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Sample records for recurrent rectal carcinoma

  1. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  2. Genomic CGH-assessed structural DNA alterations in rectal carcinoma as related to local recurrence following primary operation for cure.

    PubMed

    Kodeda, K; Asting, A Gustafsson; Lönnroth, C; Derwinger, K; Wettergren, Y; Nordgren, S; Gustavsson, B; Lundholm, K

    2012-10-01

    Several factors determine overall outcome and possible local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal carcinoma. Surgical performance is usually believed to be the most pertinent factor, followed by adjuvant oncological treatment and tumor histopathology. However, chromosomal instability is common in colorectal cancer and tumor clones are assumed to differ in aggressiveness and potential of causing local recurrence. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate if genetic alterations in primary rectal carcinoma are predictive of local recurrences. A large clinical database with linked bio-bank allowed for careful matching of two patient groups (R0) resected for rectal carcinoma. One group had developed early, isolated local recurrences and the other group seemed cured after 93 months follow-up. DNA from the primary tumors was analysed with array-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) including 55,000 genomic probes. DNA from all primary tumors in both groups displayed previously reported and well-recognised DNA aberrations in colorectal carcinoma. Significant copy number gains were confirmed in the 4q31.1-31.22 region in DNA from tumors with subsequent local recurrence. Twenty-two affected genes in this region code for products with high relevance in tumor biology (p53 regulation, cell cycle activity, transcription). DNA from rectal carcinoma displayed well-known aberrations as described for colon carcinoma with no obvious prediction of local rectal recurrence. Gains in the 4q31.1-31.22 DNA region are highly potential for local recurrence despite R0 resection to be confirmed in larger patient materials.

  3. Weekly administration of paclitaxel attenuated rectal stenosis caused by multiple peritoneal recurrence 8 years after the resection of gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoichi; Yoshida, Ikuo; Tonomura, Shuhei; Sakai, Wakana; Nakamura, Yasuko; Imazu, Hiroki; Matsubara, Toshiki; Ochiai, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    We report a patient with rectal stenosis caused by peritoneal recurrence 8 years after a curative resection of advanced stage gastric carcinoma; the recurrence was effectively treated with the weekly administration of paclitaxel. The patient was a 66-year-old Japanese woman who was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal pain and frequent bowel movements. She had undergone total gastrectomy, due to advanced-stage gastric carcinoma with extensive lymph node metastasis, 8 years before, and had taken an oral anticancer agent, fluoropyrimidine, for 4 years after the operation. Colonofiberscopy performed on admission revealed circumferential rectal stenosis located 10 cm from the anal verge. Barium enema study demonstrated extensive poor expansion of the upper and lower rectum and irregularity of the descending colon. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed wall thickening in the rectum and descending colon. These findings were compatible with rectal stenosis caused by the peritoneal recurrence of gastric carcinoma. Weekly administration of paclitaxel was started. The abdominal symptoms soon disappeared when the second cycle of paclitaxel was completed, and they have not appeared since then. The rectal stenosis was attenuated, as confirmed by imaging analyses. Weekly paclitaxel has been effective for more than 13 months, suggesting that the patient is in a state of tumor dormancy of recurrent gastric carcinoma.

  4. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated.

  5. Rectal site and suboptimal nodal yield predict systemic recurrence in resected colorectal carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brian D; O'Riordan, James M; Stuart, Charlotte; Muldoon, Cian

    2014-09-01

    We assessed the contribution of histopathological features to systemic recurrence (SR) in patients with colorectal cancer, using a case-control design: 71 cases and 184 controls were included, with a mean time until SR of 1.4 ± 0.1 years and a mean follow-up of controls of 1.6 ± 0.06 years. Cases had significantly greater odds of rectal site (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82), stage ≥ pT3 (OR = 2.11), suboptimal (<12) lymph node yield (OR = 4.6), stage ≥ pN1 (OR = 2.46), KRAS mutation (OR = 2.76), and extramural venous invasion (OR = 1.97). By multiple regression analysis, rectal site, stage ≥ pT3, suboptimal lymph node yield, and lymph node positivity independently predicted SR. Rectal cancers were more likely to have a suboptimal node yield than nonrectal cancers (relative risk = 1.6) among the entire cohort. We conclude that rectal cancers have greater risk of SR than colon cancers. A lower yield of lymph nodes in rectal cancer specimens may contribute to this.

  6. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  7. Perineal herniation of an ileal neobladder following radical cystectomy and consecutive rectal resection for recurrent bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, PA; Mehdorn, AS; Puehse, G; Senninger, N; Rijcken, E

    2016-01-01

    Secondary perineal herniation of intraperitoneal contents represents a rare complication following procedures such as abdominoperineal rectal resection or cystectomy. We present a case of a perineal hernia formation with prolapse of an ileum neobladder following radical cystectomy and rectal resection for recurrent bladder cancer. Following consecutive resections in the anterior and posterior compartment of the lesser pelvis, the patient developed problems emptying his neobladder. Clinical examination and computed tomography revealed perineal herniation of his neobladder through the pelvic floor. Through a perineal approach, the hernial sac could be repositioned, and via a combination of absorbable and non-absorbable synthetic mesh grafts, the pelvic floor was stabilised. Follow-up review at one year after hernia fixation showed no signs of recurrence and no symptoms. In cases of extensive surgery in the lesser pelvis with associated weakness of the pelvic compartments, meshes should be considered for closure of the pelvic floor. Development of biological meshes with reduced risk of infection might be an interesting treatment option in these cases. PMID:26985818

  8. Metachronous squamous-cell carcinoma of the colon and treatment of rectal squamous carcinoma with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brammer, R D; Taniere, P; Radley, S

    2009-02-01

    Rectal squamous-cell carcinoma is a rare tumour with an incidence of less than 1 per 1000 cases. We report such a case treated with chemoradiotherapy. The patient developed a metastasis in the spleen and a further squamous tumour in the right colon, both of which were successfully resected. No histological evidence of recurrent rectal tumour has been found. Two years following presentation, the patient remains disease-free although symptomatic from a radiotherapy-induced stricture of the rectum.

  9. [A case of an ulcer of the sigmoid colon during chemotherapy with FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab for recurrence of rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Okuya, Koichi; Mizushima, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The patient was a 73-year-old female. After curative resection for rectal cancer with uterus invasion, UFT/Leucovorin was administered orally for 16 months. Three years and six months after the initial surgery, en bloc cystourethrectomy was performed to control the bleeding caused by a local recurrence invading the bladder and ureter. Although postoperative FOL- FOX4/bevacizumab therapy was started, bevacizumab was discontinued after 4 courses of treatment because an ulcer was confirmed at the sigmoid colon with stoma. The ulcer was relieved by conservative medical treatment. In this case, we attempted to make a quick response because the site of the ulcer could be easily observed. During chemotherapy. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully observe the patient's conditions.

  10. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  12. Posttreatment TNM staging is a prognostic indicator of survival and recurrence in tethered or fixed rectal carcinoma after preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Alexander K.P. . E-mail: alexc@cancerboard.ab.ca; Wong, Alfred; Jenken, Daryl; Heine, John; Buie, Donald; Johnson, Douglas

    2005-03-01

    significant prognosticators of disease-specific survival and relapse-free survival. pCR Stage T4 disease was a strong predictor of local recurrence. The 5-year local control rate was 98% for pCR T0-T2, 89% for pCR T3, and 65% for pCR T4 disease (p = 0.00044). In multivariate analysis, the pCR TNM stage was the most statistically significant independent predictor of survival (p = 0.003) and relapse-free survival (p < 0.001). Conclusion: For patients who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer, the pCR TNM stage was a strong prognosticator of recurrence and survival. It can be used to identify high-risk patients for additional postoperative therapy.

  13. [Excision of mid-lower rectal carcinoma through abdomen and anogenital space].

    PubMed

    Wei, F; Zhu, B; Hou, S

    1995-07-01

    28 men with male mid and lower rectal carcinoma were treated by dissecting sigmoid colon and rectum in the abdomen through the anogenital space, which refers to the potential coronoid space located between the deep transverse perineal muscles and anal sphincter muscles. The rectal segment was pulled out through the anogenital space to accomplish resection and anastomosis outside the pelvic cavity. Follow-up for 9-57 months showed that 26 cases (92.9%) survived without recurrence of carcinoma and 1 had local recurrence. The advantages of the procedure include clear exploration, minimal trauma, super-lower anastomoses under direct vision, good recovery of defecating function, and less contamination of pelviccavity.

  14. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  15. The Prognostic Impact of Protein Expression of E-Cadherin-Catenin Complexes Differs between Rectal and Colon Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aamodt, Rolf; Bondi, Johan; Andersen, Solveig Norheim; Bakka, Arne; Bukholm, Geir; Bukholm, Ida R K

    2010-01-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin complex provides cell-cell adhesion. In order for a carcinoma to metastasize, cancer cells must let go of their hold of neighboring cells in the primary tumor. The presence of components of the E-cadherin-catenin complex in 246 rectal adenocarcinomas was examined by immunohistochemistry and compared to their presence in 219 colon carcinomas. The expression data were correlated to clinical information from the patients' records. There were statistically significant differences in protein expression between the rectal and the colon carcinomas regarding membranous beta-catenin, gamma-catenin, p120-catenin, and E-cadherin, as well as nuclear beta-catenin. In the rectal carcinomas, there was a significant inverse association between the expression of p120-catenin in cell membranes of the primary tumors and the occurrence of local recurrence, while membranous protein expression of beta-catenin was inversely related to distant metastases.

  16. [Causes of local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Hôhn, József; Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Simonka, Zsolt; Géczi, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Maráz, Anikó; Kahán, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Adám

    2003-01-01

    The rate of local recurrence (LR) has been 20-40% after resective surgery for rectal cancer by the traditional - Miles or Dixon - operative technics. The authors performed curative resection in 358 patients with rectal cancer in a 10 year period (01.01.1990 - 31.12.2000) in the Surgical Department of Szeged University. Since 01.01.1996 the authors changed this type of surgery for the Heald technics (total mesorectal excision - TME - with sharp dissection, using the UltraCision device) for the surgical treatment of middle or lower third rectal cancer. To compare the results of the two procedures, the authors analysed their material in two periods: Period I: 01.01.1991 - 31.12.1992: 62 patients operated on with the traditional operative technics; LR 15% within 2 years after surgery. Period II: 01.01.1997 - 31.12.1998: 78 patients operated on with the Heald technics (TME with sharp dissection); LR 6.4% within 2 years after surgery. Based on their results, the authors found that the modern operative technics by Heald, used in the second period of the study, was a relevant factor decreasing LR from 15% to 6.4%, while the gender, age of the patients, ratio of the abdominoperineal extirpation versus anterior resection (APRE/AR) and the free margin of more than 3 cm proved to be irrelevant.

  17. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  18. [Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of unresectable pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Fehér, István; Péley, Gábor; Rényi Vámos, Ferenc; Farkas, Emil; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kovács, Tibor; Köves, István

    2005-02-01

    More than half of colorectal cancers are located in the rectum, and the number of such cancers is increasing. In Hungary colorectal cancers are diagnosed predominantly in advanced stages. In the last five years 736 patients with colorectal cancer were operated on at our Department, with the following stage distribution: Dukes A 10%, BI 10%, B2 31%, C 36% and D 13%. The local recurrence rate is decreasing since the introduction of total mesorectal excision and preoperative radiation. Effective treatment options are however poor for unresectable pelvic recurrences. Chemo- and radiotherapy have severe limitations in this advanced stage cancer. In recent years there are a few publications on the minimal-invasive radiofrequency tumour ablation (RFTA) technique, which is an effective treatment for primary and metastatic liver carcinomas and is a new palliative for the local treatment of pelvic recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the response to treatment using ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in two patients with unresectable pelvic recurrent rectal cancer.

