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Sample records for recurrent medullary thyroid

  1. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. MTC is very rare. It can occur in children and adults. Unlike other types ...

  2. [Medullary thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Niccoli-Sire, P; Conte-Devolx, B

    2007-10-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is developed from thyroid C cells that secrete calcitonin (CT). MTC represents 5-10% of thyroid cancers with a 1-2% incidence in nodular thyroid diseases. Diagnosis is usually made by a solitary nodule often associated to nodal metastasis and confirmed by a high basal CT level which represents its biological marker. MTC may present as a sporadic form and in about 30% of case as a familial form as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, an hereditary dominant inherited disease related to germline mutation of the proto-oncogene RET. Both biological (CT) and genetic (RET) markers allows the optimal diagnosis and treatment of MTC; the former allows screening and early diagnosis of MTC by routinely CT measurements in nodular thyroid diseases that make the adequate and complete surgery required to be performed. The former leads to diagnose familial MTC and to identify at risk subjects in whom early or prophylactic surgery may be performed. Treatment of MTC is based on the complete surgical resection: total thyroidectomy associated to central and laterocervical nodal dissection. For locally advanced or metastatic MTC, complete cervical surgery is required and needs to be associated to other systemic treatments: as chemotherapy is not very efficient, radioimmunotherapy and RET target gene therapy (mainly tyrosine kinase inhibitors) appears as possible valuable therapeutic options for the future. Prognosis of MTC is mainly related to both the stage of the disease and the extend of the initial surgery. Ten-year survival is about 80% when the patients are not surgically cured and reaches 95% when the biological marker CT is normalized after surgery. PMID:17572372

  3. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  4. What is currently the best radiopharmaceutical for the hybrid PET/CT detection of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Slavikova, K; Montravers, F; Treglia, G; Kunikowska, J; Kaliska, L; Vereb, M; Talbot, J N; Balogova, S

    2013-06-01

    Among thyroid malignancies, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has some very specific features. Production and secretion of large amounts of peptides occur in malignant transformed C cells with few exceptions, leading to high serum levels of calcitonin (Ctn) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that act after thyroidectomy as tumour markers warning for the presence of persistent or metastatic MTC. The availability of those serum biomarkers with an excellent sensitivity challenges medical imaging to localise the recurrent cancer tissue, since surgery is a major therapeutic option. The aims of this article are (i) to review literature evidence about the efficacy and tolerance of radiopharmaceuticals for 3 targets of PET/CT imaging (glucose metabolism, bioamines metabolism and somatostatin receptors) and also bone scintigraphy which is recommended in the Guidelines of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO; (ii) to compare the availability and the costs in relation with those radiopharmaceuticals, (iii) and to discuss a possible sequence of those examinations, in order to optimise spending and to minimise the overall radiation dose. In this context of recurrent MTC suspected on rising tumour markers levels after thyroidectomy, this survey of literature confirms that FDOPA is the best radiopharmaceutical for PET/CT with significant diagnostic performance if Ctn>150 pg/mL; an early image acquisition starting during the first 15 min is advised. In negative cases, FDG should be the next PET radiopharmaceutical, in particular if Ctn and CEA levels are rapidly rising, and PET with a somatostatin analogue labelled with gallium-68 when neither FDOPA nor FDG PET are conclusive. Bone scintigraphy could complement FDG-PET/CT if FDOPA is not available.

  5. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  6. Association of the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Lei, Jianyong; Chen, Wenjie; Gong, Yanping; Luo, Han; Li, Zhihui; Gong, Rixiang; Zhu, Jingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are known to be prognostic factors in several cancers. However, no previous investigation has been performed to evaluate the significance of the NLR and PLR in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The aim of this study was to identify the ability of the preoperative NLR or PLR to predict lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. Data from all patients with MTC who had undergone surgery at our institution from May 2009 to May 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to identify optimal NLR and PLR cutoff points, and we assessed independent predictors of lymph node metastasis and recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The ideal cutoff points for predicting lymph node involvement were 2.7 for the NLR and 105.3 for the PLR. The optimal cutoff points of the NLR and PLR for predicting recurrence were 2.8 and 129.8, respectively. Using the cutoff values, we found that PLR>105.3 (odds ratio [OR] 4.782, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–16.7) was an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis and that PLR>129.8 (OR 3.838, 95% CI 1.1–13.5) was an independent predictor of recurrence. Our study suggests that the preoperative PLR, but not NLR, was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. PMID:27749581

  7. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: a rare presentation as a hypervascular tumour.

    PubMed

    Li, W Y; Tomlinson, M A; Bryson, J M; Hopkins, N F G

    2002-08-01

    Sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) usually presents with a thyroid mass, cervical lymphadenopathy or other local cervical symptoms. Often the diagnosis is unsuspected pre-operatively. We report a unique case of a mixed follicular medullary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a tumour with extreme vascularity. The management of hypervascular thyroid tumours is discussed together with current controversies regarding persistent hypercalcitoninaemia. PMID:12389699

  8. Management of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hadoux, Julien; Pacini, Furio; Tuttle, R Michael; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer arises from calcitonin-producing C-cells and accounts for 3-5% of all thyroid cancers. The discovery of a locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer that is not amenable to surgery or of distant metastases needs careful work-up, including measurement of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (and their doubling times), in addition to comprehensive imaging to determine the extent of the disease, its aggressiveness, and the need for any treatment. In the past, cytotoxic chemotherapy was used for treatment but produced little benefit. For the past 10 years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and RET (rearranged during transfection) have been used when a systemic therapy is indicated for large tumour burden and documented disease progression. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have shown benefits on progression-free survival compared with placebo in this setting, but their toxic effect profiles need thorough clinical management in specialised centres. This Review describes the management and treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer with emphasis on current targeted therapies and perspectives to improve patient care. Most treatment responses are transient, emphasising that mechanisms of resistance need to be better understood and that the efficacy of treatment approaches should be improved with combination therapies or other drugs that might be more potent or target other pathways, including immunotherapy. PMID:26608066

  9. Recent Updates on the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor derived from the thyroid C cells producing calcitonin. MTC accounts for 0.6% of all thyroid cancers and incidence of MTC increased steadily between 1997 and 2011 in Korea. It occurs either sporadically or in a hereditary form based on germline rearranged during transfection (RET) mutations. MTC can be cured only by complete resection of the thyroid tumor and any loco-regional metastases. The most appropriate treatment is still less clear in patients with residual or recurrent disease after initial surgery or those with distant metastases because most patients even with metastatic disease have indolent courses with slow progression for several years and MTC is not responsive to either radioactive iodine therapy or thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression. Recently, two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), vandetanib and cabozantinib, are approved for use in patients with advanced, metastatic or progressive MTC. In this review, we summarize the current approach according to revised American Thyroid Association guidelines and recent advances in systemic treatment such as TKIs for patients with persistent or recurrent MTC after surgery. PMID:27586449

  10. Concurrent Medullary, Papillary, and Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas and Simultaneous Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mazeh, Haggi; Orlev, Amir; Mizrahi, Ido; Gross, David J.; Freund, Herbert R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common thyroid cancer (85%). Follicular thyroid carcinoma is the second most common type of thyroid cancer, accounting for up to 10% of all thyroid cancers. Medullary thyroid carcinoma accounts for only 5-8% of thyroid cancers. Concurrent medullary, follicular, and papillary carcinomas of the thyroid gland are extremely rare and reported scarcely. Case Report A 72-year-old male presented with nonspecific neck pain. The workup revealed a nodular thyroid gland with a follicular lesion on fine-needle aspiration. Total thyroidectomy was performed and pathological examination identified a 25-mm follicular carcinoma, two papillary microcarcinomas, and two medullary microcarcinomas. The genetic workup was negative and no other family members were diagnosed with any endocrinopathy. Two months after surgery, the patient was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome that was treated with laparoscopic left adrenalectomy. On 3-year follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic with no evidence of recurrent disease. Conclusion We present a rare case of a patient with follicular, papillary, and medullary thyroid carcinoma, and Cushing's syndrome. To date, no known genetic mutation or syndrome can account for this combination of neoplastic thyroid and adrenal pathologies, although future research may prove differently. PMID:25960965

  11. Recurrent intramedullary epidermoid cyst of conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Christina; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2011-12-13

    Spinal intramedullary epidermoid cyst is a rare condition. Recurrent epidermoid cyst in the spine cord is known to occur. The authors describe a case of recurrent conus medullaris epidermoid cyst in a 24-year-old female. She initially presented at 7 years of age with bladder disturbance in the form of diurnal enuresis and recurrent urinary tract infection. MRI lumbar spine revealed a 4 cm conus medullaris epidermoid cyst. Since the initial presentation, the cyst had recurred seven times in the same location and she underwent surgical intervention in the form of exploration and debulking. This benign condition, owing to its anatomical location, has posed a surgical and overall management challenge. This occurrence is better managed in a tertiary-care centre requiring multi-disciplinary treatment approach.

  12. Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Monitoring and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Douglas W.

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and then focuses on current use of molecular, biochemical, and imaging disease markers as a basis for selection of appropriate therapy. Clinicians treating MTC patients face a series of challenges: 1) distinguishing MTC as early as possible from benign nodular disease and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in order to choose appropriate initial surgery; 2) managing low-level residual cancer in otherwise asymptomatic individuals; and 3) treating progressive metastatic disease. Early clinical trials employing small molecules targeting Ret and/or VEGF receptors suggest that such approaches could be effective and well-tolerated. This review highlights early progress in targeted therapy of MTC, along with significant challenges in disease monitoring to appropriately select and evaluate patients being treated with these therapies. PMID:17673130

  13. Hypercalcitoninemia is not Pathognomonic of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Sergio PA; Lourenço, Delmar M; Santos, Marcelo Augusto; Tavares, Marcos R; Toledo, Rodrigo A; de Menezes Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie

    2009-01-01

    Hypercalcitoninemia has frequently been reported as a marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma. Currently, calcitonin measurements are mostly useful in the evaluation of tumor size and progression, and as an index of biochemical improvement of medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although measurement of calcitonin is a highly sensitive method for the detection of medullary thyroid carcinoma, it presents a low specificity for this tumor. Several physiologic and pathologic conditions other than medullary thyroid carcinoma have been associated with increased levels of calcitonin. Several cases of thyroid nodules associated with increased values of calcitonin are not medullary thyroid carcinomas, but rather are related to other conditions, such as hypercalcemias, hypergastrinemias, neuroendocrine tumors, renal insufficiency, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas, and goiter. Furthermore, prolonged treatment with omeprazole (> 2–4 months), beta-blockers, glucocorticoids and potential secretagogues, have been associated with hypercalcitoninemia. An association between calcitonin levels and chronic auto-immune thyroiditis remains controversial. Patients with calcitonin levels >100 pg/mL have a high risk for medullary thyroid carcinoma (~90%–100%), whereas patients with values from 10 to 100 pg/mL (normal values: <8.5 pg/mL for men, < 5.0 pg/mL for women; immunochemiluminometric assay) have a <25% risk for medullary thyroid carcinoma. In multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), RET mutation analysis is the gold-standard for the recommendation of total preventive thyroidectomy to relatives at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation (50%). False-positive calcitonin results within MEN2 families have led to incorrect indications of preventive total thyroidectomy to RET mutation negative relatives. In this review, we focus on the differential diagnosis of hypercalcitoninemia, underlining its importance for the avoidance of misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma and

  14. Medullary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a supraglottic mass.

    PubMed

    White, Jeremy; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Schwartz, Arnold; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of medullary thyroid carcinoma that presented as a metastasis to the supraglottic larynx. A 92-year-old man with a 3-month history of voice change and airway obstruction was diagnosed with medullary thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the supraglottis. Excision of the mass, total thyroidectomy, and elective neck dissection were recommended, but the patient declined because of his advanced age. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is a rare neuroendocrine tumor with a poor prognosis when associated with a distant metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid presenting as a supraglottic mass. Total thyroidectomy, neck dissection, and surgical excision of the entire tumor comprise the treatment of choice. PMID:25397389

  15. Sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Clinical Data From A University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie M.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Imazawa, Alice T.; Lourenço, Delmar M.; Ezabella, Marilza C. L.; Tavares, Marcos R.; Toledo, Sergio P. A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medullary thyroid carcinoma may occur in a sporadic (s-medullary thyroid carcinoma, 75%) or in a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 form (MEN2, 25%). These clinical forms differ in many ways, as s-medullary thyroid carcinoma cases are RET-negative in the germline and are typically diagnosed later than medullary thyroid carcinoma in MEN2 patients. In this study, a set of cases with s-medullary thyroid carcinoma are documented and explored. PURPOSE: To document the phenotypes observed in s-medullary thyroid carcinoma cases from a university group and to attempt to improve earlier diagnosis of s-medullary thyroid carcinoma. Some procedures for diagnostics are also recommended. METHOD: Patients (n=26) with apparent s-medullary thyroid carcinoma were studied. Their clinical data were reviewed and peripheral blood was collected and screened for RET germline mutations. RESULTS: The average age at diagnosis was 43.9 years (± 10.82 SD) and did not differ between males and females. Calcitonin levels were increased in all cases. Three patients presented values that were 100-fold greater than the normal upper limit. Most (61.54%) had values that were 20-fold below this limit. Carcinoembryonic antigen levels were high in 70.6% of cases. There was no significant association between age at diagnosis, basal calcitonin levels or time of disease onset with thyroid tumor size (0.6–15 cm). Routine thyroid cytology yielded disappointing diagnostic accuracy (46.7%) in this set of cases. After total thyroidectomy associated with extensive cervical lymph node resection, calcitonin values remained lower than 5 pg/mL for at least 12 months in eight of the cases (30.8%). Immunocyto- and histochemistry for calcitonin were positive in all analyzed cases. None of the 26 cases presented germline mutations in the classical hotspots of the RET proto-oncogene. CONCLUSION: Our cases were identified late. The basal calcitonin measurements and immunostaining for calcitonin were

  16. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  17. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Iodine I 131 and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  18. Revised American Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asa, Sylvia L.; Dralle, Henning; Elisei, Rossella; Evans, Douglas B.; Gagel, Robert F.; Lee, Nancy; Machens, Andreas; Moley, Jeffrey F.; Pacini, Furio; Raue, Friedhelm; Frank-Raue, Karin; Robinson, Bruce; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Santoro, Massimo; Schlumberger, Martin; Shah, Manisha; Waguespack, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The American Thyroid Association appointed a Task Force of experts to revise the original Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association. Methods: The Task Force identified relevant articles using a systematic PubMed search, supplemented with additional published materials, and then created evidence-based recommendations, which were set in categories using criteria adapted from the United States Preventive Services Task Force Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The original guidelines provided abundant source material and an excellent organizational structure that served as the basis for the current revised document. Results: The revised guidelines are focused primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and hereditary MTC. Conclusions: The Task Force developed 67 evidence-based recommendations to assist clinicians in the care of patients with MTC. The Task Force considers the recommendations to represent current, rational, and optimal medical practice. PMID:25810047

  19. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M; Walker, Blair A; Schein, Jacqueline E; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M

    2016-03-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  20. Alternative surgical strategies in patients with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma: Long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi Hong; Liu, Qin Jiang; Zhang, You Cheng; Yang, Rong

    2011-09-01

    The extent of surgical resection in patients with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (SMTC) remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to discuss the prognosis of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma with different surgical treatments. Of 73 patients with SMTC (mean age of 43.78 years at diagnosis), 70 patients were followed up for 12.0-169.0 months (median 90.0). Having given their informed consent, 12 patients underwent total thyroidectomy with bilateral central neck dissection (group A), 40 underwent subtotal thyroidectomy preserving contralateral thyroid tissue on the entrance point of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx with ipsilateral modified radical neck dissection (group B), and 18 patients underwent subtotal thyroidectomy preserving contralateral thyroid tissue on the entrance point of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx with bilateral modified radical neck dissection (group C). The diagnosis was confirmed by a pathology examination. The incidences of hypoparathyroidism and recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, the cancer recurrence rates and survival time were investigated post-operatively. Significant differences were found between groups A, B and C in the incidence of hypoparathyroidism (χ(2)=40.9, P<0.01), as well as that of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury (χ(2)=32.9, P<0.01). The cancer recurrence rates in groups A, B and C were 75.0% (9/12), 2.5% (1/40) and 44.4% (8/18) respectively, (χ(2)=31.1, P<0.01) and the cure rates were 25, 97.5 and 55.6% respectively (χ(2)=31.1, P<0.01). The mean survival times in groups A, B and C were 77.8, 106.1 and 111.0 months respectively, but significant difference was noted (χ(2)=3.2, P>0.05). In conclusion, compared to total thyroidectomy with bilateral central neck dissection, subtotal thyroidectomy with ipsilateral/bilateral modified radical neck dissection showed a lower incidence of hypoparathyroidism, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and lower rates of recurrence, along

  1. Radioiodine in the treatment of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Hellman, D E; Kartchner, M; Van Antwerp, J D; Salmon, S E; Patton, D D; O'Mara, R

    1979-03-01

    Medullary carcinoma (MC) of the thyroid, in contrast to papillary-follicular carcinoma, fails to concentrate iodine and thus has not been treated with radioactive iodine. We have successfully treated a 16-yr-old Mexican-American girl with residual MC after maximal thyroidectomy (Tx), utilizing radioiodine (131I) to deliver radiation to residual follicular cells in the tumor bed. Immediately after Tx, plasma thyrocalcitonin levels before and during calcium infusion were all elevated (640--1200 pg/ml). 131I (150 mCi) was administered 12 days after Tx after four daily im injections of bovine TSH. Three months after 131I therapy, thyrocalcitonin levels before and during calcium infusion were all normal (less than 50 pg/ml). Ten months after 131I therapy, thyrocalcitonin levels before and after iv pentagastrin were all normal (less than 60 pg/ml). These results suggest that parafollicular cells are radiosensitive, and that therapeutic levels of radiation can be delivered to these cells after Tx if iodine trapping by the remaining follicular cells is enhanced by high levels of circulating TSH. 131I may be the therapy of choice for MC after Tx, if disease has not spread beyond the area proximate to the thyroid gland.

  2. Medullary thyroid carcinoma in a patient with Hashimoto's thyroiditis diagnosed by calcitonin washout from a thyroid nodule.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Umut; Gursoy, Alptekin; Ozdemir, Handan; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-07-01

    Serum calcitonin is a tumor marker used in the diagnosis and follow-up of medullary thyroid carcinoma. Calcitonin washout evaluation is a new method used for suspicious thyroid nodules and lymph nodes. Limited clinical data are present about the efficacy of this method. A 61-year-old female patient with known Hashimoto's thyroditis and an 8-mm hypoechoic nodule was presented with one previously benign fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). On referral to our department, she had a moderately high-serum calcitonin level, and we repeated the FNAC that was reported as nondiagnostic. We performed FNAC for the third time together with calcitonin washout evaluation from the thyroid nodule. The FNAC was again nondiagnostic, but the calcitonin washout level from the thyroid nodule was 152.569 pg/mL. Total thyroidectomy was performed, and the diagnosis was confirmed as medullary thyroid carcinoma. Calcitonin washout evaluation may be a useful method in the differential diagnosis of patients with thyroid nodules having moderately high-serum calcitonin levels.

  3. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives. PMID:27185870

  4. Results of Surgical Therapy in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Mihaela; Zosin, Ioana; Timar, Bogdan; Lazar, Fulger; Vlad, Adrian; Timar, Romulus; Cornianu, Marioara

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare form of malignancy, having an intermediate prognosis. Controversies exist regarding the best surgical approach. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome in a group of patients with MTC, diagnosed and followed up in a single care center. We performed a retrospective analysis of all the patients diagnosed with MTC in the Department of Endocrinology from the County Emergency Hospital Timisoara between 1992 and 2012. The study group included 19 patients, 6 men (31.6 %), mean age 41.2 ± 12.5 years (20-72 years). The preoperative diagnosis was based on the protocol for nodular thyroid disease. Total or near-total thyroidectomy was performed in 10 out of 16 patients who could be operated. Postoperative follow-up included repeated measurements of serum calcitonin and imaging investigations. Nine out of the total of 19 (47.3 %) patients had hereditary forms of MTC. Most of the cases (84.2 %) were submitted to surgery. The median duration of follow-up was 84 months. The pTNM staging indicated that the majority of the patients with hereditary MTC were diagnosed in an earlier stage. Disease remission was achieved in 7 cases (43.8 %). Four patients, all with sporadic forms, died. Survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were significantly higher (p = 0.048) in patients with hereditary MTC. An early diagnosis of MTC allows a better surgical approach and an improved survival rate. We support the general recommendation that modified radical neck dissection is not necessary for all the patients with MTC. PMID:27574350

  5. Medullary thyroid cancer: RET testing of an archival material.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Jørgensen, Gita; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Krogdahl, Annelise S; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nielsen, Finn C

    2010-04-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) might be sporadic (75%) or hereditary (25%). Until the mid nineties the diagnosis of hereditary MTC was based on family history, clinical evaluation, histological detection of C-cell hyperplasia and tumor multifocality. Patients and families with hereditary MTC might be missed? Today mutation analysis of the RET proto-oncogene is routinely performed on DNA. Departments of pathology often store tissue specimens from performed surgical procedures. The purpose of this study was to examine if analysis of DNA extracted from formalin fixed archival tissue might be a possible method to identify not previously known cases of hereditary MTC. In 23 cases, tissue analysis was performed, and in 2 patients (9%) a mutation was identified, but in both cases the most likely explanation was contamination with tumor tissue. The ability to detect RET mutations was confirmed by testing of non-tumor tissue from patients with known hereditary MTC. This study shows that genetic testing of archival MTC material is technically possible and might be a way of identifying patients with previously not recognized hereditary MTC. PMID:19823860

  6. Radioimmunoimaging of metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland using an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Watson, C.G.; Levine, G.; Tauxe, W.N.; Yousem, S.A.; Unger, M.; Kowal, C.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elevated levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or calcitonin after surgical therapy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) indicate the presence of residual or metastatic disease. CEA elevations appear to be prognostically more reliable in patients with metastatic disease and suggest a more virulent tumor. Attempts to stage the disease with use of conventional imaging techniques are usually inadequate, as is the therapy for disseminated or recurrent MCT. An indium-111-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ZCE-025) was used to image metastases in a patient with MCT. Potential applications of monoclonal antibody technology in the management of MCT would include (1) preoperative differentiation of unicentric from multicentric thyroid gland involvement, (2) detection of regional or distant metastases or both, (3) measurement of response to systemic therapy, and (4) the facilitation of radionuclide immunoconjugate therapy.

  7. Contribution of different scintigraphic techniques to the management of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrock, D.; Blossey, H.C.; Steinroeder, M.; Munz, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    We compared three different scintigraphic techniques for the localization of neck recurrences and metastases in seven patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma one month to eight years after the first surgical intervention. Three successive scintigraphic studies were performed in five patients (6 x 3 studies) within two weeks using 201Tl chloride, 111In-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) BW 431/31, and 131I meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG). Additionally, 11 studies were performed with the 111In-labeled MoAb fragment BW 431/31 (seven studies) or the 99mTc-labeled intact anti-CEA MoAb BW 431/26 (four studies). The gold standards for classifying scintigraphic results were biopsy, histology, surgery, and cytology. Six regions were classified as positive or negative in each study: thyroid region, four quadrants (lymph node regions) around the thyroid, and the region of the upper mediastinum. Of 36 sites, 201Tl was true positive (TP) in seven sites, false-positive (FP) in one site, true negative (TN) in 22 sites, and false-negative (FN) in six sites, resulting in a sensitivity of 54% and a specificity of 96%. 131I MIBG was TP in four sites, FP in none of the sites, TN in 23 sites, and FN in nine sites, with a sensitivity of 31% and a specificity of 100%. Immunoscintigraphy (102 sites overall) was TP in 16 sites, FP in five sites, TN in 77 sites, and FN in four sites, resulting in a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 94%. Immunoscintigraphy with 111In/99mTc anti-CEA F(ab')2 fragment/intact antibody is superior to scintigraphy with 201Tl and 131I MIBG.

  8. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of primary and metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma in a young dog

    PubMed Central

    Vieson, Miranda D.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Moon-Larson, Martha; Saunders, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the gross, histological, and immunohistochemical features of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with pulmonary metastases in a young dog. Sheets of pleomorphic cells supported by fibrous stroma characterized the primary mass, while metastatic nodules had a neuroendocrine pattern. Despite differing histologic features, all masses showed marked immunoreactivity against calcitonin and multiple neuroendocrine markers consistent with MTC. Although MTC is a well-recognized entity, it may be difficult to distinguish this mass from other thyroid neoplasms, necessitating immunohistochemical characterization. PMID:24690600

  9. Charting a course through the CEAs: diagnosis and management of medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher W; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun

    2016-09-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an uncommon thyroid cancer that requires a high index of suspicion to facilitate diagnosis of early-stage disease amenable to surgical cure. The challenges of diagnosis, as well as management in the setting of persistent disease, are explored in the context of a case presenting with the incidental finding of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and an (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET)-positive thyroid incidentaloma detected following treatment of colorectal cancer. Strategies to individualize prognosis, and emerging PET-based imaging modalities, particularly the potential role of (18) F-DOPA-PET in staging, are reviewed. PMID:27230389

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  11. A Genomic Alternative to Identify Medullary Thyroid Cancer Preoperatively in Thyroid Nodules with Indeterminate Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Robert J.; Traweek, S. Thomas; Lanman, Richard B.; Kennedy, Giulia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of calcitonin screening for the rare medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is controversial due to questions of efficacy, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. This study reports the results of a large prospective validation using a machine-trained algorithm (MTC Classifier) to preoperatively identify MTC in fine-needle aspiration biopsies in lieu of calcitonin measurements. Methods: Cytology analysis on a prospective consecutive series of 50,430 thyroid nodule biopsies yielded a total of 7815 indeterminate (Bethesda categories III/IV) cases, which were tested with the MTC classifier. A prospective, consecutively submitted series of 2673 Bethesda III–VI cases with cytology determined locally was also evaluated. RNA was isolated and tested for the MTC Classifier using microarrays. Results: Forty-three cases were positive by the MTC Classifier among 10,488 tested nodules (0.4%), consistent with the low prevalence of MTC. Of these, all but one was histologically or biochemically confirmed as MTC, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%. Of the positive cases, only 19 (44%) had been specifically suspected of MTC by cytology, highlighting the limitations of light microscopy to detect this disease. Three surgically confirmed MTC cases that were detected by the MTC Classifier had low basal serum calcitonin values, indicating these would have been missed by traditional calcitonin screening methods. A pooled analysis of three independent validation sets demonstrates high test sensitivity (97.9%), specificity (99.8%), PPV (97.9%), and negative predictive value (99.8%). Conclusions: A clinical paradigm is proposed, whereby cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules being tested for common malignancies using gene expression can be simultaneously tested for MTC using the same genomic assay at no added cost. PMID:26992356

  12. Human medullary thyroid carcinoma: cell cultures and xenotransplants in nude mice. Immunocytochemistry and calcitonin secretion.

    PubMed

    Andry, G; Lothaire, P; Vico, P; Dumont, P; Libert, A; Degeyter, M; Larsimont, D; Saigo, P E; Body, J J; Atassi, G

    1989-12-01

    Occult primary and recurrent medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC) detected only by elevated calcitonin levels in the peripheral blood, generally after pentagastrin-test stimulation, are difficult to localize. Some new imaging procedures with radionuclide tracers or radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen seem to bring some potentially therapeutic benefits. We report our results with cell cultures and xenotransplants of human MTC with the intention of establishing reproducible models in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures secrete calcitonin at up to 1200 pg/ml for periods ranging from 3 to 13 weeks. Immunocytochemistry detects cytoplasmic granules positive for calcitonin in polygonal epithelioid cells with dendritic processes. Xenotransplants in nude mice fare better in the subcutaneous axilla than in the subrenal capsule assay. In the former location the tumor-take is good and calcitonin is detected in the blood of the tumor-bearing animals, at levels ranging from 286 to more than 20,000 pg/ml. These models would be potentially usable as targets for radionuclide tracers and/or radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2689238

  13. Ectopic ACTH Production Leading to Diagnosis of Underlying Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Leslee N; Wilson, Jessica R; Baum, Howard B A

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has been described as a source of ectopic ACTH secretion in patients with Cushing's syndrome. This is an infrequent association, occurring in less than 1% of MTC cases. Among these, it is even more unusual for an initial diagnosis of hypercortisolism to lead to the discovery of underlying MTC. Here we present a case of a patient with weakness, diarrhea, and hypokalemia who was found first to have Cushing's syndrome and later diagnosed with metastatic MTC. The patient was treated initially with oral agents to control his hypercortisolism, then with an etomidate infusion after experiencing intestinal perforation. He also received vandetanib therapy targeting his underlying malignancy, as this has been shown to reverse clinical signs of Cushing's syndrome in patients with MTC and subsequent ectopic ACTH secretion. Bilateral adrenalectomy was ultimately required. Medullary thyroid carcinoma should be considered in patients presenting with Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, and a multimodality treatment approach is often required. PMID:27141514

  14. Immunocytochemical localization and identification of prosomatostatin gene products in medullary carcinoma of human thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Scopsi, L; Ferrari, C; Pilotti, S; Holst, J J; Rehfeld, J F; Fossati, G; Rilke, F

    1990-08-01

    Thirty-three cases of histologically proven calcitonin-positive medullary thyroid carcinoma were studied immunocytochemically for the occurrence of prosomatostatin-related peptides. Positive cells, identified with a panel of antisera raised against four different regions of the prosomatostatin molecule, were found in 100% of the tumors. Most but not all somatostatin-positive cells were also immunoreactive for calcitonin. Notably, seven patients harboring somatostatin-rich tumors revealed a more favorable clinical course. The results (1) indicate that somatostatin production is a universal concomitant of thyroid medullary carcinoma, (2) suggest that these cells are likely to produce a somatostatin precursor molecule similar to mammalian prosomatostatin, and (3) imply that somatostatin-reactive cells may have as yet unknown roles in these tumors, possibly in the realm of paracrine and autocrine regulation of cell growth.

  15. [Medullary thyroid carcinoma in a 10-month-old child with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B].

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Døssing, Helle; Bender, Lars; Godballe, Christian

    2014-01-27

    In infants at risk of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) the American Thyroid Association recommends genetic testing as soon as possible after birth and that thyroidectomy should be performed in MEN2B RET-mutation positive individuals as soon as possible and if possible within the first year of life. We present a ten-month-old girl with MEN2B who had prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical specimen showed medullary thyroid carcinoma. This case emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and prophylactic thyroidectomy in MEN2B patients. PMID:27498810

  16. Horner's Syndrome Incidental to Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Excision: Case Report and Brief Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Spiliopoulou, Sofia P; Zolota, Vassiliki; Papadas, Theodoros A

    2016-01-01

    Horner's syndrome is characterized by a combination of ipsilateral miosis, blepharoptosis, enophthalmos, facial anhidrosis, and iris heterochromia in existence of congenital lesions. The syndrome results from a disruption of the ipsilateral sympathetic innervation of the eye and ocular adnexa at different levels. Though rare, thyroid and neck surgery could be considered as possible causes of this clinical entity. We present a case of Horner's syndrome in a patient after total thyroidectomy and neck dissection for medullary thyroid cancer with neck nodal disease and attempt a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:27200201

  17. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: a review on ethical considerations in treatment of children.

    PubMed

    Nozhat, Zahra; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system and it accounts approximately 1%-3% of all human cancers. Among the three subtypes of thyroid cancers, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is the most common cause of death in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A (MEN2A), MEN type 2B (MEN2B) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Generally, MTC accounts for up to 10% of all types of thyroid cancers. It is one of the aggressive forms of thyroid carcinoma which is manifested in childhood ages more than adults, and it comprises about 17% of all pediatric thyroid cancer. Like the other cancers, prevention of MTC is easier than its cure. In the recent decades (from 1993) the diagnosis of asymptomatic child carrying RET mutations in the affected families by MTC, has been provided by genetic screening, and prophylactic thyroidectomy is an efficacy therapeutic procedure. On the one hand, according to near the complete penetrance of the disease and its onset in the early years of life, it is required to accelerate the protection of at-risk children with relative affected by MTC and on the other hand, there are several obstructions to MTC treatment including: 1) the proband's refusal to disclose the RET mutation genetic testing results, 2) children's vulnerability because of their inability to participate in the informed consent, and 3) the existence of conflict between physicians and children's guardian. In this review article, the recommendations and ethical issues of MTC treatment in asymptomatic and at-risk children have been summarized. PMID:26974132

  18. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  19. Serum calcitonin-lowering effect of magnesium in patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed Central

    Anast, C; David, L; Winnacker, J; Glass, R; Baskin, W; Brubaker, L; Burns, T

    1975-01-01

    The effect of magnesium chloride or magnesium sulfate infusion on circulating levels of immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) was evaluated on nine occasions in three patients with metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. One patient was normocalcemic and had normal circulating levels of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH), one patient was hypocalcemic and had surgical hypoparathyroidism, and one patient had mild to moderate hypercalcemia associated with bone metastases. The basal serum iPTH levels were undetectable in the latter two patients. In every instance magnesium administration produced a rapid and striking fall in circulating iCT and usually a detectable fall in serum calcium. During the hypermagnesemic state, serum iPTH fell from normal to undetectable in the patient with normal parathyroid function, while serum iPTH levels remained undetectable in the hypoparathyroid patient and in the patient with hypercalcemia associated with bone metastases. The results of these studies indicate that: (a) contrary to what has been reported in normal experimental animals, magnesium administration lowers circulating iCT in human subjects with thyroid medullary carcinoma and (b) the calcium-lowering effect produced by magnesium in patients with medullary carcinoma may, in part at least, be due to a redistribution of body calcium that is not mediated by the actions of either parathyroid hormone or clacitonin. PMID:1202087

  20. Mixed medullary-papillary carcinoma of the thyroid: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gurkan, Eren; Gurbuz, Yesim; Tarkun, Ilhan; Canturk, Zeynep; Cetinarslan, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) are two distinct types of thyroid carcinoma with considerable difference in terms of cellular origin, histopathological appearance, clinical course and prevalence. The histogenetic origin and possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of mixed medullary-papillary carcinoma of the thyroid are still unclear. The most widely accepted hypotheses considering co-occurrence of MTC and PTC are stem cell theory, collision effect theory and hostage theory. Herein we describe two rare cases of mixed medullary-papillary thyroid carcinoma with co-occurrence of MTC and PTC which developed with concomitant MEN 2A and different sites of lymph node metastasis in the first patient, while with atypical clinical presentation in the second patient. In conclusion, co-expression of thyroglobulin, synaptophysin and chromogranin by the papillary component of mixed tumor seems to support stem cell theory in our first case, whereas positive staining for calcitonin but not for thyroglobulin in the medullary component of the tumor along with separation of these two tumors from each other by a normal thyroid tissue seem to indicates the likelihood of collision effect theory in our second case.

  1. Iodine-131 MIBG uptake in metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. A patient treated with somatostatin

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, C.A.; Basso, L.V.

    1988-04-01

    A 47-year-old man with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2a syndrome in whom metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) concentrated in lesions from metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is reported. A somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin SMS 201-995) alleviated the symptoms of flushing and diarrhea associated with the elevated calcitonin levels but it did not alter either the course of the disease or the MIBG images. A review of the literature is presented of the noncatecholamine secreting tumors associated with MIBG uptake. Similarities between this case and metastatic carcinoid syndrome are discussed. 27 references.

  2. Medullary Carcinoma of the Thyroid With Axillary Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Murat; Makay, Ozer; Simsir, Ilgin; Ertan, Yeşim; Icoz, Gokhan; Saygili, Füsun; Akyildiz, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of axillary lymph node metastasis as a consequence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in a 42-year-old man. On January 2009, the patient was referred to us for the management of right cervical lymph node enlargement. Total thyroidectomy was performed with right-sided functional neck dissection. Postoperative histopathology revealed MTC in the right lobe of the thyroid, with extrathyroidal extension and right-sided neck metastases. Multiple left cervical, mediastinal, and right axillary lymphadenopathies were detected at the third year follow-up exam. Left-sided functional neck dissection, axillary lymph node dissection, and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed, and the pathologic outcomes revealed as the metastatic dissemination of MTC. After a disease-free term for 1 year, multiple metastatic lesions were detected in the patient. PMID:25785315

  3. RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and associated cutaneous amyloidosis binding OSMR variant p.G513D.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Cao, Jin-Lin; Du, Juan; Liu, Nai-Fang; Li, Feng; Sheng, Mao; Fu, Er; Guo, Jian; Jia, Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ming; Ma, Ju-Ming

    2015-10-20

    There are no reports on the relationship between familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) associated with cutaneous amyloidosis (CA) and RET or OSMR/IL31RA gene mutations. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family with FMTC/CA and found a recurrent RET c.2671T>G (p.S891A) mutation in six of 17 family members. Three of the six p.S891A mutation carriers presented with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Of them, three (two with and one without MTC) were diagnosed as having combined lichen/macular biphasic CA. We also identified a novel RET variant, c.1573C>T (p.R525W) in five members. Of them, three carriers had no evidence of thyroid/skin or basal serum/stimulated calcitonin abnormalities. In vitro cell proliferation assay indicated that oncogenic activity of RET p.S891A was slightly enhanced by p.R525W, whereas p.R525W alone had no effect on cell proliferation. Meanwhile, we identified a novel OSMR variant, c.1538G>A (p.G513D) in seven members. We noticed that three OSMR p.G513D carriers presenting with CA also had the RET p.S891A mutation. Our investigation indicated that the RET p.S891A mutation combined with OSMR p.G513D may underlie a novel phenotype manifesting as FMTC and CA. PMID:26356818

  4. RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and associated cutaneous amyloidosis binding OSMR variant p.G513D.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Cao, Jin-Lin; Du, Juan; Liu, Nai-Fang; Li, Feng; Sheng, Mao; Fu, Er; Guo, Jian; Jia, Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ming; Ma, Ju-Ming

    2015-10-20

    There are no reports on the relationship between familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) associated with cutaneous amyloidosis (CA) and RET or OSMR/IL31RA gene mutations. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family with FMTC/CA and found a recurrent RET c.2671T>G (p.S891A) mutation in six of 17 family members. Three of the six p.S891A mutation carriers presented with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Of them, three (two with and one without MTC) were diagnosed as having combined lichen/macular biphasic CA. We also identified a novel RET variant, c.1573C>T (p.R525W) in five members. Of them, three carriers had no evidence of thyroid/skin or basal serum/stimulated calcitonin abnormalities. In vitro cell proliferation assay indicated that oncogenic activity of RET p.S891A was slightly enhanced by p.R525W, whereas p.R525W alone had no effect on cell proliferation. Meanwhile, we identified a novel OSMR variant, c.1538G>A (p.G513D) in seven members. We noticed that three OSMR p.G513D carriers presenting with CA also had the RET p.S891A mutation. Our investigation indicated that the RET p.S891A mutation combined with OSMR p.G513D may underlie a novel phenotype manifesting as FMTC and CA.

  5. cabozantinib (COMETRIQ⁰). In medullary thyroid cancer: more harmful than beneficial, as is vandetanib.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for medullary thyroid cancer. Cytotoxic chemotherapy is generally ineffective in patients with progressive, inoperable, advanced-stage or metastatic tumours. Vandetanib is also authorised in this setting, but it has more harms than benefits. Cabozantinib, like vandetanib, inhibits several tyrosine kinases involved in angiogenesis. Cabozantinib has been authorised in the European Union for use in this setting. In a randomised, placebo-controlled trial in 330 patients, adding cabozantinib to tailored symptomatic treatment did not prolong survival or improve symptoms, despite a favourable effect on tumour imaging and certain laboratory parameters. On the contrary, cabozantinib appeared to undermine quality of life and aggravate diarrhoea. The known adverse effects of cabozantinib are numerous and often severe: diarrhoea, hand-foot syndrome, hypertension, venous and arterial thrombosis, bleeding and fistulae. Deaths unrelated to tumour progression were more frequent with cabozantinib than with placebo. Cabozantinib carries a risk of multiple pharmacokinetic interactions by interfering with cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein. In animals, cabozantinib is teratogenic and also impairs male and female fertility. Contraception is required for women, and also for the partners of treated men, who must use condoms. These precautions must be maintained for at least 4 months after the end of treatment. In practice, in mid-2015, cabozantinib, like vandetanib, has an unfavourable harm-benefit balance in medullary thyroid cancer. The focus should remain on tailored symptomatic care. PMID:26942253

  6. Ectopic ACTH Production Leading to Diagnosis of Underlying Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Leslee N.; Wilson, Jessica R.; Baum, Howard B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has been described as a source of ectopic ACTH secretion in patients with Cushing’s syndrome. This is an infrequent association, occurring in less than 1% of MTC cases. Among these, it is even more unusual for an initial diagnosis of hypercortisolism to lead to the discovery of underlying MTC. Here we present a case of a patient with weakness, diarrhea, and hypokalemia who was found first to have Cushing’s syndrome and later diagnosed with metastatic MTC. The patient was treated initially with oral agents to control his hypercortisolism, then with an etomidate infusion after experiencing intestinal perforation. He also received vandetanib therapy targeting his underlying malignancy, as this has been shown to reverse clinical signs of Cushing’s syndrome in patients with MTC and subsequent ectopic ACTH secretion. Bilateral adrenalectomy was ultimately required. Medullary thyroid carcinoma should be considered in patients presenting with Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, and a multimodality treatment approach is often required. PMID:27141514

  7. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  8. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  9. Introduction of v-Ha-ras oncogene induces differentiation of cultured human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, T.; Mabry, M.; De Bustros, A.; Ihle, J.N.; Nelkin, B.D.; Baylin, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an endocrine tumor of the thyroid C cells that expresses high levels of the neuroendocrine peptide hormone calcitonin. During tumor progression in the host, there is an apparent loss of differentiation in MTC cells that involves a consistent decrease in calcitonin content of the tumor cells associated with decreased expression of the calcitonin gene and/or changes in a mRNA alternative-processing pattern away from that characteristic of the parent thyroid C cell. The authors now report that introduction of the viral Harvey ras (v-Ha-ras) oncogene into cultured human MTC cells can reverse such changes in gene expression and can induce endocrine differentiation of the tumor cells. The expression of v-Ha-ras is associated with decreased cellular proliferation and DNA synthesis. There is a marked increase in the number of cytoplasmic secretory granules that are a classic feature of differentiated thyroid C cells. v-Ha-ras expression induces increased expression of the calcitonin gene and the processing of the primary gene transcript is shifted to favor calcitonin mRNA rather than calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA production. These studies with cultured human MTC cells provide a model system to study the role of Ha-ras and related genes in neuroendocrine differentiation. The findings suggest an important approach for identifying genes in solid tumors whose altered expression may play a role in the impaired maturational capacity characteristic of cancer cells during tumor progression.

  10. Hirschsprung disease of the colon, a vaginal mass and medullary thyroid cancer - a RET oncogene driven problem.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Romy; Thurow, Tiffany; de W Marsh, Robert

    2011-12-01

    This case report emphasizes the fact that all patients with Hirschsprung disease should be screened for RET Oncogene mutation as there is a well known association between Hirschsprung Disease and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) Type 2A. It also reminds us that Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma is known to cause elevated levels of CEA which does not originate from gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Hirschsprung disease of the colon, a vaginal mass and medullary thyroid cancer – a RET oncogene driven problem

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Romy; Thurow, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    This case report emphasizes the fact that all patients with Hirschsprung disease should be screened for RET Oncogene mutation as there is a well known association between Hirschsprung Disease and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) Type 2A. It also reminds us that Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma is known to cause elevated levels of CEA which does not originate from gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22811860

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyung; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Kyu Sun; Baek, Seon Mi; Lee, Younghen; Chong, Semin; Sim, Jung Suk; Huh, Jung Yin; Bae, Jae-Ik; Kim, Kyung Tae; Han, Song Yee; Bae, Min Young; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-01-01

    Thermal ablation using radiofrequency is a new, minimally invasive modality employed as an alternative to surgery in patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the optimal use of radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies, and expert consensus. PMID:22438678

  13. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in relation to hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kameya, T.; Shimosato, Y.; Adachi, I.; Abe, K.; Kasai, N.; Kimura, K.; Baba, K.

    1977-01-01

    Eighteen cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid were analyzed immunohistochemically for calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells, and tumor cells in 8 cases were examined by an electron microscope and analyzed by manual and computer procedures with particular attention paid to the size and quality of secretory granules. Calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells were found singly or in clusters in 14 and 11 tumors, respectively. In 4 cases, calcitonin-positive cell clusters and an increase in number of singly scattered C cells were seen apart from the main tumor, suggesting a multicentric nature of certain medullary carcinomas. Some ACTH-containing cells were apparently also positive for calcitonin. In a case of familial Sipple disease, follicular lining cells were replaced in areas with ACTH-containing cells. Three to five frequency distribution curves of the size of secretory granules were obtained in all of 6 cases analyzed, and at least two different types of granule matrix were identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:202164

  14. Vandetanib Successfully Controls Medullary Thyroid Cancer-Related Cushing Syndrome in an Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nella, A. A.; Fox, E.; Balis, F. M.; Quezado, M. M.; Whitcomb, P. O.; Derdak, J.; Kebebew, E.; Widemann, B. C.; Stratakis, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ectopic Cushing syndrome due to ACTH secretion from metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe the first case of Cushing syndrome associated with MTC in a pediatric patient and the successful reversal of Cushing syndrome with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (vandetanib) therapy. Patient and Methods: A 17-year-old Brazilian adolescent presented with metastatic MTC and associated ACTH-dependent ectopic Cushing syndrome in the context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. When the patient was treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, rapid decrease in serum cortisol and improvement of clinical symptoms were observed. Conclusion: We describe the first pediatric case of clinical and biochemical improvement of paraneoplastic MTC-related Cushing syndrome after treatment with vandetanib. Vandetanib and possibly other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be a novel beneficial option in patients with neuroendocrine tumor-related ectopic Cushing syndrome. PMID:24617713

  15. New radionuclide tracers for the diagnosis and therapy of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Delprat, C.C.; Zanin, D.; van der Schoot, J.B.

    1988-03-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a calcitonin-producing tumor that occurs in familial and sporadic forms, can be monitored satisfactorily with measurements of calcitonin and CEA in serum. However, locating the tumor site may be difficult. In the current review of the experience with four new radionuclide tracers for MTC, the relative value of each of these procedures is outlined. Total body imaging using TI-201 chloride and Tc-99m(V) DMSA are both sensitive techniques that can be used for the detection and follow-up of MTC. Imaging using I-131 MIBG and I-131 anti-CEA antibodies/fragments should be performed once the diagnosis and the tumor site have been established, to evaluate if patients might be amenable for therapy with one of these radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    With the advent of genomics-based treatment in recent years, the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of various malignancies has increased exponentially. Though much data is available regarding the efficacy of targeted therapies for common malignancies, genetic cancer syndromes remain a somewhat unexplored topic with comparatively less published literature. This review seeks to characterize targeted therapy options for the following genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, inherited medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies. By understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as available molecularly targeted therapies, oncologists, in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counsellors, can begin to develop effective clinical management options and therapy regimens for the patients with these genetic syndromes that they may encounter in their practice. PMID:25725224

  17. Pentagastrin, calcium and whisky stimulated serum calcitonin in medullary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Emmertsen, K K; Nielsen, H E; Mosekilde, L; Hansen, H H

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of pentagastrin, calcium and whisky in raising serum immunoreactive calcitonin (S-iCT) concentrations was analysed in 6 patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and in 8 healthy controls. All 6 patients responded to pentagastrin with a significant increase in S-iCT, 5 responded to calcium and only 3 to whisky. In the 8 controls no or only a modest increase in S-iCT occurred following pentagastrin, calcium and whisky with no difference between the three. It is concluded that pentagastrin is the most useful stimulative agent for ICT secretion in patients with C-cell neoplasms. In selected cases the additional use of calcium could be advantageous.

  18. Association of urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis with papillary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. A new sporadic neoplastic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Chablé-Montero, Fredy; Córdova-Ramón, Juan Carlos; Henson, Donald E

    2014-10-01

    We describe 2 adult women (72 and 54 years), 1 with a low-grade noninvasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis, who 14 years later developed a papillary carcinoma in 1 thyroid lobe and a medullary carcinoma in the contralateral lobe. Both neoplasms were similar in size and appeared symmetrical. Despite its small size, the medullary carcinoma metastasized in multiple cervical lymph nodes. The second patient had a high-grade invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis that infiltrated the renal parenchyma and metastasized in one of the lungs. Five months later, a papillary carcinoma was discovered in the thyroid gland. The 2 papillary thyroid carcinomas were of the follicular variant. Adjacent to 1 papillary carcinoma, there was a dominant nodule of a colloid and adenomatous goiter. The medullary carcinoma contained stromal amyloid and was immunoreactive for calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen. There was no C-cell hyperplasia (medullary carcinoma in situ). The 2 patients are alive, 1 is living with pulmonary metastasis from the high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Twelve cases of this neoplastic association were registered in the Survey, Epidemiology, and End Results Program from 1980 to 2009. We believe that the combination of these unusual neoplasms in the same patient may represent a new sporadic neoplastic syndrome.

  19. Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Ebadi, Seyed Alireza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Hedayati, Mehdi; Abbasalipourkabir, Roghayeh; Mahjoob, Mohammad Parsa; Poorolajal, Jalal; Zicker, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress or oxidant/antioxidant imbalance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of some diseases like cancer. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates in the thyroid parafollicular cells and includes 3-4% of the malignant neoplasms that have an effect on this gland. The aetiology of MTC has not been clarified. However, oxidative stress may be one of the factors involved. Aim The aim of the current study was to evaluate the antioxidant enzyme activity of catalase (CAT), Glutathione (GSH), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) in blood samples of MTC patients as compared to healthy controls. Materials and Methods A case-control study was designed enrolling patients with confirmed MTC diagnosis and age-and sex group matched healthy volunteers referred to the clinic of the Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Tehran, Iran from April 2013 to July 2015. Fasting blood samples were taken for study. Catalase, GSH, MDA and TAC levels were measured by colorimetry using commercial kits (ZellBio GmbH, Germany). Data were analysed using SPSS 17 software, comparing mean±SD through t-test and difference between proportions through chi-square. Results No statistical difference was observed in the demographic characteristic between cases and controls. The final MTC group included 40 males and 45 females with a mean age of 30±12.9 year, and the control group 40 males and 47 females, with a mean age of 31.2±12.3 year. Anthropometric parameters, dietary and thyroid hormones levels (T3, T4 and TSH) were similar. Serum TAC (p=0.015), GSH (p=0.029) and CAT (p<0.001) levels were found to be significantly lower in the MTC patients, while serum MDA levels were significantly higher in MTC patients than controls (p<0.001). Conclusion These preliminary findings suggest that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance may be associated with or possibly indicate an increased risk to medullary thyroid carcinoma

  20. Antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Uncaria tomentosa in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rinner, Beate; Li, Zeng Xia; Haas, Helga; Siegl, Veronika; Sturm, Sonja; Stuppner, Hermann; Pfragner, Roswitha

    2009-11-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a rare calcitonin-producing tumor, is derived from parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid and is characterized by constitutive Bcl-2 overexpression. The tumor is relatively insensitive to radiation therapy as well as conventional chemotherapy. To date, the only curative treatment is the early and complete surgical removal of all neoplastic tissue. In this study, the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of fractions obtained from Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC, commonly known as uña de gato or cat's claw were investigated. Cell growth of MTC cells as well as enzymatic activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenase was markedly inhibited after treatment with different fractions of the plant. Furthermore, there was an increase in the expressions of caspase-3 and -7 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fraction, while bcl-2 overexpression remained constant. In particular, the alkaloids isopterpodine and pteropodine of U. tomentosa exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect on MTC cells, whereas the alkaloid-poor fraction inhibited cell proliferation but did not show any pro-apoptotic effects. These promising results indicate the growth-restraining and apoptotic potential of plant extracts against neuroendocrine tumors, which may add to existing therapies for cancer.

