airway obstruction may occur, leading to a potentially life-threatening situation for the patient. The visual identification of the nerve during surgery is the best way to preserve its integrity. However identification of the nerves by means of electromyographic stimuli through electrodes attached to endotracheal tubes could help in decreasing nerve injury. In these cases the experience and role of the anesthetist is essential to correctly place the electromyographic endotracheal tube and ensure that the electrodes are in touch with the vocal cords during the surgery. Moreover, the results of the electromyography can be affected by the neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, the choice and dose must be adapted, in order to ensure a suitable anesthetic depth, and adequate response.

  6. Management of the neck in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of nodal metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancer ranges between 40% to 75%. Elective neck dissection is generally not advised in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer; however, if clinically apparent nodal disease is noted in the tracheoesophageal groove during surgery, central compartment clearance is advised. If clinically apparent nodal disease is present in the lateral compartment of the neck, modified neck dissection preserving the sternomastoid, accessory nerve, and jugular vein is advised. The "berry picking procedure" is generally not recommended because of the higher incidence of regional recurrence. Due consideration should be given for parathyroidal transplantation if the blood supply to the parathyroids is damaged during central compartment clearance. The incidence of lymph node metastasis is highest in young patients, however, lymph node metastasis has no bearing on long-term survival. There seems to be a higher incidence of regional recurrence in elderly individuals. If patients present with bulky nodal disease, consideration may be given for postoperative radioactive iodine dosimetry and ablation if necessary. Differentiated thyroid cancer represents a unique disease in the human body, where lymph node metastasis has no prognostic implication. Aggressive surgical clearance is advised in patients with medullary thyroid cancer in the central compartment and the jugular chain lymph nodes.

  7. New non-renal congenital disorders associated with medullary sponge kidney (MSK) support the pathogenic role of GDNF and point to the diagnosis of MSK in recurrent stone formers.

    PubMed

    Ria, Paolo; Fabris, Antonia; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2016-08-29

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a congenital renal disorder. Its association with several developmental abnormalities in other organs hints at the likelihood of some shared step(s) in the embryogenesis of the kidney and other organs. It has been suggested that the REarranged during Transfection (RET) proto-oncogene and the Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF) gene are defective in patients with MSK, and both RET and GDNF are known to have a role in the development of the central nervous system, heart, and craniofacial skeleton. Among a cohort of 143 MSK patients being followed up for nephrolithiasis and chronic kidney disease at our institution, we found six with one or more associated non-renal anomalies: one patient probably has congenital hemihyperplasia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with adipose metaplasia and mitral valve prolapse; one has Marfan syndrome; and the other four have novel associations between MSK and nerve and skeleton abnormalities described here for the first time. The discovery of disorders involving the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and craniofacial skeleton in MSK patients supports the hypothesis of a genetic alteration on the RET-GDNF axis having a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of MSK, in a subset of patients at least. MSK seems more and more to be a systemic disease, and the identification of extrarenal developmental defects could be important in arousing the suspicion of MSK in recurrent stone formers.

  8. [The ultrasound diagnosis of regional recurrent cancer of the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Bochkareva, O V; Siniukova, G T; Matiakin, E G; Kostiakova, L A; Titova, I A; Tsiklauri, V T

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 220 patients was performed using ultrasound investigation (USI) in B-regimen, color and energy Doppler encoding, 3D-reconstruction of image and sonoelastography. There were 49 recurrences in the regional lymph nodes. Main semiotic signs of regional recurrences were identified. USI with the application of the methods described is highly informative: sensitivity--94.2%, specificity--92.5%, accuracy--91.7%.

  9. Perspectives of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 90% of non-medullary thyroid malignancies originate from the follicular cell and are classified as papillary or follicular (well-differentiated) thyroid carcinomas, showing an overall favourable prognosis. However, recurrence or persistence of the disease occurs in some cases associated with the presence of loco-regional or distant metastatic lesions that generally become resistant to radioiodine therapy, while glucose uptake and metabolism are increased. Recent advances in the field of tumor progression have shown that CTC (circulating tumour cells) are metabolic and genetically heterogeneous. There is now special interest in unravelling the mechanisms that allow the reminiscence of dormant tumour lesions that might be related to late disease progression and increased risk of recurrence. AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is activated by the depletion in cellular energy levels and allows adaptive changes in cell metabolism that are fundamental for cell survival in a stressful environment; nevertheless, the activation of this kinase also decreases cell proliferation rate and induces tumour cell apoptosis. In the thyroid field, AMPK emerged as a novel important intracellular pathway, since it regulates both iodide and glucose uptakes in normal thyroid cells. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the AMPK pathway is highly activated in papillary thyroid carcinomas, although the clinical significance of these findings remains elusive. Herein we review the current knowledge about the role of AMPK activation in thyroid physiology and pathophysiology, with special focus on thyroid cancer.

  10. Perspectives of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of non-medullary thyroid malignancies originate from the follicular cell and are classified as papillary or follicular (well-differentiated) thyroid carcinomas, showing an overall favourable prognosis. However, recurrence or persistence of the disease occurs in some cases associated with the presence of loco-regional or distant metastatic lesions that generally become resistant to radioiodine therapy, while glucose uptake and metabolism are increased. Recent advances in the field of tumor progression have shown that CTC (circulating tumour cells) are metabolic and genetically heterogeneous. There is now special interest in unravelling the mechanisms that allow the reminiscence of dormant tumour lesions that might be related to late disease progression and increased risk of recurrence. AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is activated by the depletion in cellular energy levels and allows adaptive changes in cell metabolism that are fundamental for cell survival in a stressful environment; nevertheless, the activation of this kinase also decreases cell proliferation rate and induces tumour cell apoptosis. In the thyroid field, AMPK emerged as a novel important intracellular pathway, since it regulates both iodide and glucose uptakes in normal thyroid cells. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the AMPK pathway is highly activated in papillary thyroid carcinomas, although the clinical significance of these findings remains elusive. Herein we review the current knowledge about the role of AMPK activation in thyroid physiology and pathophysiology, with special focus on thyroid cancer. PMID:27919039

  11. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  12. Electrophysiologic recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring during thyroid and parathyroid surgery: international standards guideline statement.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Gregory W; Dralle, Henning; Abdullah, Hisham; Barczynski, Marcin; Bellantone, Rocco; Brauckhoff, Michael; Carnaille, Bruno; Cherenko, Sergii; Chiang, Fen-Yu; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Finck, Camille; Hartl, Dana; Kamani, Dipti; Lorenz, Kerstin; Miccolli, Paolo; Mihai, Radu; Miyauchi, Akira; Orloff, Lisa; Perrier, Nancy; Poveda, Manuel Duran; Romanchishen, Anatoly; Serpell, Jonathan; Sitges-Serra, Antonio; Sloan, Tod; Van Slycke, Sam; Snyder, Samuel; Takami, Hiroshi; Volpi, Erivelto; Woodson, Gayle

    2011-01-01

    Intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) during thyroid and parathyroid surgery has gained widespread acceptance as an adjunct to the gold standard of visual nerve identification. Despite the increasing use of IONM, review of the literature and clinical experience confirms there is little uniformity in application of and results from nerve monitoring across different centers. We provide a review of the literature and cumulative experience of the multidisciplinary International Neural Monitoring Study Group with IONM spanning nearly 15 years. The study group focused its initial work on formulation of standards in IONM as it relates to important areas: 1) standards of equipment setup/endotracheal tube placement and 2) standards of loss of signal evaluation/intraoperative problem-solving algorithm. The use of standardized methods and reporting will provide greater uniformity in application of IONM. In addition, this report clarifies the limitations of IONM and helps identify areas where additional research is necessary. This guideline is, at its forefront, quality driven; it is intended to improve the quality of neural monitoring, to translate the best available evidence into clinical practice to promote best practices. We hope this work will minimize inappropriate variations in monitoring rather than to dictate practice options.

  13. Image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy – a valuable salvage treatment approach for loco-regional recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Zhao, Hongfu; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhipeng; Ge, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the treatment effect of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for refractory recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Case report This 66-year-old female presented with recurrence 5 years after thyroidectomy for PTC. Despite external irradiation and radioactive 131I, the lesion expanded as 3.7 × 3.0 × 2.3 cm3 and 2.0 × 1.5 × 1.5 cm3. The locoregional recurrent tumor was treated with image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The total dose of 30 Gy in 6 fractions were delivered on the whole recurrent tumor. Results Removal of the recurrent tumor was securely achieved by HDR interstitial brachytherapy guided with ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. The refractory tumor in the patients healed uneventfully after HDR interstitial brachytherapy without recurrence during the 14 months of follow-up. Conclusions The image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment approach for refractory recurrence of PTC. PMID:27257420

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  15. Conus medullaris stroke

    PubMed Central

    Alanazy, Mohammed H.

    2016-01-01

    Absent F wave in the stage of spinal shock has been described in cases of traumatic spinal cord injury. The role of F wave in predicting prognosis after conus medullaris infarct has not been described. We describe herein a middle aged-man with a conus medullaris infarct. Both tibial and peroneal F waves were absent on day 4. The left tibial F wave reappeared in the following study on day 18. All F waves reappeared on day 56 at which time the patient was still wheelchair bound. He regained walking on day 105. We hypothesize that reappearance of initially absent F waves post conus medullaris infarct is a good prognostic sign for the return of ambulation. The applicability of this observation requires further research. We also discuss clinical and diagnostic caveats in this case. PMID:27356660

  16. Predictive factors for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer in patients under 21 years of age and a meta-analysis of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Zhong-Wu; Ji, Qing-Hai; Yang, Shu-Wen; Wei, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The influence of predictors for recurrence in relation to recurrence-free survival was analyzed retrospectively in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients under 21 years of age who underwent primary surgical treatment and who had a pathological diagnosis of DTC between 1983 and 2012 at Fudan University Cancer Hospital. Recurrences were retrospectively analyzed using a Cox regression model for the hazard ratio (HR) according to the clinicopathological features. A meta-analysis was performed with respect to the potential predictors for recurrence from current related studies. In the present study, there were 146 young patients aged from 7 to 20 years, with a female/male ratio of 2.65/1. Female gender was the only factor significantly associated with recurrence according to univariate (HR = 2.812, P = 0.037) and multivariate (HR = 4.107, P = 0.024) Cox regression analyses. Meta-analyses revealed that multifocality (HR = 1.91, P < 0.05) and presentation at diagnosis (HR = 1.39, P < 0.05) were highly associated with recurrence in young DTC patients. However, female gender and other factors, such as age (≤10 vs. 11-20 years), PTC (PTC vs. FTC), extrathyroidal extension, lymph node metastasis, total thyroidectomy (total vs. less than total), radioiodine therapy, and radiation history, were not associated with recurrence in young DTC patients. In conclusion, multifocality and presentation at diagnosis are strong predictive factors of recurrence in relation to recurrence-free survival. We recommend studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up to verify the influence of predictors for disease recurrence in young patients.

  17. Blood glucose and insulin levels, thyroid function, and serology in Ménière's disease, recurrent vestibulopathy, and psychogenic vertigo.

    PubMed

    Charles, D A; Barber, H O; Hope-Gill, H F

    1979-08-01

    Nineteen patients with unilateral Ménière's disease, 20 with psychogenic dizziness, and 20 with recurrent vestibulopathy (diagnostic criteria in text of paper) were found to have normal five hour glucose tolerance tests, serum thyroxine and effective thyroid indices, and serologic tests for syphilis. Hypothyroidism and hypoglycemia were absent in all groups. An unexplained finding of each diagnostic group was significant increase of fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, and elevated insulin:glucose ratios, compared to a control group. There appears to be no diagnostic indication for performing these chemical and serologic studies in patients with unilateral Ménière's disease, psychogenic vertigo, or recurrent vestibulopathy. Reasons are given to support the view that recurrent vestibulopathy may be a specific vestibular disturbance.

  18. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  19. Impact of lymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-02-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND. Analyses of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001-2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (P<0.0001). CLN metastasis rate rose from 18.0 to 77.3% from limited CND to formal CND (P<0.0001). An increasing rate of BRAF mutation was also found from less to more extensive CND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan-Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC.

  20. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  1. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THYROID CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David F.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer exists in several forms. Differentiated thyroid cancers include papillary and follicular histologies. These tumors exist along a spectrum of differentiation, and their incidence continues to climb. A number of advances in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancers now exist. These include molecular diagnostics and more advanced strategies for risk stratification. Medullary cancer arises from the parafollicular cells and not the follicular cells. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment differs from differentiated thyroid tumors. Genetic testing and newer adjuvant therapies has changed the diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid cancer. This review will focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of both differentiated and medullary thyroid cancers, focusing specifically on newer developments in the field. PMID:23797834

  2. Cediranib Maleate With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  3. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  4. Lenvatinib: Role in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in treatment of advanced thyroid cancers, prognoses remain poor. Treatment of advanced, progressive disease remains challenging, with limited treatment options. Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib, and lenvatinib, which are now FDA-approved for thyroid cancer, have shown clinical benefit in advanced thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib is approved for treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). It has been studied in phase II and III trials for treatment of advanced RAI-refractory DTC, and in a phase II trial for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Lenvatinib targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptors 1-4 (FGFR-1-4), RET, c-kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Its antitumor activity may be due to antiangiogenic properties and direct antitumor effects. Lenvatinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in a variety of solid tumors, including MTC, in phase I and II clinical trials. In a phase II study in advanced RAI-refractory DTC, lenvatinib-treated patients achieved a 50% response rate (RR), with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12.6 months. In a phase III trial in RAI-refractory DTC, median PFS in lenvatinib-treated patients was 18.3 months, with a 65% overall RR, versus 3.6 months in placebo-treated patients, with a 2% RR. Adverse events occurring in >50% of patients included hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue/asthenia, and decreased appetite. Lenvatinib is a promising new agent for treatment of patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  5. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... The thyroid feels big or irregular, called a goiter . You have abnormal lymph nodes near your thyroid. ... due to: Cysts Enlargement of the thyroid gland ( goiter ) Thyroid nodules Thyroiditis, or inflammation of the thyroid ( ...

  6. The use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of thyroid cancer and hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    James, C; Starks, M; MacGillivray, D C; White, J

    1999-01-01

    With the variety of radiopharmaceutical agents and refined imaging techniques, thyroid and parathyroid imaging provides much valuable clinical information. The use of imaging is most important in the follow-up of differentiated (DTC) and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Patients with DTC are followed with serum thyroidglobulin and 131I whole body scintigraphy when the serum thyroglobulin level is elevated. When the 131I scintigram is negative, 201Tl scintigraphy may best identify the site of recurrent DTC. Alternative radioisotopes, ultrasound, CT, and FDG PET are also useful in localizing the site of DTC metastases. MTC recurrences and metastases are more difficult to image. Selective venous catheterization is the most sensitive and specific method for detecting areas of recurrent MTC. High-resolution ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and scintigraphy are all capable of, and useful in, detecting macroscopic foci of metastatic tumor. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and 99mTc DMSA have been the most frequently used nuclear imaging agents in patients with recurrent MTC. Imaging for hyperparathyroidism remains controversial. Sestambi has become the preferred isotope for parathyroid scintigraphy; whereas high-resolution ultrasound is also frequently used. Preoperative imaging is being used as a method to allow a unilateral neck exploration, more recently, in conjunction with intraoperative 1-84 PTH assay and with intraoperative use of the gamma probe. Most often, parathyroid imaging is performed before reoperation for persistent hyperparathyroidism.

  7. Recurrent Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Pleural Metastasis Diagnosed by Effusion Cytology: A Report of Cases with Clinicopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Reid I; Sumida, Lauren C; Lum, Christopher AK

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is typically an indolent disease characterized by slow growth and a favorable prognosis. In rare instances, this disease may metastasize to the pleura and manifest as a malignant pleural effusion. We report 3 female patients of Japanese/Okinawan ancestry with a history of PTC who presented with hydrothorax. Cytologic examination in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining enabled a definitive diagnosis of metastatic PTC. Molecular analysis of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways demonstrated the presence of the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF)V600E mutation in 2 of our 3 patients, with the absence of any other clinically significant mutations in all cases. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular and environmental mechanisms involved in this aggressive manifestation of PTC. PMID:25755913

  8. Effectiveness of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT for localizing recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Nah, Kuk Young; Kim, Ra Mi; Oh, Yeon-Ju; An, Young-Sil; Yoon, Joon-Kee; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Soh, Euy-Young; Chung, Woong Youn

    2012-09-01

    Although the prognosis of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is generally encouraging, a diagnostic dilemma is posed when an increasing level of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is noted, without detection of a recurrent tumor using conventional imaging tools such as the iodine-131 whole-body scanning (the [(131)I] scan) or neck ultrasonography (US). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT in terms of accurate detection of both iodine- and non-iodine-avid recurrence, compared with that of conventional imaging such as the [(131)I] scan or neck ultrasonography (US). Between July 2009 and June 2010, we prospectively studied 19 DTC patients with elevated thyroglobulin levels but who do not show pathological lesions when conventional imaging modalities are used. All involved patients had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioiodine (RI) treatment, and who had been followed-up for a mean of 13 months (range, 6-21 months) after the last RI session. Combined [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT data were evaluated for detecting recurrent DTC lesions in study patients and compared with those of other radiological and/or cytological investigations. Nine of 19 patients (47.4%) showed pathological [(18)F]-FDG (5/19, 26.3%) or [(124)I]-PET (4/19, 21.1%) uptake, and were classed as true-positives. Among such patients, disease management was modified in six (66.7%) and disease was restaged in seven (77.8%). In particular, the use of the described imaging combination optimized planning of surgical resection to deal with locoregional recurrence in 21.1% (4/19) of patients, who were shown to be disease-free during follow-up after surgery. Our results indicate that combination of [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT affords a valuable diagnostic method that can be used to make therapeutic decisions in patients with DTC who are tumor-free on conventional imaging studies but who have high Tg levels.

  9. Etiopathogenesis of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Makazlieva, Tanja; Vaskova, Olivija; Majstorov, Venjamin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thyroid malignomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm consisting of most frequent differentiated encountered carcinomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma, then medullary thyroid carcinoma originating from neuroendocrine calcitonin-producing C-cells and rare forms of thyroid lymphomas arising from intrathyroidal lymphatic tissue, thyroid sarcomas and poorly differentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. There are increasing numbers of epidemiological studies and publications that have suggested increased incidence rate of thyroid carcinomas. We have read, analysed and compare available reviews and original articles investigating different etiological factors in the development of thyroid carcinomas through Google Scholar and PubMed Database. DISCUSSION: Aetiology involved in the development of thyroid carcinomas is multifactorial and includes external influences, as well as constitutional predispositions and genetic etiological factors. The actual effect of environmental and constitutional factors is on promoting genetic and epigenetic alterations which result in cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Until now are identified numerous genetic alterations, assumed to have an important role in oncogenesis, with MAPK and PI3K-AKT as crucial signalling networks regulating growth, proliferation, differentiation and cell survival/apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This new molecular insight could have a crucial impact on diagnosis and also on improving and selecting an appropriate treatment to the patients with thyroid malignancies. PMID:27703585

  10. Changes in serum thyroglobulin antibody levels as a dynamic prognostic factor for early-phase recurrence of thyroglobulin antibody-positive papillary thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Osamu; Miyauchi, Akira; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Ayako; Yabuta, Tomonori; Masuoka, Hiroo; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Higashiyama, Takuya; Kihara, Minoru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Miya, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that dynamic prognostic markers such as the thyroglobulin (Tg)-doubling time in thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb)-negative papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and changes in pre- and postoperative TgAb levels in TgAb-positive PTC patients more keenly reflect patients' prognosis than conventional static prognostic factors. Here we investigated periodic changes in TgAb levels in 513 TgAb-positive PTC patients who underwent total thyroidectomy. The TgAb levels at 1 year after surgery decreased to <50% of the preoperative values in 407 (79%) patients, and the remaining 106 (21%) patients showed no decrease in TgAb. In 426 patients, TgAb was also measured more than 1 year after surgery. Compared with their TgAb levels 1 year after surgery, 59 patients (14%) showed an increase in TgAb levels of >20% during the follow-up. The postoperative Tg levels at 1 year after surgery remained positive in 44 (9%) patients despite their TgAb positivity. To date (median follow-up period 35 months), 12 of the 426 patients (3%) showed PTC recurrence, and 11 of these patients showed either or both a TgAb elevation later than 1 year after surgery and postoperative Tg positivity. Although further studies with longer follow-ups are necessary, we can conclude that changes in postoperative TgAb levels may be usable as a surrogate tumor marker for TgAb-positive PTC patients after total thyroidectomy.

  11. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  12. Meta-analysis of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in thyroid surgery with or without intraoperative nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rulli, F; Ambrogi, V; Dionigi, G; Amirhassankhani, S; Mineo, T C; Ottaviani, F; Buemi, A; DI Stefano, P; Mourad, M

    2014-08-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) aimed at reducing the injuries of recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy is controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the incidence of nerve injuries with or without IONM. Studies published from January 1994 to February 2012 in English language on humans were identified. Heterogeneity of studies was checked by the Higgins test. Summary estimates of predictive values of injury were made using the Mantel-Haenszel test based on the fixed-effects model. Publication bias was assessed by a funnel plot and Egger's method. Eight articles were selected accounting a total of 5257 nerves at risk. IONM revealed a significant impact in preventing transient injuries (positive predictive value = 5% [95% CI: 2-8], negative = 96% [95% CI: 91-100], relative risk = 0.73 [95% CI: 0.54-0.98], p = 0.035), whereas they failed to demonstrate effect on permanent injuries (positive predictive value = 2% [95% CI: 0.6-3.8], negative 99% [95% CI: 97-100], relative risk = 0.73 [95% CI: 0.44-1.23], p = 0.235). This meta-analysis demonstrated the merit of IONM in preventing transient injury during thyroidectomy. No advantage was found in permanent injuries.

  13. New developments in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Robert I

    2013-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is common but rarely deadly. Unfortunately, when the disease becomes refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI), few effective treatment options remain. This situation is changing, however, with the availability of multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cabozantanib and vandetanib, both recently FDA-approved for advanced or metastatic disease, have more than doubled progression-free survival in medullary thyroid cancer. New agents in the pipeline may yield even better outcomes, as discussed by Dr. Robert I. Haddad at the NCCN 18th Annual Conference.

  14. Recurrent laryngeal nerve management in thyroid surgery: consequences of routine visualization, application of intermittent, standardized and continuous nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Anuwong, Angkoon; Lavazza, Matteo; Kim, Hoon Yub; Wu, Che-Wei; Rausei, Stefano; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Ferrari, Cesare Carlo; Inversini, Davide; Leotta, Andrea; Biondi, Antonio; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-12-01

    The objective is to compare the consequences of routine visualization (RV) and the application of intermitted (I-IONM), standardized (S-IONM), and continuous monitoring (C-IONM) of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) management. RV includes that 698 RLNs managed solely with visual identification. In a second period 777, RLNs were handled by the I-IONM. The third period 768 RLNs monitoring was performed according to the standards. C-IONM via VN stimulation included 626 RLNs. The following issues were analyzed and compared per each period study: RLN identification rate, branching detection, assessment of NRLN, intraoperative recognizable nerve damage, stage thyroidectomy rate, transient or definitive lesions, bilateral nerve palsy, and recovery time. Significance for nerve identification rate was achieved (p = 0.03) when the statistical analysis was applied between RV vs. S-IONM and C-IONM. Extralaryngeal bifurcation was identified in 21, 44, 43, and 46 of RLN dissected, respectively, per period (p = 0.005). The incidence of paralysis in identified and unidentified RLN was 3.8 % (107/2806) and 82 % (52/63), respectively. Rates of temporary/permanent RLNP were 16.7/1.7, 5/1.1, 4.5/1, and 3.1/0 % per period study, respectively (p = 0.07). Recognizable intraoperatively nerve damage was, respectively, 15, 45, 100, and 100 % for period study (p = 0.03). The recovery of injured nerves was significantly faster in C-IONM group. S-IONM and C-IONM cumulate 40-stage procedures. The standardized technique, guidelines adherences, and C-IONM allowed to (1) increase RLN identification; (2) reduce the severity of injuries in terms of (a) reset bilateral RLNP, (b) faster recovery time, and

  15. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  16. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  17. Thyroid Nodules

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Body in Balance › Thyroid Nodules Fact Sheet Thyroid Nodules March 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Hindi ... Singer, MD Leonard Wartofsky, MD What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped ...

  18. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  19. Medullary sponge kidney: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Antonia; Anglani, Franca; Lupo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a kidney malformation that generally manifests with nephrocalcinosis and recurrent renal stones; other signs may be renal acidification and concentration defects, and pre-calyceal duct ectasias. MSK is generally considered a sporadic disorder, but an apparently autosomal dominant inheritance has also been observed. As MSK reveals abnormalities in both the lower and the upper nephron and is often associated with urinary tract developmental anomalies, its pathogenesis should probably be sought in one of the numerous steps characterizing renal morphogenesis. Given the key role of the GDNF-RET interaction in kidney and urinary tract development and nephrogenesis, anomalies in these molecules are reasonable candidates for explaining a disorder such as MSK. As a matter of fact, we detected two, hitherto unknown, rare variants of the GDNF gene in MSK patients. We surmise that a defective distal acidification has a central role in MSK and is followed by a chain of events including defective bone mineralization, hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia and stone formation.

  20. Medullary sponge kidney in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Patriquin, H.B.; O'Regan, S.

    1985-08-01

    Medullary sponge kidney is reported in six children aged 2-18 years. One child was asymptomatic; the others had hematuria or a urine-concentrating defect. Renal function and size were otherwise normal, as was liver function. The diagnosis was made at excretory urography according to criteria established in adults. Sonography revealed hyperechogenic pyramids, at first at the periphery, later generalized. Computed tomography is very sensitive to the pyramidal nephrocalcinosis that complicates this disease and explains the frequent presenting symptom of hematuria in these children.

  1. Imaging of Renal Medullary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, Eliodoro; Santucci, Domiziana; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Nezzo, Marco; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare, highly aggressive tumor recognized as an independent pathological entity. African-descent adolescents and young adults with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy are the most affected groups. This rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma has its own morphogenetic and pathological characteristics. The major clinical manifestations include gross hematuria, abdominal or flank pain, and weight loss. The prognosis is very poor, with 95% of cases diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. In this review, we summarize the morphologic and dynamic characteristics of RMC under various imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance. Differential diagnosis and management strategies are also discussed.

  2. Medullary sponge kidney associated with congenital hemihypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Indridason, O S; Thomas, L; Berkoben, M

    1996-08-01

    Medullary sponge kidney is a developmental disorder characterized by ectatic and cystic malformation of the collecting ducts and tubules. Clinical manifestations include urinary tract infections, renal stones, and hematuria. It can be associated with other developmental disorders. A case of medullary sponge kidney associated with congenital hemihypertrophy, complicated by nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, is reported here.

  3. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  4. Eponym : de Quervain thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Engkakul, Pontipa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2011-04-01

    de Quervain thyroiditis is a self-limited inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland. It is an uncommon disease in adults and very rare in children. Fritz de Quervain, a Swiss surgeon, who was an authority on thyroid disease, described the unique pathology of this disease. Granulomatous changes with giant cells in thyroid tissue are the pathological findings. Viral infection in genetically predisposed individuals has been proposed as the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical hallmarks for the diagnosis are painful thyroid enlargement, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein as well as decreased uptake of the thyroid gland on thyroid scintigraphy. In addition, thyrotoxicosis is present in about 50% of cases in early phase of the disease. Serum thyroglobulin level is usually elevated. Only symptomatic treatment with analgesics is usually required for pain relief. Glucocorticoid therapy may be used in severely ill patients. de Quervain thyroiditis is generally completely resolved without complications in 6-12 months. However, permanent hypothyroidism and recurrent disease have been reported in some patients.

  5. Rtfc (4931414P19Rik) Regulates in vitro Thyroid Differentiation and in vivo Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Junxia; Zhang, Mimi; Wen, Wei; Ruan, Xianhui; Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Shuang; Gao, Ming; Chen, Lingyi

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid is a one of the most important endocrine organs. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid development and function, as well as thyroid diseases, is beneficial for the clinical treatment of thyroid diseases and tumors. Through genetic linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we previously identified an uncharacterized gene C14orf93 (RTFC, mouse homolog: 4931414P19Rik) as a novel susceptibility gene for familial non-medullary thyroid carcinoma, and demonstrated its function in promoting thyroid tumor. However, the role of RTFC in thyroid development and function remains unexplored. In this study, we found that knockout of Rtfc compromises the in vitro thyroid differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. In contrast, Rtfc−/− mice are viable and fertile, and the size and the morphology of thyroid are not affected by Rtfc knockout. However, female Rtfc−/− mice, but not male Rtfc−/− mice, display mild hypothyroidism. In summary, our data suggest the roles of Rtfc in in vitro thyroid differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and in vivo thyroid function. PMID:28230092

  6. Rtfc (4931414P19Rik) Regulates in vitro Thyroid Differentiation and in vivo Thyroid Function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Junxia; Zhang, Mimi; Wen, Wei; Ruan, Xianhui; Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Shuang; Gao, Ming; Chen, Lingyi

    2017-02-23

    Thyroid is a one of the most important endocrine organs. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid development and function, as well as thyroid diseases, is beneficial for the clinical treatment of thyroid diseases and tumors. Through genetic linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we previously identified an uncharacterized gene C14orf93 (RTFC, mouse homolog: 4931414P19Rik) as a novel susceptibility gene for familial non-medullary thyroid carcinoma, and demonstrated its function in promoting thyroid tumor. However, the role of RTFC in thyroid development and function remains unexplored. In this study, we found that knockout of Rtfc compromises the in vitro thyroid differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. In contrast, Rtfc(-/-) mice are viable and fertile, and the size and the morphology of thyroid are not affected by Rtfc knockout. However, female Rtfc(-/-) mice, but not male Rtfc(-/-) mice, display mild hypothyroidism. In summary, our data suggest the roles of Rtfc in in vitro thyroid differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and in vivo thyroid function.

  7. Incidental Detection of Thyroid Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to Assess Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Haberkorn, Uwe; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to assess prostate cancer. Avid Ga-PSMA uptake by thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been reported in few cases. A 75-year-old man who received a diagnosis of RCC in 2006 and prostate cancer in 2009 presented with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels (0.7 ng/mL) following prostatectomy. Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed avid Ga-PSMA uptake in 1 pelvic and 1 retroperitoneal lymph node and focal Ga-PSMA accumulation in the thyroid. Excised retroperitoneal lymph node and thyroid tissues showed metastases from RCC, whereas the pelvic lymph node exhibited metastasis from prostate cancer.

  8. Shear wave elastography in medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Gumińska, Anna; Bakuła-Zalewska, Elwira; Mlosek, Krzysztof; Słapa, Rafał Z; Wareluk, Paweł; Krauze, Agnieszka; Ziemiecka, Agnieszka; Migda, Bartosz; Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dedecjus, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Elastografia fali poprzecznej jest nowoczesną metodą oceny sztywności tkanek. Obserwuje się wzrost zainteresowania tą techniką w różnicowaniu charakteru zmian ogniskowych w tarczycy również w diagnostyce przedoperacyjnej.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of anatomic disorders of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Kabadi, U.M.

    1983-11-01

    Thyroid function tests, radioiodine uptake and scintiscanning, and antithyroid antibody titers are the main laboratory tests useful in the management of goiter. Scintiscanning and ultrasonography aid in differentiating a functioning adenoma from a ''cold'' solid nodule--a crucial distinction since the incidence of cancer in a cold nodule is 20 percent. Radioiodine scanning and serum thyroglobulin help in the diagnosis of a well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Serum calcitonin serves as a reliable tumor marker for medullary carcinoma.