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®—Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, W. Warren; Herman, Joseph M.; Blackstock, A. William; Hong, Theodore S.; Poggi, Matthew M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R.; Zook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions. These Criteria are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The development and review of these guidelines includes an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Local recurrence of rectal cancer can result in devastating symptoms for patients, including intractable pain and discharge. Prior treatment can limit subsequent treatment options. Preoperative 5-FU based chemoradiotherapy is the treatment of choice for patients with a local recurrence who did not receive adjuvant therapy after initial resection or who might have received chemotherapy alone. Chemoradiotherapy followed by evaluation for surgery is the preferred treatment for patients who have undergone previous radiotherapy after surgery. The inclusion of surgery has resulted in the best outcomes in a majority of studies. Palliative chemoradiotherapy is appropriate for patients who have received previous radiotherapy whose recurrent disease is considered inoperable. Radiotherapy can be delivered on a standard or hyperfractionated treatment schedule. Newer systemic treatments have improved response rates and given physicians more options for treating patients in this difficult situation. The use of induction chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy is an evolving treatment option. Specialized treatment modalities should be used at institutions with experience in these techniques and preferably in patients enrolled in clinical trials. PMID:22574231

  20. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Jo; Boland, Patrick J.; Meredith, Dennis S.; Lis, Eric; Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji; Yamada, Yoshiya J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  1. Laparoscopic-Assisted Altemeier’s Procedure for Recurrent Strangulated Rectal Prolapse: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameen, Wael M.; Privitera, Antonio; Al-Ayed, Amal; Sabr, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 39 Final Diagnosis: Recurrent strangulated rectal prolapse Symptoms: Chronic constipation • painful rectal mass • irreducible rectal prolapse Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Operation Specialty: Surgery Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Rectal prolapse is an uncommon disease that usually requires surgical intervention. Several techniques have been described with either an abdominal or perineal approach, the latter having a higher recurrence rate. In case of irreducible and strangulated full-thickness prolapse, a perineal approach is necessary, and efforts should be made to reduce recurrence rates. Case Report: A 39-year-old mentally retarded woman presented with a painful, recurrent, strangulated sigmoid prolapse following a perineal recto-sigmoidectomy (Altemeier’s procedure) for strangulated rectal prolapse 2 months previously. Examination revealed a 10-cm strangulated, prolapsed sigmoid. A laparoscopic-assisted perineal sigmoid resection with colo-anal anastomosis was carried out. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. Conclusions: This is the second report in the literature highlighting the role of laparoscopy in Altemeier’s procedure for strangulated prolapse. Laparoscopy aids assessment of sigmoid length, allows colonic mobilization, and assures that all redundant bowel is excised. This approach can reduce recurrence rate and need of further surgical interventions. PMID:27811832

  2. Recurrent well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Magarey, Matthew J R; Freeman, Jeremy L

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of Well-differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (WDTC) has been increasing over the past several decades. Consequently, so has the incidence of recurrence, which ranges from 15% to 30%. Factors leading to increased risk of recurrence are well described. However, the impact of local and regional recurrence is not well understood, but distant recurrence dramatically reduces 10-year survival to 50%. Recurrent WDTC has several established options for treatment; Observation, Radioactive Iodine (RAI), Surgery and External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT). Novel treatments such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and percutaneous ultrasound-guided ethanol injection (PUEI) are beginning to gain popularity and have promising early results. A review of the current literature, outcome measurements and a strategy for revision surgery within the central neck compartment are discussed within this manuscript.

  3. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases.

    PubMed

    Slebos, Robbert J C; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L; Liebler, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants.

  4. [A Case of Rectal Stenosis For Gastric Cancer Recurrence Effectively Treated with a Colonic Stent].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yutaka; Ebihara, Ken; Kato, Fumitaka; Makari, Yoichi; Mikami, Johta; Kawase, Tomono; Hamakawa, Takuya; Tsukamoto, Yuki; Fujimori, Masaki; Gobaru, Aya; Mitsudo, Daichi; Yabuta, Takamasa; Nakata, Ken; Tsujie, Masaki; Kitamura, Shinji; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 70s underwent distal gastrectomy and D1 dissection with Roux-en-Y reconstruction in March 2009 for advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. He was diagnosed with signet-ring cell carcinoma, Stage Ⅳ(T4a, N3a, H0, P1, CY1, M1) and R2. Seventeen cycles of S-1 plus CDDP were administered from April 2009 to December 2010 and 19 cycles of S-1 monotherapy were administered from January 2011 to March 2014. He developed peritoneal recurrence with serum tumor marker elevation in May 2014. Stenosis of the common bile duct, hydronephrosis, and rectal stenosis in Ra-Rs was observed in June 2014. A bile duct stent and a double J catheter was inserted. A colonic stent (NitiTM, 22 mm×6 cm) was also inserted. He could eat after the surgery and was discharged from the hospital. We suggest that a colonic stent is an effective treatment for colon stenosis due to peritoneal metastasis from gastric cancer.

  5. Management of rectal carcinoma: impact of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    van Waes, P.F.G.M.; Koehler, P.R.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty-one patients with rectal carcinoma were examined preoperatively in order to assess the accuracy of CT in recognizing the extraluminal extension of the tumor and its effect on treatment planning. Evaluation was done by barium enema, endoscopy, and standard CT augmented by nonreconstructed coronal and sagittal sections. The information was compared with the operative and pathologic findings. Correct staging was achieved in 19 out of 21 patients. In two patients, CT overestimated the extent of the disease. In two patients, small distant metastases detected at surgery were not appreciated; however, the extent of pelvic disease was accurately assessed. In 17 patients, CT added new important information unobtainable by standard techniques. This new information affected treatment planning in 10 patients.

  6. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-14

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer.

  7. Transanal Endoscopic Operation for Benign Rectal Lesions and T1 Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Emi; Dedrye, Lieven; Vindevoghel, Koen; Nuytens, Frederiek; Pottel, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) is a minimally invasive technique used for local excision of benign and selected malignant rectal lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and oncological outcomes of the procedure and to report the experience in 3 centers. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed of all patients with benign lesions or ≤cT1N0 rectal cancer who underwent TEO with curative intent at 3 Belgian centers (2012 through 2014). Results: Eighty-three patients underwent 84 TEOs for 89 rectal lesions (37 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas, 1 gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 1 lipoma, 2 neuroendocrine tumors, and 5 scar tissues). Operative time was associated with lesion size (P < .001). Postoperative complications occurred in 13 patients: 7 hemorrhages, 1 urinary tract infection, 1 urinary retention, 2 abscesses, 1 anastomotic stenosis, and 1 entrance into the peritoneal cavity. Median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1–8). During a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–27), there was 1 recurrence. Conclusion: Although longer follow-up is still necessary, TEO appears to be an effective method of excising benign tumors and low-risk T1 carcinomas of the rectum. However, TEO should be considered as part of the diagnostic work-up. Furthermore, the resected specimen of a TEO procedure allows adequate local staging in contrast to an endoscopic piecemeal excision. Nevertheless, definitive histology must be appreciated, and in case of unfavorable histology, radical salvage resection still has to be performed. PMID:28144126

  8. What operation for recurrent rectal prolapse after previous Delorme’s procedure? A practical reality

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad A; Afridi, Faryal G; Artioukh, Dmitri Y

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with perineal repair (Delorme’s procedure) of rectal prolapse with particular focus on treatment of the recurrence. METHODS: Clinical records of 40 patients who underwent Delorme’s procedure between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed to obtain the following data: Gender; duration of symptoms, length of prolapse, operation time, ASA grade, length of post-operative stay, procedure-related complications, development and treatment of recurrent prolapse. Analysis of post-operative complications, rate and time of recurrence and factors influencing the choice of the procedure for recurrent disease was conducted. Continuous variables were expressed as the median with interquartile range (IQR). Statistical analysis was carried out using the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: Median age at the time of surgery was 76 years (IQR: 71-81.5) and there were 38 females and 2 males. The median duration of symptoms was 6 mo (IQR: 3.5-12) and majority of patients presented electively whereas four patients presented in the emergency department with irreducible rectal prolapse. The median length of prolapse was 5 cm (IQR: 5-7), median operative time was 100 min (IQR: 85-120) and median post-operative stay was 4 d (IQR: 3-6). Approximately 16% of the patients suffered minor complications such as - urinary retention, delayed defaecation and infected haematoma. One patient died constituting post-operative mortality of 2.5%. Median follow-up was 6.5 mo (IQR: 2.15-16). Overall recurrence rate was 28% (n = 12). Recurrence rate for patients undergoing an urgent Delorme’s procedure who presented as an emergency was higher (75.0%) compared to those treated electively (20.5%), P value 0.034. Median time interval from surgery to the development of recurrence was 16 mo (IQR: 5-30). There were three patients who developed an early recurrence, within two weeks of the initial procedure. The management of the recurrent prolapse was as follows: No further intervention (n = 1

  9. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Progressive, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cyst Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

  10. Isolated humeral recurrence in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devdas, Santosh Kumar; Digumarti, Leela; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Patro, Kunha Charan; Nutakki, Ramakoteswararao

    2016-01-01

    Isolated skeletal metastasis in endometrial carcinoma at recurrence is very rare. We report a 52-year-old woman diagnosed to have FIGO Stage 1b, Grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, presenting with isolated distal humerus metastasis, 2 years after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for primary disease. Imaging, bone scintigraphy, and cytology confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated metastatic adenocarcinoma. She was treated with local radiotherapy followed by six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy along with zoledronic acid, monthly. She is symptom-free after the treatment and at a first follow-up visit after 3 months. PMID:27688615

  11. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  12. HIF-1α expression correlates with cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liu; Tao, Lin; Dawei, He; Xuliang, Li; Xiaodong, Luo

    2014-07-01

    Regional hypoxia caused by accelerated cell proliferation and overgrowth is an important characteristic of neoplasm. Hypoxia can cause a series of changes in gene transcription and protein expression, thereby not only inducing tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy but also promoting tumor invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HIF-1α expression and cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. In 113 rectal carcinoma cases, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, whereas the levels of HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression, microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density(LVD) were examined by immunohistochemical staining. HIF-1 expression was detected in 67 of 113 rectal carcinoma cases (59.3 %). A positive correlation was found among HIF-1α expression, cellular apoptosis and angiogenesis. The 5-year survival rate in the HIF-1α-negative group was significantly higher than that in the HIF-1α-positive group (81.34 % versus 50 %, P < 0.05). According to the Cox regression analysis, HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression and cellular apoptosis index were independent risk factors for clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. Aberrant HIF-1α expression correlates with apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis and poor prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

  13. [Rectal squamous cell carcinoma treatment: Retrospective experience in two French university hospitals, review and proposals].

    PubMed

    Schernberg, A; Servagi-Vernat, S; Loganadane, G; Touboul, E; Bosset, J-F; Huguet, F

    2016-12-01

    After publishing a retrospective series of 23 patients treated for a rectal squamous cell carcinoma with exclusive curative and conservative intent chemoradiation, we aim to propose a review of the literature about this rare tumour. We identified 11 retrospective studies, on 106 patients, treated between 2007 and 2016. Treatment of rectal squamous cell carcinoma should be similar to anal carcinoma, based on exclusive chemoradiation, displaying a 5-year overall survival rate over 80%, while it was 32% in surgical series. Baseline explorations should be similar as for anal carcinoma, with an interest in PET-CT at diagnosis and monitoring, after a delay over 6 weeks after chemoradiation. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is legitimate, to a prophylactic dose between 36 and 45Gy, and over 54Gy to the tumour. Concomitant chemotherapy should combine an antimetabolite (5-fluorouracil or capecitabine) and mitomycin C, or cisplatin. This treatment seems well tolerated, associated with grade 2 or above toxicity below 30%. Follow-up should be established on anal squamous cell carcinoma schedule, with endoscopic ultrasonography and PET-CT. Rectal squamous cell carcinoma is a rare tumour; it management should be based on anal curative and conservative intent chemoradiation.

  14. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. [Rectal cancer: locoregional recurrence in relation to surgical and complementary treatment].

    PubMed

    Asteria, C R; Valanzano, R; Marcucci, T; Tonelli, F

    2005-01-01

    Much recent data have been published on the risk of local recurrence (LR) following curative surgery for rectal cancer and the impact of adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, improvements in surgical techniques, as the total mesorectal excision, have apparently reduced the risk of LR. Furthermore, in selected cases, neoadjuvant therapy seems to reduce much more the incidence of LR. A list of prognostic factors which affect the onset of LR, other than the different procedures, was considered. To investigate such evidences a retrospective analysis was undertaken in our series, focusing on examination of the employed techniques as potential predictors of local recurrence. Thus, in a 18-yr-period (1986-2003), two hundred and ninety-five patients who had undergone elective curative surgical resection of rectal cancer were included in the study. The demographic, operative and follow-up data were collected retrospectively. All patients underwent total mesorectal excision, whereas neoadjuvant therapy was performed in a selected series of patients, according to defined entry criteria patterns. Results evidenced LR in 7.1% of patients and occurred between 6 months to 8 year following surgery. Comparisons were made between patients who had different surgical procedures; indeed sphyncter saving procedures correlated with a higher incidence of LR rather than abdomino-perineal resection. Pelvic recurrences were observed more frequently compared to the anastomotic ones. A limited number of patients with LR underwent surgery due to the associated condition of metastatic lesions; the follow-up related to such series evidenced a mortality rate of 57% within 3 year from reoperation. A low local recurrence rate can be achieved after total mesorectal excision (TME) without preoperative radiotherapy. Our results suggest that preoperative radiotherapy may be employed only for those patients who are at a higher risk for local recurrence.