  1. Antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Uncaria tomentosa in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rinner, Beate; Li, Zeng Xia; Haas, Helga; Siegl, Veronika; Sturm, Sonja; Stuppner, Hermann; Pfragner, Roswitha

    2009-11-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a rare calcitonin-producing tumor, is derived from parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid and is characterized by constitutive Bcl-2 overexpression. The tumor is relatively insensitive to radiation therapy as well as conventional chemotherapy. To date, the only curative treatment is the early and complete surgical removal of all neoplastic tissue. In this study, the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of fractions obtained from Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC, commonly known as uña de gato or cat's claw were investigated. Cell growth of MTC cells as well as enzymatic activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenase was markedly inhibited after treatment with different fractions of the plant. Furthermore, there was an increase in the expressions of caspase-3 and -7 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fraction, while bcl-2 overexpression remained constant. In particular, the alkaloids isopterpodine and pteropodine of U. tomentosa exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect on MTC cells, whereas the alkaloid-poor fraction inhibited cell proliferation but did not show any pro-apoptotic effects. These promising results indicate the growth-restraining and apoptotic potential of plant extracts against neuroendocrine tumors, which may add to existing therapies for cancer. PMID:20032400

  2. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D; Cote, Gilbert J; Chen, Herbert; Bibb, James A; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2015-05-20

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis. PMID:25900242

  3. Targeted DNA Sequencing Detects Mutations Related to Susceptibility among Familial Non-medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Dong, Li; Li, Dapeng; Chuai, Shaokun; Wu, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiangqian; Cheng, Yanan; Han, Lei; Yu, Jinpu; Gao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that familial non-medullary thyroid cancer (FNMTC) has a more aggressive clinical behavior compared to sporadic NMTC (SNMTC). However, FNMTC is difficult to differentiate from SNMTC by the morphology and immunohistochemistry. Although genes responsible for FNMTC were unclear, screening for rare germline mutations on known important tumor suppressor genes might offer more insights on predicting susceptibility to FNMTC. Here, a customized panel was designed to capture all exons of 31 cancer susceptive genes possibly related to FNMTC. Using next-generation sequencing we performed deep sequencing to achieve 500× coverage of the targeted regions. At the end 45 variants were identified in 29 of 47 familial patients and 6 of 16 sporadic patients. Notably, several germline mutations were found matching between paired FNMTC patients from the same family, including APC L292F and A2778S, BRAF D22N, MSH6 G355S and A36V, MSH2 L719F, MEN1 G508D, BRCA1 SS955S, BRCA2 G2508S, and a GNAS inframe insertion. We demonstrated a novel approach to help diagnose and elucidate the genetic cause of the FNMTC patients, and assess whether their family members are exposed to a higher genetic risk. The findings would also provide insights on monitoring the potential second cancers for thyroid cancer patients. PMID:26530882

  4. Molecular Basis of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: The Role of RET Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Siqueira, Débora R.; Romitti, Mírian; Ferreira, Carla V.; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor originating in parafollicular C cells. It accounts for 5 to 8% of all thyroid cancers. MTC develops in either sporadic (75%) or hereditary form (25%). Genetic and molecular studies have demonstrated the involvement of the RET proto-oncogene in hereditary MTC and, less often, in its sporadic form. Although a strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been described, wide clinical heterogeneity is observed among families with the same RET mutation or even in carriers of the same kindred. In recent years, several single nucleotide polymorphisms of the RET gene have been described in the general population as well as in patients with MTC. Some studies have reported associations between the presence of polymorphisms and development or progression of MTC. Nonetheless, other studies failed to demonstrate any effect of the RET variants. Differences in the genetic background of distinct populations or methodological approaches have been suggested as potential reasons for the conflicting results. Here, we review current knowledge concerning the molecular pathogenesis of sporadic and hereditary MTC. In particular, we analyze the role of RET polymorphisms in the clinical presentation and prognosis of MTC based on the current literature. PMID:22312249

  5. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis. PMID:25900242

  6. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D; Cote, Gilbert J; Chen, Herbert; Bibb, James A; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2015-05-20

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis.

  7. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations. PMID:26678667

  8. Procalcitonin: A New Biomarker for Medullary Thyroid Cancer? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Apostolos K A; Girio-Fragkoulakis, Constantine; Nakouti, Theodora

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare but aggressive thyroid malignancy. The gold-standard biomarker for its diagnosis and follow-up is calcitonin (CT); however, it has a variable half-life dependent on its circadian variability. It has been suggested that a more stable hormone, procalcitonin (PCT), may overcome these problems and its introduction to routine practice may give more accurate results in the diagnosis and follow-up of MTC. We systematically reviewed Pubmed, Scopus, Biosis Previews and Embase databases up to March 2016. A total of 15 out of 184 articles were retrieved and analyzed. Of these 15 studies, 3 were case reports. In these 15 studies, the values of CT and PCT were assessed in both patients with MTC and patients that were either healthy volunteers or with benign/malignant thyroid nodular disease or with bacterial infection. Our search suggests that PCT seems to be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and follow-up of MTC when used in conjunction with CT, particularly in a small proportion of tumors that are CT-negative or secrete low levels of CT. So far, there has not been enough data to suggest a specific threshold for normal PCT. However, most studies indicate a value of 0.1 ng/ml as an acceptable cut-off in everyday clinical practice. At present, CT should continue to be the primary biomarker in MTC with the addition of PCT in some patient groups. Nevertheless, larger patient series need to be conducted in order to provide safer and more accurate results. PMID:27466480

  9. The Oncogenic Activity of RET Point Mutants for Follicular Thyroid Cells May Account for the Occurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients Affected by Familial Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; De Falco, Valentina; Bellantoni, Marie; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo; Carlomagno, Francesca; Picascia, Antonella; Tramontano, Donatella; Tallini, Giovanni; Santoro, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Activating germ-line point mutations in the RET receptor are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), whereas somatic RET rearrangements are prevalent in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Some rare kindreds, carrying point mutations in RET, are affected by both cancer types, suggesting that, under specific circumstances, point mutations in RET can drive the generation of PTC. Here we describe a family whose siblings, affected by both PTC and MTC, carried a germ-line point mutation in the RET extracellular domain, converting cysteine 634 into serine. We tested on thyroid follicular cells the transforming activity of RET(C634S), RET(K603Q), another mutant identified in a kindred with both PTC and MTC, RET(C634R) a commonly isolated allele in MEN2A, RET(M918T) responsible for MEN2B and also identified in kindreds with both PTC and MTC, and RET/PTC1 the rearranged oncogene that characterizes bona fide PTC in patients without MTC. We show that the various RET point mutants, but not wild-type RET, scored constitutive kinase activity and exerted mitogenic effects for thyroid PC Cl 3 cells, albeit at significantly lower levels compared to RET/PTC1. The low mitogenic activity of RET point mutants paralleled their reduced kinase activity compared to RET/PTC. Furthermore, RET point mutants maintained a protein domain, the intracellular juxtamembrane domain, that exerted negative effects on the mitogenic activity. In conclusion, RET point mutants can behave as dominant oncogenes for thyroid follicular cells. Their transforming activity, however, is rather modest, providing a possible explanation for the rare association of MTC with PTC. PMID:15277225

  10. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Na'ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-28

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC.

  11. Synergistic antitumour activity of RAF265 and ZSTK474 on human TT medullary thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertazza, Loris; Barollo, Susi; Radu, Claudia Maria; Cavedon, Elisabetta; Simioni, Paolo; Faggian, Diego; Plebani, Mario; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Rubin, Beatrice; Boscaro, Marco; Pezzani, Raffaele; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive malignancy responsible for up to 14% of all thyroid cancer-related deaths. It is characterized by point mutations in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene. The activated RET kinase is known to signal via extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), leading to enhanced proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of two serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf (BRAF) inhibitors (RAF265 and SB590885), and a PI3K inhibitor (ZSTK474), on RET-mediated signalling and proliferation in a MTC cell line (TT cells) harbouring the RETC634W activating mutation. The effects of the inhibitors on VEGFR2, PI3K/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling pathways, cell cycle, apoptosis and calcitonin production were also investigated. Only the RAF265+ ZSTK474 combination synergistically reduced the viability of treated cells. We observed a strong decrease in phosphorylated VEGFR2 for RAF265+ ZSTK474 and a signal reduction in activated Akt for ZSTK474. The activated ERK signal also decreased after RAF265 and RAF265+ ZSTK474 treatments. Alone and in combination with ZSTK474, RAF265 induced a sustained increase in necrosis. Only RAF265, alone and combined with ZSTK474, prompted a significant drop in calcitonin production. Combination therapy using RAF265 and ZSTK47 proved effective in MTC, demonstrating a cytotoxic effect. As the two inhibitors have been successfully tested individually in clinical trials on other human cancers, our preclinical data support the feasibility of their combined use in aggressive MTC. PMID:26081844

  12. Ursolic acid from Trailliaedoxa gracilis induces apoptosis in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    AGUIRIANO-MOSER, VICTOR; SVEJDA, BERNHARD; LI, ZENG-XIA; STURM, SONJA; STUPPNER, HERMANN; INGOLIC, ELISABETH; HÖGER, HARALD; SIEGL, VERONIKA; MEIER-ALLARD, NATHALIE; SADJAK, ANTON; PFRAGNER, ROSWITHA

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the C-cells of the thyroid and is not sensitive to radiation or chemotherapy. Therefore, surgical removal of the tumor tissue in its entirety is the only curative treatment for MTC. The present study aimed to examine the potential mechanisms of action of extracts of Trailliaedoxa gracilis (TG; WW Smith & Forrest), a plant from the province of Sichuan, China, and of ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpen present in TG, on the MTC-SK MTC cell line. A total of 13 TG fractions and UA were examined in vitro for their effects on cell morphology, cell number, proliferation and rates of apoptosis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of nuclear factor-κB essential modifier (NEMO) was performed to delineate the role of the apoptotic pathway following treatment with UA. TG and UA were examined in vivo in xenotransplanted MTC-bearing severe combined immunodeficient mice. The TG fractions exhibited antiproliferative effects, with inhibition of mitochondrial activity in the tumor cells at concentrations, which caused no impairment of the normal control cells. The apoptotic rates of the MTC-SK cells treated with the TG fractions and UA were determined, in which no marked tumor inhibition was observed in the treated MTC-mice, and no change in the expression of NEMO was detected in the treated MTC-SK cells. The observation of early-onset activation of caspase 8 suggested that the responsible factor was linked to NEMO, an anti-apoptotic protein. However, no differences in the mRNA transcription levels of NEMO were detected in MTC-SK cells treated with UA, suggesting that this protein was not associated with the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. PMID:26151624

  13. The Anti-hypertensive Drug Prazosin Induces Apoptosis in the Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Line TT

    PubMed Central

    STRACKE, ANIKA; MEIER-ALLARD, NATHALIE; ABSENGER, MARKUS; INGOLIC, ELISABETH; HAAS, HELGA SUSANNE; PFRAGNER, ROSWITHA; SADJAK, ANTON

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a tumor associated with poor prognosis since it exhibits high resistance against conventional cancer therapy. Recent studies have shown that quinazolines exhibit a pro-apoptotic effect on malignant cells. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether MTC cells are affected by quinazolines, in particular prazosin. Materials and Methods Proliferation, apoptosis and cell morphology of the MTC cell line TT were analyzed by WST-1 assay, caspase 3/7 activation tests and microscopy. Fibroblasts were used as control for non-malignant cells. Results Prazosin potently inhibited the growth of TT cells, induced apoptosis and caused vacuolization, as well as needle-like filopodia. Fibroblasts were affected by prazosin in the same way as MTC cells. Conclusion MTC cells are responsive to prazosin treatment similar to other malignancies. The fact that fibroblasts also respond to prazosin further highlights the importance to identify the unknown pro-apoptotic target of quinazolines. PMID:25550532

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic potential of new radiopharmaceutical agents in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Troncone, L.; Rufini, V.; De Rosa, G.; Testa, A.

    1989-01-01

    Recently developed radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for imaging medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with some having therapeutic potential. This study compares the imaging results obtained with radioiodinated meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA, and {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in a group of MTC patients. In 23 patients {sup 131}I MIBG imaging showed a high specificity (no false-positive results) but a less satisfactory sensitivity (50%). In 12 patients {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA revealed a better sensitivity (77%) but a lower specificity (three false-positive results). Positive results were obtained in two of three patients studied with {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-CEA. These data suggest that the highly sensitive {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA should be considered as a first choice procedure followed by the highly specific radioiodinated MIBG to confirm the initial results. Since radioiodinated MIBG imaging may have therapeutic usefulness, {sup 131}I MIBG was evaluated in an integrated treatment protocol in four cases of proven MTC. The preliminary results obtained were encouraging.

  15. Chromosome 10 and RET gene copy number alterations in hereditary and sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Raffaele; Romei, Cristina; Cosci, Barbara; Vivaldi, Agnese; Bottici, Valeria; Renzini, Giulia; Ugolini, Clara; Tacito, Alessia; Basolo, Fulvio; Pinchera, Aldo; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    About 30% of hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC) have been demonstrated to harbour imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET alleles. We studied the RET copy number alterations (RET CNA) in 65 MTC and their correlation with RET mutation and patients' outcome. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization and Real-time PCR revealed RET CNA in 27.7% MTC but only in a variable percentage of cells. In sporadic MTC, RET CNA were represented by chromosome 10 aneuploidy while in hereditary MTC by RET amplification. A significant higher prevalence of RET CNA was observed in RET mutated MTC (P=0.003). RET CNA was also associated to a poorer outcome (P=0.005). However, the multivariate analysis revealed that only RET mutation and advanced clinical stage correlated with the worst outcome. In conclusion, 30% MTC harbour RET CNA in variable percentage of cells suggesting cell heterogeneity. RET CNA can be considered a poor prognostic factor potentiating the poor prognostic role of RET mutation. PMID:21867742

  16. Postoperative recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng‐Hsuan; Kuo, Sheng‐Fong; Hsueh, Chuen; Chao, Tzu‐Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives : The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the features of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) presenting with neck lymph node (LN) metastasis. Methods : The study enrolled 909 patients with PTC who had undergone total thyroidectomy. After a median follow‐up of 14.6 years, 73 (8.0%) patients died of thyroid cancer. A total of 536 patients had the tumor confined to the thyroid (intra‐thyroid), 111 had lymph node (LN) metastasis, 225 showed soft tissue invasion, and 37 had distant metastasis. Results : Compared with the intra‐thyroid group, the group with LN metastases showed larger tumor size, higher postoperative thyroglobulin levels, advanced TNM stage, higher recurrence rates (5.2% vs. 31.5%), and higher disease‐specific mortality (1.3% vs. 12.6%). Of the 111 patients with PTC and LN metastases, 35 (31.5%) were diagnosed with recurrence during a mean follow‐up period of 16.9 ± 0.6 years. Among the 35 patients with recurrent PTC, 14 (40.0%) died of thyroid cancer. The mortality group was characterized by older, mostly male patients who presented with larger initial tumor size compared with survivors. Conclusions : In patients with PTC, the rates of recurrence and cancer mortality were higher in the group with LN metastasis than that in the intra‐thyroid tumor group. J. Surg. Oncol. 2015 111:149–154. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Surgical Oncology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26175314

  17. Metformin inhibits growth and decreases resistance to anoikis in medullary thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Jensen, Kirk; Costello, John; Patel, Aneeta; Hoperia, Victoria; Bauer, Andrew; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Vasko, Vasyl

    2012-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is associated with activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Recent studies showed that the antidiabetic agent metformin decreases proliferation of cancer cells through 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent inhibition of mTOR. In the current study, we assessed the effect of metformin on MTC cells. For this purpose, we determined growth, viability, migration, and resistance to anoikis assays using two MTC-derived cell lines (TT and MZ-CRC-1). Expressions of molecular targets of metformin were examined in MTC cell lines and in 14 human MTC tissue samples. We found that metformin inhibited growth and decreased expression of cyclin D1 in MTC cells. Treatment with metformin was associated with inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K/pS6 signaling and downregulation of pERK in both TT and MZ-CRC-1 cells. Metformin had no significant effects on pAKT in the cell lines examined. Metformin-inducible AMPK activation was noted only in TT cells. Treatment with AMPK inhibitor (compound C) or AMPK silencing did not prevent growth inhibitory effects of metformin in TT cells. Metformin had no effect on MTC cell migration but reduced the ability of cells to form multicellular spheroids in nonadherent conditions. Immunostaining of human MTC showed over-expression of cyclin D1 in all tumors compared with corresponding normal tissue. Activation of mTOR/p70S6K was detected in 8/14 (57.1%) examined tumors. Together, these findings indicate that growth inhibitory effects in MTC cells are associated with downregulation of both mTOR/6SK and pERK signaling pathways. Expression of metformin's molecular targets in human MTC cells suggests its potential utility for the treatment of MTC in patients.

  18. A miRNA signature associated with human metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Libero; Calin, George A; Adam, Liana; Ye, Lei; Fusco, Alfredo; Giunti, Serena; Thaller, Christina; Paladini, Laura; Zhang, Xinna; Jimenez, Camilo; Trimarchi, Francesco; El-Naggar, Adel K; Gagel, Robert F

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small, non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by targeting mRNA and triggering either translational repression or RNA degradation. The objective of our study was to evaluate the involvement of miRNAs in human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and to identify the markers of metastatic cells and aggressive tumour behaviour. Using matched primary and metastatic tumour samples, we identified a subset of miRNAs aberrantly regulated in metastatic MTC. Deregulated miRNAs were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and validated by in situ hybridisation on a large independent set of primary and metastatic MTC samples. Our results uncovered ten miRNAs that were significantly expressed and deregulated in metastatic tumours: miR-10a, miR-200b/-200c, miR-7 and miR-29c were down-regulated and miR-130a, miR-138, miR-193a-3p, miR-373 and miR-498 were up-regulated. Bioinformatic approaches revealed potential miRNA targets and signals involved in metastatic MTC pathways. Migration, proliferation and invasion assays were performed in cell lines treated with miR-200 antagomirs to ascertain a direct role for this miRNA in MTC tumourigenesis. We show that the members of miR-200 family regulate the expression of E-cadherin by directly targeting ZEB1 and ZEB2 mRNA and through the enhanced expression of tumour growth factor β (TGFβ)-2 and TGFβ-1. Overall, the treated cells shifted to a mesenchymal phenotype, thereby acquiring an aggressive phenotype with increased motility and invasion. Our data identify a robust miRNA signature associated with metastatic MTC and distinct biological processes, e.g., TGFβ signalling pathway, providing new potential insights into the mechanisms of MTC metastasis.

  19. Mortalin (GRP75/HSPA9) upregulation promotes survival and proliferation of medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Starenki, Dmytro; Hong, Seung-Keun; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Park, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine tumor mainly caused by mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. For therapy of advanced MTC, the Food and Drug Administration recently approved vandetanib and cabozantinib, the tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and/or c-MET. Nevertheless, not all patients respond to these drugs, demanding additional therapeutic strategies. We found that mortalin (HSPA9/GRP75), a member of HSP70 family, is upregulated in human MTC tissues and that its depletion robustly induces cell death and growth arrest in MTC cell lines in culture and in mouse xenografts. These effects were accompanied by substantial downregulation of RET, induction of the tumor suppressor TP53, and altered expression of cell cycle regulatory machinery and apoptosis markers including E2F-1, p21CIP1, p27KIP1, and Bcl-2 family proteins. Our investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects revealed that mortalin depletion induces transient MEK/ERK activation and altered mitochondrial bioenergetics in MTC cells, as indicated by depolarized mitochondrial membrane, decreased oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification, and increased oxidative stress. Intriguingly, mortalin depletion induced growth arrest partly via the MEK/ERK pathway whereas it induced cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction in a Bcl-2 dependent manner. However, TP53 was not necessary for these effects except for p21CIP1 induction. Moreover, mortalin depletion downregulated RET expression independently of MEK/ERK and TP53. These data demonstrate that mortalin is a key regulator of multiple signaling and metabolic pathways pivotal to MTC cell survival and proliferation, proposing mortalin as a novel therapeutic target for MTC. PMID:25435367

  20. A novel RET inhibitor with potent efficacy against medullary thyroid cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Mukerji, Ridhwi; Shah, Anuj; Timmermann, Barbara N.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Most medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC) recur or progress despite optimal surgical resection. Current targeted-therapies show promise but lack durable efficacy and tolerability. The purpose of this study was to build upon previous in vitro work and evaluate Withaferin A (WA), a novel RET inhibitor, in a metastatic murine model of MTC. Methods 5 million DRO-81-1 human MTC-cells injected in the left posterior neck of Nu/Nu mice uniformly generated metastases to the liver, spleen, and/or lungs. Treatment with WA (8mg/kg/day i.p.×21 days) was started for tumors >100 mm3. Endpoints were survival, tumor>1500 mm3, decreased bodyweight, or body score (all measured thrice weekly). Results All controls (saline; n=5) died or deteriorated from metastatic disease by 7 weeks post injection. All treated animals were alive,(WA; n=5), having tumor regression and growth-delay without toxicity or weight-loss at 6 wks post treatment; p<0.01. Tumor cells treated with WA demonstrated inhibition of total and phospho-RET levels by Western-Blot analysis in a dose-dependent manner (almost complete inhibition with 5uM WA treatment) as well as potent inhibition of phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT levels. Conclusions Withaferin A is a novel natural-product RET-inhibitor with efficacy in a metastatic murine model of MTC. Further long-term efficacy/toxicity studies are warranted to evaluate this compound for clinical translation. PMID:21134556

  1. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). PMID:26487970

  2. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC).

  3. Acute coronary syndrome: a rare case of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maloberti, Alessadro; Meani, Paolo; Pirola, Roberto; Varrenti, Marisa; Boniardi, Marco; De Biase, Anna Maria; Vallerio, Paola; Bonacina, Edgardo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor arising from neuroectodermal chromaffin tissues in the adrenal gland or extra-adrenal paraganglia (paragangliomas). The prevalence of the tumor is 0.1%-0.6% in the hypertensive population, of which 10%-20% are malignant. Pheochromocytoma produces, stores, and secretes catecholamines, as well as leads to hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, angina, and acute myocardial infarction without coronary artery diseases. We report a case of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a final diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia with pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). PMID:26487970

  4. Germinoma recurrence in the conus medullaris 12 years after remission of primary intracranial lesion in the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramaniam, Vinothan; Zebian, Bassel; Thakur, Bhaskar; Saran, Frank; Chandler, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial germinomas are rare primary central nervous system tumours that are highly sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recurrences are infrequent, with the majority occurring within 5 years. Although multidisciplinary treatments have resulted in good event-free survival, long-term outcomes, over decades, are relatively poorly reported. We present a rare case of a recurrence in the conus medullaris 12 years after complete remission of the primary pituitary germinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of a significantly delayed spinal recurrence, occurring at a very distant and uncommon site, from the primary tumour. This case highlights the importance of long-term follow-up, even after complete remission, in order to identify and limit disability from late spinal recurrences in a relatively young patient population. We consider the literature regarding identifying high risk patients, and the role of craniospinal irradiation in limiting late spinal recurrences.

  5. [Metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma in a child with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B. Efficiency of medium-term treatment with vandetanib without thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Segura, D; Dupuis, C; Chabre, O; Piolat, C; Durand, C; Plantaz, D

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare cancer during childhood. MTC is sporadic in approximately 80% of cases and hereditary in 20%. When hereditary, it can be associated with other endocrine neoplasias and/or typical nonendocrine diseases, thus configuring the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes. Children with clinically obvious MTC belong to MEN 2A or 2B families, related to RET mutations. The standard treatment is total thyroidectomy and central neck dissection. However, treatment of advanced MTC has not yet been standardized, even if a new tyrosine kinase inhibitor specific to RET mutation has changed the outcome of such patients. Vandetanib plays a role in the treatment of children with metastatic, locally advanced and nonoperable MTC, with good tolerance. We report the 5-year treatment of an 11-year-old patient, with vandetanib and without thyroid surgery. PMID:27345554

  6. Retrospective analysis of 140 cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma followed-up in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    SIMÕES-PEREIRA, JOANA; BUGALHO, MARIA JOÃO; LIMBERT, EDWARD; LEITE, VALERIANO

    2016-01-01

    Familial cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may be diagnosed by genetic screening, while in sporadic tumors the diagnosis relies mainly on fine-needle aspiration cytology. The aim of the present study was to determine the demographic, clinical and pathological characteristics of MTC patients followed-up at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology Francisco Gentil (Lisbon, Portugal). For that purpose, a retrospective analysis of 140 MTC patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 was performed. The results indicated that patients with hereditary MTC (11.4%) were significantly younger than patients with sporadic MTC. Of the latter, 34.3% had no clinical suspicion of MTC prior to surgery. The sensitivity of cytology and calcitonin (CT) assay in diagnosing MTC were 51.3 and 98.7%, respectively. All familial index cases and 69.0% of sporadic cases presented with advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis, while 73.0% of familial MTC detected by genetic/pentagastrin screening were diagnosed at the early stage of the disease. Biochemical cure (BC) was achieved in 39.7% of patients and, of these, only 6.5% relapsed. The 5 and 10-year survival rates were 79.3 and 73.6%, respectively. Age >45 years (P=0.026), advanced stage at diagnosis (P<0.001) and absence of BC (P<0.001) were predictors of a worse prognosis on univariate analysis. However, when the patients detected by genetic/pentagastrin screening were excluded from the analysis, age was no longer a prognostic factor, although disease stage remained a significant prognostic factor. On multivariate analysis, BC was the only factor with a significant impact on prognosis (P=0.031). In addition, the present study confirmed that the majority of patients were diagnosed at advanced stages, and CT determination was observed to be more sensitive than cytology to diagnose MTC. Patients at early stages were more prone to achieve BC, which was a favorable prognostic factor. To the best of our knowledge, the present study

  7. Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer after optimized surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after optimized surgery requires a full understanding of the disease, especially as it has changed in the last 15 years, what comprises optimized surgery, and the different types and implications of disease relapse that can be encountered. PTC has evolved to tumors that are much smaller than previously seen, largely due to various high quality imaging studies obtained for different reasons, but serendipitously identifying thyroid nodules that prove to be papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC). With rare exception, these cancers are cured by conservative surgery without additional therapy, and seldom result in recurrent disease. PTC is highly curable in 85% of cases because of its rather innocent biologic behavior. Therefore, the shift in emphasis from disease survival to recurrence is appropriate. As a result of three technologic advances—high-resolution ultrasound (US), recombinant TSH, and highly sensitive thyroglobulin (Tg)—disease relapse can be discovered when it is subclinical. Endocrinologists who largely control administration of radioactive iodine have used it to ablate barely detectable or even biochemically apparent disease, hoping to reduce recurrence and perhaps improve survival. Surgeons, in response to this new intense postoperative surveillance that has uncovered very small volume disease, have responded by utilizing US preoperatively to image this disease, and incorporated varying degrees of lymphadenectomy into their initial treatment algorithm. Bilateral thyroid resection—either total or near-total thyroidectomy—remains the standard for PTC >1 cm, although recent data has re-emphasized the value of unilateral lobectomy in treating even some PTC measuring 1-4 cm. Therapeutic lymphadenectomy has universal approval, but when lymph nodes in the central neck are not worrisome to the surgeon’s intraoperative assessment, although that judgment in incorrect up to 50%, whether they should be excised

  8. Evaluation of Thyroid Bed Nodules on Ultrasonography after Total Thyroidectomy: Risk for Loco-Regional Recurrence of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Chitra; Wartofsky, Leonard; Tefera, Eshetu; Burman, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who underwent total thyroidectomy to examine the correlation of the persistence of thyroid bed nodules seen on ultrasonography with subsequent loco-regional recurrence. Methods A total of 60 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were identified who underwent total thyroidectomy, received 131I therapy and had thyroid bed nodules on postoperative surveillance ultrasonography. The ultrasonographic features of the thyroid bed nodules and their progression over time along with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were monitored. Those patients who demonstrated no evidence of recurrence were compared to patients who had recurrence. Results Of the 60 patients, 25% had documented cancer recurrence. Sixty percent of the patients in the recurrence group had an increase in the size of bed nodules as compared to only 7% of the patients in the group without recurrence. An increase in serum Tg of more than 2-fold was seen in 80% of the patients with recurrence and in only 13% (6/45) of the patients without cancer recurrence. The odds of identifying recurrent thyroid cancer in patients with more than a 2-fold increase in serum Tg were 80.5 greater than in patients with a less than 2-fold increase in serum Tg. The odds of identifying recurrent thyroid cancer in patients with the presence of any suspicious thyroid bed nodule were 31.5 times greater than in patients without suspicious thyroid bed nodules. Conclusions Thyroid bed nodules on surveillance ultrasound warrant fine-needle aspiration cytology if they increase in size and number, are persistent and associated with suspicious sonographic features. PMID:26279996

  9. Mild to moderate increase of serum calcitonin levels only in presence of large medullary thyroid cancer deposits.

    PubMed

    Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Da Roit, A; Merante Boschin, I; Chondrogiannis, S; Rampin, L; Colletti, P M; Vinjamury, S; Perkins, A J; Rubello, D

    2015-01-01

    Many open questions remain to be elucidated about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). The most intriguing concerns the outcome of MTC patients after surgery. Great importance is usually given to serum calcitonin (Ct) and carcinoembryonic (CEA) levels. It is commonly believed that the higher are the levels of these tumor markers and their kinetics (double time and velocity of markers levels) the worst is the prognosis. However, this is not the rule, as there are huge MTC metastatic deposits characterized by low serum Ct and CEA levels, and this condition is not closely related to the outcome of the disease during post-surgical follow-up. A series is reported here of patients who have these characteristics, as well as a description of their prognosis and clinical outcome. PMID:26420439

  10. CEP-701 and CEP-751 inhibit constitutively activated RET tyrosine kinase activity and block medullary thyroid carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Rosen, Mark; Dionne, Craig; Ruggeri, Bruce; Jones-Bolin, Susan; Denmeade, Samuel R; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2003-09-01

    All of the cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) express the RET receptor tyrosine kinase. In essentially all of the hereditary cases and approximately 40% of the sporadic cases of MTC, the RET kinase is constitutively activated by mutation. This suggests that RET may be an effective therapeutic target for treatment of MTC. We show that the indolocarbazole derivatives, CEP-701 and CEP-751, inhibit RET in MTC cells. These compounds effectively inhibit RET phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations <100 nM in 0.5% serum and at somewhat higher concentrations in the presence of 16% serum. They also blocked the growth of these MTC cells in culture. CEP-751 and its prodrug, CEP-2563, also inhibited tumor growth in MTC cell xenografts. These results show that inhibiting RET can block the growth of MTC cells and may have a therapeutic benefit in MTC.

  11. Mild to moderate increase of serum calcitonin levels only in presence of large medullary thyroid cancer deposits.

    PubMed

    Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Da Roit, A; Merante Boschin, I; Chondrogiannis, S; Rampin, L; Colletti, P M; Vinjamury, S; Perkins, A J; Rubello, D

    2015-01-01

    Many open questions remain to be elucidated about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). The most intriguing concerns the outcome of MTC patients after surgery. Great importance is usually given to serum calcitonin (Ct) and carcinoembryonic (CEA) levels. It is commonly believed that the higher are the levels of these tumor markers and their kinetics (double time and velocity of markers levels) the worst is the prognosis. However, this is not the rule, as there are huge MTC metastatic deposits characterized by low serum Ct and CEA levels, and this condition is not closely related to the outcome of the disease during post-surgical follow-up. A series is reported here of patients who have these characteristics, as well as a description of their prognosis and clinical outcome.

  12. Genetic and epigenetic background and protein expression profiles in relation to telomerase activation in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Kjellin, Hanna; Sofiadis, Anastasios; Fotouhi, Omid; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Bäckdahl, Martin; Zedenius, Jan; Xu, Dawei; Lehtiö, Janne; Larsson, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTCs) exhibit telomerase activation in strong association with shorter patient survival. To understand the background of telomerase activation we quantified TERT copy numbers and TERT promoter methylation in 42 MTCs and normal thyroid references. Gain of TERT was demonstrated by quantitative PCR in 5/39 sporadic MTC. Increased methylation index (MetI) for CpG methylation at the TERT promoter was found in sporadic MTCs (P < 0.0001) and in MEN 2 associated MTCs (P = 0.011) vs. normal thyroid tissues. MetI correlated positively with TERT gene expression (r = 0.432, P = 0.006) and negatively with telomere length (r = −0.343, P = 0.032). MTC cases with MetI above the median of 52% had shorter survival as compared to cases with lower MetI (P = 0.005 for overall survival and P = 0.007 for disease-related survival). Protein expression profiles obtained by mass spectrometry were then studied in relation to telomerase activation in MTCs. Comparing protein levels between tumors defined by telomerase activity status, 240 proteins were associated with telomerase activity. Among telomerase activation positive cases a set of proteins was found to discriminate between MTCs with high and low TERT gene expression with enrichment for proteins involved in telomerase regulation. XRCC5 mRNA expression was found increased in MTCs vs. normal thyroid (P = 0.007). In conclusion the findings suggest a role for TERT copy number gain, TERT promoter methylation and XRCC5 expression in telomerase activation and telomere maintenance of MTC. PMID:26870890

  13. Germline ESR2 mutation predisposes to medullary thyroid carcinoma and causes up-regulation of RET expression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joel; Read, Martin L; Hoffman, Jon; Brown, Rachel; Bradshaw, Beth; Campbell, Christopher; Cole, Trevor; Navas, Johanna Dieguez; Eatock, Fiona; Gundara, Justin S; Lian, Eric; Mcmullan, Dom; Morgan, Neil V; Mulligan, Lois; Morrison, Patrick J; Robledo, Mercedes; Simpson, Michael A; Smith, Vicki E; Stewart, Sue; Trembath, Richard C; Sidhu, Stan; Togneri, Fiona S; Wake, Naomi C; Wallis, Yvonne; Watkinson, John C; Maher, Eamonn R; McCabe, Christopher J; Woodward, Emma R

    2016-05-01

    Familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and its precursor, C cell hyperplasia (CCH), is associated with germline RET mutations causing multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. However, some rare families with apparent MTC/CCH predisposition do not have a detectable RET mutation. To identify novel MTC/CCH predisposition genes we undertook exome resequencing studies in a family with apparent predisposition to MTC/CCH and no identifiable RET mutation. We identified a novel ESR2 frameshift mutation, c.948delT, which segregated with histological diagnosis following thyroid surgery in family members and demonstrated loss of ESR2-encoded ERβ expression in the MTC tumour. ERα and ERβ form heterodimers binding DNA at specific oestrogen-responsive elements (EREs) to regulate gene transcription. ERβ represses ERα-mediated activation of the ERE and the RET promoter contains three EREs. In vitro, we showed that ESR2 c.948delT results in unopposed ERα mediated increased cellular proliferation, activation of the ERE and increased RET expression. In vivo, immunostaining of CCH and MTC using an anti-RET antibody demonstrated increased RET expression. Together these findings identify germline ESR2 mutation as a novel cause of familial MTC/CCH and provide important insights into a novel mechanism causing increased RET expression in tumourigenesis. PMID:26945007

  14. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  15. Autophagy activity is associated with membranous sodium iodide symporter expression and clinical response to radioiodine therapy in non-medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Theo S; Tesselaar, Marika H; Morreau, Hans; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Willemsen, Brigith K; Kusters, Benno; van Engen-van Grunsven, A C H; Smit, Johannes W A; Netea-Maier, Romana T

    2016-07-01

    Although non-medullary thyroid cancer (NMTC) generally has a good prognosis, 30-40% of patients with distant metastases develop resistance to radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy due to tumor dedifferentiation. For these patients, treatment options are limited and prognosis is poor. In the present study, expression and activity of autophagy was assessed in large sets of normal, benign and malignant tissues and was correlated with pathology, SLC5A5/hNIS (solute carrier family 5 member 5) protein expression, and with clinical response to RAI ablation therapy in NMTC patients. Fluorescent immunostaining for the autophagy marker LC3 was performed on 100 benign and 80 malignant thyroid tissues. Semiquantitative scoring was generated for both diffuse LC3-I intensity and number of LC3-II-positive puncta and was correlated with SLC5A5 protein expression and clinical parameters. Degree of diffuse LC3-I intensity and number of LC3-II-positive puncta scoring were not discriminative for benign vs. malignant thyroid lesions. Interestingly, however, in NMTC patients significant associations were observed between diffuse LC3-I intensity and LC3-II-positive puncta scoring on the one hand and clinical response to RAI therapy on the other hand (odds ratio [OR] = 3.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.91-5.12, P = 0.01; OR = 5.68, 95%CI = 3.02-10.05, P = 0.002, respectively). Mechanistically, the number of LC3-II-positive puncta correlated with membranous SLC5A5 expression (OR = 7.71, 95%CI = 4.15-11.75, P<0.001), number of RAI treatments required to reach remission (P = 0.014), cumulative RAI dose (P = 0.026) and with overall remission and recurrence rates (P = 0.031). In conclusion, autophagy activity strongly correlates with clinical response of NMTC patients to RAI therapy, potentially by its capacity to maintain tumor cell differentiation and to preserve functional iodide uptake. PMID:27105307

  16. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  17. The expression of the truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor subtype 5 associates with aggressiveness in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molè, Daniela; Gentilin, Erica; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Gagliano, Teresa; Gahete, Manuel D; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Pansini, Giancarlo; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; degli Uberti, Ettore; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2015-11-01

    The truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 associates with increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast cancer. We previously found that sst5 activation may counteract sst2 selective agonist effects in a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, the TT cells, and that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate sst5TMD4 expression in a series of human MTC and to explore the functional role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells. We evaluated sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression in 36 MTC samples. Moreover, we investigated the role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells evaluating cell number, DNA synthesis, free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), calcitonin and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, cell morphology, protein expression, and invasion. We found that in MTC the balance between sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression influences disease stage. sst5TMD4 overexpression in TT cells confers a greater growth capacity, blocks sst2 agonist-induced antiproliferative effects, modifies the cell phenotype, decreases E-cadherin and phosphorylated β-catenin levels, increases vimentin, total β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK3B levels (in keeping with the development of epithelial to mesenchymal transition), and confers a greater invasion capacity. This is the first evidence indicating that sst5TMD4 is expressed in human MTC cells, where it associates with more aggressive behavior, suggesting that sst5TMD4 might play a functionally relevant role.

  18. cAMP-synthesis in a medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line: response to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P R; Goretzki, P E; Keck, E

    1999-01-01

    Calcitonin secretion by C-cells is mediated through intracellular 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium signaling. Calcitonin release stimulation tests may take advantage of both signaling cascades in screening for medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC). To elucidate the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase system we have determined cAMP levels of a calcitonin-expressing MTC cell line (RG) after exposure to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines. In early passages (20-30) cAMP concentrations were significantly elevated in RG cells after exposure to beta-adrenergic agents and prostaglandines E1 and E2. In advanced passages (60-80) the beta-adrenergic response was no longer detectable and adrenergic receptors were uncoupled from the adenylyl cyclase complex; while the effect of prostaglandines E1 and E2 remained unaffected. Preincubation with dexamethasone, in a process requiring protein new synthesis, re-established the adrenergic response in later passages, indicating that RG cells dedifferentiated in culture over time. Our in vitro findings suggest that MTC cell dedifferentiation may be accompanied by adrenergic receptor-uncoupling from the adenylate cyclase system and that this process may be reversed by dexamethasone incubation.

  19. Uptake and localization of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-calcitonin immunoglobulins in rat medullary thyroid carcinoma tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gautvik, K.M.; Svindahl, K.; Skretting, A.; Stenberg, B.; Myhre, L.; Ekeland, A.; Johannesen, J.V.

    1982-09-15

    A medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) which has been transplanted repeatedly under the kidney capsule of Wag/Rij rats secretes calcitonin (CT) spontaneously. From 10--20 weeks after transplantation, immunoreactive serum calcitonin (iCT) is abnormally elevated and continues to rise parallel to tumor growth. The immunoglobulin fraction of the rabbit anti-CT antiserum raised against intact synthetic hormone, was purified and iodinated electrolytically. Specific activities of /sup 131/I-labeled immunoglobulin of 0.008--0.014 mCi/microgram protein were obtained with 80% preservation of CT binding activity. Wag/Rig rats with MCT tumor and increased serum iCT concentrations received intravenous injections of /sup 131/I-labeled immunoglobulins (0.054--0.811 mCi). The distribution of radioactivity in the rats was followed for 14 days using external scintigraphy in combination with radioactivity measurements of blood and different organs at the end of the observation period. The distribution of /sup 113/mIn was used as a marker for blood distribution. When the radioactivity ratios (/sup 131/I//sup 113/mIn) in tumor and different organs were related to that of blood which was set equal to unity, tumor tissue contained 3--6 times higher activity. Nonhyperimmune rabbit immunoglobulins or rabbit antirat prolactin immunoglobulins were not concentrated in MCT tissue, nor did anti-CT immunoglobulins localize in rat prolactin adenomas.

  20. Calcitonin measurement in fine-needle aspirate washouts vs. cytologic examination for diagnosis of primary or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Crea, C; Raffaelli, M; Maccora, D; Carrozza, C; Canu, G; Fadda, G; Bellantone, R; Lombardi, C P

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy cytology (FNAB-C) is able to detect approximately 63% of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The measurement of calcitonin in the needle washout (FNAB-CT) could improve its accuracy. Sixty-two FNAB-C were performed in 38 patients. Serum calcitonin (sCT) was measured before performing FNAB-C. After obtaining a FNAB-C specimen, the needle was washed with 0.5 ml of saline solution to obtain the CT washouts. Receiver operating characteristic (RO C) analysis identified the cut-offs of FNAB-CT and FNAB-CT/sCT. Eighteen MTC were found at final histology. RO C analysis indicated FNAB-CT > 10.4 pg/ml and FNABCT/ sCT > 1.39 as more accurate cut-off values. Overall accuracy, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 85%, 100 and 83%, respectively, for FNAB-C, 97%, 100%, 96% for FNAB-CT and 90%, 83% and 93% for FNAB-CT/sCT. The integration of FNAB-C and FNAB-CT resulted in 98% overall accuracy, 100% PPV and 98% NPV; the integration of FNAB-C and FNAB-CT/sCT in 90% overall accuracy, 80% PPV and 95% NPV. One of 2 false negative FNAB-CT and one of 3 false negative FNAB CT/sCT were correctly diagnosed by FNAB-C. Eight of 9 non-diagnostic FNAB-C were correctly classified by FNAB-CT and 7 by FNAB CT/sCT. FNAB-CT should integrate but not replace FNAB-C. FNAB-CT is particularly useful in the presence of non-diagnostic FNAB-C.

  1. Comprehensive assessment of the disputed RET Y791F variant shows no association with medullary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Hatakana, Roxanne; Lourenço, Delmar M; Lindsey, Susan C; Camacho, Cleber P; Almeida, Marcio; Lima, José V; Sekiya, Tomoko; Garralda, Elena; Naslavsky, Michel S; Yamamoto, Guilherme L; Lazar, Monize; Meirelles, Osorio; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Lebrao, Maria Lucia; Duarte, Yeda A O; Blangero, John; Zatz, Mayana; Cerutti, Janete M; Maciel, Rui M B; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2015-02-01

    Accurate interpretation of germline mutations of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene is vital for the proper recommendation of preventive thyroidectomy in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-prone carriers. To gain information regarding the most disputed variant of RET, ATA-A Y791F, we sequenced blood DNA samples from a cohort of 2904 cancer-free elderly individuals (1261 via Sanger sequencing and 1643 via whole-exome/genome sequencing). We also accessed the exome sequences of an additional 8069 individuals from non-cancer-related laboratories and public databanks as well as genetic results from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) project. The mean allelic frequency observed in the controls was 0.0031, with higher occurrences in Central European populations (0.006/0.008). The prevalence of RET Y791F in the control databases was extremely high compared with the 40 known RET pathogenic mutations (P=0.00003), while no somatic occurrence has been reported in tumours. In this study, we report new, unrelated Brazilian individuals with germline RET Y791F-only: two tumour-free elderly controls; two individuals with sporadic MTC whose Y791F-carrying relatives did not show any evidence of tumours; and a 74-year-old phaeochromocytoma patient without MTC. Furthermore, we showed that the co-occurrence of Y791F with the strong RET C634Y mutation explains the aggressive MTC phenotypes observed in a large affected family that was initially reported as Y791F-only. Our literature review revealed that limited analyses have led to the misclassification of RET Y791F as a probable pathogenic variant and, consequently, to the occurrence of unnecessary thyroidectomies. The current study will have a substantial clinical influence, as it reveals, in a comprehensive manner, that RET Y791F only shows no association with MTC susceptibility.

  2. MiR-886-3p Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration, and Is Dysregulated in Familial Non-Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yin; Zhang, Lisa; Holloway, Alisha K.; Wu, Xiaolin; Su, Ling; Kebebew, Electron

    2011-01-01

    Background The molecular basis and characteristics of familial non-medullary thyroid cancer are poorly understood. In this study, we performed microRNA (miRNA) profiling of familial and sporadic papillary thyroid cancer tumor samples. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome wide miRNA profiling of sporadic and familial papillary thyroid cancer was performed. Differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Ectopic expression of miR-886-3p in thyroid cancer lines was performed to identify pathways targeted by the miRNA, as well as, to determine its effect on tumor cell biology. We found four differentially expressed miRNAs between familial and sporadic papillary thyroid cancer tumor samples. MiR-886-3p and miR-20a were validated to be differentially expressed by 3- and 4-fold, respectively. Pathway analysis of genome-wide expression data on cells overexpressing miR-886-3p and target prediction analysis showed genes involved in DNA replication and focal adhesion pathways were regulated by miR-886-3p. Overexpression of miR-886-3p in thyroid cancer cell lines significantly inhibited cellular proliferation, the number and size of spheroids and cellular migration. Additionally, overexpression of miR-886-3p increased the number of cells in S phase. Conclusions/Significance Our findings for the first time suggest that miR-886-3p plays an important role in thyroid cancer tumor cell biology and regulates genes involved in DNA replication and focal adhesion. Thus, miR-886-3p may play a role in the initiation and or progression of papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:21998631

  3. Reference values of serum calcitonin with calcium stimulation tests by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay before/after total thyroidectomy in Japanese patients with thyroid diseases other than medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Minoru; Miyauchi, Akira; Kudo, Takumi; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Miya, Akihiro

    2016-07-30

    Calcitonin is a very sensitive tumor marker of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). MTC patients usually have very high values of serum calcitonin that can be used to diagnose the disease. To improve the diagnostic sensitivity in family members with small MTCs and to evaluate the postoperative biochemical cure status, a calcium stimulation test is widely used. Serum calcitonin has been measured using several methods, but in Japan, only an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) is currently performed to determine serum calcitonin. Reference values for the calcium stimulation test using an ECLIA have not been reported. Here we conducted a calcium stimulation tests in 26 patients without MTC before and after total thyroidectomy. Preoperatively, the basal calcitonin values of all patients were within normal limits and increased to a mean of 14.4 pg/mL after calcium stimulation. We transformed the peak values before total thyroidectomy to a logarithmic distribution and calculated the normalized mean ± 1.96× standard deviation; the reference upper limit was thus expressed. In the female patients with non-MTC, the reference upper limit was 67.6 pg/mL. In all patients, the calcium stimulation test results after total thyroidectomy showed undetectable basal and stimulated calcitonin values (<0.5 pg/mL). This is the first study to determine reference values to be used for the calcium stimulation test along with an ECLIA in non-MTC patients. We propose that female patients are regarded as biochemically cured or normal when the stimulated calcitonin values by ECLIA are <67.6 pg/mL before surgery and <0.5 pg/mL after total thyroidectomy. PMID:27097651

  4. Immunocytochemical localization and identification of members of the pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-fold family in human thyroid C cells and medullary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Scopsi, L; Pilotti, S; Rilke, F

    1990-09-10

    An increasing number of regulatory peptides not coded by the calcitonin genes are known to occur in the thyroid C cells. We have now carried out light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical analyses on specimens of normal human thyroids and medullary carcinomas to establish the occurrence of members of the PP-PYY-NPY family in the C cell system. By means of site-directed immunocytochemistry we provide the first evidence that a molecule closely related to proNPY is present in normal and pathologic C cells, and is co-stored with calcitonin in the cytoplasmic dense-core granules. Preliminary observations also suggest that high levels of expression of NPY-gene products help to define a subset of tumours with a less aggressive behaviour.

  5. [The direct gene test in familial medullary thyroid gland carcinoma and in MEN syndromes. Detection of mutations in the ret proto-oncogene saves screening studies].

    PubMed

    Stuhrmann, M

    1995-12-20

    Multiple endocrine neoplasias, type 2A and type 2B (MEN2A, MEN2B), and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The risk of passing on the disease is almost 50%. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention largely prevents aggressive metastasis of thyroid carcinoma, the main cause of death. The diagnostic possibilities have been much improved by the implementation of direct gene testing. Exclusion of the inheritance of a parental mutation in the RET proto-oncogene removes the potential risk of progeny contracting the disease, and obviates the need for the usual annual screening from age 5 years onward. In many of those cases in whom a mutation is detected, prophylactic surgical intervention should be considered.

  6. Pathophysiological study of diarrhoea in a patient with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Evidence against a secretory mechanism and for the role of shortened colonic transit time.