  10. Silent thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland. The disorder can cause hyperthyroidism, followed by hypothyroidism. The thyroid gland is located in the neck, ... Later symptoms may be of an underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ), including fatigue and cold intolerance, until the thyroid ...

  11. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is done to: Evaluate thyroid nodules or goiter Find the cause of an overactive thyroid gland ... chap 11. Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET ...

  12. Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your menstrual period. Your thyroid helps control your menstrual cycle. Too much or too little thyroid hormone can ... Problems getting pregnant. When thyroid disease affects the menstrual cycle, it also affects ovulation. This can make it ...

  13. Medullary cystic disease: a family study.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Chang, J M; Tsai, J H; Lai, Y H

    1998-03-01

    Medullary cystic disease of the kidney is characterized by progressive tubulointerstitial disease with medullary cyst formation and secondary glomerular sclerosis. We treated a patient with chronic renal failure and investigated the family history of renal disease. The patient, an 18-year-old woman, was admitted due to poor appetite and fatigue for several months. Findings on physical examination were normal except for a pale conjunctiva. Urinalysis revealed only mild proteinuria with clear sediment. The hemogram showed normocytic normochromic anemia with hemoglobin 86 g/L. The patient was azotemic and her creatinine clearance rate was 10.7 mL/min. Renal sonography showed contraction of both kidneys with a marked increase in cortical echogenicity. One small cyst was found in the medullary area. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed several medullary cysts. Percutaneous renal biopsy showed focal and periglomerular sclerosis, marked tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Ten of her family members were examined for renal function, and by sonography and CT. Five had medullary cysts, and three of the five showed abnormal renal function. Medullary cystic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with renal disease and a positive family history.

  14. Thyroid Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Dadu, Ramona; Hu, Mimi I; Lu, Charles; Gunn, Gary Brandon; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Lai, Stephen Y; Williams, Michelle D

    2015-12-01

    Surgery remains the most important effective treatment for differentiated (DTC) and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Radioactive iodine (RAI) is another important treatment but is reserved only for DTC whose disease captures RAI. Once patients fail primary therapy, observation is often recommended, as most DTC and MTC patients will have indolent disease. However, in a fraction of patients, systemic therapy must be considered. In recent decades 4 systemic therapies have been approved by the United States FDA for DTC and MTC. Sorafenib and lenvatinib are approved for DTC and vandetanib and cabozantinib for MTC. Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare and rapidly progressive form of thyroid cancer with a very high mortality rate. Treatment of ATC remains a challenge. Most patients are not surgical candidates at diagnosis due to advanced disease. External beam radiation and radiosensitizing radiation are the mainstay of therapy at this time. However, exciting new drugs and approaches to therapy are on the horizon but it will take a concerted, worldwide effort to complete clinical trials in order to find effective therapies that will improve the overall survival for this devastating disease.

  15. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  16. Adrenal cortical and medullary imaging.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J E

    1995-07-01

    Adrenal disease can be manifested by endocrine dysfunction or anatomic abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging modalities. With the advent of newer and more reliable in vitro assays and a better understanding of the spectrum of adrenal pathology, the physician can now adopt a more accurate and cost-effective approach to the diagnosis of adrenal disease. Both functional and anatomic imaging modalities can play an important role in the evaluation of the incidental adrenal mass, the early detection of adrenal metastases, differentiation of the various causes of Cushings's syndrome, selection of patients for potentially curative surgery in primary aldosteronism and adrenal hyperandrogenism, and localization of pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. The usefulness of the adrenal cortical radiopharmaceutical, 131I-6-beta-iodomethylnorcholesterol (NP-59), and the adrenal medullary radiopharmaceuticals, 131I and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), is detailed for these various clinical settings and the role of NP-59 and MIBG is contrasted to that of the cross-sectional modalities, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Incidental adrenal masses are common, but malignancies are few. Imaging studies select those patients who require a further evaluation by biopsy examination or adrenalectomy. In the hyperfunctioning endocrine states, such as Cushing's syndrome, primary aldosteronism, adrenal androgenism, and pheochromocytoma, correlation of biochemical findings with both functional and anatomic imaging is necessary to avoid inappropriate and ineffective surgical intervention, yet not miss an opportunity for curative resection. Lastly, MIBG and MRI are complementary in the detection and staging of neuroblastoma.

  17. Thyroid pathologies accompanying primary hyperparathyroidism: a high rate of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kutlutürk, Koray; Otan, Emrah; Yağcı, Mehmet Ali; Usta, Sertaç; Aydın, Cemalettin; Ünal, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Thyroid pathologies and non-medullary thyroid cancer often accompany primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between thyroid diseases, especially micropapillary thyroid cancer, with PHPT. Material and Methods: Data regarding 46 patients who were operated on with a diagnosis of PHPT at Inonu University Faculty of Medicine, General Surgery Clinic between June 2009 and March 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Age, gender, levels of preoperative calcium, parathyroid hormone and phosphorus, and the histopathological results of the removed parathyroid and thyroid tissues were evaluated. All of the patients had a preoperative diagnosis of PHPT and there was no history of radiation to the head and neck region in any of the patients. Results: Out of the 46 patients who were operated on for PHPT, 39 were female and 7 were male. The mean age was 52.8 years (25–76). Simultaneous thyroidectomy was performed in 35 patients (76.1%) due to an accompanying thyroid disorder. Papillary microcarcinoma was detected in 5 of these 35 (10.9%) patients who underwent thyroidectomy, two of which (40%) were multifocal tumors. The benign thyroid pathologies detected in the remaining 30 (65.2%) cases included lymphocytic thyroiditis in 3, Hashimoto thyroiditis in 1, follicular adenoma in 3 (two of which was Hurtle cell), and nodular colloidal goiter in 23 patients. The preoperative serum phosphate level was significantly higher in the group with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (p=0.013). Conclusion: In regions where goiter is endemic, thyroid diseases and thyroid papillary microcarcinoma occur in association with PHPT at a higher rate compared to the normal population. Therefore, we believe that patients who are planned for surgery due to PHPT should be thoroughly investigated for the presence of any concomitant malignant thyroid pathologies in the preoperative period. It should also be kept in mind that patients with high

  18. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references.

  19. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  20. Thyroid diseases and female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mintziori, G; Anagnostis, P; Toulis, K A; Goulis, D G

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid diseases are very common in women of reproductive age. The aim of this study was to review the current evidence on physiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of women with thyroid disorders that are currently seeking fertility, undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) or being pregnant. Normal thyroid function is essential for normal function of the gonadal axis, thus important in maintaining normal reproductive capacity. On the contrary, any type of thyroid dysfunction may reduce the likelihood of pregnancy; the latter can be restored to normal after appropriate treatment. Over eight million children have been born as a result of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) since 1978. As these procedures are becoming more common in clinical practice, the exact impact of thyroid status on reproductive outcomes as well as that of drugs used in ART on thyroid function has to be fully elucidated. Maternal thyroid function is crucial, especially during the first weeks of gestation, for offspring's wellness and brain development. On the other hand, normal physiological mechanisms during gestation can have a major impact on maternal thyroid function. As human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-like effect, high hCG concentrations are associated with thyroid stimulation, both functionally (lower serum TSH concentrations) and anatomically (increased thyroid volume). Although the association between maternal hypothyroidism and increased perinatal morbidity has been described for over a century, more recently, even the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as recurrent abortions and placental abruption. This is of major clinical significance, as anti-thyroid antibodies are surprisingly prevalent in pregnancy, especially during the first two trimesters.

  1. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  2. Intramedullary neurenteric cyst of the conus medullaris without associated spinal malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Hariri, Behrouz; Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hassani, Hajar; Taheri, Behrouz; Abbassioun, Kazem

    2012-01-01

    Spinal neurenteric (NE) cysts are rare congenital anomalies that may occur either alone or in the context of a complex malformative disorder. They are usually intradural-extramedullary lesions. Intramedullary NE cysts not associated with other congenital anomalies are very rare and only a few cases have been reported in the conus medullaris region. Intramedullary neurenteric cysts not associated with other spinal anomalies are very rare especially in the conus medullaris region. MRI is useful to define the cyst and the osseous anomalies associated with this lesion. The goal of treatment of an intramedullary neurenteric cyst is total excision at the first operation, if possible. Life-long follow-up with annual MRI is recommended due to the risk of cyst recurrence. We report an intramedullary NE cyst of the conus medullaris without associated malformation and the relevant literature is briefly reviewed.

  3. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are ... Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  4. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thyroid, a computerized tomography (CT) scan, or nuclear medicine tests, to diagnose and find the cause ... is having the scan for other health problems. Nuclear medicine tests. Nuclear medicine tests of the thyroid ...

  5. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  6. Thyroid Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated differently. Common thyroid disorders and problems include: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a disorder in which your thyroid doesn’ ... normal after you get better. If you have hypothyroidism, however, the levels of T4 in your blood ...

  7. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocking production of thyroid hormones and resulting in hypothyroidism . TBII is not routinely tested, but TSI is ... autoimmune disease . A low level of thyroid hormones ( hypothyroidism ) can cause symptoms, such as: Weight gain Fatigue ...

  8. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, Minghua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyroid was examined by ultrasonography and 99mTcO4 - thyroid imaging, and the serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (Tg) were detected. The efficacy and complications of RFA were evaluated. Results showed that, the postsurgical thyroid removal by RFA was successfully performed in 35 patients, with no significant complication. After RFA, the average largest diameter and volume were significantly decreased in 35 patients (P > 0.05), and no obvious contrast media was observed in ablation area in the majority of patients. After RFA, the serum FT3, FT4 and Tg levels were markedly decreased (P < 0.05), and TSH level was significantly increased (P < 0.05). After RFA, radioiodine concentration in the ablation area was significantly reduced in the majority of patients. The reduction rate of thyroid update was 0.69±0.20%. DTC staging and interval between surgery and RFA had negative correlation (Pearson coefficient = -0.543; P = 0.001), with no obvious correlation among others influential factors. RFA is an effective and safe method for postsurgical thyroid removal of DTC. PMID:27186311

  9. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, Minghua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyroid was examined by ultrasonography and (99m)TcO4 (-) thyroid imaging, and the serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (Tg) were detected. The efficacy and complications of RFA were evaluated. Results showed that, the postsurgical thyroid removal by RFA was successfully performed in 35 patients, with no significant complication. After RFA, the average largest diameter and volume were significantly decreased in 35 patients (P > 0.05), and no obvious contrast media was observed in ablation area in the majority of patients. After RFA, the serum FT3, FT4 and Tg levels were markedly decreased (P < 0.05), and TSH level was significantly increased (P < 0.05). After RFA, radioiodine concentration in the ablation area was significantly reduced in the majority of patients. The reduction rate of thyroid update was 0.69±0.20%. DTC staging and interval between surgery and RFA had negative correlation (Pearson coefficient = -0.543; P = 0.001), with no obvious correlation among others influential factors. RFA is an effective and safe method for postsurgical thyroid removal of DTC.

  10. TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 discovery of Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for E-twenty-six transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0, 11.3, 17.1, 43.2 and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g. RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

  11. [Goitre and thyroid nodules in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Balice, Piero; Theintz, Gérald

    2007-04-18

    Systematic examination of the thyroid gland allows discovering diffuse or multinodular goitres as well as solitary nodules. Goitre may be the only clinical manifestation of an underlying thyroid disease. Its evaluation should consider the familial history as well as nutritional and environmental factors. Thyroid ultrasonography is of critical importance to assess the diagnosis. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, colloid and endemic goitre are the most frequent causes of the diffuse form, particularly during puberty. Multinodular goitre and solitary thyroid nodule are rare in the paediatric age group: both conditions can reveal a malignant lesion. In this case, a total thyroidectomy should be performed. Long term outcome is excellent with an exception for medullary carcinoma which can be part of a multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN type 2 A).

  12. Mouse Models of Thyroid Cancer: A 2015 Update

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Lawrence S.; Qamri, Zahida; Kari, Suresh; Ashtekar, Amruta

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasm, and its rate is rising at an alarming pace. Thus, there is a compelling need to develop in vivo models which will not only enable the confirmation of the oncogenic potential of driver genes, but also point the way towards the development of new therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, techniques for the generation of mouse models of human diseases have progressed substantially, accompanied by parallel advances in the genetics and genomics of human tumors. This convergence has enabled the development of mouse lines carrying mutations in the genes that cause thyroid cancers of all subtypes, including differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancers, poorly differentiated/anaplastic cancers, and medullary thyroid cancers. In this review, we will discuss the state of the art of mouse modeling of thyroid cancer, with the eventual goal of providing insight into tumor biology and treatment. PMID:26123589

  13. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Thyroid Disorders KidsHealth > For Kids > Thyroid Disorders A A ... the world is a thyroid? What Is the Thyroid? The thyroid (say: THYE-royd) is a gland, ...

  14. Schwannosis induced medullary compression in VACTERL syndrome.

    PubMed

    Treacy, A; Redmond, M; Lynch, B; Ryan, S; Farrell, M; Devaney, D

    2009-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy with a history of VACTERL syndrome was found collapsed in bed. MRI had shown basilar invagination of the skull base and narrowing of the foramen magnum. Angulation, swelling and abnormal high signal at the cervicomedullary junction were felt to be secondary to compression of the medulla. Neuropathologic examination showed bilateral replacement of the medullary tegmentum by an irregularly circumscribed cellular lesion which was composed of elongated GFAP/S 100-positive cells with spindled nuclei and minimal atypia. The pathologic findings were interpreted as intramedullary schwannosis with mass effect. Schwannosis, is observed in traumatized spinal cords where its presence may represent attempted, albeit aberrant, repair by inwardly migrating Schwann cells ofperipheral origin. In our view the compressive effect of the basilar invagination on this boy's medulla was of sufficient magnitude to have caused tumoral medullary schwannosis with resultant intermittent respiratory compromise leading to reflex anoxic seizures.

  15. Obesity and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of 21 Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei; Tong, Yan; Wang, Hanmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have evaluated the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. However, the results remain uncertain. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Material/Methods Published literature from PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) were retrieved before 10 August 2014. We included all studies that reported adjusted risk ratios (RRs), hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of thyroid cancer risk. Results Thirty-two studies (n=12 620 676) were included in this meta-analysis. Obesity was associated with a significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer (adjusted RR=1.33; 95% CI, 1.24–1.42; I2=25%). In the subgroup analysis by study type, increased risk of thyroid cancer was found in cohort studies and case-control studies. In subgroup analysis by sex, both obese men and women were at significantly greater risk of thyroid cancer than non-obese subjects. When stratified by ethnicity, significantly elevated risk was observed in Caucasians and in Asians. In the age subgroup analysis, both young and old populations showed increased thyroid cancer risk. Subgroup analysis on smoking status showed that increased thyroid cancer risks were found in smokers and in non-smokers. In the histology subgroup analyses, increased risks of papillary thyroid cancer, follicular thyroid cancer, and anaplastic thyroid cancer were observed. However, obesity was associated with decreased risk of medullary thyroid cancer. Conclusions Our results indicate that obesity is associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk, except medullary thyroid cancer. PMID:25612155

  16. Medial medullary infarction: abnormal ocular motor findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Soo; Choi, K-D; Oh, S-Y; Park, S-H; Han, M-K; Yoon, B-W; Roh, J-K

    2005-10-25

    In 20 consecutive patients with isolated medial medullary infarction, abnormal ocular motor findings included nystagmus (n = 8), ocular contrapulsion (n = 5), and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (n = 2). The nystagmus was ipsilesional (n = 4), gaze-evoked (n = 5), upbeating (n = 4), and hemiseesaw (n = 1). The ocular motor abnormalities may be explained by involvements of the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, medial longitudinal fasciculus or efferent fibers from the vestibular nuclei, climbing fibers, and cells of the paramedian tracts.

  17. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  18. Genetic background of carcinogenesis in the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Lewiński, Andrzej; Wojciechowska, Katarzyna

    2007-04-01

    The process of carcinogenesis is permanently one of the most interesting and significant issues for researchers in different fields of medicine. Therefore, we attempted to bring closer the problem of neoplastic transformation in the thyroid gland. This article covers the latest data about genetic factors, involved in thyroid carcinogenesis. We have presented results of the most recent studies referred to molecular biology of thyroid neoplasms. We have demonstrated not only the genetic background of cancers, derived from the thyroid follicular cell, but also genetic aspects related to medullary thyroid carcinoma and some benign thyroid lesions. The review describes DNA methylation disturbances and the mutations in thyrotropin receptor and G protein genes. Furthermore, we introduce the results of studies performed at our laboratory, concerning mutations in the following protooncogenes: RAS, RET, Trk, MET, and BRAF. Also, we present our data, regarding the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the short arm of chromosome 3. Additionally, we discuss overexpression of cyclin D1 gene in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. Previous studies performed at our laboratory indicate the role of IGF-I in the pathogenesis and invasiveness of thyroid cancers. The review indicates that progress in genetics of the thyroid cancer is extremely rapid.

  19. Quantitation of the prominent medullary pyramid: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Paling, M R; Black, W C

    1986-06-01

    We propose a revised objective measurement of the size of the renal medullary pyramid in the assessment of the prominent renal pyramid: the medullary-renal ratio (MRR). (Formula: see text). This is a more accurate assessment of the size of the renal pyramid relative to the size of the kidney than the previously proposed medullary pyramid index, which fails to take into account the varying morphology of otherwise normal kidneys.

  20. Recurrent recurrent gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Z; Ahmed, M S; Alexander, D J; Miller, G V; Chintapatla, S

    2010-07-01

    We describe the second reported case of three consecutive episodes of gallstone ileus and ask the question whether recurrent gallstone ileus justifies definitive surgery to the fistula itself or can be safely managed by repeated enterotomies.

  1. Surgical Treatment of Hashimoto's with Thyroid Microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liu; Xi-Lin, H; Xiang-Dong, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the surgical strategies for treating Hashimoto's disease complicated with thyroid microcarcinoma. We analyzed the clinical data of 25 patients with Hashimoto's disease with thyroid microcarcinoma who were treated in our hospital from January 1995 to September 2011. The incidence of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid microcarcinoma was 9.8 % (25/256) in our hospital. Amongst them, 19 patients had papillary thyroid carcinoma and six had follicular thyroid carcinoma. There were 24 cases (96 %) confirmed by the frozen section examination and one (4 %) after surgery. One patient did not undergo remedial surgery. The surgical approaches were determined based on preoperative examinations and intraoperative frozen pathology, including thyroid lobe and isthmus resection with contralateral lobe subtotal resection in 19 cases, and bilateral subtotal thyroid lobectomy in one case. Central lymph node dissection was conducted for all patients except one who was not diagnosed until after the surgery. No recurrence occurred during the follow-up (range: 6 months to 17 years) and all patients have survived to date. The preoperative diagnosis rate of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid cancer (in particular thyroid microcarcinomas) is low. Preoperative palpation, color Doppler ultrasound, fine needle aspiration, and the frozen section examination are helpful to improve the diagnosis rate of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid microcarcinoma. Surgery procedure is the most effective approach.

  2. Hormone receptor status and survival of medullary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Asude; Odabas, Hatice; Kaya, Serap; Bozkurt, Oktay; Degirmenci, Mustafa; Topcu, Turkan O.; Aytekin, Aydın; Arpaci, Erkan; Avci, Nilufer; Pilanci, Kezban N.; Cinkir, Havva Y.; Bozkaya, Yakup; Cirak, Yalcin; Gumus, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the relationship between clinical features, hormonal receptor status, and survival in patients who were diagnosed with medullary breast cancer (MBC). Methods: Demographic characteristics, histopathological features, and survival statuses of 201 patients diagnosed with MBC between 1995 and 2015 were retrospectively recorded. Survival analyses were conducted with uni- and multivariate cox regression analysis. Results: Median follow-up time was 54 (4-272) months. Median patient age at the time of diagnosis was 47 years old (26-90). Of the patients, 91.5% were triple negative. Five-year recurrence free survival time (RFS) rate was 87.4% and overalll survival (OS) rate 95.7%. For RFS, progesterone receptor (PR) negativity, atypical histopathological evaluation, absence of lymphovascular invasion, smaller tumor, lower nodal involvement were found to be favourable prognostic factors by univariate analysis (p<0.05). The PR negativity and smaller tumor were found to be favourable factors by univariate analysis (p<0.05). However, none of these factors were determined as significant independent prognostic factors for OS (p>0.05). Conclusion: Turkish MBC patients exhibited good prognosis, which was comparable with survival outcomes achieved in the literature. The PR negativity was related to a better RFS and OS rates. PMID:28133688

  3. Thyroid Cancer: Pathogenesis and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liebner, David A.; Shah, Manisha H.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic options for advanced, unresectable radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancers have historically been limited. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of the various subtypes of thyroid cancer has led to increased interest in the development of targeted therapies, with potential strategies including angiogenesis inhibition, inhibition of aberrant intracellular signaling in the MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways, radioimmunotherapy, and redifferentiation agents. On the basis of a recent positive phase III clinical trial, the RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor vandetanib has received FDA approval as of April 2011 for use in the treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer. Several other recent phase II clinical trials in advanced thyroid cancer have demonstrated significant activity, and multiple other promising therapeutic strategies are in earlier phases of clinical development. The recent progress in targeted therapy is already revolutionizing management paradigms for advanced thyroid cancer, and will likely continue to dramatically expand treatment options in the coming years. PMID:23148184

  4. Medullary trichomalacia in 6 German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Tieghi, Chiara; Miller, William H; Scott, Danny W; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2003-02-01

    Medullary trichomalacia is the name proposed for a hair shaft abnormality that was recognized in 6 German shepherd dogs. Affected dogs had multifocal areas of broken hairs, especially on the dorsolateral trunk. Microscopic examination of hair shafts revealed focal areas of loss of architecture, swelling, and apparent softening of the medulla, followed by longitudinal (length-wise) splitting and breakage of the hair shaft. No cause could be found. Affected dogs were otherwise healthy, and apparent spontaneous recovery was the usual outcome. Relapses may occur.

  5. Intramedullary bronchogenic cyst of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem; Gulsen, Salih; Sonmez, Erkin; Ozger, Ozkan; Unlukaplan, Muge; Caner, Hakan

    2009-10-01

    Spinal bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital lesions. The authors describe their experience in the treatment of a 17-year-old boy who presented with back pain and paresthesia in both lower extremities. Lumbar MR imaging revealed the presence of an intramedullary cystic lesion at the conus medullaris and histopathological analysis revealed a bronchogenic cyst. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an intramedullary spinal bronchogenic cyst arising at the conus; all previously reported spinal bronchogenic cysts were either intradural extramedullary or not located at the conus.

  6. Central pontine myelinolysis and medullary myelinolysis.

    PubMed

    Bhagavan, B S; Wagner, J A; Juanteguy, J

    1976-05-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a rare, acute, and uniformly fatal demyelinative process that involves the pons almost exclusively. Three cases diagnosed at autopsy illustrate the characteristic clinical course and pathologic features of CPM. A unique extrapontine location of a similar process is noted in the medulla of a 6-year-old girl. The term "medullary myelinolysis" is a descriptive designation for demyelination that occurs predominantly in this area. The clinical and pathologic features of CPM are reviewed in detail, together with a brief review of theories of metabolic, nutritional, vascular, and endogenous and exogenous toxic factors that act either singly or in concert in the cause and pathogenesis of CPM.

  7. Columnar cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: A diagnostic dilemma in fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Paul, Paramita

    2016-10-01

    Columnar cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is an uncommon variant with an aggressive course as compared to classic papillary carcinoma. Cytologic diagnosis of these tumors is difficult due to absence of characteristic nuclear features of classic pattern of papillary carcinoma. We present a case of columnar cell variant in a young female misdiagnosed on aspiration cytology. A 21-year-old female presented with solitary nodule in the left aspect of thyroid. A diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma was rendered. The resected thyoroidectomy specimen revealed a columnar cell variant of PTC which was further supported by immunohistochemical staining. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:816-819. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. External beam radiotherapy in thyroid carcinoma: clinical review and recommendations of the AIRO "Radioterapia Metabolica" Group.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Monica; Gobitti, Carlo; Autorino, Rosa; Cerizza, Lorenzo; Furlan, Carlo; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Monari, Fabio; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Vianello, Federica; Basso, Michela; Zanirato Rambaldi, Giuseppe; Russi, Elvio; Tagliaferri, Luca

    2017-03-24

    The therapeutic approach to thyroid carcinoma usually involves surgery as initial treatment. The use of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is limited to high-risk patients and depends on clinical stage and histologic type. Different behavior patterns and degrees of aggressiveness of thyroid carcinomas require different management for differentiated, medullary, and anaplastic carcinoma. However, the role of EBRT is an issue of debate. Most clinical studies are retrospective and based on single-institution experiences. In this article, we review the main literature and give recommendations for the use of EBRT in thyroid carcinoma on behalf of the "Radioterapia Metabolica" Group of the Italian Radiation Oncology Association.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... THE THYROID GLAND? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in ... the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in ...

  10. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  11. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  12. Thyroid and Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meetings ATA Publications ATA Professional Guidelines Research Grants Thyroid Cancer Trainees Corner ATA Career Link Continuing Medical Education THYROID Calculators Thyroid Cancer Staging (CEA) Doubling Time Calculator Change In Thyroid ...

  13. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid hormone medicine ... natural thyroid hormone. You may not need hormone replacement if only part of your thyroid was removed. ...

  14. Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A L; Gandhi, A; Scott-Coombes, D; Perros, P

    2016-05-01

    spread (pT3 and pT4a), familial disease and those with clinically or radiologically involved nodes and/or distant metastases. (R) • Subtotal thyroidectomy should not be used in the management of thyroid cancer. (G) • Central compartment neck dissection is not routinely recommended for patients with papillary thyroid cancer without clinical or radiological evidence of lymph node involvement, provided they meet all of the following criteria: classical type papillary thyroid cancer, patient less than 45 years old, unifocal tumour, less than 4 cm, no extrathyroidal extension on ultrasound. (R) • Patients with metastases in the lateral compartment should undergo therapeutic lateral and central compartment neck dissection. (R) • Patients with follicular cancer with greater than 4 cm tumours should be treated with total thyroidectomy. (R) • I131 ablation should be carried out only in centres with appropriate facilities. (R) • Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) should be checked in all post-operative patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but not sooner than six weeks after surgery. (R) • Patients who have undergone total or near total thyroidectomy should be started on levothyroxine 2 µg per kg or liothyronine 20 mcg tds after surgery. (R) • The majority of patients with a tumour more than 1 cm in diameter, who have undergone total or near-total thyroidectomy, should have I131 ablation. (R) • A post-ablation scan should be performed 3-10 days after I131 ablation. (R) • Post-therapy dynamic risk stratification at 9-12 months is used to guide further management. (G) • Potentially resectable recurrent or persistent disease should be managed with surgery whenever possible. (R) • Distant metastases and sites not amenable to surgery which are iodine avid should be treated with I131 therapy. (R) • Long-term follow-up for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is recommended. (G) • Follow-up should be based on clinical examination, serum Tg and

  15. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  16. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; Pacini, F.; Lippi, F.; Elisei, R.; Arganini, M.; Miccoli, P.; Pinchera, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report on 49 patients younger than 18 years at diagnosis, of 776 patients with thyroid cancer, seen in our institution in the last 17 years. Female/male ratio was 2.2:1. Histologic type was papillary in 44, follicular in 4, and medullary in 1. Initial treatment was near-total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection. Surgical complications (vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, or both) were found in 25 patients and were usually associated with more advanced primary tumors. At surgery, node metastases were present in 73% of the patients and lung metastases, detected by chest x ray films, in 6%. Patients were treated with thyroid suppressive therapy and, except the one with medullary cancer, with radioiodine (131I) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 +/- 4.4 years (range, 1 to 17 years), one patient with lung metastases died of respiratory failure. Of 36 patients who have been followed up more than 4 years, 22 (61.1%) are now cured, and 14 have metastases (to lymph nodes, 2; to nodes and lung, 10; and to lung, 2). Since 1977 serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was used routinely as a tumor marker for differentiated thyroid cancer. After operation, Tg was elevated in all patients both not receiving (mean +/- SE, 902 +/- 380 ng/ml) and receiving (44 +/- 15 ng/ml) suppressive therapy; after 131I treatment, serum Tg dropped to 104 +/- 50 and 7.3 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, without and with suppressive therapy, respectively. Of 11 patients with lung metastases treated with 131I, respiratory function, as assessed by means of spirometry, was normal in three, mildly reduced in six, and severely impaired in two (including the one who died). In conclusion, our study indicates that thyroid cancer in young patients is rather advanced at initial examination and usually associated with node and, less frequently, lung metastases.

  17. Spontaneous proliferative and neoplastic lesions in thyroid and parathyroid glands of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Pope, Jenny P; Steeil, James; Ramsay, Edward C; Reel, Danielle; Newman, Shelley J

    2017-01-01

    Based on microscopic and immunohistochemical characterization, we documented spontaneous proliferative and neoplastic lesions in the thyroid and parathyroid glands of nondomestic felids. Ten animals (4 leopards, 3 tigers, and 3 cougars), all with a previous diagnosis of thyroid neoplasia were identified from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine database. The mean age of affected animals was 15.9 y. Twelve neoplasms were identified; 2 animals had 2 concurrent neoplasms. After immunohistochemical characterization using a panel of chromogranin A, thyroglobulin, and calcitonin, 7 of the former thyroid neoplasms were diagnosed as thyroid adenomas, 1 was diagnosed as a thyroid carcinoma, and 4 were diagnosed as parathyroid adenomas. No thyroid medullary neoplasms (C-cell tumors) were diagnosed in the current study. Most of the diagnosed neoplasms were benign (11 of 12), and metastasis was not documented in the single carcinoma. Only 2 animals were suspected to have functional neoplasms (1 thyroid adenoma and 1 parathyroid adenoma), based on associated tissue lesions or serum biochemistry. Other documented lesions in the thyroid and parathyroid glands included thyroid nodular hyperplasia ( n = 7), parathyroid hyperplasia associated with chronic renal disease ( n = 2), a thyroid abscess, and a branchial cyst. Parathyroid adenomas were more commonly diagnosed than expected in comparison with domestic cats. We demonstrated that an immunohistochemistry panel for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, and chromogranin A can be used to differentiate neoplasms of thyroid from parathyroid origin in nondomestic felids.

  18. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  19. Thyroid inferno.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amit; Kaur, Manmeet

    2014-01-01

    The key to uncovering the etiology of hyperthyroidism lies in a careful history and physical examination. Autoimmune markers provide additive information, but should not solely be used to make a diagnosis. Concern has been raised that the overzealous use of thyroid ultrasound, following abnormal thyroid function tests, diverts attention from the workup of the biochemical abnormality to the workup of an incidentally found thyroid nodule. If further imaging is needed, the use ofathyroidscanhas been suggestedbythe Endocrine Society and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, in certain scenarios, this may be contraindicated. We present the case of a 28-year-old female with hyperthyroidism, as aplatform to discuss an important clinical sign present on Doppler ultrasound of the thyroid. By recognizing the clinical information gained from a Doppler ultrasound, physicians can avoid additional invasive workup and apply the use of ultrasound where most appropriate.

  20. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The coming of age of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected neck nodal metastases in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2011;96:2717. Caprelsa (prescribing information). Wilmington, Del.: ...

  1. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... when they believe that subsequent treatment with radioactive iodine might be necessary. For patients with larger (>1. ... if there are plans for treatment with radioactive iodine. FNA Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules Goiter Graves’ Disease ...