  16. Lack of CD44 variant 6 expression in rectal cancer invasive front associates with early recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Avoranta, Suvi Tuulia; Korkeila, Eija Annika; Syrjänen, Kari Juhani; Pyrhönen, Seppo Olavi; Sundström, Jari Toivo Tapio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6), a membranous adhesion molecule, in rectal cancer. METHODS: Altogether, 210 rectal cancer samples from 214 patients treated with short-course radiotherapy (RT, n = 90), long-course (chemo) RT (n = 53) or surgery alone (n = 71) were studied with immunohistochemistry for CD44v6. The extent and intensity of membranous and cytoplasmic CD44v6 staining, and the intratumoral membranous staining pattern, were analyzed. RESULTS: Membranous CD44v6 expression was seen in 84% and cytoplasmic expression in 81% of the cases. In 59% of the tumors with membranous CD44v6 expression, the staining pattern in the invasive front was determined as “front-positive” and in 41% as “front-negative”. The latter pattern was associated with narrower circumferential margin (P = 0.01), infiltrative growth pattern (P < 0.001), and shorter disease-free survival in univariate survival analysis (P = 0.022) when compared to the “front-positive” tumors. CONCLUSION: The lack of membranous CD44v6 in the rectal cancer invasive front could be used as a method to identify patients at increased risk for recurrent disease. PMID:22969228

  17. Oxaliplatin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent Solid Tumors That Have Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer

  18. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na’ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  19. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  20. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  1. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and total mesorectal excision for rectal carcinoma has significantly lowered the incidence of local recurrence. However, a new problem is represented by the patient with locally recurrent cancer who has received previous irradiation to the pelvis. In these patients, local recurrence is very often not easily resectable and reirradiation is expected to be associated with a high risk of late toxicity. The aim of this multicenter phase II study is to evaluate the response rate, resectability rate, local control, and treatment-related toxicity of preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically proven pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma, with the absence of extrapelvic disease or bony involvement and previous pelvic irradiation with doses {<=}55 Gy; age {>=}18 years; performance status (PS) (Karnofsky) {>=}60, and who gave institutional review board-approved written informed consent were treated by preoperative chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to a planning target volume (PTV2) including the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus a 4-cm margin, with a dose of 30 Gy (1.2 Gy twice daily with a minimum 6-h interval). A boost was delivered, with the same fractionation schedule, to a PTV1 including the GTV plus a 2-cm margin (10.8 Gy). During the radiation treatment, concurrent chemotherapy was delivered (5-fluorouracil, protracted intravenous infusion, 225 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 7 days per week). Four to 6 weeks after the end of chemoradiation, patients were evaluated for tumor resectability, and, when feasible, surgical resection of recurrence was performed between 6-8 weeks from the end of chemoradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed to all patients, using Raltitrexed, 3 mg/square meter (sm), every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 cycles. Patients were staged using the computed tomography (CT)-based F

  2. Subconjunctival "ring" recurrence of Basal cell carcinoma of the globe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Scott; Cnaan, Ran Ben; Paramanathan, Nirosha; Davies, Michael; Benger, Ross; Ghabrial, Raf

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common indication for orbital exenteration. The recurrence rate of BCC removed with microscopically controlled histology sections is up to 6%. The authors describe the recurrence of a lower eyelid BCC resected with microscopic control that did not manifest itself until 15 years later as a subconjunctival lesion, encircling the globe, and without apparent skin involvement. BCC can present in any manner following surgery, and therefore, judicious follow-up is necessary even after microscopically controlled resection.

  3. [A Case of Local Recurrence and Lung Metastasis from a Rectal Cancer Treated with Systemic Chemotherapy and Cyberknife].

    PubMed

    Uchino, Tairin; Mishima, Hideyuki; Osawa, Takaaki; Matsumura, Tatsuki; Komaya, Kenichi; Kimura, Kengo; Ando, Keiichi; Saito, Takuya; Ishiguro, Seiji; Ohashi, Norifumi; Arikawa, Takashi; Komatsu, Shunichiro; Miyachi, Masahiko; Mizumatsu, Shinichiro; Sano, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for a rectal cancer. He developed a hip pain 3 years and 6 months after the surgery. A CT scan revealed a local recurrence in the perineum and multiple lung metastases in the bilateral lung. He received systemic chemotherapy consisting of XELOX with bevacizumab. Thereafter, the hip pain was slightly relieved. The hip pain worsened 1 year and 6 months after the recurrence. The border between the perineal tumor and skin was very narrow, and conventional radiation therapy could cause a perineal skin necrosis and subsequent poor wound healing. Therefore, we selected a Cyberknife treatment. The hip pain was relieved and a CT scan showed a reduction of the perineal tumor's size after the Cyberknife treatment. A Cyberknife treatment may be effective and promising as palliation for patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C in pelvic stopflow infusion and hypoxic pelvic perfusion with and without hemofiltration: a pilot study of patients with recurrent unresectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, S; Aigner, K R; Palumbo, G; Cantore, M; Fiorentini, G; Pozone, T; Deraco, M; Clerico, M; Chaudhuri, P K

    1998-10-01

    This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the advantage in drug delivery for regional chemotherapy in patients with unresectable recurrent rectal carcinoma by different methods. For this research, the pharmacokinetic advantages of mitomycin C delivery by four different methods were compared: intraaortic infusion with aortic stopflow; intraaortic infusion with inferior vena cava stopflow; intraaortic infusion with aortic and inferior caval vein stopflow (hypoxic pelvic perfusion); and hypoxic pelvic perfusion with hemofiltration. The results of this study indicate that pelvic stopflow infusion followed by hypoxic pelvic perfusion significantly increases mitomycin C concentrations in the blood coming from the tumor site. Also, use of hemofiltration reduces mitomycin C levels in peripheral blood after high-dose regional chemotherapy. Further investigations involving more patients should be carried out in the future to validate these results.

  5. Prognosis and value of preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chun-Run; Wang, Rui; Wang, Mo-Jin; Ping, Jie; Zhuang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    As well known, signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare histological subtype of colorectal adenocarcinoma, which has been associated with poor prognosis and resistant to non-surgery therapy compared with common adenocarcinoma. In this study, we assessed the effect of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) for locally advanced rectal SRCC in a large patient group from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER, 1988–2011) database. SRCC was found in 0.9% (n = 622) rectal cancer (RC) patients in our study. In the PRT setting, SRCC had significantly worse cancer-specific survival than mucinous adenocarcinoma and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma patients (log-rank, P < 0.001). In terms of SRCC, stage III RC patients benefited from PRT (log-rank, P < 0.001) while stage II did not (P = 0.095). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that PRT was an independent benefit factor in stage III rectal SRCC patients (HR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.407–0.919; P = 0.018). In conclusion, SRCC was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in stage III RC patients, but not in stage II. In the PRT setting of locally advanced RC, SRCC patients had significantly worse prognosis. PRT was an independent prognostic factor associated with improved survival in stage III rectal SRCC. PMID:28345614

  6. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Gastroesophageal carcinoma with rectal metastasis Symptoms: Bloating • constipation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy • flexible sigmoidoscopy • lower endoscopic ultrasound Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. Case Report: A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. Conclusions: Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  7. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma in a patient with rectal laterally spreading tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MIN; YIN, LINGDI; YAO, YULING; WANG, LEI; XU, GUIFANG; ZHANG, XIAOQI; LV, YING; SUN, QI; FAN, XIANGSHAN; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (LELGC) is a rare neoplasm of the stomach that accounts for 1–4% of all gastric cancer cases. It is characterized by the presence of a lymphoid stroma with cells arranged primarily in micro alveolar, thin trabecular and primitive tubular patterns or isolated cells. In the present study, the case of a 50-year-old male patient with LELGC and rectal laterally spreading tumor is presented. Following endoscopic submucosal dissection, a diagnosis of carcinoma was reached and the patient underwent total radical gastrectomy. The postoperative pathological stage was IA T1bN0cM0 according to the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification of gastric carcinoma, and the patient recovered well. The present case is reported to summarize the endoscopic and pathological characteristics of LELGC. PMID:27073504

  8. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  9. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hoetker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Dueber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p {<=} 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM {<=} 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p {<=} 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  10. Basaloid large cell lung carcinoma presenting as cutaneous metastasis at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, Vicente; García-García, José Angel; Roig-Vila, José Vicente

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of a tumor at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma is rare and it may be related to a previously resected carcinoma or another primary tumor. We report a 61-year-old man who developed an ulcerated skin nodule at her colostomy site 6 years after resection of a rectal adenocarcinoma. Histopathologically, the skin nodule was composed of atypical large and pleomorphic cells with high mitotic rate and they were arranged in nests and within lymphatic channels in the dermis. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin (CK) AE1/3, CK7, CK34ßE12, epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin while detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA was negative. A diagnosis of basaloid large cell carcinoma of pulmonary origin was suggested and it was confirmed by computed tomography-guided fine needle aspiration of a right subpleural mass. A metastatic tumor at the colostomy site is an exceptional finding and may be the first manifestation of lung cancer, especially if it consist of pleomorphic large cells with high mitotic rate and basaloid immunophenotype.

  11. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Rajib Lochan; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri; Rao, Ramakrishna; Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  12. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  13. Opposite variation tendencies of serum CA724 levels in patients with colon and rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhanmeng; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Chunlin; Yang, Ziyi; Xuan, Weibo; Hou, Yahui; Zuo, Yunfei; Ren, Shuangyi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tumor biomarker carbohydrate antigen 724 (CA724) in the serum of patients with carcinomas of the colon and rectum at various clinical stages. Serum was collected from 51 patients with colon carcinoma (CC) and 49 patients with rectal carcinoma (RC). CA724 levels were then measured in the different groups according to site, TNM classification, gender, age and metastastic status of the patients. The statistical significance of the differences between the groups was calculated by non-parametric statistics (Mann-Whitney and Kruskall-Wallis tests). We observed a close association between the serum CA724 levels and tumor migration in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and opposite variation tendencies of CA724 in the evolution of CC and RC. In conclusion, we identified a close association between the serum levels of CA724 and tumor migration in CRC. The opposite variation tendencies of CA724 in the different evolution groups of CC and RC may reflect the differences between these two types of cancer. The evaluation of serum CA724 may be of monitoring and and predictive value and may also assist in the development of treatment strategies for CRC patients.

  14. Oxaliplatin Plus Dual Inhibition of Thymidilate Synthase During Preoperative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Long-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella; Scott, Nigel; Marone, Pietro; Aloi, Luigi; Sandomenico, Claudia; Lastoria, Secondo; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo Rosario; Scala, Dario; Iodice, Giovanni; Budillon, Alfredo; Comella, Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin (OXA) plus dual inhibition of thymidilate synthase during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with poor prognosis for rectal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty-three patients with the following characteristics, a clinical (c) stage T4, cN1-2, or cT3N0 of {<=}5 cm from the anal verge and/or with a circumferential resection margin (CRM) of {<=}5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging), received three biweekly courses of chemotherapy with OXA, 100 mg/m{sup 2}; raltitrexed (RTX), 2.5 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 900 mg/m{sup 2} (31 patients) or 800 mg/m{sup 2} (32 patients); levo-folinic acid (LFA), 250 mg/m{sup 2} on day 2, during pelvic RT (45 Gy). Pathologic response was defined as complete pathological response (ypCR), major (tumor regression grade(TRG) 2 to 3, with ypCRM-ve and ypN-ve) or minor or no response (TRG4 to -5, or ypCRM+ve, or ypN+ve). Adjuvant 5-FU/LFA regimen was given in cases of cT4, ypN+ve, or ypCRM+ve. Results: Overall, neutropenia (40%) and diarrhea (13%) were the most common grade {>=}3 toxicities, and tolerability was better with a 5-FU dose reduction. No significant difference in pathologic response was seen according 5-FU dosage: overall, a ypCR was obtained in 24 (39%) patients, and a major response in 20 (32%) patients. The 5-year probability of freedom from recurrence was 80% (95% confidence interval, 68%-92%); it was 56% for the minor/no response group, while it was around 90% for both the ypCR and the major response group. Conclusions: OXA, RTX, and 5-FU/LFA administered during pelvic RT produced promising early and long-term results in rectal carcinoma patients with poor prognosis. The postoperative treatment strategy applied in our study supports the risk-adapted approach in postoperative management.

  15. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  16. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-11-28

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann's operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed to

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  18. Prognostic factors of recurrence and neck metastasis in oral carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Behcet; Bulgurcu, Suphi; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of tumor size, proximity to midline and invasion depth of oral cancer of the tongue (TC) on neck metastasis and recurrence. Methods: In this retrospective observational study, was conducted through a chart review of the 11 male and 9 female patients who underwent surgeries with the diagnosis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma and at least one side neck dissection. We wanted to assess effects of tumor size, proximity to midline, and invasion depth of TC, according to the surgical specimens and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging, on neck metastasis and recurrence between 2007 and 2014. The study was conducted in a training hospital-based otorhinolaryngology clinic. Statistical analyses were performed to determine possible relationship between such tumor features and tumor recurrence and neck metastasis. Results: Statistically significant relationship were detected between recurrence and the proximity of tumor to midline (p=0.031) and between invasion depth and neck metastasis (p=0.017). No relationship was found between tumor size and recurrence and neck metastasis (p=0.721 and p=0.827, respectively). Conclusions: Parameters like invasion depth and tumor proximity to midline might provide useful information about prognosis and may help to determine a treatment schedule in patients suffering fdrom cancer of the tongue. The present TNM classification might not be sufficient to provide enough information to determine prognosis and staging adequately in these patients. PMID:28083063

  19. Aggressive tumor recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cha, Dong Ik

    2017-03-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic metastasis. RFA offers significant advantages as it is less invasive than surgery and carries a low risk of major complications. However, serious complications, including aggressive tumor recurrence, may be observed during follow-up, and recently, mechanical or thermal damage during RFA has been proposed to be one of the causes of this kind of recurrence. Although the exact mechanism of this still remains unclear, physicians should be familiar with the imaging features of aggressive tumor recurrence after RFA for HCC and its risk factors. In addition, in order to prevent or minimize this newly recognized tumor recurrence, a modified RFA technique, combined RFA treatments with transarterial chemoembolization, and cryoablation can be used as alternative treatments. Ultimately, combining an understanding of this potential complication of RFA with an understanding of the possible risk factors for aggressive tumor recurrence and choosing alternative treatments are crucial to optimize clinical outcomes in each patient with HCC.