    PubMed Central

    Rambaud, J C; Jian, R; Flourié, B; Hautefeuille, M; Salmeron, M; Thuillier, F; Ruskoné, A; Florent, C; Chaoui, F; Bernier, J J

    1988-01-01

    Intubation techniques and scintigraphic studies were used to determine the origin and mechanism of diarrhoea in a patient with medullary thyroid carcinoma, high plasma immunoreactive calcitonin and normal circulating serotonin, substance P and prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha. Normal function of the small intestine was found for the following: (a) absorption tests; (b) water and electrolyte absorption in the proximal jejunum; (c) 24 hour flow rate and composition of fluid entering the colon and (d) gastric emptying rate and small intestinal progression of a normal meal. By contrast, colonic function was markedly impaired in three ways: (a) water absorption was decreased by half; (b) as the main excreted solutes were organic acids, a large electrolyte gap was recorded in faecal water, and (c) colonic transit time of the meal marker was very short, and was in agreement with the rapid transit of ingested radioopaque markers. These data strongly suggest that decreased absorption in the colon secondary to a motor disturbance is the main mechanism of diarrhoea in this case of medullary thyroid carcinoma, while calcitonin induced small intestinal fluid secretion suggested earlier is either non-existent, or only of minor importance. PMID:3371722

  7. In silico and in vitro analysis of rare germline allelic variants of RET oncogene associated with medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cosci, B; Vivaldi, A; Romei, C; Gemignani, F; Landi, S; Ciampi, R; Tacito, A; Molinaro, E; Agate, L; Bottici, V; Cappagli, V; Viola, D; Piaggi, P; Vitti, P; Pinchera, A; Elisei, R

    2011-10-01

    Germline and somatic RET oncogene mutations are found in 98% hereditary and 40% sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas. Our aim was to analyse by in silico and in vitro assays the transforming activity of six rare RET mutations (T338I, V648I, M918V, A883T, S904F and M848T). Six known RET mutations were used as controls. The in silico analysis showed the highest score value (i.e. 65) for S904F, M848T, M918T and C634R, whereas L790F, G691S, T338I and V648I had 0 score. Intermediate score values were obtained by A883T (score=55), M918V, V804M and Y791F (score=15). The in vitro focus formation assay showed that cells transfected with S904F, M918T, M848T or C634R generated the largest number of focus formation units (FFU). Intermediate numbers of FFU were observed in cells transfected with M918V, V804M, Y791F or A883T, while cells transfected with L790F, G691S, T338I or V648I showed a number of FFU similar to control cells. A positive correlation between the in silico score and in vitro FFU was found (P=0.0005). Only cells transfected with M918T or C634R grew faster and generated higher number of colonies in soft agar than control cells. However, the cells that were transfected with V804M produced an intermediate number of colonies. In conclusion, two of the six rare RET mutations, S904F and M848T possessed a relatively high transforming activity but a low aggressiveness; the other four mutations T338I, V648I, M918V and A883T were low or non-transforming, and their ability to induce tumoural transformation might be related to particular genetic conditions. PMID:21810974

  8. How to Treat a Signal? Current Basis for RET-Genotype-Oriented Choice of Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Medullary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Hugo; Torres, Joana; Rodrigues, Fernando; Couto, Joana P; Vinagre, João; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The significance of RET in thyroid cancer comes from solid evidence that, when inherited, an RET activating mutation primes C-cells to transform into medullary carcinomas. Moreover, environmental exposure to radiation also induces rearranged transforming RET "isoforms" that are found in papillary thyroid cancer. The RET gene codes for a tyrosine kinase receptor that targets a diverse set of intracellular signaling pathways. The nature of RET point mutations predicts differences in the mechanisms by which the receptor becomes activated and correlates with different forms of clinical presentation, age of onset, and biological aggressiveness. A number of RET-targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) are currently undergoing clinical trials to evaluate their effectiveness in the treatment of thyroid cancer, and it is conceivable that the RET genotype may also influence response to these compounds. The question that now emerges is whether, in the future, the rational for treatment of refractory thyroid cancer will be based on the management of an abnormal RET signal. In this paper we address the RET-targeting TKIs and review studies about the signaling properties of distinct RET mutants as a means to predict response and design combinatorial therapies for the soon to be available TKIs. PMID:21765992

  9. How to Treat a Signal? Current Basis for RET-Genotype-Oriented Choice of Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prazeres, Hugo; Torres, Joana; Rodrigues, Fernando; Couto, Joana P.; Vinagre, João; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The significance of RET in thyroid cancer comes from solid evidence that, when inherited, an RET activating mutation primes C-cells to transform into medullary carcinomas. Moreover, environmental exposure to radiation also induces rearranged transforming RET “isoforms” that are found in papillary thyroid cancer. The RET gene codes for a tyrosine kinase receptor that targets a diverse set of intracellular signaling pathways. The nature of RET point mutations predicts differences in the mechanisms by which the receptor becomes activated and correlates with different forms of clinical presentation, age of onset, and biological aggressiveness. A number of RET-targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) are currently undergoing clinical trials to evaluate their effectiveness in the treatment of thyroid cancer, and it is conceivable that the RET genotype may also influence response to these compounds. The question that now emerges is whether, in the future, the rational for treatment of refractory thyroid cancer will be based on the management of an abnormal RET signal. In this paper we address the RET-targeting TKIs and review studies about the signaling properties of distinct RET mutants as a means to predict response and design combinatorial therapies for the soon to be available TKIs. PMID:21765992

  10. Investigation of factors potentially influencing calcitonin levels in the screening and follow-up for medullary thyroid carcinoma: a cautionary note

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The malignant transformation of thyroid C cells is associated with an increase in human calcitonin (hCT), which can thus be helpful in the early diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). For this reason, hCT levels should be determined in all patients with nodular goitre. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, nodular goitre and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are factors reported to influence basal serum hCT concentrations. The diagnostic role of mildly to moderately increased hCT levels is thus a matter of debate. In this study, we attempt to clarify the role of the aforementioned factors. Methods From 2008 to 2009, we collected data from 493 patients who were divided into five groups. We assessed whether there were significant differences in hCT levels between patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, patients with nodular goitre, patients with PPI therapy, and healthy control subjects. In addition, we investigated whether a delayed analysis of blood samples has an effect on serum hCT concentrations. Results Immunoradiometric assays (Calcitonin IRMA magnum, MEDIPAN) revealed that the time of analysis did not play a role when low levels were measured. Delayed analysis, however, carried the risk of false low results when serum hCT concentrations were elevated. Men had significantly higher serum hCT levels than women. The serum hCT concentrations of patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and nodular goitre were not significantly different from those of control subjects. Likewise, PPI therapy did not lead to a significant increase in serum hCT concentrations regardless of the presence or absence of nodular goitre. Conclusions Increases in serum hCT levels are not necessarily attributable to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, nodular goitre or the regular use of PPIs and always require further diagnostic attention. PMID:24188348

  11. Thyroid autoimmunity and obstetric outcomes in women with recurrent miscarriage: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Kusum; Dutta, Pinaki; Sridhar, Subbiah; Rohilla, Minakshi; Srinivasan, Anand; Prashad, G R V; Shah, Viral N; Bhansali, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Thyroid antibody positivity during pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes including miscarriage and preterm delivery. The aim of the study is to evaluate the obstetric outcome in pregnant women with recurrent miscarriage and their response to levothyroxine (l-T4) therapy. Study design and methods All pregnant and non-pregnant women between 21 and 35 years of age with a history of two or more consecutive miscarriages were included in the study. A third group comprising 100 pregnant women without a history of miscarriage were taken as healthy controls. Thyroid autoimmunity, prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and maternal and foetal complications were analysed in all the groups with appropriate statistical methods. Results The mean age of the patients included in the study was 27.0±3.1 years. Of 100 pregnant patients with previous recurrent miscarriage, thyroid autoimmunity (thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb+) >34 U/ml) was found in 31% of the cases. The incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism was higher in TPOAb+ group than in TPOAb− group (52 vs 16%; P=0.0002). There was no difference in the prevalence of miscarriage or obstetric outcomes between recurrent miscarriage and healthy pregnant women group irrespective of TPO status. Conclusions The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity was higher in pregnant women with a history of recurrent abortion compared with healthy pregnant control population. Following l-T4 treatment, there was no difference in prevalence of miscarriage between hypothyroid and euthyroid individuals in TPOAb+ women. PMID:23802061

  12. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  13. [Method of detection of residual tissues in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Gostimskiĭ, A V; Romanchishen, A F; Zaĭtseva, I V; Kuznetsova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    A search of residual tissues is complicated in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland. The Saint-Petersburg Centre of Surgery of the Endocrine System and Oncology developed the method of detection of residual tissues of the thyroid gland with the aim of preoperative chromothyroidolymphography under control of ultrasound. The method consisted of US performance during 15-20 minutes before the operation and an introduction of 1% sterile water solution of methylene blue in revealed residual tissues of the thyroid gland. The volume of injected coloring agent was 0.5-2 ml in the residual tissue volume smaller than 9 cm3 and 2-3 ml injected in case of more than 9 cm3. The residual tissues of the thyroid gland accurately visualized during the following operation. Described method gives the possibility to detect all regions of residual tissues which should be removed and at the same time it shortens a revision and surgery trauma.

  14. Recurrent Episodes of Thyrotoxicosis in a Man following Pregnancies of his Spouse with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Belokovskaya, Regina; Levine, Alice C.

    2015-01-01

    Over an 8-year period, a male patient presented three times to an endocrinologist with strikingly similar presentations, including palpitations, anxiety, and tremors. Each of his presentations occurred following either the birth of one of his two children or his wife's late termination of pregnancy. This patient's illness followed the typical time course of silent thyroiditis: hyperthyroidism, followed by euthyroidism, a late hypothyroid phase, and then a complete resolution of symptoms and normalization of thyroid function tests over a period of several months. We discuss the curious clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and a literature review of alternate explanations for this patient's condition, including a discussion of the impact of seasonal shift, spousal's autoimmune disease, stress, and evolutionary changes in males postpartum. Although the differential diagnosis is broad in this case and the thyrotoxicosis could have coincidentally followed pregnancies of the patient's wife, documented hormonal changes in men during postpartum period in conjunction with the timeline of the patient's condition are suggestive of recurrent “sympathetic” postpartum thyroiditis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent painless thyroiditis in a man following pregnancies of his wife with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. PMID:26421199

  15. Cervix carcinoma and incidental finding of medullary thyroid carcinoma by 18F-FDG PET/CT--clinical case.

    PubMed

    Chaushev, Borislav; Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Anelia; Yordanov, Kaloyan; Encheva, Elitsa; Dancheva, Jivka; Yordanova, Cvetelina; Hristozov, Kiril; Krasnaliev, Ivan; Radev, Radoslav; Nenkov, Rumen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are encountered in clinical practice during the diagnostic procedures or patients' follow-up due to other diseases quite far from the thyroid gland with prevalence 4-50% in general population, depending on age, diagnostic method and race. The prevalence of thyroid nodules increases with age and their clarification should be done for their adequate treatment. An 18F-FDG PET/CT was done with a PET/CT scanner (Philips Gemini TF), consisting of dedicated lutetium orthosilicate full ring PET scanner and 16 slice CT. The PET/CT scan of the whole-body revealed on the CT portion a hypodense nodular lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid gland with increased uptake of 18F-FDG on the PET with SUVmax 10.3 and demonstrated a complete response to the induction therapy of the main oncological disease of the patient--squamous cell carcinoma. This clinical case demonstrates that whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/CT has an increasingly important role in the early evaluation of thyroid cancer as a second independent malignant localization. Focal thyroid lesion with high risk of thyroid malignancy was incidentally found on 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:25088110

  16. Can the Serum Level of Myostatin be Considered as an Informative Factor for Cachexia Prevention in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer?

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Nozhat, Zahra; Hannani, Masoomeh

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine neoplasia, consists of four main types of carcinomas: papillary, follicular, and anaplastic, all with thyroid follicular origin, and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) related to para-follicular cells. Cronic diseases such as diverse cancers may be associated with cachexia, especially at advanced stage. Cancer-induced cachexia is associated with diminished quality of life, functional performance, reduced response to antitumor therapy, and increased morbidity and mortality. Myostatin (Mst) is one of the outstanding molecules in the skeletal muscle loss process in cancer and it may be released by both skeletal muscle and cachexia-inducing tumors. Recently changes in serum levels of Mst have been identified as an important factor of cancer-induced cachexia. The goal of this study was to assessserum Mst levels in MTC patients. In this descriptive and case-control study, 90 participants were selected, comprising 45 MTC patients (20 males, 29±13.9 years, 25 females, 29±14.5 years) and 45 control individuals (25 males, 23.1±11.6 years, 20 females, 31.5±14.4 years). Serum Mst was determined using an ELISA kit and body mass index (BMI) was calculated by weight and height measurements. The Kolmogorov Simonov test showed a normal distribution for log transformed Mst serum levels in both case and control groups. Geometric means were 5.9 and 8.2 ng/ml respectively, and a significant difference was found according to the independent t-test results (P<0.01) . There was also a significant difference mean of Mst between females in control and MTC groups, but not for the males. Pearson correlation test showed no correlation between age and BMI with Mst serum levels. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that Mst serum levels may have a potential ability for early diagnosis of cachexia in MTC patients, especially in females. PMID:27165248

  17. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis, and pancreatic polypeptide hypersecretion: a new association and clinical and hormonal responses to long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, T W; Sacks, H S; O'Dorisio, T M; Tuttle, S; Solomon, S S

    1987-06-01

    We describe a 63-yr-old man with disseminated medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis with pancreatic polypeptide (PP) hypersecretion. His major symptoms were watery diarrhea, flushing, and abdominal bloating; these and the elevated plasma PP levels did not change after resection of the distal two thirds of the pancreas, which contained a 2-cm mass of nesidioblastotic tissue. Postoperatively, a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/day), normalized PP secretion acutely and chronically (7 months) and ameliorated his symptoms. The analog had no side-effects and did not alter glucose tolerance, calcitonin hypersecretion, or growth of the medullary carcinoma, but it did inhibit GH secretion. After withdrawal from therapy for 1 month, PP hypersecretion and all symptoms except diarrhea recurred. The coexistence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and PP cell nesidioblastosis represents a new variant of the overlap syndromes between multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and II. Patients with medullary carcinoma and unexplained watery diarrhea should have fasting gastroenteropancreatic hormone assays done to screen for a potential gastrointestinal or pancreatic origin for the diarrhea. PMID:2883196

  18. Hemithyroidectomy increases the risk of disease recurrence in patients with ipsilateral multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAOLONG; ZHAO, CUI; HU, DANDAN; YU, YANG; GAO, JIN; ZHAO, WENCHUAN; GAO, MING

    2013-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is often clinically multifocal. In this study, the clinicopathological characteristics of a total of 347 PTC patients treated between 2006 and 2007 were investigated in order to assess the risk factors for tumor recurrence in patients with multifocal PTC. Of all the PTC cases reviewed, 35 (10%) were categorized as multifocal PTC. Patients with multifocal PTC were significantly more likely to have extrathyroidal extension, lymph node metastases and disease recurrence (P<0.05). Hemithyroidectomy resulted in a significantly higher incidence of tumor recurrence in patients with ipsilateral multifocal PTC compared with unifocal PTC patients (P<0.01). In conclusion, hemithyroidectomy was associated with tumor recurrence in patients with ipsilateral multifocal PTC but not those with unifocal PTC. Hemithyroidectomy should only be carried out after careful deliberation when involving patients with ipsilateral multifocal PTC. PMID:23599804

  19. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  20. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  1. Are there disparities in the presentation, treatment and outcomes of patients diagnosed with medullary thyroid cancer?—An analysis of 634 patients from the California Cancer Registry

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christine; Chen, Yingjia; Cress, Rosemary; Semrad, Alison M.; Semrad, Thomas; Gosnell, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Race, gender and socioeconomic disparities have been suggested to adversely influence stage at presentation, treatment options and outcomes in patients with cancer. Underserved minorities and those with a low socioeconomic status (SES) present with more advanced disease and have worse outcomes for differentiated thyroid cancer, but this relationship has never been evaluated for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Methods We used the California Cancer Registry (CCR) to evaluate disparities in the presentation, treatment and outcomes of patients diagnosed with MTC. Results We identified 634 patients with MTC diagnosed between 1988 and 2011. Almost everyone (85%) underwent thyroidectomy with 50% having a central lymph node dissection (CLND). There were no statistically significant differences by age, race or SES in mean tumor size or the proportion of patients diagnosed with localized disease, but men were diagnosed with larger tumors than women and were less likely to be diagnosed at a localized stage. Younger patients and women were more likely to be treated with a thyroidectomy. There were no statistically significant differences in surgical treatment by race or SES. Patients in the highest SES category had a better overall survival, but not disease specific survival, than those in the lowest SES (HR =0.3, CI =0.1–0.7). Patients treated with thyroidectomy had a better overall and cause specific survival, but the effect of CLND was not statistically significant after adjustment for other factors. Conclusions In MTC, we did not find that race, gender or SES influenced the presentation, treatment or outcomes of patients with MTC. Men with MTC present with larger tumors and are less likely to have localized disease. Half of the MTC patients in California do not undergo a CLND at the time of thyroidectomy, which may suggest a lack appropriate care across a range of healthcare systems. PMID:27563561

  2. [Conservative treatment of chyle fistula of the neck following a reintervention of cervical bilateral lymphectomy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Case report].

    PubMed

    Giove, Eleonora; Merlicco, Domenico; Nacchiero, Eleonora; Marzaioli, Rinaldo

    2010-01-01

    Chyle fistula is an uncommon serious complication of neck surgery, occurring in 1-3% of radical neck dissections. An untreated chyle leak is a potentially dangerous condition that may rarely lead to hypovolemia, hyponatremia, hypochloremia, hypoproteinemia and lymphopenia. Anatomic variants of the terminal portion of the thoracic duct and suction drainage in the neck wound play a primary role in causing this kind of lesion. Poor is the literature concerning chyle fistula, due to its rarity, and mostly case reports; still debated--prevalently empiric--is the management of this disease. The Authors report a case of chyle fistula following a reintervention of cervical bilateral lymphectomy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in a 75 years old female. In the reported case the chyle fistula was successfully treated conservatively, in early post-operative period with a low-fat diet and total parenteral nutrition, definitely followed by sclerosant therapy. The injection of a sclerosant agent (4 g of sterile medical talc diluted in isotonic sodium chloride solution) into the supraclavicular wound bed, through the drainage tube (clamped for 2 hours), determined rapid decline in fistula output, hence obviating surgical intervention.

  3. Interleukin-1beta can mediate growth arrest and differentiation via the leukemia inhibitory factor/JAK/STAT pathway in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2005-02-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a pleiotropic cytokine that can induce several cellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that IL-1beta can induce cell cycle arrest and differentiation in the human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, TT. IL-1beta induces cell cycle arrest accompanied by morphological changes and expression of the neuroendocrine marker calcitonin. These changes are blocked by the MEK1/2 specific inhibitor U0126, indicating that MEK1/2 is essential for IL-1beta signaling in TT cells. IL-1beta induces expression of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and activation of STAT3 via the MEK/ERK pathway. This activation of STAT3 could be abrogated by treatment with anti-LIF neutralizing antibody or anti-gp130 blocking antibody, indicating that induction of LIF expression is sufficient and essential for STAT3 activation by IL-1beta. In addition to activation of the LIF/JAK/STAT pathway, IL-1beta also induced an MEK/ERK-mediated intracellular cell-autonomous signaling pathway that is independently sufficient for growth arrest and differentiation. Thus, IL-1beta activates the MEK/ERK pathway to induce growth arrest and differentiation in MTC cells via dual independent signaling mechanisms, the cell-extrinsic LIF/JAK/STAT pathway, and the cell-intrinsic autonomous signaling pathway.

  4. Usefulness of Serum Calcitonin in Patients Without a Suspicious History of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and with Thyroid Nodules Without an Indication for Fine-Needle Aspiration or with Benign Cytology.

    PubMed

    Rosario, P W; Calsolari, M R

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of serum calcitonin (Ctn) in subjects without a suspicious history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and with nodular thyroid disease without an indication for fine-needle aspiration (FNA) or with benign cytology. This was a prospective study that evaluated 421 patients with nodular disease without an indication for FNA and 602 patients with benign cytology. Patients with basal Ctn>10 pg/ml were submitted to calcium stimulation testing. Patients with stimulated Ctn>100 pg/ml were submitted to total thyroidectomy. Basal Ctn was<10 pg/ml in 1001 patients (97.8%). Among patients with basal Ctn>10 pg/ml, 16/22 exhibited stimulated Ctn>100 pg/ml. Two of these 16 patients had MTC. The 2 patients with MTC had undetectable basal Ctn 6 months after surgery. Using a cut-off of 30 pg/ml in women and 60 pg/ml in men for basal Ctn, the 2 cases of MTC of our series would have been identified and there would have been no false-positive case. It should be noted that 14/16 patients with stimulated Ctn>100 pg/ml were false-positive cases. Although uncommon, even subjects without a suspicious history and with nodular thyroid disease without an indication for FNA or with benign cytology can have MTC. The measurement of Ctn permits the diagnosis of these cases. Our results favor the hypothesis that basal Ctn could be superior to stimulated Ctn. PMID:27203410

  5. Further Evidence on the Role of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Women with Recurrent Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarin, Natalia; Moretti, Costanzo; De Felice, Giovanna; Vaquero, Elena; Manfellotto, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It has been twenty years since the first paper reporting the association between thyroid antibodies (TAIs) and spontaneous miscarriage was published. Following this observation, several studies have clearly demonstrated an increased prevalence of TAI in patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM). However, the exact mechanism underlying this association remains a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the thyroid function, throughout a specific test, in patient with RM and TAI focusing on the hypothesis that TAI should be an indirect sign of a mild thyroid dysfunction. 46 patients with RM and TAI were included in the study. All patients underwent short TRH stimulation test showing an abnormal response in the vast majority of cases (65%). Normal FT4 and FT3 mean values were found whereas TSH values were in the upper normal range (2.64 ± 1.3 mUI/L). Our data support the hypothesis that in patients with RM the presence of TAI is an indirect sign of a subtle thyroid dysfunction detectable by a specific test. This test give the possibility to identify women with RM in which specific therapeutic approaches could effectively improve the possibility for a successful pregnancy. PMID:22319528

  6. Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis due to Both Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in the Same Three Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Ashley; Puthenpura, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are the 2 most common autoimmune disease processes affecting the thyroid gland. The relationship between the two is complex and not clearly understood. It has been theorized that HT and GD are 2 separate disease processes due to unique genetic differences demonstrated by genome studies. On the other hand, based on occurrence of both HT and GD in monozygotic twins and within the same family, they have been regarded to represent 2 ends of the same spectrum. This case report describes 3 patients who presented with thyrotoxicosis due to both GD and HT. The initial presentation was thyrotoxicosis due to GD treated with antithyroid medication followed by temporary resolution. They all subsequently experienced recurrence of thyrotoxicosis in the form of Hashitoxicosis due to HT, and then eventually all developed thyrotoxicosis due to GD, requiring radioablation therapy. PMID:27340576

  7. Charcoal tattoo localization for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence in the central compartment of the neck.

    PubMed

    Soprani, F; Bondi, F; Puccetti, M; Armaroli, V

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer can often require further surgical options. Reoperations may carry significant risk of surgical complications; additionally, as the anatomy is subverted, there is the possibility of leaving residual neoplasm. In order to avoid such problems during reoperation for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence, we have introduced the technique of preoperative ultrasound-guided tattooing localization of the lymphatic structure to be removed with a 4% solution of active charcoal. Using ultrasound guidance, the lesion is identified and 0.5-2 ml of colloidal charcoal is injected near the lesion. The extraction of the needle is accompanied by injection at constant pressure of other charcoal as to leave a trace of colouring along the path of the needle up to the skin. The preoperative injection was well tolerated in all cases. In the last 5 years, we have used this technique in 13 patients with suspected recurrence in the central compartment (all from papillary carcinomas). Postoperative ultrasound and histological examination confirmed the removal of the lesion in all patients; in one case, the lesion was a parathyroid cyst. Complications were observed in two of 13 (15.4%) cases (one transitory hypoparathyroidism, and one transitory vocal cord paresis). Considering our experience, charcoal tattoo localization can be considered a safe, low-cost technique that is extremely useful for facilitating surgical procedures, and reduces the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation to Treat Loco-Regional Recurrence of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Bum Soo; Ahn, Kook Jin; Choi, Hyun Seok; Lim, Dong Jun; Kim, Min Hee; Bae, Ja Seong; Kim, Min Sik; Jung, Chan Kwon; Chong, Se Min

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of loco-regional, recurrent, and well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Materials and Methods Thirty-five recurrent well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas (RTC) in 32 patients were treated with RFA, between March 2008 and October 2011. RTCs were detected by regular follow-up ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy. All patients had fewer than 3 RTCs in the neck and were at high surgical risk or refused to undergo repeated surgery. Average number of RFA sessions were 1.3 (range 1-3). Post-RFA biopsy and ultrasound were performed. The mean follow-up period was 30 months. Pre- and post-RFA serum thyroglobulin values were evaluated. Results Thirty-one patients with 33 RTCs were treated with RFA only, whereas 1 patient with 2 RTCs was treated with RFA followed by surgery. At the last follow-up ultrasound, 31 (94%) of the 33 RTCs treated with RFA alone completely disappeared and the remaining 2 (6%) RTCs showed decreased volume. The largest diameter and volume of the 33 RTCs were markedly decreased by 93.2% (from 8.1 ± 3.4 mm to 0.6 ± 1.8 mm, p < 0.001) and 96.4% (from 173.9 ± 198.7 mm3 to 6.2 ± 27.9 mm3, p < 0.001), respectively. Twenty of the 21 RTCs evaluated with post-RFA biopsies (95%) were negative for malignancy. One (5%) showed remaining tumor that was removed surgically. The serum thyroglobulin was decreased in 19 of 26 patients (73%). Voice change developed immediately after RFA in 6 patients (19%) and was spontaneously recovered in 5 patients (83%). Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation can be effective in treating loco-regional, recurrent, and well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma in patients at high surgical risk. PMID:25469095

  9. Long-term eradication of locally recurrent invasive follicular thyroid carcinoma after taxane-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall; Skarulis, Monica C; Sherman, Steven I; Sarlis, Nicholas J; Santarpia, Libero

    2009-11-01

    A 46-year-old woman with history of radioiodine-refractory follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) presented with locally recurrent, high-risk, invasive disease. She was treated with paclitaxel/carboplatin concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), which was well tolerated, resulting in complete remission and freedom from residual or recurrent FTC for longer than 5 years until her last follow-up at age 52. This case highlights the possibility of combining taxane-based chemotherapy with definitive radiotherapy (as CRT) for the management of locally aggressive recurrences in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, thereby resulting in rapid and persistent disease eradication. Even in the light of recent data on the potential benefit of novel targeted therapy agents in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, this approach in similar clinical settings deserves future investigation. PMID:20032418

  10. The Effect of Extent of Surgery and Number of Lymph Node Metastases on Overall Survival in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David T.; Yin, Huiying; Banerjee, Mousumi; Haymart, Megan R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Total thyroidectomy with central lymph node dissection is recommended in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). However, the relationship between disease severity and extent of resection on overall survival remains unknown. Objective: The aim of the study was to identify the effect of surgery on overall survival in MTC patients. Methods: Using data from 2968 patients with MTC diagnosed between 1998 and 2005 from the National Cancer Database, we determined the relationship between the number of cervical lymph node metastases, tumor size, distant metastases, and extent of surgery on overall survival in patients with MTC. Results: Older patient age (5.69 [95% CI, 3.34–9.72]), larger tumor size (2.89 [95% CI, 2.14–3.90]), presence of distant metastases (5.68 [95% CI, 4.61–6.99]), and number of positive regional lymph nodes (for ≥16 lymph nodes, 3.40 [95% CI, 2.41–4.79]) were independently associated with decreased survival. Overall survival rate for patients with cervical lymph nodes resected and negative, cervical lymph nodes not resected, and 1–5, 6–10, 11–16, and ≥16 cervical lymph node metastases was 90, 76, 74, 61, 69, and 55%, respectively. There was no difference in survival based on surgical intervention in patients with tumor size ≤ 2 cm without distant metastases. In patients with tumor size > 2.0 cm and no distant metastases, all surgical treatments resulted in a significant improvement in survival compared to no surgery (P < .001). In patients with distant metastases, only total thyroidectomy with regional lymph node resection resulted in a significant improvement in survival (P < .001). Conclusions: The number of lymph node metastases should be incorporated into MTC staging. The extent of surgery in patients with MTC should be tailored to tumor size and distant metastases. PMID:24276457

  11. High Affinity Pharmacological Profiling of Dual Inhibitors Targeting RET and VEGFR2 in Inhibition of Kinase and Angiogeneis Events in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Kandula, Venkatesh; Girdhar, Amandeep; Pudutha, Amareshwari; Hussain, Tajamul; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence shows that dual inhibition of kinases as well angiogenesis provides ideal therapeutic option in the treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) than inhibiting either of these with the events separately. Although treatment with dual inhibitors has shown good clinical responses in patients with MTC, it has been associated with serious side effects. Some inhibitors are active agents for both angiogenesis or kinase activity. Owing to narrow therapeutic window of established inhibitors, the present study aims to identify high affinity dual inhibitors targeting RET and VEGFR2 respectively for kinase and angiogenesis activity. Established inhibitors like Vandetanib, Cabozantinib, Motesanib, PP121, RAF265 and Sunitinib served as query parent compounds for identification of structurally similar compounds by Tanimoto-based similarity searching with a threshold of 95% against the PubChem database. All the parent inhibitors and respective similar compounds were docked against RET and VEGFR2 in order to retrieve high affinity compounds with these two proteins. AGN-PC-0CUK9P PubCID: 59320403 a compound related to PPI21 showed almost equal affinity for RET and VEGFR2 and unlike other screened compounds with no apparent bias for either of the receptors. Further, AGN- PC-0CUK9P demonstrated appreciable interaction with both RET and VEGFR2 and superior kinase activity in addition to showed optimal ADMET properties and pharmacophore features. From our in silico investigation we suggest AGN-PC-0CUK9P as a superior dual inhibitor targeting RET and VEGFR2 with high efficacy which should be proposed for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies for improved treatment of MTC.

  12. High Affinity Pharmacological Profiling of Dual Inhibitors Targeting RET and VEGFR2 in Inhibition of Kinase and Angiogeneis Events in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Kandula, Venkatesh; Girdhar, Amandeep; Pudutha, Amareshwari; Hussain, Tajamul; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence shows that dual inhibition of kinases as well angiogenesis provides ideal therapeutic option in the treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) than inhibiting either of these with the events separately. Although treatment with dual inhibitors has shown good clinical responses in patients with MTC, it has been associated with serious side effects. Some inhibitors are active agents for both angiogenesis or kinase activity. Owing to narrow therapeutic window of established inhibitors, the present study aims to identify high affinity dual inhibitors targeting RET and VEGFR2 respectively for kinase and angiogenesis activity. Established inhibitors like Vandetanib, Cabozantinib, Motesanib, PP121, RAF265 and Sunitinib served as query parent compounds for identification of structurally similar compounds by Tanimoto-based similarity searching with a threshold of 95% against the PubChem database. All the parent inhibitors and respective similar compounds were docked against RET and VEGFR2 in order to retrieve high affinity compounds with these two proteins. AGN-PC-0CUK9P PubCID: 59320403 a compound related to PPI21 showed almost equal affinity for RET and VEGFR2 and unlike other screened compounds with no apparent bias for either of the receptors. Further, AGN- PC-0CUK9P demonstrated appreciable interaction with both RET and VEGFR2 and superior kinase activity in addition to showed optimal ADMET properties and pharmacophore features. From our in silico investigation we suggest AGN-PC-0CUK9P as a superior dual inhibitor targeting RET and VEGFR2 with high efficacy which should be proposed for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies for improved treatment of MTC. PMID:26514495

  13. Efficacy of the Natural Clay, Calcium Aluminosilicate Anti-Diarrheal, in Reducing Medullary Thyroid Cancer–Related Diarrhea and Its Effects on Quality of Life: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mimi I.; Cleeland, Charles; Busaidy, Naifa L.; Habra, Mouhammed; Waguespack, Steven G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Ying, Anita; Fox, Patricia; Cabanillas, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC)–related diarrhea can be debilitating, reduces quality of life (QOL), and may be the only indication for initiating systemic therapy. Conventional antidiarrheal drugs are not always helpful and may have side effects. Calcium aluminosilicate antidiarrheal (CASAD), a natural calcium montmorrilonite clay, safely adsorbs toxins and inflammatory proteins associated with diarrhea. It was hypothesized that CASAD would reduce the severity of diarrhea and improve QOL in MTC patients. Methods: This was a prospective pilot trial (NCT01739634) of MTC patients not on systemic therapy with self-reported diarrhea of three or more bowel movements (BMs) per day for a week or more. The study design included a one-week run-in period followed by one week of CASAD ± a two-week optional continuation period. The primary endpoint was efficacy of one week of CASAD treatment in decreasing the number of BMs per day by ≥20% when compared with the baseline run-in period. Secondary objectives included tolerability and safety and the impact on QOL using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Thyroid questionnaire (MDASI-THY). Results: Ten MTC patients (median age = 52 years, 70% female, 80% white) were enrolled. All had distant metastases, and median calcitonin was 5088 ng/mL (range 1817–42,007 ng/mL). Ninety percent had received prior antidiarrheals, and 40% of these had used two or more drugs, including tincture of opium (30%), loperamide (50%), diphenoxylate/atropine (20%), colestipol (10%), or cholestyramine (10%). Of seven evaluable patients, four (56%) had ≥20% reduction in BMs per day. Six out of seven patients discontinued their prior antidiarrheals. Best response ranged from 7% to 99% reduction in mean BMs/day from baseline. Five out of seven patients considered CASAD a success, and they opted for the two-week continuation period. Improvements in diarrhea and all six interference items assessed by MDASI-THY were noted at weeks

  14. Recurrent EZH1 mutations are a second hit in autonomous thyroid adenomas.

    PubMed

    Calebiro, Davide; Grassi, Elisa S; Eszlinger, Markus; Ronchi, Cristina L; Godbole, Amod; Bathon, Kerstin; Guizzardi, Fabiana; de Filippis, Tiziana; Krohn, Knut; Jaeschke, Holger; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Bircan, Rifat; Gozu, Hulya Iliksu; Sancak, Seda; Niedziela, Marek; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Persani, Luca; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous thyroid adenomas (ATAs) are a frequent cause of hyperthyroidism. Mutations in the genes encoding the TSH receptor (TSHR) or the Gs protein α subunit (GNAS) are found in approximately 70% of ATAs. The involvement of other genes and the pathogenesis of the remaining cases are presently unknown. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 19 ATAs that were paired with normal DNA samples and identified a recurrent hot-spot mutation (c.1712A>G; p.Gln571Arg) in the enhancer of zeste homolog 1 (EZH1) gene, which codes for a catalytic subunit of the polycomb complex. Targeted screening in an independent cohort confirmed that this mutation occurs with high frequency (27%) in ATAs. EZH1 mutations were strongly associated with known (TSHR, GNAS) or presumed (adenylate cyclase 9 [ADCY9]) alterations in cAMP pathway genes. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that the p.Gln571Arg EZH1 mutation caused increased histone H3 trimethylation and increased proliferation of thyroid cells. In summary, this study revealed that a hot-spot mutation in EZH1 is the second most frequent genetic alteration in ATAs. The association between EZH1 and TSHR mutations suggests a 2-hit model for the pathogenesis of these tumors, whereby constitutive activation of the cAMP pathway and EZH1 mutations cooperate to induce the hyperproliferation of thyroid cells. PMID:27500488

  15. The Delayed Risk Stratification System in the Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Walczyk, Agnieszka; Pałyga, Iwona; Gąsior-Perczak, Danuta; Gadawska-Juszczyk, Klaudia; Szymonek, Monika; Trybek, Tomasz; Lizis-Kolus, Katarzyna; Szyska-Skrobot, Dorota; Mikina, Estera; Hurej, Stefan; Słuszniak, Janusz; Mężyk, Ryszard; Góźdź, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Context There has been a marked increase in the detection of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) over the past few years, which has improved the prognosis. However, it is necessary to adjust treatment and monitoring strategies relative to the risk of an unfavourable disease course. Materials and Methods This retrospective study examined data from 916 patients with DTC who received treatment at a single centre between 2000 and 2013. The utility of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the European Thyroid Association (ETA) recommended systems for early assessment of the risk of recurrent/persistent disease was compared with that of the recently recommended delayed risk stratification (DRS) system. Results The PPV and NPV for the ATA (24.59% and 95.42%, respectively) and ETA (24.28% and 95.68%, respectively) were significantly lower than those for the DRS (56.76% and 98.5%, respectively) (p<0.0001). The proportion of variance for predicting the final outcome was 15.8% for ATA, 16.1% for ETA and 56.7% for the DRS. Recurrent disease was rare (1% of patients), and was nearly always identified in patients at intermediate/high risk according to the initial stratification (9/10 cases). Conclusions The DRS showed a better correlation with the risk of persistent disease than the early stratification systems and allows personalisation of follow-up. If clinicians plan to alter the intensity of surveillance, patients at intermediate/high risk according to the early stratification systems should remain within the specialized centers; however, low risk patients can be referred to endocrinologists or other appropriate practitioners for long-term follow-up, as these patients remained at low risk after risk re-stratification. PMID:27078258

  16. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  17. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  18. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  19. Aberrant expression of COT is related to recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Lee, Eun Jig; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-02-01

    Aberrant expression of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Oncogene mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (COT) (MAP3K8) is a driver of resistance to B-RAF inhibition. However, the de novo expression and clinical implications of COT in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) have not been investigated.The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of A-, B-, C-RAF, and COT in PTC (n = 167) and analyze the clinical implications of aberrant expression of these genes.Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed on primary thyroid cancers. Expression of COT was compared with clinicopathological characteristics including recurrence-free survival. Datasets from public repository (NCBI) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA).qPCR data showed that the relative mRNA expression of A-, B-, C-RAF and COT of PTC were higher than normal tissues (all P < 0.01). In addition, the expression of COT mRNA in PTC showed positive correlation with A- (r = 0.4083, P < 0.001), B- (r = 0.2773, P = 0.0003), and C-RAF (r = 0.5954, P < 0.001). The mRNA expressions of A-, B,- and C-RAF were also correlated with each other (all P < 0.001). In IHC, the staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were higher in PTC than in normal tissue (P < 0.001). Interestingly, moderate-to-strong staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were more frequent in B-RAF-positive PTC (P < 0.001, P = 0.013, respectively). In addition, aberrant expression of COT was related to old age at initial diagnosis (P = 0.045) and higher recurrence rate (P = 0.025). In multivariate analysis, tumor recurrence was persistently associated with moderate-to-strong staining of COT after adjusting for age, sex, extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, T-stage, N-stage, TNM stage, and B-RAF mutation (odds ratio, 4.662; 95% confidence interval 1.066 - 21.609; P = 0.045). Moreover, moderate-to-strong COT expression in PTC

  20. Aberrant Expression of COT Is Related to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Lee, Eun Jig; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant expression of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Oncogene mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (COT) (MAP3K8) is a driver of resistance to B-RAF inhibition. However, the de novo expression and clinical implications of COT in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) have not been investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of A-, B-, C-RAF, and COT in PTC (n = 167) and analyze the clinical implications of aberrant expression of these genes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed on primary thyroid cancers. Expression of COT was compared with clinicopathological characteristics including recurrence-free survival. Datasets from public repository (NCBI) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). qPCR data showed that the relative mRNA expression of A-, B-, C-RAF and COT of PTC were higher than normal tissues (all P < 0.01). In addition, the expression of COT mRNA in PTC showed positive correlation with A- (r = 0.4083, P < 0.001), B- (r = 0.2773, P = 0.0003), and C-RAF (r = 0.5954, P < 0.001). The mRNA expressions of A-, B,- and C-RAF were also correlated with each other (all P < 0.001). In IHC, the staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were higher in PTC than in normal tissue (P < 0.001). Interestingly, moderate-to-strong staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were more frequent in B-RAFV600E-positive PTC (P < 0.001, P = 0.013, respectively). In addition, aberrant expression of COT was related to old age at initial diagnosis (P = 0.045) and higher recurrence rate (P = 0.025). In multivariate analysis, tumor recurrence was persistently associated with moderate-to-strong staining of COT after adjusting for age, sex, extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, T-stage, N-stage, TNM stage, and B-RAFV600E mutation (odds ratio, 4.662; 95% confidence interval 1.066 − 21.609; P = 0.045). Moreover, moderate

  1. Analysis of Risk Factors Contributing to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients Who Underwent Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Jiao, De; Liu, Baoguo; Sun, Shanping

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a very common endocrine malignancy, with a rate of total thyroidectomy reported to be up to 27.8%. However, studies analyzing the risk factors that contribute to recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) after total thyroidectomy in China are still scarce. Material/Methods A total of 536 patients with PTC who underwent total thyroidectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with no recurrent tumor were included in group 1 and patients with tumor recurrence were included in group 2. Results Of 536 patients, 65 patients (12.1%) developed a recurrence of PTC, and 471 patients (87.9%) did not have a recurrence. Univariate analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, tumor ≥1 cm, poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, bilaterality, and multifocality may be related to PTC recurrence. Additionally, the results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, primary tumor ≥1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality may be independent factors contributing to PTC recurrence. Conclusions Male sex, age more than 50 years, primary tumor larger than 1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the primary tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality were found to increase the risk of PTC recurrence in patients who underwent total thyroidectomy. Additionally, it is necessary to use strictly aggressive and extensive surgery, as well as close monitoring, after the operation. PMID:27084873

  2. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-02-01

    Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients.This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II-VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan-Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS).Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72-12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458-3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan-Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation.The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut-off values may prove

  3. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients. This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II–VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan–Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS). Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72–12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458–3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan–Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation. The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut

  4. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC. PMID:27679545

  5. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC.

  6. Effect of 3′UTR RET Variants on RET mRNA Secondary Structure and Disease Presentation in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Romitti, Mirian; Rodrigues Siqueira, Débora; Vaz Ferreira, Carla; Oliboni Scapineli, Jessica; Assis-Brazil, Beatriz; Vieira Maximiano, Rodolfo; Dias Amarante, Tauanne; de Souza Nunes, Miriam Celi; Weber, Gerald; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Background The RET S836S variant has been associated with early onset and increased risk for metastatic disease in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). However, the mechanism by which this variant modulates MTC pathogenesis is still open to discuss. Of interest, strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between RET S836S and 3'UTR variants has been reported in Hirschsprung's disease patients. Objective To evaluate the frequency of the RET 3’UTR variants (rs76759170 and rs3026785) in MTC patients and to determine whether these variants are in LD with S836S polymorphism. Methods Our sample comprised 152 patients with sporadic MTC. The RET S836S and 3’UTR (rs76759170 and rs3026785) variants were genotyped using Custom TaqMan Genotyping Assays. Haplotypes were inferred using the phase 2.1 program. RET mRNA structure was assessed by Vienna Package. Results The mean age of MTC diagnosis was 48.5±15.5 years and 57.9% were women. The minor allele frequencies of RET polymorphisms were as follows: S836S, 5.6%; rs76759170, 5.6%; rs3026785, 6.2%. We observed a strong LD among S836S and 3’UTR variants (|D’| = -1, r2 = 1 and |D’| = -1, r2 = 0,967). Patients harboring the S836S/3’UTR variants presented a higher percentage of lymph node and distant metastasis (P = 0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). Accordingly, RNA folding analyses demonstrated different RNA secondary structure predictions for WT(TCCGT), S836S(TTCGT) or 3’UTR(GTCAC) haplotypes. The S836S/3’UTR haplotype presented a greater number of double helices sections and lower levels of minimal free energy when compared to the wild-type haplotype, suggesting that these variants provides the most thermodynamically stable mRNA structure, which may have functional consequences on the rate of mRNA degradation. Conclusion The RET S836S polymorphism is in LD with 3’UTR variants. In silico analysis indicate that the 3’UTR variants may affect the secondary structure of RET mRNA, suggesting that these variants might play a

  7. F18-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer: a systematic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haslerud, Torjan; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Reisæter, Lars; Küfner Lein, Regina; Heinecke, Achim; Varhaug, Jan Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluor-18-deoxy-glucose (FDG) is widely used for diagnosing recurrent or metastatic disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Purpose To assess the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET for DTC in patients after ablative therapy. Material and Methods A systematic search was conducted in Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Open Grey looking for all English-language original articles on the performance of FDG-PET in series of at least 20 patients with DTC having undergone ablative therapy including total thyroidectomy. Diagnostic performance measures were pooled using Reitsma’s bivariate model. Results Thirty-four publications between 1996 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 79.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73.9–84.1) and 79.4% (95% CI, 71.2–85.4), respectively, with an area under the curve of 0.858. Conclusion F18-FDG-PET is a useful method for detecting recurrent DTC in patients having undergone ablative therapy. PMID:26163534

  8. Thyroid Cancer: Role of RET and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Specific thyroid cancer histotypes, such as papillary and medullary thyroid carcinoma, display genetic rearrangements or point mutations of the RET gene, resulting in its oncogenic conversion. The molecular mechanisms mediating RET rearrangement with other genes and the role of partner genes in tumorigenesis have been described. In addition, the RET protein has become a molecular target for medullary thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:24782993

  9. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  10. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    PubMed

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries.

  11. AZD6244 in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  12. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  13. C-cell hyperplasia accompanying thyroid diseases other than medullary carcinoma: an immunocytochemical study by means of antibodies to calcitonin and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Scopsi, L; Di Palma, S; Ferrari, C; Holst, J J; Rehfeld, J F; Rilke, F

    1991-05-01

    Eighteen normal thyroid glands and unaffected thyroid tissue adjacent to 37 follicular cell-derived benign and malignant tumors and to ten thyroid metastases were studied immunocytochemically with calcitonin (CT) and prosomatostatin/somatostatin (SMS) antibodies. CT- and SMS-immunoreactive cells were found in 100% of cases, though with ample variations in number. Most but not all SMS-immunoreactive cells also contained CT. Diffuse and/or nodular C-cell hyperplasia was seen in 30% of pathological thyroid glands; in concomitance with follicular adenomas, the mean C-cell number more than doubled that found in normal glands. Furthermore the proportion of SMS-immunoreactive C-cells increased from about 1% of CT-immunoreactive cells in normal adult thyroid glands to 2.5% in follicular adenomas, 3% in follicular carcinomas, 4.6% in papillary carcinomas, and 5.7% in metastases. The findings suggest that C-cell hyperplasia may be causally related to pathologic disorders affecting follicular cells. Furthermore, the demonstration that the intrathyroidal SMS cell mass is readily affected by alterations of the follicular structure of the gland suggests a possible regulatory role of SMS in the thyroidal microenvironment.

  14. Protection and Dissection of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve in Salvage Thyroid Cancer Surgery to Patients with Insufficient Primary Operation Extent and Suspicious Residual Tumor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Nai-Song

    2015-01-01

    Some thyroid cancer patients undergone insufficient tumor removal in the primary surgery in China . our aim is to evaluate the impact of dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during a salvage thyroid cancer operation in these patients to prevent nerve injury. Clinical data of 49 enrolled patients who received a salvage thyroid operation were retrospectively reviewed. Primary pathology was thyroid papillary cancer. The initial procedure performed included nodulectomy (20 patients), partial thyroidectomy (19 patients) and subtotal thyroidectomy (10 patients). The effect of dissection and protection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the mechanism of nerve injury were studied. The cervical courses of the recurrent laryngeal nerves were successfully dissected in all cases. Nerves were adherent to or involved by scars in 22 cases. Three were ligated near the place where the nerve entered the larynx, while another three were cut near the intersection of inferior thyroid artery with the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Light hoarseness occurred to four patients without a preoperative voice change. In conclusion, accurate primary diagnosis allows for a sufficient primary operation to be performed, avoiding insufficient tumor removal that requires a secondary surgery. The most important cause of nerve damage resulted from not identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve during first surgery , and meticulous dissection during salvage surgery was the most efficient method to avoid nerve damage. PMID:26625744

  15. The identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve by injection of blue dye into the inferior thyroid artery in elusive locations.

    PubMed

    Hepgul, Gulcin; Kucukyilmaz, Meltem; Koc, Oguz; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Sari, Yavuz Selim; Erbil, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Thyroidectomy creates a potential risk for all parathyroid glands and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The identification and dissection of the RLN is the gold standard for preserving its function. In some cases, it may be quite difficult to identify the nerve localization. In such elusive locations, we aimed to identify RLNs using peroperative injection of a blue dye into the inferior thyroid artery. Materials and Methods. This study included 10 selected patients whose RLN identification had been difficult peroperatively during the period from April 2008 to June 2009. When the RLNs became elusive in location, the branches of the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) on the capsule of the thyroid lobe were isolated, and then 0.5 mL isosulphan blue dye was injected into the artery. Results. RLN was carefully dissected in the tracheoesophageal groove. RLN was clearly visualized, in all patients. All RLNs were identified along their course in the dyed surrounding tissue. No RLN palsy was encountered. Conclusion. The injection of blue dye into the ITA branches can be used as an alternate method in case of difficulty in identification of RLNs.

  16. The Identification of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve by Injection of Blue Dye into the Inferior Thyroid Artery in Elusive Locations

    PubMed Central

    Hepgul, Gulcin; Kucukyilmaz, Meltem; Koc, Oguz; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Sari, Yavuz Selim; Erbil, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Thyroidectomy creates a potential risk for all parathyroid glands and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The identification and dissection of the RLN is the gold standard for preserving its function. In some cases, it may be quite difficult to identify the nerve localization. In such elusive locations, we aimed to identify RLNs using peroperative injection of a blue dye into the inferior thyroid artery. Materials and Methods. This study included 10 selected patients whose RLN identification had been difficult peroperatively during the period from April 2008 to June 2009. When the RLNs became elusive in location, the branches of the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) on the capsule of the thyroid lobe were isolated, and then 0.5 mL isosulphan blue dye was injected into the artery. Results. RLN was carefully dissected in the tracheoesophageal groove. RLN was clearly visualized, in all patients. All RLNs were identified along their course in the dyed surrounding tissue. No RLN palsy was encountered. Conclusion. The injection of blue dye into the ITA branches can be used as an alternate method in case of difficulty in identification of RLNs. PMID:23401846

  17. Pentavalent (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA, (/sup 131/I)MIBG, and (/sup 99m/Tc)MDP--an evaluation of three imaging techniques in patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.E.; Lazarus, C.R.; Wraight, P.; Sampson, C.; Maisey, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    Nine patients with histologically proven medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MCT) were imaged using pentavalent (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercaptosuccinic acid ((V)DMSA), (/sup 131/I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and (/sup 99m/Tc)methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Technetium-99m (V)DMSA demonstrated most of the tumor sites in eight patients with proven metastases, with an overall sensitivity of 95% in lesion detection. Iodine-131 MIBG showed definite uptake in some of the tumor sites in three of the nine patients imaged, with equivocal uptake seen in a further one patient, with sensitivity of only 11% for lesion detection. Technetium-99m MDP demonstrated bony metastases only, in four of the patients imaged yielding a sensitivity of 61%. Technetium-99m (V)DMSA has been demonstrated in this study to be a useful imaging agent in patients with MCT, showing uptake in significantly more lesions and with better imaging qualities than (/sup 131/I)MIBG, and with the ability to detect soft tissue as well as bony metastases.

  18. Recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a focal neurologic deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.N.; Wu, S.Y.; Kim, D.D.; Kollin, J.; Prasasvinichai, S.

    1986-10-01

    Papillary-follicular thyroid carcinoma usually remains localized to the thyroid bed and, in cases of metastasis, almost always involves the lung, bone, or liver. The two patients described here presented with papillary carcinoma and neurologic dysfunction. Total body iodine 131 scans disclosed cerebral uptake, and cerebral masses were confirmed by computed tomographic scan. Both patients presented diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas, and ultimately underwent craniotomy. One patient's cerebral metastasis recurred and was treated by a second craniotomy. The other patient received postoperative external cerebral radiotherapy and a novel intraoperative treatment: implantation of 22 iodine 125 seeds in the tumor bed, estimated to yield 16,000 rad (160 Gy) in one year. To date, cerebral metastases have not recurred in the latter patient, although tumor has reappeared in other sites. There is little reported in the medical literature concerning cerebral metastases of thyroid carcinoma, and the present report reviews this experience and discusses treatment alternatives.

  19. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Christopher; De Luca, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer). Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppressed TSH, elevated free T4, and normal TSI titer. In addition, an I(123) thyroid uptake was borderline-low. A month later, the free T4 had normalized. After remaining asymptomatic for 3 years, the patient presented again with increased appetite, and he was found with low TSH and high free T4. Within the following 3 months, his free T4 and TSH normalized. At his most recent evaluation, his TSH was normal and the free T4 was borderline-high; the TG antibody titer was still elevated and the TSI titer was negative. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. This case exemplifies the variability of the manifestations and natural history of Hashimoto thyroiditis and supports the need for a long-term evaluation of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  20. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  1. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  2. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery: a national study of patients treated at Danish departments of ENT Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Schytte, Sten; Trolle, Waldemar; Helweg-Larsen, Jens; Barfoed, Lisa; Kristiansen, Larry; Sørensen, Vibeke Zederkof; Samuelsen, Grethe; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with thyroid surgery from 1 January 2001 to the 31 December 2008 at the Danish departments of ENT-HNS were analyzed. Unilateral RLN palsy was found in 2.1 % and bilateral in 0.1 %. In benign histology, RLN palsies were registered in 1.3 %. Malignant histology and accordingly neck dissection were the most predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous performed thyroid surgery are the strongest predictors for RLN palsy and patient information should be given accordingly. Incomplete resections should be reserved for isthmectomy only. Centralization of thyroid surgery in larger units might improve quality. PMID:24132654

  3. Medullary Sponge Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association of Kidney Patients National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Medullary Sponge Kidney Page Content On this page: What is Medullary ...