  2. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Steven P; Cabanillas, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for thyroid cancer – cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid cancer and sorafenib and lenvatinib for differentiated thyroid cancer. This change in the treatment landscape has raised challenges for practitioners who may not be familiar with the use of MKIs or with the treatment and natural history of advanced thyroid cancer in general. This article reviews the epidemiology, molecular drivers, and initial treatment of patients with thyroid cancer and offers practical guidance to assist with the determination of when to appropriately start an MKI. As an example, cabozantinib and its efficacy are discussed in detail. Close monitoring is required for all patients on targeted agents to assess for adverse effects and response to therapy. An approach to managing drug-related adverse events is detailed. Since these drugs are not curative and have not yet proven to prolong overall survival, it is critical to weigh the risks and benefits of treatment at every visit. The potential value of changing to a different agent following failure of an MKI is also addressed. PMID:26316818

  3. [Dysphagia with lateral medullary infarction (Wallenberg's syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Oshima, Fumiko

    2011-11-01

    Dysphagia after lateral medullary infarction (LMI) is common. The dysphagia of LMI is dynamically characterized by a failure in triggering of the pharyngeal-phase swallowing movements, reduced output, and lack of coordination (swallowing pattern abnormality). Based on accurate evaluation, we can select suitable rehabilitative approaches for individual patients, including respiratory therapy, food modification, postural changes, and oral care. We focused on the absence of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening of the unaffected side of the medullae. The movement pattern was defined as failure of bolus passage through the intact side of the UES, occurring at least once during the videofluorographic evaluation of each individual. Three abnormal patterns of UES opening were classified. The passage pattern abnormality shows the failure of the stereotyped motor sequence. For severe cases, it is necessary to consider long-term treatment, including botulinum toxin injection or surgery to prevent aspiration and adequate nutritional management.

  4. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, A.

    1988-05-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

  5. Primary papillary thyroid carcinoma previously treated incompletely with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Yub; Ryu, Woo Sang; Woo, Sang Uk; Son, Gil Soo; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Jae Bok; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) recently has been applied to benign thyroid nodules, mainly for the cosmetic reasons, and limited cases of local recurrences or focal distant metastases of well-differentiated thyroid cancer, in the high-risk reoperative condition or for the palliative purpose. But no report has been made on the RFA for primary thyroid cancer to date. We report on a patient with primary papillary carcinoma of thyroid gland who had undergone RFA before the cytological diagnosis of malignancy, later referred and treated with robotic surgery successfully. We can learn the following lessons from our case; (1) the RFA for operable primary thyroid malignancy should be avoided, because of the possibility of remnant viable cancer and undetectable nodal metastasis, and (2) robotic or endoscopic thyroid surgery may be a feasible operative method for benign or malignant thyroid nodules previously treated with RFA.

  6. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  7. Coexistence of resistance to thyroid hormone and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Igata, Motoyuki; Tsuruzoe, Kaku; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Seiya; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Miyamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones. RTH is majorly caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. Here, we report a rare case of RTH with a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to a thyroid tumor and hormonal abnormality. She had elevated serum thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels. Genetic analysis of THRB identified a missense mutation, P452L, leading to a diagnosis of RTH. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor and lymph nodes enabled the cytological diagnosis of PTC with lymph node metastases. Total thyroidectomy and neck lymph nodes dissection were performed. Following surgery, thyroxine replacement (≥500 μg) was necessary to avoid the symptoms of hypothyroidism and to maintain her TSH levels within the same range as before the operation. During the follow-up, basal thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were around 6 ng/ml and TSH-stimulated Tg levels were between 12 and 20 ng/ml. Up to present, the patient has had no recurrence of PTC. This indicates that these Tg values are consistent with a biochemical incomplete response or an indeterminate response. There is no consensus regarding the management of thyroid carcinoma in patients with RTH, but aggressive treatments such as total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI) and TSH suppression therapy are recommended. Learning points There are only a few cases reporting the coexistence of RTH and thyroid carcinoma. Moreover, our case would be the first case presenting one with lymph node metastases. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. When total thyroidectomy is performed in

  8. Calcitonin-negative primary neuroendocrine tumor of the thyroid (nonmedullary) in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Arias, E.A. Soler; Castillo, V.A.; Aristarain, M.E. Caneda

    2016-01-01

    The Calcitonin-negative neuroendocrine tumor of the thyroid (CNNET) or “nonmedullary” in humans is a rare tumor that arises primarily in the thyroid gland and may be mistaken for medullary thyroid carcinoma; it is characterized by the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of neuroendocrine markers and the absence of expression for calcitonin. An Argentine dogo bitch showed a solid, compact thyroid tumor, which was IHC negative for the expression of calcitonin, carcinoembryonic antigen, thyroglobulin and S100 protein, and positive for synaptophysin and cytokeratin AE1-AE3. The Ki-67 proliferation index was low. We cite this case not only because it is the first case report of calcitonin-negative primary neuroendocrine tumor of the thyroid in dogs but also because we want to highlight the diagnostic importance of IHC in this regard. PMID:27928520

  9. Oral complications associated with idiopathic medullary aplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Clercq, Marcel; Gagné-Tremblay, Mélanie

    2008-05-01

    This article describes a patient who experienced serious oral sequelae after severe oral hemorrhage associated with medullary aplasia. These complications required medical, surgical and prosthetic treatments necessitating dental expertise in the hospital setting.

  10. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erik K.; Bible, Keith C.; Doherty, Gerard M.; Mandel, Susan J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W.; Sawka, Anna M.; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    , and thyrotropin suppression therapy using levothyroxine. Recommendations related to long-term management of differentiated thyroid cancer include those related to surveillance for recurrent disease using imaging and serum thyroglobulin, thyroid hormone therapy, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, consideration for clinical trials and targeted therapy, as well as directions for future research. Conclusions: We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision-making in the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. They represent, in our opinion, contemporary optimal care for patients with these disorders. PMID:26462967

  11. Oncologic Safety of Robot Thyroid Surgery for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Comparative Study of Robot versus Open Thyroid Surgery Using Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighting

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tae-Yon; Yoon, Jong Ho; Han, Minkyu; Lee, Yi Ho; Lee, Yu-mi; Song, Dong Eun; Chung, Ki-Wook; Kim, Won Bae; Shong, Young Kee; Hong, Suck Joon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic safety of robot thyroid surgery compared to open thyroid surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We enrolled 722 patients with PTC who underwent a total thyroidectomy with central compartment node dissection (CCND) from January 2009 to December 2010. These patients were classified into open thyroid surgery (n = 610) or robot thyroid surgery (n = 112) groups. We verified the impact of robot thyroid surgery on clinical recurrence and ablation/control-stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) levels predictive of non-recurrence using weighted logistic regression models with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Age, sex, thyroid weight, extent of CCND, and TNM were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05); however, there was no significant difference in recurrence between the open and robot groups (1.5% vs. 2.7%; p = 0.608). The proportion of patients with ablation sTg < 10.0 ng/mL and control sTg < 1.0 ng/mL was comparable between the two groups (p > 0.05). Logistic regression with IPTW using the propensity scores estimated by adjusting all of the parameters demonstrated that robot thyroid surgery did not influence the clinical recurrence (OR; 0.784, 95% CI; 0.150–3.403, p = 0.750), ablation sTg (OR; 0.950, 95% CI; 0.361–2.399, p = 0.914), and control sTg levels (OR; 0.498, 95% CI; 0.190–1.189, p = 0.130). Robot thyroid surgery is comparable to open thyroid surgery with regard to oncologic safety in PTC patients. PMID:27285846

  12. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  13. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  14. Thyroid Resection Improves Perception of Swallowing Function in Patients with Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, David Yü; Sippel, Rebecca; Leverson, Glen; Frydman, James; Schaefer, Sarah; Chen, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with thyroid disease frequently complain of dysphagia. To date, there have been no prospective studies evaluating swallowing function before and after thyroid surgery. We used the swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) validated outcomes assessment tool to measure changes in swallowing-related quality-of-life in patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Methods Patients undergoing thyroid surgery from May 2002 to December 2004 completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire before and one year after surgery. Data were collected on demographic and clinicopathologic variables, and comparisons were made to determine the effect of surgery on patients’ perceptions of swallowing function. Results Of 146 eligible patients, 116 (79%) completed the study. The mean patient age was 49 years, and 81% were female. Sixty-four patients (55%) underwent total thyroidectomy and the remainder received thyroid lobectomy. Thirty patients (26%) had thyroid cancer. The most frequent benign thyroid conditions were multinodular goiter (28%) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (27%). Mean pre-operative SWAL-QOL scores were below 90 for nine of the eleven domains, indicating the perception of impaired swallowing and imperfect quality of life. After surgery, significant improvements were seen in eight SWAL-QOL domains. Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was associated with dramatic score decreases in multiple domains. Conclusions In patients with thyroid disease, uncomplicated thyroidectomy leads to significant improvements in many aspects of patient-reported swallowing-related quality-of-life measured by the SWAL-QOL instrument. PMID:19034567

  15. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  16. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation. PMID:27588138

  17. Thyroid neoplasia in captive raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephanie L; Allender, Matthew C; Bohling, Mark; Ramsay, Edward C; Morandi, Federica; Newkirk, Kimberly M

    2010-03-01

    Two adult, spayed, female raccoons were diagnosed with thyroid neoplasia. One raccoon had a palpable, left-sided, nonfunctional thyroid adenocarcinoma which was treated with a thyroidectomy twice with local recurrence both times. After the second recurrence, pulmonary metastases were identified. A third thyroidectomy was performed, and a vascular access port was placed for administration of intravenous doxorubicin. The raccoon developed pancytopenia and became anorexic after chemotherapy, and the owner elected humane euthanasia. The second raccoon had nonpalpable, bilateral, functional follicular thyroid adenomatous hyperplasia and was treated with a right thyroidectomy and a partial left thyroidectomy, leaving behind the grossly normal portion of the left thyroid. However, the animal was still hyperthyroid after surgery and was then successfully managed with topical methimazole gel. Thyroid pathology has been documented in raccoons in Europe, but is not reported in the United States. Thyroid neoplasia in raccoons can occur as a nonfunctional adenocarcinoma, as is commonly reported in dogs, or as a functional adenoma, as is commonly reported in cats. Raccoons with adenocarcinomas should be evaluated for pulmonary metastasis. Methimazole gel may be a viable treatment option for raccoons with hyperthyroidism.

  18. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  19. Renal Medullary Carcinoma; A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Selahattin; Gökçe, Ali Murat; Gümrükçü, Gülistan; Önenerk, Mine

    2017-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is an uncommon aggressive neoplasm of the kidney. RMC is biologically aggressive with a very poor prognosis, and metastasis is seen in up to 95% of the patients at diagnosis or shortly thereafter. The common sites of metastasis are respectively lymph nodes, lungs, livers, and adrenal glands in order of frequency. The presence of poorly differentiated eosinophilic cells in a characteristic fibro-inflammatory stroma is seen in histological examination. The origin and pathogenesis of RMC are unclear. The radiographical and pathological findings suggest that RMC probably originates in the calyceal epithelium in or near the renal papillae, which could be the result of chronic ischemic damage in the renal papillae epithelium by sickled erythrocytes. Positivity of VEGF and HIF-1α supports the chronic hypoxia that may be caused in the pathogenesis of RMC. Other factors such as genetic or environmental factors are important. Although hemoglobinopathy is very common, RMC is very rare. An understanding of the molecular and genetic factors of this rare disease is important for its prevention and treatment. We herein describe an adult Turkish patient, who presented with hematuria. The diagnosis was RMC after pathological examination. PMID:28360450

  20. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  1. Renal medullary carcinomas: histopathologic phenotype associated with diverse genotypes.

    PubMed

    Gatalica, Zoran; Lilleberg, Stan L; Monzon, Federico A; Koul, Manika Sapru; Bridge, Julia A; Knezetic, Joseph; Legendre, Ben; Sharma, Poonam; McCue, Peter A

    2011-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations have become major determinants in the classification of kidney carcinomas. Most renal medullary carcinomas develop in patients with hereditary sickle cell disease, but sporadic cases unassociated with sickle cell disease have also been described, for which underlying genetic abnormality is unknown. We evaluated 3 patients with renal medullary carcinoma (1 patient with sickle cell disease and 2 patients without sickle cell disease) for germ line and somatic mutations in genes commonly involved in pathogenesis of renal carcinomas using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Chromosomal abnormalities were studied by the conventional cytogenetic and SNP arrays analysis. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was examined using immunohistochemistry. Two new mutations in the gene for fumarate hydratase were identified in 1 case of medullary renal carcinoma without sickle cell disease: a germ line mutation in exon 6 (R233H) and an acquired (somatic) mutation in exon 8 (P374S). No fumarate hydratase mutations were identified in the other 2 patients. The second sporadic case of renal medullary carcinoma harbored double somatic mutations in von Hippel-Lindau gene, and renal medullary carcinoma in the patient with sickle cell disease showed von Hippel-Lindau gene promoter methylation (epigenetic silencing). No consistent pattern of chromosomal abnormalities was found between 2 cases tested. All 3 cases showed increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression. Medullary renal carcinomas from patients with or without sickle cell disease show involvement of genes important in hypoxia-induced signaling pathways. Generalized cellular hypoxia (in sickle cell disease) or pseudohypoxia (in tumors with fumarate hydratase and von Hippel-Lindau mutations or epigenetic silencing) may act alone or in concert at the level of medullary tubular epithelium to promote development of this rare type of renal

  2. Primary Sarcomas of Thyroid Gland–Series of Three Cases with Brief Review of Spindle Cell Lesions of Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meeta; Rani, Poonam; Khurana, Nita; Mishra, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Primary Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma (MFH-T) and Leiomyosarcoma (LMS-T) of the thyroid gland are extremely rare tumors. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. Both entities occur more commonly in women than men. The closest clinical and histological differential diagnosis is anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid. We present three cases of rare primary sarcomas of thyroid gland. Case-1 was a 63-year-old woman and Case-2 was a 52-year-old woman. Both of them presented with a rapidly increasing thyroid mass clinically mimicking anaplastic carcinoma (AC-T). Both the patients developed pulmonary metastasis and succumbed to the illness soon after the diagnosis of MFH-T was made. Case 3 was 65-year-old woman with neck swelling since six months diagnosed as LMS-T. The present communication adds three new cases to the literature on sarcomas of thyroid gland with an emphasis on differential diagnosis of spindle cell lesions of thyroid. MFH-T and LMS-T needs to be differentiated from AC-T, metastatic sarcomas, spindle cell variant of medullary carcinoma, synovial sarcoma, fibrosarcoma; final diagnosis rests on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:28384879

  3. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Endocrine System Metabolism What Is a Growth Disorder? Blood Test: ... Scan: Neck Blood Test: T4 (Thyroxine) Thyroid Disorders Endocrine System Metabolism Thyroid Disease Thyroid Disease Definitions Growth Problems ...

  4. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of the following ...

  5. Evaluation of thyroid incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are an extremely common endocrine disorder with a generally accepted prevalence of around 4% to 7%. Incidental thyroid nodules are typically nonpalpable thyroid nodules found during radiographic evaluation for a non-thyroid-related issue (eg, computed tomographic scan, positron emission tomography scan, carotid duplex). Incidental thyroid nodules are contributing to but are not the sole reason for the rising incidence of thyroid cancer in the Unites States and other developed nations.

  6. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting.

  7. HLA-DR and ß2 microglobulin expression in medullary and atypical medullary carcinoma of the breast: histopathologically similar but biologically distinct entities

    PubMed Central

    Feinmesser, M.; Sulkes, A.; Morgenstern, S.; Sulkes, J.; Stern, S.; Okon, E.

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To examine the expression of HLA-DR and ß2 microglobulin in medullary carcinoma and atypical medullary carcinoma of the breast to determine if the effective presentation of tumour antigens to the immune system can differentiate between these two histopathologically similar entities. Methods—Expression of HLA-DR and ß2 microglobulin was examined by immunohistochemical methods in five samples of medullary carcinoma of the breast, which has a relatively favourable prognosis, six samples of atypical medullary carcinoma of the breast, which has a prognosis closer to that of regular invasive duct carcinoma, and 20 samples of invasive duct carcinomas, 10 with an accompanying lymphocytic infiltrate. Results—A positive and significant correlation was found between tumour type and both HLA-DR and ß2 microglobulin expression. Expression was most prominent in medullary carcinoma, followed by atypical medullary carcinoma and invasive duct carcinoma with and without lymphocytic infiltrates. The mean intensity and percentage of HLA-DR tumour immunostaining were significantly higher in medullary carcinoma than in the other three tumour groups, as was the mean intensity of ß2 microglobulin immunostaining. Mean percentage of ß2 microglobulin immunostaining was significantly higher in medullary carcinoma than in invasive duct carcinoma without lymphocytic infiltrates, and showed a trend to increase from invasive duct carcinoma with lymphocytic infiltrates to atypical medullary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma. Conclusions—Medullary carcinoma and atypical medullary carcinoma of the breast differ in their expression of HLA-DR and ß2 microglobulin. The relatively favourable prognosis of medullary carcinoma of the breast may be related to effective tumour antigen presentation to the immune system through MHC-I and MHC-II expression. Immunotherapy aimed at MHC-I and MHC-II induction might have a beneficial effect in breast cancer. Key Words: medullary carcinoma of the

  8. Recurrent uric acid stones.

    PubMed

    Kamel, K S; Cheema-Dhadli, S; Shafiee, M A; Davids, M R; Halperin, M L

    2005-01-01

    A 46-year-old female had a history of recurrent uric acid stone formation, but the reason why uric acid precipitated in her urine was not obvious, because the rate of urate excretion was not high, urine volume was not low, and the pH in her 24-h urine was not low enough. In his discussion of the case, Professor McCance provided new insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stone formation. He illustrated that measuring the pH in a 24-h urine might obscure the fact that the urine pH was low enough to cause uric acid to precipitate during most of the day. Because he found a low rate of excretion of NH(4)(+) relative to that of sulphate anions, as well as a high rate of citrate excretion, he speculated that the low urine pH would be due to a more alkaline pH in proximal convoluted tubule cells. He went on to suspect that there was a problem in our understanding of the function of renal medullary NH(3) shunt pathway, and he suggested that its major function might be to ensure a urine pH close to 6.0 throughout the day, to minimize the likelihood of forming uric acid kidney stones.

  9. Canadian survey of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W. John; McKinney, Steven E.

    1985-01-01

    We report the results of a multicentre retrospective chart review of 2214 patients with thyroid cancer registered at 13 radiotherapy centres between 1958 and 1978. The data analysed included sex, age at the time of diagnosis, pathological diagnosis, extent of disease before treatment, types of treatment and their complications, and the rates of recurrence and survival up to 24 years after diagnosis. Although papillary cancers were most common, anaplastic and miscellaneous tumours were more frequent than expected, which reflects the type of patients referred by endocrinologists and surgeons to radiotherapy centres. There were marked differences in patterns of referral to the centres. Some patients with papillary and follicular thyroid cancers died of these cancers up to 20 years after diagnosis. The clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome of the rarer types of thyroid malignant tumours were of particular interest. The influence of age at the time of diagnosis on survival rates for patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancer was highly significant, indicating much more aggressive behaviour of these cancers in older patients, particularly those beyond the age of 60 years. A more detailed analysis of tumour subtypes should provide new information on their natural history and lead to better management. PMID:3978516

  10. Thyroid Nodules and Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Orlo H.

    1980-01-01

    Patients with thyroid nodules must be treated selectively because these nodules develop far more frequently than does thyroid cancer. A thorough clinical history, family history and history of radiation, as well as an accurate physical examination, are very important in determining whether surgical treatment is indicated. Thyroid function tests, a radioactive isotope scan, a thyroid echogram and fine-needle biopsy are also useful. Although there is considerable debate concerning the amount of thyroid tissue that should be removed at operation, the minimal procedure for a “cold,” solid thyroid nodule is a total thyroid lobectomy and isthmectomy. This is the treatment of choice for patients with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma. Partial lobectomy is to be discouraged. Near total or total thyroidectomy should be considered for all other patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Many factors influence the prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer including age, sex, type of thyroid cancer, invasion, symptoms, lymph node metastasis, metastasis to distant sites, extent of the surgical procedure, and use of radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone. With adequate treatment, the prognosis for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is excellent. PMID:7222643

  11. Highly prevalent TERT promoter mutations in aggressive thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Justin; Shan, Yuan; Pai, Sara; Liu, Dingxie; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sun, Hui; El-Naggar, Adel K; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-08-01

    Mutations 1 295 228 C>T and 1 295 250 C>T (termed C228T and C250T respectively), corresponding to -124 C>T and -146 C>T from the translation start site in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, have recently been reported in human cancers, but not in thyroid cancers yet. We explored these mutations in thyroid cancers by genomic sequencing of a large number of primary tumor samples. We found the C228T mutation in 0 of 85 (0.0%) benign thyroid tumors, 30 of 257 (11.7%) papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 9 of 79 (11.4%) follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 3 of 8 (37.5%) poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTC), 23 of 54 (42.6%) anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC), and 8 of 12 (66.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. The C250T mutation was uncommon, but mutually exclusive with the C228T mutation, and the two mutations were collectively found in 11 of 79 (13.9%) FTC, 25 of 54 (46.3%) ATC, and 11 of 12 (91.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. Among PTC variants, the C228T mutation was found in 4 of 13 (30.8%) tall-cell PTC (TCPTC), 23 of 187 (12.3%) conventional PTC, and 2 of 56 (3.6%) follicular variant PTC samples. No TERT mutation was found in 16 medullary thyroid cancer samples. The C228T mutation was associated with the BRAF V600E mutation in PTC, being present in 19 of 104 (18.3%) BRAF mutation-positive PTC vs 11 of 153 (7.2%) the BRAF mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). Conversely, BRAF mutation was found in 19 of 30 (63.3%) C228T mutation-positive PTC vs 85 of 227 (37.4%) C228T mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). We thus for the first time, to our knowledge, demonstrate TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancers, that are particularly prevalent in the aggressive thyroid cancers TCPTC, PDTC, ATC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, revealing a novel genetic background for thyroid cancers.

  12. An Association of Chronic Hyperaldosteronism with Medullary Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Sharma, Rajaram; Thakkar, Hemangini; Hira, Priya; Deshmukh, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background An association between chronic hyperaldosteronism and medullary nephrocalcinosis has rarely been made, with only a handful of cases described in literature. Case Report We describe five cases of hyperaldosteronism with a long- standing history in whom associated medullary nephrocalcinosis was established. Conclusions We infer that a chronic hyperaldosteronic status, whether primary or secondary, is a causal factor in the etiopathogenesis of medullary nephrocalcinosis. This article illustrates and summarizes various postulated theories that support our proposed association between hyperaldosteronism and nephrocalcinosis. We conclude that chronic hyperaldosteronism should be included as one of the causes of nephrocalcinosis and that our case series emphasizes the need of a well-organized retrospective study to prove it further. PMID:26413177

  13. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  14. Fifteen years' experience in thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, John C

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Thyroid disease is common, thyroid cancer is uncommon. Most goitres are investigated using blood tests, fine needle aspiration cytology together with ultrasound. Surgery usually entails either lobectomy or total thyroidectomy, and for malignancy, patients may need a neck dissection. Recently, significant advances have been made regarding mechanisms involved in both thyroid growth and function (goitrogenesis) and carcinogenesis at a molecular level. PATIENTS AND METHODS In the study cohort, 1113 patients had benign disease and 387 malignancy. For benign disease, 716 patients had lobectomy or isthmusectomy, 44 had near-total thyroidectomy and 318 a total thyroidectomy. For malignancy, patients received initial lobectomy (180) or total thyroidectomy (152). One hundred and eleven had completion surgery. Thirty patients had extensive surgery. Thyroid growth and function was investigated using 500 human thyroid cell primary cultures obtained at surgery, as well as in three animal models. The role of pituitary tumour transforming gene (PTTG), PTTG binding factor (PBF) and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in thyroid cell function was then evaluated. RESULTS Temporary and permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy rates were 2.4% and 0.4%. Other complications included temporary (21%) and permanent (3%) hypoparathyroidism, wound infection (1.2%), haematoma (1.2%) and poor scar (0.8%). Six patients have died. Regarding thyroid growth and function, TSH represents (either directly or indirectly) the main factor mediating thyroid follicular cell growth. For carcinogenesis, over-expression of the proto-oncogenes PTTG and PBF induces tumours in nude mice, and PTTG can induce proliferation of human thyroid cells and, in addition, both repress expression and function of NIS. PMID:20883601

  15. Neuroendocrine marker expression in thyroid epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Satoh, F; Umemura, S; Yasuda, M; Osamura, R Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue sections from 50 cases with thyroid tumors, composed of 11 follicular adenomas, 10 follicular carcinomas, 14 papillary carcinomas, 10 anaplastic carcinomas, and 5 medullary carcinomas, were immunohistochemically analyzed for representative neuroendocrine markers. Immunoexpression ratios of these neuroendocrine markers were as follows: Follicular adenomas, neuron-specific enolase (NSE)63.6%, synaptophysin (SynP) 45.5%, Leu7 27.3%, NCAM 45.5%, chromogranin A (CgA) 0%, SNAP25 0%; follicular carcinomas, NSE 90.0%, SynP 80.0%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; papillary carcinomas, NSE 85.7%, SynP 78.6%, Leu7 100%, NCAM 7.0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25.0%; anaplastic carcinomas, NSE 10.0%, SynP 0%, Leu7 0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; medullary carcinomas, NSE 100%, SynP100%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 40.0%, CgA 100%, SNAP25 100%. The two follicular carcinomas, which were morphologically characterized by "insular" (or "alveolar") arrangements, showed distinct immunoexpression of NSE and SynP at the same time. By in situ hybridization (ISH), expression of mRNA for NSE was confirmed in cases with marked immunoexpression of NSE. Although no endocrine granules were found, our results suggested that a specific type of follicular carcinoma, i.e., insular variant, may be immaturely neuroendocrine-differentiated.

  16. [Thyroid dysfunctions and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology of the thyroid function in normal pregnancy have highlighted the importance of the consequences of abnormal thyroid function on mother and fetal outcomes. Thyroid diseases are common in young women of childbearing age while management of thyroid diseases is relatively straightforward. For each thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroxinemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis), the issues with the obstetric complications of the mother and the fetus are considered. Indeed, early recognition of thyroid diseases during pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and the fetus.

  17. [Extracapsular lobectomy in benign monolobar thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Prete, F; Di Ciaula, G; Sammarco, D; Parlati, C

    1995-12-01

    On the basis of their experience acquired in the field of thyroid surgery the authors examine the problems related to extracapsular lobectomy from a tactical and technical point of view, starting with its principal indications: benign monolobar thyroid disease in a single or multiple nodular form. The validity of extemporary histological tests is also assessed on the basis of their experience of rare false negatives and the relative successive totalization programme. Lastly, the paper underlines the fundamental identification of the recurrent nerve as the central point of the operation, before which the authors emphasize that nothing should be cut or ligated apart from the superior vascular peduncle and vena media.

  18. A Calcitonin Non-producing Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Thyroid Gland.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Atsuko; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Loidi, Lourdes; Takahashi, Yoshio; Nakashima, Noriaki; Sato, Satoko; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Watanabe, Mika; Nakazawa, Tadao; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Kondo, Tetsuo; Kato, Ryohei; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the thyroid gland are generally considered to derive from parafollicular endocrine cells (C cells) and are generally referred to as medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC). Calcitonin secretion is almost always detected in MTC and a prerequisite for both clinical and pathological diagnosis. Thyroid neuroendocrine tumors without any apparent calcitonin secretion reflect a diagnostic dilemma because non-calcitonin-producing MTCs have virtually not been characterized. Here, we report a case of primary thyroid neuroendocrine tumors lacking calcitonin secretion or expression. The tumor cells expressed cytokeratins, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin, all of which were consistent with epithelial and neuroendocrine differentiation. Thyroid transcription factor-1 paired box gene 8, and carcinoembryonic antigen were also immunohistochemically detected, consistent with its thyroid origin. However, the tumor was negative for calcitonin both by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, hence, not meeting the definition of MTC. Despite the loss of calcitonin expression, immunoreactivity for the calcitonin-gene-related peptide was detected in the tumor. Somatic gene mutations of RET, H-RAS, K-RAS, or BRAF were not detected in this case. A limited number of calcitonin non-producing thyroid neuroendocrine tumors are available in the scientific literature available in English, and its etiology and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown. Our case, along with the rare, previously reported cases, suggests that calcitonin non-producing neuroendocrine tumors of the thyroid gland are most likely derived from C cells, but should be differentiated from ordinary MTCs.

  19. Thyroiditis: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lori B; Stewart, Christopher; Gaitonde, David Y

    2014-09-15

    Thyroiditis is a general term that encompasses several clinical disorders characterized by inflammation of the thyroid gland. The most common is Hashimoto thyroiditis; patients typically present with a nontender goiter, hypothyroidism, and an elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody level. Treatment with levothyroxine ameliorates the hypothyroidism and may reduce goiter size. Postpartum thyroiditis is transient or persistent thyroid dysfunction that occurs within one year of childbirth, miscarriage, or medical abortion. Release of preformed thyroid hormone into the bloodstream may result in hyperthyroidism. This may be followed by transient or permanent hypothyroidism as a result of depletion of thyroid hormone stores and destruction of thyroid hormone-producing cells. Patients should be monitored for changes in thyroid function. Beta blockers can treat symptoms in the initial hyperthyroid phase; in the subsequent hypothyroid phase, levothyroxine should be considered in women with a serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level greater than 10 mIU per L, or in women with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level of 4 to 10 mIU per L who are symptomatic or desire fertility. Subacute thyroiditis is a transient thyrotoxic state characterized by anterior neck pain, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone, and low radioactive iodine uptake on thyroid scanning. Many cases of subacute thyroiditis follow an upper respiratory viral illness, which is thought to trigger an inflammatory destruction of thyroid follicles. In most cases, the thyroid gland spontaneously resumes normal thyroid hormone production after several months. Treatment with high-dose acetylsalicylic acid or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is directed toward relief of thyroid pain.

  20. Evaluation of thyroid tissue by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, C. S. B.; Bitar, R. A.; Santos, A. B. O.; Kulcsar, M. A. V.; Friguglietti, C. U. M.; Martinho, H. S.; da Costa, R. B.; Martin, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid gland is a small gland in the neck consisting of two lobes connected by an isthmus. Thyroid's main function is to produce the hormones thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and calcitonin. Thyroid disorders can disturb the production of these hormones, which will affect numerous processes within the body such as: regulating metabolism and increasing utilization of cholesterol, fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The gland itself can also be injured; for example, neoplasias, which have been considered the most important, causing damage of to the gland and are difficult to diagnose. There are several types of thyroid cancer: Papillary, Follicular, Medullary, and Anaplastic. The occurrence rate, in general is between 4 and 7%; which is on the increase (30%), probably due to new technology that is able to find small thyroid cancers that may not have been found previously. The most common method used for thyroid diagnoses are: anamnesis, ultrasonography, and laboratory exams (Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy- FNAB). However, the sensitivity of those test are rather poor, with a high rate of false-negative results, therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostic techniques. Raman spectroscopy has been presented as a valuable tool for cancer diagnosis in many different tissues. In this work, 27 fragments of the thyroid were collected from 18 patients, comprising the following histologic groups: goitre adjacent tissue, goitre nodular tissue, follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma. Spectral collection was done with a commercial FTRaman Spectrometer (Bruker RFS100/S) using a 1064 nm laser excitation and Ge detector. Principal Component Analysis, Cluster Analysis, and Linear Discriminant Analysis with cross-validation were applied as spectral classification algorithm. Comparing the goitre adjacent tissue with the goitre nodular region, an index of 58.3% of correct classification was obtained. Between goitre (nodular region and

  1. Early diagnosis of and surgical strategy for adrenal medullary disease in MEN II gene carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.; Fjaelling, M.L.; Lindberg, S.; Jacobsson, L.; Zachrisson, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen multiple endocrine neoplasia type II (MEN II) gene carriers--12 who had undergone thyroidectomy because of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and 4 whose thyroid glands had been removed because of C cell hyperplasia--were examined for the presence of pheochromocytomas. No patient had sought medical advice for pheochromocytoma symptoms. Fourteen patients had MEN IIa syndromes, one patient had a MEN IIb and another patient had a mixed syndrome of von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis and MEN II. Eight patients had undergone unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma 11 +/- 4 years before. The patients underwent clinical examination, determination of the urinary excretion of catecholamines and metabolites, and /sup 131/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I-MIBG) and CAT scans. /sup 131/I-MIBG scanning was performed with images 1, 4, and 7 days after the radionuclide injection. In seven of eight patients who had undergone unilateral adrenalectomies, the /sup 131/I-MIBG scans showed accumulation of the radionuclide in the remaining adrenal gland. Bilateral adrenal accumulation of the radionuclide was demonstrated in seven of eight MEN IIa gene carriers who had not undergone adrenalectomy. Five patients, two of whom had undergone adrenalectomy, were found to have unilateral pheochromocytomas less than 2 cm in diameter. Only one of these five patients had an elevated excretion of urinary catecholamines. Between day 4 and day 7 after /sup 131/I-MIBG injection, adrenal glands with pheochromocytomas increased their relative accumulation of the radionuclide significantly more (p less than 0.02) than did adrenal glands without any demonstrable pheochromocytomas. All the pheochromocytomas were viewed by means of CAT scans.