  20. Aggressive tumor recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cha, Dong Ik

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic metastasis. RFA offers significant advantages as it is less invasive than surgery and carries a low risk of major complications. However, serious complications, including aggressive tumor recurrence, may be observed during follow-up, and recently, mechanical or thermal damage during RFA has been proposed to be one of the causes of this kind of recurrence. Although the exact mechanism of this still remains unclear, physicians should be familiar with the imaging features of aggressive tumor recurrence after RFA for HCC and its risk factors. In addition, in order to prevent or minimize this newly recognized tumor recurrence, a modified RFA technique, combined RFA treatments with transarterial chemoembolization, and cryoablation can be used as alternative treatments. Ultimately, combining an understanding of this potential complication of RFA with an understanding of the possible risk factors for aggressive tumor recurrence and choosing alternative treatments are crucial to optimize clinical outcomes in each patient with HCC. PMID:28349677

  1. A Successfully Resected Case of Recurrent Lung and Liver Metastases of Rectal Cancer Treated with XELIRI + Bevacizumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Aisu, Naoya; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Ishii, Fuminori; Miyake, Toru; Tanimura, Shu; Wada, Yoshito; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Noritomi, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that many colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with synchronous or metachronous liver metastases underwent surgery subsequent to neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), folinic acid, fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI), or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX). However, there are very few reports of the use of capecitabine and irinotecan (XELIRI). We herein report a successfully resected case of recurrent lung and liver metastases of rectal cancer treated with combination chemotherapy with XELIRI + bevacizumab (BV) therapy. A 63-year-old male developed recurrence of a solitary nodule in the right lower lobe of the lung and multiple liver metastases after low anterior resection for rectal cancer 1 year previously. Partial resection of the right lower lobe of the lung was performed and treatment with XELIRI + BV was initiated. A computed tomography scan revealed a reduction in tumor size without any new lesions after four cycles of XELIRI + BV therapy. Partial hepatectomy of S1, S5, and S7 was safely performed. The patient is now undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and has been free from recurrence for 18 months following surgery. There are only few studies with relatively low patient numbers reporting on the outcome after resection of both pulmonary and hepatic metastases of CRC. We therefore report a patient who underwent sequential resection of pulmonary and hepatic metastases with XELIRI + BV therapy.

  2. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. CASE REPORT A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  4. Rectal carcinoma with metachronous metastasis to the extrahepatic bile duct without liver tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kobayashi, Ryu; Kato, Shingo; Watanabe, Seitaro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Shimamura, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Endo, Itaru

    2011-08-01

    In July 2003, a 63-year-old man received a low anterior resection for rectal cancer. In February 2006, he underwent a right hepatectomy for a solitary metastatic liver tumor; the liver tumor had not invaded the bile duct, and a curative resection was performed. In August 2008, an enhanced computed tomography examination revealed a massive focal lesion at the point of the common bile duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography clearly revealed a hyperechoic polypoid lesion that had spread laterally on the surface of the slightly dilated bile duct and had a smooth outer hyperechoic layer. No lymph nodes were present in this region. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed an irregular stricture, and a biopsy was performed through the scope. Microscopic examination revealed a tumor characterized as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma resembling the liver tumor. We diagnosed the intrabiliary tumor as a metachronous metastatic bile duct tumor from rectal cancer without involvement of the liver parenchyma. This is a very rare case, with recurrence only in an extrahepatic bile duct after the complete resection of a metastatic liver tumor. This is the first clinical, pathological, and radiological description of this rare condition.

  5. Could preoperative short-course radiotherapy be the treatment of choice for localized advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ciria, Juan Pablo; Eguiguren, Mikel; Cafiero, Sergio; Uranga, Intza; Diaz de Cerio, Ivan; Querejeta, Arrate; Urraca, Jose Maria; Minguez, Julian; Guimon, Elena; Puertolas, Jose Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in northern Europe for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, but its role in the era of advanced imaging techniques is uncertain. Here, we reviewed articles and abstracts on SCRT published from 1974 through 2013 with the goal of identifying patients who might be best suited for short-course RT. We included relevant articles comparing surgery with or without preoperative radiation published before and after the advent of total mesorectal excision. We also analyzed two randomized trials directly comparing short-course RT with conventionally fractionated chemoradiation (the Polish Colorectal Study Group and the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group) that compared short-course RT with conventional chemoradiotherapy. We conclude from our review that short-course RT can be generally applied for operable rectal cancer and produces high rates of pelvic control with acceptable toxicity; it reduces local recurrence rates but does not increase overall survival. SCRT seems to be best used for tumors considered “low risk,” i.e., those that are >5 cm from the anal margin, without circumferential margin involvement, and involvement of fewer than 4 lymph nodes. Whether sequential chemotherapy can further improve outcomes remains to be seen, as does the best time for surgery (immediately or 6–8 weeks after RT). We further recommend that selection of patients for short-course RT should be based on findings from magnetic resonance imaging or transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:25535578

  6. A novel approach to inoperable or recurrent rectal cancer by chemoembolization. A new arrow in our quiver?

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Roberto; Comelli, Simone; Leli, Renzo; Vaudano, Giacomo Paolo; Savio, Daniele; Viora, Tiziana; Addeo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of TACE with irinotecan loaded micro particles (debiri) for the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Results We assessed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). The tool is designed to assess nine common symptoms in cancer patients: pain, tiredness, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite, wellbeing and shortness of breath. The ESAS score was 7 in 10/12 (83%) patients before treatment and 6 in 2/12 (16.5%) patients. After treatment in 6/12 (50%) patients the score dropped to 3; 3/12 (33%) reported 4, 1/12 (8%) reported 2. All patients experienced local control disease with a degree of citoreduction; in 4 cases (33%) we observed outstanding responses with a dramatic reduction in the tumors size which led us to surgical radical resections. Materials and methods We run a prospective mono-institutional study where we recruited, 12 non- consecutive patients with histology confirmation of rectal cancer, inoperable and not treatable due to severe comorbidities, or pelvic recurrence/progression after curative treatment, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery. Their performance status (PS) ECOG was 2-3. Twelve patients (10 male and 2 female) with a median age 71 (range 56-89) were recruited in the study. Conclusions The study has met the primary endpoint and showed encouraging activity. Debiri could be a possible option for locally advanced/inoperable or recurred rectal cancer patients. Further trials are warranted to validate this methodic in early stages. PMID:27303924

  7. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  8. Prophylactic liver transplantation for high-risk recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Chih; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Hu, Rey-Heng; Ho, Ming-Chih; Wu, Yao-Ming; Lee, Po-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Radical treatment of HCC in early stages results in a long disease-free period and improved overall survival. The choice of optimal management strategy for HCC mainly depends on the severity of the underlying liver disease. For patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis and HCC within Milan criteria (MC), liver transplant (LT) is the choice of treatment. However, for patients with good residual liver reserve and HCC within MC, selection of other curative treatments such as liver resection (LR) or radiofrequency ablation may be a reasonable alternative. For patients without cirrhosis, LR can result in an overall survival similar to that provided by LT. Therefore, it is an accepted alternative to LT especially in areas with organ shortage. However, the cumulative 5-year recurrence rate of HCC post LR might be as high as 70%. For initial transplant-eligible (within MC) patients with recurrent HCC post LR, salvage liver transplant (SLT) was first proposed in 2000. However, most patients with recurrent HCC considered for SLT are untransplantable cases due to HCC recurrence beyond MC or comorbidity. Thus, the strategy of opting for SLT results in the loss of the opportunity of LT for these patients. Some authors proposed the concept of “de principe liver transplant” (i.e., prophylactic LT before HCC recurrence) to prevent losing the chance of LT for these potential candidates. Factors associated with the failure of SLT will be dissected and discussed in three parts: Patient, tumor, and underlying liver disease. Regarding patient-related factors, the rate of transplantability depends on patient compliance. Patients without regular follow-up tend to develop HCC recurrence beyond MC at the time of tumor detection. Advancing age is another factor related to severe comorbidities when LT is considered for HCC recurrence, and these elderly candidates become ineligible as

  9. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With High Risk Primary or Recurrent Gynecologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Cervical Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Vulvar Carcinoma; Uterine Corpus Cancer; Vulvar Carcinoma; Peritoneal Neoplasms

  10. Recurrently deregulated lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Lei; Gu, Jin; Zhang, Hanshuo; Yuan, Jiapei; Lian, Qiuyu; Lv, Guishuai; Wang, Siqi; Wu, Yang; Yang, Yu-Cheng T.; Wang, Dongfang; Liu, Yang; Tang, Jing; Luo, Guijuan; Li, Yang; Hu, Long; Sun, Xinbao; Wang, Dong; Guo, Mingzhou; Xi, Qiaoran; Xi, Jianzhong; Wang, Hongyang; Zhang, Michael Q.; Lu, Zhi John

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells often invade the portal venous system and subsequently develop into portal vein tumour thrombosis (PVTT). Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been associated with HCC, but a comprehensive analysis of their specific association with HCC metastasis has not been conducted. Here, by analysing 60 clinical samples' RNA-seq data from 20 HCC patients, we have identified and characterized 8,603 candidate lncRNAs. The expression patterns of 917 recurrently deregulated lncRNAs are correlated with clinical data in a TCGA cohort and published liver cancer data. Matched array data from the 60 samples show that copy number variations (CNVs) and alterations in DNA methylation contribute to the observed recurrent deregulation of 235 lncRNAs. Many recurrently deregulated lncRNAs are enriched in co-expressed clusters of genes related to cell adhesion, immune response and metabolic processes. Candidate lncRNAs related to metastasis, such as HAND2-AS1, were further validated using RNAi-based loss-of-function assays. Thus, we provide a valuable resource of functional lncRNAs and biomarkers associated with HCC tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:28194035

  11. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  12. A Case of Rectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Metachronous Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in an HIV-Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heun; Lee, Hye Won; Ann, Hea Won; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kang, Hua Pyong; Kim, Sun Wook; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the most common acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and rectal cancer has recently emerged as a prevalent non-AIDS-defining malignancy. We report a case of rectal squamous cell carcinoma that was metachronous with DLBCL in an HIV-infected patient who was receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patient was diagnosed with DLBCL and showed complete remission after chemotherapy. Follow-up imaging showed increased uptake at the rectum, previously treated as lymphoma. Repeated biopsy was performed and squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum was reported. After concurrent chemoradiation therapy, curative resection was performed.

  13. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Recurrence Patterns in Rectal Cancer: The Cranial Border in Hypofractionated Preoperative Radiotherapy Can Be Lowered

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Kusters, Miranda; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Martijn, Hendrik; Beets, Geerard L.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether and where the radiotherapy (RT) clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced in short-course preoperative treatment of rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Patients treated in the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial, with a local recurrence were analyzed. For 94 (25 who underwent radiation therapy 69 who did not) of 114 patients with a local recurrence, the location of the recurrence was placed in a three-dimensionalthree (3D) model. The data in the 3D model were correlated to the clinical trial data to distinguish a group of patients eligible for CTV reduction. Effects of CTV reduction on dose to the small bowel was tested retrospectively in a dataset of 8 patients with three-field conformal plans and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT). Results: The use of preoperative RT mainly reduces anastomotic, lateral, and perineal recurrences. In patients without primary nodal involvement, no recurrences were found cranially of the S2-S3 interspace, irrespective of the delivery of RT. In patients without primary nodal involvement and a negative circumferential resection margin (CRM), only one recurrence was found cranial to the S2-S3 interspace. With a cranially reduced CTV to the S2-S3 interspace, over 60% reduction in absolute small bowel exposure at dose levels from 15 to 35 Gy could be achieved with three-field conventional RT, increasing to 80% when IMRT is also added. Conclusions: The cranial border of the CTV can safely be lowered for patients without expected nodal or CRM involvement, yielding a significant reduction of dose to the small bowel. Therefore, a significant reduction of acute and late toxicity can be expected.

  14. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  15. A rare case of medullary carcinoma of the colon presenting as intussusception in an adult with rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shilpa; Jain, Ankur; Onizuka, Neil; Boukhar, Sarag A

    2014-11-01

    Medullary carcinoma is a recently recognized rare subtype of colorectal cancer resembling both poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. Medullary carcinoma most commonly presents in the proximal colon and can be differentiated from other right-sided malignant lesions by histology and immunochemical markers. We present here a rare case of an adult patient with rectal bleeding who was found to have an intussusception due to underlying medullary carcinoma of the splenic flexure. A 72-year-old woman presented to our GI clinic with rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a necrotic mass of the sigmoid colon, later determined by CT to be a colo-colonic intussusception at the level of the splenic flexure. Patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with findings of a large splenic flexure mass, which was resected and found to be medullary carcinoma of the colon. The tumor was poorly differentiated and exhibited microsatellite instability but was discovered at an early stage and thus did not require any adjuvant chemotherapy. Unlike most previously reported cases of medullary carcinoma, our patient presented with a left sided tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a medullary colon cancer presenting with intussusception.