  4. Ependymal cyst in the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Satoshi; Ijiri, Kosei; Kawabata, Ryodai; Zenmyo, Michihisa; Yone, Kazunori; Kitajima, Shinichi; Komiya, Setsuro

    2010-02-01

    The immunohistological features and surgical treatment of an intramedullary ependymal cyst in the conus medullaris is presented. An intramedullary ependymal cyst is a rare lesion of dysembryoplastic origin. There have been only seven patients reported with pathologically proven ependymal cysts in the conus medullaris. A 64-year-old woman reported pain and numbness in both thighs and feet. Neither sensory nor motor impairment was present in the lower extremities. MRI revealed a cyst on the right side of the conus medullaris, compressing the spinal cord upward. Clinical signs and symptoms disappeared following surgical resection of the cyst. Histological examination showed that this cyst was lined with a single layer of tall columnar or low cuboidal cells on fibrous connective tissue. The basement membrane was absent in the cyst wall. Reactivity to CAM5.2 and AE1/AE3 anti-keratin antibodies suggested that the cyst was of neuroepithelial origin. No recurrence has been noted 3 years after surgery.

  5. Post-PET ultrasound improves specificity of 18F-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer while maintaining sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kråkenes, Jostein; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Heinecke, Achim; Akslen, Lars A; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Brauckhoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluor-18-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) with or without computed tomography (CT) is generally accepted as the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in patients with negative whole body scintigraphy with iodine-131 (I-131). Purpose To assess the potential incremental value of ultrasound (US) over 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Material and Methods Fifty-one consecutive patients with suspected recurrent DTC were prospectively evaluated using the following multimodal imaging protocol: (i) US before PET (pre-US) with or without fine needle biopsy (FNB) of suspicious lesions; (ii) single photon emission computed tomography (≥3 GBq I-131) with co-registered CT (SPECT-CT); (iii) 18F-FDG-PET with co-registered contrast-enhanced CT of the neck; (iv) US in correlation with the other imaging modalities (post-US). Postoperative histology, FNB, and long-term follow-up (median, 2.8 years) were taken as composite gold standard. Results Fifty-eight malignant lesions were identified in 34 patients. Forty lesions were located in the neck or upper mediastinum. On receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, 18F-FDG-PET had a limited lesion-based specificity of 59% at a set sensitivity of 90%. Pre-US had poor sensitivity and specificity of 52% and 53%, respectively, increasing to 85% and 94% on post-US, with knowledge of the PET/CT findings (P < 0.05 vs. PET and pre-US). Multimodal imaging changed therapy in 15 out of 51 patients (30%). Conclusion In patients with suspected recurrent DTC, supplemental targeted US in addition to 18F-FDG-PET-CT increases specificity while maintainin sensitivity, as non-malignant FDG uptake in cervical lesions can be confirmed. PMID:25770086

  6. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... look for the gene mutations found in familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Because of this, most of the familial cases of MTC can be prevented or treated early by removing the thyroid gland. Once the disease is discovered in a family, the rest of ...

  7. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  8. Cediranib Maleate With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  9. Utility of Thyroglobulin measurement in fine-needle aspiration biopsy specimens of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of recurrent thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baloch, Zubair W; Barroeta, Julieta E; Walsh, Janet; Gupta, Prabodh K; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Langer, Jill E; Mandel, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The most common site for the metastasis of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid (PTC) is regional lymph nodes. Ultrasound (US) imaging may identify abnormal appearing lymph nodes, suspicious for PTC recurrence. Although fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of abnormal lymph nodes is often diagnostic of recurrence, small or cystic lymph nodes may be non-diagnostic due to lack of tumor cells. The measurement of thyroglobulin (TG) levels in FNAB specimens from lymph nodes suspicious for recurrent PTC can serve as an adjunct to the cytologic diagnosis. Materials and methods 115 abnormal appearing lymph nodes were aspirated under ultrasound guidance in 89 patients with history of thyroid carcinoma. In addition to obtaining material for cytologic interpretation, an additional aspirate was obtained by FNAB and rinsed in 1 ml of normal saline for TG level measurements. Results The cytologic diagnoses included: 35 (30%) reactive lymph node, no tumor seen (NTS), 39 (34%) PTC, 23 (20%) inadequate for evaluation due to lack of lymphoid or epithelial cells (NDX) 15 (13%) atypical/suspicious for PTC, and 3 (3%) other (e.g. paraganglioma, poorly differentiated carcinoma and carcinoma not otherwise specified). TG levels were markedly elevated (median 312 ng/ml; normal < 10 ng/ml) in 28 (72%) cases of PTC lymph node recurrence identified on cytology. TG measurements were also elevated in 5 lymph nodes classified as NTS and 4 NDX on cytology which resulted in 5 and 3 carcinoma diagnoses respectively on histological follow-up. Of the 9 atypical/suspicious cases with elevated TG levels all resulted in carcinoma diagnoses on follow-up. Conclusion The measurement of TG in FNAB specimens from lymph node in patients with history of PTC is useful in detecting recurrent disease, especially in cases when the specimen is known to be or likely to be inadequate for cytologic evaluation. PMID:18237420

  10. Detecting and Treating Thyroid Nodules and Cancer Before, During, and After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer have their own risk factors. For instance, “medullary” thyroid cancer (an uncommon type) can run in ... most common to least common, are papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. (See the Hormone Health Network’s Thyroid ...

  11. Thyroid carcinoma, version 2.2014.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, R Michael; Haddad, Robert I; Ball, Douglas W; Byrd, David; Dickson, Paxton; Duh, Quan-Yang; Ehya, Hormoz; Haymart, Megan; Hoh, Carl; Hunt, Jason P; Iagaru, Andrei; Kandeel, Fouad; Kopp, Peter; Lamonica, Dominick M; Lydiatt, William M; McCaffrey, Judith; Moley, Jeffrey F; Parks, Lee; Raeburn, Christopher D; Ridge, John A; Ringel, Matthew D; Scheri, Randall P; Shah, Jatin P; Sherman, Steven I; Sturgeon, Cord; Waguespack, Steven G; Wang, Thomas N; Wirth, Lori J; Hoffmann, Karin G; Hughes, Miranda

    2014-12-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on some of the major updates to the 2014 NCCN Guidelines for Thyroid Carcinoma. Kinase inhibitor therapy may be used to treat thyroid carcinoma that is symptomatic and/or progressive and not amenable to treatment with radioactive iodine. Sorafenib may be considered for select patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, whereas vandetanib or cabozantinib may be recommended for select patients with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma. Other kinase inhibitors may be considered for select patients with either type of thyroid carcinoma. A new section on "Principles of Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Advanced Thyroid Cancer" was added to the NCCN Guidelines to assist with using these novel targeted agents.

  12. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  13. Use of imaging tests after primary treatment of thyroid cancer in the United States: population based retrospective cohort study evaluating death and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Wiebel, Jaime L; Guo, Cui; Gay, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the use of imaging tests after primary treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is associated with more treatment for recurrence and fewer deaths from the disease. Design Population based retrospective cohort study. Setting Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database in the United States. Participants 28 220 patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer between 1998 and 2011. The study cohort was followed up to 2013, with a median follow-up of 69 months. Main outcome measures Treatment for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer (additional neck surgery, additional radioactive iodine treatment, or radiotherapy), and deaths due to differentiated thyroid cancer. We conducted propensity score analyses to assess the relation between imaging (neck ultrasound, radioiodine scanning, or positron emission tomography (PET) scanning) and treatment for recurrence (logistic model) and death (Cox proportional hazards model). Results From 1998 until 2011, we saw an increase in incident cancer (rate ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.06), imaging (1.13, 1.12 to 1.13), and treatment for recurrence (1.01, 1.01 to 1.02); the change in death rate was not significant. In multivariable analysis, use of neck ultrasounds increased the likelihood of additional surgery (odds ratio 2.30, 95% confidence interval 2.05 to 2.58) and additional radioactive iodine treatment (1.45, 1.26 to 1.69). Radioiodine scans were associated with additional surgery (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 3.06 to 3.76), additional radioactive iodine treatment (17.83, 14.49 to 22.16), and radiotherapy (1.89, 1.71 to 2.10). Use of PET scans was associated with additional surgery (odds ratio 2.31, 95% confidence interval 2.09 to 2.55), additional radioactive iodine treatment (2.13, 1.89 to 2.40), and radiotherapy (4.98, 4.52 to 5.49). Use of neck ultrasounds or PET scans did not significantly affect disease specific survival (hazard

  14. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  15. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  16. Thyroid and adrenal relationships

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Victor; Ramsay, Ian

    1968-01-01

    A brief review of the actions of adrenal medullary and thyroid hormones is presented and the ways in which they interact are examined. It is concluded that thyroid hormone produces the necessary intracellular environment without which the steady state and emergency actions of cathecholamines would be vitiated. In hyperthyroidism the increased concentration of thyroid hormones results in a lowering of the threshold for catecholamine action. For this reason it is possible to alleviate many of the symptoms of thyrotoxicosis by means of drugs which block β-adrenergic receptors. Attention is also drawn to the simultaneous occurrence of thyroid and adrenal disease, in the hope that this will encourage the search for further links in this field of endocrinology. PMID:5655216

  17. Lenvatinib: Role in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in treatment of advanced thyroid cancers, prognoses remain poor. Treatment of advanced, progressive disease remains challenging, with limited treatment options. Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib, and lenvatinib, which are now FDA-approved for thyroid cancer, have shown clinical benefit in advanced thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib is approved for treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). It has been studied in phase II and III trials for treatment of advanced RAI-refractory DTC, and in a phase II trial for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Lenvatinib targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptors 1-4 (FGFR-1-4), RET, c-kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Its antitumor activity may be due to antiangiogenic properties and direct antitumor effects. Lenvatinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in a variety of solid tumors, including MTC, in phase I and II clinical trials. In a phase II study in advanced RAI-refractory DTC, lenvatinib-treated patients achieved a 50% response rate (RR), with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12.6 months. In a phase III trial in RAI-refractory DTC, median PFS in lenvatinib-treated patients was 18.3 months, with a 65% overall RR, versus 3.6 months in placebo-treated patients, with a 2% RR. Adverse events occurring in >50% of patients included hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue/asthenia, and decreased appetite. Lenvatinib is a promising new agent for treatment of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. PMID:26678514

  18. C-cell-derived calcitonin-free neuroendocrine carcinoma of the thyroid: the diagnostic importance of CGRP immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Tadao; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Vinagre, João; Soares, Paula; Rousseau, Emmanuel; Eloy, Catarina; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    In the thyroid, primary neuroendocrine tumors encompass medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and, rarely, other tumors such as paragangliomas. MTCs are derived from C-cells and express calcitonin and neuroendocrine markers. Besides classic MTC, some reports have documented thyroid neuroendocrine tumors, which show no calcitonin expression and raise difficult diagnostic problems. A 76-year-old man presented with a mass in the left thyroid with neither serological calcitonin elevation nor familial history. A thorough clinico-laboratorial study did not disclose any other mass elsewhere. A left hemithyroidectomy was performed, and the histological examination revealed a neuroendocrine carcinoma resembling a paraganglioma-like MTC displaying unequivocal signs of vascular invasion. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells showed reactivity for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), paired box gene 8 (PAX8), cytokeratins (AE1/AE3 and CK8/18), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and negativity for calcitonin, carcinoembryonic antigen, TTF-2, thyroperoxidase, and thyroglobulin. In situ hybridization showed that the tumor cells lacked expression for calcitonin and thyroglobulin mRNA. Genetic analysis did not disclose any RET mutation. A diagnosis of C-cell-derived primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the thyroid without calcitonin expression was made, and the patient remains free of metastasis or recurrence 18 months after surgery. PMID:24599901

  19. Thyroid Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the thyroid gland Hyperthyroidism - when your thyroid gland makes more thyroid hormones than your body needs Hypothyroidism - when your thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormones Thyroid cancer ...

  20. Recurrent Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Pleural Metastasis Diagnosed by Effusion Cytology: A Report of Cases with Clinicopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Reid I; Sumida, Lauren C; Lum, Christopher AK

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is typically an indolent disease characterized by slow growth and a favorable prognosis. In rare instances, this disease may metastasize to the pleura and manifest as a malignant pleural effusion. We report 3 female patients of Japanese/Okinawan ancestry with a history of PTC who presented with hydrothorax. Cytologic examination in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining enabled a definitive diagnosis of metastatic PTC. Molecular analysis of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways demonstrated the presence of the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF)V600E mutation in 2 of our 3 patients, with the absence of any other clinically significant mutations in all cases. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular and environmental mechanisms involved in this aggressive manifestation of PTC. PMID:25755913

  1. Etiopathogenesis of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Makazlieva, Tanja; Vaskova, Olivija; Majstorov, Venjamin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thyroid malignomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm consisting of most frequent differentiated encountered carcinomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma, then medullary thyroid carcinoma originating from neuroendocrine calcitonin-producing C-cells and rare forms of thyroid lymphomas arising from intrathyroidal lymphatic tissue, thyroid sarcomas and poorly differentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. There are increasing numbers of epidemiological studies and publications that have suggested increased incidence rate of thyroid carcinomas. We have read, analysed and compare available reviews and original articles investigating different etiological factors in the development of thyroid carcinomas through Google Scholar and PubMed Database. DISCUSSION: Aetiology involved in the development of thyroid carcinomas is multifactorial and includes external influences, as well as constitutional predispositions and genetic etiological factors. The actual effect of environmental and constitutional factors is on promoting genetic and epigenetic alterations which result in cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Until now are identified numerous genetic alterations, assumed to have an important role in oncogenesis, with MAPK and PI3K-AKT as crucial signalling networks regulating growth, proliferation, differentiation and cell survival/apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This new molecular insight could have a crucial impact on diagnosis and also on improving and selecting an appropriate treatment to the patients with thyroid malignancies. PMID:27703585

  2. Intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis of periurethral adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakonar, H H; Thomas, A; Lind, C R P

    2011-04-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis to the conus medullaris is very rare. We report a 44-year-old woman with an intra-axial conus medullaris metastasis from periurethral adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature. We also discuss the clinical features, possible pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment options for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis to the conus medullaris.

  3. Central Role of RET in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    RET (rearranged during transfection) is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the development of neural crest derived cell lineages, kidney, and male germ cells. Different human cancers, including papillary and medullary thyroid carcinomas, lung adenocarcinomas, and myeloproliferative disorders display gain-of-function mutations in RET. Accordingly, RET protein has become a promising molecular target for cancer treatment. PMID:24296167

  4. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  5. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  6. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... Thyroid storm occurs due to a major stress such as trauma, heart attack , or infection. In rare cases, thyroid ...

  7. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cameselle-Teijeiro, J; Varela-Duran, J; Fonseca, E; Villanueva, J P; Sobrinho-Simoes, M

    1994-04-01

    A case of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the thyroid in a 43-year-old woman with a multinodular goiter is reported. This is the first case of SFT described in the thyroid. On histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural examination, the tumor was identical to SFT of the pleura and other organs. Despite its rarity, SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of spindle-cell tumors of the thyroid, along with anaplastic carcinoma, spindle-cell medullary carcinoma, and several types of mesenchymal tumors.

  8. Targeted therapy: a new hope for thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Perri, Francesco; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Lastoria, Secondo; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Scarpati, Giuseppina Della Vittoria; Caponigro, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid carcinomas are rare and heterogeneous diseases representing less than 1% of all malignancies. The majority of thyroid carcinomas are differentiated entities (papillary and folliculary carcinomas) and are characterized by good prognosis and good response to surgery and radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, about 10% of differentiated carcinomas recur and become resistant to all therapies. Anaplastic and medullary cancers are rare subtypes of thyroid cancer not suitable for radioiodine therapy. A small percentage of differentiated and all the anaplastic and medullary thyroid carcinomas often recur after primary treatments and are no longer suitable for other therapies. In the last years, several advances have been made in the field of molecular biology and tumorigenesis mechanisms of thyroid carcinomas. Starting from these issues, the targeted therapy may be employed as a new option. The MAP-Kinase pathway has been found often dysregulated in thyroid carcinomas and several upstream signals have been recognized as responsible for this feature. RET/PTC mutations are often discovered both in papillary and in medullary carcinomas, while B-RAF mutation is typical of papillary and anaplastic histologies. Also mTOR disruptions and VEGFR pathway disruption are common features in all advanced thyroid cancers. Some angiogenesis inhibitors and a number of RET/PTC pathway blocking agents are yet present in the clinical armamentarium. Vandetanib, cabozatinib and sorafenib have reached clinical use. A number of other biological compounds have been tested in phase II and III trials. Understanding the biology of thyroid cancers may help us to design a well shaped targeted therapy.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bano, Gul; Hodgson, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are largely divided into medullary (MTC) and non-medullary (NMTC) cancers , depending on the cell type of origin. Familial non-medullary thyroid cancer (FNMTC) comprises about 5-15% of NMTC and is a heterogeneous group of diseases, including both non-syndromic and syndromic forms. Non-syndromic FNMTC tends to manifest papillary thyroid carcinoma , usually multifocal and bilateral . Several high-penetrance genes for FNMTC have been identified, but they are often confined to a few or single families, and other susceptibility loci appear to play a small part, conferring only small increments in risk. Familial susceptibility is likely to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental influences. The current focus of research in FNMTC is to characterise the susceptibility genes and their role in carcinogenesis. FNMTC can also occur as a part of multitumour genetic syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis , Cowden's disease , Werner's syndrome and Carney complex . These tend to present at an early age and are multicentric and bilateral with distinct pathology. The clinical evaluation of these patients is similar to that for most patients with a thyroid nodule. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) arises from the parafollicular cells of the thyroid which release calcitonin. The familial form of MTC accounts for 20-25% of cases and presents as a part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) syndromes or as a pure familial MTC (FMTC). They are caused by germline point mutations in the RET oncogene on chromosome 10q11.2. There is a clear genotype-phenotype correlation, and the aggressiveness of FMTC depends on the specific genetic mutation, which should determine the timing of surgery. PMID:27075347

  10. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  11. Scans Not Worthwhile for Most Thyroid Cancers: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160009.html Scans Not Worthwhile for Most Thyroid Cancers: Study Doctors found checking for recurrences with ... News) -- Having scans after treatment does not improve thyroid cancer patients' chances of survival, a new study ...

  12. Medullary sponge kidney in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Patriquin, H.B.; O'Regan, S.

    1985-08-01

    Medullary sponge kidney is reported in six children aged 2-18 years. One child was asymptomatic; the others had hematuria or a urine-concentrating defect. Renal function and size were otherwise normal, as was liver function. The diagnosis was made at excretory urography according to criteria established in adults. Sonography revealed hyperechogenic pyramids, at first at the periphery, later generalized. Computed tomography is very sensitive to the pyramidal nephrocalcinosis that complicates this disease and explains the frequent presenting symptom of hematuria in these children.

  13. Intramedullary schwannoma of conus medullaris with syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Mete; Koktekir, Ender; Erdem, Yavuz; Celik, Haydar; Sertbas, Idris; Bayar, Mehmet Akif

    2014-06-14

    Intramedullary schwannomas of the spinal cord are rare tumors. They are most commonly observed in the cervical region; however, few have been described in the conus medullaris. The association of intramedullary schwannomas with syringomyelia is also rare. In this report, we present a case of intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris with syringomyelia, which was treated surgically.

  14. Intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris complicated by dense adhesion to neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Ohtonari, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Nobuharu; Ota, Taisei; Ota, Shinzo; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    2009-11-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with an intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris manifesting as an 8-month history of mild bladder dysfunction, sexual impotence, and paresthesia in the buttocks. Subtotal removal of the lesion was achieved, as part of the tumor showed dense adhesion to the rostral neural tissue, with only postoperative transient deterioration of bladder dysfunction. Intramedullary schwannoma, especially involving the conus medullaris and the proximal spinal cord, is relatively rare and the pathogenesis and pathophysiology are unclear. Complete resection is often advised to avoid recurrence, but tumor adhesion to neural tissue sometimes renders complete resection difficult, and may create the risk of unacceptable operative morbidity. The present case shows that transient neurological deterioration may occur even with just subtotal removal, leaving the adherent part. Therefore, recognition of the particular features and the strategy for treatment in intramedullary schwannoma of the conus medullaris is essential for making appropriate decisions on the degree of removal.

  15. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  16. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  17. The relevance of preoperative ultrasound cervical mapping in patients with thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kocharyan, Davit; Schwenter, Frank; Bélair, Manon; Nassif, Edgard

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical lymph node involvement in thyroid cancer is associated with locoregional recurrence and decreased disease-free survival. Preoperative lymph node mapping helps in planning surgery for neck dissection and improves patient outcomes. We sought to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of ultrasound mapping for thyroid cancer and evaluate the clinical importance of this exam in terms of identifying the group of patients who would benefit most from subsequent surgical dissection. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 263 patients who underwent thyroid surgery between 2009 and 2013. We calculated the positive predictive values (PPVs) of ultrasound mapping of both the lateral and central compartments together and the lateral or central compartment individually. A quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the number of positive lymph nodes at ultrasound imaging with histopathologic evaluation. Results A total of 136 cases of thyroid cancer in 120 patients met the inclusion criteria for ultrasound mapping analysis. The PPVs (and 95% confidence intervals) were 83.82 (0.76–0.89) for the lateral and central compartments, 85.39% (0.76–0.91) for the lateral compartment, and 80.48% (0.7–0.87) for the central compartment. When comparing the positive lymph nodes at ultrasound imaging with histopathologic evaluation, the result was χ2 = 10.33 (p = 0.006). Conclusion This single-institution study indicated that preoperative ultrasound mapping is an accurate imaging procedure for predicting lymphatic spread in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer. Ultrasound mapping can be used as an efficient tool for surgical planning and prognosis determination, as well as for identifying the group of patients who would benefit most from subsequent surgical intervention. PMID:27007092

  18. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  19. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  20. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Thyroid Tests Page Content On this page: What is the ... Top ] Why do health care providers perform thyroid tests? Health care providers perform thyroid tests to assess ...

  1. Subacute thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests that may be done include: Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level T4 (thyroid hormone, thyroxine) and T3 level Radioactive iodine uptake Thyroglobulin level Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) In some cases, a thyroid ...

  2. Silent thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland. The disorder can cause hyperthyroidism, followed by hypothyroidism. The thyroid gland is located in the neck, ... Later symptoms may be of an underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ), including fatigue and cold intolerance, until the thyroid ...

  3. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid surgery, requiring treatment with thyroid hormone (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). This is especially true if you had ... Nodules Goiter Graves’ Disease Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Hyperthyroidism (Overactive) Hypothyroidism (Underactive) Iodine Deficiency Low Iodine Diet Radioactive Iodine ...

  4. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid; Radioactive iodine uptake and scan test - thyroid; Nuclear scan - thyroid ... the test. Ask your provider or the radiology/nuclear medicine team performing the scan about taking precautions.

  5. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroiditis and identify autoimmune thyroid conditions Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody—a marker for autoimmune thyroid disease; ... for thyroid gland abnormalities and to evaluate thyroid function (for iodine) in different areas of the thyroid ...

  6. Conus Medullaris Syndrome following Radionuclide Cisternography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclide cisternography is generally considered to be a safe procedure without significant neurological complications. However, in this report we present a patient who developed conus medullaris syndrome following radionuclide cisternography. A 46-year-old woman underwent lumbar puncture followed by radionuclide cisternography with the diagnosis of hydrocephalus. After the cisternography, she developed voiding difficulty with perineal sensory loss. Lumbar MRI revealed a high signal intensity lesion on T2-weighted images at the level of conus medullaris. Considering its clinical course and MRI findings, a spinal cord infarction is highly suggested as a cause of the conus medullaris lesion in this patient.

  7. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  8. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  9. Calcitonin-negative neuroendocrine tumor of thyroid gland mimicking anaplastic carcinoma: an unusual entity

    PubMed Central

    Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Berkesoglu, Mustafa; Dag, Ahmet; Sezer, Emel; Bal, Kemal Koray; Vayısoğlu, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is the neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of thyroid with mostly both secreting calcitonin and immunohistochemically showing calcitonin positivity. Occasionally; NETs of thyroid may have little or no calcitonin expression. We present a case of serum calcitonin negative and immunohistochemically calcitonin-negative staining tumor with positive reaction to neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranin-A. The patient’s right vocal cord was paralytic and thyroid mass was huge with descending to thorax till hilar region. We discussed diagnostic difficulties and way of treatment about NETs of thyroid with the light of current literature with this case. PMID:26312221

  10. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  11. Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein expression in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Gou Young; Lim, Sung-Jig; Kim, Youn Wha

    2010-12-01

    Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) has been implicated in several fundamental signal transduction pathways that control cellular growth, differentiation, apoptosis and migration. RKIP is reduced in a variety of human carcinomas, but RKIP expression in thyroid carcinomas has not been analyzed at the protein level. In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of RKIP in various subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Immunostaining for RKIP was performed on 104 cases of primary thyroid carcinoma (40 papillary, 29 follicular, 11 medullary, 11 poorly differentiated, and 13 anaplastic carcinomas) and 26 cases of nodal metastatic tumor (17 papillary, 4 medullary, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas). Normal thyroid tissue and all cases of follicular, papillary, and medullary carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for RKIP. With the exception of one case, poorly differentiated carcinomas also revealed strong RKIP expression. In contrast, RKIP expression was completely absent in all anaplastic carcinomas. The transition zone from the differentiated carcinoma component (strong RKIP expression) to the anaplastic carcinoma component (no RKIP expression) demonstrated a completely opposite pattern of RKIP immunoreactivity. This reduction of RKIP expression in anaplastic carcinoma was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Additionally, RKIP expression of nodal metastatic tumors corresponded with that of primary tumors: metastatic papillary and medullary carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic RKIP immunoreactivity, in contrast, in metastatic anaplastic carcinomas, RKIP expression was completely absent. RKIP expression is significantly reduced in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma as compared to other subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanism of RKIP action in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  12. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references.

  13. Ruptured concomitant dermoid cysts of conus medullaris and cervico medullary junction.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Adhithyan; Sathyanathan, Babupeter; Krishnamoorthy, Vanitha; Perumal, Balaji Ayyam; Srihari, Iyengaran

    2015-01-01

    Cranio spinal dermoid tumors are rare, benign, slow growing congenital, cystic uni or multi locular tumors, which arise from the inclusion of epithelial tissue within the neural grove during embryonic development.[1] In this case report, we present an uncommon presentation, of a case of concomitant dermoid cysts at conus medullaris and cervico medullary junction that ruptured into the central canal.

  14. [Thyroid diseases in sub-Saharan Africa].

    PubMed

    Sidibé, El Hassane

    2007-01-01

    Thyroid gland diseases vary according to the environment. In sub-Saharan Africa, they are also influenced by population isolation and the absence of food self-sufficiency, both factors affecting the onset and persistence of iodine-deficiency goiters. More cosmopolitan diseases are now added to these thyroid disorders. Women are mainly affected (94.2%), most often with euthyroid goiters (54.7%), followed by Graves disease (13.1%), hypothyroidism (8.8%), thyroiditis (6.6%), toxic multinodular goiters (6.6 %) and unclassified goiters (10%) [Gabon]. The paucity of laboratories specializing in endocrinology and of nuclear medicine facilities, the delay in diagnosis that results in compressive or recurrent goiters, and endemic goiters are all typical in Africa. In children and adolescents, death rates increase with congenital or acquired thyroiditis as with delayed physical or mental development. In this environment, thyroiditis can also be pregnancy-related. Very recent surveys show a prevalence of endemic goiters of 28.6% in the community of Sekota, Ethiopia, 64-70% in Sahel-Sudan (population aged 10-20 years), 20-29% in KwaZulu-Natal (school children), 14.3-30.2% in Namibia (school children), 0.21% (congenital hypothyroidism or cretinism) in Plateau State, Nigeria, 55.2% at Zitenga, Burkina Faso (210 persons 0-45 years), and 10% in Hararé and Wedza, Zimbabwe (newborn TSH >10.1 microIU/mL). The prevalence of goiters is 43.6% in children emigrating from Ethiopia to Israel. Millet from semi-arid zones contains apigenin at a concentration of 150 mg/kg and luteolin at 350 mg/kg, both of which can interfere with thyroid function. The harmful effects of cassava (also known as manioc) are better known: milling cassava reduces its goitrogenic potential. In addition to iodine deficiency, selenium deficiency, and the effect of the thiocyanates in cassava, ion concentrations in soil and drinking water appear to play a role. The proportion of thyroid surgery indicated for

  15. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease type 1 medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1) is an inherited condition that affects the ...

  16. Thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  17. Thyroid Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated differently. Common thyroid disorders and problems include: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a disorder in which your thyroid doesn’ ... normal after you get better. If you have hypothyroidism, however, the levels of T4 in your blood ...

  18. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocking production of thyroid hormones and resulting in hypothyroidism . TBII is not routinely tested, but TSI is ... autoimmune disease . A low level of thyroid hormones ( hypothyroidism ) can cause symptoms, such as: Weight gain Fatigue ...

  19. Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. This gland makes thyroid hormone that travels in ... base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. This gland makes thyroid hormone that travels in ...

  20. Thyroid nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... food Nodules that produce thyroid hormones will likely cause symptoms of overactive thyroid gland , including: Warm, sweaty skin Fast pulse Increased appetite Nervousness Restlessness Skin blushing or flushing Weight loss Irregular menstrual periods Older ...

  1. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  2. Thyroid Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Myxedema coma and thyroid storm are thyroid emergencies associated with increased mortality. Prompt recognition of these states-which represent the severe, life-threatening conditions of extremely reduced or elevated circulating thyroid hormone concentrations, respectively-is necessary to initiate treatment. Management of myxedema coma and thyroid storm requires both medical and supportive therapies and should be treated in an intensive care unit setting. PMID:27598067

  3. Primary Medullary Hemorrhage Associated with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Min; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Jee-Young

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous primary medullary hemorrhage is a rare event. A 64-year-old man was admitted for sudden-onset vertigo and vomiting. His clinical features were similar to those of lateral medullary syndrome. The patient had no anticoagulant therapy, vascular malformation, or a caudal extension of a pontine hemorrhage. The patient had multiple hypertensive changes, including retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography, multiple cerebral microbleeds, and small-vessel changes on MRI. T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI performed 3 months prior to admission and contrast-enhanced MRI showed no evidence of vascular malformation. We concluded that the patient had uncontrolled hypertension that may have lead to primary medullary hemorrhage. PMID:20396466

  4. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, Minghua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyroid was examined by ultrasonography and 99mTcO4 - thyroid imaging, and the serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (Tg) were detected. The efficacy and complications of RFA were evaluated. Results showed that, the postsurgical thyroid removal by RFA was successfully performed in 35 patients, with no significant complication. After RFA, the average largest diameter and volume were significantly decreased in 35 patients (P > 0.05), and no obvious contrast media was observed in ablation area in the majority of patients. After RFA, the serum FT3, FT4 and Tg levels were markedly decreased (P < 0.05), and TSH level was significantly increased (P < 0.05). After RFA, radioiodine concentration in the ablation area was significantly reduced in the majority of patients. The reduction rate of thyroid update was 0.69±0.20%. DTC staging and interval between surgery and RFA had negative correlation (Pearson coefficient = -0.543; P = 0.001), with no obvious correlation among others influential factors. RFA is an effective and safe method for postsurgical thyroid removal of DTC. PMID:27186311

  5. Intramedullary neurenteric cyst of the conus medullaris without associated spinal malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Hariri, Behrouz; Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hassani, Hajar; Taheri, Behrouz; Abbassioun, Kazem

    2012-01-01

    Spinal neurenteric (NE) cysts are rare congenital anomalies that may occur either alone or in the context of a complex malformative disorder. They are usually intradural-extramedullary lesions. Intramedullary NE cysts not associated with other congenital anomalies are very rare and only a few cases have been reported in the conus medullaris region. Intramedullary neurenteric cysts not associated with other spinal anomalies are very rare especially in the conus medullaris region. MRI is useful to define the cyst and the osseous anomalies associated with this lesion. The goal of treatment of an intramedullary neurenteric cyst is total excision at the first operation, if possible. Life-long follow-up with annual MRI is recommended due to the risk of cyst recurrence. We report an intramedullary NE cyst of the conus medullaris without associated malformation and the relevant literature is briefly reviewed.

  6. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research.

  7. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research. PMID:22514922

  8. Differential Expression of Aquaporins and Its Diagnostic Utility in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dongfeng; Kondo, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Tadao; Kawasaki, Tomonori; Yamane, Tetsu; Mochizuki, Kunio; Kato, Yohichiro; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Takata, Kuniaki; Katoh, Ryohei

    2012-01-01

    Background Aquaporin3 (AQP3) and Aquaporin4 (AQP4) play a major role in transcellular and transepithelial water movement as water channel membrane proteins. Little is known of their expression and significance in human thyroid tissues. Thus, we examined the expression of AQP3 and AQP4 in normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic thyroid tissues in conjunction with human thyroid cancer cell lines. Methods and Results Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated AQP3 in the cytoplasmic membrane of normal C cells, but not in follicular cells. In contrast, AQP4 was not found in C cells but was identified in normal follicular cells. AQP4 was positive in 92% of Graves’ disease thyroids and 97% of multinodular goiters, and we failed to demonstrate AQP3 in these hyperplastic tissues. In neoplastic thyroid lesions, we observed AQP3 in 91% of medullary thyroid carcinomas but in no other follicular cell tumors. AQP4 was demonstrated in 100% of follicular adenomas, 90% of follicular carcinomas, and 85% of papillary carcinomas, while it was negative in all medullary carcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed AQP3 mRNA expression only in medullary carcinomas and AQP4 mRNA expression in follicular cell-derived tumors except for undifferentiated carcinomas. In thyroid cancer cell lines, using RT-PCR and western blotting, AQP3 mRNA and protein were only identified in the TT cell line (human medullary carcinoma cell line) and AQP4 in the other cell lines. In addition, AQP3 mRNA expression was up-regulated by FBS and calcium administration in both a dose and time dependent manner in TT cells. Conclusion The differential expressions of AQP3 and AQP4 may reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and additionally may have value in determining differential diagnoses of thyroid tumors. PMID:22808259

  9. Thyroid Hormone, Cancer, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Chin, Yu-Tan; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Lai, Husan-Yu; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Liu, Leory F; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play important roles in regulating normal metabolism, development, and growth. They also stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Their metabolic and developmental effects and growth effects in normal tissues are mediated primarily by nuclear hormone receptors. A cell surface receptor for the hormone on integrin [alpha]vβ3 is the initiation site for effects on tumor cells. Clinical hypothyroidism may retard cancer growth, and hyperthyroidism was recently linked to the prevalence of certain cancers. Local levels of thyroid hormones are controlled through activation and deactivation of iodothyronine deiodinases in different organs. The relative activities of different deiodinases that exist in tissues or organs also affect the progression and development of specific types of cancers. In this review, the effects of thyroid hormone on signaling pathways in breast, brain, liver, thyroid, and colon cancers are discussed. The importance of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and of the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin [alpha]vβ3 as potential cancer risk factors and therapeutic targets are addressed. We analyze the intracellular signaling pathways activated by thyroid hormones in cancer progression in hyperthyroidism or at physiological concentrations in the euthyroid state. Determining how to utilize the deaminated thyroid hormone analog (tetrac), and its nanoparticulate derivative to reduce risks of cancer progression, enhance therapeutic outcomes, and prevent cancer recurrence is also deliberated. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1221-1237, 2016. PMID:27347891

  10. A review on thyroid cancer during pregnancy: Multitasking is required.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Hussein; Al Lahloubi, Nasr; Rashad, Noha

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy after breast cancer. The goal of management is to control malignancy and prevent maternal and fetal complications as a result of maternal hypothyroidism. The role of female sex hormones as an etiologic factor was investigated, with no clear association. Pregnancy can cause an increase in size of a previously existed thyroid nodule through the structural similarity between TSH and BHCG, and the normally expressed estrogen receptors on thyroid gland cells. Effect of pregnancy on development and prognosis of differentiated thyroid malignancies (papillary and follicular) has also been studied. The prognosis of thyroid cancer is not worse in patients diagnosed during pregnancy or those who got pregnant after curative treatment. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated at all, surgery can be delayed till after delivery except in rapidly growing aggressive tumors. While radioactive iodine ablation is absolutely contra-indicated, the new systemic therapies are not well studied during pregnancy. However, almost all these new agents are classified as FDA category C or D and are better to be avoided. The effect of pregnancy on other types of thyroid cancer (medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors) is not well studied because of very low incidence with pregnancy. The endocrinological management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy is of utmost importance. The hypothyroidism after total thyroidectomy can cause fetal hypothyroidism. Therefore, the management of thyroid cancer related to pregnancy needs a multidisciplinary team.

  11. A review on thyroid cancer during pregnancy: Multitasking is required.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Hussein; Al Lahloubi, Nasr; Rashad, Noha

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy after breast cancer. The goal of management is to control malignancy and prevent maternal and fetal complications as a result of maternal hypothyroidism. The role of female sex hormones as an etiologic factor was investigated, with no clear association. Pregnancy can cause an increase in size of a previously existed thyroid nodule through the structural similarity between TSH and BHCG, and the normally expressed estrogen receptors on thyroid gland cells. Effect of pregnancy on development and prognosis of differentiated thyroid malignancies (papillary and follicular) has also been studied. The prognosis of thyroid cancer is not worse in patients diagnosed during pregnancy or those who got pregnant after curative treatment. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated at all, surgery can be delayed till after delivery except in rapidly growing aggressive tumors. While radioactive iodine ablation is absolutely contra-indicated, the new systemic therapies are not well studied during pregnancy. However, almost all these new agents are classified as FDA category C or D and are better to be avoided. The effect of pregnancy on other types of thyroid cancer (medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors) is not well studied because of very low incidence with pregnancy. The endocrinological management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy is of utmost importance. The hypothyroidism after total thyroidectomy can cause fetal hypothyroidism. Therefore, the management of thyroid cancer related to pregnancy needs a multidisciplinary team. PMID:27408758

  12. Clinicopathological significance of gastric poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hideaki; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Morohashi, Satoko; Haga, Toshihiro; Wu, Yunyan; Ota, Rie; Takatsuna, Masafumi; Akasaka, Harue; Hakamada, Kenichi; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma of solid type is known to show a clinicopathological diversity, but its morphological characteristics have rarely been investigated. In this study, we defined poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma indicating the following three characteristics: (i) more than 90% of the entire tumor were composed of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in a medullary growth, (ii) the tumor exhibited an expansive growth at the tumor margin, and (iii) special types such as an α-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, and carcinoma with lymphoid stroma were excluded. Based on the definition, we subclassified the poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma of solid type into the two groups: medullary carcinoma and non-medullary carcinoma, and clinicopathologically analyzed 23 cases of medullary carcinomas and 38 cases of non-medullary carcinomas. The medullary carcinomas less frequently displayed lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and lymph node metastasis, compared with the non-medullary carcinoma (P < 0.001, P = 0.002, and P < 0.001, respectively). The patients with medullary carcinomas significantly showed better disease-free survival (P = 0.017). This is the first study to demonstrate that poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of solid type can be subclassified into tumors with low and high malignant potentials. Gastric poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma is considered to be a novel histological type predicting good patients' prognosis. PMID:27108877

  13. [Insular carcinoma of the thyroid. An uncommon but aggressive neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Gómez, José Manuel; Folqué-Gómez, Emilio; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Moldes-Rodríguez, Milagros; Martínez-Martínez, Patricia; González-Aragoneses, Federico; Orusco-Palomino, Eduardo

    2005-04-01

    Insular carcinoma of the thyroid is an infrequent entity, named in 1984 by Carcangiu when he described its characteristic histology. Clinically and morphologically it is considered to be in an intermediate position between well-differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid (papillary or follicular) and undifferentiated or anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid. However, most authors believe it to be an independent entity. The prognosis of this tumor is worse than that of classic carcinoma of the thyroid, and most authors advise aggressive therapy, which in some cases can achieved prolonged survival. We describe 2 patients who experienced recurrence after treatment for the primary tumor. The recurrences were treated but the clinical courses differed.

  14. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  15. Hyperaldosteronism, hyperparathyroidism, medullary sponge kidneys, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hellman, D E; Kartchner, M; Komar, N; Mayes, D; Pitt, M

    1980-09-19

    Hyperparathyroidism and hyperaldosteronism coexisted in association with medullary sponge kidneys in a 27-year-old woman with severe hypertension. A modest fall in systolic and diastolic pressure followed removal of a parathyroid adenoma. Blood pressure was controlled with spironolactone therapy and restored to normal after removal of an aldosterone-secreting adrenal tumor. Elevated levels of aldosterone may have been responsible for the severe hypertension, while hypercalcemia may have had a synergistic effect on the arteriolar response to circulating vasoactive peptides.

  16. Current Concepts in the Molecular Genetics and Management of Thyroid Cancer: An Update for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Tatiana; Keraliya, Abhishek R; Howard, Stephanie A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Hornick, Jason L; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Substantial improvement in the understanding of the oncogenic pathways in thyroid cancer has led to identification of specific molecular alterations, including mutations of BRAF and RET in papillary thyroid cancer, mutation of RAS and rearrangement of PPARG in follicular thyroid cancer, mutation of RET in medullary thyroid cancer, and mutations of TP53 and in the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)/AKT1 pathway in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonography (US) and US-guided biopsy remain cornerstones in the initial workup of thyroid cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy reserved for differentiated subtypes. Posttreatment surveillance of thyroid cancer is done with US of the thyroid bed as well as monitoring of tumor markers such as serum thyroglobulin and serum calcitonin. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT are used in the follow-up of patients with negative iodine 131 imaging and elevated tumor markers. Certain mutations, such as mutations of BRAF in papillary thyroid carcinoma and mutations in RET codons 883, 918, and 928, are associated with an aggressive course in medullary thyroid carcinoma, and affected patients need close surveillance. Treatment options for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are limited. Currently, Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted therapies for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, including sorafenib, lenvatinib, vandetanib, and cabozantinib, target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and RET kinases. Imaging plays an important role in assessment of response to these therapies, which can be atypical owing to antiangiogenic effects. A wide spectrum of toxic effects is associated with the molecularly targeted therapies used in thyroid cancer and can be detected at restaging scans. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  17. Current Concepts in the Molecular Genetics and Management of Thyroid Cancer: An Update for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Tatiana; Keraliya, Abhishek R; Howard, Stephanie A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Hornick, Jason L; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Substantial improvement in the understanding of the oncogenic pathways in thyroid cancer has led to identification of specific molecular alterations, including mutations of BRAF and RET in papillary thyroid cancer, mutation of RAS and rearrangement of PPARG in follicular thyroid cancer, mutation of RET in medullary thyroid cancer, and mutations of TP53 and in the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)/AKT1 pathway in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonography (US) and US-guided biopsy remain cornerstones in the initial workup of thyroid cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy reserved for differentiated subtypes. Posttreatment surveillance of thyroid cancer is done with US of the thyroid bed as well as monitoring of tumor markers such as serum thyroglobulin and serum calcitonin. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT are used in the follow-up of patients with negative iodine 131 imaging and elevated tumor markers. Certain mutations, such as mutations of BRAF in papillary thyroid carcinoma and mutations in RET codons 883, 918, and 928, are associated with an aggressive course in medullary thyroid carcinoma, and affected patients need close surveillance. Treatment options for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are limited. Currently, Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted therapies for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, including sorafenib, lenvatinib, vandetanib, and cabozantinib, target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and RET kinases. Imaging plays an important role in assessment of response to these therapies, which can be atypical owing to antiangiogenic effects. A wide spectrum of toxic effects is associated with the molecularly targeted therapies used in thyroid cancer and can be detected at restaging scans. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618325

  18. [Differentiated thyroid cancer -- 2009].

    PubMed

    Konrády, András

    2011-01-30

    Three years ago continental guidelines were published referring management and follow-up of low risk thyroid cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to summarize the changes and new directions in this field. High risk patients require another protocol. Neck ultrasound plays important role in differential diagnosis and in detecting recurrences. Some new ultrasound techniques are discussed, too. FDG-PET can help to solve the problem of patients having negative scan and increased thyroglobulin level. In recent years there was an expansion of our knowledge about the pathomechanism of thyroid cancer. It appears that genetic alterations frequently play a key role in carcinogenesis. There are molecular methods that allow the detection of these genetic events in thyroid fine needle aspirations samples providing important information for diagnosis, management and prognosis. Instead of diagnostic whole body scanning the posttherapeutic scan became preferable but in high risk cases the diagnostic whole body scintigrams serve useful data. Primary therapy of thyroid cancer is an adequate surgery: total thyreoidectomy and, if necessary, lymph node dissection or limited surgery in selected cases. Nowadays radioguided surgery can help to improve the results. Radioiodine therapy (e.g. rest ablation) proved to be a safe and effective method to complete surgery. It can prevent relapses and results in longer survival. Thyroid hormone withdrawal or recombinant human thyrotropin stimulation can increase thyrotropin level before radioiodine treatment. These two methods have similar success rate of rest ablation but irradiation burden of blood is lower in the case of exogenous stimulation which avoids hypothyroid state and preserves quality of life. Since tumor cells fail to maintain the ability to perform physiological functions they undergo dedifferentiation. Therefore, an important aim is to reactivate some function of differentiated cells, e.g. iodine uptake, production of

  19. [Surgical therapy of benign thyroid gland diseases].

    PubMed

    Mann, B; Buhr, H J

    1998-01-01

    Operations due to benign thyroid diseases are one of the most common elective surgical procedures performed in Germany. In the majority of cases, the preoperative determination of the serum thyrotropin concentration and an ultrasound of the thyroid region are sufficient preoperative investigations. In cases of thyroid functional disorders a scintigram should be additionally performed. Indications for operation in nodular goiter are local, mechanical compression, suspicion of malignancy and focal or disseminated autonomy. In Graves' disease the indication for operation is usually recurrent hyperthyroidism after medical treatment. In endemic nodular goiter the morphology of the nodular thyroid tissue is the guideline for resection; i.e. all nodules have to be removed. In Graves' disease the function of the remaining thyroid tissue is essential. The standardized subtotal resection with remaining tissue around the hilus, which frequently barries nodules, should be avoided. Instead a selective resection which takes the individual morphology and function of the diseased thyroid tissue into account should be favorized. With this operative technique the surgeon will have frequently direct contact with the recurrent nerve and the parathyroids. It is documented, that intraoperative visualisation of the recurrent nerve decreases not only the rate of permanent nerve damages but increases as well the completeness of resection. Additionally, ligation of the inferior thyroid artery decreases the incidence of residual or recurrent disease without enlarging the risk of postoperative parathyroiprive hypocalcemia. An individual follow-up with iodine and/or thyroxine replacement therapy is an indispensable component of the surgical therapeutic approach. The target of thyroxine substitution in patients after resection due to benign thyroid diseases is a physiologic serum thyrotropin concentration (0.3 to 4.0 mU/l). PMID:9542021

  20. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  1. Airway obstruction secondary to large thyroid adenolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Nicholas; Malik, Paras; Hinton-Bayre, Anton; Lewis, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Adenolipoma of the thyroid gland is a rare benign neoplasm composed of normal thyroid and mature adipose tissue. Ordinarily, only a small amount of fat exists in a normal thyroid gland. CT and MRI may differentiate between benign and malignant lesions, and fine-needle aspirate often assists diagnosis. Surgical excision for adenolipoma is considered curative. We report the case of a 67-year-old man presenting with a large neck lump and evidence of airway obstruction. Imaging revealed a 97×70 mm left thyroid mass with retropharyngeal extension and laryngotracheal compression. Hemithyroidectomy was performed with subsequent histology confirming a large thyroid adenolipoma. The patient's symptoms resolved and he remains asymptomatic with no sign of recurrence 2 years postsurgery. PMID:25199190

  2. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R. H.

    1898-01-01

    From the results of the various experiments already detailed I feel justified in drawing the following conclusions: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  3. Thyroid inferno.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amit; Kaur, Manmeet

    2014-01-01

    The key to uncovering the etiology of hyperthyroidism lies in a careful history and physical examination. Autoimmune markers provide additive information, but should not solely be used to make a diagnosis. Concern has been raised that the overzealous use of thyroid ultrasound, following abnormal thyroid function tests, diverts attention from the workup of the biochemical abnormality to the workup of an incidentally found thyroid nodule. If further imaging is needed, the use ofathyroidscanhas been suggestedbythe Endocrine Society and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, in certain scenarios, this may be contraindicated. We present the case of a 28-year-old female with hyperthyroidism, as aplatform to discuss an important clinical sign present on Doppler ultrasound of the thyroid. By recognizing the clinical information gained from a Doppler ultrasound, physicians can avoid additional invasive workup and apply the use of ultrasound where most appropriate.

  4. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Laryngoscopy (looking inside the throat using a mirror or flexible tube called a laryngoscope placed through ... It may be performed by: Aiming external beam (x-ray) radiation at the thyroid Taking radioactive iodine by ...

  5. Intramedullary mature teratoma of the conus medullaris

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Olguner, Semih Kivanc; Sarac, Mustafa Emre; Vural, Sakir Berat

    2016-01-01

    Teratoma is a tumor that derivatives from all three primitive germ layers and spinal intramedullary teratomas are very rare lesions. The primary treatment modality for these tumors is surgical resection, and total resection should be the aim. However, subtotal resection is a valid alternative to prevent traumatizing adjacent functional neural tissue. In this report, we presented a case of a 12-year-old male patient with spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris. We describe the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of this rare disease. PMID:27114670

  6. Intramedullary mature teratoma of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Olguner, Semih Kivanc; Sarac, Mustafa Emre; Vural, Sakir Berat

    2016-01-01

    Teratoma is a tumor that derivatives from all three primitive germ layers and spinal intramedullary teratomas are very rare lesions. The primary treatment modality for these tumors is surgical resection, and total resection should be the aim. However, subtotal resection is a valid alternative to prevent traumatizing adjacent functional neural tissue. In this report, we presented a case of a 12-year-old male patient with spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris. We describe the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of this rare disease.

  7. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; Pacini, F.; Lippi, F.; Elisei, R.; Arganini, M.; Miccoli, P.; Pinchera, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report on 49 patients younger than 18 years at diagnosis, of 776 patients with thyroid cancer, seen in our institution in the last 17 years. Female/male ratio was 2.2:1. Histologic type was papillary in 44, follicular in 4, and medullary in 1. Initial treatment was near-total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection. Surgical complications (vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, or both) were found in 25 patients and were usually associated with more advanced primary tumors. At surgery, node metastases were present in 73% of the patients and lung metastases, detected by chest x ray films, in 6%. Patients were treated with thyroid suppressive therapy and, except the one with medullary cancer, with radioiodine (131I) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 +/- 4.4 years (range, 1 to 17 years), one patient with lung metastases died of respiratory failure. Of 36 patients who have been followed up more than 4 years, 22 (61.1%) are now cured, and 14 have metastases (to lymph nodes, 2; to nodes and lung, 10; and to lung, 2). Since 1977 serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was used routinely as a tumor marker for differentiated thyroid cancer. After operation, Tg was elevated in all patients both not receiving (mean +/- SE, 902 +/- 380 ng/ml) and receiving (44 +/- 15 ng/ml) suppressive therapy; after 131I treatment, serum Tg dropped to 104 +/- 50 and 7.3 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, without and with suppressive therapy, respectively. Of 11 patients with lung metastases treated with 131I, respiratory function, as assessed by means of spirometry, was normal in three, mildly reduced in six, and severely impaired in two (including the one who died). In conclusion, our study indicates that thyroid cancer in young patients is rather advanced at initial examination and usually associated with node and, less frequently, lung metastases.