  2. Recurrent vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anna M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Vulvovaginitis (VV) is one of the most commonly encountered problems by a gynecologist. Many women frequently self-treat with over-the-counter medications, and may present to their health-care provider after a treatment failure. Vulvovaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis may occur as discreet or recurrent episodes, and have been associated with significant treatment cost and morbidity. We present an update on diagnostic capabilities and treatment modalities that address recurrent and refractory episodes of VV.

  3. Meningioma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bencze, János; Varkoly, Gréta; Kouhsari, Mahan C; Klekner, Álmos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meningioma accounts for more than 30% of all intracranial tumours. It affects mainly the elderly above the age of 60, at a female:male ratio of 3:2. The prognosis is variable: it is usually favourable with no progression in tumour grade and no recurrence in WHO grade 1 tumours. However, a minority of tumours represent atypical (grade 2) or anaplastic (grade 3) meningiomas; this heterogeneity is also reflected in histopathological appearances. Irrespective of the grade, the size of the tumour and the localisation may have severe, sometimes lethal consequences. Following neurosurgical interventions to remove the tumour, recurrence and progression in WHO grade may occur. Our knowledge on predisposing histomorphological and molecular factors of recurrence is rather limited. These can be classified as I) demographic II) environmental, III) genetic and epigenetic IV) imaging, V) neuropathological, and VI) neurosurgical. In view of the complex background of tumour recurrence, the recognition of often subtle signs of increased risk of recurrence requires close collaboration of experts from several medical specialties. This multidisciplinary approach results in better therapy and fewer complications related to tumour recurrence. PMID:28352788

  4. Thyroid Gland Involvement in Carcinoma Larynx and Hypopharynx-Predictive Factors and Prognostic Significance

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Elizabeth Mathew; Jagad, Vijay; Varghese, Bipin T.; Sebastian, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intraoperative management of thyroid gland in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer is controversial. Aim The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion in patients undergoing surgery for laryngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma, to assess predictive factors and to assess the prognosis in patients with and without thyroid gland invasion. Materials and Methods One hundred and thirty-three patients who underwent surgery for carcinoma larynx and hypopharynx from 2006 to 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Surgical specimens were examined to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion and predictive factors were analysed. The recurrence rate and the survival in patients with and without thyroid gland invasion were also analysed. Results Out of the 133 patients with carcinoma larynx and hypopharynx who underwent surgery, histological thyroid gland invasion was observed in 28/133 (21%) patients. Significant relationship was found between histological thyroid gland invasion and preoperative evidence of thyroid cartilage erosion by CT scan and also when gross thyroid gland involvement observed during surgery. There is significant association between thyroid gland invasion when there is upper oesophageal or subglottic involvement. Conclusion After analysing the retrospective data from our study, we would like to suggest that thyroid gland need not be removed routinely in all laryngectomies, unless there is advanced disease with thyroid cartilage erosion and gross thyroid gland involvement or disease with significant subglottic or oesophageal involvement. PMID:27042568

  5. Medullary serotonin neurons are CO2 sensitive in situ

    PubMed Central

    Richerson, George B.; Harris, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Brainstem central chemoreceptors are critical to the hypercapnic ventilatory response, but their location and identity are poorly understood. When studied in vitro, serotonin-synthesizing (5-HT) neurons within the rat medullary raphé are intrinsically stimulated by CO2/acidosis. The contributions of these neurons to central chemosensitivity in vivo, however, are controversial. Lacking is documentation of CO2-sensitive 5-HT neurons in intact experimental preparations and understanding of their spatial and proportional distribution. Here we test the hypothesis that 5-HT neurons in the rat medullary raphé are sensitive to arterial hypercapnia. We use extracellular recording and hypercapnic challenge of spontaneously active medullary raphé neurons in the unanesthetized in situ perfused decerebrate brainstem preparation to assess chemosensitivity of individual cells. Juxtacellular labeling of a subset of recorded neurons and subsequent immunohistochemistry for the 5-HT-synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) identify or exclude this neurotransmitter phenotype in electrophysiologically characterized chemosensitive and insensitive cells. We show that the medullary raphé houses a heterogeneous population, including chemosensitive and insensitive 5-HT neurons. Of 124 recorded cells, 16 cells were juxtacellularly filled, visualized, and immunohistochemically identified as 5-HT synthesizing, based on TPH-immunoreactivity. Forty-four percent of 5-HT cells were CO2 stimulated (increased firing rate with hypercapnia), while 56% were unstimulated. Our results demonstrate that medullary raphé neurons are heterogeneous and clearly include a subset of 5-HT neurons that are excited by arterial hypercapnia. Together with data identifying intrinsically CO2-sensitive 5-HT neurons in vitro, these results support a role for such cells as central chemoreceptors in the intact system. PMID:24047906

  6. Concurrent papillary thyroid cancer with pituitary ACTH-secreting tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chen, Jeng-Yeou; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Jung, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Chen; Lin, Jen-Der

    2007-04-01

    Concomitant thyroid cancer with pituitary tumor is uncommon. This study reports a case of advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma with pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting tumor. A 58-year-old male patient had thyroid cancer in 1991 and presented with headache caused by pituitary tumor with apoplexy in 1993. Due to hypopituitarism, the patient underwent radioactive iodide ((131)I) for detection and treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer after the use of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) in 2000. During follow-up for thyroid cancer, (201)thallium scan proved to be an effective tool for detecting metastatic thyroid cancer in the patient without pituitary TSH reserve. Pituitary ACTH-secreting tumor was confirmed in 2001 based on the high serum ACTH level and positive immunohistochemical stain for ACTH. The patient had no Cushingoid features. Moreover, serum ACTH levels were 337 and 232 pg/mL with normal serum cortisol and urine-free cortisol. Although the patient underwent three operations and a total of 370 mCi (131)I therapy for recurrent thyroid cancer, the cancer continued to progress. Finally, the patient died of pneumonia with septic shock 12 years after the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

  7. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  8. Familial clustering of medullary sponge kidney is autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Antonia; Lupo, Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro M; Anglani, Franca; Pei, York; Danza, Francesco M; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a renal malformation typically associated with nephrocalcinosis and recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis. Approximately 12% of recurrent stone formers have MSK, which is generally considered a sporadic disorder. Since its discovery, three pedigrees have been described in which an apparently autosomal dominant inheritance was suggested. Here, family members of 50 patients with MSK were systematically investigated by means of interviews, renal imaging, and biochemical studies in an effort to establish whether MSK is an inheritable disorder. Twenty-seven MSK probands had 59 first- and second-degree relatives of both genders with MSK in all generations. There were progressively lower mean levels of serum calcium, urinary sodium, pH, and volume, combined with higher serum phosphate and potassium from probands to relatives with bilateral, to those with unilateral, and to those unaffected by MSK. This suggests that most affected relatives have a milder form of MSK than the probands, which would explain why they had not been so diagnosed. Thus, our study provides strong evidence that familial clustering of MSK is common, and has an autosomal dominant inheritance, a reduced penetrance, and variable expressivity.

  9. The added clinical value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in evaluating intratracheal recurrence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: implications for planning surgery, assessing its completeness, and planning radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit

    2013-12-01

    In selected patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, (18)F-FDG PET/CT has been shown to have added value. We present 2 clinical examples in the settings of both iodine-concentrating and non-iodine-concentrating lesions with tracheal involvement with special reference to its importance in planning of surgery or radioiodine therapy and assessing completeness of surgery. We believe that the use of PET/CT should be considered on a case-by-case basis and specifically when SPECT/CT is unavailable or has inconclusive findings.

  10. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Thyroid Cancer Be Found Early? Many cases of thyroid cancer ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  12. Incidental carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Pezzolla, Angela; Marzaioli, Rinaldo; Lattarulo, Serafina; Docimo, Giovanni; Conzo, Giovanni; Ciampolillo, Anna; Barile, Graziana; Anelli, Ferdinando Massimiliano; Madaro, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of incidental thyroid carcinoma in patients submitted to thyroidectomy for a benign disease is quite frequent. A retrospective analysis was performed on 455 patients submitted to surgical intervention in order to establish the incidence of this kind of carcinoma. Two hundred fifty-six patients (56%) were affected by benign disease (176 multinodular goiter, 12 uninodular goiter, 1 Plummer disease and 67 Basedow disease) and 202 (44%) by carcinoma. In 28 of 256 patients (11%), affected by benign disease, occurred a histological diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma, (10 papillary carcinoma, 1 follicular carcinoma, 29 papillary carcinoma follicular variant). In this study it's considered incidental thyroid carcinoma the one occurred in patients who never underwent Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) and there were no suspicious features in all exams that may suggest the presence of carcinoma. Twenty-three of the 40 incidental carcinoma (57.5%) were microcarcinomas. Ten patients had a sincronous carcinoma. Actually, these patients are still in a follow up program and no recurrency of disease is occasionally observed. This study shows that the only way to put doubts on the real benignity of the disease is the fine needle aspiration; there are no other instruments that could identify the occurrence of the carcinoma. Moreover in the majority of cases the incidental carcinoma is a microcarcinoma, it doesn't reach significant volume, may be not centered by a FNA, but in most cases it's not really biologically aggressive.

  13. Fine needle aspiration of secondary synovial sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Slade, Jamie Macagba; Syed, Sahr; Gattuso, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Synovial sarcomas (SS) of the head and neck region are extremely rare and arise in only 5% of cases. We present a case of secondary SS of the thyroid originally diagnosed as medullary carcinoma on fine needle aspiration (FNA). A 41-year-old man presented with several weeks of dysphonia and a left thyroid mass. FNA of the thyroid nodule showed a cellular smear composed of loosely cohesive oval to spindle-shaped cells with irregular nuclear borders, finely granular chromatin, and inconspicuous nucleoli. The patient was diagnosed with medullary carcinoma and underwent a total thyroidectomy. Intro-operatively, the mass was found to arise from the tracheoesophageal groove with spread to the left thyroid. Microscopic examination of the thyroid tumor revealed a dense spindle cell proliferation with abundant mitoses, scant cords and nests of epithelial cells and foci of necrosis. The spindle cells were positive for bcl2 and vimentin and the epithelial cells were positive for cytokeratin 8/18 and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Both spindle and epithelial cells were negative for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, synaptophysin and chromogranin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated translocation (X;18)(p11;q11), confirming the diagnosis of SS. The patient underwent a total laryngopharyngoesophagectomy with subsequent adjuvant therapy and is currently disease free. Only 6 cases of histologically confirmed primary SS of the thyroid have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of FISH-confirmed secondary SS of the thyroid and also the first case of SS arising from the tracheoesophageal groove.

  14. Recurrent novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent novae seem to be a rather inhomogeneous group: T CrB is a binary with a M III companion; U Sco probably has a late dwarf as companion. Three are fast novae; two are slow novae. Some of them appear to have normal chemical composition; others may present He and CNO excess. Some present a mass-loss that is lower by two orders of magnitude than classical novae. However, our sample is too small for saying whether there are several classes of recurrent novae, which may be related to the various classes of classical novae, or whether the low mass-loss is a general property of the class or just a peculiarity of one member of the larger class of classical novae and recurrent novae.

  15. Microsurgical anatomy of the arterial basket of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Kalani, M Yashar S; Lemole, G Michael; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C; Theodore, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT The arterial basket of the conus medullaris (ABCM) consists of 1 or 2 arteries arising from the anterior spinal artery (ASA) and circumferentially connecting the ASA and the posterior spinal arteries (PSAs). The arterial basket can be involved in arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous malformations of the conus. In this article, the authors describe the microsurgical anatomy of the ABCM with emphasis on its morphometric parameters and important role in the intrinsic blood supply of the conus medullaris. METHODS The authors performed microsurgical dissections on 16 formalin-fixed human spinal cords harvested within 24 hours of death. The course, diameter, and branching angles of the arteries comprising the ABCM were then identified and measured. In addition, histological sections were obtained to identify perforating vessels arising from the ABCM. RESULTS The ASA tapers as it nears the conus medullaris (mean preconus diameter 0.7 ± 0.12 mm vs mean conus diameter 0.38 ± 0.08 mm). The ASA forms an anastomotic basket with the posterior spinal artery (PSA) via anastomotic branches. In most of the specimens (n= 13, 81.3%), bilateral arteries formed connections between the ASA and PSA. However, in the remaining specimens (n= 3, 18.7%), a unilateral right-sided anastomotic artery was identified. The mean diameter of the right ABCM branch was 0.49 ± 0.13 mm, and the mean diameter of the left branch was 0.53 ± 0.14 mm. The mean branching angles of the arteries forming the anastomotic basket were 95.9° ± 36.6° and 90° ± 34.3° for the right- and left-sided arteries, respectively. In cases of bilateral arterial anastomoses between the ASA and PSA, the mean distance between the origins of the arteries was 4.5 ± 3.3 mm. Histological analysis revealed numerous perforating vessels supplying tissue of the conus medullaris. CONCLUSIONS The ABCM is a critical anastomotic connection between the ASA and PSA, which play an important role in the intrinsic blood supply

  16. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with <4 μm axial resolution (OCT and OCM), and 14 μm (OCT) and <2 μm (OCM) transverse resolution. The system allows seamless switching between low and high magnifications in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence is observed between optical images and histological sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  17. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions A A ... or injury. Signs of inflammation can include redness, heat, pain, or swelling. metabolism: Metabolism refers to the ...

  18. Thyroid Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem that is directly affecting the thyroid (primary hypothyroidism). The opposite situation, in which the TSH level ... making enough TSH to stimulate the thyroid (secondary hypothyroidism). In most healthy individuals, a normal TSH value ...

  19. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... an underactive thyroid gland is called hypothyroidism. In hypothyroidism, the body's metabolism is slowed. Several causes for this condition exist, most of which affect the thyroid gland directly, impairing its ability to ...

  20. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  1. Child thyroid anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and ... a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. Thyroid disorders are more common in older children and ...

  2. Thyroid preparation overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid preparations are medicines used to treat thyroid gland disorders. Overdose occurs when someone takes more than the normal or recommended amount of this medicine. This can be by accident or ...

  3. Cabozantinib (thyroid cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat a certain type of thyroid cancer that is getting worse and that has spread ... only gives information about cabozantinib capsules (Cometriq) for thyroid cancer. If you are using this medication for advanced ...

  4. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroid disorder or thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism (say: hi-per-THYE-roy-diz-em) happens when the ... Kids with the opposite problem have hypothyroidism (say: hi-po-THYE-roy-diz-em). In this case, ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  6. Russell-Silver syndrome associated with low conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Larisa; Canaz, Huseyin; Canaz, Gokhan; Kara, Nursu; Alatas, Ibrahim; Bozkus, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Russell-Silver syndrome is a rare heterogeneous disorder mainly characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, craniofacial disproportion, clinodactyly, variation in urogenital development, and skeletal asymmetry. It is rare to come across tethered cord-associated Russell-Silver syndrome. We report a rare case of Russell-Silver syndrome associated with low conus medullaris in a 2-year-old patient with demonstrative phenotype. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated a low conus medullaris at the inferior border of the L3 vertebral body. Urodynamic study revealed detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia and detrusor overactivity. A decision to follow-up the patient was made because of the suspicion of tethered cord syndrome. Even though tethered cord syndrome is not a common finding in Russell-Silver syndrome, it is important to consider tethered cord syndrome to avoid scoliosis and other long-term complications.

  7. Effect of Space Flight on Adrenal Medullary Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelkes, Peter I.

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity conditions during space flight alter the expression and specific activities of the adrenal medullary CA synthesizing enzymes (CASE). Previously, we examined adrenals from six rats flown for six days aboard STS 54 and reported that microgravity induced a decrease in the expression and specific activity of rat adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of CA synthesis, without affecting the expression of other CASE. In the past, we analyzed some of the > 300 adrenals from two previous Space Shuttle missions (PARE 03 and SLS 2). The preliminary results (a) attest to the good state of tissue preservation, thus proving the feasibility of subsequent large-scale evaluation, and (b) confirm and extend our previous findings. With this grant we will be able to expeditiously analyze all our specimens and to complete our studies in a timely fashion.

  8. Russell–Silver syndrome associated with low conus medullaris

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Larisa; Canaz, Huseyin; Canaz, Gokhan; Kara, Nursu; Alatas, Ibrahim; Bozkus, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Russell–Silver syndrome is a rare heterogeneous disorder mainly characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, craniofacial disproportion, clinodactyly, variation in urogenital development, and skeletal asymmetry. It is rare to come across tethered cord-associated Russell–Silver syndrome. We report a rare case of Russell–Silver syndrome associated with low conus medullaris in a 2-year-old patient with demonstrative phenotype. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated a low conus medullaris at the inferior border of the L3 vertebral body. Urodynamic study revealed detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia and detrusor overactivity. A decision to follow-up the patient was made because of the suspicion of tethered cord syndrome. Even though tethered cord syndrome is not a common finding in Russell–Silver syndrome, it is important to consider tethered cord syndrome to avoid scoliosis and other long-term complications. PMID:28217167

  9. Medullary sponge kidney and testicular dysgenesis syndrome: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Masciovecchio, Stefano; Saldutto, Pietro; Paradiso Galatioto, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The medullary sponge kidney is also known as Lenarduzzi's kidney or Cacchi and Ricci's disease from the first Italian authors who described its main features. A review of the scientific literature underlines particular rarity of the association of MSK with developmental abnormalities of the lower urinary tract and genital tract such as hypospadias and bilateral cryptorchidism. The work presented is the only one in the scientific literature that shows the association between the medullary sponge kidney and the testicular dysgenesis syndrome. A question still remains unanswered: are the MSK and TDS completely independent malformation syndromes occurring, in this case, simultaneously for a rare event or are they different phenotypic expressions of a common malformative mechanism? In the future we hope that these questions will be clarified.

  10. Medullary Sponge Kidney and Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Masciovecchio, Stefano; Saldutto, Pietro; Paradiso Galatioto, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The medullary sponge kidney is also known as Lenarduzzi's kidney or Cacchi and Ricci's disease from the first Italian authors who described its main features. A review of the scientific literature underlines particular rarity of the association of MSK with developmental abnormalities of the lower urinary tract and genital tract such as hypospadias and bilateral cryptorchidism. The work presented is the only one in the scientific literature that shows the association between the medullary sponge kidney and the testicular dysgenesis syndrome. A question still remains unanswered: are the MSK and TDS completely independent malformation syndromes occurring, in this case, simultaneously for a rare event or are they different phenotypic expressions of a common malformative mechanism? In the future we hope that these questions will be clarified. PMID:24716085

  11. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  12. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  13. Sentinel node radioguided biopsy in surgical management of the medullary thyroid carcinoma A case report.

    PubMed

    Boni, Giuseppe; Mazzarri, Sara; Grosso, Mariano; Manca, Giampiero; Biricotti, Marco; Ambrosini, Carlo Enrico; Fregoli, Lorenzo; Puccini, Marco; Caldarelli, Claudio; Spisni, Roberto

    2014-01-21

    Il carcinoma midollare della tiroide è raro. Il suo trattamento è chirurgico e consiste in una tiroidectomia totale associata a dissezione dei linfonodi centrali. L’opportunità della linfoadenectomia dei linfonodi cervicali laterali è argomento controverso. Per ridurre l’estensione della dissezione dei linfonodi laterocervicali ai casi in cui tale procedura sia effettivamente necessaria abbiamo eseguito la tecnica della biopsia del linfonodo sentinella, già praticata in altra patologia tumorale, in un caso di carcinoma midollare, sporadico, diagnosticato con ecografia, determinazione dei livelli di calcitonina serica e citologia dell’agoaspirato. All’ecografia non si evidenziavano linfonodi cervicali centrali o laterali. Abbiamo eseguito mappaggio preoperatorio dei linfonodi sentinella iniettando Tecnezio 99-m nel nodulo tiroideo. La paziente è stata poi sottoposta a tiroidectomia totale e biopsia radioguidata dei linfonodi sentinella. L’esame istologico ha confermato la presenza di un carcinoma midollare della tiroide e di micrometastasi in due linfonodi sentinella situati nel compartimento laterale destro. Dopo la tiroidectomia l’intervento è stato completato con dissezione dei compartimenti centrale e laterala destro. Al followup non sono stati rilevati livelli di calcitonina serica nè basali nè dopo stimolazione con pentagastrina. Si tratta del primo caso, riportato in letteratura, che dimostra l’utilità della biopsia radioguidata del linfonodo sentinella nella stadiazione linfonodale e del trattamento chirurgico del microcarcinoma midollare della tiroide. Tale biopsia può essere utile ad eseguire la dissezione linfonodale laterale solo nei pazienti con provato coinvolgimento dei linfonodi laterali del collo e quindi a ridurre l’entità della dissezione e delle relative complicanze.

  14. Advances in thyroid cancer treatment: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Gordoa, T.; Díez, J.J.; Durán, M.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced thyroid carcinoma is an infrequent tumor entity with limited treatment possibilities until recently. The extraordinary improvement in the comprehension of genetic and molecular alterations involving the RAS/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and interacting pathways that are involved in tumor survival, proliferation, differentiation, motility and angiogenesis have been the rationale for the development of new effective targeted therapies. Data coming from phase II clinical trials have confirmed the efficacy of those targeted agents against receptors in cell membrane and cytoplasmic molecules. Moreover, four of those investigational drugs, vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib and lenvatinib, have reached a phase III clinical trial with favorable results in progression-free survival and overall survival in medullary thyroid carcinoma and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Further analysis for an optimal approach has been conducted according to mutational profile and tumor subtypes. However, consistent results are still awaited and the research for adequate prognostic and predictive biomarkers is ongoing. The following report offers a comprehensive review from the rationale to the basis of targeted agents in the treatment of thyroid carcinoma. In addition, current and future therapeutic developments by the inhibition of further molecular targets are discussed in this setting. PMID:25553081

  15. Expression of glutamine metabolism-related proteins in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the expression of glutamine metabolism-related protein in tumor and stromal compartments among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. Results GLS1 and GDH expression in tumor and stromal compartments were the highest in AC than in other subtypes. Tumoral ASCT2 expression was higher in MC but lower in FC (p < 0.001). In PTC, tumoral GLS1 and tumoral GDH expression was higher in the conventional type than in the follicular variant (p = 0.043 and 0.001, respectively), and in PTC with BRAF V600E mutation than in PTC without BRAF V600E mutation (p<0.001). Stromal GDH positivity was the independent factor associated with short overall survival (hazard ratio: 21.48, 95% confidence interval: 2.178-211.8, p = 0.009). Methods We performed tissue microarrays with 557 thyroid cancer cases (papillary thyroid carcinoma [PTC]: 344, follicular carcinoma [FC]: 112, medullary carcinoma [MC]: 70, poorly differentiated carcinoma [PDC]: 23, and anaplastic carcinoma [AC]: 8) and 152 follicular adenoma (FA) cases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of glutaminolysis-related proteins (glutaminase 1 [GLS1], glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH], and amino acid transporter-2 [ASCT-2]). Conclusion Glutamine metabolism-related protein expression differed among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. PMID:27447554

  16. [Thyroid cancer. In search of individualized treatment].

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Cavallo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased exponentially around the world (mostly papillary thyroid carcinoma). This growth may reflect the combined effects of increased screening practices, together with changes in risk factors for thyroid cancer. In spite of this, disease specific mortality remained stable in the last three decades. Due to the fact that patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma often have a very good prognosis, with high survival in the long term follow-up compared with other types of carcinomas, there has been no need to change the standard treatment. The mainstays of thyroid cancer treatment are surgery (total or near-total thyroidectomy) with or without the additional administration of radioiodine (131I). These approaches are now in the center of discussion in all global forums. The current trend is to ensure the most effective and less harmful treatment and the most important issue at this point is to individualize patients according to tumor stage and risk of recurrence, to define which patients will benefit of more aggressive therapy and who could be handled with a more conservative approach.

  17. Bronchogenic cyst of the conus medullaris with spinal cord tethering: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Hu, Jia-Rui; Kang, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing; Lv, Guo-Hua; She, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts (BCs) are congenital malformations that originate from remnants of the primitive foregut. Intraspinal BCs, especially those of the conus medullaris are rare with only one case reported until now. To date, a bronchogenic cyst with spinal cord tethering has not been previously reported. We reviewed the clinical course of a 44-year-old woman, who presented with low back pain and leg weaknesss as well as sphincter disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradural oval mass located at the conus medullaris. A tethered cord was also observed, as well as a dermal sinus tract. The mass was totally removed after an L3-L4 laminectomy without detethering during operation. Pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of bronchogenic cyst. By six months after treatment, the patient had experienced nearly complete recovery. The review of literature indicated that detethering was performed in most reported cases of neurenteric cysts with spinal cord tethering, and one of six patients was diagnosed with a postoperative recurrence. The co-existence of bronchogenic cyst and a tethered spinal cord would imply associated developmental errors in embryogenesis. It is worth noting that whether detethering is necessary after the cyst removal. PMID:26097578

  18. Biopsy proven medullary sponge kidney: clinical findings, histopathology, and role of osteogenesis in stone and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Worcester, Elaine M; Williams, James C; Sommer, Andre J; Lingeman, James E; Phillips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2015-05-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is associated with recurrent stone formation, but the clinical phenotype is unclear because patients with other disorders may be incorrectly labeled MSK. We studied 12 patients with histologic findings pathognomonic of MSK. All patients had an endoscopically recognizable pattern of papillary malformation, which may be segmental or diffuse. Affected papillae are enlarged and billowy, due to markedly enlarged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD), which contain small, mobile ductal stones. Patients had frequent dilation of Bellini ducts, with occasional mineral plugs. Stones may form over white (Randall's) plaque, but most renal pelvic stones are not attached, and have a similar morphology as ductal stones, which are a mixture of calcium oxalate and apatite. Patients had no abnormalities of urinary acidification or acid excretion; the most frequent metabolic abnormality was idiopathic hypercalciuria. Although both Runx2 and Osterix are expressed in papillae of MSK patients, no mineral deposition was seen at the sites of gene expression, arguing against a role of these genes in this process. Similar studies in idiopathic calcium stone formers showed no expression of these genes at sites of Randall's plaque. The most likely mechanism for stone formation in MSK appears to be crystallization due to urinary stasis in dilated IMCD with subsequent passage of ductal stones into the renal pelvis where they may serve as nuclei for stone formation.

  19. Medullary carcinoma of the colon: can the undifferentiated be differentiated?

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Grauslund, Morten; Glenthøj, Anders; Melchior, Linea Cecilie; Vainer, Ben; Willemoe, Gro Linno

    2015-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the colon is a rare variant of colorectal cancer claimed to have a more favorable prognosis than conventional adenocarcinomas. The histopathologic appearance may be difficult to distinguish from poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic interobserver agreement and to characterize the immunohistochemical and molecular differences between these two subgroups. Fifteen cases initially classified as medullary carcinoma and 30 cases of poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas were included. Two pathologists reviewed the slides independently without knowledge of the original diagnosis and subgrouped the tumors into the two entities. Agreement was reached in 31 of 45 cases (69 %) with kappa = 0.32. An extensive immunohistochemical panel was performed, and KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutational status was assessed. Of the 31 cases with diagnostic agreement, the expression of only MLH-1 along with corresponding expression of PMS-2 differed significantly (p = 0.04). A high rate of BRAF mutations was detected in both subgroups without significant differences. Expression of MLH-1 was superior in dividing the tumors into two separate entities with significant differences in CK20 (p = 0.005) expression and in the rate of BRAF mutations (p = 0.0035). In conclusion, medullary carcinomas of the colon are difficult to discriminate from poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma even with the help of immunohistochemical and molecular analyses. This raises the question whether these morphological subtypes should be maintained or whether an alternative classification of poorly differentiated colorectal adenocarcinomas based on MLH-1 status rather than morphology should be suggested.

  20. Effect of chronic renal medullary nitric oxide inhibition on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Mattson, D L; Lu, S; Nakanishi, K; Papanek, P E; Cowley, A W

    1994-05-01

    The effects of chronic nitric oxide inhibition in the renal medulla on renal cortical and medullary blood flow, sodium balance, and blood pressure were evaluated in conscious uninephrectomized Sprague-Dawley rats. During a 5-day renal medullary interstitial infusion of the nitric oxide inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 120 micrograms/h) in saline (0.5 ml/min), renal medullary blood flow was selectively decreased by 30% after 2 h and was maintained at that level for the entire infusion. The decrease in medullary blood flow was associated with sodium retention and increased blood pressure. After the cessation of L-NAME infusion, medullary blood flow returned to control, and the sodium balance became negative as blood pressure returned to baseline. These data indicate that renal medullary nitric oxide plays an important role in the regulation of renal blood flow, sodium excretion, and blood pressure.

  1. Pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Christian; Richter, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Poor prognosis of anaplastic thyroid cancer and advanced disease in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer, together with absence of effective therapeutic measures, has induced recent intensified basic and clinical research in this area. The aim of this article is to assess the effects of new drug treatment for advanced thyroid cancer. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE until the end of September 2011 for relevant data. Further sources were reference lists of original publications and review articles. We included prospective studies that investigated drug interventions for advanced thyroid cancer published in any language. We did not include trials solely communicated as abstracts. For inclusion, studies had to report overall survival, progression-free survival or similar, or response outcomes. Data were extracted by one author and checked by the other. All tables are part of this publication. Because only non-comparative studies were included, we had to focus on descriptive analysis. Twenty-four studies with 715 patients were included; 18 studies investigated kinase inhibitors, the remainder various drugs. All studies reported response (only one complete response was observed; proportions of partial response were up to 49%). Median progression-free survival was about 12 months, ranging from 3.7 to 27.9 months. Adverse events (at least grade 3) of kinase inhibitors included hypertension, hand foot syndrome and diarrhoea (10%, 16% and 9%, respectively). Due to bias-prone data, any interpretation of newer pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer is limited because only non-comparative studies could be included. Therefore, we strongly argue the need for adequate randomized controlled trials that should provide a better basis for therapeutic decision making in thyroid cancer.

  2. Hormonal causes of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL).

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Nicola; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Wenger, Jean Marie; Petignat, Patrick; Streuli, Isabelle; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disorders play a major role in approximately 8% to 12% of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). Indeed, the local hormonal milieu is crucial in both embryo attachment and early pregnancy. Endocrine abnormalities, including thyroid disorders, luteal phase defects, polycystic ovary syndrome, hyperprolactinaemia and diabetes have to be evaluated in any case of RPL. Moreover, elevated androgen levels and some endocrinological aspects of endometriosis are also factors contributing to RPL. In the present article, we review the significance of endocrine disease on RPL.