  16. Metastasis to the Glans Penis: An Unusual Site of Rectal Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Beatriz; Matias, Margarida; Alves, António; Jorge, Marília

    2015-01-01

    Secondary malignancy of the penis is a rare clinical condition, often associated with disseminated genitourinary malignancies. The prognosis is poor and the treatment options include penectomy, local surgical excision, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and supportive therapy. Neither of these therapeutic options lead to superior treatment outcomes in the literature. The authors report the case of a 66 year-old man with a metastasis to the glans penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma, diagnosed two years after radical treatment for primary disease. The patient underwent palliative treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, remaining asymptomatic and disease-free at one year follow-up. Close follow-up of patients with history of rectal adenocarcinoma is very important. Radiochemotherapy is a feasible and effective therapeutic option for penile metastasis, addressing both disease control and symptomatic improvement.

  17. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  18. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  19. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  20. Differentiating rectal carcinoma by an immunohistological analysis of carcinomas of pelvic organs based on the NCBI Literature Survey and the Human Protein Atlas database.

    PubMed

    Miura, Koh; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Ito, Akihiro; Niikura, Hitoshi; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Iwao

    2012-06-01

    The treatments and prognoses of pelvic organ carcinomas differ, depending on whether the primary tumor originated in the rectum, urinary bladder, prostate, ovary, or uterus; therefore, it is essential to diagnose pathologically the primary origin and stages of these tumors. To establish the panels of immunohistochemical markers for differential diagnosis, we reviewed 91 of the NCBI articles on these topics and found that the results correlated closely with those of the public protein database, the Human Protein Atlas. The results revealed the panels of immunohistochemical markers for the differential diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma, in which [+] designates positivity in rectal adenocarcinoma and [-] designates negativity in rectal adenocarcinoma: from bladder adenocarcinoma, CDX2[+], VIL1[+], KRT7[-], THBD[-] and UPK3A[-]; from prostate adenocarcinoma, CDX2[+], VIL1[+], CEACAM5[+], KLK3(PSA)[-], ACPP(PAP)[-] and SLC45A3(prostein)[-]; and from ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma, CEACAM5[+], VIL1[+], CDX2[+], KRT7[-] and MUC5AC[-]. The panels of markers distinguishing ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, cervical carcinoma, and endometrial adenocarcinoma were also represented. Such a comprehensive review on the differential diagnosis of carcinomas of pelvic organs has not been reported before. Thus, much information has been accumulated in public databases to provide an invaluable resource for clinicians and researchers.

  1. Extramammary Paget’s Disease of Anal Canal Associated With Rectal Adenoma Without Invasive Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chumbalkar, Vaibhav; Jennings, Timothy A.; Ainechi, Sanaz; Lee, Edward C.; Lee, Hwajeong

    2016-01-01

    Extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare disease which is found in apocrine-rich locations such as anogenital region, axilla and rarely in other sites. Perianal EMPD is often reported as the involvement of perianal skin, but involvement of anal mucosa is very rare. Based on pathogenesis and association with either synchronous or metachronous malignancy, EMPD can be divided into primary and secondary types. Treatment approach for these two types of Paget’s disease and their prognosis is different, thus it is important to make the distinction. Secondary type of Paget’s disease is almost always described in association with invasive malignancy. While secondary Paget’s disease arising in association with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast is common, secondary EMPD associated with precursor lesion of the rectum without invasion is exceedingly rare. We report a very rare case of secondary Paget’s disease of the anal canal in association with rectal tubular adenoma (precursor lesion) without malignancy. PMID:28058078

  2. [A Case of Rectal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma with Metachronous Liver Metastasis Treated with Multimodality Therapy].

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yohei; Shimizu, Hisashi; Naganuma, Atsushi; Aiba, Masaaki; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Tetsushi; Ogawa, Akira; Osamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    A 6 2-year-old woman visited our hospital with a complaint of anal bleeding and was diagnosed with rectal cancer. She underwent low anterior resection and D3 lymphadenectomy. The pathological diagnosis was shown as follows: Ra, Circ, type 2, por1, pSS, ly3, v1, pN2, pStage III b, and KRAS wild type. UFT/UZEL with polysaccharide K(PSK)was initiated as adjuvant chemotherapy after the operation. However, multiple liver metastases were found on CT after 3 courses of UFT/UZEL with PSK, and pathological reexamination revealed that the primary tumor was a neuroendocrine carcinoma. She underwent chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with CPT-11, but bone marrow suppression was observed after 4 courses of the treatment. As second-line chemotherapy, FOLFOX4 plus panitumumab(Pmab)was administered. Although the disease remained stable through 10 courses of FOLFOX4 plus Pmab, Grade 3 peripheral neuropathy was observed. Hence, FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab(Bmab)was administered as third-line chemotherapy. Twenty-eight courses of FOLFIRI plus Bmab were administered, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization(TACE)was performed during chemotherapy. However, her general condition worsened after the therapies, and she died 2 years 3 months after the initial chemotherapy.

  3. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  4. New barium paste mixture for helical (slip-ring) CT evaluation of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Noda, Y; Nishioka, A; Inomata, T; Yoshida, S; Toki, T; Ogoshi, S; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method for complete opacification of the rectum using helical CT and a newly developed anal contrast agent. Rectal cancers were easily identified in all of the 21 patients examined, and diagnostic accuracy in detecting local invasion was 94%. Our method of rectal CT is easy to perform and well tolerated.

  5. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  6. Strong PMSA Radioligand Uptake by Rectal Carcinoma: Who Put the "S" in PSMA?

    PubMed

    Stoykow, Christian; Huber-Schumacher, Sabine; Almanasreh, Nadja; Jilg, Cordula; Ruf, Juri

    2017-03-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old patient with newly diagnosed rectal adenocarcinoma and hepatic metastases. Restaging after chemotherapy revealed a good response of the rectal primary while liver metastases were progressive. As the patient also had a history of prostate cancer, a Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scan was performed to noninvasively further assess hepatic metastases. However, a definite differentiation between tumor entities was not possible because not only the liver metastases but also the rectal primary showed radioligand uptake (moderate and strong, respectively). Consecutive liver biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of intestinal origin.

  7. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  8. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Perez, Rodrigo O; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-11-10

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice.

  9. Duodenal Recurrence of Fibrolamellar Carcinoma 12 Years After Partial Hepatectomy and Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Ruiz, Ismael Antonio; Torre, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) has a better prognosis than hepatocellular carcinoma; however, it is a highly recurrent disease. A 17-year-old woman presented with FLC with regional disease at the right lobe of the liver and underwent right hepatic lobe resection plus adjuvant chemotherapy with interferon α and adriamycin. She then presented at age 29 years with anemia. Endoscopy revealed an exofitic lesion in the duodenum, which was a recurrence of FLC. The patient underwent duodenal partial resection of a metastatic FLC tumor with disease-free edges and without neural or lymphoid-vascular involvement, a nonreported site of recurrence. PMID:27921059

  10. Preoperative concurrent 5-Fluorouracil infusion, Mitomycin C and pelvic radiation therapy in tethered and fixed rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.; Wong, A.; Langevin, J.; Khoo, R. )

    1993-04-02

    This is a Phase 1/2 study of preoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy in tethered and fixed rectal carcinoma. This study examined the curative resectability, the acute toxicities during chemo-radiation and the surgical complications. Between 1986 and 1990, 46 patients were treated with preoperative pelvic radiation (4,000 cGy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks), 5-Fluorouracil infusion (20 mg/m[sup 2], days 1--4 and 15--18) and Mitomycin C (8 mg/m[sup 2], day 1). This was followed by surgery 6 to 8 weeks later. 30 patients had tethered tumors and 16 patients had fixed tumors. After preoperative chemo-radiation, 41 patients (89%) underwent curative resection. Two patients (4%) had no residual tumor found (T0N0M0). Seven patients (15%) had nodal metastases. Two patients developed grade 3 neutropenia (WBC = 1--2 [times] 10[sup 9]/L) during chemo-radiation. Five patients had delay in perineal wound healing. One patient had an anastomotic leak. Four patients developed stomal stenosis which required surgical revision. The 2-year actuarial survival was 73%. The 2-year local relapse rate was 16%. Patients with fixed carcinoma had a higher incidence of local failure (28% vs. 10%) and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0036). The 2-year distant failure rate was 41%, and the rates were similar for both tethered and fixed carcinomas. Preoperative pelvic radiation, chemotherapy and surgery could achieve a curative resection rate of 89% in tethered and fixed rectal carcinomas. However, distant metastases remained the major cause of failure. 42 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and sphincter-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

    PubMed Central

    Wolmark, N; Fisher, B

    1986-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of sphincter-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that sphincter preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or sphincter-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to sphincter-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with sphincter-saving resections. A patient undergoing sphincter-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with sphincter-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing sphincter-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection

  12. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  13. [Reoperations of rectal resection for recurrence after previous resection for rectosigmoid cancer].

    PubMed

    Paineau, J; Letessier, E; Hamy, A; Hamelin, E; Courant, O; Visset, J

    1993-12-01

    From June 1986 to December 1992, 16 patients (12 men and 4 women, 63 years-old [36 to 79]) who underwent a prior sphincter-saving resection for colorectal adenocarcinoma were operated on for locoregional recurrence with a surgical resection. Eight patients had a second anterior resection (5 colorectal, 2 coloanal and 1 ileoanal anastomosis), one a resection without anastomosis, and 7 an abdomino-perineal resection. Nine patients received an intraoperative irradiation (10 to 25 Gy). Excisions of surrounding organs were often necessary. Post-operative complications occurred in most of the patients. Excluding 3 post-operative deaths, 9 patients died of disease in a median of 12.9 months after surgery (range: 3 to 32 months). Four patients are still living 5 to 14 months after the second resection. There is little in the surgical literature dealing with these difficult surgical problem of which results are always uncertain. An earlier diagnosis of the recurrence would result in a more satisfactory procedure, but is difficult because of the limited possibilities of detection after surgical treatment and often external irradiation.

  14. Strategy for improving survival and reducing recurrence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2013-10-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. With advances in imaging diagnostics, accompanied by better understanding of high-risk patients, HCC is now frequently detected at an early stage; however, the prognosis remains poor. The recurrence rate after treatment of HCC is higher than that associated with cancers of other organs. This may be because of the high incidence of intrahepatic distant recurrence and multicentric recurrence, especially with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) classification has recently emerged as the standard classification system for the clinical management of patients with HCC. According to the BCLC staging system, curative therapies (resection, transplantation, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, percutaneous ethanol injection therapy, percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation) can improve survival in HCC patients diagnosed at an early stage and offer a potential long-term cure. However, treatment strategies for recurrent disease are not mentioned in the BCLC classification. The strategy for recurrence may differ according to the recurrence pattern, i.e., intrahepatic distant recurrence vs multicentric recurrence. In this article, we review recurrent HCC and the therapeutic strategies for reducing recurrent HCC, especially HCV-related HCC.

  15. Multiple nephron-sparing procedures in solitary kidney with recurrent, metachronous, nonfamilial renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nosnik, Israel P; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Nelson, Rendon; Polascik, Thomas J

    2006-12-01

    Patients with metachronous bilateral renal cell carcinoma pose a significant challenge given the high mortality of renal cell carcinoma and the poor quality of life should dialysis become necessary. In addition, patients may be subject to morbidity due to potential multiple treatments of the multifocal renal tumors. We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with multifocal, bilateral clear cell carcinoma who maintained a minimal change in serum creatinine after undergoing unilateral radical nephrectomy, subsequent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous cryoablation, laparoscopic cryoablation, and open partial nephrectomy for recurrent renal cell carcinoma in a solitary kidney.

  16. Adjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy After Simultaneous Surgical Resection of Rectal Cancer With Liver Metastases: Analysis of Prognosis and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho Jung; Yu, Chang Sik; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kang, Byung Woog; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after simultaneous surgical resection in rectal cancer patients with liver metastases (LM). Materials and Methods: One hundred and eight patients receiving total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and surgical resection for LM were reviewed. Forty-eight patients received adjuvant CRT, and 60 were administered CT alone. Recurrence patterns and prognosis were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were compared between the CRT and CT groups. The inverse probability of the treatment-weighted (IPTW) method based on the propensity score was used to adjust for selection bias between the two groups. Results: At a median follow-up period of 47.7 months, 77 (71.3%) patients had developed recurrences. The majority of recurrences (68.8%) occurred in distant organs. By contrast, the local recurrence rate was only 4.7%. Median DFS and OS were not significantly different between the CRT and CT groups. After applying the IPTW method, we observed no significant differences in terms of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.347; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.759-2.392; p = 0.309) and OS (HR, 1.413; CI, 0.752-2.653; p = 0.282). Multivariate analyses showed that unilobar distribution of LM and normal preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level (<6 mg/mL) were significantly associated with longer DFS and OS. Conclusions: The local recurrence rate after simultaneous resection of rectal cancer with LM was relatively low. DFS and OS rates were not different between the adjuvant CRT and CT groups. Adjuvant CRT may have a limited role in this setting. Further prospective randomized studies are required to evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment in these patients.