  8. Radionuclide bone scanning of medullary chondrosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.; Chew, F.S.; Manaster, B.J.

    1982-12-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans of 18 medullary chondrosarcomas of bone were correlated with pathologic macrosections of the resected tumors. There was increased scan uptake by all 18 tumors, and the uptake in 15 scans corresponded accurately to the anatomic extent of the tumors. Only three scans displayed increased uptake beyond the true tumor margins; thus, the extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor extent is much less common in medullary chondrosarcomas than in many other primary bone tumors. Therefore, increased uptake beyond the apparent radiographic margin of the tumor suggests possible occult tumor spread. Pathologically, there was intense reactive new bone formation and hyperemia around the periphery of all 18 tumors, and there were foci of enchondral ossification, hyperemia, or calcification within the tumor itself in nearly every tumor. Three scans displayed less uptake in the center of the tumors than around their peripheries. One of these tumors was necrotic in the center, but the other two were pathologically no different from tumors that displayed homogeneous uptake on the scan.

  9. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, A.

    1988-05-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

  10. Coexistence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma With Thyroid MALT Lymphoma in a Patient With Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: A Clinical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Ji, Ting; Hu, Shuang; Liu, Bin; Kuang, Anren

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid neoplasias; however, primary thyroid gland lymphoma (PTL) is uncommon and their simultaneous occurrence is very rare.Herein, we reported a 25-year-old female patient with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), who developed a small goiter with a palpable 1.2-cm nodule in the right lobe. A fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy revealed atypical follicular epithelial cells and lymphoid cells in a background of lymphocytic thyroiditis. A total thyroidectomy was performed. The pathology showed multicentric papillary thyroid carcinoma, concomitant thyroid mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Postoperatively, he received chemotherapy and radioactive iodine ablation treatment. Nowadays the thyroglobulin of the patient is undetectable, without recurrences at 2 years of follow-up.It is concluded that the PTC and MALT lymphoma can exist concomitantly, especially in patients with HT. For the diagnostic workup and optional management of this rare coexistence, a multidisciplinary approach and close surveillance are needed.

  11. Coexistence of resistance to thyroid hormone and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Igata, Motoyuki; Tsuruzoe, Kaku; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Seiya; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Miyamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones. RTH is majorly caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. Here, we report a rare case of RTH with a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to a thyroid tumor and hormonal abnormality. She had elevated serum thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels. Genetic analysis of THRB identified a missense mutation, P452L, leading to a diagnosis of RTH. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor and lymph nodes enabled the cytological diagnosis of PTC with lymph node metastases. Total thyroidectomy and neck lymph nodes dissection were performed. Following surgery, thyroxine replacement (≥500 μg) was necessary to avoid the symptoms of hypothyroidism and to maintain her TSH levels within the same range as before the operation. During the follow-up, basal thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were around 6 ng/ml and TSH-stimulated Tg levels were between 12 and 20 ng/ml. Up to present, the patient has had no recurrence of PTC. This indicates that these Tg values are consistent with a biochemical incomplete response or an indeterminate response. There is no consensus regarding the management of thyroid carcinoma in patients with RTH, but aggressive treatments such as total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI) and TSH suppression therapy are recommended. Learning points There are only a few cases reporting the coexistence of RTH and thyroid carcinoma. Moreover, our case would be the first case presenting one with lymph node metastases. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. When total thyroidectomy is performed in

  12. Oncologic Safety of Robot Thyroid Surgery for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Comparative Study of Robot versus Open Thyroid Surgery Using Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighting.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tae-Yon; Yoon, Jong Ho; Han, Minkyu; Lee, Yi Ho; Lee, Yu-Mi; Song, Dong Eun; Chung, Ki-Wook; Kim, Won Bae; Shong, Young Kee; Hong, Suck Joon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic safety of robot thyroid surgery compared to open thyroid surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We enrolled 722 patients with PTC who underwent a total thyroidectomy with central compartment node dissection (CCND) from January 2009 to December 2010. These patients were classified into open thyroid surgery (n = 610) or robot thyroid surgery (n = 112) groups. We verified the impact of robot thyroid surgery on clinical recurrence and ablation/control-stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) levels predictive of non-recurrence using weighted logistic regression models with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Age, sex, thyroid weight, extent of CCND, and TNM were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05); however, there was no significant difference in recurrence between the open and robot groups (1.5% vs. 2.7%; p = 0.608). The proportion of patients with ablation sTg < 10.0 ng/mL and control sTg < 1.0 ng/mL was comparable between the two groups (p > 0.05). Logistic regression with IPTW using the propensity scores estimated by adjusting all of the parameters demonstrated that robot thyroid surgery did not influence the clinical recurrence (OR; 0.784, 95% CI; 0.150-3.403, p = 0.750), ablation sTg (OR; 0.950, 95% CI; 0.361-2.399, p = 0.914), and control sTg levels (OR; 0.498, 95% CI; 0.190-1.189, p = 0.130). Robot thyroid surgery is comparable to open thyroid surgery with regard to oncologic safety in PTC patients.

  13. Oncologic Safety of Robot Thyroid Surgery for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Comparative Study of Robot versus Open Thyroid Surgery Using Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighting

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tae-Yon; Yoon, Jong Ho; Han, Minkyu; Lee, Yi Ho; Lee, Yu-mi; Song, Dong Eun; Chung, Ki-Wook; Kim, Won Bae; Shong, Young Kee; Hong, Suck Joon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic safety of robot thyroid surgery compared to open thyroid surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We enrolled 722 patients with PTC who underwent a total thyroidectomy with central compartment node dissection (CCND) from January 2009 to December 2010. These patients were classified into open thyroid surgery (n = 610) or robot thyroid surgery (n = 112) groups. We verified the impact of robot thyroid surgery on clinical recurrence and ablation/control-stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) levels predictive of non-recurrence using weighted logistic regression models with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Age, sex, thyroid weight, extent of CCND, and TNM were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05); however, there was no significant difference in recurrence between the open and robot groups (1.5% vs. 2.7%; p = 0.608). The proportion of patients with ablation sTg < 10.0 ng/mL and control sTg < 1.0 ng/mL was comparable between the two groups (p > 0.05). Logistic regression with IPTW using the propensity scores estimated by adjusting all of the parameters demonstrated that robot thyroid surgery did not influence the clinical recurrence (OR; 0.784, 95% CI; 0.150–3.403, p = 0.750), ablation sTg (OR; 0.950, 95% CI; 0.361–2.399, p = 0.914), and control sTg levels (OR; 0.498, 95% CI; 0.190–1.189, p = 0.130). Robot thyroid surgery is comparable to open thyroid surgery with regard to oncologic safety in PTC patients. PMID:27285846

  14. Osmoregulatory betaine uptake by rat renal medullary slices.

    PubMed

    Lohr, J W; Pochal, M A; Acara, M

    1991-10-01

    Betaine is an osmolyte present in high concentrations in renal medullary cells. Betaine and other organic osmolytes, such as glycerophosphorylcholine, myo-inositol, and sorbitol, have been shown to increase in concentration during antidiuresis when the inner medullary extracellular osmolality rises. Its concentration may increase in renal cells either by betaine uptake or by choline metabolism to betaine. These studies measured the uptake of (14C)betaine into cortical, outer medullary and inner medullary slices from rat kidney. The tissue-to-medium ratio of (14C) betaine increased with increasing osmolality up to 450 mosmol/kg in outer medullary and inner medullary slices, but not in cortical slices. Betaine uptake increased when the osmolality was raised with NaCl or mannitol, but not with urea. When LiCl was substituted for NaCl in a medium of 300 mosmol/kg, there was significant inhibition of betaine uptake, although the tissue-to-medium ratios remained greater then unity. Thus, increases in osmolality stimulate betaine uptake in rat renal medullary slices and this uptake occurs by both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent betaine transport.

  15. Postpartum thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Argatska, Antoaneta B; Nonchev, Boyan I

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a syndrome of transient or permanent thyroid dysfunction occurring in the first year after delivery or abortion. It is the most common thyroid disease in the postpartum period with incidence between 5 and 9%. In essence, it is an autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid, caused by changes in humoral and cell-mediated immune response. It has a characteristic biphasic course with an episode of transient thyrotoxicosis followed by transient or permanent hypothyroidism. Of all predisposing factors positive titers of thyroid peroxidase antibodies have the greatest importance. In some of the affected patients the disease course is marked by expressed hormonal disorders causing significant subjective symptoms. This underlines the need for early identification of risk groups aimed at prophylaxis and adequate treatment of thyroid dysfunction in the postpartum period. The frequency of PPT varies between analyses and studies on risk factors do not establish reliable predictive models for progression of the disease. This is due to the different methodology of research and the involvement of a number of genetic and non-genetic factors in different geographic regions. That is why implementation of mass screening programs is now controversial. The discrepancy in the opinions of researchers makes it necessary to have studies of the problem in performed in every clinical center in which the possible risk specific to the region and the population covered might be defined prognostically. The results of these studies can be used to introduce targeted and cost-effective screening for early detection of risk patients and prevention of morbidity and complications of PPT. PMID:25434070

  16. Postpartum thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Argatska, Antoaneta B; Nonchev, Boyan I

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a syndrome of transient or permanent thyroid dysfunction occurring in the first year after delivery or abortion. It is the most common thyroid disease in the postpartum period with incidence between 5 and 9%. In essence, it is an autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid, caused by changes in humoral and cell-mediated immune response. It has a characteristic biphasic course with an episode of transient thyrotoxicosis followed by transient or permanent hypothyroidism. Of all predisposing factors positive titers of thyroid peroxidase antibodies have the greatest importance. In some of the affected patients the disease course is marked by expressed hormonal disorders causing significant subjective symptoms. This underlines the need for early identification of risk groups aimed at prophylaxis and adequate treatment of thyroid dysfunction in the postpartum period. The frequency of PPT varies between analyses and studies on risk factors do not establish reliable predictive models for progression of the disease. This is due to the different methodology of research and the involvement of a number of genetic and non-genetic factors in different geographic regions. That is why implementation of mass screening programs is now controversial. The discrepancy in the opinions of researchers makes it necessary to have studies of the problem in performed in every clinical center in which the possible risk specific to the region and the population covered might be defined prognostically. The results of these studies can be used to introduce targeted and cost-effective screening for early detection of risk patients and prevention of morbidity and complications of PPT. PMID:25507668

  17. Incidental finding of bilateral papillary thyroid carcinoma in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Mehr Sadat; Azarpira, Negar; Mojallal, Mehra

    2010-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) affects 0.5%-1% of the adult population and presents with classical signs of renal lithiasis, cholecystolithiasis, gastrointestinal ulcerations, depression, and osteoporosis. Parathyroid adenoma, hyperplasia and rarely carcinoma are the underlying pathology. Synchronous thyroid and parathyroid pathologies are described in multiple endocrine neoplasia. We report a case of a 47 years old woman with non-syndromic concomitant occurrence of bilateral non-medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnosed by histopathology, and with PHP confirmed by (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy, hypercalcemia and elevated serum parathyroid hormone. A head and neck surgeon needs to be aware of the possible coexistence of thyroid and parathyroid lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of concomitant PHP and bilateral papillary thyroid cancer in the literature. In conclusion, it is optimal to remove both tumors in one operative procedure. Therefore careful thyroid evaluation should be considered for all patients with PHP.

  18. Schwannoma of the conus medullaris: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Canbay, Suat; Hasturk, Askin Esen; Markoc, Fatma; Caglar, Sukru

    2011-12-01

    Intradural schwannoma of the conus medullaris is a rare form of spinal neoplasm, which commonly occurs in the lumbar region. Conus medullaris level is unusual for schwannomas. A 49-year-old woman presented with chronic sciatica, mild bladder dysfunction, and paresthesia in the buttocks. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed a mass lesion in the conus medullaris region with nerve compression. The tumor was completely resected and diagnosed histologically as schwannoma. The patient recovered after surgery. Clinical and radiologic features of this rare tumor are reviewed and are accompanied by literature findings.

  19. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  20. Thyroid emergencies.

    PubMed

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2012-03-01

    This review presents current knowledge about the thyroid emergencies known as myxedema coma and thyrotoxic storm. Understanding the pathogenesis of these conditions, appropriate recognition of the clinical signs and symptoms, and their prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment are crucial in optimizing survival.

  1. Recurrent varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Rotker, Katherine; Sigman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele recurrence is one of the most common complications associated with varicocele repair. A systematic review was performed to evaluate varicocele recurrence rates, anatomic causes of recurrence, and methods of management of recurrent varicoceles. The PubMed database was evaluated using keywords “recurrent” and “varicocele” as well as MESH criteria “recurrent” and “varicocele.” Articles were not included that were not in English, represented single case reports, focused solely on subclinical varicocele, or focused solely on a pediatric population (age <18). Rates of recurrence vary with the technique of varicocele repair from 0% to 35%. Anatomy of recurrence can be defined by venography. Management of varicocele recurrence can be surgical or via embolization. PMID:26806078

  2. [Thyroid disease].

    PubMed

    Ashitaka, Y

    1990-08-01

    The incidence of pregnant women with thyroid dysfunction has been reported to be around 0.1-0.4%. Graves' disease accounts for more than half of these disorders. The main cause of thyroid disease in pregnancy and puerperium is autoimmune dysfunction. Whether there may be goitre or exophthalmus present, clinical signs as inappropriate weight gain, high systolic pressure, palpitation (greater than or equal to 110/min), emotional lability, fatigue, acceleration of suppression of the Achilles' tendon reflex should induce changes in the biochemical thyroid function tests. Parameters for the diagnosis and management for hyperthyroidism are serum levels of free T4 and TSH, while those of T3, reverse T3, and TSH are for hypothyroidism. Serum anti-microsomal antibodies and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies which have no effect on the fetus are also good markers for severity. The transplacental transfer of maternal TSH receptor antibodies consisting of stimulatory and inhibitory immunoglobulins and maternal thyroid-binding inhibiting immunoglobulins play roles in the development of transient neonatal hyper- or hypothyroidism. Fetal control is achieved by optimal maternal management. Untreated hyperthyroidism may be associated with fetal malformations. This risk may be reduced by antithyroid drug treatment of up to 150 mg/day of propylthiouracil which has less chance of placental passage and less secretion into the mother's milk than methyl-mercapto-imidazol. Maternal thyroid function should be kept in the upper limit of normal range, taking into consideration the fetal dysfunction induced by over-administration of the drug which passes through placenta. Children of hypothyroid women taking inadequate replacement therapy manifested lower IQ values compared to the progeny of euthyroid or hypothyroid women taking adequate therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  4. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... may show a tumor growing from the thyroid gland. A thyroid biopsy makes the diagnosis. An examination of the ... be cured by surgery. Complete removal of the thyroid gland does not prolong the lives of people who ...

  5. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Having too much thyroid hormone (a condition called hyperthyroidism ) can cause a rapid or irregular heartbeat, trouble ... nodules make too much thyroid hormone and cause hyperthyroidism. Nodules that produce increased thyroid hormone are almost ...

  6. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may ...

  7. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands make hormones. The thyroid uses iodine , a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, ... Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid : The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The ...

  8. Isolation and perfusion of rat inner medullary vasa recta.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kristen K; Nawata, C Michele; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-08-15

    Outer medullary isolated descending vasa recta have proven to be experimentally tractable, and consequently much has been learned about outer medullary vasa recta endothelial transport, pericyte contractile mechanisms, and tubulovascular interactions. In contrast, inner medullary vasa recta have never been isolated from any species, and therefore isolated vasa recta function has never been subjected to in vitro quantitative evaluation. As we teased out inner medullary thin limbs of Henle's loops from the Munich-Wistar rat, we found that vasa recta could be isolated using similar protocols. We isolated ∼30 inner medullary vasa recta from 23 adult male Munich-Wistar rats and prepared them for brightfield or electron microscopy, gene expression analysis by RT-PCR, or isolated tubule microperfusion. Morphological characteristics include branching and nonbranching segments exhibiting a thin endothelium, axial surface filaments radiating outward giving vessels a hairy appearance, and attached interstitial cells. Electron microscopy shows multiple cells, tight junctions, and either continuous or fenestrated endothelia. Isolated vasa recta express genes encoding the urea transporter UT-B and/or the fenestral protein PV-1, genes expressed in descending or ascending vasa recta, respectively. The transepithelial NaCl permeability (383.3 ± 60.0 × 10(-5) cm/s, mean ± SE, n = 4) was determined in isolated perfused vasa recta. Future quantitative analyses of isolated inner medullary vasa recta should provide structural and functional details important for more fully understanding fluid and solute flows through the inner medulla and their associated regulatory pathways. PMID:26062876

  9. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  10. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis as the presenting symptom of silent thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debmalya; Bhattacharjee, Shakya

    2013-01-01

    Silent thyroiditis is a rare cause of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. The objective was to present a case of silent thyroiditis presenting as periodic paralysis. A 23-year-old man presented with recurrent acute flaccid predominantly proximal weakness of all four limbs. He had a similar episode 3 weeks back. On examination he was found to have hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis. Clinically there were no features of thyrotoxicosis or thyroiditis. He was initially treated with intravenous and later oral potassium supplementation and propranolol. At 8 weeks of follow-up his thyroid profile became normal and his propranolol was stopped. He had no further recurrence of paralysis. He was diagnosed as a case silent thyroiditis presenting as thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. In cases of recurrent or acute flaccid muscle paralysis, it is important to suspect thyrotoxicosis, even if asymptomatic. Definitive treatment of thyrotoxicosis prevents recurrence. PMID:23956568

  11. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation. PMID:27588138

  12. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the conus medullaris in an elderly patient: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shimosawa, H; Matsumoto, M; Yabe, H; Mukai, M; Toyama, Y; Morioka, H

    2011-05-01

    Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are very rare conditions. Most of these tumors occur in children and young adults. A 63-year-old man with a primary spinal PNET in the conus medullaris from the L1 to L2 level is presented in this report. The optimal treatment of primary spinal PNETs is yet unknown. Surgical resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have been advocated for the treatment of spinal PNET based on PNETs at other sites. However, the outcome is very poor. There are a few reports of cases with long-term survival and no recurrence. In these patients, en bloc resections were performed.

  13. Renal pericytes: regulators of medullary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of medullary blood flow (MBF) is essential in maintaining normal kidney function. Blood flow to the medulla is supplied by the descending vasa recta (DVR), which arise from the efferent arterioles of juxtamedullary glomeruli. DVR are composed of a continuous endothelium, intercalated with smooth muscle-like cells called pericytes. Pericytes have been shown to alter the diameter of isolated and in situ DVR in response to vasoactive stimuli that are transmitted via a network of autocrine and paracrine signalling pathways. Vasoactive stimuli can be released by neighbouring tubular epithelial, endothelial, red blood cells and neuronal cells in response to changes in NaCl transport and oxygen tension. The experimentally described sensitivity of pericytes to these stimuli strongly suggests their leading role in the phenomenon of MBF autoregulation. Because the debate on autoregulation of MBF fervently continues, we discuss the evidence favouring a physiological role for pericytes in the regulation of MBF and describe their potential role in tubulo-vascular cross-talk in this region of the kidney. Our review also considers current methods used to explore pericyte activity and function in the renal medulla. PMID:23126245

  14. Impaired Sacculocollic Reflex in Lateral Medullary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonhye; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine saccular dysfunction by measuring cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) and to correlate abnormality of cVEMP with results of other vestibular function tests in lateral medullary infarction (LMI). Methods: We recorded cVEMP in 21 patients with LMI documented on MRI. cVEMP was induced by a short tone burst and was recorded in contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle while patients turned their heads forcefully to the contralateral side against resistance. Patients also underwent video-oculographic recording of spontaneous, gaze-evoked and head shaking nystagmus (HSN), evaluation of ocular tilt reaction (OTR), measurement of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) tilt, bithermal caloric tests, and audiometry. Results: Nine patients (43%) showed abnormal cVEMP, unilateral in seven and bilateral in two. The cVEMP abnormalities included decreased p13–n23 amplitude in four, delayed p13/n23 responses in five, and both decreased and delayed responses in two. The abnormal cVEMP was ipsilesional in five, contralesional in two, and bilateral in two. The prevalence of OTR/SVV tilt, spontaneous nystagmus, and HSN did not differ between the patients with normal and abnormal cVEMP. Conclusion: cVEMP was abnormal in approximately half of the patients with LMI. The abnormal cVEMP indicates damage to the descending sacculocollic reflex pathway or disruption of commissural modulation between the vestibular nuclei. PMID:21415908

  15. Detection of human parvovirus B19 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J H; Zhang, W P; Liu, H X; Wang, D; Li, Y F; Wang, W Q; Wang, L; He, F R; Wang, Z; Yan, Q G; Chen, L W; Huang, G S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate whether parvovirus B19, a common human pathogen, was also involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 112 paraffin-embedded thyroid specimens of benign nodules, papillary, medullary and follicular carcinomas, and normal controls were examined for B19 DNA and capsid protein by nested PCR, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expression of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was investigated by IHC. The results showed B19 DNA commonly exists in human thyroid tissues; however, there were significant differences between PTC group and normal controls, and between PTC and nonneoplastic adjacent tissues (P<0.001). The presence of viral DNA in PTC neoplastic epithelium was confirmed by laser-capture microdissection and sequencing of nested PCR products. B19 capsid protein in PTC group was significantly higher than that of all the control groups and nonneoplastic adjacent tissues (P⩽0.001). Compared with control groups, the activation of NF-κB in PTC group was significantly increased (P⩽0.02), except for medullary carcinomas, and the activation of NF-κB was correlated with the viral protein presence (P=0.002). Moreover, NF-κB was colocalised with B19 DNA in the neoplastic epithelium of PTC by double staining of IHC and ISH. These results indicate for the first time a possible role of B19 in pathogenesis of PTC. PMID:18212749

  16. Intramedullary enterogenous cyst of the conus medullaris presenting as lower limb pain.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Tyagi, Devendra K; Sawant, Hemant V

    2011-01-01

    Enterogenous cysts account for 0.7-1.3% of spinal axis tumors. Cervical and thoracic segments are most often affected and they are rare in the lumbar region. Intramedullary variant which comprises less than 5% of enterogenous cysts are densely adherent to the surrounding tissue and preclude total excision. Partial excision is associated with recurrence and is the most common unfavorable outcome in these cysts. Hence, such patients need follow-up with serial imaging. We describe a case of conus medullaris enterogenous cyst presenting as lower limb pain. Due to dense adhesion of the cyst to the surrounding neural tissue, subtotal excision was done. The patient is symptom and tumor free at one year interval. We describe our case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare but difficult to cure tumor.

  17. Intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis from prostate carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zengbao; Xu, Siyi; Zhong, Chunlong; Gao, Yang; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Yan; Guo, Yang; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao

    2014-03-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCMs) are rare and account for 4-8.5% of central nervous system metastases. Only one case of biopsy-proven ISCM due to prostate cancer has previously been reported. The current study presents an additional unique case of a 74-year-old male who developed symptoms from an intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis as the first manifestation of prostate adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this scenario is even more rare and has not previously been reported. The tumor was radically resected, followed by androgen blockade treatment. The patient's neurological deficit significantly improved, with no tumor recurrence during the follow-up period. In addition, the present study provides an overview of the previous literature concerning ISCMs from prostate cancer, and discusses the treatment options.

  18. Conus Medullaris Teratoma with Utilization of Fiber Tractography: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Alkherayf, Fahad; Arab, Abdullah Faisal; Tsai, Eve

    2015-07-01

    Objective Conus medullaris teratomas are very rare tumors. Traditional preoperative diagnosis depended on the findings from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tractography is a novel technique that has recently been utilized to diagnose spinal cord lesions. This case report shows that fiber tractography has great potential in preoperative diagnosis and postoperative follow-up of teratomas of the conus medullaris. Methods A 50-year-old man with a conus medullaris teratoma underwent tractography with the aim of visualizing the tumor in relation to the white matter tracts. The patient underwent a T12-L2 laminectomy, and the lesion was resected. The histopathology diagnosis was of a mature teratoma. Study Design Case report. Results Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography provide more details about the white matter tracts in relation to space-occupying lesions that may be more sensitive than conventional MRI and have recently been utilized in spinal cord lesions. Fiber tracking has the ability to visualize the integrity of the white matter tracts at the level of the conus medullaris in relation to the lesion. The tracts appeared to be displaced by the lesion at the conus medullaris. Tractography also showed no white matter tracts within the lesion. Such findings are consistent with the characteristics of a benign lesion. Exploiting tractography in this case was helpful in predicting the nature of the lesion preoperatively and in planning the surgical intervention. Conclusions Conus medullaris teratomas mostly affect adults. Patients generally present with a long history of clinical symptoms prior to diagnosis. Surgery is required for diagnosis, and the goal should be complete tumor excision without sacrificing any neurologic functions. The use of DTI and tractography, in addition to conventional MRI, has the potential to be very valuable for the diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up of patients with conus medullaris teratomas.

  19. Quadruple Cancers of Non-producing Multiple Myeloma, Cholangiocellular Carcinoma, and Two Different Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Junya; Sasaki, Nana; Kiyota, Miki; Tatekawa, Shotaro; Tsukamoto, Taku; Maegawa, Saori; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Horiike, Shigeo; Tando, So; Fushiki, Shinji; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with non-producing multiple myeloma (MM) with three additional concomitant solid tumors that were identified by postmortem autopsy. The disease was refractory to anti-MM therapy including bortezomib and lenalidomide, and he finally died of bacterial pneumonia with diffuse alveolar damage 8 months after the diagnosis. An autopsy revealed that he was also affected by three other solid cancers, cholangiocellular carcinoma, medullary thyroid cancer and papillary thyroid cancer that were clinically asymptomatic and remained undiagnosed before death. A review of the literature suggests that primary quadruple cancers including MM are extremely rare. PMID:27150876

  20. [Extracapsular lobectomy in benign monolobar thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Prete, F; Di Ciaula, G; Sammarco, D; Parlati, C

    1995-12-01

    On the basis of their experience acquired in the field of thyroid surgery the authors examine the problems related to extracapsular lobectomy from a tactical and technical point of view, starting with its principal indications: benign monolobar thyroid disease in a single or multiple nodular form. The validity of extemporary histological tests is also assessed on the basis of their experience of rare false negatives and the relative successive totalization programme. Lastly, the paper underlines the fundamental identification of the recurrent nerve as the central point of the operation, before which the authors emphasize that nothing should be cut or ligated apart from the superior vascular peduncle and vena media.

  1. Thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Skolnik, E.M.; Baim, H.M.; Becker, S.P.; Katz, A.H.; Mantravadi, R.V.

    1980-12-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma was studied with regard to mode of presentation, initial findings, treatment and survival. The classic signs, symptoms, physical and scan findings were found to be present in approximately 70% of the patients. Prognosis was found to be dependent on age of presentation more than any other factor. Patients with prior exposure to radiation were found to have more extensive disease and require more extensive surgery but ultimately had the same prognosis for 15-year cure. Treatment for distant metastatic disease by surgery, radioactive iodine and external radiation all resulted in long-term survival in certain cases.

  2. Carcinoma of the Breast With Medullary-like Features

    PubMed Central

    Kleer, Celina G.

    2016-01-01

    This case presentation reviews the histologic distinction between pure medullary carcinoma and breast carcinomas with medullary-like features. This particular case prompts us to analyze the relationship among medullary carcinoma, basal-like breast carcinomas and carcinomas associated with germline BRCA1 mutations. In addition to now well-defined features, such as expression of high-molecular-weight cytokeratins and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), basal-like tumors have a deficiency or dysfunction of BRCA1. This association in part explains the histologic features of BRCA1-associated breast cancers. Recent studies in our laboratory demonstrate that BRCA1 protein is regulated by a recently described gene, EZH2. These concepts illustrate the important relationships among histopathologic features; genomic profile; single gene abnormalities, such as BRCA1 and EZH2; and growth regulation in this subset of breast carcinomas. PMID:19886718

  3. Conus medullaris stroke. Does F wave predict return of ambulation?

    PubMed

    Alanazy, Mohammed H

    2016-07-01

    Absent F wave in the stage of spinal shock has been described in cases of traumatic spinal cord injury. The role of F wave in predicting prognosis after conus medullaris infarct has not been described. We describe herein a middle aged-man with a conus medullaris infarct. Both tibial and peroneal F waves were absent on day 4. The left tibial F wave reappeared in the following study on day 18. All F waves reappeared on day 56 at which time the patient was still wheelchair bound. He regained walking on day 105. We hypothesize that reappearance of initially absent F waves post conus medullaris infarct is a good prognostic sign for the return of ambulation. The applicability of this observation requires further research. We also discuss clinical and diagnostic caveats in this case.

  4. An Association of Chronic Hyperaldosteronism with Medullary Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Sharma, Rajaram; Thakkar, Hemangini; Hira, Priya; Deshmukh, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background An association between chronic hyperaldosteronism and medullary nephrocalcinosis has rarely been made, with only a handful of cases described in literature. Case Report We describe five cases of hyperaldosteronism with a long- standing history in whom associated medullary nephrocalcinosis was established. Conclusions We infer that a chronic hyperaldosteronic status, whether primary or secondary, is a causal factor in the etiopathogenesis of medullary nephrocalcinosis. This article illustrates and summarizes various postulated theories that support our proposed association between hyperaldosteronism and nephrocalcinosis. We conclude that chronic hyperaldosteronism should be included as one of the causes of nephrocalcinosis and that our case series emphasizes the need of a well-organized retrospective study to prove it further. PMID:26413177

  5. Medullary carcinoma of the breast: a tumour lacking keratin 19.

    PubMed

    Larsimont, D; Lespagnard, L; Degeyter, M; Heimann, R

    1994-06-01

    The presence of keratin 19 (K19) was searched for by immunostaining in 16 medullary carcinomas, comprising 12 typical and four atypical cases, in 29 undifferentiated high-grade carcinomas (NOS-HG) with conspicuous lymphoid response and in 12 well differentiated low-grade carcinomas (NOS-LG). The medullary carcinomas were all negative whereas 23 of the high-grade and all 12 low-grade carcinomas expressed K19. Staining for K19 could be of value in the differential diagnosis of these tumours. Furthermore, these findings, with other observations, raise the possibility that medullary carcinoma cells could be linked to precursor cells of the terminal duct lobular units because both populations share several characteristics. PMID:7520414

  6. Conus medullaris stroke. Does F wave predict return of ambulation?

    PubMed

    Alanazy, Mohammed H

    2016-07-01

    Absent F wave in the stage of spinal shock has been described in cases of traumatic spinal cord injury. The role of F wave in predicting prognosis after conus medullaris infarct has not been described. We describe herein a middle aged-man with a conus medullaris infarct. Both tibial and peroneal F waves were absent on day 4. The left tibial F wave reappeared in the following study on day 18. All F waves reappeared on day 56 at which time the patient was still wheelchair bound. He regained walking on day 105. We hypothesize that reappearance of initially absent F waves post conus medullaris infarct is a good prognostic sign for the return of ambulation. The applicability of this observation requires further research. We also discuss clinical and diagnostic caveats in this case. PMID:27356660

  7. Adrenal medullary ganglion neurons project into the splanchnic nerve.

    PubMed

    Dagerlind, A; Pelto-Huikko, M; Diez, M; Hökfelt, T

    1995-12-01

    Retrograde tract-tracing was used to study the projections of adrenal medullary ganglion neurons. The splanchnic nerve was cut close to the suprarenal ganglia and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold was applied at the site of nerve transection. Groups of adrenal medullary ganglion neurons exhibited FlurorGold- or Fast Blue-induced fluorescence restricted to the perikarya. Using immunohistochemistry most retrogradely labelled ganglion neurons showed immunoreactivity for neuropeptide Y. In addition, after splanchnicotomy most ganglion neurons expressed galanin and galanin message-associated peptide immunoreactivities which could not be observed in control adrenals. Taken together, the present results strongly indicate that adrenal medullary ganglion neurons project back into the splanchnic nerve perhaps representing feedback system modulating the preganglionic innervation of the adrenal gland.

  8. Evaluation of thyroid tissue by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, C. S. B.; Bitar, R. A.; Santos, A. B. O.; Kulcsar, M. A. V.; Friguglietti, C. U. M.; Martinho, H. S.; da Costa, R. B.; Martin, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid gland is a small gland in the neck consisting of two lobes connected by an isthmus. Thyroid's main function is to produce the hormones thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and calcitonin. Thyroid disorders can disturb the production of these hormones, which will affect numerous processes within the body such as: regulating metabolism and increasing utilization of cholesterol, fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The gland itself can also be injured; for example, neoplasias, which have been considered the most important, causing damage of to the gland and are difficult to diagnose. There are several types of thyroid cancer: Papillary, Follicular, Medullary, and Anaplastic. The occurrence rate, in general is between 4 and 7%; which is on the increase (30%), probably due to new technology that is able to find small thyroid cancers that may not have been found previously. The most common method used for thyroid diagnoses are: anamnesis, ultrasonography, and laboratory exams (Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy- FNAB). However, the sensitivity of those test are rather poor, with a high rate of false-negative results, therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostic techniques. Raman spectroscopy has been presented as a valuable tool for cancer diagnosis in many different tissues. In this work, 27 fragments of the thyroid were collected from 18 patients, comprising the following histologic groups: goitre adjacent tissue, goitre nodular tissue, follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma. Spectral collection was done with a commercial FTRaman Spectrometer (Bruker RFS100/S) using a 1064 nm laser excitation and Ge detector. Principal Component Analysis, Cluster Analysis, and Linear Discriminant Analysis with cross-validation were applied as spectral classification algorithm. Comparing the goitre adjacent tissue with the goitre nodular region, an index of 58.3% of correct classification was obtained. Between goitre (nodular region and

  9. Fast rhythms in the discharges of medullary inspiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christakos, C N; Cohen, M I; See, W R; Barnhardt, R

    1988-11-01

    The discharges of 44 medullary inspiratory (I) neurons in decerebrate paralyzed cats were studied using interval and spectral analysis. Most neurons had a rhythm in their discharge. In 31 the rhythm was at the frequency of, and coherent to, the high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) of I nerves, and in 7 the rhythm was in the range of medium-frequency oscillations (MFOs), with no coherence to nerve MFOs. Thus, correlated HFOs are characteristic of the I system at all levels, whereas MFOs are uncommon in medullary neurons and seem to be unrelated to general mechanisms. PMID:3196923

  10. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  11. The thyroid and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Lichiardopol, Corina; Moţa, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease, postpartum thyroiditis, atrophic thyroiditis and drug induced thyroiditis) are prevalent disorders worldwide, especially in women (related to the millieu of sex steroids and X chromosome effects on the thyroid and the immune system). Disruption of thyroid self tolerance, usually induced by an infection, generates abnormal thyroid--immune interactions, implicating an array of cytokines and their receptors. Thyrocytes achieve antigen presenting cell properties which stimulate effector immune cells (Th1, Th2, Th17), in the context of defective immunomodulatory T regulatory cells, resulting in thyroid lymphocytic infiltration and activation of B cells, with production of antibodies against thyroid antigens, thyroid destruction or stimulation, depending on the Th1-Th2 balance. During pregnancy there is a Th2 predominance sustained by the increased glucocorticoid, estrogen and progesteron levels, which allows tolerance versus the histoincompatible fetoplacental unit. In the postpartum period, the return shift Th2 to Th1 favors the occurrence of postpartum thyroiditis. Altered thyroid hormone levels can influence the immune system, and, on the other side, some immune cells secrete TSH, which exerts endocrine and paracrine, cytokine-like effects. Understanding the complex pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disorders is crucial for prevention and management.

  12. Early diagnosis of and surgical strategy for adrenal medullary disease in MEN II gene carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.; Fjaelling, M.L.; Lindberg, S.; Jacobsson, L.; Zachrisson, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen multiple endocrine neoplasia type II (MEN II) gene carriers--12 who had undergone thyroidectomy because of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and 4 whose thyroid glands had been removed because of C cell hyperplasia--were examined for the presence of pheochromocytomas. No patient had sought medical advice for pheochromocytoma symptoms. Fourteen patients had MEN IIa syndromes, one patient had a MEN IIb and another patient had a mixed syndrome of von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis and MEN II. Eight patients had undergone unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma 11 +/- 4 years before. The patients underwent clinical examination, determination of the urinary excretion of catecholamines and metabolites, and /sup 131/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I-MIBG) and CAT scans. /sup 131/I-MIBG scanning was performed with images 1, 4, and 7 days after the radionuclide injection. In seven of eight patients who had undergone unilateral adrenalectomies, the /sup 131/I-MIBG scans showed accumulation of the radionuclide in the remaining adrenal gland. Bilateral adrenal accumulation of the radionuclide was demonstrated in seven of eight MEN IIa gene carriers who had not undergone adrenalectomy. Five patients, two of whom had undergone adrenalectomy, were found to have unilateral pheochromocytomas less than 2 cm in diameter. Only one of these five patients had an elevated excretion of urinary catecholamines. Between day 4 and day 7 after /sup 131/I-MIBG injection, adrenal glands with pheochromocytomas increased their relative accumulation of the radionuclide significantly more (p less than 0.02) than did adrenal glands without any demonstrable pheochromocytomas. All the pheochromocytomas were viewed by means of CAT scans.

  13. [So-called medullary fibromas of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Postnov, Iu V; Perov, Iu L; Gribunov, Iu P

    1978-01-01

    This is the first description in the national literature of morphology of the so-called medullar fibromas of the human kidney which are considered to be hormonally-active (producing prostaglandines) tumours or tumour-like focal hyperplasias of interstitial cells of the kidney medullary layer.

  14. Rare (new) entities of the breast and medullary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foschini, Maria P; Eusebi, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Rare tumours are a heterogeneous group of conditions that encompass benign to malignant lesions both of stromal and epithelial origin. Here some of these tumours are described, in which the authors have most familiarity. An outline of medullary carcinoma is also presented.

  15. Recurrent novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent novae seem to be a rather inhomogeneous group: T CrB is a binary with a M III companion; U Sco probably has a late dwarf as companion. Three are fast novae; two are slow novae. Some of them appear to have normal chemical composition; others may present He and CNO excess. Some present a mass-loss that is lower by two orders of magnitude than classical novae. However, our sample is too small for saying whether there are several classes of recurrent novae, which may be related to the various classes of classical novae, or whether the low mass-loss is a general property of the class or just a peculiarity of one member of the larger class of classical novae and recurrent novae.

  16. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  17. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  18. Medullary serotonin neurons are CO2 sensitive in situ.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Kimberly E; Richerson, George B; Harris, Michael B

    2013-12-01

    Brainstem central chemoreceptors are critical to the hypercapnic ventilatory response, but their location and identity are poorly understood. When studied in vitro, serotonin-synthesizing (5-HT) neurons within the rat medullary raphé are intrinsically stimulated by CO2/acidosis. The contributions of these neurons to central chemosensitivity in vivo, however, are controversial. Lacking is documentation of CO2-sensitive 5-HT neurons in intact experimental preparations and understanding of their spatial and proportional distribution. Here we test the hypothesis that 5-HT neurons in the rat medullary raphé are sensitive to arterial hypercapnia. We use extracellular recording and hypercapnic challenge of spontaneously active medullary raphé neurons in the unanesthetized in situ perfused decerebrate brainstem preparation to assess chemosensitivity of individual cells. Juxtacellular labeling of a subset of recorded neurons and subsequent immunohistochemistry for the 5-HT-synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) identify or exclude this neurotransmitter phenotype in electrophysiologically characterized chemosensitive and insensitive cells. We show that the medullary raphé houses a heterogeneous population, including chemosensitive and insensitive 5-HT neurons. Of 124 recorded cells, 16 cells were juxtacellularly filled, visualized, and immunohistochemically identified as 5-HT synthesizing, based on TPH-immunoreactivity. Forty-four percent of 5-HT cells were CO2 stimulated (increased firing rate with hypercapnia), while 56% were unstimulated. Our results demonstrate that medullary raphé neurons are heterogeneous and clearly include a subset of 5-HT neurons that are excited by arterial hypercapnia. Together with data identifying intrinsically CO2-sensitive 5-HT neurons in vitro, these results support a role for such cells as central chemoreceptors in the intact system.

  19. Medullary serotonin neurons are CO2 sensitive in situ

    PubMed Central

    Richerson, George B.; Harris, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Brainstem central chemoreceptors are critical to the hypercapnic ventilatory response, but their location and identity are poorly understood. When studied in vitro, serotonin-synthesizing (5-HT) neurons within the rat medullary raphé are intrinsically stimulated by CO2/acidosis. The contributions of these neurons to central chemosensitivity in vivo, however, are controversial. Lacking is documentation of CO2-sensitive 5-HT neurons in intact experimental preparations and understanding of their spatial and proportional distribution. Here we test the hypothesis that 5-HT neurons in the rat medullary raphé are sensitive to arterial hypercapnia. We use extracellular recording and hypercapnic challenge of spontaneously active medullary raphé neurons in the unanesthetized in situ perfused decerebrate brainstem preparation to assess chemosensitivity of individual cells. Juxtacellular labeling of a subset of recorded neurons and subsequent immunohistochemistry for the 5-HT-synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) identify or exclude this neurotransmitter phenotype in electrophysiologically characterized chemosensitive and insensitive cells. We show that the medullary raphé houses a heterogeneous population, including chemosensitive and insensitive 5-HT neurons. Of 124 recorded cells, 16 cells were juxtacellularly filled, visualized, and immunohistochemically identified as 5-HT synthesizing, based on TPH-immunoreactivity. Forty-four percent of 5-HT cells were CO2 stimulated (increased firing rate with hypercapnia), while 56% were unstimulated. Our results demonstrate that medullary raphé neurons are heterogeneous and clearly include a subset of 5-HT neurons that are excited by arterial hypercapnia. Together with data identifying intrinsically CO2-sensitive 5-HT neurons in vitro, these results support a role for such cells as central chemoreceptors in the intact system. PMID:24047906

  20. Fine needle aspiration of secondary synovial sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Slade, Jamie Macagba; Syed, Sahr; Gattuso, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Synovial sarcomas (SS) of the head and neck region are extremely rare and arise in only 5% of cases. We present a case of secondary SS of the thyroid originally diagnosed as medullary carcinoma on fine needle aspiration (FNA). A 41-year-old man presented with several weeks of dysphonia and a left thyroid mass. FNA of the thyroid nodule showed a cellular smear composed of loosely cohesive oval to spindle-shaped cells with irregular nuclear borders, finely granular chromatin, and inconspicuous nucleoli. The patient was diagnosed with medullary carcinoma and underwent a total thyroidectomy. Intro-operatively, the mass was found to arise from the tracheoesophageal groove with spread to the left thyroid. Microscopic examination of the thyroid tumor revealed a dense spindle cell proliferation with abundant mitoses, scant cords and nests of epithelial cells and foci of necrosis. The spindle cells were positive for bcl2 and vimentin and the epithelial cells were positive for cytokeratin 8/18 and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Both spindle and epithelial cells were negative for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, synaptophysin and chromogranin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated translocation (X;18)(p11;q11), confirming the diagnosis of SS. The patient underwent a total laryngopharyngoesophagectomy with subsequent adjuvant therapy and is currently disease free. Only 6 cases of histologically confirmed primary SS of the thyroid have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of FISH-confirmed secondary SS of the thyroid and also the first case of SS arising from the tracheoesophageal groove.

  1. Endocrinology of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Francisco; Noble, Luis S

    2006-02-01

    Following implantation, the maintenance of the pregnancy is dependent on a multitude of endocrinological events that will eventually aid in the successful growth and development of the fetus. Although the great majority of pregnant women have no pre-existing endocrine abnormalities, a small number of women can have certain endocrine alterations that could potentially lead to recurrent pregnancy losses. It is estimated that approximately 8 to 12% of all pregnancy losses are the result of endocrine factors. During the preimplantation period, the uterus undergoes important developmental changes stimulated by estrogen, and more importantly, progesterone. Progesterone is essential for the successful implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. Therefore, disorders related to inadequate progesterone secretion by the corpus luteum are likely to affect the outcome of the pregnancy. Luteal phase deficiency, hyperprolactinemia, and polycystic ovarian syndrome are some examples. Several other endocrinological abnormalities such as thyroid disease, hypoparathyroidism, uncontrolled diabetes, and decreased ovarian reserve have been implicated as etiologic factors for recurrent pregnancy loss.

  2. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  3. Thoracic intrathymic thyroid.

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, R J; Moore, K L; Gottfried, M R; Lowe, J E; Sabiston, D C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors introduce thoracic intrathymic thyroid as a clinical entity. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although accessory aberrant thyroid has not been found in other tissues in the mediastinum, a thoracic intrathymic location has not been described previously. It is believed that mediastinal thyroid tissue represents accessory ectopic tissue from the median thyroid anlage. Moreover, the close association of the thymus and thyroid supports the theory that mediastinal ectopic thyroid tissue develops from abnormal descent of these structures during embryogenesis. METHODS: Benign thoracic intrathymic thyroid lesions are described in patients with mediastinal masses. CONCLUSION: Thoracic intrathymic thyroid is a distinct entity. Its occurrence is supported both clinically and embryologically. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8024364

  4. Thyroid Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem that is directly affecting the thyroid (primary hypothyroidism). The opposite situation, in which the TSH level ... making enough TSH to stimulate the thyroid (secondary hypothyroidism). In most healthy individuals, a normal TSH value ...

  5. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... the amount of hormones produced by the thyroid. Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a thyroid disorder that occurs when the ... irregularities Depression Dry skin and hair Sluggishness Constipation Hypothyroidism is often caused by Hashimoto's disease, an autoimmune ...

  6. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroid disorder or thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism (say: hi-per-THYE-roy-diz-em) happens when the ... Kids with the opposite problem have hypothyroidism (say: hi-po-THYE-roy-diz-em). In this case, ...

  7. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to closely replicate normal thyroid functioning. Pure, synthetic thyroxine (T4) works in the same way as ... needing thyroid hormone replacement (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). Pure synthetic thyroxine (T4), taken once daily by mouth, successfully ...

  8. Thyroid preparation overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person takes too much of the medicine: Levothyroxine Liothyronine Liotrix Other thyroid medicine Other thyroid preparations ... found in these medicines with these brand names: Levothyroxine ... Liothyronine (Cytomel) Liotrix (Thyrolar, Euthyroid) Other ...

  9. Child thyroid anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. Thyroid disorders are more common in older children and adolescents (especially in girls) than in infants. Most thyroid ...

  10. Thyroid spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE): is cytopathological diagnosis possible?

    PubMed

    Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Jazbec, Janez; Us-Krasovec, Marija; Lamovec, Janez

    2002-05-01

    Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) is a rare tumor of the thyroid gland which occurs predominantly in children, adolescents, and young adults. It usually presents as a painless neck or thyroid mass and only exceptionally as a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, without metastatic disease at diagnosis. We report on the case of 12-yr-old girl who had diffusely enlarged thyroid gland for about 1 yr and was initially treated for thyroiditis. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was performed 8 mo after the first admission. Cytological examination of smears showed unusual morphological features. FNAB smears were cellular, with dissociated cells, naked oval nuclei, aggregates, and groups. Three main cell types were observed: spindle, epithelioid, and epithelial. These cells were uniform, cytologically bland, with few mitotic figures. The distinction between these cells was not always unequivocal. In the background of the smears abundant red extracellular material in the form of fine, dust-like granules and irregular patches were present. It was also observed in some aggregates and groups of tumor cells. Spindle and epithelioid cells were immunocytochemically diffusely pan-cytokeratin-positive. In the differential diagnosis, medullary thyroid carcinoma and SETTLE were suggested. The final histological diagnosis was SETTLE. In cases of SETTLE presented as a diffuse thyromegaly the correct diagnosis may be delayed because clinically and ultrasonographically thyroiditis is suspected. To avoid such a delay, FNAB should be used preoperatively. It can provide specific cytological diagnosis based on morphological features and certain immunocytochemical characteristics of the tumor.

  11. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with <4 μm axial resolution (OCT and OCM), and 14 μm (OCT) and <2 μm (OCM) transverse resolution. The system allows seamless switching between low and high magnifications in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence is observed between optical images and histological sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  12. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions Print A A A Text Size ... sweat, mucous, and tears. goiter: This is a thyroid gland that is enlarged to the point that ...

  13. [Thyroid cancer. In search of individualized treatment].

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Cavallo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased exponentially around the world (mostly papillary thyroid carcinoma). This growth may reflect the combined effects of increased screening practices, together with changes in risk factors for thyroid cancer. In spite of this, disease specific mortality remained stable in the last three decades. Due to the fact that patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma often have a very good prognosis, with high survival in the long term follow-up compared with other types of carcinomas, there has been no need to change the standard treatment. The mainstays of thyroid cancer treatment are surgery (total or near-total thyroidectomy) with or without the additional administration of radioiodine (131I). These approaches are now in the center of discussion in all global forums. The current trend is to ensure the most effective and less harmful treatment and the most important issue at this point is to individualize patients according to tumor stage and risk of recurrence, to define which patients will benefit of more aggressive therapy and who could be handled with a more conservative approach.

  14. Sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Politti, Ugo; Spisni, Roberto; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has been evaluated in several Phase II and III studies in patients with locally advanced/metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs), reporting partial responses, stabilization of the disease and improvement of progression-free survival. Best responses were observed in lung metastases and minimal responses in bone lesions. On the basis of these studies, sorafenib was approved for the treatment of metastatic DTC in November 2013. Few studies suggested that reduction of thyroglobulin levels, or of average standardized uptake value at the fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, could be helpful for the identification of responding patients; but further studies are needed to confirm these results. Tumor genetic marker levels did not have any prognostic or predictive role in DTC patients.The most common adverse events observed included skin toxicity and gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. Encouraging results have also been observed in patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Many studies are ongoing to evaluate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in DTC patients.