  3. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  4. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  5. Thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ghervan, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid ultrasound is easy to perform due to the superficial location of the thyroid gland, but appropriate equipment is mandatory with a linear high frequency transducer (7.5 - 12) MHz. Some pathological aspects of the thyroid gland are easily diagnosed by ultrasound, like the enlargement of the thyroid volume (goiter) or the presence of nodules and cysts; while other aspects are more difficult and need more experience (diffuse changes in the structure, echogenicity and vascularization of the parenchyma, differential diagnosis of malignant nodules). Ultrasound has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules; most structural abnormalities of the thyroid need evaluation and monitoring but not intervention. A good knowledge of the normal appearance of the thyroid gland is compulsory for an accurate ultrasound diagnosis.

  6. [Riedel thyroiditis: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rongjin; Wang, Junguo

    2014-10-01

    Riedel thyroiditis is a benign disease, which is often self-limited. Examinations, such as CT and histologic diagnosis can distinguish it from malignant neoplasms and hashimoto's thyroiditis. Riedel thyroiditis is an uncommon form of chronic thyroiditis in which the thyroid gland is replaced by fibrous tissue. It can be cured by surgery and medicine.

  7. Antenatal management of recurrent fetal goitrous hyperthyroidism associated with fetal cardiac failure in a pregnant woman with persistent high levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody after ablative therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tadashi; Miyakoshi, Kei; Saisho, Yoshifumi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Ikenoue, Satoru; Kasuga, Yoshifumi; Kadohira, Ikuko; Sato, Seiji; Momotani, Naoko; Minegishi, Kazuhiro; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2013-01-01

    High titer of maternal thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TRAb) in patients with Graves' disease could cause fetal hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. Clinical features of fetal hyperthyroidism include tachycardia, goiter, growth restriction, advanced bone maturation, cardiomegaly, and fetal death. The recognition and treatment of fetal hyperthyroidism are believed to be important to optimize growth and intellectual development in affected fetuses. We herein report a case of fetal treatment in two successive siblings showing in utero hyperthyroid status in a woman with a history of ablative treatment for Graves' disease. The fetuses were considered in hyperthyroid status based on high levels of maternal TRAb, a goiter, and persistent tachycardia. In particular, cardiac failure was observed in the second fetus. With intrauterine treatment using potassium iodine and propylthiouracil, fetal cardiac function improved. A high level of TRAb was detected in the both neonates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the changes of fetal cardiac function in response to fetal treatment in two siblings showing in utero hyperthyroid status. This case report illustrates the impact of prenatal medication via the maternal circulation for fetal hyperthyroidism and cardiac failure.

  8. Modified Miccoli's thyroid surgery for thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    YU, HUI; GE, XIN; PAN, WEIKANG; WANG, HUAIJIE; HUANG, QIANG; DONG, YU; GAO, YA; YU, JIANJUN

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT), originally described by Miccoli, is considered to be the most widely practiced and easily reproducible procedure for selected patients with benign and/or malignant thyroid nodules. Modified techniques based on MIVAT, namely modified Miccoli's thyroid surgery (MMTS), were developed based on MIVAT. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary results of MMTS compared with those of MIVAT. The enrolling criteria included a benign nodule <3.5 cm in diameter, a malignant tumor <2 cm, no previous neck surgery and no evidence of any suspected lymph node metastasis or local invasion. Unilateral lobectomy was considered for benign lesions and the additional dissection of central compartment (level VI) lymph nodes was applied for malignant disease. The modified techniques included carefully selecting the operative incision, expanding the operative space, embedding a drainage tube in situ and delicately suturing every layer inwards and crosswise, as well as measuring cervical motion. In addition to the comparison of surgical outcomes between MMTS and MIVAT, other surgical parameters, including operative time, blood loss, postoperative drainage, cosmetic satisfaction, peak angle of cervical rotation, length of hospitalization and complications, were retrospectively analyzed. A consecutive series of 70 patients, including 54 cases of benign and 16 cases of malignant disease, initially underwent MIVAT between April, 2008 and May, 2012, while 127 patients, including 98 benign and 29 malignant cases, subsequently underwent MMTS between September, 2011 and October, 2014. Patients who received MMTS exhibited significantly less blood loss (20.3±11.3 vs. 32.3±12.6 ml, P<0.01), lower volume of postoperative drainage (42.77±15.2 vs. 50.48±23.2 ml, P<0.01) and higher cosmetic satisfaction (94.6±3.5 vs. 88.9±2.7%, P<0.01), but a longer operative time (102±36 vs. 50.48±23.2 min, P<0.01) when compared with MIVAT. In addition, a

  9. [Surgical treatment of benign recurrent goiter with pre-existing unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis--a report of experiences].

    PubMed

    Wasiak, J; Pohle, T

    1996-01-01

    Operations for recurrent goiter are considered to range among the most difficult procedures in thyroid surgery, because the risk of a permanent recurrent nerve palsy increases to 10 or 30%. In case of pre-existing unilateral lesion of the nerve the danger of bilateral paralysis of the vocal chord will become even larger. The results from 29 patients with an intracapsular resection (nearly total removement of the thyroid tissue without the preparation of the recurrent nerve) are presented and compared with those found in 4 patients with an extracapsular approach. All four patients, where the operation was performed extracapsularly, must be tracheotomized although the palsy did recover within 21 days till 14 months. After an intracapsular resection of the recurrence at the side of an intact nerve (29 patients) a tracheotomy had not been necessary.

  10. Axon-glial relations during regeneration of axons in the adult rat anterior medullary velum.

    PubMed

    Berry, M; Hunter, A S; Duncan, A; Lordan, J; Kirvell, S; Tsang, W L; Butt, A M

    1998-12-01

    The anterior medullary velum (AMV) of adult Wistar rats was lesioned in the midsagittal plane, transecting all decussating axons including those of the central projection of the IVth nerve. At selected times up to 200 days after transection, the degenerative and regenerative responses of axons and glia were analyzed using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. In particular, both the capacity of oligodendrocytes to remyelinate regenerated fibers and the stability of the CNS/PNS junctional zone of the IVth nerve rootlet were documented. Transected central AMV axons exhibited four patterns of fiber regeneration in which fibers grew: rostrocaudally in the reactive paralesion neuropil (Group 1); randomly within the AMV (Group 2); into the ipsilateral IVth nerve rootlet, after turning at the lesion edge and growing recurrently through the old degenerated contralateral central trochlear nerve trajectory (Group 3); and ectopically through paralesion tears in the ependyma onto the surface of the IVth ventricle (Group 4). Group 1-3 axons regenerated unperturbed through degenerating central myelin, reactive astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and large accumulations of hematogenous macrophages. Only Group 3 axons survived long term in significant numbers, and all became myelinated by oligodendrocytes, ultimately establishing thin sheaths with relatively normal nodal gaps and intersegmental myelin sheath lengths. Schwann cells at the CNS/PNS junction of the IVth nerve rootlet did not invade the CNS, but astrocyte processes grew across the junction into the PNS portion of the IVth nerve. The basal lamina of the junctional glia limitans remained stable throughout the experimental period.

  11. [Trabecular hyalinizing adenoma of the thyroid (HAT): A report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Román-González, Alejandro; Simón-Duque, Carlos; Camilo-Pérez, Juan; Vélez-Hoyo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The hyalinizing trabecular adenoma is a rare lesion of the thyroid. There is controversy in the literature about the correct name for this disease. Dr. Carney defended the benign nature of this condition and therefore continues calling it adenoma, the World Health Organization calls for the potential of tumor malignancy, and others qualify it as a variant of papillary carcinoma based on the presence of rearranged in transformation/papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC) rearrangements. In Latin America there are few reported cases. Two cases of hyalinizing trabecular adenoma are reported. The first is a 40-year-old woman with a thyroid nodule of 3x3 cm. The immunohistochemistry was positive for thyroglobulin and calcitonin and negative for cytokeratin 19 and chromogranin. The second case is a 36-year-old patient with a thyroid nodule of 4x4 cm with an immunohistochemical pattern identical to the first case. Trabecular hyalinizing adenoma is a benign disease, easily confused with papillary or medullary thyroid carcinoma. Awareness of this entity will allow a better classification and management of thyroid conditions.

  12. Multikinase inhibitors in the treatment of thyroid cancer: specific role of lenvatinib.

    PubMed

    Stjepanovic, Neda; Capdevila, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most frequent neoplasms of the endocrine system and in the initial stages their prognosis is excellent. However, few therapeutic options are available for advanced or metastatic disease. In the last decade, a better understanding of the molecular events involved in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancers has led to development of new targeted agents for the management of advanced and refractory disease. Multikinase inhibitors that are able to block pathways involved in the proliferation, invasion, and neoangiogenesis of thyroid cancer have been the most widely studied. After an international effort to identify and recruit sufficient patients, four placebo-controlled studies of multikinase inhibitors have been completed. These trials have led to the approval of the first agents with activity in advanced medullary thyroid cancers, which will probably change the landscape of treatment for iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer in the near future. The purpose of this paper is to review the development of targeted agents for thyroid malignancy, with a special focus on lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor.

  13. Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer can cause any of the following ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  14. Nuclear Radiation and the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... release of radioactive material? The thyroid gland needs iodine to produce hormones that regulate the body’s energy and metabolism. The thyroid absorbs available iodine from the bloodstream. The thyroid gland cannot distinguish ...

  15. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  16. Submandibular ectopic thyroid with normally located thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Mahmut Sinan; Aytürk, Semra; Güven, Mehmet; Dilek, Fatma Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly of the thyroid gland which is defined as the presence of thyroid tissue at a site other than the pretracheal area. Nearly 1 to 3% of all ectopic thyroids are located in the lateral neck. Simultaneous submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue presenting with a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is extremely rare. In this article, we report a 37-year-old female case admitted to our clinic with a complaint of swollen neck in whom ultrasonography revealed submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue presenting with an orthotopic thyroid gland.

  17. Involvement of medullary serotonergic groups in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E; Schmeichel, Ann M; Low, Phillip A; Parisi, Joseph E

    2004-03-01

    We sought to determine whether medullary serotonergic neurons were affected in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Immunostaining for tryptophan hydroxylase was performed on serial 50 microm sections of the medulla of brains obtained at autopsy from six control subjects, eight subjects with clinical diagnosis of MSA, and four with Parkinson's disease. There was a severe depletion of serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus, raphe obscurus, raphe pallidus, and ventrolateral medulla in MSA. Depletion of serotonergic neurons may contribute to impaired control of sympathetic outflow and other abnormalities in MSA.

  18. Ependymoma of conus medullaris presenting as subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, C T; Beck, J; Seifert, V; Marquardt, G

    2008-02-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) due to spinal ependymoma is very rare. We report a 37 year old man who presented with typical clinical signs of SAH. Lumbar puncture confirmed SAH but cerebral angiography was negative, and further diagnostic work-up revealed an ependymoma of the conus medullaris as the source of the haemorrhage. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted. Only 17 patients with spontaneous SAH due to a spinal ependymoma have been reported since 1958. However, in cases of SAH and negative diagnostic findings for cerebral aneurysms or malformations, this aetiology should be considered and work-up of the spinal axis completed.

  19. The impact of coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis on lymph node metastasis and prognosis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Dao-Zhe; Ji, Qing-Hai; Zhu, Yong-Xue; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The impact of coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) on lymph node metastasis (LNM) and prognosis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) remains controversial. We evaluated the association of coexistent HT with clinicopathologic parameters, LNM, and prognosis by retrospectively reviewing a series of consecutive patients treated for PTMC at Fudan University Cancer Center from January 2005 to December 2010. Of all 1,250 patients with complete data for analysis, 364 (29.1 %) had coexistent HT (HT group) and 886 patients (70.9 %) had no evidence of HT (control group). The HT group had higher proportion of female (87.9 vs 70.1 %) patients, higher mean level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (2.39 vs 2.00 mIU/L), and lower incidence of extrathyroidal extension (7.4 vs 11.7 %) than those in the control group. However, the incidence of LNM and recurrence was similar between the two groups, and HT was not associated with LNM and recurrence. A series of clinicopathologic factors identified for predicting LNM and recurrence in the control group did not show any prediction in the HT group. In summary, this study suggested that coexistent HT had insignificant protective effect on LNM and prognosis in PTMC, which was inconsistent with prior studies. Further studies aiming to determine novel predictors are recommended in PTMC patients with coexistent HT.

  20. Coexistence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with papillary thyroid carcinoma: clinical manifestation and prognostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyun Ki; Lee, Cho-Rok; Park, Seulkee; Park, Jae Hyun; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

    2012-08-01

    The study aimed to identify the clinical characteristics of coexisting chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and to evaluate the influence on prognosis. A total of 1,357 patients who underwent thyroid surgery for PTC were included. The clinicopathological characteristics were identified. Patients who underwent total thyroidectomy (n = 597) were studied to evaluate the influence of coexistent CLT on prognosis. Among the total 1,357 patients, 359 (26.5%) had coexistent CLT. In the CLT group, the prevalence of females was higher than in the control group without CLT (P < 0.001). Mean tumor size and mean age in the patients with CLT were smaller than without CLT (P = 0.040, P = 0.047, respectively). Extrathyroidal extension in the patients with CLT was significantly lower than without CLT (P = 0.016). Among the subset of 597 patients, disease-free survival rate in the patients with CLT was significantly higher than without CLT (P = 0.042). However, the multivariate analysis did not reveal a negative association between CLT coexistence and recurrence. Patients with CLT display a greater female preponderance, smaller size, younger and lower extrathyroidal extension. CLT is not a significant independent negative predictive factor for recurrence, although presence of CLT indicates a reduced risk of recurrence.

  1. Affective psychosis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and brain perfusion abnormalities: case report

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background It has recently become evident that circulating thyroid antibodies are found in excess among patients suffering from mood disorders. Moreover, a manic episode associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis has recently been reported as the first case of bipolar disorder due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy. We report a case in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis was suspected to be involved in the deteriorating course of mood disorder and discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms linking thyroid autoimmunity with psychopathology. Case presentation A 43-year-old woman, with a history of recurrent depression since the age of 31, developed manic, psychotic, and soft neurological symptoms across the last three years in concomitance with her first diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patient underwent a thorough medical and neurological workup. Circulating thyroperoxidase antibodies were highly elevated but thyroid function was adequately maintained with L-thyroxine substitution. EEG was normal and no other signs of current CNS inflammation were evidenced. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging evidenced several non-active lesions in the white matter from both hemispheres, suggestive of a non-specific past vasculitis. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography showed cortical perfusion asymmetry particularly between frontal lobes. Conclusion We hypothesize that abnormalities in cortical perfusion might represent a pathogenic link between thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders, and that the rare cases of severe Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with mood disorder might be only the tip of an iceberg. PMID:18096026

  2. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  3. A genome-wide association study yields five novel thyroid cancer risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sigurdsson, Jon K.; Stefansdottir, Lilja; Jonasson, Jon G.; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Masson, Gisli; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Halldorsson, Gisli H.; Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Sulem, Patrick; Senter, Leigha; He, Huiling; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Ringel, Matthew D.; Aguillo, Esperanza; Panadero, Angeles; Prats, Enrique; Garcia-Castaño, Almudena; De Juan, Ana; Rivera, Fernando; Xu, Li; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Olafsson, Isleifur; Kristvinsson, Hoskuldur; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Jonsson, Thorvaldur; Mayordomo, Jose I.; Plantinga, Theo S.; Hjartarson, Hannes; Hrafnkelsson, Jon; Sturgis, Erich M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Rafnar, Thorunn; de la Chapelle, Albert; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-01-01

    The great majority of thyroid cancers are of the non-medullary type. Here we report findings from a genome-wide association study of non-medullary thyroid cancer, including in total 3,001 patients and 287,550 controls from five study groups of European descent. Our results yield five novel loci (all with Pcombined<3 × 10−8): 1q42.2 (rs12129938 in PCNXL2), 3q26.2 (rs6793295 a missense mutation in LRCC34 near TERC), 5q22.1 (rs73227498 between NREP and EPB41L4A), 10q24.33 (rs7902587 near OBFC1), and two independently associated variants at 15q22.33 (rs2289261 and rs56062135; both in SMAD3). We also confirm recently published association results from a Chinese study of a variant on 5p15.33 (rs2736100 near the TERT gene) and present a stronger association result for a moderately correlated variant (rs10069690; OR=1.20, P=3.2 × 10−7) based on our study of individuals of European ancestry. In combination, these results raise several opportunities for future studies of the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. PMID:28195142

  4. Nodular thyroid disease in children and adolescents: a high incidence of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Smith, M.; Lawrence, A.M.; Jarosz, H.; Paloyan, E.

    1988-07-01

    Over a period of 32 years from 1954 to 1986, 65 patients under the age of 21 years, 52 girls and 13 boys, were operated for nodular thyroids: the overall incidence of carcinoma was 37 per cent. It was 46 per cent in those patients presenting with a solitary nodule. Among the 24 patients with a malignancy, the carcinoma was of the papillary variety in 63 per cent, follicular in 25 per cent and medullary in 12 per cent. Two thirds of the patients had metastatic disease at the time of presentation. All patients with thyroid carcinoma were treated with total thyroidectomy. Other measures included neck dissection and radioactive iodine. When the eight patients with a history of head and neck irradiation and the three patients with medullary carcinoma were excluded, the incidence of carcinoma was 28 per cent. In summary, in spite of the decline in radiation associated cases, the incidence of carcinoma in nodular thyroid disease in the population under 21 years, remains at the relatively high figure of 28 per cent.

  5. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  6. Dual Ectopic Thyroid with Normally Located Thyroid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Choudhury, Bipul; Kaimal Saikia, Uma; Sarma, Dipti; Saikia, Mihir; Dutta Choudhury, Sarojini; Barua, Santanu; Dewri, Swapna

    2011-01-01

    Dual ectopic thyroid is a rare presentation of thyroid ectopia. Only a few cases have been reported in the world literature. Dual ectopic thyroid in the presence of a normally located thyroid is even rarer. We report a case of dual ectopic thyroid in the lingual and submandibular areas in a seventeen-year-old female with hypoplastic thyroid gland in its normal location. The patient presented with a midline swelling at the base of tongue with dysphagia. Thyroid function test revealed primary hypothyroidism. Ultrasonography of the neck showed hypoplastic thyroid in its normal location. A thyroid scan with Technetium-99 m pertechnate showed two intensely hyperfunctioning foci of ectopic thyroid tissue at a higher level in the midline consistent with dual ectopic thyroid, one at the base of tongue and the other in submental region. No uptake was seen in the normal bed. PMID:21765986

  7. Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A primary thyroid adenocarcinoma harboring ETV6–NTRK3 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Dawson, Robert R; Shah, Jatin P; Sherman, Eric J; Tuttle, R Michael; Fagin, James A; Klimstra, David S; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    ETV6–NTRK3 fusion was identified in several cancers including the recently described mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary glands and a minority of papillary thyroid carcinomas. We describe three cases of primary MASC of the thyroid gland and provide a detailed clinical and pathological characterization of the tumor morphology, immunoprofile, and genetic background. Immunohistochemistry for PAX8, TTF-1, thyroglobulin, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, and p63 was used to define the tumor immunophenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6 rearrangement was performed in three, and the next-generation sequencing assay MSK-IMPACT™ (Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) was performed in two cases. Primary MASC of the thyroid occurred in two women and one man, age 47–72 years. All patients presented with high T stage, infiltrative, locally aggressive tumors with extrathyroidal extension. Two cases were associated with well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma. Histologically, they appeared as low-grade tumors, resembling MASC of the salivary glands and labeled positive for mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, p63, weakly positive for PAX8, and negative for TTF-1 and thyroglobulin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed ETV6 rearrangement in all cases. In two tested cases MSK-IMPACT™ confirmed the presence of ETV6–NTRK3 gene fusion. Two patients had at least two local recurrences, one was alive with disease, and one was alive and free of disease after 14 and 17 years, respectively. The third patient was alive and free of disease after 2 years. MASC of the thyroid is histologically, immunophenotypically, and genetically similar to its salivary gland counterpart. Thyroid MASC can be associated with a well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma component, supporting follicular cell origin. Clinically, these carcinomas may show frequent recurrences but are associated

  8. TROP-2 expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma: Potential Diagnostic Utility.

    PubMed

    Simms, Anthony; Jacob, Reuben P; Cohen, Cynthia; Siddiqui, Momin T

    2016-01-01

    TROP-2 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein which is over-expressed in various malignancies, and is related to epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), also called TROP-1, gp40, and KSA. In this study, we evaluated TROP-2 expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and compared it to other thyroid neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions. Immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluation for TROP-2 was performed on 137 thyroid fine needle aspiration (FNA) cell blocks (CB) which included classic PTC (64), follicular variant PTC (FVPTC) (10), anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (AC) (2), medullary carcinoma (MC) (8), follicular neoplasms (FN) (8), Hurthle cell neoplasms (HCN) (9), follicular lesion of uncertain significance (FLUS) (12), and benign thyroid nodule (BTN) (24). IHC for TROP-2 expression was also performed on 331 BTN and malignant tumor tissue sections in tissue microarray (TMA). Membranous staining in >5% of tumor cells was considered positive. TROP-2 stained 61 of 64 PTC CB, 7 of 10 FVPTC CB, and 9 of 12 FLUS CB. All other cases were negative for TROP-2. TROP-2 showed a sensitivity of 95.31% and specificity of 89% for classic PTC in FNA CB. In TMA samples, TROP-2 stained 54 of 60 classic PTC cases and hence showed a high sensitivity and specificity. All BTN in CB and TMA were negative. We conclude that TROP-2 is a highly sensitive and specific IHC marker for identifying classic PTC. TROP-2 may play an important role in diagnosing classic PTC, especially in equivocal cases. This study also identifies a strong role for TROP-2 in separating PTC from BTN.

  9. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  10. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination.

  11. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  12. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  13. Protective effect of angiotensin II-induced increase in nitric oxide in the renal medullary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Cowley, A W

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of intravenous infusion of subpressor doses of angiotensin (Ang II) on renal medullary blood flow (MBF), medullary partial oxygen pressure (PO2), and nitric oxide (NO) concentration under normal conditions and during reduction of the medullary nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in anesthetized rats. With laser Doppler flowmetry and polarographic measurement of PO2 with microelectrodes, Ang II (5 ng/kg per minute) did not alter renal cortical and medullary blood flows or medullary PO2. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was infused into the renal medullary interstitial space at a dose of 1.4 microg/kg per minute, a dose that did not significantly alter basal levels of MBF or PO2. Intravenous infusion of Ang II at the same dose in the presence of L-NAME decreased MBF by 23% and medullary PO2 by 28%, but it had no effect on cortical blood flow or arterial blood pressure. An in vivo microdialysis-oxyhemoglobin NO trapping technique was used in other rats to determine tissue NO concentrations using the same protocol. Ang II infusion increased tissue NO concentrations by 85% in the renal cortex and 150% in the renal medulla. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of L-NAME (1.4 microg/kg per minute) reduced medullary NO concentrations and substantially blocked Ang II-induced increases in NO concentrations in the renal medulla, but not in the renal cortex. Tissue slices of the renal cortex and medulla were studied to determine the effects of Ang II and L-NAME on the nitrite/nitrate production. Ang II stimulated the nitrite/nitrate production predominately in the renal medulla, which was significantly attenuated by L-NAME. We conclude that small elevations of circulating Ang II levels increase medullary NO production and concentrations, which plays an important role in buffering the vasoconstrictor effects of this peptide and in maintaining a constancy of MBF.

  14. Total Thyroidectomy for Benign Thyroid Diseases: What is the Price to be Paid?

    PubMed Central

    Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa; Patanki, Adithya Malolan; Ishwar, Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Total thyroidectomy has been used to treat patients with malignant thyroid disease. But for patients with benign thyroid disease, the safety and efficacy of total thyroidectomy is a matter of debate. Subtotal thyroidectomy that was previously the treatment of choice for benign thyroid disease has been associated with high recurrence rates. The risk of permanent complications is greatly increased in patients who undergo surgery for recurrence of benign thyroid disease. Total thyroidectomy is an operation that can be safely performed, with low incidence of permanent complications, which allows one to broaden its indications in various benign thyroid diseases, thus avoiding future recurrences and reoperations. Aim To assess the benefits of total thyroidectomy for benign thyroid diseases. Materials and Methods This randomized prospective study was conducted between Feb 2013 and Nov 2014 in the Department of General Surgery at Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute. It included 116 patients undergoing total thyroidectomy procedure for benign thyroid disease. All cases were followed-up for a period of 6 months for incidence of RLN palsy, hypoparathyroidism, disease recurrence and number of incidental malignancies detected on postoperative histological analyses of the thyroid specimens. Results Most of the patients were in the third decade of their lives. The female to male ratio was 6.7:1. Total thyroidectomy was done for 116 benign thyroid diseases with multinodular goiter as the most common diagnosis. The incidence of postoperative hypocalcaemia was 16.37% (however, only 1 patient developed permanent hypocalcaemia) and that of wound infection was 2.58% and seroma formation was 2.58%. None of the patients included in this study had haematoma formation or RLN paralysis. An incidental malignancy was identified in 11.20% patients. Conclusion Total thyroidectomy shows benefits in eradicating multinodular goiter, alleviating Grave’s opthalmopathy

  15. Medullary infarcts may cause ipsilateral masseter reflex abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thömke, Frank; Marx, Jürgen J; Cruccu, Giorgio; Stoeter, Peter; Hopf, Hanns C

    2007-10-01

    There is a suprasegmental influence on the masseter reflex (MassR) in animals, which is mediated via the fifth nerve spinal nucleus (5SpN). Corresponding data in humans are lacking. Out of 268 prospectively recruited patients with clinical signs of acute brainstem infarctions, we identified 38 with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented unilateral infarcts caudal to the levels of the fifth nerve motor and main sensory nuclei. All had biplanar T2- and echo planar diffusion-weighted MRI and MassR testing. Five patients (13%) had ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. In all, the infarcts involved the region of the 5SpN. Patients with medullary infarcts involving the region of the 5SpN may thus have ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. This possibly represents an interruption of an excitatory projection mediated via the 5SpN to masseter motoneurons in the fifth nerve motor nucleus. MassR abnormalities with medullary lesions restrict the topodiagnostic value of the MassR.

  16. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  17. Role of renal medullary adenosine in the control of blood flow and sodium excretion.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Nithipatikom, K; Li, P L; Cowley, A W

    1999-03-01

    This study determined the levels of adenosine in the renal medullary interstitium using microdialysis and fluorescence HPLC techniques and examined the role of endogenous adenosine in the control of medullary blood flow and sodium excretion by infusing the specific adenosine receptor antagonists or agonists into the renal medulla of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Renal cortical and medullary blood flows were measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Analysis of microdialyzed samples showed that the adenosine concentration in the renal medullary interstitial dialysate averaged 212 +/- 5.2 nM, which was significantly higher than 55.6 +/- 5.3 nM in the renal cortex (n = 9). Renal medullary interstitial infusion of a selective A1 antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 300 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 8), did not alter renal blood flows, but increased urine flow by 37% and sodium excretion by 42%. In contrast, renal medullary infusion of the selective A2 receptor blocker 3, 7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX; 150 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 9) decreased outer medullary blood flow (OMBF) by 28%, inner medullary blood flows (IMBF) by 21%, and sodium excretion by 35%. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of adenosine produced a dose-dependent increase in OMBF, IMBF, urine flow, and sodium excretion at doses from 3 to 300 pmol. kg-1. min-1 (n = 7). These effects of adenosine were markedly attenuated by the pretreatment of DMPX, but unaltered by DPCPX. Infusion of a selective A3 receptor agonist, N6-benzyl-5'-(N-ethylcarbonxamido)adenosine (300 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 6) into the renal medulla had no effect on medullary blood flows or renal function. Glomerular filtration rate and arterial pressure were not changed by medullary infusion of any drugs. Our results indicate that endogenous medullary adenosine at physiological concentrations serves to dilate medullary vessels via A2 receptors, resulting in a natriuretic response that overrides the tubular A1 receptor

  18. High prevalence of mutations of the p53 gene in poorly differentiated human thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Fagin, J A; Matsuo, K; Karmakar, A; Chen, D L; Tang, S H; Koeffler, H P

    1993-01-01

    The development and progression of thyroid tumors is signaled by phenotype-specific mutations of genes involved in growth control. Molecular events associated with undifferentiated thyroid cancer are not known. We examined normal, benign, and malignant thyroid tissue for structural abnormalities of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphisms of PCR-amplified DNA, using primers bracketing the known hot spots on either exons 5, 6, 7, or 8. The prevalence of mutations was as follows: normal thyroid 0/6; follicular adenomas 0/31; papillary carcinomas 0/37; medullary carcinomas 0/2; follicular carcinomas 1/11; anaplastic carcinomas 5/6; thyroid carcinoma cell lines 3/4. Positive cases were confirmed by direct sequencing of the PCR products. All five anaplastic carcinoma tissues and the anaplastic carcinoma cell line ARO had G:C to A:T transitions leading to an Arg to His substitution at codon 273. In both tumors and cell lines, examples of heterozygous and homozygous p53 mutations were identified. The only thyroid carcinoma cell line in which p53 mutations were not detected in exons 5-8 had markedly decreased p53 mRNA levels, suggesting the presence of a structural abnormality of either p53 itself or of some factor controlling its expression. The presence of p53 mutations almost exclusively in poorly differentiated thyroid tumors and thyroid cancer cell lines suggests that inactivation of p53 may confer these neoplasms with aggressive properties, and further loss of differentiated function. Images PMID:8423216

  19. Adipocytokines in Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan, Berna İmge; Sahin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Adipocytokines are important mediators of interorgan crosstalk in metabolic regulation. Thyroid diseases have effects on metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of these effects is not clear. Recently, there are several reports suggesting this interrelation between adipocytokines and thyroid dysfunction. In this review, we summarize this relation according to the literature. PMID:24049662

  20. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating ... sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ...

  1. Thyroid imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.; Chen, J.J.S.

    1987-06-01

    This is the second in a series of Continuing Education articles related to functional/quantitative imaging techniques. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the clinical applications of thyroid imaging; 2) understand the relationship of related thyroid tests; and 3) recognize the pitfalls and problems associated with this procedure.

  2. [Thyroid and radiation].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Namba, H; Nagataki, S

    1993-11-20

    The topic "Thyroid and Radiation" is both an old and a new area to be solved by human beings. The thyroid is an organ that is usually susceptible to exposure to ionizing radiation, both by virtue of its ability to concentrate radioiodine (internal radiation) and by routine medical examination: Chest X-ray, Dental X-ray, X-irradiation of cervical lymphnodes etc. (external radiation). Iodine-131 is widely used for the therapy of Graves' disease and thyroid cancers, of which the disadvantage is radiation-induced hypothyroidism but not complications of thyroid tumor. The thyroid gland is comparatively radioresistant, however, the data obtained from Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Marshall islands indicates a high incidence of external radiation-induced thyroid tumors as well as hypothyroidism. The different biological effects of internal and external radiation remains to be further clarified. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrate the increased number of thyroid cancer in children around Chernobyl in Belarus. In this review, we would like to introduce the effect of radiation on the thyroid gland at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Furthermore the clinical usefulness of iodine-131, including the safety-control for radiation exposure will be discussed.