  17. Preservation of Facial Nerve With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Recurrent Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma of Parotid Gland.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shufang; Ma, Hailong; He, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands harbors the recurrent ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion because of the translocation t (12; 15) (p13; q25) and resembles breast secretory carcinoma. This tumor composed of papillary, cystic, solid, and cribriform patterns. Immunohistochemically, the tumors are positive for mammaglobin, CK7, CK8, STAT5a, vimentin, and S100. In this report, the authors presented a patient of recurrent parotid gland mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in a 22-year-old woman. The patient received extended parotidectomy with partial adhesive masseter surgery. The facial nerve was preserved during the surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy was performed postoperation. The patient did not suffer local recurrence and facial paralysis in the 18 months follow-up period.

  18. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  19. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. Rectal Dose and Source Strength of the High-Dose-Rate Iridium-192 Both Affect Late Rectal Bleeding After Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reconfirm our previous findings that the rectal dose and source strength both affect late rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT), by using a rectal dose calculated in accordance with the definitions of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 (ICRU{sub RP}) or of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICBT and were followed up for 1 year or more were studied. The rectal dose for ICBT was calculated by using the ICRP{sub RP} based on orthogonal radiographs or the DVH parameters based on computed tomography (CT). The total dose was calculated as the biologically equivalent dose expressed in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). The relationship between averaged source strength or the EQD{sub 2} and late rectal bleeding was then analyzed. Results: When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal EQD{sub 2} ({>=} or =} or <2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}), the group with both a high EQD{sub 2} and a high source strength showed a significantly greater probability of rectal bleeding for ICRU{sub RP}, D{sub 2cc}, and D{sub 1cc}. The patients with a median rectal dose above the threshold level did not show a greater frequency of rectal bleeding unless the source strength exceeded 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}. Conclusions: Our results obtained with data based on ICRU{sub RP} and CT-based DVH parameters indicate that rectal dose and source strength both affect rectal bleeding after HDR-ICBT.

  1. Recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins and related risk factors*

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Fernanda; Santamaría, Jesus Rodriguez; Garbers, Luiz Eduardo Fabricio de Melo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The best way to approach surgically removed basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins is a controversial issue. Some authors believe that the more appropriate treatment is an immediate reoperation while others prefer a periodic follow up. The rates of recurrence are variable in literature, between 10% and 67%. OBJECTIVE To define the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive margins after surgery. Secondarily, identify morphological aspects that can suggest a more frequent tumoral recurrence. METHODS This was a retrospective and observational study made by analysis of medical records of 487 patients between January 2003 and December 2009 in Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná (HC-UFPR). From 402 basal cell carcinomas surgically treated, 41 fulfilled inclusion criteria and were evaluated for five years or more. Recurrence rate of these tumors was analyzed in all patients and clinical characteristics such as sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, ulceration, and histological type were evaluated in order to find if they were related to more common tumoral recurrence. RESULTS The rate of positive margins after surgery was 12.18%. There were five cases of tumoral recurrence in the observation group and three cases in the re-excision group. Tumor size, site, histological type, ulceration and type of positive margin did not differ statistically between groups. It was not possible to consider if these factors were important in recurrence rates. STUDY LIMITATIONS Ideally, a prospective study with a larger sample would be more accurate. CONCLUSION The treatment of choice in basal cell carcinoma with positive margins must be individualized to reduce recurrence rates. PMID:28225958

  2. Technical aspects of image-based treatment planning of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Robert; Drzymala, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The role of 3-dimensional treatment planning in the management of rectal cancer is not well defined. This report reviews technical guidelines for simulation, defining target volumes, and suggested beam configurations. Outcome from pilot clinical trials, with emphasis on the impact of volume and dose on tumor response and treatment morbidity is discussed.

  3. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  4. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  5. K-ras mutations, rectal crypt cells proliferation, and meat consumption in patients with left-sided colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, H; Matthew, J A; Gee, J M; Watson, M; Rhodes, M; Speakman, C T; Stebbings, W S; Kennedy, H J; Johnson, I T

    2000-02-01

    It has been suggested that N-nitroso compounds derived from meat may increase the risk of K-ras mutations in the human colon. We sought evidence of associations between red meat consumption, frequency and type of K-ras mutations in resected tumours, and the rate of crypt cell proliferation (CCP) in the normal mucosa of patients with left-sided colorectal carcinoma. Meat consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and CCP was determined in rectal biopsies obtained prior to surgery. K-ras mutations in the resected tumours were determined using a PCR-based oligonucleotide hybridization assay. Fifteen K-ras mutations were detected in tumours from 43 patients; 13/15 in codon 12, 3/15 in codon 13, and 1/15 in both codons 12 and 13. All mutations were G-->A or G-->T transitions. There was no statistically significant difference between intakes of red meat in patients with a K-ras mutation (92.4 +/- 9.7 g/day) and those without (82.3 +/- 7.7 g/day). Rectal CCP was significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls, but there was no correlation with meat consumption or K-ras mutation. These data do not support the hypothesis that meat consumption is a risk factor for acquisition of K-ras mutations during colorectal carcinogenesis.

  6. Managements of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de’Angelis, Nicola; Landi, Filippo; Carra, Maria Clotilde; Azoulay, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy (survival) and safety of treatments for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in liver transplantation (LT) patients. METHODS: Literature search was performed on available online databases without a time limit until January 2015. Clinical studies describing survival after HCC recurrence in LT patients were retrieved for a full-text evaluation. A total of 61 studies were selected: 13 case reports, 41 retrospective case series, and 7 retrospective comparative studies. RESULTS: Based on all included studies, the mean HCC recurrence rate was 16% of all LTs for HCC. A total of 1021 LT patients experienced HCC recurrence. The median time from LT to HCC recurrence was 13 mo (range 2-132 mo). The majority of patients (67%) presented with HCC extra-hepatic recurrences, involving lung, bone, adrenal gland, peritoneal lymph nodes, and rarely the brain. Overall survival after HCC recurrence was 12.97 mo. Surgical resection of localized HCC recurrence and Sorafenib for controlling systemic spread of HCC recurrence were associated with the higher survival rates (42 and 18 mo, respectively). However, Sorafenib, especially when combined with mTOR, was frequently associated with severe side effects that required dose reduction or discontinuation CONCLUSION: Management of recurrent HCC in LT patients is challenging and associated with poor prognosis independently of the type of treatment. PMID:26494973

  7. Protrusion of hepatocellular carcinoma is a predictor of early recurrence in hepatectomy patients after spontaneous rupture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Rim; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Kim, Sung Joo; Joh, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The factors related to early-onset tumor recurrence in patients with spontaneously ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy remain unclear. The aims of the present study were to compare characteristics between early and late recurrence groups in spontaneously ruptured HCC patients who received curative hepatectomy and to identify risk factors for mortality. Methods We selected 19 patients who had been diagnosed with spontaneously ruptured HCC and who were treated with curative liver resection between 1998 and 2013. The 19 patients were divided into 2 groups: the early recurrence group of patients who experienced tumor recurrence within 12 months after hepatectomy, and the late recurrence group of patients who experienced recurrence after 12 months or who did not experience recurrence. Results The median tumor size was 7.4 cm, and there were no cases of postoperative mortality. Patient survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 78.9%, 58.6%, and 58.6%, respectively. The incidence of tumor protrusion in the early recurrence group was higher than that in the late recurrence group (100% vs. 30%, respectively, P = 0.003). There were no statistically significant differences in other factors between the 2 groups. Multivariate analysis showed that greater than 30% protrusion of the tumor was a predictor of patient survival. Conclusion The results from the present study suggests that spontaneously ruptured HCC patients with protrusion should be frequently monitored after hepatectomy in order to achieve early detection of tumor recurrence and improve survival. PMID:27433460

  8. Copy number analysis of ductal carcinoma in situ with and without recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Hunter, Sally M; Pang, Jia-Min; Opeskin, Ken; Hill, Prue; Rowley, Simone M; Choong, David Y H; Thompson, Ella R; Dobrovic, Alexander; Fox, Stephen B; Mann, G Bruce; Campbell, Ian G

    2015-09-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer and a frequent mammographic finding requiring treatment. Up to 25% of DCIS can recur and half of recurrences are invasive, but there are no reliable biomarkers for recurrence. We hypothesised that copy number aberrations could predict likelihood of recurrence. We analysed a cohort of pure DCIS cases treated only with wide local excision for genome-wide copy number and loss of heterozygosity using Affymetrix OncoScan MIP arrays. Cases included those without recurrence within 7 years (n = 25) and with recurrence between 1 and 5 years after diagnosis (n = 15). Pure DCIS were broadly similar in copy number changes compared with invasive breast cancer, with the consistent exception of a greater frequency of ERBB2 amplification in DCIS. There were no significant differences in age or ER status between the cases with a recurrence vs those without. Overall, the DCIS cases with recurrence had more copy number events than the DCIS without recurrence. The increased copy number appeared non-random with several genomic regions showing an increase in frequency in recurrent cases, including 20 q gain, ERBB2 amplification and 15q loss. Copy number changes may provide prognostic information for DCIS recurrence, but validation in additional cohorts is required.

  9. [A Case of Pure Type Mucinous Carcinoma Recurrence after Local Control].

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 44-year-old woman. Mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy had been performed for carcinoma of the left breast approximately 1 year previously. The diagnosis was mucinous carcinoma, T3N0M0, stage ⅡB, ER(+), PgR(+), HER2 score 0, Ki-67 20%. Hormone therapy was administered postoperatively. Four months after the surgery, left axilla lymphadenopathy was observed. Chemotherapy with EC and nab-PTX was started for the postoperative lymph node recurrence. To achieve local control, axillary lymphadenectomy was performed within 1 year postoperatively, and 1 metastatic lesion in the lymph nodes was observed. Hormone therapy was started sequentially, with no subsequent recurrence or metastasis. Mucinous carcinomas are classified as a breast cancer subtype. Mixed type, including breast ductal carcinoma, form a large proportion of mucinous carcinomas and the therapy for breast ductal carcinoma is usually administered in such cases. Conversely, pure type mucinous carcinomas rarely show metastasis and have a good prognosis. In this case, however, metastasis was noted and chemotherapy was not completely effective, and local control was achieved with surgical resection.

  10. The treatment of squamous anal carcinoma: guidelines of the Italian Society of Colo-Rectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Giani, I; Mistrangelo, M; Fucini, C

    2013-04-01

    The Italian society of colo-rectal surgery (SICCR) is dedicated to improving the study, prevention and management of the diseases of the colon, rectum and anus. One of the aims of the society is to establish guidelines to the treatment of these diseases. These guidelines are based on the international literature and on the best available evidence. Clinical practice guidelines are one of the most important instruments to provide therapeutic decision-making support, based on the best scientific evidence available at the time. Guidelines are advisory and not prescriptive, susceptible to continual variations secondary to innovations and new scientific evidence. These guidelines are a guide for all colo-rectal surgeons and physicians who approach anal cancer.

  11. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of the colonic and rectal carcinoma: concepts and uptodate results].

    PubMed

    Weber, W; Nagel, G A

    1977-06-18

    The aim of adjuvant chemotherapy is the destruction of micrometastases after surgical removal of a malignant tumor. This treatment modality is gaining in importance in the light of experimental data and lcinical success in pediatric tumors. Results of ongoing studies in colo-rectal cancer show a marginal effect of prophylactic treatment with 5-fluorouracil. The treatment benefits in trials with historical controls are much greater than in studies with simultaneous controls. Use of historical controls is therefore of doubtful value. Ongoing trials use the combination of 5-fluorouracil and methyl-CCNU, which has been shown to double the remission rate in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy of colo-rectal cancer is still experimental and justified only in the framework of clinical trials.