  15. Sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Politti, Ugo; Spisni, Roberto; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has been evaluated in several Phase II and III studies in patients with locally advanced/metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs), reporting partial responses, stabilization of the disease and improvement of progression-free survival. Best responses were observed in lung metastases and minimal responses in bone lesions. On the basis of these studies, sorafenib was approved for the treatment of metastatic DTC in November 2013. Few studies suggested that reduction of thyroglobulin levels, or of average standardized uptake value at the fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, could be helpful for the identification of responding patients; but further studies are needed to confirm these results. Tumor genetic marker levels did not have any prognostic or predictive role in DTC patients.The most common adverse events observed included skin toxicity and gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. Encouraging results have also been observed in patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Many studies are ongoing to evaluate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in DTC patients. PMID:26152651

  16. Microsurgical anatomy of the arterial basket of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Kalani, M Yashar S; Lemole, G Michael; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C; Theodore, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT The arterial basket of the conus medullaris (ABCM) consists of 1 or 2 arteries arising from the anterior spinal artery (ASA) and circumferentially connecting the ASA and the posterior spinal arteries (PSAs). The arterial basket can be involved in arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous malformations of the conus. In this article, the authors describe the microsurgical anatomy of the ABCM with emphasis on its morphometric parameters and important role in the intrinsic blood supply of the conus medullaris. METHODS The authors performed microsurgical dissections on 16 formalin-fixed human spinal cords harvested within 24 hours of death. The course, diameter, and branching angles of the arteries comprising the ABCM were then identified and measured. In addition, histological sections were obtained to identify perforating vessels arising from the ABCM. RESULTS The ASA tapers as it nears the conus medullaris (mean preconus diameter 0.7 ± 0.12 mm vs mean conus diameter 0.38 ± 0.08 mm). The ASA forms an anastomotic basket with the posterior spinal artery (PSA) via anastomotic branches. In most of the specimens (n= 13, 81.3%), bilateral arteries formed connections between the ASA and PSA. However, in the remaining specimens (n= 3, 18.7%), a unilateral right-sided anastomotic artery was identified. The mean diameter of the right ABCM branch was 0.49 ± 0.13 mm, and the mean diameter of the left branch was 0.53 ± 0.14 mm. The mean branching angles of the arteries forming the anastomotic basket were 95.9° ± 36.6° and 90° ± 34.3° for the right- and left-sided arteries, respectively. In cases of bilateral arterial anastomoses between the ASA and PSA, the mean distance between the origins of the arteries was 4.5 ± 3.3 mm. Histological analysis revealed numerous perforating vessels supplying tissue of the conus medullaris. CONCLUSIONS The ABCM is a critical anastomotic connection between the ASA and PSA, which play an important role in the intrinsic blood supply

  17. Thyroglossal Duct Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Synchronous Lingual Thyroid Atypia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Timothy; Kim, Yohanan; Simental, Alfred; Inman, Jared C.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglossal duct and lingual thyroid ectopic lesions are exceedingly rare synchronous findings. Papillary thyroid carcinoma of these ectopic thyroid sites is well understood but still a rare finding. This case points to some management nuances in regard to ectopic thyroid screening with imaging and also shows the effectiveness of minimally invasive transoral robotic surgery for lingual thyroid. PMID:27119036

  18. Solitary fibrous tumour of thyroid: report of two cases with immunohistochemical features and literature review.

    PubMed

    Santeusanio, Giuseppe; Schiaroli, Stefania; Ortenzi, Angela; Mulè, Antonino; Perrone, Giuseppe; Fadda, Guido

    2008-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare tumour principally found in adults in the pleural cavity. Extrapleural occurrences are rare. Two cases of SFT of the thyroid gland are described in this paper showing their distinctive microscopical architecture, namely "patternless growth pattern". It is characterized by a bland spindle-cell proliferation alternating hyper- and hypo-cellular areas, keloid-like hyalinization and a focal hemangiopericytoma-like vascular pattern. Tumour cells revealed a diffuse strong positivity for CD34, CD99, bcl-2 and Vimentin, but negativity for Desmin, EMA, AE1/AE3, SMA, S-100 and CD31 antibodies. The differential diagnosis of thyroid SFT includes different types of spindle cell proliferation, benign and malignant mesenchymal tumours, medullary thyroid carcinoma, fasciitis-like papillary carcinoma, and undifferentiated (anaplastic) carcinoma. However, the morphologic and immunohistochemical findings of SFT are so characteristic that this diagnosis seldom represent a difficulty.

  19. Imaging of rare medullary adrenal tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Maciel, C A; Tang, Y Z; Coniglio, G; Sahdev, A

    2016-05-01

    Although adrenal medullary tumours are rare, they have important clinical implications. They form a heterogeneous group of tumours, ranging from benign, non-secretory, incidental masses to hormonally active tumours presenting acutely, or malignant tumours with disseminated disease and a poor prognosis. Increasingly, benign masses are incidentally detected due to the widespread use of imaging and routine medical check-ups. This review aims to illustrate the multimodality imaging appearances of rare adrenal medullary tumours, excluding the more common phaeochromocytomas, with clues to the diagnosis and to summarise relevant epidemiological and clinical data. Careful correlation of clinical presentation, hormone profile, and various imaging techniques narrow the differential diagnosis. Image-guided percutaneous adrenal biopsy can provide a definitive diagnosis, allowing for conservative management in selected cases. A close collaboration between the radiologist, endocrinologist, and surgeon is of the utmost importance in the management of these tumours. PMID:26944698

  20. Effect of Space Flight on Adrenal Medullary Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelkes, Peter I.

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity conditions during space flight alter the expression and specific activities of the adrenal medullary CA synthesizing enzymes (CASE). Previously, we examined adrenals from six rats flown for six days aboard STS 54 and reported that microgravity induced a decrease in the expression and specific activity of rat adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of CA synthesis, without affecting the expression of other CASE. In the past, we analyzed some of the > 300 adrenals from two previous Space Shuttle missions (PARE 03 and SLS 2). The preliminary results (a) attest to the good state of tissue preservation, thus proving the feasibility of subsequent large-scale evaluation, and (b) confirm and extend our previous findings. With this grant we will be able to expeditiously analyze all our specimens and to complete our studies in a timely fashion.

  1. ["Incidental" thyroid carcinoma among patients in surgical treatment for nontumors thyroid desease].

    PubMed

    Nechaĭ, O P; Larin, O S; Cheren'ko, S M; Sheptukha, S A; Smoliar, V A; Zolotar'ov, P O

    2012-07-01

    Incidence of unexpected diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma among operations on benign thyroid surgical diseases (nodular goiter and Graves' disease) was studied in 608 patients within 2008-2009 years in specialized clinic of endocrine surgery. In 56 (9.2%) patients the "incidental" thyroid carcinoma including 43 (77%) - papillary microcarcinoma were diagnosed in histological investigations. In 10 (18%) patients which were performed within the first postoperative week. Repeated surgery demonstrates increased risk of complication (damage of parathyroid glands, recurrent laryngeal nerves and other anatomic structures of neck) considering less favoring conditions for secondary operations, it is worth to implement wider indications to frozen section, radical primary operation (total thyroidectomy at multi-nodular bilateral goiter and Graves' disease), and also maximal complete examination prior to surgery. PMID:23033769

  2. Cavernoma of the conus medullaris mimicking transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Mahore, Amit

    2013-02-01

    We present an interesting case of conus medullaris cavernoma that was initially treated as transverse myelitis. Haemorrhagic lumbar puncture led us to perform magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which showed the presence of a cavernous angioma at the D12-L1 level. The total excision of the lesion was followed by dramatic improvement. We suggest that MR imaging be performed early in all suspected cases of transverse myelitis so that emergency surgical intervention can be offered before the development of permanent neurological deficits.

  3. Biopsy proven medullary sponge kidney: clinical findings, histopathology, and role of osteogenesis in stone and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Worcester, Elaine M; Williams, James C; Sommer, Andre J; Lingeman, James E; Phillips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2015-05-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is associated with recurrent stone formation, but the clinical phenotype is unclear because patients with other disorders may be incorrectly labeled MSK. We studied 12 patients with histologic findings pathognomonic of MSK. All patients had an endoscopically recognizable pattern of papillary malformation, which may be segmental or diffuse. Affected papillae are enlarged and billowy, due to markedly enlarged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD), which contain small, mobile ductal stones. Patients had frequent dilation of Bellini ducts, with occasional mineral plugs. Stones may form over white (Randall's) plaque, but most renal pelvic stones are not attached, and have a similar morphology as ductal stones, which are a mixture of calcium oxalate and apatite. Patients had no abnormalities of urinary acidification or acid excretion; the most frequent metabolic abnormality was idiopathic hypercalciuria. Although both Runx2 and Osterix are expressed in papillae of MSK patients, no mineral deposition was seen at the sites of gene expression, arguing against a role of these genes in this process. Similar studies in idiopathic calcium stone formers showed no expression of these genes at sites of Randall's plaque. The most likely mechanism for stone formation in MSK appears to be crystallization due to urinary stasis in dilated IMCD with subsequent passage of ductal stones into the renal pelvis where they may serve as nuclei for stone formation. PMID:25615853

  4. Bronchogenic cyst of the conus medullaris with spinal cord tethering: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Hu, Jia-Rui; Kang, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing; Lv, Guo-Hua; She, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts (BCs) are congenital malformations that originate from remnants of the primitive foregut. Intraspinal BCs, especially those of the conus medullaris are rare with only one case reported until now. To date, a bronchogenic cyst with spinal cord tethering has not been previously reported. We reviewed the clinical course of a 44-year-old woman, who presented with low back pain and leg weakness as well as sphincter disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradural oval mass located at the conus medullaris. A tethered cord was also observed, as well as a dermal sinus tract. The mass was totally removed after an L3-L4 laminectomy without detethering during operation. Pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of bronchogenic cyst. By six months after treatment, the patient had experienced nearly complete recovery. The review of literature indicated that detethering was performed in most reported cases of neurenteric cysts with spinal cord tethering, and one of six patients was diagnosed with a postoperative recurrence. The co-existence of bronchogenic cyst and a tethered spinal cord would imply associated developmental errors in embryogenesis. It is worth noting that whether detethering is necessary after the cyst removal.

  5. Biopsy proven medullary sponge kidney: clinical findings, histopathology, and role of osteogenesis in stone and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Worcester, Elaine M; Williams, James C; Sommer, Andre J; Lingeman, James E; Phillips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2015-05-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is associated with recurrent stone formation, but the clinical phenotype is unclear because patients with other disorders may be incorrectly labeled MSK. We studied 12 patients with histologic findings pathognomonic of MSK. All patients had an endoscopically recognizable pattern of papillary malformation, which may be segmental or diffuse. Affected papillae are enlarged and billowy, due to markedly enlarged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD), which contain small, mobile ductal stones. Patients had frequent dilation of Bellini ducts, with occasional mineral plugs. Stones may form over white (Randall's) plaque, but most renal pelvic stones are not attached, and have a similar morphology as ductal stones, which are a mixture of calcium oxalate and apatite. Patients had no abnormalities of urinary acidification or acid excretion; the most frequent metabolic abnormality was idiopathic hypercalciuria. Although both Runx2 and Osterix are expressed in papillae of MSK patients, no mineral deposition was seen at the sites of gene expression, arguing against a role of these genes in this process. Similar studies in idiopathic calcium stone formers showed no expression of these genes at sites of Randall's plaque. The most likely mechanism for stone formation in MSK appears to be crystallization due to urinary stasis in dilated IMCD with subsequent passage of ductal stones into the renal pelvis where they may serve as nuclei for stone formation.

  6. Imaging medullary cystic kidney disease with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Farres, Maria Teresa; Mougenot, Béatrice; Jacob, Laurent; Le Goas, Françoise; Antignac, Corinne; Ronco, Pierre

    2003-07-01

    Medullary cystic kidney disease is characterized by multiple renal cysts at the corticomedullary boundary area, by autosomal dominant inheritance, and by onset of chronic renal failure in the third decade of life. Its clinical manifestations are often insignificant and nonspecific. Furthermore, its diagnosis may be difficult in sporadic forms where genetic linkage analysis cannot be performed. The authors report the case of a patient presenting with a sporadic form of medullary cystic kidney disease whose diagnosis was confirmed using computerized tomography with 3-dimensional reconstruction at the nephrography-excretion time and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance angiography and urography after the injection of gadolinium, a nonnephrotoxic compound. Both imaging techniques showed normal-sized, normal-shaped kidneys containing multiple cysts from 1 to 30 mm in diameter in the medulla and at the corticomedullary junction. A characteristic medullary nephrogram appeared after injection of iodinated contrast medium or gadolinium corresponding to contrast-filled dilated collecting ducts. This report shows that MRI with gadolinium injection can substitute for computerized tomography in azotemic patients. MRI seems particularly promising for the diagnosis of cystic diseases of the kidney and must also be considered when investigating a patient with chronic renal failure of unknown origin. PMID:12830488

  7. A medullary inhibitory region for trigeminal motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Castillo, P; Pedroarena, C; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1991-05-24

    The present report describes the effects on trigeminal motoneurons of stimulation of a circumscribed site within the parvocellular region of the medullary reticular formation. This medullary site was selected because anatomical studies have shown that premotor interneurons project from this site to the trigeminal motorpool. Electrical stimulation of this site induced IPSPs (PcRF-IPSPs) in jaw-closer motoneurons. A population of these IPSPs, recorded contralateral to the site of stimulation, exhibited latencies shorter than 1.5 ms (mean 1.16 +/- 0.08 SD). Their mean amplitude was 1.72 mV +/- 1.13 SD and their mean duration was 3.52 ms +/- 2.15 SD. We believe that these PcRF-IPSPs arose as the result of activation of a monosynaptic pathway. A comparable inhibitory input from this site to ipsilateral jaw-closer motoneurons and to both contra and ipsilateral digastric motoneurons was also observed. We therefore conclude that this medullary PcRF site contains premotor interneurons that are capable of postsynaptically inhibiting motoneurons that innervate antagonistic jaw muscles. PMID:1884229

  8. Combined surgical and endovascular treatment of complex high-flow conus medullaris arteriovenous fistula associated with Parkes Weber syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Bagherpour, Arya N; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Moorthy, Chetan; Trier, Todd T; Maud, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Parkes Weber syndrome (PWS) is a congenital overgrowth disorder characterized by unilateral limb and axial hypertrophy, capillary malformations of the skin, and high-flow arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). Spinal AVFs in the setting of PWS are challenging vascular lesions that often contain multiple arteriovenous (AV) shunts. The present case report highlights an adolescent girl with PWS who presented with a ruptured complex high-flow conus medullaris AVF. She was successfully treated with endovascular embolization and microsurgery. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient remained free of neurological symptoms and had no recurrence of the vascular malformation.

  9. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid nodule fine needle aspirate biopsy; Biopsy - thyroid - skinny-needle; Skinny-needle thyroid biopsy ... cleaned. A thin needle is inserted into the thyroid, and a sample of thyroid cells and fluid ...

  10. Expression, clinical significance and mechanism of Slit2 in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-Liang; Qu, Ning; Liao, Tian; Wang, Yu-Long; Wang, Yu; Sun, Guo-Hua; Ji, Qing-Hai

    2016-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. The last decade has seen exciting progress in understanding thyroid cancer molecular pathogenesis. Several major signaling pathways and related molecular derangements have been elucidated, which represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers for thyroid cancer. Based on the molecular biology of thyroid cancer, a series of therapeutic targets have been developed, which provide unprecedented opportunities. Thus, histological characterization of subgroups of patients and the correct molecular characterization of patients are thought to be key aspects for future clinical management of these patients. In the present study, we identified Slit2 as a prognostic marker for thyroid cancer oncogenesis and recurrence. Mechanistically, Slit2 regulated Warburg effect in thyroid cancer cells through regulation of HIF1α and HIF1α transcriptional activity. Taken together, our present data uncovered Slit2 as a novel predictive marker for thyroid cancer. The mechanism study indicated that Slit2 regulated the Warburg effect. Additional study on the function of Slit2 in thyroid cancer is required to provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of oncogenesis and recurrence potential of thyroid cancer.

  11. Existence of a rotational axial component in the human humeral medullary canal.

    PubMed

    Descamps, S; Moreel, P; Garcier, J M; Bouillet, B; Brehant, J; Tanguy, A

    2009-10-01

    To explain surgical findings, we studied the anatomy of the human humeral medullary canal on a series of 28 bones in 16 patients and 9 dried bones. A methodology is described to find angle of medullary canal on CT scans regarding to an epicondylar reference axis. We found a constant tri-dimensional spiral shape of the medullary canal in the distal part of the bone. The relations between this first description and the literature are discussed.

  12. QT prolongation in a child with thyroid storm

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Benjamin B; Eckersley, Luke Gerard; Skinner, Jonathan Robert; Jefferies, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 12-year-old girl presented with an acute confusional state and a 2-year history of weight loss, anxiety, agitation and recurrent fever. Thyroid function tests confirmed severe hyperthyroidism, and a diagnosis of thyroid storm was made (Burch and Wartofsky score=75). ECG showed a prolonged QTc interval of 506 ms. Acute treatment for thyroid storm consisted of Lugol's iodine, prednisolone, carbimazole and propranolol. She made a steady recovery and by 3 months her thyroid function had normalised; a repeat ECG showed a QTc within the normal range (430 ms). There was no relevant family history. This is a case of QTc prolongation with hyperthyroidism and normalisation with euthyroidism. It is not commonly recognised that hyperthyroidism in children may be associated with QTc prolongation. QTc measurement should be incorporated into management protocols for hyperthyroidism. PMID:24729112

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands make hormones. The thyroid uses iodine , a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, ... Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid : The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The ...

  14. Ectopic goitrous submandibular thyroid with goitrous orthotopic thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Avinash Kumar; Mani, Vinayaga; Dixit, Rashmi; Garg, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly with lingual thyroid accounting for majority of the cases. The presence of ectopic thyroid tissue lateral to the midline is very rare, and very few cases located in the submandibular region have been reported. The simultaneous finding of submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue and a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is even rarer. In the differential diagnosis of an ectopic submandibular thyroid, it is fundamental to exclude a metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer, even when primary thyroid carcinoma is not demonstrable.

  15. Ectopic goitrous submandibular thyroid with goitrous orthotopic thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Avinash Kumar; Mani, Vinayaga; Dixit, Rashmi; Garg, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly with lingual thyroid accounting for majority of the cases. The presence of ectopic thyroid tissue lateral to the midline is very rare, and very few cases located in the submandibular region have been reported. The simultaneous finding of submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue and a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is even rarer. In the differential diagnosis of an ectopic submandibular thyroid, it is fundamental to exclude a metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer, even when primary thyroid carcinoma is not demonstrable. PMID:27413274

  16. Submandibular ectopic thyroid with normally located thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Mahmut Sinan; Aytürk, Semra; Güven, Mehmet; Dilek, Fatma Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly of the thyroid gland which is defined as the presence of thyroid tissue at a site other than the pretracheal area. Nearly 1 to 3% of all ectopic thyroids are located in the lateral neck. Simultaneous submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue presenting with a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is extremely rare. In this article, we report a 37-year-old female case admitted to our clinic with a complaint of swollen neck in whom ultrasonography revealed submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue presenting with an orthotopic thyroid gland.

  17. Ectopic goitrous submandibular thyroid with goitrous orthotopic thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Avinash Kumar; Mani, Vinayaga; Dixit, Rashmi; Garg, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly with lingual thyroid accounting for majority of the cases. The presence of ectopic thyroid tissue lateral to the midline is very rare, and very few cases located in the submandibular region have been reported. The simultaneous finding of submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue and a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is even rarer. In the differential diagnosis of an ectopic submandibular thyroid, it is fundamental to exclude a metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer, even when primary thyroid carcinoma is not demonstrable. PMID:27413274

  18. [Trabecular hyalinizing adenoma of the thyroid (HAT): A report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Román-González, Alejandro; Simón-Duque, Carlos; Camilo-Pérez, Juan; Vélez-Hoyo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The hyalinizing trabecular adenoma is a rare lesion of the thyroid. There is controversy in the literature about the correct name for this disease. Dr. Carney defended the benign nature of this condition and therefore continues calling it adenoma, the World Health Organization calls for the potential of tumor malignancy, and others qualify it as a variant of papillary carcinoma based on the presence of rearranged in transformation/papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC) rearrangements. In Latin America there are few reported cases. Two cases of hyalinizing trabecular adenoma are reported. The first is a 40-year-old woman with a thyroid nodule of 3x3 cm. The immunohistochemistry was positive for thyroglobulin and calcitonin and negative for cytokeratin 19 and chromogranin. The second case is a 36-year-old patient with a thyroid nodule of 4x4 cm with an immunohistochemical pattern identical to the first case. Trabecular hyalinizing adenoma is a benign disease, easily confused with papillary or medullary thyroid carcinoma. Awareness of this entity will allow a better classification and management of thyroid conditions. PMID:26927651

  19. Thyroid and the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age monitoring of TSH, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding segment of our population. A better understanding of the impact of thyroid hormonal status on cardiovascular physiology will enable health care providers to make decisions regarding thyroid hormone evaluation and therapy in concert with evaluating and treating hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The goal of this review is to access contemporary understanding of the effects of thyroid hormones on normal cardiovascular function and the potential role of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24662620

  20. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  1. THYROID FUNCTION IN DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Boral, G. C.; Ghosh, A. B.; Pal, S. K; Ghosh, K. K.; Nandi, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies on thyroid functions were performed on patients suffering from depression and compared with normal control group. 31 different cases of depression were studied for their thyroid function andshowed a diminished level of T3 and T4 with a concomitant rise in TSH level. When the female population of these 31 cases was compared with their male counterparts the females showed a significantly lower thyroidal functional status than the males. PMID:22058497

  2. Thyroid calcifications: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Lacout, Alexis; Chevenet, Carole; Thariat, Juliette; Marcy, Pierre Yves

    2016-05-01

    Incidental diagnosis of thyroid nodules is very common on adult neck ultrasonography examination. Thyroid calcifications are encountered in benign thyroid nodules and goiters as well as in thyroid malignancy. Depiction and characterization of such calcifications within a thyroid nodule may be a key element in the thyroid nodule diagnosis algorithm. The goal of this paper is to display typical radio-pathological correlations of various thyroid pathologies of benign and malignant conditions in which the calcification type diagnosis can play a key role in the final diagnosis of the thyroid nodule. PMID:26891122

  3. Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A primary thyroid adenocarcinoma harboring ETV6-NTRK3 fusion.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Dawson, Robert R; Shah, Jatin P; Sherman, Eric J; Michael Tuttle, R; Fagin, James A; Klimstra, David S; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2016-09-01

    ETV6-NTRK3 fusion was identified in several cancers including the recently described mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary glands and a minority of papillary thyroid carcinomas. We describe three cases of primary MASC of the thyroid gland and provide a detailed clinical and pathological characterization of the tumor morphology, immunoprofile, and genetic background. Immunohistochemistry for PAX8, TTF-1, thyroglobulin, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, and p63 was used to define the tumor immunophenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6 rearrangement was performed in three, and the next-generation sequencing assay MSK-IMPACT™ (Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) was performed in two cases. Primary MASC of the thyroid occurred in two women and one man, age 47-72 years. All patients presented with high T stage, infiltrative, locally aggressive tumors with extrathyroidal extension. Two cases were associated with well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma. Histologically, they appeared as low-grade tumors, resembling MASC of the salivary glands and labeled positive for mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, p63, weakly positive for PAX8, and negative for TTF-1 and thyroglobulin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed ETV6 rearrangement in all cases. In two tested cases MSK-IMPACT™ confirmed the presence of ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion. Two patients had at least two local recurrences, one was alive with disease, and one was alive and free of disease after 14 and 17 years, respectively. The third patient was alive and free of disease after 2 years. MASC of the thyroid is histologically, immunophenotypically, and genetically similar to its salivary gland counterpart. Thyroid MASC can be associated with a well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma component, supporting follicular cell origin. Clinically, these carcinomas may show frequent recurrences but are associated with long

  4. Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A primary thyroid adenocarcinoma harboring ETV6–NTRK3 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Dawson, Robert R; Shah, Jatin P; Sherman, Eric J; Tuttle, R Michael; Fagin, James A; Klimstra, David S; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    ETV6–NTRK3 fusion was identified in several cancers including the recently described mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary glands and a minority of papillary thyroid carcinomas. We describe three cases of primary MASC of the thyroid gland and provide a detailed clinical and pathological characterization of the tumor morphology, immunoprofile, and genetic background. Immunohistochemistry for PAX8, TTF-1, thyroglobulin, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, and p63 was used to define the tumor immunophenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6 rearrangement was performed in three, and the next-generation sequencing assay MSK-IMPACT™ (Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) was performed in two cases. Primary MASC of the thyroid occurred in two women and one man, age 47–72 years. All patients presented with high T stage, infiltrative, locally aggressive tumors with extrathyroidal extension. Two cases were associated with well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma. Histologically, they appeared as low-grade tumors, resembling MASC of the salivary glands and labeled positive for mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, p63, weakly positive for PAX8, and negative for TTF-1 and thyroglobulin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed ETV6 rearrangement in all cases. In two tested cases MSK-IMPACT™ confirmed the presence of ETV6–NTRK3 gene fusion. Two patients had at least two local recurrences, one was alive with disease, and one was alive and free of disease after 14 and 17 years, respectively. The third patient was alive and free of disease after 2 years. MASC of the thyroid is histologically, immunophenotypically, and genetically similar to its salivary gland counterpart. Thyroid MASC can be associated with a well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma component, supporting follicular cell origin. Clinically, these carcinomas may show frequent recurrences but are associated

  5. Ectopic Lingual Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Khamassi, Khaled; Jaafoura, Habib; Masmoudi, Fahmi; Lahiani, Rim; Bougacha, Lobna; Ben Salah, Mamia

    2015-01-01

    Ectopy of the thyroid gland is an abnormal embryological development. Its occurrence in children is rare. In this study, we report the case of a 12-year-old girl that presented with dysphagia and nocturnal dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of a lingual thyroid. Thyroid scintigraphy showed intense and elective uptake of radiotracer at the base of the tongue. Hormonal tests revealed hypothyroidism. Treatment consisted of opotherapy based on levothyroxine. Evolution has been favourable and the patient showed significant improvement with reduction of the dyspnea and the dysphagia and normalization of thyroid hormone tests. PMID:25893126

  6. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  7. Differentiated thyroid carcinomas in children and adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, A.M.; Sharma, S.M. )

    1991-04-15

    An analysis of differentiated thyroid carcinomas in children and adolescents revealed that the incidence was 3.05% of total number of patients with differentiated thyroid cancers in all age groups. There was a female preponderance. The incidence of papillary, follicular and papillary with follicular elements was equal. There were no papillary carcinomas observed in children younger than 10 years. The predominant mode of presentation was a solitary nodule of thyroid and some of them had associated cervical adenopathy. A considerable number presented with only cervical adenopathy. The incidence of nodal metastases was 50% at time of presentation and lung involvement was present in 15% of children at the time of diagnosis. Radioiodine treatment was given in 70% of children. Ablation was achieved in 86% of patients given two doses of radioiodine (200 millicuries). The more resistant cases were those with lung and nodal metastases. There was complete ablation in 100% with only residual thyroid tissue, 83% in those with associated nodal metastases, and 57% in those with lung involvement. Average duration of follow-up was 10.3 years (range, 2 to 19 years). Recurrence rate or relapse was observed in 8.5% and was in the regional nodes. There was no recorded mortality due to the disease.

  8. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  9. Total Thyroidectomy for Benign Thyroid Diseases: What is the Price to be Paid?

    PubMed Central

    Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa; Patanki, Adithya Malolan; Ishwar, Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Total thyroidectomy has been used to treat patients with malignant thyroid disease. But for patients with benign thyroid disease, the safety and efficacy of total thyroidectomy is a matter of debate. Subtotal thyroidectomy that was previously the treatment of choice for benign thyroid disease has been associated with high recurrence rates. The risk of permanent complications is greatly increased in patients who undergo surgery for recurrence of benign thyroid disease. Total thyroidectomy is an operation that can be safely performed, with low incidence of permanent complications, which allows one to broaden its indications in various benign thyroid diseases, thus avoiding future recurrences and reoperations. Aim To assess the benefits of total thyroidectomy for benign thyroid diseases. Materials and Methods This randomized prospective study was conducted between Feb 2013 and Nov 2014 in the Department of General Surgery at Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute. It included 116 patients undergoing total thyroidectomy procedure for benign thyroid disease. All cases were followed-up for a period of 6 months for incidence of RLN palsy, hypoparathyroidism, disease recurrence and number of incidental malignancies detected on postoperative histological analyses of the thyroid specimens. Results Most of the patients were in the third decade of their lives. The female to male ratio was 6.7:1. Total thyroidectomy was done for 116 benign thyroid diseases with multinodular goiter as the most common diagnosis. The incidence of postoperative hypocalcaemia was 16.37% (however, only 1 patient developed permanent hypocalcaemia) and that of wound infection was 2.58% and seroma formation was 2.58%. None of the patients included in this study had haematoma formation or RLN paralysis. An incidental malignancy was identified in 11.20% patients. Conclusion Total thyroidectomy shows benefits in eradicating multinodular goiter, alleviating Grave’s opthalmopathy

  10. Endo medullary extractability of cementless full HA coated femoral stem: Results from 19 cases.

    PubMed

    Lecuire, François; Melere, Gilles; Martres, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    The Aura cementless full HA coated stem is an anatomical femoral component with a different surface treatment in the metaphyseal and diaphyseal areas. We have studied the feasibility of isolated endo-medullar extraction of the stem. 19 patients (6 infections, 6 neck fractures, 3 stems with risk of fracture, 3 head fractures, and 1 recurrent dislocation) were subjected to the removal of a stable and bone integrated implant at a mean of 4.5 years after surgery. The 19 cases represent the entire population of Aura cementless integrated stem requiring revision during the period of 2003 through 2011, excluding periprosthetic bone fracture cases. The technique consisted of a careful release of the metaphyseal part of the implant with thin osteotomes, followed by the use of a highly efficient extractor. The re-implanted procedure always utilised standard stems: 17 cementless stems full HA coated (13 had the same size as the removed implant, 4 cases had larger sizes) and two received cemented stems. The 19 stems were extracted by simple endo-medullary approach, without the need for additional action. Several complications were encountered, 1 intraoperative diaphyseal fracture, requiring a wiring, 1 fracture of the lesser trochanter at 15 days post-surgery, requiring a revision and 2 postoperative dislocations. Except for the early revision due to fracture, no other stem was revised. There was no recurrence of infection and the functional results were satisfactory (PMA 15-18). 3 patients showed metaphyseal lucent lines on X-Ray leading us to advise the use of a standard stem with larger size after distal reaming, combined with preventive circulate of the calcar. The use of dedicated instrumentation allows successful extraction of full HA coated short stem by endomedullary approach. PMID:26280859

  11. Nodular thyroid disease in children and adolescents: a high incidence of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Smith, M.; Lawrence, A.M.; Jarosz, H.; Paloyan, E.

    1988-07-01

    Over a period of 32 years from 1954 to 1986, 65 patients under the age of 21 years, 52 girls and 13 boys, were operated for nodular thyroids: the overall incidence of carcinoma was 37 per cent. It was 46 per cent in those patients presenting with a solitary nodule. Among the 24 patients with a malignancy, the carcinoma was of the papillary variety in 63 per cent, follicular in 25 per cent and medullary in 12 per cent. Two thirds of the patients had metastatic disease at the time of presentation. All patients with thyroid carcinoma were treated with total thyroidectomy. Other measures included neck dissection and radioactive iodine. When the eight patients with a history of head and neck irradiation and the three patients with medullary carcinoma were excluded, the incidence of carcinoma was 28 per cent. In summary, in spite of the decline in radiation associated cases, the incidence of carcinoma in nodular thyroid disease in the population under 21 years, remains at the relatively high figure of 28 per cent.

  12. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  13. Ipsipulsion: A forgotten sign of lateral medullary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Vimal Kumar; Kumar, Surendra; Gupta, Durgesh Kumar; Neyaz, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Ipsipulsion is a clinical sign specifically seen in lateral medullary syndrome. It is characterized by two involuntary phenomenons. One is static eye deviation ipsilateral to the side of lesion especially in the absence of visual fixation. Second is the saccadic lateropulsion whereby voluntary saccades towards the side of lesion are hypermetric and saccades towards opposite side are hypometric. The vertical saccades may also appear oblique. Ipsipulsion is produced due to damage to the contralateral olivocerebellar pathways that crosses midline in medulla and pass through the ipsilateral inferior cerebellar peduncle to supply ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere.

  14. Ipsipulsion: A forgotten sign of lateral medullary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Vimal Kumar; Kumar, Surendra; Gupta, Durgesh Kumar; Neyaz, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Ipsipulsion is a clinical sign specifically seen in lateral medullary syndrome. It is characterized by two involuntary phenomenons. One is static eye deviation ipsilateral to the side of lesion especially in the absence of visual fixation. Second is the saccadic lateropulsion whereby voluntary saccades towards the side of lesion are hypermetric and saccades towards opposite side are hypometric. The vertical saccades may also appear oblique. Ipsipulsion is produced due to damage to the contralateral olivocerebellar pathways that crosses midline in medulla and pass through the ipsilateral inferior cerebellar peduncle to supply ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere. PMID:26425003

  15. Adrenal imaging (Part 2): Medullary and secondary adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal malignancies can be either primary adrenal tumors or secondary metastases, with metastases representing the most common malignant adrenal lesion. While imaging cannot always clearly differentiate between various adrenal malignancies, presence of certain imaging features, in conjunction with appropriate clinical background and hormonal profile, can suggest the appropriate diagnosis. The second part of the article on adrenal imaging describes adrenal medullary tumors, secondary adrenal lesions, bilateral adrenal lesions, adrenal incidentalomas and provides an algorithmic approach to adrenal lesions based on current imaging recommendations. PMID:25593821

  16. [Thyroid carcinoma: from diagnosis to therapy].

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Casà, Luigi; Noto, Antonio; Romano, Giorgio; Marrazzo, Emilia; Buscemi, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    From 1999 to 2007 we performed 104 surgical operations for thyroid malignancies. Over the same period, 312 patients underwent surgery for benign lesions of the thyroid gland. The patients were subdivided on the basis of age bracket and gender and the distribution of cancer and benign nodules was evaluated. Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography, scintigraphy and fine needle aspiration cytology were also evaluated. The incidence of thyroid cancer was 25% in all patients. Patients aged < 30 years and > 71 had the highest rate of malignancies: 52% of patients under 30 years of age and 46% over 70 years. Males showed a higher incidence than females. The scintigraphic findings were an area of low uptake in 19 cases (47.5%), an irregular pattern in 12 patients (30%) and a high uptake in 9 cases (22.5%); in 3 of them (7.5%), cancer was in the contralateral lobe and in 2 cases (5%) the dimensions were 8 and 4 mm. Forty-three patients had a single hypoechoic nodule at ultrasonography (41.3%), 3 (3%) were found with hypoechoic nodules containing calcifications and 1 (0.9%) a single anechoic nodule. Fifty-six patients (53.9%) had multiple nodules and 1 (0.9%) was admitted for a latero-cervical lymph node. FNAC revealed 11 cases of fibronectin expression (14.4%): in particular, 3 patients (4%) had cancer in the contralateral lobe and 3 patients (4%) had tumours measuring less than 5 mm. Thyroid surgery is safe and the morbidity rate is about 2%. We observed only one lesion of recurrent nerve (0.5% of patients), temporary recurrent palsy in 2.8% of patients and transient hypocalcaemia in 6.7% of cases. PMID:19062491

  17. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating ... sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ...

  18. Thyroid imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.; Chen, J.J.S.

    1987-06-01

    This is the second in a series of Continuing Education articles related to functional/quantitative imaging techniques. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the clinical applications of thyroid imaging; 2) understand the relationship of related thyroid tests; and 3) recognize the pitfalls and problems associated with this procedure.

  19. Thyroid function and obesity.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter; Knudsen, Nils; Andersen, Stig; Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Karmisholt, Jesper

    2012-10-01

    Important interaction exists between thyroid function, weight control, and obesity. Several mechanisms seem to be involved, and in studies of groups of people the pattern of thyroid function tests depends on the balance of obesity and underlying thyroid disease in the cohort studied. Obese people with a normal thyroid gland tend to have activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis with higher serum TSH and thyroid hormones in serum. On the other hand, small differences in thyroid function are associated with up to 5 kg difference in body weight. The weight loss after therapy of overt hypothyroidism is caused by excretion of water bound in tissues (myxoedema). Many patients treated for hyperthyroidism experience a gain of more weight than they lost during the active phase of the disease. The mechanism for this excessive weight gain has not been fully elucidated. New studies on the relation between L-T3 therapy and weight control are discussed. The interaction between weight control and therapy of thyroid disease is important to many patients and it should be studied in more detail. PMID:24783015

  20. Amiodarone-Induced Thyrotoxicosis Recurrence After Amiodarone Reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Maqdasy, Salwan; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Auclair, Candy; Desbiez, Françoise; Citron, Bernard; Thieblot, Philippe; Roche, Béatrice; Lusson, Jean René; Tauveron, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Reintroduction of amiodarone in patients with a history of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) is rarely used. To date, the risk of AIT recurrence after amiodarone reintroduction is unpredicted. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of AIT recurrence. Retrospectively, from 2000 to 2011, all euthyroid patients with a history of AIT with amiodarone reintroduction were included. Type and severity of the first AIT, amiodarone chronology, and thyroid function evolution after reintroduction of amiodarone were investigated: 46 of 172 patients with AIT history needed amiodarone reintroduction. At first AIT episode, the mean age was 62.2 ± 16 years with male gender predominance; 65% of patients were classified as type 1 AIT. AIT recurred in 14 patients (30%), 12 patients developed hypothyroidism (26%), and 20 patients remained euthyroid (44%). Characteristics of type 1 AIT during the first episode, namely briefer exposure period to amiodarone and longer duration of treatment to normalize thyroid hormones, were predictive of AIT recurrence; 73% of patients (8 of 11) with previous episode of type 1 AIT, who did not receive a preventive thioamide treatment, developed a second episode of AIT. Thioamide preventive treatment could be useful to prevent type 1 AIT recurrence. In conclusion, AIT recurrence after amiodarone reintroduction is 4 times more frequent in patients with type 1 AIT history. Thyroid ablation before amiodarone reintroduction in patients with a history of type 1 AIT is preferred. Preventive thioamide treatment could be suggested in patients with type 1 AIT history pending for surgery. PMID:26853955

  1. Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Mirella; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have found that diabetes and thyroid disorders tend to coexist in patients. Both conditions involve a dysfunction of the endocrine system. Thyroid disorders can have a major impact on glucose control, and untreated thyroid disorders affect the management of diabetes in patients. Consequently, a systematic approach to thyroid testing in patients with diabetes is recommended. PMID:21785689

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Corrado, Alda; Di Domenicantonio, Andrea; Fallahi, Poupak

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) result from a dysregulation of the immune system leading to an immune attack on the thyroid. AITD are T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disorders. The prevalence of AITD is estimated to be 5%; however, the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies may be even higher. The AITD comprise two main clinical presentations: Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), both characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid parenchyma. The clinical hallmarks of GD and HT are thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism, respectively. The mechanisms that trigger the autoimmune attack to the thyroid are still under investigation. Epidemiological data suggest an interaction among genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers as the key factor leading to the breakdown of tolerance and the development of disease. Recent studies have shown the importance of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of AT and GD. In thyroid tissue, recruited T helper 1 (Th1) lymphocytes may be responsible for enhanced IFN-γ and TNF-α production, which in turn stimulates CXCL10 (the prototype of the IFN-γ-inducible Th1 chemokines) secretion from the thyroid cells, therefore creating an amplification feedback loop, initiating and perpetuating the autoimmune process. Associations exist between AITD and other organ specific (polyglandular autoimmune syndromes), or systemic autoimmune disorders (Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, cryoglobulinemia, sarcoidosis, psoriatic arthritis). Moreover, several studies have shown an association of AITD and papillary thyroid cancer. These data suggest that AITD patients should be accurately monitored for thyroid dysfunctions, the appearance of thyroid nodules, and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:25461470

  3. Renal medullary changes in renal allograft recipients with raised serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Sis, B; Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Kasap, B; Yildiz, S; Kavukcu, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the renal medulla may reflect rejection related changes and thus have a predictive value in the assessment of acute renal allograft rejection or chronic graft damage. Methods 75 post‐transplant biopsies from 57 patients were scored according to the Banff 1997 scheme. The biopsies with adequate cortical and medullary tissue (n = 23) were selected and medullary tissues were reviewed for rejection related lesions except intimal arteritis. Chronic damage was determined by image analysis depending on periodic acid‐methenamine silver (PAMS)‐Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Medullary and cortical changes were compared. Results Interstitial inflammation and tubulitis were more frequent and severe in the cortex (p<0.001). Medullary tubulitis was associated with intimal arteritis (p = 0.003, r = 0.598). Medullary interstitial inflammation (n = 8) and tubulitis (n = 4) were associated with cortical borderline changes (n = 5) or allograft rejection (n = 3). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of medullary inflammatory changes in predicting cortical allograft rejection were 43%, 69%, 37%, and 73%, respectively. A significant association was observed between medullary MT‐SAP and cortical PAMS‐SAP values (p = 0.02, R2 = 0.23). Conclusions Acute rejection related lesions are more common and severe in the cortex, and the renal medulla does not sufficiently reflect cortical rejection. The positive and negative predictive values of medullary changes for allograft rejection are low, and medullary inflammation is not a reliable indicator of allograft rejection. Increased medullary fibrosis is correlated with chronic cortical damage. PMID:16461569

  4. Direct toxicity of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs for renal medullary cells

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Gerson M.; Michea, Luis F.; Peters, Eugenia M.; Kirby, Martha; Xu, Yuhui; Ferguson, Douglas R.; Burg, Maurice B.

    2001-01-01

    Antipyretic analgesics, taken in large doses over a prolonged period, cause a specific form of kidney disease, characterized by papillary necrosis and interstitial scarring. Epidemiological evidence incriminated mixtures of drugs including aspirin (ASA), phenacetin, and caffeine. The mechanism of toxicity is unclear. We tested the effects of ASA, acetaminophen (APAF, the active metabolite of phenacetin), caffeine, and other related drugs individually and in combination on mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD3). The number of rapidly proliferating cells was reduced by ≈50% by 0.5 mM ASA, salicylic acid, or APAF. The drugs had less effect on confluent cells, which proliferate slowly. Thus, the slow in vivo turnover of IMCD cells could explain why clinical toxicity requires very high doses of these drugs over a very long period. Caffeine greatly potentiated the effect of acetaminophen, pointing to a potential danger of the mixture. Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, indomethacin and NS-398, did not reduce cell number except at concentrations greatly in excess of those that inhibit COX. Therefore, COX inhibition alone is not toxic. APAF arrests most cells in late G1 and S and produces a mixed form of cell death with both oncosis (swollen cells and nuclei) and apoptosis. APAF is known to inhibit the synthesis of DNA and cause chromosomal aberrations due to inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase. Such effects of APAF might account for renal medullary cell death in vivo and development of uroepithelial tumors from surviving cells that have chromosomal aberrations. PMID:11320259

  5. Symptomatic hyponatremia following lateral medullary infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been reported from patients with severe neurological disease, and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone and cerebral salt wasting syndrome are the two main etiologies of hyponatremia after brain injury. Here we describe a patient with a lateral medullary infarction who experienced symptomatic hyponatremia with finding suggestive of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone followed by cerebral salt wasting syndrome. Case presentation A 70-year-old Korean man visited emergency room complaining of sudden onset vertigo and gait disturbance. Neurological exam showed left side ataxia, Horner syndrome, and right side hypesthesia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed acute infarction involving left lateral medulla. His neurological status was stabilized, but he began to complain of non-vertiginous dizziness and general weakness five days after admission. Serum sodium level dropped from 131 mEq/mL to 122 mEq/mL with reduced serum osmolarity of 265 mOsm/L. The diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone was made and we restricted fluid intake, but his symptoms worsened and his mental status became drowsy. Follow up serum sodium level was 108 mEq/L with volume loss, suggesting cerebral salt wasting syndrome. We treated him with hypertonic saline and his consciousness was recovered. Conclusion This case shows symptomatic hyponatremia after lateral medullary infarction, providing insight about distinct pathogenesis of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone and cerebral salt wasting syndrome. PMID:24886592

  6. Lumbar Spinal Immature Ganglioneuroma with Conus Medullaris Invasion: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapıcıer, Ozlem; Konya, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioneuroma (GN) is a benign rare tumor that originates from neural crest cells. It shares a common histogenic family with ganglioneuroblastoma and neuroblastoma and represents the most benign and differentiated form of the group. The most common locations of the GNs are the mediastinum and retroperitoneum. We report an extremely rare case of lumbar spinal GN with conus medullaris invasion and extradural paraspinal extension. A 10-year-old girl presented with a history of worsening lower-back pain and an intermittent tingling sensation in the left leg. Neurological examination revealed reduced sensation in the left L2-L5 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intra- and extradural mass extending from the D11 to L5 vertebral body level. There was conus medullaris invasion by the tumor. After L1-L5 laminotomies, the patient underwent tumor resection. Histopathological diagnosis was immature GN. GNs occurring within the spinal column are rare and may grow to a large size. Despite the size and the common involvement of both intra- and extraspinal compartments, the prognosis is usually excellent after complete excision using microsurgical techniques.

  7. Thyroid diseases in elderly.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Del Prete, M; Marciello, F; Marotta, V; Ramundo, V; Colao, A

    2011-09-01

    Thyroid diseases are the commonest endocrine disorders in the general population. In most of the cases, they are consistent with benign conditions which may be asymptomatic or affect people at a variable extent. Since they often represent chronic conditions their prevalence increases by age and reaches in elderly the highest rates. Thyroid nodules are a common clinical finding. Most subjects with thyroid nodules have few or no symptoms. Thyroid nodules are more commonly non-functioning. However, in elderly, toxic multinodular goiter is the most frequent cause of spontaneous hyperthyroidism and often, it emerges insidiously from nontoxic multinodular goiter. Although autoimmune thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in elderly subjects, other causes, such as drugs, neck radiotherapy, thyroidectomy or radioiodine therapy, are frequently observed among these subjects. A small subset of medications including dopamine agonists, glucocorticoids and somatostatin analogs affect thyroid function through suppression of TSH. Other medications that may affect TSH levels are metformin, antiepileptic medications, lithium carbonate and iodine-containing medications. Other drugs can alter T4 absorption, T4 and T3 transport in serum and metabolism of T4 and T3, such as proton-pump inhibitors and antacids, estrogens, mitotane and fluorouracil, phenobarbital and rifampin. Amiodarone administration is associated with thyrotoxicosis or hypothyroidism. Thyroid cancer has similar characteristics in elderly as in general population, however the rate of aggressive forms such as the anaplastic histotype, is higher in older than younger subjects. Diagnosis of thyroid diseases includes a comprehensive medical history and physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests. A correct diagnosis of thyroid diseases in the elderly is crucial for proper treatment, which consists in the removal of medications that may alter thyroid function, in the use of levo-thyroxine in case of

  8. Management of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Focus on the American Thyroid Association Pediatric Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Marguerite T; Eslamy, Hedieh; Mankoff, David

    2016-03-01

    First introduced in 1946, radioactive iodine (I-131) produces short-range beta radiation with a half-life of 8 days. The physical properties of I-131 combined with the high degree of uptake in the differentiated thyroid cancers (DTCs) led to the use of I-131 as a therapeutic agent for DTC in adults. There are two indications for the potential use of I-131 therapy in pediatric thyroid disorders: nonsurgical treatment of hyperthyroidism owing to Graves' disease and the treatment of children with intermediate- and high-risk DTC. However, children are not just miniature adults. Not only are children and the pediatric thyroid gland more sensitive to radiation than adults but also the biologic behavior of DTC differs between children and adults as well. As opposed to adults, children with DTC typically present with advanced disease at diagnosis; yet, they respond rapidly to therapy and have an excellent prognosis that is significantly better than that in adult counterparts with advanced disease. Unfortunately, there are also higher rates of local and distant disease recurrence in children with DTC compared with adults, mandating lifelong surveillance. Further, children have a longer life expectancy during which the adverse effects of I-131 therapy may become manifest. Recognizing the differences between adults and children with DTC, the American Thyroid Association commissioned a task force of experts who developed and recently published a guideline to address the unique issues related to the management of thyroid nodules and DTC in children. This article reviews the epidemiology, diagnosis, staging, treatment, therapy-related effects, and suggestions for surveillance in children with DTC, focusing not only on the differences between adults and children with this disease but also on the latest recommendations from the inaugural pediatric management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association.

  9. The role of Cdk5 in neuroendocrine thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Castro-Rivera, Emely; Tan, Chunfeng; Plattner, Florian; Schwach, Gert; Siegl, Veronika; Meyer, Douglas; Guo, Ailan; Gundara, Justin; Mettlach, Gabriel; Richer, Edmond; Guevara, Jonathan A; Ning, Li; Gupta, Anjali; Hao, Guiyang; Tsai, Li-Huei; Sun, Xiankai; Antich, Pietro; Sidhu, Stanley; Robinson, Bruce G; Chen, Herbert; Nwariaku, Fiemu E; Pfragner, Roswitha; Richardson, James A; Bibb, James A

    2013-10-14

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer that originates from calcitonin-secreting parafollicular cells, or C cells. We found that Cdk5 and its cofactors p35 and p25 are highly expressed in human MTC and that Cdk5 activity promotes MTC proliferation. A conditional MTC mouse model was generated and corroborated the role of aberrant Cdk5 activation in MTC. C cell-specific overexpression of p25 caused rapid C cell hyperplasia leading to lethal MTC, which was arrested by repressing p25 overexpression. A comparative phosphoproteomic screen between proliferating and arrested MTC identified the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) as a crucial Cdk5 downstream target. Prevention of Rb phosphorylation at Ser807/Ser811 attenuated MTC proliferation. These findings implicate Cdk5 signaling via Rb as critical to MTC tumorigenesis and progression. PMID:24135281

  10. The role of Cdk5 in neuroendocrine thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Castro-Rivera, Emely; Tan, Chunfeng; Plattner, Florian; Schwach, Gert; Siegl, Veronika; Meyer, Douglas; Guo, Ailan; Gundara, Justin; Mettlach, Gabriel; Richer, Edmond; Guevara, Jonathan A; Ning, Li; Gupta, Anjali; Hao, Guiyang; Tsai, Li-Huei; Sun, Xiankai; Antich, Pietro; Sidhu, Stanley; Robinson, Bruce G; Chen, Herbert; Nwariaku, Fiemu E; Pfragner, Roswitha; Richardson, James A; Bibb, James A

    2013-10-14

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer that originates from calcitonin-secreting parafollicular cells, or C cells. We found that Cdk5 and its cofactors p35 and p25 are highly expressed in human MTC and that Cdk5 activity promotes MTC proliferation. A conditional MTC mouse model was generated and corroborated the role of aberrant Cdk5 activation in MTC. C cell-specific overexpression of p25 caused rapid C cell hyperplasia leading to lethal MTC, which was arrested by repressing p25 overexpression. A comparative phosphoproteomic screen between proliferating and arrested MTC identified the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) as a crucial Cdk5 downstream target. Prevention of Rb phosphorylation at Ser807/Ser811 attenuated MTC proliferation. These findings implicate Cdk5 signaling via Rb as critical to MTC tumorigenesis and progression.

  11. Sonography of Normal and Abnormal Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands.

    PubMed

    Andrioli, Massimiliano; Valcavi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) represents the most sensitive and efficient method for the evaluation of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. Infectious and autoimmune thyroiditis are common diseases, usually diagnosed and followed up by clinical examination and laboratory analyses. Nevertheless, US plays an important role in confirming diagnoses, predicting outcomes and, in autoimmune hyperthyroidism, in titrating therapy. Conversely, in nodular thyroid disease US is the imaging method of choice for the characterization and surveillance of lesions. It provides consistent clues in predicting the risk of malignancy, thus directing patient referral for fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy. Suspicious US features generally include marked hypoechogenicity, a shape taller than it is wide, ill-defined or irregular borders, microcalcifications and hardness at elastographic evaluation. Finally, the role of US in thyroid cancer is to evaluate extension beyond the thyroid capsule and to assess nodal metastases or tumor recurrence. The main application of US in parathyroid diseases is represented by primary hyperparathyroidism. In this condition, US plays a role after biochemical diagnosis, and it should always be strictly performed for localization purposes. In both thyroidal and parathyroid diseases, US is recommended as a guide in FNA biopsies. PMID:27002829

  12. Expression of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein in Neoplastic Thyroid Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sun A; Kim, Won Gu; Jeon, Min Ji; Han, Ji Min; Sung, Tae Yon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Bae; Hong, Suck Joon; Shong, Young Kee; Gong, Gyungyub

    2011-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is associated with tumor genesis, growth, progression and metastasis, and acts by blocking caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the expression patterns of XIAP in various neoplastic thyroid disorders and determine the association between XIAP expression and clinicopathologic factors. Expression of XIAP was evaluated with immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal anti-XIAP in 164 specimens of conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and 53 specimens of other malignant or benign thyroid tumors. XIAP positivity was observed in 128 (78%) of the 164 conventional PTC specimens. Positive rates of XIAP expression in follicular variant PTC, follicular, medullary, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma specimens were 20%, 25%, 38%, 67%, and 38%, respectively. Six nodular hyperplasia specimens were negative and 1 of 7 follicular adenomas (8%) was positive for XIAP. Lateral neck lymph node metastases were more frequent in patients negative for XIAP expression (P = 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining for XIAP as a novel molecular marker may thus be helpful in the differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Moreover, high XIAP expression in conventional PTC is strongly associated with reduced risk of lateral neck lymph node metastasis. PMID:21935275

  13. Familial recurrent atrial myxoma: Carney's complex.

    PubMed

    Shetty Roy, A Nagesh; Radin, Michael; Sarabi, Dennis; Shaoulian, Emanuel

    2011-02-01

    We report on a family of 4 members, all of whom have had multifocal, recurrent atrial myxomas associated with skin pigmentation, melanotic schwannomas, mucocutaneous myxomas, and tumors of the ovary and pituitary, adrenal, and thyroid glands. Immunochemistry of the myxoma cells is positive for calretinin, confirming their neuroendocrine origin. Genetic studies confirmed mutations in the gene coding protein kinase A, regulatory subunit 1-α (PRKAR1α). This is Carney's complex, characterized by multiple, mucocutaneous myxomas; pigmented lesions over the lips, conjunctiva, and genitalia; adenomas of the breast and thyroid; schwannomas; and endocrinal abnormalities including Cushing syndrome and acromegaly. Members of the family require vigorous screening, including urinary free cortisol, plasma transforming growth factor-β(1) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, testicular ultrasound, routine echocardiographic screening, searches for cardiac and mucocutaneous myxomas in multiple locations, and genetic studies for the PRKAR1α gene sequence. PMID:21298650

  14. Granulomatous thyroiditis: an unexpected finding leading to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Umberto Vespasiani; Picardi, Antonio; Manfiini, Silvia; D'Avola, Delia; Costantino, Sebastiano; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2004-04-01

    A 59-year old male presented with dyspnoea, dull pain at the base of the neck, fever, and a history of severe recurrent coronary disease. In the past he had undergone two angioplasties, multiple stenting, and a triple aorto-coronary bypass. The patient also experienced a painful enlargement of the thyroid gland with bilateral multiple lymphoadenopathies and thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid histology revealed interstitial non-caseating granulomas that are typical of thyroid sarcoidosis. The finding ofgranulomas in the thyroid allowed us to interpret the clinical manifestations of our patient leading to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient was ultimately treated for sarcoidosis and after one year of specific therapy has completely recovered without recurrence of cardiac or respiratory symptoms up to date.