  3. [Ultrasound of the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active versus inactive nodes, and in particular benign versus malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also show promising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  4. [Ultrasound of the Thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active vs. inactive nodes, and in particular benign vs. malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also showpromising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fineneedle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  5. Thyroid associated orbitopathy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Gupta, Mani; Mehta, Vinod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) is a self-limiting auto-immune condition usually associated with Grave's disease. It is characterised by ocular pain, eyelid swelling, chemosis, proptosis and keratopathy. As the mechanism for ophthamoplegia and optic neuropathy is the orbital swelling leading to mechanical restriction of ocular muscles and compression of optic nerve, one expects proptosis rather than ptosis in TAO. We describe a case of a young adult woman who presented with acute onset restriction of movement along with partial ptosis and severe diminution of vision in left eye. The MRI of orbit revealed significant swelling of recti along with signal alteration consistent with TAO. The radio-isotope thyroid scan revealed thyroiditis, and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody was significantly high; hence, the diagnosis of Hashimoto thyroiditis was considered. A course of intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral steroid was administered, which produced marked improvement in vision and extraocular movement. PMID:23737589

  6. The EORTC module for quality of life in patients with thyroid cancer: phase III.

    PubMed

    Singer, Susanne; Jordan, Susan; Locati, Laura D; Pinto, Monica; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Araujo, Claudia; Hammerlid, Eva; Vidhubala, E; Husson, Olga; Kiyota, Naomi; Brannan, Christine; Salem, Dina; Gamper, Eva; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Ioannidis, Georgios; Andry, Guy; Inhestern, Johanna; Gregoire, Vincent; Licitra, Lisa

    2017-02-21

    We pilot-tested a questionnaire measuring health related quality of life (QoL) in thyroid cancer patients to be used with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. A provisional questionnaire with 47 items was administered to patients treated for thyroid cancer within the last 2 years. Patients were interviewed about time and help needed to complete the questionnaire and whether they found the items understandable, confusing, or annoying. Items were kept in the questionnaire if they fulfilled pre-defined criteria: relevant to the patients, easy to understand, not confusing, few missing values, neither floor nor ceiling effects, and high variance. A total of 182 thyroid cancer patients in 15 countries participated (n=115 with papillary, n=31 with follicular, n=22 with medullary, n=6 with anaplastic, and n=8 with other types of thyroid cancer). Sixty-six percent of the patients needed 15 minutes or less to complete the questionnaire. Of the 47 items, 31 fulfilled the predefined criteria and were kept unchanged, 14 were removed, 2 were changed. Shoulder dysfunction was mentioned by 5 patients as missing and an item covering this issue was added. We conclude that the EORTC quality of life module for thyroid cancer (EORTC QLQ-THY34) is ready for the final validation phase IV.

  7. Expression of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein in Neoplastic Thyroid Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sun A; Kim, Won Gu; Jeon, Min Ji; Han, Ji Min; Sung, Tae Yon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Bae; Hong, Suck Joon; Shong, Young Kee; Gong, Gyungyub

    2011-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is associated with tumor genesis, growth, progression and metastasis, and acts by blocking caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the expression patterns of XIAP in various neoplastic thyroid disorders and determine the association between XIAP expression and clinicopathologic factors. Expression of XIAP was evaluated with immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal anti-XIAP in 164 specimens of conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and 53 specimens of other malignant or benign thyroid tumors. XIAP positivity was observed in 128 (78%) of the 164 conventional PTC specimens. Positive rates of XIAP expression in follicular variant PTC, follicular, medullary, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma specimens were 20%, 25%, 38%, 67%, and 38%, respectively. Six nodular hyperplasia specimens were negative and 1 of 7 follicular adenomas (8%) was positive for XIAP. Lateral neck lymph node metastases were more frequent in patients negative for XIAP expression (P = 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining for XIAP as a novel molecular marker may thus be helpful in the differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Moreover, high XIAP expression in conventional PTC is strongly associated with reduced risk of lateral neck lymph node metastasis. PMID:21935275

  8. Radioactive Iodine Therapy of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Redesigning the Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Stanley J.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy has evolved over the past 70 years from treatment of known metastatic thyroid carcinoma to include adjuvant use to decrease the incidence of recurrent disease and to ablation of normal remnant tissue following thyroidectomy, even for minimal tumor involvement. Advances in laboratory testing, development of drugs useful in radioiodine treatment, as well as advances in radiation detection and imaging instrumentation, have progressively improved the utility of radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Guidelines have proliferated and they have become more detailed and complex. This trend is likely to continue as the science and technology involved increases in sophistication and efficacy. PMID:28117291

  9. Medullary Sponge Kidney and Urinary Calculi Aeromedical Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Cherian, Sebastian F.; Barr, Yael R.; Stocco, Amber

    2008-01-01

    Medullary Sponge Kidney (MSK) is a benign disorder associated with renal stones in 60% of patients. Patients frequently have episodic painless hematuria but are otherwise asymptomatic unless renal calculi or infections complicate the disease. Nephrolithiasis is a relative, but frequently enforced, contraindication to space or other high performance flight. Two case reports of asymptomatic NASA flight crew with MSK and three cases of military aviators diagnosed with MSK are reviewed, all cases resulted in waiver and return to flight status after treatment and a vigorous follow up and prophylaxis protocol. MSK in aviation and space flight necessitates a highly case-by-case dependent evaluation and treatment process to rule out other potential confounding factors that might also contribute to stone formation and in order to re-qualify the aviator for flight duties.

  10. Pain and neuroma formation in Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Hamburger, H L

    1986-01-01

    We report a patient with a Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome in which pain was a prominent feature. This led to substitution of the original and correct diagnosis by that of a thalamic syndrome for which a prefrontal leucotomy was performed. The patient died some years later from a myocardial infarction and autopsy was performed. In the dorsolateral part of the medulla oblongata a cavity was found in which aberrant nerve fibres with neuroma-like formations could be seen. These fibres coursed along blood vessels, and penetrated from the surface of the medulla oblongata. On the base of the clinico-pathological correlations, it is conjectured that destruction of the lateral reticular formation cannot be the sole cause of the severe pain.

  11. [Biomechanical analysis of the medullary bone nail and its locking].

    PubMed

    Teubner, E

    1985-07-01

    By mechanical definition an intramedullary nail is not a nail but rather a bendable feather, subject to longitudinal tension and to a lesser degree to transverse pressure. Reaming the medullary canal is necessary for centralization of the nail as well as to increase the area of contact with the bone. However, this procedure is detrimental to the bone metabolism and reduces its elasticity against torsional forces. The dynamic locking nail-system is more biologic than conventional nailing and it reduces rotatory instability with the help of additional components, such as transverse screws. Only static locking allows true static weight bearing with crutches, but not dynamic mobilisation. Nails with conventional strength and in leaf of trefoil formation are superior to other designs. However, an improved angle in the proximal locking is suggested, as this would allow for a three to four times greater weight bearing.

  12. Lateral medullary stroke in patient with granulomatous polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Taraschenko, Olga D; Amory, Colum F; Waldman, Jonathan; Hanspal, Era K; Bernardini, Gary L

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous polyangiitis (GPA), also known as Wegener granulomatosis, is a systemic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis that infrequently affects the central nervous system. We report a 41-year-old man with lateral medullary infarction who developed rapidly progressive renal failure. He was diagnosed with GPA based on positive serum c-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies and demonstration of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis on kidney biopsy. He was treated with Coumadin, pulse steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. He had resolution of his neurologic deficits and improvement in renal function. This case report highlights the importance to consider GPA vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of stroke in patients with development of acute kidney injury.

  13. Sonography of Normal and Abnormal Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands.

    PubMed

    Andrioli, Massimiliano; Valcavi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) represents the most sensitive and efficient method for the evaluation of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. Infectious and autoimmune thyroiditis are common diseases, usually diagnosed and followed up by clinical examination and laboratory analyses. Nevertheless, US plays an important role in confirming diagnoses, predicting outcomes and, in autoimmune hyperthyroidism, in titrating therapy. Conversely, in nodular thyroid disease US is the imaging method of choice for the characterization and surveillance of lesions. It provides consistent clues in predicting the risk of malignancy, thus directing patient referral for fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy. Suspicious US features generally include marked hypoechogenicity, a shape taller than it is wide, ill-defined or irregular borders, microcalcifications and hardness at elastographic evaluation. Finally, the role of US in thyroid cancer is to evaluate extension beyond the thyroid capsule and to assess nodal metastases or tumor recurrence. The main application of US in parathyroid diseases is represented by primary hyperparathyroidism. In this condition, US plays a role after biochemical diagnosis, and it should always be strictly performed for localization purposes. In both thyroidal and parathyroid diseases, US is recommended as a guide in FNA biopsies.

  14. Synchronous papillary thyroid carcinoma and breast ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jinjing; Lei, Jianyong; Jiang, Ke; Li, Zhihui; Gong, Rixiang; Zhu, Jingqiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The incidences of both thyroid cancer and breast cancer have been rising in recent years; however, it is very rare to find a single person with both of these cancers. Only a few cases of synchronous thyroid and breast cancer have been published, and even fewer cases have been reported in older patients (>60 years). Case summary: The current study presents a case of synchronous papillary thyroid carcinoma and breast ductal carcinoma in an elderly patient. The patient first underwent a mastectomy and axillary lymphadenectomy in our department, followed by a total thyroidectomy and lymphadenectomy of the left lateral region of the neck 1 month later. Postoperative pathological examination identified invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. Over almost half a year of follow-up, the patient has exhibited no evidence of recurrence or metastasis, as demonstrated by careful ultrasound examinations. Herein, we not only report this case but also present a systematic review of the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of synchronous breast and thyroid cancer. Conclusion: Although synchronous primary tumors of the thyroid and breast are very rare, they remain a possibility; therefore, more attention should be paid to these cases. PMID:28207532

  15. Thyroid-Related Protein Expression in the Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Do Joon; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Radioiodine whole body scan (WBS), related to sodium iodide symporter (NIS) function, is widely used to detect recurrence/metastasis in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer. However, the normal thymic uptake of radioiodine has occasionally been observed in young patients. We evaluated the expression of thyroid-related genes and proteins in the human thymus. Thymic tissues were obtained from 22 patients with thyroid cancer patients of all ages. The expression of NIS, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), thyroperoxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) was investigated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. NIS and TSHR were expressed in 18 (81.8%) and 19 samples (86.4%), respectively, whereas TPO was expressed in five samples (22.7%). Three thyroid-related proteins were localized to Hassall's corpuscles and thymocytes. In contrast, Tg was detected in a single patient (4.5%) localized to vascular endothelial cells. The expression of thyroid-related proteins was not increased in young thymic tissues compared to that in old thymic tissues. In conclusion, the expression of NIS and TSHR was detected in the majority of normal thymus samples, whereas that of TPO was detected less frequently, and that of Tg was detected rarely. The increased thymic uptake of radioiodine in young patients is not due to the increased expression of NIS. PMID:28386277

  16. Dual malignancy in adolescence: A rare case report of metachronous papillary carcinoma of thyroid following dysgerminoma of ovary

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Suvadip; Desai, Sanjay M.; Mehta, Dharmendra Y.; Somanath, Shreyas

    2016-01-01

    Dual malignancy is rare in adolescents. Dual malignancy with the second malignancy of thyroid is rare. No association has been reported between dysgerminoma of ovary and carcinoma thyroid in medical literature. Despite a thorough PubMed search (key words — Papillary carcinoma of thyroid, metachronous, dysgerminoma ovary), we were unable to find a previous reported case of metachronous papillary carcinoma of thyroid (PTC) following dysgerminoma of the ovary. After surgery, the patient is being regularly followed up for recurrence/development of new primary. We report this unusual and rare case in a 17-year-old female patient. PMID:27904567

  17. Use of thyroid scintigraphy and pituitary immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of spontaneous hypothyroidism in a mature cat.

    PubMed

    Blois, Shauna L; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Mitchell, Colleen; Yu, Anthony; Stoewen, Debbie; Lillie, Brandon N; Kiupel, Matti

    2010-02-01

    A 12-year old, castrated male domestic shorthair cat presented with a 2-year history of poor hair coat, seborrhea, generalized pruritus and otitis externa. Low circulating concentrations of total serum thyroxine (TT(4)) and free thyroxine (fT(4)) and an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone concentration supported a diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism. Thyroid scintigraphy did not show uptake of radioactive technetium in the thyroid area. Treatment with levothyroxine resulted in clinical improvement. Recurrence of dermatitis 8 months after onset of treatment resulted in euthanasia of the cat. On post-mortem examination, thyroid tissue was not identified on gross or histological examination. Pituitary immunohistochemistry identified hyperplasia of chromophobe cells.

  18. Bridging hypoxia, inflammation and estrogen receptors in thyroid cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Tafani, Marco; De Santis, Elena; Coppola, Luigi; Perrone, Giulietta A; Carnevale, Ilaria; Russo, Andrea; Pucci, Bruna; Carpi, Angelo; Bizzarri, Mariano; Russo, Matteo A

    2014-02-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine-related cancer with a higher incidence in women than in men. Thyroid tumors are classified on the basis of their histopathology as papillary, follicular, medullary, and undifferentiated or anaplastic. Epidemiological and in vitro or in vivo studies have suggested a correlation between incidence of thyroid malignancies and hormones. In particular, growing evidence indicates a role of estrogens and estrogen receptors (ERs) in thyroid tumorigenesis, reprogramming and progression. In this scenario, estrogens are hypothesized to contribute to the observed female predominance of thyroid cancer in reproductive years. However, the precise contribution of estrogens in thyroid proliferative disease initiation and progression is not well understood. HIF-1α and NF-κB are two transcription factors very frequently activated in tumors and involved in tumor growth, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. In fact, HIF-1α and NF-κB together regulate transcription of over a thousand genes that, in turn, control vital cellular processes such as adaptation to the hypoxia, metabolic and differentiation reprogramming, inflammatory-reparative response, extracellular matrix digestion, migration and invasion, adhesion, etc. Because of this wide involvement, they could control in an integrated manner the origin of the malignant phenotype. Interestingly, hypoxia and inflammation have been sequentially bridged in tumors by the discovery that alarmin receptors genes such as RAGE, P2X7 and some TLRs are activated by HIF-1α; and that, in turn, alarmin receptors strongly activate NF-κB and proinflammatory gene expression, evidencing all the hallmarks of the malignant phenotype. Recently, a large number of drugs have been identified that inhibit one or both transcription factors with promising results in terms of controlling tumor progression. In addition, many of these inhibitors are natural compounds or off-label drugs already used to cure other

  19. Operative management of locally advanced, differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laura Y.; Nixon, Iain J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Palmer, Frank L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of differentiated thyroid cancer tends to present with limited locoregional disease, leading to excellent long-term survival after operative treatment. Even patients with advanced local disease may survive for long periods with appropriate treatment. The aim of this study is to present our institutional experience of the management of locally advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and to analyze factors predictive of outcome. Methods We reviewed our institutional database of 3,664 previously untreated patients with differentiated thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010. A total of 153 patients had tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule that invaded the subcutaneous soft tissues, recurrent laryngeal nerve, larynx, trachea, or esophagus. Details on extent of operation and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Disease-specific survival and locoregional recurrence-free probability were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were determined by multivariate analysis. Results The median age of the 153 patients with tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule was 55 years (range 11–91 years). Eighty-nine patients (58.2%) were female. Twenty-three patients (15.0%) were staged as M1 at presentation, and 122 (79.7%) had pathologically involved lymph nodes. The most common site of extrathyroidal extension was the recurrent laryngeal nerve (51.0%) followed by the trachea (46.4%) and esophagus (39.2%). Sixty-three patients (41%) required resection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve due to tumor involvement. After surgery, 20 patients (13.0%) had gross residual disease (R2), 63 (41.2%) had a positive margin of resection (R1), and 70 (45.8%) had complete resection with negative margins (R0). With a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 5-year, disease-specific survival, when stratified by R0/R1/R2 resection, was 94.4%, 87.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P = .030). The data do not demonstrate a statistical difference in survival

  20. Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to the nose: report and review of cutaneous metastases of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma typically appears in local lymph nodes. Skin metastases are rare. Purpose: A man with progressive metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma who developed a cutaneous metastasis on his nose is described. The clinical manifestations of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to skin are reviewed. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: basal, cancer, carcinoma, cell, cutaneous, kinase, inhibitor, metastases, nose, papillary, rearranged during transfection, receptor, RET, thyroid, tyrosine, vandetanib. Results: Pathologic changes observed on the biopsy of the man’s nose lesion were similar to those of his original cancer. Genomic evaluation of the tumor revealed an aberration involving the rearranged during transfection (RET) receptor tyrosine kinase. The residual tumor was excised. Treatment with vandetanib, a RET inhibitor was initiated; his metastatic disease has been stable, without symptoms or recurrent cutaneous metastasis, for 2 years following the discovery of his metastatic nose tumor. Conclusions: Papillary thyroid carcinoma with skin metastases is rare. Nodules usually appear on the scalp or neck; the thyroidectomy scar is also a common site. Metastatic tumor, albeit infrequently, can present as a nose lesion. The prognosis for patients with cutaneous metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma is poor. However, with the ability to test the tumor for genomic aberrations, molecular targeted therapies—such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors—may provide extended survival in these individuals. PMID:26693082

  1. Thyroid Ultrasound: State of the Art Part 1 - Thyroid Ultrasound reporting and Diffuse Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Manjiri; Barr, Richard; Bojunga, Jörg; Cantisani, Vito; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Cosgrove, David; Cui, Xin Wu; Dong, Yi; Fenner, Franziska; Radzina, Maija; Vinayak, Sudhir; Xu, Jun Mei; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2017-01-31

    Accurate differentiation of focal thyroid nodules (FTL) and thyroid abnormalities is pivotal for proper diagnostic and therapeutic work-up. In these two part articles, the role of ultrasound techniques in the characterization of FTL and evaluation of diffuse thyroid diseases is described to expand on the recently published World Federation in Ultrasound and Medicine (WFUMB) thyroid elastography guidelines and review how this guideline fits into a complete thyroid ultrasound exam.

  2. RET oncogene in MEN2, MEN2B, MTC and other forms of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2008-04-01

    Hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is caused by specific autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. MTC represents a promising model for targeted cancer therapy, as the oncogenic event responsible for initiating malignancy has been well characterized. The RET proto-oncogene has become the target for molecularly designed drug therapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting activated RET are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with MTC. This review will provide a brief overview of MTC and the associated RET oncogenic mutations, and will summarize the therapies designed to strategically interfere with the pathologic activation of the RET oncogene.

  3. Dynamical model for thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni Lamooki, Gholam Reza; Shirazi, Amir H.; Mani, Ali R.

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid's main chemical reactions are employed to develop a mathematical model. The presented model is based on differential equations where their dynamics reflects many aspects of thyroid's behavior. Our main focus here is the well known, but not well understood, phenomenon so called as Wolff-Chaikoff effect. It is shown that the inhibitory effect of intake iodide on the rate of one single enzyme causes a similar effect as Wolff-Chaikoff. Besides this issue, the presented model is capable of revealing other complex phenomena of thyroid hormones homeostasis.

  4. Transoral robotic thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clark, James H.; Kim, Hoon Yub

    2015-01-01

    There is currently significant demand for minimally invasive thyroid surgery; however the majority of proposed surgical approaches necessitate a compromise between minimal tissue dissection with a visible cervical scar or extensive tissue dissection with a remote, hidden scar. The development of transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery however provides an approach which is truly minimally invasive, as it conceals the incision within the oral cavity without significantly increasing the amount of required dissection. The transoral endoscopic approach however presents multiple technical challenges, which could be overcome with the incorporation of a robotic operating system. This manuscript summarizes the literature on the feasibility and current clinical experience with transoral robotic thyroid surgery. PMID:26425456

  5. TSH (Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of a thyroid disorder , including hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism . TSH is produced by the pituitary gland , a ... thyroid Monitor thyroid replacement therapy in people with hypothyroidism Monitor anti-thyroid treatment in people with hyperthyroidism ...

  6. Check Your Neck for Thyroid Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Awareness Month. "The number of cases of thyroid cancer is rising, and while in most cases the ... the American Thyroid Association. "While in most patients thyroid cancer develops without signs or symptoms, patients who have ...

  7. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Abnormal results may mean: Thyroid disease such as goiter or thyroiditis Noncancerous tumors Thyroid cancer ... Alexander EA, Hay ID. Nontoxic diffuse and nodular goiter and thyroid neoplasia. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen ...

  8. The medullary pyramid index: an objective assessment of prominence in renal transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Fried, A M; Woodring, J H; Loh, F K; Lucas, B A; Kryscio, R J

    1983-12-01

    Prominence of the medullary pyramids at sonography has been considered a sign of renal transplant rejection. A search of the literature reveals no previously published objective assessment of this phenomenon. Medullary pyramids of 67 normal kidneys, 53 nonrejecting transplanted kidneys, and 71 transplanted kidneys in rejection were measured. The area of the pyramid was related to the thickness of the overlying renal cortex by a "medullary pyramid index" (MPI): MPI (formula; see text) The median MPI was 4.17 for normal kidneys, 6.0 for nonrejecting transplanted kidneys, and 7.50 for transplanted kidneys in rejection. The results are significantly different (P = 0.0001) for all possible pairs. Overlap between rejection and nonrejection distributions is, however, considerable, rendering the discriminatory value of an individual observation quite low (0.69). Prominence of the medullary pyramids is therefore of very limited predictive value in the determination of transplant rejection in an individual patient.

  9. Fenestration of the superior medullary velum as treatment for a trapped fourth ventricle: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Salter, George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2004-03-01

    We developed a novel approach for fenestration of the trapped fourth ventricle utilizing the superior medullary velum (valve of Vieussens). Trapped fourth ventricles, which are seen often in the pediatric hydrocephalic population, are troublesome entities surgically. A right burr hole was carried out in 10 adult cadavers with no gross intracranial pathology and the superior medullary velum was fenestrated to the quadrigeminal cistern with the aid of an endoscope. This technique was carried out easily in all cadaveric specimens. With endoscopy, no vascular insult was appreciated either before or after fenestration of the superior medullary velum. These preliminary findings demonstrate that fenestration of the superior medullary velum may provide a good alternative to the present therapy of shunting trapped fourth ventricles, a therapy wrought with complications.

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation leads to transient depletion of the mouse thymic medulla and persistent abnormalities among medullary stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.; Gandour, D.; Strober, S.; Weissman, I.

    1988-05-15

    Mice given multiple doses of sublethal irradiation to both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid tissues showed major transient, and some persistent disruptions in general thymic architecture and in thymic stromal components. At 2 wk after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), the thymus lacked identifiable medullary regions by immunohistochemical analyses. Medullary stromal cells expression MHC Ag or a medullary epithelial cell Ag, as well as medullary macrophages, were undetectable. Instead, the processes of cortical epithelial cells were observed throughout the entire thymus. Strikingly, thymocyte subsets with mature phenotypes (CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+) were present in the apparent absence of a medulla. This early, gross effect was rapidly reversed such that by 1 to 2 mo after TLI, medullary areas with MHC Ag-positive cells were evident. However, abnormalities in a subset of medullary stromal cells appeared to be more persistent. Medullary epithelial cells, identified by the MD1 mAb, were greatly reduced in number and abnormally organized for at least 4 mo after TLI. In addition, macrophages containing endogenous peroxidase activity, normally abundant in medullary regions, were undetectable at all times examined after TLI. Therefore, this irradiation regimen induced both transient and long term effects in the thymus, primarily in medullary regions. These results suggest that TLI may be used as an experimental tool for studying the impact of selective depletion of medullary stromal cells on the development of specific T cell functions.

  11. Aspergillus thyroiditis in a renal transplant recipient mimicking subacute thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Nar, A; Ozbek, O; Turkmen, K; Erekul, S; Turk, S

    2011-04-01

    Fungal pathogens are increasingly encountered after renal transplantation. Aspergillus causes significant morbidity and mortality in transplant patients. Fungal thyroiditis is a rare occurrence owing to unique features of the thyroid gland. Most cases are caused by Aspergillus species and have been described in immunocompromised patients. Presentation may be identical with that of subacute thyroiditis, in which hyperthyroidism features and painful thyroid are the prominent findings. Diagnosis can be ascertained by fine-needle aspiration of thyroid showing branching hyphae of Aspergillus. We describe a renal transplant patient who developed Aspergillus thyroiditis as part of a disseminated infection successfully treated with voriconazole.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ecthyma gangrenosum in a woman with recurrent Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng-Yao; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Yu, Zuo-Zhong; Li, Zhao-Jun; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2014-04-01

    A 35-year-old woman with postoperative recurrent Graves' disease presented with a 5-day history of a red swelling on the right cheek associated with 4 days of remittent hyperpyrexia. Investigations revealed fever, a gangrenous ulcer on the right cheek, submandibular lymphadenopathy, and thyroid gland enlargement. Her white blood cell count, immunoglobulins, and lymphocyte subsets were unremarkable. Thyroid function tests showed low thyroid-stimulating hormone, high free thyroxine, and elevated radioactive iodine uptake. Repeated pus cultures grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but blood cultures were negative. An ill-demarcated erythematous plaque occurred on the right leg on hospital day 3. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics with topical gentamicin, recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor, and radioiodine therapy with anti-thyroid drugs. The ulcer healed leaving a depressed scar at 35 days after discharge. This patient may represent the first case of P. aeruginosa ecthyma gangrenosum and cellulitis in postoperative recurrent Graves' disease.

  13. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  14. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration.

  15. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence. Because of its uncommon occurrence, randomized trials have not been applied to test best-care options in children. Even in adults that have a 10-fold or higher incidence of thyroid cancer than children, few prospective trials have been executed to compare treatment approaches. We recognize that treatment recommendations have changed over the past few decades and will continue to do so. Respecting the aggressiveness of pediatric thyroid cancer, high recurrence rates, and the problems associated with decades of long-term follow-up, a premium should be placed on treatments that minimize risk of recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments and facilitate follow-up. We recommend that total thyroidectomy and central compartment lymph node dissection is the surgical procedure of choice for children with DTC if it can be performed by a high-volume thyroid surgeon. We recommend radioactive iodine therapy for remnant ablation or residual disease for most children with DTC. We recommend long-term follow-up because disease can recur decades after initial diagnosis and therapy. Considering the complexity of DTC management and the potential complications associated with therapy, it is essential that pediatric DTC be managed by physicians with expertise in this area. PMID:21880704

  16. Incidental and non-incidental thyroid microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KALISZEWSKI, KRZYSZTOF; WOJTCZAK, BEATA; STRUTYŃSKA-KARPIŃSKA, MARTA; ŁUKIEŃCZUK, TADEUSZ; FORKASIEWICZ, ZDZISŁAW; DOMOSŁAWSKI, PAWEŁ

    2016-01-01

    There is no clear therapeutic approach for thyroid microcarcinoma (TMC). This may be as a consequence of recent observations that have reported biologically different types of TMC, which should be treated differently. The objective of the present study was to compare incidental TMC (ITMC) and non-incidental TMC (NITMC) in order to assess the differences in the incidence, diagnostic results, clinicopathological characteristics and surgical treatment. The study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 3,218 patients consecutively admitted and surgically treated in a single institution due to thyroid pathology. A total of 246 (7.64%) patients presented with a thyroid malignancy, and 97 (39.43%) of these individuals were diagnosed with TMC; 37 (38.14%) patients exhibited ITMC and 60 (61.86%) exhibited NITMC. All 37 (100.00%) patients with ITMC exhibited a papillary type of cancer. In the NITMC group, 1 (1.67%) patient presented with follicular microcarcinoma, 1 (1.67%) individual with papillary- and follicular-type microcarcinoma, 1 (1.67%) individual with medullary microcarcinoma, and the remaining 57 (95.00%) patients presented with papillary microcarcinoma. The number of younger patients (<45 years old) was higher in the NITMC group, but this difference was not significant (P=0.205). In all patients with ITMC, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy did not reveal malignant processes. In the NITMC group, the number of larger tumors (>5 mm) was significantly higher compared with that in the ITMC group (P<0.001). ITMC was significantly associated with multinodular goiter (MNG) (P<0.001). Amongst the NITMC group, 18.33% of patients presented with cervical lymph node involvement (P<0.001). Overall, the incidence of TMC is high, and consists of ITMC and NITMC, although the prevalence of NITMC is higher than that of ITMC. The majority of ITMCs and NITMCs are composed of a papillary type of cancer. The majority of ITMCs have dimensions ≤5 mm in diameter and

  17. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  18. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... some noncancerous childhood conditions Radiation exposure from nuclear plant disasters Radiation given through a vein (through an IV) during medical tests and treatments does not increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer.

  19. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... common than normal in children who lived near Chernobyl, the site of a 1986 nuclear plant accident ... exposure was much, much lower than that around Chernobyl. A higher risk of thyroid cancer has not ...

  20. [Postpartum thyroiditis. A review].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Hernández, Z; Segura-Domínguez, A

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a transient thyroid dysfunction of autoimmune origin that can occur in the first year postpartum in women who have not been previously diagnosed with thyroid disease. It may start with clinical thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism and the subsequent recovery of thyroid function, or may just appear as isolated thyrotoxicosis or hypothyroidism. PPT recurs in high percentage of patients after subsequent pregnancies. Many women develop permanent hypothyroidism sometime during the 3 to 10 year period after an episode of PPT. It is important for family physicians to be familiar with this disease, due to its high prevalence in order to make a correct diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Family doctors also play a crucial role in the monitoring of these patients, given the negative implications of established hypothyroidism on reproduction in the female population during their reproductive years. This article reviews the principle characteristics of PPT along with its diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  2. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  3. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to congestive heart failure preeclampsia—a dangerous rise in blood pressure in late pregnancy thyroid ... Development Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney ...

  4. Decreased GABAA receptor binding in the medullary serotonergic system in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Broadbelt, Kevin G; Paterson, David S; Belliveau, Richard A; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Haas, Elisabeth A; Stanley, Christina; Krous, Henry F; Kinney, Hannah C

    2011-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the medulla oblongata help regulate homeostasis, in part through interactions with the medullary serotonergic (5-HT) system. Previously, we reported abnormalities in multiple 5-HT markers in the medullary 5-HT system of infants dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), suggesting that 5-HT dysfunction is involved in its pathogenesis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that markers of GABAA receptors are decreased in the medullary 5-HT system in SIDS cases compared with controls. Using tissue receptor autoradiography with the radioligand H-GABA, we found 25% to 52% reductions in GABAA receptor binding density in 7 of 10 key nuclei sampled of the medullary 5-HT system in the SIDS cases (postconceptional age [PCA] = 51.7 ± 8.3, n = 28) versus age-adjusted controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 13.5, n = 8) (p ≤ 0.04). By Western blotting, there was 46.2% reduction in GABAAα3 subunit levels in the gigantocellularis (component of the medullary 5-HT system) of SIDS cases (PCA = 53.9 ± 8.4, n = 24) versus controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 8.3, n = 8) (56.8% standard in SIDS cases vs 99.35% in controls; p = 0.026). These data suggest that medullary GABAA receptors are abnormal in SIDS infants and that SIDS is a complex disorder of a homeostatic network in the medulla that involves deficits of the GABAergic and 5-HT systems.