  12. Prognostic Significance of Microvessel Density Determining by Endoglin in Stage II Rectal Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Drazen; Martinovic, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of endoglin in the Dukes B rectal cancer is still unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of endoglin (CD105) in resected rectal cancer and to evaluate the relationship between microvessels density (MVD), clinicopathological factors, and survival rates. Methods. The study included 95 primary rectal adenocarcinomas, corresponding to 67 adjacent and 73 distant normal mucosa specimens from surgical resection samples. Tumor specimens were paraffin-embedded and immunohistochemical staining for the CD105 endothelial antigen was performed to count CD105-MVD. For exact measurement of the CD105-MVD used a computer-integrated system Alphelys Spot Browser 2 was used. Results. The intratumoral CD105-MVD was significantly higher compared with corresponding adjacent mucosa (P < 0.0001) and distant mucosa specimens (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CD105-MVD according to patients age, gender, tumor location, grade of differentiation, histological type, depth of tumor invasion, and tumor size. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low CD105-MVD group of patients than in the high CD105-MVD group of patients (log-rank test, P = 0.0406). Conclusion. CD105-assessed MVD could help to identify patients with possibility of poor survival in the group of stage II RC. PMID:26089870

  13. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  15. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for recurrence assessment. Most

  16. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  17. The Importance of Frozen Section-Controlled Excision in Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Eyelids

    PubMed Central

    Şahan, Berna; Çiftçi, Ferda; Özkan, Ferda; Öztürk, Vildan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To show the importance of frozen section-controlled excision to avoid the re-recurrence of recurrent basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the eyelids. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five cases who underwent eyelid tumor excision in different centers and were admitted to our clinic with recurrent eyelid tumors. Recurrent tumors were resected by excision 1-2 mm from the tumor’s visible margin and sent to pathology for frozen section examination. Eyelid reconstructions with flap and graft were performed after confirming that the surgical margins were negative. Results: Twenty-one (60%) of our patients were male and 14 (40%) were female. Median age of our group was 63.4±14.2 years. Excision and sending the excised material for frozen section control was performed once for 11 patients, twice for 12 patients, 3 times for 8 patients and 4 times for 4 patients to confirm that the surgical margins were clean. All pathology samples were reported as BCC. All patients had eyelid reconstruction with flap and graft. Recurrence was detected in 2 patients (5.7%) during 1 to 8 years (mean 4.3 years) of follow-up and those patients were reoperated; no recurrence was detected in the remaining 33 patients (94.3%). Conclusion: Frozen section control can provide low re-recurrence rate in patients with recurrent BCC of the eyelids. PMID:28050325

  18. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  19. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  20. The Use of Donation After Cardiac Death Allografts Does Not Increase Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Croome, K P; Lee, D D; Burns, J M; Musto, K; Paz, D; Nguyen, J H; Perry, D K; Harnois, D M; Taner, C B

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) with donation after brain death (DBD) and donation after cardiac death (DCD) allografts has not previously been investigated. Rates and patterns of HCC recurrences were investigated in patients undergoing DBD (N = 1633) and DCD (N = 243) LT between 2003 and 2012. LT for HCC was identified in 397 patients (340 DBD and 57 DCD). No difference in tumor number (p = 0.26), tumor volume (p = 0.34) and serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) (p = 0.47) was seen between the groups. HCC recurrence was identified in 41 (12.1%) patients in the DBD group and 7 (12.3%) patients in the DCD group. There was no difference in recurrence-free survival (p = 0.29) or cumulative incidence of HCC recurrence (p = 0.91) between the groups. Liver allograft was the first site of recurrence in 22 (65%) patients in the DBD group and two (37%) patients in the DCD group (p = 0.39). LT for HCC with DBD and DCD allografts demonstrate no difference in the rate of HCC recurrence. Previously published differences in survival demonstrated between recipients with HCC receiving DBD and DCD allografts despite statistical adjustment can likely be explained by practice patterns not captured by variables contained in the SRTR database.

  1. Durable control of locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Jillian; Breau, Rodney H; Scheida, Nicola; Malone, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is generally poorly responsive to conventional radiation doses, and patients with inoperable local recurrence have limited therapeutic options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an increasingly available technology that allows delivery of a radiation schedule providing doses far more biologically effective against cancer cells than conventional radiotherapy. We present a case where durable disease control was achieved using SBRT in a patient with inoperable locally recurrent RCC who presented 18 years from original nephrectomy. The patient remains asymptomatic with no evidence of active disease 30 months following SBRT. This case highlights the need to reconsider the role of therapies with continuing advances in technology. PMID:25199199

  2. Recurrent histoplasmosis in AIDS mimicking a colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, G; Marcos, L A; Ogbaa, I

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence rate of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with AIDS is around 2.6%. A 42-year-old woman with AIDS (CD(4) count 9/microL) and recently treated for disseminated histoplasmosis presented to the emergency room with melena, severe anaemia and fever. A colonoscopy showed an umbilicated colonic nodule mimicking a carcinoma of the colon. The biopsy showed intracytoplasmic microorganisms compatible with Histoplasma capsulatum. She had poor compliance to the itraconazole when discharge on previous admission. Despite the fact that colonic histoplasmosis is uncommon, the mortality rate is around 8% and clinicians should be aware of the clinical presentation of histoplasmosis when recur, especially in patients not taking the itraconazole for long-term treatment.

  3. Nonoperable Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma: Management with Embolization and CT-Guided RF Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas Pomomi, Maria; Mylona, Sophia; Ntai, Sparti; Mpatakis, Nikolaos

    2006-08-15

    We report the case of a 59-year-old male who underwent embolization and computed-tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation of a recurrent renal cell carcinoma that developed after radical nephrectomy in contiguity to the inferior vena cava. The alternative of a new operation was rejected because of the proximity of the tumor to the vessel and percutaneous approach seemed to be the better solution.

  4. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Duggan, Margaret M.; Golshan, Mehra; Pochebit, Stephen; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  5. Downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in metastatic colorectal carcinoma predicts recurrent metastasis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Youn-Wha

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in primary colorectal carcinoma and its significant association with aggressive oncogenic behavior, which suggest that this process contributes to colorectal carcinoma development and progression. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate osteoprotegerin expression in 81 colorectal liver metastasis tissue samples and investigated its possible association with the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of patients with colorectal liver metastasis. These tissues exhibited significantly reduced expression of osteoprotegerin compared to primary colorectal carcinomas and normal colorectal mucosa. This reduced expression was significantly associated with the extent of colorectal liver metastasis, including multiplicity of metastatic tumors, involvement of the bilateral hepatic lobes, and higher histological grade. In addition, reduced osteoprotegerin expression was an independent significant predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and prognostic factor for reduced patient survival. These findings suggest that osteoprotegerin expression may be a novel predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and a prognostic biomarker in patients with colorectal liver metastasis. Patients harboring colorectal liver metastasis with reduced osteoprotegerin expression should be carefully monitored after hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastasis to enable early detection of potentially resectable metastatic recurrences. PMID:27764814

  6. Ultra-Low Anterior Resection with Coloanal Anastomosis for Recurrent Rectal Prolapse in a Young Woman with Colitis Cystica Profunda

    PubMed Central

    Hompes, R; Arnold, S; Venkatasubramaniam, A

    2015-01-01

    This case demonstrates the successful treatment of a young female patient with colitis cystica profunda causing rectal prolapse, after primary treatment with a Delorme procedure had failed. An ultra-low anterior resection with a temporary defunctioning ileostomy was carried out with good postoperative results. This case illustrates the possibility of carrying out sphincter preserving surgery rather than an abdominoperineal resection in the treatment of this condition, which may be preferable for patients. PMID:25723681

  7. Can sorafenib increase survival for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Angel E; Makris, Alexia; Nenos, Vasilios; Sucre, Eduardo; Arrobas, Jade; Franco, Edson; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2014-07-01

    Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a main detriment to long-term survival in liver transplants (LTx) for HCC. The study aims to review the use of sorafenib in recurrent HCC LTx in the Model End Stage Liver Disease era. Two hundred forty-seven patients with HCC LTx from 2002 to 2013 were included. Survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and Cox multivariate model. Twenty-two patients recurred (11%). By KM, overall survival was 27 months (standard deviation [SD], 3.2 months; median, 28.4 months). Mean time to recurrence was 16.9 months (SD, 2.8 months; median, 12 months). Nine patients were treated with sorafenib after recurrence. Median survival for sorafenib-treated patients was 42 months compared with a median of 16.2 months without sorafenib (-2 log likelihood ratio, P = 0.0582). By Cox, only sorafenib (P = 0.0233; hazard ratio, 8.528) and pathologic stage had a significant impact on survival. The recurrence rates of HCC LTx remain acceptable considering understaging and expansion of beyond Stage A. This pilot study of sorafenib in recurrent HCC demonstrates improved survival over historic controls. Many other factors affecting improved survival are explained. However, treatment remains palliative. Quality-of-life years and cost analysis need to be performed in this population.

  8. Impact of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after liver transplantation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiang-Qian; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Teng, Da-Hong; Sun, Ji-San; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasm of the liver and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Liver transplantation (LT) has become one of the best curative therapeutic options for patients with HCC, although tumor recurrence after LT is a major and unaddressed cause of mortality. Furthermore, the factors that are associated with recurrence are not fully understood, and most previous studies have focused on the biological properties of HCC, such as the number and size of the HCC nodules, the degree of differentiation, the presence of hepatic vascular invasion, elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, and the tumor stage outside of the Milan criteria. Thus, little attention has been given to factors that are not directly related to HCC (i.e., “non-oncological factors”), which have emerged as predictors of tumor recurrence. This review was performed to assess the effects of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after LT. The identification of these factors may provide new research directions and clinical strategies for the prophylaxis and surveillance of tumor recurrence after LT, which can help reduce recurrence and improve patient survival. PMID:26973413

  9. Clonal evolution of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma from primary to recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Castellarin, Mauro; Milne, Katy; Zeng, Thomas; Tse, Kane; Mayo, Michael; Zhao, Yongjun; Webb, John R; Watson, Peter H; Nelson, Brad H; Holt, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and fatal form of ovarian cancer. While most tumours are highly sensitive to cytoreductive surgery and platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy, the majority of patients experience recurrence of treatment-resistant tumours. The clonal origin and mutational adaptations associated with recurrent disease are poorly understood. We performed whole exome sequencing on tumour cells harvested from ascites at three time points (primary, first recurrence, and second recurrence) for three HGSC patients receiving standard treatment. Somatic point mutations and small insertions and deletions were identified by comparison to constitutional DNA. The clonal structure and evolution of tumours were inferred from patterns of mutant allele frequencies. TP53 mutations were predominant in all patients at all time points, consistent with the known founder role of this gene. Tumours from all three patients also harboured mutations associated with cell cycle checkpoint function and Golgi vesicle trafficking. There was convergence of germline and somatic variants within the DNA repair, ECM, cell cycle control, and Golgi vesicle pathways. The vast majority of somatic variants found in recurrent tumours were present in primary tumours. Our findings highlight both known and novel pathways that are commonly mutated in HGSC. Moreover, they provide the first evidence at single nucleotide resolution that recurrent HGSC arises from multiple clones present in the primary tumour with negligible accumulation of new mutations during standard treatment.

  10. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrences of advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma after organ preservation failure.

    PubMed

    López Delgado, I; Riestra Ayora, J; Arenas Brítez, O; García López, I; Martínez Guirado, T; Scola Yurrita, B

    2014-12-01

    Organ preservation treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is associated with poor outcomes due to locoregional recurrences. Salvage surgery is the main therapeutic option for some of these patients. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of salvage surgery for advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma previously treated with radiochemotherapy. We performed a retrospective study on 38 patients (36 men, 2 women). The median age at diagnosis was 60 years with a mean follow-up period of 49.8 months. Recurrences were diagnosed at a mean of 395 days after finalising organ preservation treatment. Patients went under different salvage surgeries, including 22 total laryngectomies, 6 partial laryngectomies (3 transoral laser surgeries and 3 opened surgeries), 8 functional neck dissections and 2 tongue base surgeries. Nineteen patients had no postoperative complications after a mean hospital stay of 2 weeks. However, 5 patients died of significant recurrent bleedings. There were 4 salivary fistulas that responded to conservative management, while 7 patients had important pharyngostomas that required reconstruction with either regional or free flaps. The mean hospital stay was of 61.60 days for all patients. Five-year overall survival from diagnosis, overall survival after salvage surgery and survival after salvage surgery were 44.20, 37.90 and 45.70%, respectively. In summary, we conclude that salvage surgery is an optimal treatment for pharyngolaryngeal and regional recurrences and provides improvement in locoregional control and survival, despite the severe complications.