  15. Treatment with thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency can have important repercussions. Treatment with thyroid hormone in replacement doses is essential in patients with hypothyroidism. In this review, we critically discuss the thyroid hormone formulations that are available and approaches to correct replacement therapy with thyroid hormone in primary and central hypothyroidism in different periods of life such as pregnancy, birth, infancy, childhood, and adolescence as well as in adult patients, the elderly, and in patients with comorbidities. Despite the frequent and long term use of l-T4, several studies have documented frequent under- and overtreatment during replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. We assess the factors determining l-T4 requirements (sex, age, gender, menstrual status, body weight, and lean body mass), the major causes of failure to achieve optimal serum TSH levels in undertreated patients (poor patient compliance, timing of l-T4 administration, interferences with absorption, gastrointestinal diseases, and drugs), and the adverse consequences of unintentional TSH suppression in overtreated patients. Opinions differ regarding the treatment of mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and we examine the recent evidence favoring treatment of this condition. New data suggesting that combined therapy with T3 and T4 could be indicated in some patients with hypothyroidism are assessed, and the indications for TSH suppression with l-T4 in patients with euthyroid multinodular goiter and in those with differentiated thyroid cancer are reviewed. Lastly, we address the potential use of thyroid hormones or their analogs in obese patients and in severe cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, and nonthyroidal illnesses.

  16. INTERFERON INDUCED THYROIDITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tomer, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases that develop as a result of interactions between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic and environmental triggers contributing to AITD. The major environmental triggers of AITD include iodine, smoking, medications, pregnancy, and possibly stress. In this review we will focus on two well-documented environmental triggers of AITD, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and interferon alpha (IFNa) therapy. Chronic HCV infection has been shown to be associated with increased incidence of clinical and subclinical autoimmune thyroiditis (i.e. the presence of thyroid antibodies in euthyroid subjects). Moreover, IFNa therapy of chronic HCV infection is associated with subclinical or clinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of cases which can be autoimmune, or non-autoimmune thyroiditis. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) in chronic HCV patients may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of HCV and interferon induced thyroiditis have been well characterized, the mechanisms causing these conditions are still poorly understood. PMID:20022216

  17. Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iddah, M. A.; Macharia, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review. Studies have been published in the field of autoimmune thyroid diseases since January 2005. The review is organized into areas of etiology, autoimmune features, autoantibodies, mechanism of thyroid cell injury, B-cell responses, and T-cell responses. Also it reviews the diagnosis and the relationship between autoimmune thyroid disease, neoplasm, and kidney disorders. Recent Findings. Autoimmune thyroid diseases have been reported in people living in different parts of the world including North America, Europe, Baalkans, Asia, Middle East, South America, and Africa though the reported figures do not fully reflect the number of people infected per year. Cases are unrecognized due to inaccurate diagnosis and hence are treated as other diseases. However, the most recent studies have shown that the human autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) affect up to 5% of the general population and are seen mostly in women between 30 and 50 years. Summary. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Overall, this review has expanded our understanding of the mechanism involved in pathogenesis of AITD and the relationship between autoimmune thyroid disease, neoplasm, and kidney disease. It has opened new lines of investigations that will ultimately result in a better clinical practice. PMID:23878745

  18. [Thyroid and the environment].

    PubMed

    Brucker-Davis, Françoise; Hiéronimus, Sylvie; Fénichel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that the thyroid depends upon the environment for regular iodine supply, avoiding iodine deficiency or excess. Thyroid function may be altered by natural compounds present in water or foodstuff (such as iodine or phyto-goitrogens), or by synthetic compounds, either administered knowingly (in case of medicine), or as an untoward event in case of exposure to industrial products and pesticides, massively produced and polluting the environment. Compounds with an impact on thyroid homeostasis are called thyroid disruptors (TD). TD may disrupt the thyroid economy at any level of regulation: thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism, or transport; cellular level including thyroid hormone signaling; tumorigenesis or more indirectly via the triggering of an autoimmune process. Compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may act at multiple levels. PT effects on human health depend on parameters linked to the individual person (age at exposure, iodine status, diet, professional exposure, place of living, family history of thyroid disease, detoxification enzyme genetic variants) and on parameters linked to the compounds themselves (chemical structure, lipo- or hydro-solubility, modes of exposure, metabolites activity, "cocktail effect"). The toxic effects of TD do not necessarily follow the rules of classical toxicology (low-dose effects, non-monotonic curves). The main clinical risks are the deleterious impact on neurocognition and behavior for the fetus and the young child, and possibly the elderly, while in adults the main concerns are tumori/goitrogenesis and autoimmune thyroid disease. The potential socioeconomic impact for society warrants an active and major involvement in research to find solutions in a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26603908

  19. [Thyroid and the environment].

    PubMed

    Brucker-Davis, Françoise; Hiéronimus, Sylvie; Fénichel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that the thyroid depends upon the environment for regular iodine supply, avoiding iodine deficiency or excess. Thyroid function may be altered by natural compounds present in water or foodstuff (such as iodine or phyto-goitrogens), or by synthetic compounds, either administered knowingly (in case of medicine), or as an untoward event in case of exposure to industrial products and pesticides, massively produced and polluting the environment. Compounds with an impact on thyroid homeostasis are called thyroid disruptors (TD). TD may disrupt the thyroid economy at any level of regulation: thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism, or transport; cellular level including thyroid hormone signaling; tumorigenesis or more indirectly via the triggering of an autoimmune process. Compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may act at multiple levels. PT effects on human health depend on parameters linked to the individual person (age at exposure, iodine status, diet, professional exposure, place of living, family history of thyroid disease, detoxification enzyme genetic variants) and on parameters linked to the compounds themselves (chemical structure, lipo- or hydro-solubility, modes of exposure, metabolites activity, "cocktail effect"). The toxic effects of TD do not necessarily follow the rules of classical toxicology (low-dose effects, non-monotonic curves). The main clinical risks are the deleterious impact on neurocognition and behavior for the fetus and the young child, and possibly the elderly, while in adults the main concerns are tumori/goitrogenesis and autoimmune thyroid disease. The potential socioeconomic impact for society warrants an active and major involvement in research to find solutions in a multidisciplinary approach.

  20. Dynamical model for thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni Lamooki, Gholam Reza; Shirazi, Amir H.; Mani, Ali R.

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid's main chemical reactions are employed to develop a mathematical model. The presented model is based on differential equations where their dynamics reflects many aspects of thyroid's behavior. Our main focus here is the well known, but not well understood, phenomenon so called as Wolff-Chaikoff effect. It is shown that the inhibitory effect of intake iodide on the rate of one single enzyme causes a similar effect as Wolff-Chaikoff. Besides this issue, the presented model is capable of revealing other complex phenomena of thyroid hormones homeostasis.

  1. Thyroid: biological actions of 'nonclassical' thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Senese, Rosalba; Cioffi, Federica; de Lange, Pieter; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are produced by the thyroid gland and converted in peripheral organs by deiodinases. THs regulate cell functions through two distinct mechanisms: genomic (nuclear) and nongenomic (non-nuclear). Many TH effects are mediated by the genomic pathway--a mechanism that requires TH activation of nuclear thyroid hormone receptors. The overall nongenomic processes, emerging as important accessory mechanisms in TH actions, have been observed at the plasma membrane, in the cytoplasm and cytoskeleton, and in organelles. Some products of peripheral TH metabolism (besides triiodo-L-thyronine), now termed 'nonclassical THs', were previously considered as inactive breakdown products. However, several reports have recently shown that they may have relevant biological effects. The recent accumulation of knowledge on how classical and nonclassical THs modulate the activity of membrane receptors, components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, kinases and deacetylases, opened the door to the discovery of new pathways through which they act. We reviewed the current state-of-the-art on the actions of the nonclassical THs, discussing the role that these endogenous TH metabolites may have in the modulation of thyroid-related effects in organisms with differing complexity, ranging from nonmammals to humans.

  2. TSH (Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of a thyroid disorder , including hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism . TSH is produced by the pituitary gland , a ... thyroid Monitor thyroid replacement therapy in people with hypothyroidism Monitor anti-thyroid treatment in people with hyperthyroidism ...

  3. Recurrent oculomotor neuritis related to autoimmune hypothyroidism. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Yeon; Rhee, Hak Young; Shin, Hae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Ophthalmopathy related to thyroid disease is due mainly to diffuse periorbital or eye muscle inflammation. It is more common in Grave's hyperthyroidism and rare in Hashimoto's hypothyroidism. Here we report a case of recurrent oculomotor nerve palsy associated with autoimmune hypothyroidism. Brain MRI revealed enhancement of the oculomotor nerves. Despite thyroid hormone replacement therapy, oculomotor nerve palsy recurred at the side contralateral to the initially involved nerve and the autoimmune antibody titer remained high. The symptom was responsive to high-dose steroid therapy. PMID:26454483

  4. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration. PMID:24176541

  5. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration.

  6. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... some noncancerous childhood conditions Radiation exposure from nuclear plant disasters Radiation given through a vein (through an IV) during medical tests and treatments does not increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer.

  7. [Postpartum thyroiditis. A review].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Hernández, Z; Segura-Domínguez, A

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a transient thyroid dysfunction of autoimmune origin that can occur in the first year postpartum in women who have not been previously diagnosed with thyroid disease. It may start with clinical thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism and the subsequent recovery of thyroid function, or may just appear as isolated thyrotoxicosis or hypothyroidism. PPT recurs in high percentage of patients after subsequent pregnancies. Many women develop permanent hypothyroidism sometime during the 3 to 10 year period after an episode of PPT. It is important for family physicians to be familiar with this disease, due to its high prevalence in order to make a correct diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Family doctors also play a crucial role in the monitoring of these patients, given the negative implications of established hypothyroidism on reproduction in the female population during their reproductive years. This article reviews the principle characteristics of PPT along with its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23834978

  8. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  9. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  10. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... isthmus). The thyroid secretes three main hormones: 1) Thyroxine, that contains iodine, needed for growth and metabolism; ... also contains iodine and similar in function to Thyroxine; and 3) Calcitonin, which decreases the concentration of ...

  11. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence. Because of its uncommon occurrence, randomized trials have not been applied to test best-care options in children. Even in adults that have a 10-fold or higher incidence of thyroid cancer than children, few prospective trials have been executed to compare treatment approaches. We recognize that treatment recommendations have changed over the past few decades and will continue to do so. Respecting the aggressiveness of pediatric thyroid cancer, high recurrence rates, and the problems associated with decades of long-term follow-up, a premium should be placed on treatments that minimize risk of recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments and facilitate follow-up. We recommend that total thyroidectomy and central compartment lymph node dissection is the surgical procedure of choice for children with DTC if it can be performed by a high-volume thyroid surgeon. We recommend radioactive iodine therapy for remnant ablation or residual disease for most children with DTC. We recommend long-term follow-up because disease can recur decades after initial diagnosis and therapy. Considering the complexity of DTC management and the potential complications associated with therapy, it is essential that pediatric DTC be managed by physicians with expertise in this area. PMID:21880704

  12. RET oncogene in MEN2, MEN2B, MTC and other forms of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2008-04-01

    Hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is caused by specific autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. MTC represents a promising model for targeted cancer therapy, as the oncogenic event responsible for initiating malignancy has been well characterized. The RET proto-oncogene has become the target for molecularly designed drug therapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting activated RET are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with MTC. This review will provide a brief overview of MTC and the associated RET oncogenic mutations, and will summarize the therapies designed to strategically interfere with the pathologic activation of the RET oncogene.

  13. [Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Führer, D; Mann, K; Feldkamp, J; Krude, H; Spitzweg, C; Kratzsch, J; Schott, M

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid dysfunction may impair fertility, course of pregnancy and fetal development. Physiological alterations of thyroid function parameters, that occur during pregnancy need to be distinguished from pathophysiological states of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. We performed a literature search (PubMed 1990-2013) and review relevant publications as well as consensus and practice guidelines of international thyroid/endocrine societies. Interpretation of thyroid function values in pregnancy must be based on trimester-specific TSH and T4 ranges. Alterations in thyroid function are present in up to 15% of pregnancies (0.4% overt hypothyroidism, 0.1-0.4% hyperthyroidism) and may lead to preventable complications in the pregnant woman and the fetus. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk for abortion, premature delivery and stillbirth, besides impairment of neurocognitive development. The latter has also been shown in situations of grave iodine deficiency. In addition to new-born screening directed at early recognition of congenital hypothyroidism (incidence 0.03%), universal screening of all pregnant women should be implemented in health care guidelines. Newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism in a pregnant woman requires immediate levothyroxine substitution at adequate doses. In subclinical hypothyroidism thyroid hormone replacement should be considered. Iodine supplementation is strongly recommended in all pregnant and breast-feeding women. Pregnancy causes a number of, that need to be of thyroid dysfunction. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis may impair the course of pregnancy and may negatively affect the fetus. In particular, maternal hypothyroidism may lead to irreparable and detrimental deficits in the neurocognitive development of the fetus. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common cause of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated with impaired fertility and miscarriage, and may first manifest in pregnancy due to the

  14. Conus medullaris metastasis in breast cancer: report of a case and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kao-Chih; Li, Tsung-Ying; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2013-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis is quite rare. This report presents the case of a female patient with metastasis of the conus medullaris from breast cancer, presenting with paraplegia and sphincter dysfunction. Bladder dysfunction improved after removal of the conus mass. This report is the seventh case of conus medullaris metastasis from breast cancer and the first review of clinical outcome, survival time and other data of all these 7 cases. This study also reviewed cases of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis arising from breast cancer in regions other than the conus medullaris in the literature. Longer survival time resulted from surgery in contrast to those without surgery in the latter group.

  15. Thyroid transplantation developing autoimmune thyroiditis following thymectomy and irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S A; Penhale, W J

    1981-01-01

    Post-irradiation transplantation of normal thyroids under the renal capsule of syngenetic thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) rats leads to the development of thyroiditis in the ectopic grafted thyroids. A close correlation was observed between the extent of the lesions in the grafted and recipient's own thyroid. The histopathology of both grafted and recipient thyroid was similar and was characterized by infiltration with mononuclear cells together with some plasma cells. Conversely, grafting of affected thyroids from Tx-X rats to normal animals resulted in the regression of the lesion in the graft and no evidence thyroiditis was observed in either the graft or the recipient's thyroid when these were examined 60 days post-grafting. Thyroids derived from normal animals grafted to syngenetic normal rats were found to remain healthy and intact over a 60-day period. In contrast to normal animals, Tx-X rats were unable to reject totally in transplanted allogeneic thyroids by 28 days post-grafting, suggesting that some impairment of cell-mediated immunity follows this treatment. These findings indicate that the pathological change occurring in the thyroid gland of Tx-X rats is not attributable to the local effect of irradiation of the thyroids and adds further support to the concept that the process is immunologically mediated by thyroid-specific circulating components in the absence of normal immune regulatory function. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6896018

  16. Medullary Sponge Kidney and Urinary Calculi Aeromedical Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Cherian, Sebastian F.; Barr, Yael R.; Stocco, Amber

    2008-01-01

    Medullary Sponge Kidney (MSK) is a benign disorder associated with renal stones in 60% of patients. Patients frequently have episodic painless hematuria but are otherwise asymptomatic unless renal calculi or infections complicate the disease. Nephrolithiasis is a relative, but frequently enforced, contraindication to space or other high performance flight. Two case reports of asymptomatic NASA flight crew with MSK and three cases of military aviators diagnosed with MSK are reviewed, all cases resulted in waiver and return to flight status after treatment and a vigorous follow up and prophylaxis protocol. MSK in aviation and space flight necessitates a highly case-by-case dependent evaluation and treatment process to rule out other potential confounding factors that might also contribute to stone formation and in order to re-qualify the aviator for flight duties.

  17. Endometriosis of the conus medullaris causing cyclic radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Jeffrey A; Gonda, David D; Muller, Karra; Ciacci, Joseph D

    2014-11-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord hematomas are a rare neurosurgical pathological entity typically arising from vascular and neoplastic lesions. Endometriosis is an extremely rare cause of intramedullary spinal cord hematoma, with only 5 previously reported cases in the literature. Endometriosis is characterized by ectopic endometrial tissue, typically located in the female pelvic cavity, that causes a cyclical pain syndrome, bleeding, and infertility. In the rare case of intramedullary endometriosis of the spinal cord, symptoms include cyclical lower-extremity radiculopathies and voiding difficulties, and can acutely cause cauda equina syndrome. The authors report a case of endometriosis of the conus medullaris, the first to include radiological, intraoperative, and histopathological imaging. A brief review of the literature is also presented, with discussion including etiological theories surrounding intramedullary endometriosis.

  18. Ocular lateropulsion. A sign of lateral medullary disease.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K T; Baloh, R W; Krohel, G B; Hepler, R S

    1980-09-01

    Four patients with clinically localized lesions in the lateral medulla exhibited a tonic bias of their eyes toward the damaged side despite full extracular movements. Each reported that his eyes were being pulled toward the involved side. Although the tonic bias was most prominent when fixation was inhibited, it also occurred with fixation and interfered with saccadic and smooth-pursuit eye movements. Saccades were hypometric when directed against the bias, whereas they were hypermetric when directed toward the side of the lesion. Smooth pursuit toward the intact side was severely impaired, whereas pursuit in the direction of the bias was normal or near normal. Lateropulsion of the eyes seems to be a unique sign of disease in the lateral medullary region of the brainstem.

  19. Malignant thyroid teratoma: report of an aggressive tumor in a 64-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, R; Zafon, C; Ruiz-Marcellan, C; Obiols, G; Fort, J M; Baena, J A; Villanueva, B; Garcia, A; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2013-09-01

    Malignant teratoma of the thyroid is a rare and aggressive tumor, frequent in children than in adults. Histologically, thyroid teratomas usually show a predominance of a neuroectodermal component. Mature cartilage and bone may be present. We present the case of primary malignant teratoma of the thyroid in a 64-year-old man. Histologically, the tumor displayed a predominant neuroectodermal component. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The patient underwent a radical thyroidectomy with central neck dissection as primary treatment and radioiodine treatment afterwards. The patient had local and distant recurrence. A second surgery was performed with poor results and the patient died 3 months afterwards.

  20. A case of polymyositis associated with papillary thyroid cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kalliabakos, Dimitrios; Pappas, Apostolos; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Papadima, Artemisia; Chrysikos, John; Basagiannis, Christos; Tsakoumagou, Maria; Skanelli, Yasemi; Manouras, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is rarely associated with paraneoplastic events. Polymyositis, an autoimmune inflammatory myopathy, can be manifested as a paraneoplastic syndrome (PS). We report a case of a young woman who developed progressive proximal muscle weakness one and a half year after a total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Clinical features, laboratory results and muscle biopsy led us to the diagnosis of polymyositis, possibly related to her previous malignancy. A search for recurrence of the thyroid carcinoma or other underlying malignancy was fruitless. The patient improved slowly but almost completely after about 6 months of immunosupressive therapy, which she is still receiving. PMID:18973692

  1. Incidental and non-incidental thyroid microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KALISZEWSKI, KRZYSZTOF; WOJTCZAK, BEATA; STRUTYŃSKA-KARPIŃSKA, MARTA; ŁUKIEŃCZUK, TADEUSZ; FORKASIEWICZ, ZDZISŁAW; DOMOSŁAWSKI, PAWEŁ

    2016-01-01

    There is no clear therapeutic approach for thyroid microcarcinoma (TMC). This may be as a consequence of recent observations that have reported biologically different types of TMC, which should be treated differently. The objective of the present study was to compare incidental TMC (ITMC) and non-incidental TMC (NITMC) in order to assess the differences in the incidence, diagnostic results, clinicopathological characteristics and surgical treatment. The study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 3,218 patients consecutively admitted and surgically treated in a single institution due to thyroid pathology. A total of 246 (7.64%) patients presented with a thyroid malignancy, and 97 (39.43%) of these individuals were diagnosed with TMC; 37 (38.14%) patients exhibited ITMC and 60 (61.86%) exhibited NITMC. All 37 (100.00%) patients with ITMC exhibited a papillary type of cancer. In the NITMC group, 1 (1.67%) patient presented with follicular microcarcinoma, 1 (1.67%) individual with papillary- and follicular-type microcarcinoma, 1 (1.67%) individual with medullary microcarcinoma, and the remaining 57 (95.00%) patients presented with papillary microcarcinoma. The number of younger patients (<45 years old) was higher in the NITMC group, but this difference was not significant (P=0.205). In all patients with ITMC, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy did not reveal malignant processes. In the NITMC group, the number of larger tumors (>5 mm) was significantly higher compared with that in the ITMC group (P<0.001). ITMC was significantly associated with multinodular goiter (MNG) (P<0.001). Amongst the NITMC group, 18.33% of patients presented with cervical lymph node involvement (P<0.001). Overall, the incidence of TMC is high, and consists of ITMC and NITMC, although the prevalence of NITMC is higher than that of ITMC. The majority of ITMCs and NITMCs are composed of a papillary type of cancer. The majority of ITMCs have dimensions ≤5 mm in diameter and

  2. Thyroid disorders in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stagnaro-Green, Alex; Pearce, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

    The thyroid gland is substantially challenged during pregnancy. Total T(3) and T(4) levels increase by 50% during pregnancy owing to a 50% increase in thyroxine-binding globulin levels. Serum TSH levels decrease in the first trimester and increase in the second and third trimesters; however, not to prepregnancy levels. Hypothyroidism is present in up to 3% of all pregnant women. Subclinical hypothyroidism during pregnancy is associated with an increased rate of miscarriage and preterm delivery, and a decrease in the IQ of the child. Overt hyperthyroidism is present in less than 1% of pregnant women but is linked to increased rates of miscarriage, preterm delivery and maternal congestive heart failure. In women who are euthyroid, thyroid autoantibodies are associated with an increased risk of spontaneous miscarriage and preterm delivery. Postpartum thyroiditis occurs in 5.4% of all women following pregnancy; moreover, 50% of women who are euthyroid in the first trimester of pregnancy but test positive for thyroid autoantibodies will develop postpartum thyroiditis. The need for the essential nutrient iodine increases during pregnancy and in women who are breastfeeding, and the effect of treatment of mild iodine deficiency on maternal and fetal outcomes is consequently being evaluated in a prospective study. The debate regarding the pros and cons of universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy is ongoing. PMID:23007317

  3. [Thyroid diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Medina, José Luís; Neves, Celestino; Magalhães, Angela; Pereira-Monteiro, Lídia; Marques, Luís

    2002-01-01

    The thyroid diseases are more frequent in women, which is probably related to the fact that many thyroid diseases are of the autoimmune type, secondary to the effects of sexual steroids in the immunological system; although it had never been completely cleared up, it seems that estrogens and progestogens may modulate the lymphocyte differentiation as well as the induction of the autoimmune response. After delivery, the thyroid dysfunction of autoimmune type often occurs, even in women without previous history of thyroid disease. Some authors assume that the cytokines, produced by the mother, fetus or placenta, inhibit the autoimmune reaction during pregnancy. The subsequent reduction in the inhibiting cytokines, after delivery, allows the aggravation or the beginning of the autoimmune disease. Although autoimmunity is traditionally considered as a major cause for thyroid disease during pregnancy, recent studies indicate that the most common aetiology of disturbance of thyroid tests during pregnancy is the hyperthyroidism due to the inadequate production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). However, from the clinical point of view, the hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease is the most important cause for maternal and fetal morbidity.

  4. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  5. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  6. Recurrent miscarriage: causes, evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Gimenez, Carmen; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent miscarriage is frustrating for the physician and a heartbreaking experience for the patient. Approximately 5% of couples trying to conceive have two consecutive miscarriages. Despite a thorough study of patients, the aetiology of this common obstetric complication is unknown in 50% of cases. Known causes include abnormal chromosomes, endocrinological disorders and uterine abnormalities. Although antiphospholipid antibodies have been demonstrated in miscarriages, the role played by alloimmune mechanisms remains unclear. New immunological approaches such as natural killer cells, regulatory T cells, tumour necrosis factor α, cell-derived microparticles, leptin, certain glycoproteins and cytokines should be considered. The management of thyroid diseases and immunological disorders is continuously evolving. Several genetic diagnostic procedures such as parental karyotyping and preimplantation genetic screening should probably not be used routinely. Antiphopholipid syndrome and some recurrent miscarriage-related endocrinological disorders can be effectively treated. Finally, new therapeutic approaches and the pleiotropic effects of old ones have led to improved fetal-maternal outcomes.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid....

  9. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid....

  10. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of treatment-refractory metastatic thyroid cancer using 90Yttrium and 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs: toxicity, response and survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Budiawan, Hendra; Salavati, Ali; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The overall survival rate of non-radioiodine avid differentiated (follicular, papillary, medullary) thyroid carcinoma is significantly lower than for patients with iodine-avid lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate toxicity and efficacy (response and survival) of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in non-radioiodine-avid or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients. Sixteen non-radioiodine-avid and/or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, including follicular thyroid carcinoma (n = 4), medullary thyroid carcinoma (n = 8), Hürthle cell thyroid carcinoma (n = 3), and mixed carcinoma (n = 1) were treated with PRRT by using 90Yttrium and/or 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs. 68Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT was used to determine the somatostatin receptor density in the residual tumor/metastatic lesions and to assess the treatment response. Hematological profiles and renal function were periodically examined after treatment. By using fractionated regimen, only mild, reversible hematological toxicity (grade 1) or nephrotoxicity (grade 1) were seen. Response assessment (using EORTC criteria) was performed in 11 patients treated with 2 or more (maximum 5) cycles of PRRT and showed disease stabilization in 4 (36.4%) patients. Two patients (18.2%) showed partial remission, in the remaining 5 patients (45.5%) disease remained progressive. Kaplan-Meier analysis resulted in a mean survival after the first PRRT of 4.2 years (95% CI, range 2.9-5.5) and median progression free survival of 25 months (inter-quartiles: 12-43). In non-radioiodine-avid/radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, PRRT is a promising therapeutic option with minimal toxicity, good response rate and excellent survival benefits. PMID:24380044

  11. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Taylor, Barbara E.; Harris, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception. PMID:25087734

  12. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Kimberly E; Corcoran, Andrea E; Taylor, Barbara E; Harris, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception.

  13. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) ...

  14. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thyroid Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Hashimoto thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the most common cause of thyroid underactivity (hypothyroidism) in the United States. Related Information What information ... However, some people with thyroid antibodies never develop hypothyroidism or experience any related signs or symptoms. People ...

  16. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  17. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  18. Pediatric intramedullary cavernous malformation of the conus medullaris: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hamidi, Mehrdokht; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2011-03-01

    Cavernous malformations of the conus medullaris are rare lesions; only 9 cases have been reported in the literature. Most cases are described in adults and only one case has been reported in pediatric age group. In this report, the authors describe a 16-year-old male presenting with acute myelopathy due to an intramedullary cavernous malformation of the conus medullaris. The clinical, radiological and surgical features of this patient are presented and discussed and relevant literature of this rare lesion is reviewed.

  19. MRI study of the position of the conus medullaris in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ba, Zhaoyu; Zhao, Weidong; Wu, Desheng; Huang, Yufeng; Kan, Heng

    2012-06-01

    Substantial data exist from cadaveric and magnetic resonance imaging studies regarding the position of the conus medullaris in normally developed adults. However, no large studies have documented the position of the conus medullaris in patients with diagnosed lumbar spinal stenosis. To goal of the current study was to determine the position of the conus medullaris within a living adult population with existing pathology of lumbar spinal stenosis. In a retrospective study, 234 patients (110 women and 124 men; mean age, 48.8 years) with diagnosed lumbar spinal stenosis had their T2-weighted, midline, sagittal, spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging studies compared to assess and confirm the position of the conus medullaris. A straight line perpendicular to the long axis of the spinal cord in the median sagittal sequence was subtended to the adjacent vertebra or disk space, and the position was defined in relation to the vertebra or disk space. The conus medullaris position was labeled in relation to the upper, middle, and lower segments of the adjacent vertebral body or the adjacent disk space and assigned numerical values from 1 to 12. The position of the conus medullaris in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis followed a normal distribution. The mean conus medullaris position was mainly within the lower third of the L1 vertebral body (ranged from the middle third of T12 to the upper third of L3). No significant differences existed between men and women with lumbar spinal stenosis. The conus medullaris position was found to be unaffected by the pathology of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  20. Myxopapillary ependymoma of the conus medullaris presenting with intratumoral hemorrhage during weight lifting in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hemorrhage within a myxopapillary ependymoma of the conus medullaris and cauda equina is rare. Most patients with myxopapillary ependymoma present insidiously, but they may present with hemorrhage or cauda equina syndrome. Limited number of case reports available has described this condition only in adult patients. We report our experience with intratumoral hemorrhage of myxopapillary ependymoma of the conus medullaris during weight lifting in a 15-year-old boy.

  1. Thyroid hormones and bone development.

    PubMed

    Combs, C E; Nicholls, J J; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, G R

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical determinants of postnatal skeletal development. Thyroid hormone deficiency or excess in children results in severe abnormalities of linear growth and bone maturation. These clinical observations have been recapitulated in mutant mice and these models have facilitated studies of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action in the developing skeleton. In this review, we consider in detail the direct and indirect effects of thyroid hormone on bone and the molecular mechanisms involved.

  2. Two-dimensional Fourier analysis of the spongy medullary keratin of structurally coloured feather barbs

    PubMed Central

    Prum, R. O.; Torres, R.; Williamson, S.; Dyck, J.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted two-dimensional (2D) discrete Fourier analyses of the spatial variation in refractive index of the spongy medullary keratin from four different colours of structurally coloured feather barbs from three species of bird: the rose-faced lovebird, Agapornis roseicollis (Psittacidae), the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus (Psittacidae), and the Gouldian finch, Poephila guttata (Estrildidae). These results indicate that the spongy medullary keratin is a nanostructured tissue that functions as an array of coherent scatterers. The nanostructure of the medullary keratin is nearly uniform in all directions. The largest Fourier components of spatial variation in refractive index in the tissue are of the appropriate size to produce the observed colours by constructive interference alone. The peaks of the predicted reflectance spectra calculated from the 2D Fourier power spectra are congruent with the reflectance spectra measured by using microspectrophotometry. The alternative physical models for the production of these colours, the Rayleigh and Mie theories, hypothesize that medullary keratin is an incoherent array and that scattered waves are independent in phase. This assumption is falsified by the ring-like Fourier power spectra of these feathers, and the spacing of the scattering air vacuoles in the medullary keratin. Structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by constructive interference of coherently scattered light waves from the optically heterogeneous matrix of keratin and air in the spongy medullary layer.

  3. Do egg-laying crocodilian (Alligator mississippiensis) archosaurs form medullary bone?

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M H; Elsey, R M; Dacke, C G; Horner, J R; Lamm, E-T

    2007-04-01

    It is beyond question that Mesozoic dinosaurs, like Aves and Crocodylia, are archosaurs. However, within the archosaurian clade, the origin and distribution of some major features are less clear, particularly with respect to reproductive physiology. Medullary bone, a highly mineralized, bony reproductive tissue present in the endosteal cavities of all extant egg-laying birds thus far examined, has recently been reported in Tyrannosaurus rex. Its presence or absence in extant crocodilians, therefore, may shed light on the timing of its evolutionary appearance. If medullary bone is present in all three taxa, it arose before the three lineages diverged. However, if medullary bone arose after this divergence, it may be present in both extinct dinosaurs and birds, or in birds only. If present in extinct dinosaurs and birds, but not crocodilians, it would indicate that it arose in the common ancestor of this clade, thus adding support to the closer phylogenetic relationship of dinosaurs and birds relative to crocodilians. Thus, the question of whether the crocodilian Alligator mississippiensis forms medullary bone during the production of eggs has important evolutionary significance. Our examination of long bones from several alligators (two alligators with eggs in the oviducts, one that had produced eggs in the past but was not currently in reproductive phase, an immature female and an adult male) shows no differences on the endosteal surfaces of the long bones, and no evidence of medullary bone, supporting the hypothesis that medullary bone first evolved in the dinosaur-bird line, after the divergence of crocodilians from this lineage.

  4. Thyroid disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Becks, G P; Burrow, G N

    1991-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in younger women and may be a factor in reproductive dysfunction. This probably only applies to severe cases of hyper- or hypothyroidism. Once adequately treated, neither of these disorders significantly impacts on fertility. The key is to recognize and to treat thyroid disorders in the reproductive-age woman before conception. Thyroxine therapy and even antithyroid drug therapy should be continued during pregnancy as necessary. Pregnancy is a euthyroid state that is normally maintained by complex changes in thyroid physiology. The fetal and neonatal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system develops independently, but it may be influenced by thyroid disease in the mother. Early pregnancy is characterized by an increase in maternal T4 secretion stimulated by hCG and an increase in TBG, resulting in the elevated total serum T4 in pregnancy. The debate continues as to whether maternal T4 is important in early or late fetal brain development. If so, the physiologic changes in thyroid hormone secretion and transport in early pregnancy would help to ensure that a sufficient amount of thyroid hormone was available. There is new evidence in human subjects that substantial maternal T4 can cross the placenta during pregnancy, and this may be particularly important when fetal thyroid function is compromised as a result of congenital hypothyroidism. Maternal and fetal/neonatal outcomes in pregnancy are adversely affected if severe hypothyroidism is undiagnosed or inadequately treated. Thyroid function tests should be obtained during gestation in women taking T4 and appropriate dose adjustments should be made for TSH levels outside a normal range. The TSH-receptor blocking antibodies from the mother are a recognized cause of congenital hypothyroidism in the fetus and neonate that can be permanent or transient. If neonatal hypothyroidism is detected through neonatal screening programs, and prompt and adequate T4 replacement therapy is instituted as soon as

  5. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  6. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. PMID:25433782

  7. Thyroid hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Olateju, Tolulope O; Vanderpump, Mark P J

    2006-11-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome of reduced end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Patients with RTH have elevated serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations and normal or slightly elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level. Despite a variable clinical presentation, the common characteristic clinical features are goitre but an absence of the usual symptoms and metabolic consequences of thyroid hormone excess. Patients with RTH can be classified on clinical grounds alone into either generalized resistance (GRTH), pituitary resistance (PRTH) or combined. Mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta gene are responsible for RTH and 122 different mutations have now been identified belonging to 300 families. With the exception of one family found to have complete deletion of the TRbeta gene, all others have been demonstrated to have minor alterations at the DNA level. The differential diagnosis includes a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma and the presence of endogenous antibodies directed against thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Failure to differentiate RTH from primary thyrotoxicosis has resulted in the inappropriate treatment of nearly one-third of patients. Although occasionally desirable, no specific treatment is available for RTH; however, the diagnosis allows appropriate genetic counselling. PMID:17132274

  8. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Preeti, L; Magesh, KT; Rajkumar, K; Karthik, Raghavendhar

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulcers are common painful mucosal conditions affecting the oral cavity. Despite their high prevalence, etiopathogenesis remains unclear. This review article summarizes the clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, and recent trends in the management of recurrent apthous stomatitis. PMID:22144824

  9. Cancer stem cells as a potential therapeutic target in thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; Colarossi, Cristina; Giuffrida, Dario; De Maria, Ruggero; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that tumor growth and proliferation is dependent on a small subset of cells, defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have the capability to self-renew, and are involved with cancer propagation, relapse and metastatic dissemination. CSCs have been isolated from numerous tissues, including normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. A regulatory network of signaling pathways and microRNAs (miRNAs) control the properties of CSCs. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common type of endocrine cancer, with an increasing incidence. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the most rare type of endocrine cancer; however, it also exhibits the highest mortality rate among thyroid malignancies, with an extremely short survival time. Thyroid CSCs are invasive and highly resistant to conventional therapies, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which results in disease relapse even when the primary lesion has been eradicated. Therefore, targeting thyroid CSCs may represent an effective treatment strategy against aggressive neoplasms, including recurrent and radioresistant tumors. The present review summarizes the current literature regarding thyroid CSCs and discusses therapeutic strategies that target these cells, with a focus on the function of self-renewal pathways and miRNAs. Elucidation of the mechanisms that regulate CSC growth and survival may improve novel therapeutic approaches for treatment-resistant thyroid cancers.

  10. Cancer stem cells as a potential therapeutic target in thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; Colarossi, Cristina; Giuffrida, Dario; De Maria, Ruggero; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that tumor growth and proliferation is dependent on a small subset of cells, defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have the capability to self-renew, and are involved with cancer propagation, relapse and metastatic dissemination. CSCs have been isolated from numerous tissues, including normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. A regulatory network of signaling pathways and microRNAs (miRNAs) control the properties of CSCs. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common type of endocrine cancer, with an increasing incidence. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the most rare type of endocrine cancer; however, it also exhibits the highest mortality rate among thyroid malignancies, with an extremely short survival time. Thyroid CSCs are invasive and highly resistant to conventional therapies, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which results in disease relapse even when the primary lesion has been eradicated. Therefore, targeting thyroid CSCs may represent an effective treatment strategy against aggressive neoplasms, including recurrent and radioresistant tumors. The present review summarizes the current literature regarding thyroid CSCs and discusses therapeutic strategies that target these cells, with a focus on the function of self-renewal pathways and miRNAs. Elucidation of the mechanisms that regulate CSC growth and survival may improve novel therapeutic approaches for treatment-resistant thyroid cancers. PMID:27698787

  11. Relapse or Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  12. Subperiostial recurrence of chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sumanth; Deavers, Michael; Lin, Patrick; Haygood, Tamara Miner

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of subperiosteal recurrence of chondroblastoma adjacent to the greater trochanter that was initially thought to represent septic arthritis of the hip in a 10-year-old girl. Soft-tissue recurrence of chondroblastoma is very rare, with fewer than ten cases reported in the literature. We demonstrate the recurrence on both CT and MRI. The MRI clearly demonstrates the soft-tissue recurrence and the associated inflammatory changes, with signal characteristics not unlike the primary tumor. PMID:27307836

  13. Does normal thyroid gland by ultrasonography match with normal serum thyroid hormones and negative thyroid antibodies?

    PubMed

    Trimboli, P; Rossi, F; Condorelli, E; Laurenti, O; Ventura, C; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Guarino, M; Valabrega, S

    2010-10-01

    Few papers have shown that a hypoechoic appearance of the thyroid gland at ultrasonography (US) is related to a hypofunction and serum positivity of thyroid antibodies (T-Ab). However, it is not ascertained if normal thyroid appearance at US correspond to normal thyroid laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to assess the value of normal thyroid at US in predicting normal thyroid hormones and negative T-Ab in a cohort of 48 adult patients. All patients (37 females and 11 males) were referred to our hospital to undergo their first thyroid US examination, followed by a thyroid function evaluation. All subjects had normal thyroid gland at US. As a control group 65 patients with hypoechoic and inhomogeneous thyroid gland were enrolled. All 48 patients had normal free-T (3) and free-T (4) levels. While 41 patients (85.4%) showed normal TSH, in 7 subjects (14.6%) TSH was elevated and a significant (p < 0.001) difference was recorded between the two groups in mean TSH value. Positive T-Ab value was found in 5 patients (10.4%) and the remaining 43 patients (89.6%) had negative T-Ab. TSH was not significantly correlated with age, thyroid volume or BMI. The multivariate model showed that only BMI was significantly correlated to thyroid volume (p < 0.01, r(2)=0.31). These results showed that normal thyroid recorded by US matches with normal thyroid laboratory assessment to a large degree. These preliminary data need to be confirmed in a prospective study and in a larger series and should suggest the evaluation of thyrotropin and thyroid antibodies in subjects with normal thyroid gland as assessed by US.

  14. On the Origin of Cells and Derivation of Thyroid Cancer: C Cell Story Revisited.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mikael; Williams, Dillwyn

    2016-07-01

    We will highlight and put into perspective new lineage tracing data from genetic studies in mice indicating that the genuine progenitors to C cells arise in the endoderm germ layer. This overturns the current concept of a neural crest origin of thyroid C cells referred to in every textbook and dedicated paper to this very day. As will become apparent, except for a single experiment, the neural crest theory has little or no support when the evolution and development of calcitonin-producing cells in the entire chordate family are considered. Instead, a unifying origin of all cells of the ultimobranchial bodies reopens questions on the histogenesis of certain thyroid pathologies previously difficult to explain. On this aspect, medullary thyroid cancer shows a stronger connection to gut neuroendocrine tumours than previously recognized. It is envisaged that novel factors implicated in C cell-derived tumour growth and progression will be discovered as the mechanisms that regulate lineage expansion of embryonic C cell precursors from pharyngeal endoderm are uncovered. We will not discuss why C cells go to the bother of burying themselves in the thyroid - this remains a mystery.

  15. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  16. Follicular thyroid adenoma dominated by spindle cells: report of two unusual cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Agaimy; Thomas, Hahn; Josef, Schroeder; Afaf, Elhag

    2012-01-01

    Primary spindle cell neoplasms of the thyroid gland are quite rare. They encompass a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant lesions of mesenchymal and epithelial origin. We herein describe two unusual follicular thyroid adenomas dominated by spindle cells with occasional areas of colloid-forming follicular differentiation. The tumors affected a 77-year woman and a 70-year old man; both had a long-history of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). One tumor presented as a large cold thyroid nodule and the other was an autopsy finding. The tumors were predominantly composed of fibroblast-like spindled cells. One case showed prominent meningioma-like concentric perivascular arrangement and contained cytoplasmic melanin-like pigment. Stromal hyalinization was a prominent feature of both. By immunohistochemistry, the spindled cells expressed vimentin, pankeratin (KL1), thyroglobulin and TTF1 consistent with a follicular differentiation. They did not stain with calcitonin, CEA and other lineage-specific mesenchymal, neuroendocrine and melanocytic markers. There was no evidence of metastasis at autopsy (case 2) or at last follow-up 2 years after surgery (case 1). These cases demonstrate the diversity of follicular thyroid neoplasms and the unusual occurrence of extensive spindle cell metaplasia. These uncommon lesions need to be distinguished from spindle cell medullary carcinoma, paucicellular spindle cell anaplastic carcinoma, spindle cell foci in papillary and follicular carcinoma, solitary fibrous tumor and other rare benign and malignant mesenchymal lesions. PMID:22400075

  17. Safety of Completion Thyroidectomy for Initially Misdiagnosed Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kranthikumar, Gangiti; Syed, Nusrath; Nemade, Hemantkumar; Pawar, Satish; Chandra Sekhara Rao, L. M.; Subramanyeshwar Rao, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Completion thyroidectomy is defined as the surgical removal of the remnant thyroid tissue following procedures of less than total or near-total thyroidectomy. Whether thyroid reoperations are associated with an increased complication risk is controversial. Objective A retrospective analysis was done of patients undergoing completion thyroidectomy for cancer of the thyroid who had undergone surgery elsewhere for solitary thyroid nodule. The incidence of surgical complications in these patients after reoperation was investigated in this study. Material and methods The study included a total of 53 patients who had undergone thyroid lobectomy for a solitary nodule as initial surgery elsewhere and were referred to our institute for completion thyroidectomy when the histopathology revealed malignancy. Results There were 53 patients, 43 females and 10 males. Their mean age was 34.7±12.12 years (range 19–65 years). After initial surgery, the histopathology revealed papillary carcinoma in 46 patients (86.8%), follicular carcinoma in 7 (13.2%). Fourteen out of 53 patients had recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy after initial surgery (26.4%). None of the patients had clinical hypocalcemia after the first surgery. One or more parathyroid glands were identified and preserved in 52 patients (98.1%) in the process of completion thyroidectomy. No patient had additional recurrent nerve injury at the second surgery. The mean serum calcium value preoperatively was 8.96±0.39 mg/dL, and six months after surgery serum calcium was 8.74±0.56 mg/dL. Mean follow-up was 18 months. Transient hypoparathyroidism occurred in 24.5% patients. Five patients were lost to follow-up. Permanent and symptomatic hyperparathyroidism occurred in eight patients (16.67%). Conclusions Completion thyroidectomy is a safe and appropriate option in the management of well-differentiated thyroid cancer. It removes disease on the ipsilateral and contralateral side of the thyroid and carries a low risk

  18. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  19. [Thyroid gland and fertility].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, P

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that the thyroid hormones are associated with a number of aspects of the human reproduction. Both states, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, have significant effect on the estrogen and androgen metabolism, the menstrual function and on fertility. The role of thyroid hormones (TH) during infertility has been little exploited. Interesting facts are that TH deficiency is more common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and in certain cases with unexplained infertility. There are very few studies on the effect and paracrine regulation of TH and its receptors in the female reproductive tract. This report provides an overview of the most common thyroid disorders and their impact on ovarian function and reproductive performance in women as well as in cases with infertility and the implementation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). PMID:25675618

  20. [Therapy of thyroid nodules].

    PubMed

    Schott, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent in Germany. In about every fourth person thyroid nodules can be detected. Most of them are benign. Signs for malignancy are hypoechogenicity, microcalcifications, an unregular margin and increased blood perfusion. There is no strict indication for the treatment of benign nodules. In most cases iodine supplementation is sufficient. A combination therapy with levothyroxine and iodine is more efficient for the treatment of larger nodules. Subclinical hyperthyroidism caused by an adenoma does not necessarily need to be treated, whereas manifest hyperthyroidism needs to treated in most cases with antithyroid drug therapy. Radioiodine therapy is the classical indication for the treatment of unifocal autonomous adenomas. A largely increased thyroid gland with and without uni- / multifocal adenomas are often operated. PMID:25831118

  1. Expression of p63 and Bcl-2 in Malignant Thyroid Tumors and their Correlation with other Diagnostic Immunocytochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shyama; Khurana, Nita; Kakar, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bcl-2 is a marker recently studied in thyroid tumours and proposed to have prognostic significance. p63 is expressed in a proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases and may have a role in tumour progression. Aim To study expression of Bcl2 and p63 in thyroid tumours and correlation of Bcl-2 with diagnostic markers including Thyroglobulin, Calcitonin and Carcinoembryonic antigen. Materials and Methods Cytology smears of 35 cases of thyroid cancer were studied over a period of 18 months. In 20 cases histopathology was available. Immunocytochemistry for Bcl-2 and p63 was done, and diagnostic markers were applied as and when required. Results p63 showed focal nuclear expression in 46.1% of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases, and was negative in all other tumours. Bcl-2 was positive in 88.9% of follicular carcinomas, 100% of papillary carcinomas and 83.3% of medullary carcinoma cases, and showed focal weak expression in 40% of Anaplastic Carcinoma (ATC) cases, thereby signifying down regulation (p-value = 0.001). There was significant down regulation of Thyroglobulin (Tg) in ATC vs well differentiated follicular derived tumours (p-value ≤ 0.016). Positive correlation was noted between expression of Bcl-2 and Calcitonin (0.93) and Bcl-2 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) (0.89), and weak positive correlation (0.65) between Tg and Bcl-2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is downregulated in anaplastic carcinomas as compared to well differentiated thyroid tumours, and shows correlation with differentiation associated tumour antigens. Thus, loss of Bcl-2 was associated with loss of differentiation in thyroid tumours. Anaplastic carcinoma as such is associated with worse prognosis and loss of Bcl-2 may be partly responsible for the same. p63 is specific but less sensitive marker for PTC. Further studies are required to determine the role of Bcl-2 and p63 in thyroid tumours. PMID:27630849

  2. Expression of p63 and Bcl-2 in Malignant Thyroid Tumors and their Correlation with other Diagnostic Immunocytochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shyama; Khurana, Nita; Kakar, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bcl-2 is a marker recently studied in thyroid tumours and proposed to have prognostic significance. p63 is expressed in a proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases and may have a role in tumour progression. Aim To study expression of Bcl2 and p63 in thyroid tumours and correlation of Bcl-2 with diagnostic markers including Thyroglobulin, Calcitonin and Carcinoembryonic antigen. Materials and Methods Cytology smears of 35 cases of thyroid cancer were studied over a period of 18 months. In 20 cases histopathology was available. Immunocytochemistry for Bcl-2 and p63 was done, and diagnostic markers were applied as and when required. Results p63 showed focal nuclear expression in 46.1% of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases, and was negative in all other tumours. Bcl-2 was positive in 88.9% of follicular carcinomas, 100% of papillary carcinomas and 83.3% of medullary carcinoma cases, and showed focal weak expression in 40% of Anaplastic Carcinoma (ATC) cases, thereby signifying down regulation (p-value = 0.001). There was significant down regulation of Thyroglobulin (Tg) in ATC vs well differentiated follicular derived tumours (p-value ≤ 0.016). Positive correlation was noted between expression of Bcl-2 and Calcitonin (0.93) and Bcl-2 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) (0.89), and weak positive correlation (0.65) between Tg and Bcl-2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is downregulated in anaplastic carcinomas as compared to well differentiated thyroid tumours, and shows correlation with differentiation associated tumour antigens. Thus, loss of Bcl-2 was associated with loss of differentiation in thyroid tumours. Anaplastic carcinoma as such is associated with worse prognosis and loss of Bcl-2 may be partly responsible for the same. p63 is specific but less sensitive marker for PTC. Further studies are required to determine the role of Bcl-2 and p63 in thyroid tumours.

  3. [Non thyroidal illnesses (NTIS)].