  5. Do egg-laying crocodilian (Alligator mississippiensis) archosaurs form medullary bone?

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M H; Elsey, R M; Dacke, C G; Horner, J R; Lamm, E-T

    2007-04-01

    It is beyond question that Mesozoic dinosaurs, like Aves and Crocodylia, are archosaurs. However, within the archosaurian clade, the origin and distribution of some major features are less clear, particularly with respect to reproductive physiology. Medullary bone, a highly mineralized, bony reproductive tissue present in the endosteal cavities of all extant egg-laying birds thus far examined, has recently been reported in Tyrannosaurus rex. Its presence or absence in extant crocodilians, therefore, may shed light on the timing of its evolutionary appearance. If medullary bone is present in all three taxa, it arose before the three lineages diverged. However, if medullary bone arose after this divergence, it may be present in both extinct dinosaurs and birds, or in birds only. If present in extinct dinosaurs and birds, but not crocodilians, it would indicate that it arose in the common ancestor of this clade, thus adding support to the closer phylogenetic relationship of dinosaurs and birds relative to crocodilians. Thus, the question of whether the crocodilian Alligator mississippiensis forms medullary bone during the production of eggs has important evolutionary significance. Our examination of long bones from several alligators (two alligators with eggs in the oviducts, one that had produced eggs in the past but was not currently in reproductive phase, an immature female and an adult male) shows no differences on the endosteal surfaces of the long bones, and no evidence of medullary bone, supporting the hypothesis that medullary bone first evolved in the dinosaur-bird line, after the divergence of crocodilians from this lineage.

  6. Two-dimensional Fourier analysis of the spongy medullary keratin of structurally coloured feather barbs

    PubMed Central

    Prum, R. O.; Torres, R.; Williamson, S.; Dyck, J.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted two-dimensional (2D) discrete Fourier analyses of the spatial variation in refractive index of the spongy medullary keratin from four different colours of structurally coloured feather barbs from three species of bird: the rose-faced lovebird, Agapornis roseicollis (Psittacidae), the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus (Psittacidae), and the Gouldian finch, Poephila guttata (Estrildidae). These results indicate that the spongy medullary keratin is a nanostructured tissue that functions as an array of coherent scatterers. The nanostructure of the medullary keratin is nearly uniform in all directions. The largest Fourier components of spatial variation in refractive index in the tissue are of the appropriate size to produce the observed colours by constructive interference alone. The peaks of the predicted reflectance spectra calculated from the 2D Fourier power spectra are congruent with the reflectance spectra measured by using microspectrophotometry. The alternative physical models for the production of these colours, the Rayleigh and Mie theories, hypothesize that medullary keratin is an incoherent array and that scattered waves are independent in phase. This assumption is falsified by the ring-like Fourier power spectra of these feathers, and the spacing of the scattering air vacuoles in the medullary keratin. Structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by constructive interference of coherently scattered light waves from the optically heterogeneous matrix of keratin and air in the spongy medullary layer.

  7. Anthropometric Factors and Thyroid Cancer Risk by Histological Subtype: Pooled Analysis of 22 Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Marjorie L.; Franceschi, Silvia; Rinaldi, Sabina; Wolk, Alicja; Neta, Gila; Olov Adami, Hans; Anderson, Kristin; Andreotti, Gabriella; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Bernstein, Leslie; Buring, Julie E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; De Roo, Lisa A.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Håkansson, Niclas; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Kirsh, Vicki A.; Linet, Martha S.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Orsini, Nicola; Park, Yikyung; Patel, Alpa V.; Purdue, Mark P.; Riboli, Elio; Robien, Kimberly; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P.; Schairer, Catherine; Schneider, Arthur B.; Sesso, Howard D.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Singh, Pramil N.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Ward, Elizabeth; Weiderpass, Elisabete; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Hartge, Patricia; Berrington de González, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Greater height and body mass index (BMI) have been associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary carcinoma, the most common and least aggressive subtype. Few studies have evaluated these associations in relation to other, more aggressive histologic types or thyroid cancer-specific mortality. Methods: This large pooled analysis of 22 prospective studies (833,176 men and 1,260,871 women) investigated thyroid cancer incidence associated with greater height, BMI at baseline and young adulthood, and adulthood BMI gain (difference between young-adult and baseline BMI), overall and separately by sex and histological subtype using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Associations with thyroid cancer mortality were investigated in a subset of cohorts (578,922 men and 774,373 women) that contributed cause of death information. Results: During follow-up, 2996 incident thyroid cancers and 104 thyroid cancer deaths were identified. All anthropometric factors were positively associated with thyroid cancer incidence: hazard ratios (HR) [confidence intervals (CIs)] for height (per 5 cm) = 1.07 [1.04–1.10], BMI (per 5 kg/m2) = 1.06 [1.02–1.10], waist circumference (per 5 cm) = 1.03 [1.01–1.05], young-adult BMI (per 5 kg/m2) = 1.13 [1.02–1.25], and adulthood BMI gain (per 5 kg/m2) = 1.07 [1.00–1.15]. Associations for baseline BMI and waist circumference were attenuated after mutual adjustment. Baseline BMI was more strongly associated with risk in men compared with women (p = 0.04). Positive associations were observed for papillary, follicular, and anaplastic, but not medullary, thyroid carcinomas. Similar, but stronger, associations were observed for thyroid cancer mortality. Conclusion: The results suggest that greater height and excess adiposity throughout adulthood are associated with higher incidence of most major types of thyroid cancer, including the least common but

  8. Anatomy of thyroid and parathyroid glands and neurovascular relations.

    PubMed

    Mohebati, A; Shaha, A R

    2012-01-01

    Historically, thyroid surgery has been fraught with complications. Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve, superior laryngeal nerve, or the parathyroid glands may result in profound life-long consequences for the patient. To minimize the morbidity of the operation, a surgeon must have an in-depth understanding of the anatomy of the thyroid and parathyroid glands and be able to apply this information to perform a safe and effective operation. This article will review the pertinent anatomy and embryology of the thyroid and parathyroid glands and the critical structures that lie in their proximity. This information should aid the surgeon in appropriate identification and preservation of the function of these structures and to avoid the pitfalls of the operation.

  9. Why Thyroid Surgeons Are Frustrated with Radiologists: Lessons Learned from Pre- and Postoperative US.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Sachin S; O'Malley, Ryan B; Robinson, Tracy J; Maximin, Suresh; Lalwani, Neeraj; Byrd, David R; Wang, Carolyn L

    2016-01-01

    Optimal treatment of thyroid cancer is highly dependent on accurate staging of the extent of disease at presentation. Preoperative ultrasonography (US) is the most sensitive method for detecting metastatic lymph nodes and is recommended as part of the standard preoperative workup. Missed findings on preoperative scans may lead to understaging and inadequate surgical management, which subsequently predispose these patients to residual disease postoperatively and a higher risk for recurrence, possibly requiring repeat surgery. Traditionally, thyroid US for pre- and postoperative staging has been performed by radiologists. However, there is a growing trend away from radiologist-performed US in favor of surgeon-performed US. Recent surgical and endocrinology literature has shown that, when compared with surgeon-performed US, radiologist-performed preoperative staging US is less accurate and is inadequate for presurgical planning, with higher local recurrence rates. This review highlights the importance of accurate preoperative US for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, with specific attention to deficiencies that exist in general radiology department thyroid US reports. We present a standardized approach to neck US reporting that incorporates the newly updated 2015 recommendations from the American Thyroid Association and also addresses the pertinent questions for thyroid surgeons. By ensuring comprehensive preoperative assessment and improving thyroid US reporting, we seek to improve patient access to optimized care. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  10. Thyroid hormone transporter defects.

    PubMed

    Grüters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, active transport of thyroid hormones had been repeatedly demonstrated. The membrane transporters for thyroid hormones which have been identified include the organic anion transporting polypeptide, heterodimeric amino acid transporters and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which are the focus of this chapter. The gene encoding MCT8 which was identified as a specific thyroid hormone transporter is located on chromosome Xq13.2. The expression pattern of MCT8 indicates that MCT8 plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system by transporting thyroid hormone into neurons as its main target cells. Mutational analysis of the MCT8 gene revealed mutations or deletions in the MCT8 gene in unrelated male patients with severe psychomotor retardation and biochemical findings consistent with thyroid hormone resistance. Indeed, thyroid function tests in patients with MCT8 mutations demonstrated marked elevations of serum T3 (in the thyrotoxic range), a significant decrease in serum T4 or fT4 and normal to elevated TSH levels.

  11. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  12. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  13. The association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Dalal M

    2002-04-01

    An association between lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyroid papillary carcinoma is still controversial. To assess the relationship, a histopathologic analysis of surgically resected thyroid tumors together with the frequency and severity of chronic lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid among patients with follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma was performed. The prevalence of lymphocytic infiltrate, which is indicative of autoimmune thyroiditis, was significantly higher in patients with papillary carcinoma (58%) than in patients with follicular carcinoma (20%) or follicular adenoma (14%). The lymphocytic infiltration within the tumor compared with the severity of thyroiditis in the nontumorous tissue. Therefore, the association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma was confirmed. The possibility that an immunologic mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of papillary carcinoma stimulates lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid tissue through an autoimmune mechanism is suggested.

  14. Antitumor Activity of Lenvatinib (E7080): An Angiogenesis Inhibitor That Targets Multiple Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Preclinical Human Thyroid Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, Osamu; Matsui, Junji; Kodama, Kotaro; Hata-Sugi, Naoko; Kimura, Takayuki; Iwata, Masao; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by blockading the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib mesilate (lenvatinib) is a potent inhibitor of VEGF receptors (VEGFR1–3) and other prooncogenic and prooncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1–4), platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), KIT, and RET. We examined the antitumor activity of lenvatinib against human thyroid cancer xenograft models in nude mice. Orally administered lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in 5 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), 5 anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), and 1 medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) xenograft models. Lenvatinib also showed antiangiogenesis activity against 5 DTC and 5 ATC xenografts, while lenvatinib showed in vitro antiproliferative activity against only 2 of 11 thyroid cancer cell lines: that is, RO82-W-1 and TT cells. Western blot analysis showed that cultured RO82-W-1 cells overexpressed FGFR1 and that lenvatinib inhibited the phosphorylation of FGFR1 and its downstream effector FRS2. Lenvatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of RET with the activated mutation C634W in TT cells. These data demonstrate that lenvatinib provides antitumor activity mainly via angiogenesis inhibition but also inhibits FGFR and RET signaling pathway in preclinical human thyroid cancer models. PMID:25295214

  15. Antitumor activity of lenvatinib (e7080): an angiogenesis inhibitor that targets multiple receptor tyrosine kinases in preclinical human thyroid cancer models.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Osamu; Matsui, Junji; Kodama, Kotaro; Hata-Sugi, Naoko; Kimura, Takayuki; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Minoshima, Yukinori; Iwata, Masao; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by blockading the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib mesilate (lenvatinib) is a potent inhibitor of VEGF receptors (VEGFR1-3) and other prooncogenic and prooncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1-4), platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), KIT, and RET. We examined the antitumor activity of lenvatinib against human thyroid cancer xenograft models in nude mice. Orally administered lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in 5 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), 5 anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), and 1 medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) xenograft models. Lenvatinib also showed antiangiogenesis activity against 5 DTC and 5 ATC xenografts, while lenvatinib showed in vitro antiproliferative activity against only 2 of 11 thyroid cancer cell lines: that is, RO82-W-1 and TT cells. Western blot analysis showed that cultured RO82-W-1 cells overexpressed FGFR1 and that lenvatinib inhibited the phosphorylation of FGFR1 and its downstream effector FRS2. Lenvatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of RET with the activated mutation C634W in TT cells. These data demonstrate that lenvatinib provides antitumor activity mainly via angiogenesis inhibition but also inhibits FGFR and RET signaling pathway in preclinical human thyroid cancer models.

  16. Differentiating the undifferentiated: immunohistochemical profile of medullary carcinoma of the colon with an emphasis on intestinal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Winn, Brody; Tavares, Rosemarie; Fanion, Jacqueline; Noble, Lelia; Gao, John; Sabo, Edmond; Resnick, Murray B

    2009-03-01

    Undifferentiated or medullary carcinoma is characterized by its distinct histologic appearance and relatively better prognosis compared to poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma. These 2 entities may be difficult to differentiate by light microscopy alone. Only limited immunohistochemical studies investigating medullary carcinoma have been reported. These studies suggest a loss of intestinal differentiation, exemplified by a high percentage of CDX2 negativity. Our aim was to further characterize the immunohistochemical profile of medullary carcinoma, with particular emphasis on intestinal markers. Paraffin blocks from 16 cases of medullary carcinoma and 33 cases of poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed and stained with an immunohistochemical panel including CDX2, CK7, CK20, p53, intestinal trefoil factor 3, chromogranin, synaptophysin, MLH-1, MUC-1, MUC-2, and calretinin. A significantly higher proportion of medullary carcinomas, as opposed to poorly differentiated colonic carcinomas, showed loss of staining for MLH-1 and for the intestinal transcription factor CDX2, in accordance with previous studies. MLH-1 staining was present in only 21% of medullary carcinoma cases compared with 60% of the poorly differentiated colonic carcinoma cases (P = .02), whereas CDX2 was positive in 19% of medullary carcinomas and 55% of poorly differentiated colonic carcinomas (P = .03). Interestingly, calretinin staining was strongly positive in 73% of medullary carcinomas compared to only 12% of poorly differentiated colonic carcinomas (P < .0001). Evidence of intestinal differentiation by MUC-1, MUC-2, and TFF-3 staining was seen in 67%, 60%, and 53% of the medullary carcinomas, respectively. These 3 markers were frequently positive in many of the CDX2-negative medullary carcinoma cases. Medullary carcinoma of the colon retains a significant degree of intestinal differentiation as evidenced by its high percentage of

  17. Recurrent groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. J.; Leach, R. D.; Ellis, Harold

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive recurrences following repair of inguinal hernias have been studied; 62 were direct, 30 indirect, 7 pantaloon and one a femoral hernia. Half the indirect recurrences occurred within a year of repair and probably represented failure to detect a small indirect sac. Later indirect recurrences probably represented failure to repair the internal ring. Nine of the direct hernias were medial funicular recurrences and represented failure to anchor the darn medially. The rest of the direct recurrences were attributable to tissue insufficiency and could probably have been averted by larger tissue bites. Recurrences following inguinal herniorrhaphy remain an all too common problem but can be reduced by meticulous surgical technique. PMID:7339602

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Hashimoto thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the most common cause of thyroid underactivity (hypothyroidism) in the United States. Related Information What information ... However, some people with thyroid antibodies never develop hypothyroidism or experience any related signs or symptoms. People ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  20. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  1. Culturing primary rat inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Faust, Dörte; Geelhaar, Andrea; Eisermann, Beate; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno; Klussman, Enno

    2013-06-21

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) facilitates water reabsorption by renal collecting duct principal cells and thereby fine-tunes body water homeostasis. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R) on the surface of the cells and thereby induces synthesis of cAMP. This stimulates cellular signaling processes leading to changes in the phosphorylation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein kinase A phoshorylates AQP2 and thereby triggers the translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane facilitating water reabsorption from primary urine. Aberrations of AVP release from the pituitary or AVP-activated signaling in principal cells can cause central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, respectively; an elevated blood plasma AVP level is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic heart failure and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Here, we present a protocol for cultivation of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, which express V2R and AQP2 endogenously. The cells are suitable for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the control of AQP2 and thus to discover novel drug targets for the treatment of diseases associated with dysregulation of AVP-mediated water reabsorption. IMCD cells are obtained from rat renal inner medullae and are used for experiments six to eight days after seeding. IMCD cells can be cultured in regular cell culture dishes, flasks and micro-titer plates of different formats, the procedure only requires a few hours, and is appropriate for standard cell culture laboratories.

  2. Culturing Primary Rat Inner Medullary Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Dörte; Geelhaar, Andrea; Eisermann, Beate; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussman, Enno

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) facilitates water reabsorption by renal collecting duct principal cells and thereby fine-tunes body water homeostasis. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R) on the surface of the cells and thereby induces synthesis of cAMP. This stimulates cellular signaling processes leading to changes in the phosphorylation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein kinase A phoshorylates AQP2 and thereby triggers the translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane facilitating water reabsorption from primary urine. Aberrations of AVP release from the pituitary or AVP-activated signaling in principal cells can cause central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, respectively; an elevated blood plasma AVP level is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic heart failure and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Here, we present a protocol for cultivation of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, which express V2R and AQP2 endogenously. The cells are suitable for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the control of AQP2 and thus to discover novel drug targets for the treatment of diseases associated with dysregulation of AVP-mediated water reabsorption. IMCD cells are obtained from rat renal inner medullae and are used for experiments six to eight days after seeding. IMCD cells can be cultured in regular cell culture dishes, flasks and micro-titer plates of different formats, the procedure only requires a few hours, and is appropriate for standard cell culture laboratories. PMID:23852264

  3. Diethyl pyrocarbonate inhibits rostral ventrolateral medullary H+ sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nattie, E E

    1988-04-01

    Diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), an acylating agent that reacts with imidazole-histidine in vitro, inhibits CO2 sensitivity when applied by pledget to the rostral chemosensitive area on the ventrolateral medullary (VLM) surface in glomectomized, chloralose-urethan-anesthetized cats. In this study similar application of DEPC inhibits the phrenic nerve response to CO2 expressed as a function of VLM [H+] measured by surface pH electrode. Attempts to evaluate direct chemoreceptor stimulation by HCL-soaked surface pledgets proved difficult, but rostral DEPC did inhibit the response to intravenous infusion of HCl. As previously reported, the CO2 and intravenous H+ responses are not a unique function of the VLM [H+]. DEPC had similar inhibitory effects on both the CO2 and the intravenous H+ responses, suggesting that the difference between them may reflect more the orientation or accessibility of the central chemoreceptor than a different mechanism for sensing CO2 vs. H+. DEPC did not alter the phrenic nerve response to hypoxia, indicating that DEPC effects on central chemoreception are not the result of a generalized inhibitory process. The results support the hypothesis that imidazolehistidine is involved at the rostral area with chemoreception of both CO2 and H+.

  4. Hormonal regulation of medullary bone metabolism in the laying hen

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new organ culture system for the study of bone formation has been developed using medullary bone, a non-structural, metabolically active form of bone which is found in the marrow cavities of egg-laying birds. In the presence of fetal calf serum, bone explants were viable in culture by morphological criteria, and retained large numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-proline into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and non-collagen protein (NCP) was determined using purified bacterial collagenase. Collagen accounted for over 10% of the total protein labeled. The calcium-regulating hormones, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into CDP. The effective dose range of 1,25(OH)2D3 was 0.1 nM to 100 nM, while that of PTH was 1.0 nM to 100 nM. The effect of both hormones was specific for collagen, since /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into NCP was unaffected. Hydroxyproline analysis of bone explants and culture medium revealed that both hormones decreased the total hydroxyroline content of the cultures, suggesting that the inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into DCP is due to inhibition of collagen synthesis.

  5. Histochemical carbonic anhydrase in rat inner medullary collecting duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, J. G.; Bain, J. L.; Fritsche, C.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) secretes substantial amounts of H+. However, carbonic anhydrase (CA), a concomitant of H+ secretion, has been generally reported absent in this segment. To reexamine this problem, we investigated CA and the morphological phenotypes of cells comprising the IMCD by CA histochemistry, using a modified Hansson technique with light and electron microscopy. Throughout the medulla, tubule cells exhibit histochemical CA activity. In the initial third of the inner medulla, a small proportion have features of intercalated cells and demonstrate some degree of CA activity. However, the majority population in the early portions of the IMCD appears to consist of principal cells. These also show CA staining of widely variable intensity, both among and within cells. A third cell type, previously called "IMCD cells", appears in the middle portion of the IMCD and is the only cell type present near the papilla tip. In contrast to previous reports, these "IMCD cells" have histochemical CA staining, also of highly variable intensity. These results demonstrate that stainable carbonic anhydrase to support acidification is present throughout the rat IMCD, both in intercalated cells and in some cells clearly not of this type. Therefore, the presence of CA is not specific for the intercalated cell type and suggests that other cell types may participate in acid secretion in IMCD.

  6. Is familial papillary thyroid microcarcinoma more aggressive than sporadic form?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cho Rok; Park, Seulkee; Kang, Sang-Wook; Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Jong Ju; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose With the increasing incidence of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC), familial papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (FPTMC) is now recognized more frequently. However, the biological behavior of FPTMC is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of FPTMC and its biological aggressiveness. Methods Between March 2006 and July 2010, 2,414 patients underwent primary surgical therapy for PTMC and 149 (6.2%) were further classified as FPTMC. To determine the biological aggressiveness of FPTMC, we compared the clinicopathological features and prognosis between FPTMC and sporadic PTMC (SPTMC). Results The male-to-female ratio was higher in FPTMC than in sporadic papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (SPTMC: 1:4.5 vs. 1:7.2, P = 0.041). The central lymph node (LN) metastasis rate was significantly higher in FPTMC than in SPTMC (36.2% vs. 24.2%, P = 0.002). The local recurrence rate was also higher in FPTMC than in SPTMC (4.5% vs. 0.6%, P < 0.001). We identified familial occurrence in 6.2% of cases of PTMC. FPTMC is associated with a high rate of central LN metastasis and local recurrence. Conclusion These findings suggest that close follow-up can be beneficial in FPTMC patients to detect local recurrence. PMID:28289666

  7. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  8. On the Origin of Cells and Derivation of Thyroid Cancer: C Cell Story Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Mikael; Williams, Dillwyn

    2016-01-01

    We will highlight and put into perspective new lineage tracing data from genetic studies in mice indicating that the genuine progenitors to C cells arise in the endoderm germ layer. This overturns the current concept of a neural crest origin of thyroid C cells referred to in every textbook and dedicated paper to this very day. As will become apparent, except for a single experiment, the neural crest theory has little or no support when the evolution and development of calcitonin-producing cells in the entire chordate family are considered. Instead, a unifying origin of all cells of the ultimobranchial bodies reopens questions on the histogenesis of certain thyroid pathologies previously difficult to explain. On this aspect, medullary thyroid cancer shows a stronger connection to gut neuroendocrine tumours than previously recognized. It is envisaged that novel factors implicated in C cell-derived tumour growth and progression will be discovered as the mechanisms that regulate lineage expansion of embryonic C cell precursors from pharyngeal endoderm are uncovered. We will not discuss why C cells go to the bother of burying themselves in the thyroid - this remains a mystery. PMID:27493881

  9. Effects of renal perfusion pressure on renal medullary hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunhua; Hu, Chunyan; Polichnowski, Aaron; Mori, Takefumi; Skelton, Meredith; Ito, Sadayoshi; Cowley, Allen W

    2009-06-01

    Studies were designed to determine the effects of increases of renal perfusion pressure on the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) within the renal outer medulla. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied with either the renal capsule intact or removed to ascertain the contribution of changes of medullary blood flow and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure on H(2)O(2) and NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) production. Responses to three 30-minute step changes of renal perfusion pressure (from approximately 85 to approximately 115 to approximately 145 mm Hg) were studied using adjustable aortic occluders proximal and distal to the left renal artery. Medullary interstitial H(2)O(2) determined by microdialysis increased at each level of renal perfusion pressure from 640 to 874 to 1593 nmol/L, as did H(2)O(2) urinary excretion rates, and these responses were significantly attenuated by decapsulation. Medullary interstitial NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-) increased from 9.2 to 13.8 to 16.1 mumol/L, with parallel changes in urine NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-), but decapsulation did not significantly blunt these responses. Over the range of renal perfusion pressure, medullary blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) rose approximately 30% and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure rose from 7.8 to 19.7 cm H(2)O. Renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure and the natriuretic and diuretic responses were significantly attenuated with decapsulation, but medullary blood flow was not affected. The data indicate that pressure-induced increases of H(2)O(2) emanated largely from increased tubular flow rates to the medullary thick-ascending limbs of Henle and NO largely from increased medullary blood flow to the vasa recta. The parallel pressure-induced increases of H(2)O(2) and NO indicate a participation in shaping the "normal" pressure-natriuresis relationship and explain why an imbalance in either would affect the blood pressure salt sensitivity.

  10. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kirsten; Woods, Andrew; Gupta, Sandeep; Smith, Roger; Wynne, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy. Learning points: Pregnancy is associated with the growth of thyroid nodules due to stimulation from oestrogen receptors on thyrocytes and HCG cross-stimulation of the TSH receptor. Thyroid cancer diagnosed during pregnancy has not been shown to be associated with increased rates of persistent or recurrent disease in most studies. There is little evidence to guide the management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy, where both maternal and foetal wellbeing must be carefully balanced. PMID:27994875

  11. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  12. Expression of p63 and Bcl-2 in Malignant Thyroid Tumors and their Correlation with other Diagnostic Immunocytochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shyama; Khurana, Nita; Kakar, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bcl-2 is a marker recently studied in thyroid tumours and proposed to have prognostic significance. p63 is expressed in a proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases and may have a role in tumour progression. Aim To study expression of Bcl2 and p63 in thyroid tumours and correlation of Bcl-2 with diagnostic markers including Thyroglobulin, Calcitonin and Carcinoembryonic antigen. Materials and Methods Cytology smears of 35 cases of thyroid cancer were studied over a period of 18 months. In 20 cases histopathology was available. Immunocytochemistry for Bcl-2 and p63 was done, and diagnostic markers were applied as and when required. Results p63 showed focal nuclear expression in 46.1% of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases, and was negative in all other tumours. Bcl-2 was positive in 88.9% of follicular carcinomas, 100% of papillary carcinomas and 83.3% of medullary carcinoma cases, and showed focal weak expression in 40% of Anaplastic Carcinoma (ATC) cases, thereby signifying down regulation (p-value = 0.001). There was significant down regulation of Thyroglobulin (Tg) in ATC vs well differentiated follicular derived tumours (p-value ≤ 0.016). Positive correlation was noted between expression of Bcl-2 and Calcitonin (0.93) and Bcl-2 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) (0.89), and weak positive correlation (0.65) between Tg and Bcl-2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is downregulated in anaplastic carcinomas as compared to well differentiated thyroid tumours, and shows correlation with differentiation associated tumour antigens. Thus, loss of Bcl-2 was associated with loss of differentiation in thyroid tumours. Anaplastic carcinoma as such is associated with worse prognosis and loss of Bcl-2 may be partly responsible for the same. p63 is specific but less sensitive marker for PTC. Further studies are required to determine the role of Bcl-2 and p63 in thyroid tumours. PMID:27630849

  13. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amit; Shetty, Kishore V

    2011-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral ulcerative disease, affecting 10% to 15% of the general US population. This article reviews the epidemiology and clinical presentations of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, including diagnosis and management.

  14. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Marrero Calvo, M; Merino Arribas, J; Rodrigo Palacios, J; Bartolomé Albistegui, M; Camino Fernández, A; Grande Sáez, C

    2001-02-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by multiple bone lesions and a variable clinical course. We present a 10 year old boy with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis who improved after treatment with naproxen.

  15. Relapse or Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  16. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area.

  17. Does normal thyroid gland by ultrasonography match with normal serum thyroid hormones and negative thyroid antibodies?

    PubMed

    Trimboli, P; Rossi, F; Condorelli, E; Laurenti, O; Ventura, C; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Guarino, M; Valabrega, S

    2010-10-01

    Few papers have shown that a hypoechoic appearance of the thyroid gland at ultrasonography (US) is related to a hypofunction and serum positivity of thyroid antibodies (T-Ab). However, it is not ascertained if normal thyroid appearance at US correspond to normal thyroid laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to assess the value of normal thyroid at US in predicting normal thyroid hormones and negative T-Ab in a cohort of 48 adult patients. All patients (37 females and 11 males) were referred to our hospital to undergo their first thyroid US examination, followed by a thyroid function evaluation. All subjects had normal thyroid gland at US. As a control group 65 patients with hypoechoic and inhomogeneous thyroid gland were enrolled. All 48 patients had normal free-T (3) and free-T (4) levels. While 41 patients (85.4%) showed normal TSH, in 7 subjects (14.6%) TSH was elevated and a significant (p < 0.001) difference was recorded between the two groups in mean TSH value. Positive T-Ab value was found in 5 patients (10.4%) and the remaining 43 patients (89.6%) had negative T-Ab. TSH was not significantly correlated with age, thyroid volume or BMI. The multivariate model showed that only BMI was significantly correlated to thyroid volume (p < 0.01, r(2)=0.31). These results showed that normal thyroid recorded by US matches with normal thyroid laboratory assessment to a large degree. These preliminary data need to be confirmed in a prospective study and in a larger series and should suggest the evaluation of thyrotropin and thyroid antibodies in subjects with normal thyroid gland as assessed by US.

  18. Thyroid Langerhans cell histiocytosis and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Mohammed; Alhakami, Hadi; AlSubayea, Haia; Alfattani, Naif; Guler, Mohammet; Satti, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 27-year-old female, married with two children, presented to our clinic with a 1-year history of thyroid swelling and pressure symptoms on lying backward and bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. The patient was a known case of panhypopituitarism for 5 years. Comprehensive patient evaluation including FNAC with papillary thyroid cancer result then she underwent total thyroidectomy and bilateral neck dissection and final histologic examination confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma in the background of lymphocytic thyroiditis, associated with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). The draining cervical lymph nodes were also involved by LCH and metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Although the association of LCH with papillary thyroid carcinoma in the thyroid has been reported, their co-existence with LCH in the draining lymph nodes is very uncommon. PMID:27867869

  19. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most common form of endocrine cancer and that thyroid hormone is needed for the growth and metabolism of each cell in the body, understanding the molecular and the cellular aspects of thyroid stem cell biology will ultimately provide insights into mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:18310275

  20. Routine calcitonin measurement in nodular thyroid disease management: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Yigit; Ozdemir, Murat; Ertunc, Gozde; Demir, Batuhan; Icoz, Gokhan; Akyildiz, Mahir; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine calcitonin measurement in patients with nodular thyroid disease. Methods Consecutive patients with nodular thyroid disease (n = 640) were studied. Serum calcitonin levels were measured under basal conditions, and when basal values were between 10–100 pg/mL, testing was repeated after pentagastrin (PG) stimulation. Patients with previously diagnosed or familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) were excluded. Patients were operated on when basal or stimulated calcitonin >100 pg/mL or when other surgical indications were present. Results Four cases of MTC were identified. MTC was diagnosed in 75% of patients with basal calcitonin >100 pg/mL. One out of 11 patients with basal calcitonin between 10–100 pg/mL was diagnosed with MTC. PG stimulation resulted in elevation in 4 cases, where 1 case was diagnosed with MTC. Positive predictive value for basal calcitonin levels in the preoperative diagnosis of MTC was 5% for values between 10–100 pg/mL and 100% for values >100 pg/mL. Possible reasons for false positivity were papillary thyroid cancer in 17%, renal insufficiency in 8.3%, Hashimoto thyroiditis in 17% and β-blocker use in 33%. Positive predictive value for the PG test (>100 pg/mL) was 25% in the entire series. The cost of adding calcitonin measurement (±PG stimulation) to the preoperative work-up, resulted in €912.68 per MTC patient to detect the disease. Conclusion Basal calcitonin measurement together with PG stimulation in cases of basal calcitonin >10 pg/mL detects MTC in 0.62% of patients with nodular thyroid disease. PMID:28382288

  1. Neural control of adrenal medullary and cortical blood flow during hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, M.J.; Jordan, D.A.; Thellman, S.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension produces an increase in adrenal medullary blood flow and a decrease in adrenal cortical blood flow. To determine whether changes in adrenal blood flow during hemorrhage are neurally mediated, the authors compared blood flow responses following adrenal denervation (splanchnic nerve section) with changes in the contralateral, neurally intact adrenal. Carbonized microspheres labeled with /sup 153/Gd, /sup 114/In, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 95/Nb or /sup 46/Se were used. Blood pressure was reduced and maintained at 60 mmHg for 25 min by hemorrhage into a pressurized bottle system. Adrenal cortical blood flow decreased to 50% of control with hemorrhage in both the intact and denervated adrenal. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased to four times control levels at 15 and 25 min posthemorrhage in the intact adrenal, but was reduced to 50% of control at 3, 5, and 10 min posthemorrhage in the denervated adrenal. In a separate group of dogs, the greater splanchnic nerve on one side was electrically stimulated at 2, 5, or 15 Hz for 40 min. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased 5- to 10-fold in the stimulated adrenal but was unchanged in the contralateral, nonstimulated adrenal. Adrenal cortical blood flow was not affected by nerve stimulation. They conclude that activity of the splanchnic nerve profoundly affects adrenal medullary vessels but not adrenal cortical vessels and mediates the observed increase in adrenal medullary blood flow during hemorrhagic hypotension.

  2. [Non thyroidal illnesses (NTIS)].

    PubMed

    Luca, F; Goichot, B; Brue, T

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities in the circulating levels of thyroid hormones, without evidence of coexisting thyroid or pituitary gland disease can be observed in all general diseases. These nonthyroidal illnesses (NTIS) are the result of complex mechanisms that combine the effect of some drugs, cytokines, nutritional and endocrine factors at all levels of the thyrotropic axis, from the hypothalamus to the cellular transporters and nuclear receptors of thyroid hormones. The patterns of NTIS depend on the underlying disease and its severity. Thirtyfive years after the initial description, the pathophysiological significance of these anomalies remains controversial. One of the dilemma of NTIS is whether the hormone responses represent an adaptive and normal, physiologic response to conserve energy and protect against hypercatabolism in case of aggression, or whether it is a maladaptive response contributing to a worsening of the disease. This debate is not just a theoretical question, because in the first case the process must be respected, in the other case a vigorous treatment to restore circulating thyroid hormone levels is justified. There have been very few clinical studies designed to address whether the substitution with thyroid hormone is advantageous, and there is at current time no permissive evidence for the use of thyroid hormone replacement in patients with NTIS. But the clinical context, the choice of the molecule or of the dose and the way of administration were not necessarily the most relevant. Theoretically, stimulation of thyreotrope axis used a continuous infusion of TRH seems to provide clinical benefit. With the expectation that randomized clinical trials will provide demonstration of NTIS treatment efficiency, the question might remain unanswered for several more years.

  3. Robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alabbas, Haytham; Bu Ali, Daniah

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the gold standard treatment for patients with thyroid cancer or nodules suspicious for cancer. Open conventional approach is the standard surgical approach. However, a visible neck incision could be a concern for most young female patients, especially for patients with a history of healing with keloid or hypertrophic scars. Robotic remote access approaches have evolved into a safe and feasible approach in selected patients, providing a hidden scar with good patient satisfaction. This review will focus on the performance and safety of robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery. PMID:28149806

  4. Altered processing of otolithic information in isolated lateral medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Seoyeon; Park, Jae Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) evaluate the function of otolithic pathways in central as well as peripheral vestibular disorders. This study aimed to determine the associations and dissociations of otolithic dysfunction in lateral medullary infarction (LMI), the most well-known disorder of central vestibulopathy. At the Dizziness Clinic of a referral-based University Hospital, 45 patients with isolated LMI (28 men, mean age = 55.6 ± 12.5) had evaluation of the ocular tilt reaction (OTR), tilt of the subjective visual vertical (SVV), and ocular and cervical VEMPs from Janurary 2011 to August 2015 during the acute phase, 1-11 days from the symptom onset (median = 2 days). Almost all (42/45, 93 %) patients showed at least one component of the OTR or SVV tilt that was invariably ipsiversive. In contrast, oVEMPs were abnormal only in 12 (27 %) and cVEMPs in 13 (29 %) patients. Only three patients showed abnormal results in all the tests of the OTR, SVV tilt, and ocular and cervical VEMPs. Abnormal oVEMPs were more common in patients with the OTR than those without (38 vs 6 %, Pearson X (2) test, p = 0.021). In contrast, abnormality of cVEMPs showed no correlation with the presence of OTR (28 vs 31 %, Pearson X (2) test, p = 0.795). In patients with LMI, ipsiversive OTR is invariable, but abnormalities of oVEMPs and cVEMPs were much less common and mostly dissociated even in the patients with abnormal results. This discrepancy in otolithic dysfunction suggests different anatomical substrates and/or dissimilar reciprocal modulation for processing of each otolithic signal in central vestibular structures located in the dorsolateral medulla.

  5. Medullary carcinoma of the large intestine: a population based analysis.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Sathaiah, Magesh; Singla, Smit; Sukumar, Shyam; Karunamurthy, Arivarasan; Pragatheeshwar, Kothai Divya; Lee, Kenneth K W; Zeh, Herbert; Kane, Kevin M; Bartlett, David L

    2010-10-01

    Medullary carcinoma (MC) of the colorectum is a relatively new histological type of adenocarcinoma characterized by poor glandular differentiation and intraepithelial lymphocytic infiltrate. To date, there has been no epidemiological study of this rare tumor type, which has now been incorporated as a separate entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of colorectal cancers. We used the population-based registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify all cases of colorectal MC between 1973 and 2006 and compared them to poorly and undifferentiated colonic adenocarcinomas (PDA and UDA, respectively). We observed that MCs were rare tumors, constituting approximately 5-8 cases for every 10,000 colon cancers diagnosed, with a mean annual incidence of 3.47 (+/-0.75) per 10 million population. Mean age at diagnosis was 69.3 (+/-12.5) years, with incidence increasing with age. MCs were twice as common in females, who presented at a later age, with a lower stage and a trend towards favorable prognosis. MCs were extremely rare among African-Americans. MCs were most common in the proximal colon (74%), where they present at a later age than the sigmoid colon. There were no cases reliably identified in the rectum or appendix. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (CEA) were elevated prior to first course of treatment in 40% of the patients. MCs were more commonly poorly differentiated (72%), with 22% being undifferentiated. MCs commonly presented with Stage II disease, with 10% presenting with metastases. Only one patient presented with N2b disease (>7 positive nodes). Early outcome analyses showed that MCs have 1- and 2-year relative survival rates of 92.7 and 73.8% respectively. Although MCs showed a trend towards better early overall survival, undifferentiated MCs present more commonly with Stage III, with comparatively worse early outcomes.

  6. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  7. Neurones in the adult rat anterior medullary velum.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Menoud, P A; Celio, M R

    2000-03-27

    The presence of neurones in the rat anterior medullary velum (AMV) has been investigated by using antibodies to the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), and calbindin-D28k (CB). Disparate populations of mainly GABAergic neurones were located in the rostral and caudal regions of the AMV. The rostral region of the AMV was characterised by GABAergic CR-labelled or PV-labelled neurones. CR-labelled neurones were bipolar or multipolar with round to ovoid somata (diameters between 8 and 12 microm), and rostrocaudally running dendrites forming a network. PV-labelled neurones had round somata (diameters between 6 and 10 microm) and were bi-tufted, with beaded dendrites. Both CR-labelled and PV-labelled dendrites formed punctate pericellular associations with unlabelled somatic profiles. In the caudal region of the AMV, PV-labelled neurones were GABAergic, multipolar cells, having round somata (diameters between 9 and 12 microm), with either beaded or nonbeaded dendrites forming a network of interconnecting dendrites. PV-labelled pericellular associations were made around both PV-labelled and unlabelled somatic profiles. CR labelled unipolar brush cells (UBCs) were not GABAergic. UBCs were characterised by a round to oval somata (10-15 microm in diameter) from which a single primary dendrite emerged to form a distal expansion having small terminal dendrites. From the distal expansion, there also appeared to be CR-labelled processes emanating and extending for up to 250 microm. CB occasionally labelled "Purkinje-like cells" (PLCs). The rat AMV is a more complex structure than first envisaged with the presence of predominantly inhibitory neurones expressing different calcium-binding proteins. Functional and anatomic aspects of this circuitry are further discussed.

  8. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:28373861

  9. Lingual thyroid: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Quarracino, María; Aguas, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Lingual thyroid is an abnormal formation appearing as the result of a deficient descent during embryological development of the thyroid gland through the thyroglossal duct to its normal pretracheal location. The lesion consists of a tumor mass of thyroid tissue located at the base of the tongue, in the region of the foramen caecum linguae. The size can vary from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. More than 400 cases of lingual thyroid have been documented in the literature to date. Lingual thyroid has been identified in 10% of the tongues examined in some autopsy series. Its identification is of great significance, since it may constitute the only functional thyroid tissue in the body, and may inadvertently be destroyed as a result of histological biopsy procedures. The present study presents a clinical case of lingual thyroid in a 17-year-old female.

  10. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  11. Painless thyroiditis complicated by acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko

    2010-01-01

    The serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level is decreased in acromegalic patients. Although this phenomenon is thought to be caused by the enhanced secretion of somatostatin which suppresses TSH production, it has not yet been proven. We describe a 60-year-old woman with acromegaly who showed a low concentration of TSH. We diagnosed her as painless thyroiditis based on an increased level of thyroglobulin, depressed radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), normal vascularity and mild swelling of the thyroid, and normal T3, T4, free T3 and free T4 levels. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of acromegaly complicated by painless thyroiditis. The differential diagnosis between central hypothyroidism and painless thyroiditis is so important. Since it is difficult to diagnose precisely based on only the data of a low level of TSH and normal levels of thyroid hormones, we consider that measurement of thyroglobulin and RAIU is necessary when the complication of painless thyroiditis is suspected.

  12. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes.

  13. Effect of medullary cavity in cancellous bone on two-wave phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiken, Takuma; Nakanishi, Shoko; Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic patients have a larger medullary cavity in their cancellous bone than healthy people. In this study, the effect of the medullary cavity on the two-wave phenomenon was experimentally investigated using a cancellous bone model and a radius bone model. In the cancellous bone model, with the increase in hole (medullary cavity) diameter, the amplitudes of the fast waves became smaller, whereas the amplitudes of the slow waves became larger. In the radius bone model, the fast wave overlapped with the circumferential wave. The slow wave became larger with increasing hole diameter. The analysis of the slow wave thus seems to be useful for the in vivo diagnosis of the degree of osteoporosis.

  14. Lateral medullary infarction presenting as isolated vertigo and unilateral loss of visual suppression.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Masahiko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Tomoe; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Kataoka, Manabu; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki

    2012-02-01

    Isolated vertigo is rare in lateral medullary infarction. We described early diagnostic challenges in such cases by a neuro-otological approach. We report a 56-year-old man who developed a lateral medullary infarction that presented as isolated vertigo. Before the day 4 from disease onset when diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became positive, this patient showed unilateral loss of visual suppression, a central type of vestibular dysfunction. Since MRI abnormalities may not appear in the early few days from disease onset, unilateral loss of visual suppression might become an important diagnostic option for isolated vertigo due to a lateral medullary infarction. This finding is presumably relevant to the inferior olive lesion.

  15. Panmedullary edema with inferior olivary hypertrophy in bilateral medial medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuteru; Miyashita, Fumio; Koga, Masatoshi; Yamada, Naoaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    Bilateral medial medullary infarction (MMI) is a rare type of stroke with poor outcomes. Inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy results from a pathologic lesion in the Guillain-Mollaret triangle. The relationship between inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and the medullary lesion is obscure. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 autopsy case with unilateral medial medullary infarction that was associated with ipsilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy has been reported. We describe a rare case with acute infarction in the bilateral medial medulla oblongata accompanied by subacute bilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and panmedullary edema. The hypertrophy appeared to have been caused by local ischemic damage to the termination of the central tegmental tract at the bilateral inferior olivary nucleus.

  16. [A case of medial medullary infarction with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery].

    PubMed

    Jin, Kazutaka; Aihara, Naoto; Tsukamoto, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, dizziness and vertigo. Neurological examination on admission revealed only upbeat nystagmus without cranial nerve symptoms, paresis, cerebellar signs or sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance(MR) images demonstrated a new T 2 high intensity and T 1 iso-intensity signal lesion in the right upper medial medulla. This medial medullary infarction caused central vestibular dysfunction. MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) originating from the right internal carotid artery to the vertebrobasilar artery associated with the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery at the level of the cervical bifurcation. This is the first report of medullary infarction with persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis. We suspected this medullary infarction was caused by artery to artery embolism in the branch of the right vertebral artery through the PPHA distal originated from the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery.

  17. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  18. A Common Stem Cell for Murine Cortical and Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Van Soest, Peter; Platenburg, Peter Paul; Van Ewijk, Willem

    1995-01-01

    We have addressed the question whether the epithelial stroma in the thymus is derived from a common stem cell or whether cortical and medullary epithelial cells are derived from different embryonic stem cells emerging, for example, from endoderm and ectoderm. By the use of rapidly expanding cultures of thymic epithelial cells (TEC) from 14 to 16 day-old murine fetuses and by specific antibodies against cortical and medullary epithelium, respectively, we were able to demonstrate a small subpopulation of double-labeled TEC in the cultures. These cells were not present in TEC cultures initiated from thymuses of neonatal mice. Double-labeled TEC were also found in tissue sections from fetal thymuses. These findings may indicate that TEC populations of the cortex and the medulla are derived from a common stem cell, with potential for differentiation toward both cortical and medullary TEC. PMID:9700364

  19. Decreased GABAA Receptor Binding in the Medullary Serotonergic System In the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Broadbelt, Kevin G.; Paterson, David S.; Belliveau, Richard A.; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Haas, Elisabeth A.; Stanley, Christina; Krous, Henry F.; Kinney, Hannah C.

    2011-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the medulla oblongata help regulate homeostasis, in part through interactions with the medullary serotonergic (5-HT) system. Previously, we reported abnormalities in multiple 5-HT markers in the medullary 5-HT system of infants dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), suggesting that 5-HT dysfunction is involved in its pathogenesis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that markers of GABAA receptors are decreased in the medullary 5-HT system in SIDS cases compared to controls. Using tissue receptor autoradiography with the radioligand 3H-GABA, we found 25–52% reductions in GABAA receptor binding density in 7 of 10 key nuclei sampled of the medullary 5-HT system in the SIDS cases (postconceptional age [PCA] = 51.7 ± 8.3, n = 28) vs. age-adjusted controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 13.5, n = 8) (p ≤ 0.04). By Western blotting there was 46.2% reduction in GABAAα3 subunit levels in the gigantocellularis (component of the medullary 5-HT system) of SIDS cases (PCA = 53.9 ± 8.4, n = 24) vs. controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 8.3, n = 8) (56.8% standard in SIDS cases vs. 99.35% in controls; p = 0.026). These data suggest that medullary GABAA receptors are abnormal in SIDS infants and that SIDS is a complex disorder of a homeostatic network in the medulla that involves deficits of the GABAergic and 5-HT systems. PMID:21865888

  20. US-guided biopsy of neck masses in postoperative management of patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R T; Reading, C C; Charboneau, J W; James, E M; Grant, C S; Hay, I D

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency (10-MHz) sonography demonstrated a cervical mass or lymphadenopathy, or both, during postoperative follow-up of 52 patients who had undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. Percutaneous biopsy with ultrasonographic (US) guidance was performed in all 52 masses, 44 of which were nonpalpable. Malignant cells were obtained in 29 biopsies, and the results of 20 biopsies were negative, yielding benign lymphocytes only. Results in three biopsies were nondiagnostic due to hypocellular specimens. Therefore, 94% of biopsy results (49) of 52) were confidently assigned as either positive (56%) or negative (38%) for malignancy. There were no complications. High-frequency sonography can demonstrate clinically occult thyroid bed tumor recurrence and lymph node metastases. US-guided biopsy is an accurate and safe technique to confirm or exclude malignancy in patients at high risk of recurrence of thyroid cancer.

  1. Thyroid-associated Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Şahlı, Esra; Gündüz, Kaan

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is the most frequent extrathyroidal involvement of Graves’ disease but it sometimes occurs in euthyroid or hypothyroid patients. Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is an autoimmune disorder, but its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Autoimmunity against putative antigens shared by the thyroid and the orbit plays a role in the pathogenesis of disease. There is an increased volume of extraocular muscles, orbital connective and adipose tissues. Clinical findings of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy are soft tissue involvement, eyelid retraction, proptosis, compressive optic neuropathy, and restrictive myopathy. To assess the activity of the ophthalmopathy and response to treatment, clinical activity score, which includes manifestations reflecting inflammatory changes, can be used. Supportive approaches can control symptoms and signs in mild cases. In severe active disease, systemic steroid and/or orbital radiotherapy are the main treatments. In inactive disease with proptosis, orbital decompression can be preferred. Miscellaneous treatments such as immunosuppressive drugs, somatostatin analogs, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulins and anticytokine therapies have been used in patients who are resistant to conventional treatments. Rehabilitative surgeries are often needed after treatment.

  2. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  3. Immunogenetics of Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2005-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is an organ-specific T-cell mediated disease. It is a complex disease, with a strong genetic component. To date, significant progress has been made towards the identification and functional characterization of HT susceptibility genes. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the genetic input to the pathogenesis of HT. PMID:15762980

  4. Medullary sponge kidney presenting in a neonate with distal renal tubular acidosis and failure to thrive: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Medullary sponge kidney is a congenital anomaly characterized by diffuse ectasy of the collecting tubules of one or both kidneys. It is usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. Case presentation Distal renal tubular acidosis is commonly observed in patients with medullary sponge kidney. We describe here a 50-day-old Egyptian Caucasian girl with medullary sponge kidney who had features of distal renal tubular acidosis, (persistent alkaline urine, hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia) and failure to thrive. Renal ultrasound revealed left renal increased medullary echogenicity and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Conclusion Early gene(s) expression of medullary sponge kidney disease might be responsible for persistent metabolic acidosis during the neonatal period. PMID:19830120

  5. alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in NO production buffers renal medullary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Cowley, A W

    2000-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in modulating the adrenergic vasoconstrictor response of the renal medullary circulation. In anesthetized rats, intravenous infusion of norepinephrine (NE) at a subpressor dose of 0.1 microgram. kg(-1). min(-1) did not alter renal cortical (CBF) and medullary (MBF) blood flows measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry nor medullary tissue PO(2) (P(m)O(2)) as measured by a polarographic microelectrode. In the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in the renal medulla, intravenous infusion of NE significantly reduced MBF by 30% and P(m)O(2) by 37%. With the use of an in vivo microdialysis-oxyhemoglobin NO-trapping technique, we found that intravenous infusion of NE increased interstitial NO concentrations by 43% in the renal medulla. NE-stimulated elevations of tissue NO were completely blocked either by renal medullary interstitial infusion of L-NAME or the alpha(2)-antagonist rauwolscine (30 microgram. kg(-1). min(-1)). Concurrently, intavenous infusion of NE resulted in a significant reduction of MBF in the presence of rauwolscine. The alpha(1)-antagonist prazosin (10 microgram. kg(-1). min(-1) renal medullary interstitial infusion) did not reduce the NE-induced increase in NO production, and NE increased MBF in the presence of prazosin. Microdissection and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the vasa recta expressed the mRNA of alpha(2B)-adrenergic receptors and that medullary thick ascending limb and collecting duct expressed the mRNA of both alpha(2A)- and alpha(2B)-adrenergic receptors. These subtypes of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors may mediate NE-induced NO production in the renal medulla. We conclude that the increase in medullary NO production associated with the activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors counteracts the vasoconstrictor effects of NE in the renal medulla and may play an important role in maintaining a constancy of MBF and medullary

  6. Sporadic bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia: apparent false positive MIBG scan and expected MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Yung, B C; Loke, T K; Tse, T W; Tsang, M W; Chan, J C

    2000-10-01

    Adrenal medullary hyperplasia is a rare cause of clinical symptoms and biochemical findings identical to pheochromocytoma occurring mostly in multiple endocrine neoplasia patients. The scenario of positive MIBG scan, but no focal lesion found on CT and MRI led to diagnostic and management difficulties. Like pheochromocytoma, surgical excision can lead to clinical and biochemical recovery. We report this unusual case of sporadic bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia, with hypertension and biochemical abnormalities alleviated after surgical adrenalectomy. Based on T2 values reported in literature, high signal focal lesions may not appear on T2-weighted MRI images until development of frank pheochromocytoma. MIBG scan remains the most sensitive imaging modality for this condition.

  7. Transient hyperechogenicity of the renal medullary pyramids: incidence in the healthy term newborn.

    PubMed

    Khoory, B J; Andreis, I A; Vino, L; Fanos, V

    1999-01-01

    A screening program was performed on 1881 clinically healthy term newborns, aimed at detecting eventual pathological conditions not diagnosed during pregnancy. Seventy-three cases of transient hyperechogenicity of the renal medullary pyramids were observed, involving one or both kidneys with either sectorial or diffuse pattern. None of the neonates examined had evidence of renal dysfunction and follow-up ultrasound scans demonstrated complete resolution of the sonographic picture. Medullary hyperechogenicity is not rare in healthy term newborns (3.9%); it presents rapid resolution and should be considered in differential diagnosis of pathological conditions.

  8. Medullary cystic disease of the kidney: its occurrence in two siblings

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Satya Paul; Tennant, Robert

    1968-01-01

    Two cases of medullary cystic disease of the kidney in two siblings are presented. In both siblings there was an insidious onset of azotaemia and anaemia at an early age. The urinalyses were normal except for a trace of proteinuria and persistent low specific gravity. The kidneys were small by radiological studies and this was proved at necropsy. The gross microscopic appearances of the kidneys were consistent with medullary cystic disease. The literature on this subject and current views on the similarities between familial juvenile nephronophthisis and this condition are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5705387

  9. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Zuckerkandl tubercle in thyroid surgery: Is it a reality or a myth?

    PubMed Central

    Irkorucu, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Background Zuckerkandl tubercle (ZT) is a lateral projection from the lateral thyroid lobe which is a constant landmark for finding the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery. It is the condensed thyroid parenchyma located in the cricothyroid junction. Even today, ZT and its relationship with recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is not well known by all surgeons. The objectives of the present study were to find out the incidence of ZT in our thyroidectomies and to investigate whether the ZT has a relationship with RLN. We also discussed how to prevent RLN injury during thyroidectomy. Materials and methods One hundred operations were performed by the same surgeon included in this study. All operations performed with intraoperative neuromonitorization (IONM) for proving the visualization of RLN. In each patient, particularly the ZT and its relationship with RLN searched and recorded. We also analyzed the patients in terms of sex, age, clinical diagnosis, and types of performed operations. Results In 100 operations, 173 thyroid lobectomies were considered. 87 of these lobectomies were in right side and 86 in left side. The ZT was determined in 127 of 173 (73.41%) lobectomies. ZT was detected in 68 (78.16%) of right thyroid lobes whereas in 59 (68.60%) of left thyroid lobes. We observed that the ZT was detected more frequently in the right side. In 115 (90.55%) of these occasions, the recurrent nerve was directed upwards covered by the ZT. Conclusions If it is present, ZT is a real constant landmark pointing to the RLN. In order to find and protect RLN during thyroid surgery, a careful, bloodless, and meticulous dissection should be carried out around the ZT. Although our results are encouraging, further researches are still needed on this topic. PMID:27144005

  11. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, B.; Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Vosoughi, H.; Khademi, S.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered. PMID:27853722

  12. A case of thyroid fibromatosis, a rare lesion of this gland

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Rafael Adame; Leite, Valeriano

    2016-01-01

    Summary Thyroid fibromatosis is a very rare lesion; to our knowledge, there are only four cases reported in the medical literature. Herein, we report the clinical case of a woman with thyroid fibromatosis with a long follow-up (11 years). A 63-year-old female patient, with an increasing multinodular goitre without compressive symptoms, was admitted to total thyroidectomy. The histology revealed a spindle-cell proliferation with fibroblastic characteristics with no atypia and thin capillary vessels. Immunohistochemistry was positive for beta-catenin, focally to desmin and alfa-actin and negative for cytokeratins and CD34. Thyroid cells did not display any features of papillary thyroid cancer. These characteristics were compatible with thyroid fibromatosis. For the past 11 years, the patient has been periodically followed up with neck CTs and she has not shown any signs of recurrence. Thyroid fibromatosis has been associated with invasion of surrounding structures in previous reported cases. However, this aggressive behaviour was not observed in our patient. The most challenging differential diagnosis is with papillary thyroid cancer with fibromatosis-like stroma, in which the malignant component is usually peripheral. Therefore, in these cases, it is mandatory to perform an extensive examination of the resected sample. Learning points: Fibromatosis is a mesenchymal lesion that consists of an infiltrative proliferation of fibroblasts without atypia. Thyroid fibromatosis is a rare entity in this gland. In previously reported cases, it has been associated with an invasive behaviour but this was not the case in our patient. When spindle-cell proliferation with fibroblastic/myofibroblastic characteristics is detected on thyroid histology, it is mandatory to exclude a papillary thyroid carcinoma with fibromatosis-like stroma. PMID:27855230

  13. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  14. 2009 American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Perros, P

    2010-08-01

    The American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, published in 2009, provide valuable recommendations based on current evidence. Inevitably, controversies and uncertainties will continue to challenge clinicians and patients. On topics where evidence is not clear-cut, judgement may be coloured by pre-existing practises and the structure of the health service in each country, so one has to be aware of the pitfalls of transferring recommendations to one's own practise.

  15. Thyroidectomy for Painful Thyroiditis Resistant to Steroid Treatment: Three New Cases with Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Enrico; Quaglino, Francesco; Suriani, Adolfo; Palestini, Nicola; Gottero, Cristina; Leli, Renzo; Taraglio, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidal pain is usually due to subacute thyroiditis (SAT). In more severe forms prednisone doses up to 40 mg daily for 2-3 weeks are recommended. Recurrences occur rarely and restoration of steroid treatment cures the disease. Rarely, patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) have thyroidal pain (painful HT, PHT). Differently from SAT, occasional PHT patients showed no benefit from medical treatment so that thyroidectomy was necessary. We report three patients who did not show clinical response to prolonged high dose prednisone treatment: a 50-year-old man, a 35-year-old woman, and a 33-year-old woman. Thyroidectomy was necessary, respectively, after nine-month treatment with 50 mg daily, two-month treatment with 75 mg daily, and one-month treatment with 50 mg daily. The two women were typical cases of PHT. Conversely, in the first patient, thyroid histology showed features of granulomatous thyroiditis, typical of SAT, without fibrosis or lymphocytic infiltration, typical of HT/PHT, coupled to undetectable serum anti-thyroid antibodies. Our data (1) suggest that not only PHT but also SAT may show resistance to steroid treatment and (2) confirm a previous observation in a single PHT patient that increasing prednisone doses above conventional maximal dosages may not be useful in these patients. PMID:26137327

  16. [Clinical guideline for management of patients with low risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Oleaga, Amelia; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Martín, Tomás; Galofré, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing in Spain and worldwide. Overall thyroid cancer survival is very high, and stratification systems to reliably identify patients with worse prognosis have been developed. However, marked differences exist between the different specialists in clinical management of low-risk patients with thyroid carcinoma. Almost half of all papillary thyroid carcinomas are microcarcinomas, and 90% are tumors < 2 cm that have a particularly good prognosis. However, they are usually treated more aggressively than needed, despite the lack of adequate scientific support. Surgery remains the gold standard treatment for these tumors. However, lobectomy may be adequate in most patients, without the need for total thyroidectomy. Similarly, prophylactic lymph node dissection of the central compartment is not required in most cases. This more conservative approach prevents postoperative complications such as hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Postoperative radioiodine remnant ablation and strict suppression of serum thyrotropin, although effective for the more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer, have not been shown to be beneficial for the treatment of low risk patients, and may impair their quality of life. This guideline provides recommendations from the task force on thyroid cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition for adequate management of patients with low-risk thyroid cancer.

  17. Aurora kinase A induces papillary thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis by promoting cofilin-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Yusufu; Jie, Tan; Jing, Zhou; Changwen, Wang; Pan, Yu; Chen, Chen; Tao, Huang

    2016-04-22

    Aurora-A (Aur-A), a member of the serine/threonine Aurora kinase family, plays an important role in ensuring genetic stability during cell division. Previous studies indicated that Aur-A possesses oncogenic activity and may be a valuable therapeutic target in cancer therapy. However, the role of Aur-A in the most common thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), remains largely unknown. In patients with PTC, cancer cell migration and invasion account for most of the metastasis, recurrence, and cancer-related deaths. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is the most important effector of actin polymerization and depolymerization, determining the direction of cell migration. Here, we assessed the correlation between Aur-A and CFL-1 in PTC with lymph node metastasis. Tissue microarray data showed that simultaneous overexpression of Aur-A and CFL-1 correlated with lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer tissue. Inhibition of Aur-A suppressed thyroid cancer cell migration in vitro and decreased lymph node metastasis in nude mice. Importantly, Aur-A increased the non-phosphorylated, active form of CFL-1 in TPC-1 cells, thus promoting cancer cell migration and thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis. Our findings indicate that the combination of Aur-A and CFL-1 may be useful as a molecular prediction model for lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer and raise the possibility of targeting Aur-A and CFL-1 for more effective treatment of thyroid cancer.

  18. Thyroid hormone antibodies and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in mongrel dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Rajatanavin, R.; Fang, S.L.; Pino, S.; Laurberg, P.; Braverman, L.E.; Smith, M.; Bullock, L.P.

    1989-05-01

    Abnormally elevated serum T3 concentrations measured by RIA were observed in 19 clinically euthyroid or hypothyroid mongrel dogs. The serum T4 concentrations in these sera were low, normal, or high. Measurement of the intensity of thyroid hormone binding to serum proteins was determined by equilibrium dialysis. A marked decrease in the percent free T3 was observed in these abnormal sera. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pH 7.4, of normal dog serum enriched with tracer /sup 125/I-labeled thyroid hormones demonstrated binding of (/sup 125/I)T4 to transthyretin, thyroid hormone-binding globulin, and albumin and of (/sup 125/I)T3 primarily to thyroid hormone-binding globulin. In all abnormal sera, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated strikingly higher binding of T3 to immunoglobulin (Ig). Eleven of 16 abnormal sera had minimal to moderate binding of T4 to Ig. The percent free T4 was lower only in dogs whose sera demonstrated markedly increased binding of T4 to Ig. All abnormal sera tested had positive antithyroglobulin antibodies, consistent with the diagnosis of autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis. As in humans, antibodies to thyroid hormones in dogs are more common in the presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and should be considered when elevated serum thyroid hormone concentrations are observed in the absence of clinical thyrotoxicosis. When an antibody to only one thyroid hormone is present, a marked discrepancy in the serum concentrations of T3 and T4 will be observed.

  19. Lymph Node Dissection for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have a wide spectrum of clinical significance. Several variables are taken under consideration when trying to decide on the optimal management of patients with DTC. Routine prophylactic central and/or lateral lymph node dissection is not advocated with exception of central neck dissection for locally advanced tumors. When regarding recurrent disease, foundations have been laid for clinicians to make accurate decisions as to when to perform surgery and when to continue maintaining the patient’s disease under observation. These complex decisions are determined based upon multiple factors, not only regarding the patient’s disease but also the patient’s comprehension of the procedure and apprehension levels. Nevertheless if the patient and/or clinician are emotionally keen to surgically remove the disease then the procedure should be considered. PMID:28117285

  20. [Diagnostic imaging of thyroid tumor].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Megumi

    2012-11-01

    Recently, thyroid nodules are found frequently when other imaging test was performed, and selection of diagnostic methods and its handling have become a problem clinically. Although it is possible to differentiate the malignant tumor from benign one using B-mode ultrasound, it can be obtained more detailed information in combination of other modalities such as color Doppler and tissue elasticity imaging (elastography). The malignant B-mode findings are irregular shape, indistinct border, hypoechoic and inhomogeneous internal echo, and fine calcification. CT/MRI is useful to evaluate the extention of thyroid cancer to adjacent organs beyond the thyroid capsule. It is also useful to evaluate distant metastases to lung or brain of thyroid cancer. In nuclear medicine, 125I scintigraphy is used to measure thyroid uptake rate, 131I scintigraphy is used to investigate the distant metastasis of thyroid cancer. It is necessary to be careful that some false-positive cases exist in 18FDG-PET.