    PubMed

    Luca, F; Goichot, B; Brue, T

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities in the circulating levels of thyroid hormones, without evidence of coexisting thyroid or pituitary gland disease can be observed in all general diseases. These nonthyroidal illnesses (NTIS) are the result of complex mechanisms that combine the effect of some drugs, cytokines, nutritional and endocrine factors at all levels of the thyrotropic axis, from the hypothalamus to the cellular transporters and nuclear receptors of thyroid hormones. The patterns of NTIS depend on the underlying disease and its severity. Thirtyfive years after the initial description, the pathophysiological significance of these anomalies remains controversial. One of the dilemma of NTIS is whether the hormone responses represent an adaptive and normal, physiologic response to conserve energy and protect against hypercatabolism in case of aggression, or whether it is a maladaptive response contributing to a worsening of the disease. This debate is not just a theoretical question, because in the first case the process must be respected, in the other case a vigorous treatment to restore circulating thyroid hormone levels is justified. There have been very few clinical studies designed to address whether the substitution with thyroid hormone is advantageous, and there is at current time no permissive evidence for the use of thyroid hormone replacement in patients with NTIS. But the clinical context, the choice of the molecule or of the dose and the way of administration were not necessarily the most relevant. Theoretically, stimulation of thyreotrope axis used a continuous infusion of TRH seems to provide clinical benefit. With the expectation that randomized clinical trials will provide demonstration of NTIS treatment efficiency, the question might remain unanswered for several more years.

  4. Thyroid Disease and the Heart.

    PubMed

    Klein, Irwin; Danzi, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid hormones have an intimate relationship with cardiac function. Some of the most significant clinical signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are the cardiac manifestations. In both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, the characteristic physiological effects of thyroid hormone can be understood from the actions at the molecular and cellular level. Here we explore topics from the metabolism and cellular effects of thyroid hormone to special considerations related to statin and amiodarone therapy for the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany heart disease. PMID:26792255

  5. Metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast to the thyroid gland diagnosed with fine needle aspiration: A case report with emphasis on morphologic and immunophenotypic features.

    PubMed

    Magers, Martin J; Dueber, Julie C; Lew, Madelyn; Pang, Judy C; Davenport, Robertson D

    2016-06-01

    Metastases to the thyroid are uncommon [<0.2% of thyroid fine needle aspirations (FNA)]. Of metastases to the thyroid, breast carcinoma is relatively common. The diagnosis of metastasis to the thyroid has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. To our knowledge, a morphologic and immunophenotypic comparison of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast and primary thyroid carcinomas has not been reported. Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female with a history of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast (modified Bloom-Richardson grade 2; ER+, PgR+, HER2+) diagnosed 6 years prior. She developed hoarseness, prompting a CT scan. Multiple thyroid nodules were found, including a 1.5 cm hypoechoic, solid, irregularly-shaped nodule. On FNA, cells were arranged singly and in crowded groups, varied in size and degree of pleomorphism, and exhibited rare nuclear grooves, inconspicuous nucleoli, and rare intracytoplasmic lumina with no nuclear pseudoinclusions or colloid (Figs. 1A and B). These findings raised the differential of papillary thyroid carcinoma (Fig. 1C), follicular neoplasm (Fig. 1D), medullary carcinoma (Fig. 1E), parathyroid (Fig. 1F), and metastatic breast carcinoma. Immunostaining for GATA-3 (+), ER (+), PAX-8 (-), and TTF-1 (-) was consistent with metastatic breast carcinoma (Fig. 2). We conclude that metastatic breast carcinoma to the thyroid may morphologically mimic primary thyroid carcinoma on FNA; a panel of immunomarkers, such as GATA-3, hormonal marker(s), PAX-8, and TTF-1, may be useful in some cases. GATA-3 immunostaining for metastatic breast carcinoma was helpful in our case and has not been previously reported in a thyroid metastasis sampled by FNA. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:530-534. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Browne-Martin, K; Emerson, C H

    1997-03-01

    Four disorders of the postpartum period are associated with thyroid dysfunction. The most common is PPT. Although recovery from thyroid dysfunction often occurs in PPT, many patients eventually develop permanent hypothyroidism. Postpartum Graves' Disease is less common than PPT, but it is not unusual. Whereas antithyroid drugs are indicated for postpartum Graves' Disease, they are not useful in PPT. Although they are rare, lymphocytic hypophysitis and postpartum pituitary infarction are important entities because they cause deficiencies of many critical hormones. The autoimmune nature of PPT, postpartum Graves' disease, and lymphocytic hypophysitis highlights the unique effects of pregnancy on the immune system.

  7. High-frequency oscillations in membrane potentials of medullary inspiratory and expiratory neurons (including laryngeal motoneurons).

    PubMed

    Huang, W X; Cohen, M I; Yu, Q; See, W R; He, Q

    1996-09-01

    1. In midcollicular decerebrate, unanesthetized, paralyzed cats ventilated with a cycle-triggered pump system, the properties of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 50-100 Hz) in membrane potentials (MPs) of medullary inspiratory (I) and expiratory (E) cells were studied. Simultaneous recordings were taken from bilateral phrenic and recurrent laryngeal (RL) nerves and from cells in the intermediate ventral respiratory group (intVRG, 0-1 mm rostral to the obex) or the caudal ventral respiratory group (cVRG, 2-4 mm caudal to the obex). 2. Spectral coherence analyses were used to detect the presence of HFOs during I in I and E cell MPs. Cross-correlation histograms (CCHs) between the cell and phrenic signals were used to ascertain cell-nerve HFO phase relations and to identify cells as RL motoneurons. Of the 103 cells that had significant HFOs (cell-phrenic coherences > or = 0.1), measurable HFO peak lags in the CCH were seen in 53 cells: 1) RL cells (9 I cells and 7 E cells); and 2) other types of cell (8 intVRG I cells, 18 intVRG E cells, and 11 cVRG E cells). These cells had high HFO correlations; the cell-phrenic coherence range was 0.35-0.94, with a mean HFO frequency of 58 Hz. 3. The cell-phrenic HFO lag (in ms) was measured in the CCH as the lag of the primary peak (peak located nearest to 0 lag). The phase lag was defined as (lag of primary peak in ms)/(HFO period in ms). The phase lags differed markedly between two subsets of cells: 1) RL I cells had HFO depolarization peaks that lagged the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = -0.18); and 2) the non-RL cells, regardless of location (intVRG or cVRG) and type (I or E), had HFO depolarization peaks leading (preceding) the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = 0.28). In addition, the cVRG E cells had significantly shorter cell-phrenic phase lags than the intVRG E cells (0.23 vs. 0.31, respectively). 4. These lags can be compared with the (I unit)-phrenic phase lags (average

  8. Medullary activation of intercostal fusimotor and alpha motoneurones

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P.; Sears, T. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Studies have been made of the anatomical localization in the brain stem of the sites at which tetanic stimulation evoke inspiratory and expiratory apneusis. 2. The inspiratory responses arise from a relatively circumscribed region within the medulla corresponding to the nucleus reticularis giganto-cellularis and ventralis which give rise to the medullary contingent of the long reticulo-spinal tracts. Expiratory responses were obtained dorsal and lateral to this area, but not localized to any cyto-architectonically distinct region of the reticular formation. 3. During the apneustic responses there was co-activation of the intercostal alpha and fusimotor neurones with reciprocal inhibition of the antagonistic motoneurones. The threshold for activation of the fusimotor neurones was usually lower than for the alpha motoneurones. 4. Results with brief tetanic stimulation suggest that the long reticulospinal tracts are responsible for the apneustic responses and that the effects are mediated at segmental level over an interneuronal pathway. 5. The response of the intercostal motoneurones during the apneustic responses is shown to be dependent on the integrity of the dorsal spinal roots. PMID:5499806

  9. Medullary activation of intercostal fusimotor and alpha motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P; Sears, T A

    1970-08-01

    1. Studies have been made of the anatomical localization in the brain stem of the sites at which tetanic stimulation evoke inspiratory and expiratory apneusis.2. The inspiratory responses arise from a relatively circumscribed region within the medulla corresponding to the nucleus reticularis giganto-cellularis and ventralis which give rise to the medullary contingent of the long reticulo-spinal tracts. Expiratory responses were obtained dorsal and lateral to this area, but not localized to any cyto-architectonically distinct region of the reticular formation.3. During the apneustic responses there was co-activation of the intercostal alpha and fusimotor neurones with reciprocal inhibition of the antagonistic motoneurones. The threshold for activation of the fusimotor neurones was usually lower than for the alpha motoneurones.4. Results with brief tetanic stimulation suggest that the long reticulospinal tracts are responsible for the apneustic responses and that the effects are mediated at segmental level over an interneuronal pathway.5. The response of the intercostal motoneurones during the apneustic responses is shown to be dependent on the integrity of the dorsal spinal roots.

  10. Lateral medullary ischemia presenting with persistent hiccups and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Rufa, Alessandra; Cerase, Alfonso; Bracco, Sandra; Galluzzi, Paolo; Venturi, Carlo; Nuti, Daniele

    2010-03-01

    This study describes a patient with lateral medullary ischemia (LMI) presenting with persistent hiccups followed by vertigo with horizontal head-shaking-induced contralesional nystagmus (HSN) and discusses pertinent pathophysiology. A 65-year-old man presented with persistent hiccups and disabling spells of vertigo, lasting 30 seconds that became much more frequent and associated with lateropulsion to the right. A strong left beating HSN was evident. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, and intra-arterial cerebral digital subtracted angiography showed subacute ischemic lesions in the right lateral medulla and ipsilateral inferior cerebellar hemisphere, and two tight stenoses of the V1 and V4 segments of the right vertebral artery. Patient was treated by intravenous heparin and oral clopidogrel. After 48 hours, hiccups disappeared. One month later, vertigo spells were less frequent but still disabling. Endovascular stenting of the right vertebral artery stenoses was then performed. In the subsequent four years, the patient had no further episodes of hiccups or vertigo. Less intense HSN persisted. Hiccups followed by vertigo, lateropulsion, and HSN had been the clinical presentation of LMI and cerebellar ischemia, without other major neurologic or ocular motor findings. This unusual clinical variant of LMI could mimic a more benign labyrinthine lesion, and possibly leading to a dangerously delayed treatment.

  11. Medullary infarction--was it depo-provera?

    PubMed

    Oon, C J; Lee, Y S

    1980-10-01

    A possible relation between parenteral Depo-Provera and the subsequent development of medullary infarction in a heavy smoker is reported. The patient, a 40-year old Chinese woman had smoked 30 cigarettes daily for many years. She received injections of 150 mg Depo-Provera in April and July 1979. 2 days after the 2nd injection she was admitted to the hospital for vomiting and vertigo of 2 days duration. Clinical examination showed a 12th nerve palsy with the tongue deviated to the right but no other neurological abnormalities. She was treated symptomatically with intravenous fluids and stemetil and improved. On the 5th day her vertigo and vomiting progressed and she developed more lower brain stem signs. The same day she had a grand mal fit and went into a coma. She died on the 7th hospital day. A partial autopsy limited to the skull revealed minimal atherosclerosis of the vertebral artery but no thrombosis or occlusion. Cut sections after perfusion revealed an area of softening associated with some hemorrhage involving the whole length of the right half of the medulla oblongata dorsal to the olivary nucleus. Histological examination revealed an infarct undergoing liquefaction necrosis. The possibility of a causative relationship is suggested by the development of tinnitis about 12 hours after injection of Depo-Provera. PMID:6452693

  12. Hormonal regulation of medullary bone metabolism in the laying hen

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new organ culture system for the study of bone formation has been developed using medullary bone, a non-structural, metabolically active form of bone which is found in the marrow cavities of egg-laying birds. In the presence of fetal calf serum, bone explants were viable in culture by morphological criteria, and retained large numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-proline into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and non-collagen protein (NCP) was determined using purified bacterial collagenase. Collagen accounted for over 10% of the total protein labeled. The calcium-regulating hormones, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into CDP. The effective dose range of 1,25(OH)2D3 was 0.1 nM to 100 nM, while that of PTH was 1.0 nM to 100 nM. The effect of both hormones was specific for collagen, since /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into NCP was unaffected. Hydroxyproline analysis of bone explants and culture medium revealed that both hormones decreased the total hydroxyroline content of the cultures, suggesting that the inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into DCP is due to inhibition of collagen synthesis.

  13. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  14. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thyroid gland: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Jin; Kashima, Kenji; Daa, Tsutomu; Kondoh, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Masashi; Kerakawauchi, Hideomi; Yokoyama, Shigeo

    2006-08-01

    Presented herein are the first two Japanese cases of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the thyroid gland. The patients were 64- and 41-year-old men, who underwent hemithyroidectomy for thyroid tumors. Histopathologically, the tumors were well circumscribed, and were composed of spindle cells, collagen bundles and entrapped thyroid follicles. Spindle cells and collagen bundles were mostly in a patternless arrangement with an admixture of hypo- and hypercellular areas. Proliferating spindle cells were bland, slender, and occasionally wavy without any atypia and increased mitotic figures. Immunohistochemically, they were strongly positive for CD34, CD99, and bcl-2, but negative for epithelial membrane antigen, keratin, thyroglobulin, calcitonin, thyroid transcription factor-1, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, S-100 protein and CD117. Based on these findings, the two patients were diagnosed as having thyroid SFT. Neither local recurrence nor metastasis has been observed in 5 years in patient 1 or in 4 years in patient 2. Thyroid SFT is extremely rare, and only 20 cases have been reported in the English-language literature including hemangiopericytoma. Although recurrence or metastasis has not been described in any reported cases, the clinical behavior of SFT is still undetermined, therefore long-term follow up seems necessary at present.

  15. Bladder urine oxygen tension for assessing renal medullary oxygenation in rabbits: experimental and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Sgouralis, Ioannis; Kett, Michelle M; Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Layton, Anita T; Gardiner, Bruce S; Smith, David W; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Evans, Roger G

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen tension (Po2) of urine in the bladder could be used to monitor risk of acute kidney injury if it varies with medullary Po2 Therefore, we examined this relationship and characterized oxygen diffusion across walls of the ureter and bladder in anesthetized rabbits. A computational model was then developed to predict medullary Po2 from bladder urine Po2 Both intravenous infusion of [Phe(2),Ile(3),Orn(8)]-vasopressin and infusion of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine reduced urinary Po2 and medullary Po2 (8-17%), yet had opposite effects on renal blood flow and urine flow. Changes in bladder urine Po2 during these stimuli correlated strongly with changes in medullary Po2 (within-rabbit r(2) = 0.87-0.90). Differences in the Po2 of saline infused into the ureter close to the kidney could be detected in the bladder, although this was diminished at lesser ureteric flow. Diffusion of oxygen across the wall of the bladder was very slow, so it was not considered in the computational model. The model predicts Po2 in the pelvic ureter (presumed to reflect medullary Po2) from known values of bladder urine Po2, urine flow, and arterial Po2 Simulations suggest that, across a physiological range of urine flow in anesthetized rabbits (0.1-0.5 ml/min for a single kidney), a change in bladder urine Po2 explains 10-50% of the change in pelvic urine/medullary Po2 Thus, it is possible to infer changes in medullary Po2 from changes in urinary Po2, so urinary Po2 may have utility as a real-time biomarker of risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27385734

  16. An integrated analysis of cancer genes in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Li; Li, Jia; Lv, Zhongwei

    2016-02-01

    Cancer driver genes are commonly mutationally disrupted in cancer, which confers a growth advantage to tumor cells. Recent studies preferentially search for recurrently mutated driver genes across multiple tumor samples, leading to the neglect of low-frequency mutated cancer genes. The present study was conducted to identify cancer‑driving genes in thyroid cancer with two distinct tools, OncodriveFM and Dendrix, which aim to detect neglected driver genes with low mutation frequency. A total of 23,620 somatic mutations generated by whole‑exome sequencing of 446 tumor/normal pairs of thyroid cancer were obtained from TCGA. Variant classification was conducted with Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor (VEP). OncodriveFM and Dendrix were applied to detect driver genes and pathways with statistical evidence. In addition, we analyzed DNA‑methylation status, copy number variation, expression levels and fusion genes among these driver candidates. In total, non‑synonymous mutations accounted for over 55% (13,091/23,620) of the total variants; 53 and 3 driver genes were determined by OncodriveFM and Dendrix, respectively, including 6 recurrently mutated driver genes, such as BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, EIF1AX, KRAS and 47 new genes. A total of 75 pathways with high function impact bias were identified by OncodriveFM. Two genes, FHOD3 and SRP72, were hypomethylated, overexpressed and involved in major deletions in thyroid cancer. Moreover, we identified 91 pairs of fusion genes, 89 of which were new fusion pairs in thyroid cancer. In conclusion, we successfully identified a list of new cancer genes, pathways and fusion genes, providing better insight into the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer. PMID:26718127

  17. Natural history, treatment, and course of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, L.J.; Kaplan, E.L.; McCormick, M.; Straus, F.H. )

    1990-08-01

    We have analyzed the course of papillary thyroid carcinoma in 269 patients managed at the University of Chicago, with an average follow-up period of 12 yr from the time of diagnosis. Patients were categorized by clinical class; I, with intrathyroidal disease; II, with cervical nodal metastases; III, with extrathyroidal invasion; and IV, with distant metastases. Half of the patients had a history of thyroid enlargement known, on the average, for over 3 yr. In 15% of patients given thyroid hormone, the mass decreased in size. The peak incidence of cancer was when subjects were between 20-40 yr of age. Tumors averaged 2.4 cm in size; 21.6% had tumor capsule invasion, and 46% of patients had multifocal tumors. Sixty-six percent of the patients had near-total or total thyroidectomy. The overall incidence of postoperative hypoparathyroidism was 8.4%, but the incidence was zero in 83 near-total or total thyroidectomies carried out by 1 surgeon. Twenty-five percent of the patients had continuing or recurrent disease, and 8.2% died from cancer. Deaths occurred largely in patients with class III or IV disease. Cervical lymph nodes were associated with increased recurrences, but not increased deaths. Extrathyroidal invasion carried an increased risk of 5.8-fold for death, and distant metastases increased this risk 47-fold. Age over 45 yr at diagnosis increased the risk of death 32-fold. Tumor size over 3 cm increased the risk of death 5.8-fold. Surgical treatment combining lobectomy plus at least contralateral subtotal thyroidectomy was associated, by Cox proportional hazard analysis, with decreased risk of death in patients with tumors larger than 1 cm and decreased risk of recurrence among all patients, including patients in classes I and II, compared to patients who underwent unilateral thyroid surgery or bilateral subtotal resections.

  18. Overview of the 2015 American Thyroid Association guidelines for managing thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Matti, Bashar; Cohen-Hallaleh, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed numerous publications addressing the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this review is to provide a simplified summary of the newly released guidelines by the American Thyroid Association. A systematic approach has been recommended to evaluate a thyroid nodule through clinical assessment, measurement of serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, neck ultrasonography and Fine Needle Aspiration where appropriate. This is followed by cytology analysis using the Bethesda scoring system to detect malignancy. Once diagnosed, thyroid cancers need to be staged and risk stratification needs to be applied to develop further treatment plans. Lastly, several recommendations have been presented to assure proper follow-up and support for thyroid cancer patients regardless of the treatment received. PMID:27607088

  19. Cancer of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 64,300 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.8% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,980 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 637,115 people living with thyroid cancer in ...

  20. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to make thyroid hormone, iodine is an important mineral for a mother during pregnancy. During pregnancy, the baby gets iodine from the mother’s diet. Women need more iodine when they are pregnant—about 250 micrograms a day. In the United States, about 7 percent of pregnant women may not ...

  1. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and radiation fallout from power plant accidents or nuclear weapons. Having had head or neck radiation treatments in childhood is a risk factor for ... should be done using the lowest dose of radiation that still provides a clear ... from nuclear weapons or power plant accidents. For instance, thyroid ...

  2. Tubercular thyroid abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awanish; Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Srivastava, Rohit; Khan, Khursheed Alam

    2013-01-01

    We encountered a patient who presented with neck swelling, difficulty in swallowing, voice change along with systemic features such as evening rise of temperature, chronic cough and weight loss. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed two cystic swellings. An ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of tubercular abscess. The patient responded well to antigravity aspiration of the swellings and antitubercular treatment.

  3. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  4. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  5. Relb acts downstream of medullary thymic epithelial stem cells and is essential for the emergence of RANK(+) medullary epithelial progenitors.

    PubMed

    Baik, Song; Sekai, Miho; Hamazaki, Yoko; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) provide essential signals for αβT-cell development, and medullary TECs (mTECs) control T-cell tolerance through both negative selection and Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell development. Although heterogeneity within the mTEC compartment is well studied, the molecular regulators of specific stages of mTEC development are still poorly understood. Given the importance of the RANK-RANKL axis in thymus medulla formation, we have used RANK Venus reporter mice to analyze the ontogeny of RANK(+) TECs during development and correlated RANK expression with mTEC stem cells defined by SSEA-1. In addition, we have investigated how requirements for the key regulators Foxn1 and Relb map to specific stages of mTEC development. Here, we show SSEA-1(+) mTEC stem cells emerge prior to RANK expression and are present in both nude and Relb(-/-) mice, providing direct evidence that mTEC lineage specification occurs independently of Foxn1 and Relb. In contrast, we show that Relb is necessary for the effective production of downstream RANK(+) mTEC progenitors. Collectively, our work defines stage-specific requirements for critical TEC regulators during medulla development, including the timing of Relb dependency, and provides new information on mechanisms controlling mTEC specification. PMID:26806881

  6. Chemical contamination and the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Duntas, Leonidas H

    2015-02-01

    Industrial chemical contaminants have a variable impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, this depending both on their class and on confounding factors. Today, mounting evidence is pointing to the role of environmental factors, and specifically EDCs, in the current distressing upsurge in the incidence of thyroid disease. The unease is warranted. These substances, which are nowadays rife in our environments (including in foodstuffs), have been shown to interfere with thyroid hormone action, biosynthesis, and metabolism, resulting in disruption of tissue homeostasis and/or thyroid function. Importantly, based on the concept of the "nonmonotonic dose-response curve", the relationship between dose and effect has often been found to be nonlinear. Thus, small doses can induce unpredictable, adverse effects, one case being polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), of which congener(s) may centrally inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, or dissociate thyroid receptor and selectively affect thyroid hormone signaling and action. This means that PCBs can act as agonists or antagonists at the receptor level, underlining the complexity of the interaction. This review highlights the multifold activity of chemicals demonstrated to cause thyroid disruption. It also represents a call to action among clinicians to undertake systematic monitoring of thyroid function and registering of the classes of EDs and additionally urges broader scientific collaborations to clarify these chemicals' molecular mechanisms of action, substances whose prevalence in our environments is disrupting not only the thyroid but all life on earth. PMID:25294013

  7. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders.

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  9. [Pregnancy and the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J L; Dreyfus, M

    1993-01-01

    During pregnancy the thyroid should adapt itself to the availability of the least quantities of iodides necessary to synthesis hormones and to several other possible modifications such as a rise in the thyroxine-binding globulin and the thyroid stimulating effect of beta-hCG. An increase in size of the thyroid gland is very common. The interpretation of the parameters used to diagnose abnormalities of thyroid function can be carried out. Although the development of the fetal thyroid can take place independently of the maternal thyroid behaviour, an abnormal thyroid function in the mother can not occur without affecting the pregnancy. Grave's disease can cause either fetal or neonatal hyperthyroidism due to a transplacental transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins or hypothyroidism secondary to the use of too large doses of synthetic antithyroid products. Pregnancy itself favours hyperthyroidism. Maternal hypothyroidism which has not been treated is rarer because of a lack of fertility. It can cause repercussions on the fetus that have probably been over estimated. When pregnancy occurs in a hypothyroid woman who is being treated the dosages of drugs that she is being given should be increased by 20-30%. Providing a good knowledge of the thyroid parameters and keeping the patient preferably euthyroid in cases where thyroid dysfunction can occur, the pregnancy can continue normally whatever the state of the mother thyroid function was. The risks to the fetus are minimal. In women who are at risk it is very important to keep controlling the thyroid state after delivery when there is an immunological rebound which may lead to a relapse in Grave's disease and to post-partum thyroiditis. PMID:7693795

  10. Thyroid disrupting chemicals in plastic additives and thyroid health.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2012-01-01

    The globally escalating thyroid nodule incidence rates may be only partially ascribed to better diagnostics, allowing for the assessment of environmental risk factors on thyroid disease. Endocrine disruptors or thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDC) like bisphenol A, phthalates, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers are widely used as plastic additives in consumer products. This comprehensive review studied the magnitude and uncertainty of TDC exposures and their effects on thyroid hormones for sensitive subpopulation groups like pregnant women, infants, and children. Our findings qualitatively suggest the mixed, significant (α = 0.05) TDC associations with natural thyroid hormones (positive or negative sign). Future studies should undertake systematic meta-analyses to elucidate pooled TDC effect estimates on thyroid health indicators and outcomes. PMID:22690712

  11. Requirement of Stat3 Signaling in the Postnatal Development of Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Rumi; Kakugawa, Kiyokazu; Yasuda, Takuwa; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Sibilia, Maria; Katsura, Yoshimoto; Levi, Ben; Abramson, Jakub; Koseki, Yoko; Koseki, Haruhiko; van Ewijk, Willem; Hollander, Georg A; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Thymic medullary regions are formed in neonatal mice as islet-like structures, which increase in size over time and eventually fuse a few weeks after birth into a continuous structure. The development of medullary thymic epithelial cells (TEC) is dependent on NF-κB associated signaling though other signaling pathways may contribute. Here, we demonstrate that Stat3-mediated signals determine medullary TEC cellularity, architectural organization and hence the size of the medulla. Deleting Stat3 expression selectively in thymic epithelia precludes the postnatal enlargement of the medulla retaining a neonatal architecture of small separate medullary islets. In contrast, loss of Stat3 expression in cortical TEC neither affects the cellularity or organization of the epithelia. Activation of Stat3 is mainly positioned downstream of EGF-R as its ablation in TEC phenocopies the loss of Stat3 expression in these cells. These results indicate that Stat3 meditated signal via EGF-R is required for the postnatal development of thymic medullary regions. PMID:26789017

  12. Stat3 Signaling Promotes Survival And Maintenance Of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lomada, Dakshayani; Jain, Manju; Bolner, Michelle; Reeh, Kaitlin A G; Kang, Rhea; Reddy, Madhava C; DiGiovanni, John; Richie, Ellen R

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are essential for establishing central tolerance by expressing a diverse array of self-peptides that delete autoreactive thymocytes and/or divert thymocytes into the regulatory T cell lineage. Activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mTEC precursors is indispensable for mTEC maturation and proliferation resulting in proper medullary region formation. Here we show that the Stat3-mediated signaling pathway also plays a key role in mTEC development and homeostasis. Expression of a constitutively active Stat3 transgene targeted to the mTEC compartment increases mTEC cellularity and bypasses the requirement for signals from positively selected thymocytes to drive medullary region formation. Conversely, conditional deletion of Stat3 disrupts medullary region architecture and reduces the number of mTECs. Stat3 signaling does not affect mTEC proliferation, but rather promotes survival of immature MHCIIloCD80lo mTEC precursors. In contrast to striking alterations in the mTEC compartment, neither enforced expression nor deletion of Stat3 affects cTEC cellularity or organization. These results demonstrate that in addition to the NFkB pathway, Stat3-mediated signals play an essential role in regulating mTEC cellularity and medullary region homeostasis. PMID:26789196

  13. Role of medullary progenitor cells in epithelial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yuning; Park, Chanyoung; Al-Omari, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing medullary interstitial progenitor cells and to examine their capacity to induce tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. We have isolated a progenitor cell side population from a primary medullary interstitial cell line. We show that the medullary progenitor cells (MPCs) express CD24, CD44, CXCR7, CXCR4, nestin, and PAX7. MPCs are CD34 negative, which indicates that they are not bone marrow-derived stem cells. MPCs survive >50 passages, and when grown in epithelial differentiation medium develop phenotypic characteristics of epithelial cells. Inner medulla collecting duct (IMCD3) cells treated with conditioned medium from MPCs show significantly accelerated cell proliferation and migration. Conditioned medium from PGE2-treated MPCs induce tubule formation in IMCD3 cells grown in 3D Matrigel. Moreover, most of the MPCs express the pericyte marker PDGFR-b. Our study shows that the medullary interstitium harbors a side population of progenitor cells that can differentiate to epithelial cells and can stimulate tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. The findings of this study suggest that medullary pericyte/progenitor cells may play a critical role in collecting duct cell injury repair. PMID:24808539

  14. Total occlusion of a conus medullaris pial arteriovenous malformation obtained with one session of superselective embolization.

    PubMed

    Carangelo, B; Casasco, A E; Vallone, I; Peri, G; Cerase, A; Venturi, C; Palma, L

    2009-09-01

    The authors report about a case of the endovascular treatment of a pial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The lesion was located on the conus medullaris. This injury is a rare spinal AVM. The diagnostic management and surgical treatment was chosen with a collaboration between neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists. The diagnostic management was based on clinical validation and magnetic resonance with angiographic technique as a gold standard. With regard to the surgical treatment of spinal AVM, endovascular and radiotherapy is a decision which should be taken multidisciplinarily. The treatment is crucial in resolving this lesion. The authors describe the case of a 38-year-old girl with clinical findings of progressive radiculomedullary ischemic process caused by the presence of spinal AVM. The angiographic images showed a pial AVM of the conus medullaris fed by an anterior radiculomedullary artery (Adamckiewiz artery) originated from a left T11 dorsospinal artery and by a posterior radiculopial artery originated from the left L1 artery. The draining veins were posterior pial veins, and accessory anterior subpial veins. Even if the first treatment of a pial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of conus medullaris can be the surgical treatment for posterior localization, a neurointerventional angiographic and modern materials make it possible to reach pial AVMS of conus medullaris avoiding surgery. The authors describe a successful treatment of conus medullaris arteriovenous malformation with a one session of superselective embolization.

  15. Coordinated response of renal medullary enzymes regulating net sorbitol production in diuresis and antidiuresis.

    PubMed

    Sands, J M; Schrader, D C

    1990-07-01

    The renal response to changes in hydration includes variation in intracellular sorbitol, a major inner medullary osmolyte. To examine the mechanism for changes in net sorbitol production, we measured activities of enzymes regulating sorbitol production (aldose reductase) and degradation (sorbitol dehydrogenase) in untreated, water diuretic, and antidiuretic (water restriction and/or vasopressin administration) rats. Collecting duct segments dissected from collagenase-treated kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into outer medullary and three distinct inner medullary regions. Aldose reductase activity increased during antidiuresis and decreased during diuresis. In contrast, sorbitol dehydrogenase activity was very low during antidiuresis and increased during diuresis. These changes in enzyme activity were found after 3 days, but not after 1 day, of water diuresis/antidiuresis. Enzyme activity changed only in the deepest 50% of the inner medullary collecting duct. Thus, there is coordinated regulation of aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities so that (a) during water diuresis, aldose reductase activity decreases while sorbitol dehydrogenase activity increases; and (b) during antidiuresis (water restriction and/or vasopressin administration), aldose reductase activity increases while sorbitol dehydrogenase activity remains low. We conclude that long-term osmoregulation in response to physiologic stimuli involves both aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities in rat terminal inner medullary collecting duct segments.

  16. Stat3 Signaling Promotes Survival And Maintenance Of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolner, Michelle; Reeh, Kaitlin A. G.; Kang, Rhea; Reddy, Madhava C.; DiGiovanni, John; Richie, Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are essential for establishing central tolerance by expressing a diverse array of self-peptides that delete autoreactive thymocytes and/or divert thymocytes into the regulatory T cell lineage. Activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mTEC precursors is indispensable for mTEC maturation and proliferation resulting in proper medullary region formation. Here we show that the Stat3-mediated signaling pathway also plays a key role in mTEC development and homeostasis. Expression of a constitutively active Stat3 transgene targeted to the mTEC compartment increases mTEC cellularity and bypasses the requirement for signals from positively selected thymocytes to drive medullary region formation. Conversely, conditional deletion of Stat3 disrupts medullary region architecture and reduces the number of mTECs. Stat3 signaling does not affect mTEC proliferation, but rather promotes survival of immature MHCIIloCD80lo mTEC precursors. In contrast to striking alterations in the mTEC compartment, neither enforced expression nor deletion of Stat3 affects cTEC cellularity or organization. These results demonstrate that in addition to the NFkB pathway, Stat3-mediated signals play an essential role in regulating mTEC cellularity and medullary region homeostasis. PMID:26789196

  17. Neural control of adrenal medullary and cortical blood flow during hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, M.J.; Jordan, D.A.; Thellman, S.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension produces an increase in adrenal medullary blood flow and a decrease in adrenal cortical blood flow. To determine whether changes in adrenal blood flow during hemorrhage are neurally mediated, the authors compared blood flow responses following adrenal denervation (splanchnic nerve section) with changes in the contralateral, neurally intact adrenal. Carbonized microspheres labeled with /sup 153/Gd, /sup 114/In, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 95/Nb or /sup 46/Se were used. Blood pressure was reduced and maintained at 60 mmHg for 25 min by hemorrhage into a pressurized bottle system. Adrenal cortical blood flow decreased to 50% of control with hemorrhage in both the intact and denervated adrenal. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased to four times control levels at 15 and 25 min posthemorrhage in the intact adrenal, but was reduced to 50% of control at 3, 5, and 10 min posthemorrhage in the denervated adrenal. In a separate group of dogs, the greater splanchnic nerve on one side was electrically stimulated at 2, 5, or 15 Hz for 40 min. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased 5- to 10-fold in the stimulated adrenal but was unchanged in the contralateral, nonstimulated adrenal. Adrenal cortical blood flow was not affected by nerve stimulation. They conclude that activity of the splanchnic nerve profoundly affects adrenal medullary vessels but not adrenal cortical vessels and mediates the observed increase in adrenal medullary blood flow during hemorrhagic hypotension.

  18. Zuckerkandl tubercle in thyroid surgery: Is it a reality or a myth?

    PubMed Central

    Irkorucu, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Background Zuckerkandl tubercle (ZT) is a lateral projection from the lateral thyroid lobe which is a constant landmark for finding the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery. It is the condensed thyroid parenchyma located in the cricothyroid junction. Even today, ZT and its relationship with recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is not well known by all surgeons. The objectives of the present study were to find out the incidence of ZT in our thyroidectomies and to investigate whether the ZT has a relationship with RLN. We also discussed how to prevent RLN injury during thyroidectomy. Materials and methods One hundred operations were performed by the same surgeon included in this study. All operations performed with intraoperative neuromonitorization (IONM) for proving the visualization of RLN. In each patient, particularly the ZT and its relationship with RLN searched and recorded. We also analyzed the patients in terms of sex, age, clinical diagnosis, and types of performed operations. Results In 100 operations, 173 thyroid lobectomies were considered. 87 of these lobectomies were in right side and 86 in left side. The ZT was determined in 127 of 173 (73.41%) lobectomies. ZT was detected in 68 (78.16%) of right thyroid lobes whereas in 59 (68.60%) of left thyroid lobes. We observed that the ZT was detected more frequently in the right side. In 115 (90.55%) of these occasions, the recurrent nerve was directed upwards covered by the ZT. Conclusions If it is present, ZT is a real constant landmark pointing to the RLN. In order to find and protect RLN during thyroid surgery, a careful, bloodless, and meticulous dissection should be carried out around the ZT. Although our results are encouraging, further researches are still needed on this topic. PMID:27144005

  19. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA.

  20. A case of thyroid fibromatosis, a rare lesion of this gland

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Rafael Adame; Leite, Valeriano

    2016-01-01

    Summary Thyroid fibromatosis is a very rare lesion; to our knowledge, there are only four cases reported in the medical literature. Herein, we report the clinical case of a woman with thyroid fibromatosis with a long follow-up (11 years). A 63-year-old female patient, with an increasing multinodular goitre without compressive symptoms, was admitted to total thyroidectomy. The histology revealed a spindle-cell proliferation with fibroblastic characteristics with no atypia and thin capillary vessels. Immunohistochemistry was positive for beta-catenin, focally to desmin and alfa-actin and negative for cytokeratins and CD34. Thyroid cells did not display any features of papillary thyroid cancer. These characteristics were compatible with thyroid fibromatosis. For the past 11 years, the patient has been periodically followed up with neck CTs and she has not shown any signs of recurrence. Thyroid fibromatosis has been associated with invasion of surrounding structures in previous reported cases. However, this aggressive behaviour was not observed in our patient. The most challenging differential diagnosis is with papillary thyroid cancer with fibromatosis-like stroma, in which the malignant component is usually peripheral. Therefore, in these cases, it is mandatory to perform an extensive examination of the resected sample. Learning points: Fibromatosis is a mesenchymal lesion that consists of an infiltrative proliferation of fibroblasts without atypia. Thyroid fibromatosis is a rare entity in this gland. In previously reported cases, it has been associated with an invasive behaviour but this was not the case in our patient. When spindle-cell proliferation with fibroblastic/myofibroblastic characteristics is detected on thyroid histology, it is mandatory to exclude a papillary thyroid carcinoma with fibromatosis-like stroma.

  1. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  2. Comparison of Clinical and Ultrasonographic Features of Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Niu, Hui-Min; Wu, Qiong; Zhou, Jiong; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Yang, Xiao; Li, Jian-Chu; Zhao, Rui-Na; Wang, Ming; Li, Kang-Ning; Zhu, Shen-Ling; Xia, Yu; Zhong, Ding-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical behavior and management of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) are very different from papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). By comparing the clinical and ultrasonographic features between the two tumors, we proposed to provide more possibilities for recognizing PDTC before treatment. Methods: The data of 13 PDTCs and 39 age- and gender-matched PTCs in Peking Union Medical College Hospital between December 2003 and September 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical and ultrasonic features between the two groups were compared. Results: The frequencies of family history of carcinoma, complication with other thyroid lesions, lymph node metastases, recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, and distant metastases were higher in PDTCs (30.8%, 61.6%, 69.2%, 23.1%, and 46.2%, respectively) than those in PTCs (2.6%, 23.1%, 25.6%, 2.6%, and 2.6%, respectively) (P < 0.05). The mortality rate of PDTCs was greatly higher than PTCs (P < 0.01). Conventional ultrasound showed that the size of PDTCs was larger than that of PTCs (3.1 ± 1.9 cm vs. 1.7 ± 1.0 cm). Clear margins and rich and/or irregular blood flow were found in 92.3% of PDTCs, which differed substantially from PTCs (51.7% and 53.8%, respectively) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: PDTC is more aggressive and its mortality rate is higher than PTCs. Accordingly, more attention should be given to suspicious thyroid cancer nodules that show large size, regular shape, and rich blood flow signals on ultrasound to exclude the possibility of PDTCs. PMID:26830987

  3. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands make hormones. The thyroid uses iodine , a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, ... Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid : The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The ...

  5. Management of recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Ozaki, Yasuhiko; Suzumori, Nobuhiro

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent miscarriage is classically defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. Many researchers have now revised this definition to two or more pregnancy losses because of the recent increase in the prevalence of childless couples. Established causes of recurrent miscarriage are antiphospholipid antibodies, uterine anomalies and abnormal chromosomes in either partner, particularly translocations. Antiphospholipid syndrome is the most important treatable cause of recurrent miscarriage. However, it is not yet established as to what kind of testing should be conducted in patients with recurrent pregnancy loss. Standardization of tests for antiphospholipid antibodies is needed. On the other hand, embryonic aneuploidy is the most frequent cause of recurrent miscarriage. Chromosome analysis of the embryo is important, because it has good predictive value for subsequent live birth. It is not necessary to give any medications for unexplained cases of recurrent miscarriage, and provision of psychological support may be the most important to encourage the couples to continue to conceive until a live birth results.

  6. Glucose-deprivation increases thyroid cancer cells sensitivity to metformin.

    PubMed

    Bikas, Athanasios; Jensen, Kirk; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; McDaniel, Dennis; Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Larin, Olexander; Hoperia, Victoria; Burman, Kenneth D; Boyle, Lisa; Wartofsky, Leonard; Vasko, Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth. We sought to determine if variable glucose concentrations in medium alter the anti-cancer efficacy of metformin. Thyroid cancer cells (FTC133 and BCPAP) were cultured in high-glucose (20 mM) and low-glucose (5 mM) medium before treatment with metformin. Cell viability and apoptosis assays were performed. Expression of glycolytic genes was examined by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunostaining. Metformin inhibited cellular proliferation in high-glucose medium and induced cell death in low-glucose medium. In low-, but not in high-glucose medium, metformin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and oncosis. At micromolar concentrations, metformin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and blocked p-pS6 in low-glucose medium. Metformin increased the rate of glucose consumption from the medium and prompted medium acidification. Medium supplementation with glucose reversed metformin-inducible morphological changes. Treatment with an inhibitor of glycolysis (2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG)) increased thyroid cancer cell sensitivity to metformin. The combination of 2-DG with metformin led to cell death. Thyroid cancer cell lines were characterized by over-expression of glycolytic genes, and metformin decreased the protein level of pyruvate kinase muscle 2 (PKM2). PKM2 expression was detected in recurrent thyroid cancer tissue samples. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the glucose concentration in the cellular milieu is a factor modulating metformin's anti-cancer activity. These data suggest that the combination of metformin with inhibitors of glycolysis could represent a new strategy for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  7. Thyroid hormone antibodies and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in mongrel dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Rajatanavin, R.; Fang, S.L.; Pino, S.; Laurberg, P.; Braverman, L.E.; Smith, M.; Bullock, L.P.

    1989-05-01

    Abnormally elevated serum T3 concentrations measured by RIA were observed in 19 clinically euthyroid or hypothyroid mongrel dogs. The serum T4 concentrations in these sera were low, normal, or high. Measurement of the intensity of thyroid hormone binding to serum proteins was determined by equilibrium dialysis. A marked decrease in the percent free T3 was observed in these abnormal sera. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pH 7.4, of normal dog serum enriched with tracer /sup 125/I-labeled thyroid hormones demonstrated binding of (/sup 125/I)T4 to transthyretin, thyroid hormone-binding globulin, and albumin and of (/sup 125/I)T3 primarily to thyroid hormone-binding globulin. In all abnormal sera, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated strikingly higher binding of T3 to immunoglobulin (Ig). Eleven of 16 abnormal sera had minimal to moderate binding of T4 to Ig. The percent free T4 was lower only in dogs whose sera demonstrated markedly increased binding of T4 to Ig. All abnormal sera tested had positive antithyroglobulin antibodies, consistent with the diagnosis of autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis. As in humans, antibodies to thyroid hormones in dogs are more common in the presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and should be considered when elevated serum thyroid hormone concentrations are observed in the absence of clinical thyrotoxicosis. When an antibody to only one thyroid hormone is present, a marked discrepancy in the serum concentrations of T3 and T4 will be observed.

  8. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. [Clinical guideline for management of patients with low risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Oleaga, Amelia; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Martín, Tomás; Galofré, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing in Spain and worldwide. Overall thyroid cancer survival is very high, and stratification systems to reliably identify patients with worse prognosis have been developed. However, marked differences exist between the different specialists in clinical management of low-risk patients with thyroid carcinoma. Almost half of all papillary thyroid carcinomas are microcarcinomas, and 90% are tumors < 2 cm that have a particularly good prognosis. However, they are usually treated more aggressively than needed, despite the lack of adequate scientific support. Surgery remains the gold standard treatment for these tumors. However, lobectomy may be adequate in most patients, without the need for total thyroidectomy. Similarly, prophylactic lymph node dissection of the central compartment is not required in most cases. This more conservative approach prevents postoperative complications such as hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Postoperative radioiodine remnant ablation and strict suppression of serum thyrotropin, although effective for the more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer, have not been shown to be beneficial for the treatment of low risk patients, and may impair their quality of life. This guideline provides recommendations from the task force on thyroid cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition for adequate management of patients with low-risk thyroid cancer.

  10. The role of thyroid hormone signaling in the prevention of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Simmen, Frank A

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  11. Evaluation of a thyroid nodule

    PubMed Central

    Bomeli, Steven R.; LeBeau, Shane O.; Ferris, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    The thyroid specialist frequently evaluates thyroid nodules because they may represent malignancy. Nodules are typically found on physical exam or incidentally when other imaging studies are performed. Malignant or symptomatic nodules that compress nearby structures warrant surgical excision. Yet, the majority of thyroid nodules are asymptomatic and benign, so the thyroid surgeon must rely on diagnostic studies to determine when surgery is indicated. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for thyroid nodules, and the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is the preferred method of tissue sampling. Nodules one centimeter or larger, or nodules with suspicious sonographic appearance warrant cytologic analysis to better quantify the risk of malignancy. Molecular biomarkers are a powerful adjunct to cytology, as detecting malignancy pre-operatively allows total thyroidectomy in a single operation without the need for frozen section or a second operation for completion thyroidectomy if malignancy is found during the initial thyroid lobectomy. PMID:20510711

  12. Effect of medullary cavity in cancellous bone on two-wave phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiken, Takuma; Nakanishi, Shoko; Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic patients have a larger medullary cavity in their cancellous bone than healthy people. In this study, the effect of the medullary cavity on the two-wave phenomenon was experimentally investigated using a cancellous bone model and a radius bone model. In the cancellous bone model, with the increase in hole (medullary cavity) diameter, the amplitudes of the fast waves became smaller, whereas the amplitudes of the slow waves became larger. In the radius bone model, the fast wave overlapped with the circumferential wave. The slow wave became larger with increasing hole diameter. The analysis of the slow wave thus seems to be useful for the in vivo diagnosis of the degree of osteoporosis.

  13. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  14. Panmedullary edema with inferior olivary hypertrophy in bilateral medial medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuteru; Miyashita, Fumio; Koga, Masatoshi; Yamada, Naoaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    Bilateral medial medullary infarction (MMI) is a rare type of stroke with poor outcomes. Inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy results from a pathologic lesion in the Guillain-Mollaret triangle. The relationship between inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and the medullary lesion is obscure. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 autopsy case with unilateral medial medullary infarction that was associated with ipsilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy has been reported. We describe a rare case with acute infarction in the bilateral medial medulla oblongata accompanied by subacute bilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and panmedullary edema. The hypertrophy appeared to have been caused by local ischemic damage to the termination of the central tegmental tract at the bilateral inferior olivary nucleus.

  15. Isolated axial lateropulsion with ipsilesional subjective visual vertical tilt in caudal lateral medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Kim, Saeromi; Lee, Dong Hyun; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Sung, Ki-Bum

    2015-01-01

    The isolated body lateropulsion has been well recognized in caudal lateral medullary infarction and postulated to result from the involvement of ipsilateral dorsal spinocerebellar tract which is known to convey proprioception of trunk and legs. However, there has been no case accompanied by the tilt of the subjective visual vertical in caudal lateral medullary infarction. Recently, it has been suggested that a lesion in the ipsilateral graviceptive vestibulothalamic pathway can lead to alteration of subjective visual vertical without ocular tilt reaction in various brainstem lesions. Here we describe two cases of caudal lateral medullary infarction with ipsilesional body lateropulsion and subjective visual vertical tilt but without limb ataxia or ocular tilt reaction. It could be hypothesized that the ascending graviceptive information from the spinal cord may run adjacent to the dorsal spinocerebellar tract or perception of the visual vertical can be influenced by ascending spinal proprioception.

  16. Viruses and thyroiditis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Desailloud, Rachel; Hober, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections are frequently cited as a major environmental factor involved in subacute thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid diseases This review examines the data related to the role of viruses in the development of thyroiditis. Our research has been focused on human data. We have reviewed virological data for each type of thyroiditis at different levels of evidence; epidemiological data, serological data or research on circulating viruses, direct evidence of thyroid tissue infection. Interpretation of epidemiological and serological data must be cautious as they don't prove that this pathogen is responsible for the disease. However, direct evidence of the presence of viruses or their components in the organ are available for retroviruses (HFV) and mumps in subacute thyroiditis, for retroviruses (HTLV-1, HFV, HIV and SV40) in Graves's disease and for HTLV-1, enterovirus, rubella, mumps virus, HSV, EBV and parvovirus in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, it remains to determine whether they are responsible for thyroid diseases or whether they are just innocent bystanders. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between viruses and thyroid diseases, in order to develop new strategies for prevention and/or treatment. PMID:19138419

  17. Thyroid scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory B; Neelis, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid scintigraphy is performed in cats and dogs and has been used to a limited degree in other species such as the horse. Thyroid scintigraphy is most commonly used to aid in the diagnosis and treatment management of feline hyperthyroidism but is also used in the evaluation of canine hypothyroidism and canine thyroid carcinoma. This article reviews the normal scintigraphic appearance of the thyroid in the cat, the dog, and the horse and the principles of interpretation of abnormal scan results in the cat and the dog. Radioiodine is the treatment of choice for feline hyperthyroidism, and the principles of its use in the cat are reviewed.

  18. [A Case of Metachronous Multiple Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma with FAP].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yusuke; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Azusa; Chika, Noriyasu; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsuzawa, Takeaki; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Iwama, Takeo; Akagi, Kiwamu; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder, the result of a germ line mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. FAP can be associated with various extracolonic lesions, including thyroid cancer, which frequently occurs in women. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman diagnosed as having FAP with multiple metachronous thyroid papillary carcinomas. She underwent left thyroidectomy at the age of 19 years without a diagnosis of FAP. Multiple polyps in her stomach were detected by medical examination and more than 100 polyps in the colon were found by colonoscopy. She was referred to our hospital after a diagnosis of non-profuse FAP. Multiple tumors with a maximum diameter of 10mm were detected in the right lobe of the thyroid gland during the preoperative examination. Papillary carcinoma was suspected based on fine-needle aspiration cytology. We performed a right thyroidectomy after prophylactic colectomy. Pathological findings revealed a cribriform-morula variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient remains well after 2 year 6 months with no recurrence.

  19. Thyroid peroxidase and the induction of autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, S M; Atherton, M C; Nakajima, Y; Napier, J; Jordan, R K; Clark, F; Rees Smith, B

    1990-01-01

    Animal models of autoimmune thyroid disease are associated with thyroglobulin (Tg) as autoantigen whereas in man the autoimmune response to microsomal antigen/thyroid peroxidase (TPO) appears to play a major role in thyroiditis. Consequently, we have compared the ability of TPO and Tg to induce thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid damage in mice known to be susceptible (CBA/J) or resistant (BALB/c) to thyroiditis induced using murine Tg. Groups of three to five mice were immunized twice using Freund's complete adjuvant with 80-100 micrograms highly purified porcine (p) TPO, pTg, rat (r) Tg, human Tg, bovine serum albumin (BSA) or BSA + 0.2 micrograms pTg (the level of Tg contamination of TPO). Four weeks after immunization with TPO, plasma from CBA/J (but not BALB/c) mice contained IgG class antibodies which bound to TPO-coated tubes in the presence or absence of excess Tg (and could therefore be clearly distinguished from Tg antibodies) but there was no evidence of thyroiditis in either strain of mice. In contrast, in CBA/J mice immunized with rTg and, to a lesser extent in mice that had received pTg, thyroid tissue was infiltrated with lymphoid cells and/or neutrophils and antibodies to pTg (but not pTPO) were present. Our observations demonstrate that induction of TPO antibody alone is insufficient to lead to thyroiditis in CBA/J mice. Further, these studies emphasize the complex interactions between MHC and different thyroid antigens in the processes leading to thyroid destruction. PMID:2311297

  20. Endocrine dysfunction and recurrent spontaneous abortion: An overview.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramandeep; Gupta, Kapil

    2016-01-01

    Miscarriage is the spontaneous loss of a fetus before it is viable, occurring at a rate of 15-20%. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) or habitual miscarriage is defined as repeated occurrence of 3 or more miscarriages before 20(th) week of gestation accounting for the most common complication of early pregnancy in humans. Various etiological factors responsible for recurrent miscarriage are anatomical, genetical, endocrinological, immunological, and infectious. The endocrinological abnormalities may be polycystic ovarian syndrome, hyperprolactinemia, luteal phase defect, thyroid dysfunction, diabetes, or hyperandrogenism contributing to recurrent pregnancy loss. In the present article, the role of endocrinological disorders in patients with RSA has been reviewed. The article search was done using electronic databases, Google scholarly articles, and PubMed based on different key words. We have further combined the searches and made grouping as per various endocrine abnormalities, which might be responsible to cause spontaneous loss of fetus. PMID:27127734