  11. Mutated KRAS Results in Overexpression of DUSP4, a MAP-Kinase Phosphatase, and SMYD3, a Histone Methyltransferase, in Rectal Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaedcke, Jochen; Grade, Marian; Jung, Klaus; Camps, Jordi; Jo, Peter; Emons, Georg; Gehoff, Anastasia; Sax, Ulrich; Schirmer, Markus; Becker, Heinz; Beissbarth, Tim; Ried, Thomas; Ghadimi, B. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the KRAS oncogene are predictive for resistance to treatment with antibodies against the epithelial growth factor receptor in patients with colorectal cancer. Overcoming this therapeutic dilemma could potentially be achieved by the introduction of drugs that inhibit signaling pathways that are activated by KRAS mutations. To identify comprehensively such signaling pathways we profiled pretreatment biopsies and normal mucosa from 65 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer - 30 of which carried mutated KRAS - using global gene expression microarrays. By comparing all tumor tissues exclusively to matched normal mucosa, we could improve assay sensitivity, and identified a total of 22,297 features that were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05) between normal mucosa and cancer, including several novel potential rectal cancer genes. We then used this comprehensive description of the rectal cancer transcriptome as the baseline for identifying KRAS-dependent alterations. The presence of activating KRAS mutations is significantly correlated to an upregulation of 13 genes (adjusted P-value <0.05), among them DUSP4, a MAP-kinase phosphatase, and SMYD3, a histone methyltransferase. Inhibition of the expression of both genes has previously been shown using the MEK1-inhibitor PD98059 and the antibacterial compound Novobiocin, respectively. These findings suggest a potential approach to overcome resistance to treatment with antibodies against the epithelial growth factor receptor in patients with KRAS-mutant rectal carcinomas. PMID:20725992

  12. Clinical Score Predicting Long-Term Survival after Repeat Resection for Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thuy B; Maithel, Shishir K; Pawlik, Timothy M; Wang, Tracy S; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Phay, John E; Fields, Ryan C; Weber, Sharon M; Sicklick, Jason K; Yopp, Adam C; Duh, Quan-Yang; Solorzano, Carmen C; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Poultsides, George A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignancy typically resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Surgery, even in the setting of locally recurrent or metastatic disease, remains the only potentially curative option. However, the subset of patients who will benefit from repeat resection in this setting remains ill defined. The objective of this study was to propose a prognostic clinical score that facilitates selection of patients for repeat resection of recurrent ACC. STUDY DESIGN Patients who underwent curative-intent repeat resection for recurrent ACC at 1 of 13 academic medical centers participating in the US ACC Study Group were identified. End points included morbidity, mortality, and overall survival. RESULTS Fifty-six patients underwent repeat curative-intent resection for recurrent ACC (representing 21% of 265 patients who underwent resection for primary ACC) from 1997 to 2014. Median age was 52 years. Sites of resected recurrence included locoregional only (54%), lung only (14%), liver only (12%), combined locoregional and lung (4%), combined liver and lung (4%), and other distant sites (12%). Thirty-day morbidity and mortality rates were 40% and 5.4%, respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that the presence of multifocal recurrence, disease-free interval <12 months, and extrapulmonary distant metastases were independent predictors of poor survival. A clinical score consisting of 1-point each for the 3 variables demonstrated good discrimination in predicting survival after repeat resection (5-year: 72% for 0 points, 32% for 1 point, 0% for 2 or 3 points; p = 0.0006, area under the curve = 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Long-term survival after repeat resection for recurrent ACC is feasible when 2 of the following factors are present: solitary tumor, disease-free interval >12 months, and locoregional or pulmonary recurrence. PMID:27618748

  13. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Anne Gry; Guren, Marianne G.; Wanderas, Eva H.; Frykholm, Gunilla; Tveit, Kjell M.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Dahl, Olav; Balteskard, Lise

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  14. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Will, Olga Maria; Purcz, Nicolai; Chalaris, Athena; Heneweer, Carola; Boretius, Susann; Purcz, Larissa; Nikkola, Lila; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Kalthoff, Holger; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1) no treatment, 2) implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3) implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4) diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%–100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%–25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous

  15. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Will, Olga Maria; Purcz, Nicolai; Chalaris, Athena; Heneweer, Carola; Boretius, Susann; Purcz, Larissa; Nikkola, Lila; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Kalthoff, Holger; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya; Tiwari, Sanjay

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1) no treatment, 2) implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3) implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4) diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%-100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%-25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous

  16. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Hancock, S.; Coe, F.L.; Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1986-09-01

    An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.

  17. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  18. Analysis of recurrence and survival rates in grade 3 endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieyu; Jia, Nan; Li, Qing; Wang, Chao; Tao, Xiang; Hua, Keqin; Feng, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine risk factors associated with recurrence and survival in patients with grade 3 endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (G3EEC). A retrospective analysis of 117 patients with G3EEC, who were admitted to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University between January 2000 and December 2011, was performed. The χ2 test or Fisher's exact test were used for the comparison of categorical variables. Kaplan-Meier method was used for estimating recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) rates. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model were used to assess the prognostic significance of various patient characteristics. In 117 patients, 16 patients (13.7%) had tumor recurrence, of which 6 (37.5%) developed local-regional recurrence and 10 (62.5%) developed distant recurrence. Out of the 16 patients with tumor recurrence, 14 (87.5%) had a recurrence within 3 years of surgery. Statistically significant characteristics affecting RFS, DSS and OS rates were outer half myometrial invasion (MI ≥50%), advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, positive lymph node metastasis (PLNM), lymph vascular space invasion, adnexal involvement and characterization as a high-risk group, according to the Gynecologic Oncology Group 99 stratification algorithm. RFS was associated with the depth of cervical mucosa (stromal) involvement. Furthermore, in the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, significant independent adverse factors for RFS and DSS included MI ≥50% and adnexal involvement. For OS, there were no statistically significant prognostic factors. In conclusion, MI ≥50% and adnexal involvement are independent prognostic factors for RFS and DSS in G3EEC patients. PMID:27698871

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  20. Treatment of recurrent carcinoma at the base of the skull with carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed

    Rontal, M; Rontal, E

    1983-10-01

    The extension of carcinoma to the cribriform plate is a poor prognostic finding. Two extremes of treatment approach have been advocated. On the one hand, patients may be abandoned to palliative chemotherapy. On the other hand, heroic and aggressive resections may be advocated including combined neurosurgical transdural and otolaryngologic facial-orbital resection. Armed with the surgical microscope and the CO2 laser there may be a place for a middle ground of therapy. We present our experience with recurrent tumor after full course radiation therapy and maxilloethmoidectomy. The biopsy proven recurrences were found at the cribriform plate but could not be shown to have crossed into the anterior cranial fossa by polytomography or high resolution CT scanning. The CO2 surgical laser delivered through the surgical microscope was used with repeated applications. Recurrent epidermoid carcinoma found to be confined to the nasal side of the cribriform plate can be controlled by careful microscopic stripping of soft tissue from the cribriform plate with a surgical laser.

  1. Gene expression analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma survival and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu; Lamperska, Katarzyna; Golusinski, Paweł; Schork, Nicholas J.; Luczewski, Lukasz; Kolenda, Tomasz; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas represent about 90 % of all head and neck cancers, ranking the sixth most common human cancer. Approximately 450,000 of new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately, because of diagnosis at the advanced stages and early metastasis to the lymph nodes, the HNSCC is associated with very high death rate. Identification of signature biomarkers and molecularly targeted therapies could provide more effective and specific cancer treatment, prevent recurrence, and increase survival rate. We used paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples to screen with RT² Profiler™ PCR Array Human Cancer PathwayFinderTM. Total of 20 up-regulated genes and two down-regulated genes were screened out. Out of 22 genes, 12 genes were subsequently validated to be significantly altered in the HNSCC; the samples were from all 41 patients. Five year survival and recurrence selected genes that could represent the biomarkers of survival and recurrence of the disease. We believe that comprehensive understanding of the unique genetic characteristics of HNSCC could provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and meet the requirement for molecular-targeted therapy for the HNSCC. PMID:25575813

  2. Gene expression analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma survival and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xu; Lamperska, Katarzyna; Golusinski, Paweł; Schork, Nicholas J; Luczewski, Lukasz; Kolenda, Tomasz; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M

    2015-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas represent about 90 % of all head and neck cancers, ranking the sixth most common human cancer. Approximately 450,000 of new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately, because of diagnosis at the advanced stages and early metastasis to the lymph nodes, the HNSCC is associated with very high death rate. Identification of signature biomarkers and molecularly targeted therapies could provide more effective and specific cancer treatment, prevent recurrence, and increase survival rate. We used paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples to screen with RT² Profiler™ PCR Array Human Cancer PathwayFinderTM . Total of 20 up-regulated genes and two down-regulated genes were screened out. Out of 22 genes, 12 genes were subsequently validated to be significantly altered in the HNSCC; the samples were from all 41 patients. Five year survival and recurrence selected genes that could represent the biomarkers of survival and recurrence of the disease. We believe that comprehensive understanding of the unique genetic characteristics of HNSCC could provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and meet the requirement for molecular-targeted therapy for the HNSCC.

  3. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  4. Recurrent pure mucinous carcinoma of the breast with mediastinal great vessel invasion: HER-2/neu confers aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Adair, Jamie D; Harvey, Kyle P; Mahmood, Ali; Caralis, James; Gordon, William; Yanish, Gregory

    2008-02-01

    Mucinous carcinoma of the breast, also known as colloid carcinoma, is a less common variant of breast cancer constituting less than five per cent of breast cancers. We report the case of a 42-year-old premenopausal female who presented with a palpable chest wall recurrence 4 years after simple mastectomy, axillary node dissection, and TRAM flap reconstruction for pure mucinous carcinoma. The recurrent neoplasm was a pure mucinous carcinoma and was found to be invading the mediastinum into the great vessels. The tumor was estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor negative, and HER-2/neu positive, which is an unusual finding for mucinous carcinoma. The fact that this tumor demonstrated HER-2/neu positivity may explain the uncharacteristic aggressive nature of this normally indolent type of breast tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of any mucinous breast cancer invading the mediastinal great vessels and its subsequent en-bloc resection.

  5. Expression of p27 and PTEN and clinical characteristics in early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlation with recurrence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Quan; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Meng; Sun, Yu-Man; Liu, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumor of otolaryngeal region. At present, effective treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma still depends on surgery and radiotherapy. In recent years, application of CO2 laser resection in the treatment of stage T1 glottic carcinoma can remove the tumor completely and reduce the injury of laryngeal tissues. But recurrence still happened in some postoperative patients. Here, we selected 131 patients to compare the therapeutic effects of CO2 laser resection and traditional split laryngeal surgery on the early laryngeal cancer, examined the expression of p27 and PTEN by immunohistochemistry in early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma tissues in correlation to clinical outcome. After two years follow-up 14/85 (16.5%) of CO2 laser treatment group presented with local recurrence (recurrent group), while that of split laryngeal surgery group was 6/46 (13.0%). There was no statistical significance in recurrence rate between the two groups (P>0.05). 10 of all the 111 (9.0%) non-recurrent patients did not follow the doctor's advice to quit smoking after the operation, while 12 in the 20 (60.0%) recurrent patients did not; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). The positive rates of p27 were 80.2% (105/131) and 43.5% (57/131), and that of PTEN were 83.2% (109/131) and 48.9% (64/131) in the cancer adjacent tissues (negative surgical margin tissues) and in laryngeal carcinoma tissues, respectively (P<0.001). The expression rates of p27 and PTEN in laryngeal carcinoma tissues of the recurrent group were 20.0% (4/20), 10.0% (2/20) and that in non recurrent group were 47.7% (53/111) and 55.9% (62/111), respectively, with a significant difference (P<0.001). In addition, the expression of p27 and PTEN in tumor resected marginal tissues of the recurrence group was 50.0% (10/20), 40.0% (8/20) and that in non recurrence group was 85.6% (95/111) and 91.0% (101/111), respectively; the

  6. Hematospermia and Cloacogenic Transitional Cell Carcinoma: A Twist on Significance and Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, Alex M.; Clement, Jessica M.; Forouhar, Faripour; Taylor, John A.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old gentleman presented with recurrent hematospermia. Further history revealed recent onset of constipation and difficulty voiding. Rectal examination revealed a firm, polypoid mass and colonoscopy showed suspicious, ulcerated lesions of the rectal mucosa with narrowing of the rectal vault. Pathology demonstrated transitional cell carcinoma of the rectum. While transitional cell carcinoma is a common genitourinary cancer, its presence in the anus and rectum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, hematospermia is generally not associated with malignancy. This case is a remarkable example of two pathologic processes presenting in rare form and underscores the value of a thorough investigation of hematospermia when associated with other clinical symptoms. PMID:26977332

  7. Treatment of Recurrent Bronchial Carcinoma: The Role of High-Dose-Rate Endoluminal Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hauswald, Henrik; Stoiber, Eva; Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Grehn, Christian; Becker, Heinrich D.; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: This study's aim was to assess outcome and toxicity of high-dose-rate endoluminal brachytherapy (HDREB) for recurrent bronchial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 2005, 41 patients were treated with HDREB for symptomatic recurrent bronchial carcinoma. All patients had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 56 Gy (range, 30-70 Gy). The median HDREB dose applied was 15 Gy (range, 5-29 Gy). The median time interval between primary EBRT and reirradiation was 9 months (range, 2-54 months). Results: After a median follow-up of 6.7 months, the 6-, 12-, and 24-month overall survival rates were 58%, 18%, and 7%, respectively. The median overall survival time was 6.7 months. Local remission was achieved in 73% of patients (n = 30). A total of 24% of patients (n = 10) showed no response or progressive disease within 8 weeks after treatment. In 1 patient, treatment response was not documented. The 6-, 12-, and 24-month local control rates were 38%, 17%, and 3%, respectively. The median local progression-free survival time was 4 months (range, 1-23 months). Prognostic factors were a total dose of >=15 Gy of HDREB (p = 0.029) and a Karnofsky performance score of >=80% (p = 0.0012). The cause of death was locoregional progression in 27% of patients (n = 11), distant metastases in 24% of patients (n = 10), fatal hemorrhage in 15% of patients (n = 6), and other causes in 29% of patients (n = 12). None of the patients with locally controlled disease showed grade 3 or 4 late effects. Conclusions: Palliative treatment of symptomatic, locally recurrent bronchial carcinoma with HDREB can effectively relieve symptoms in the majority of patients while causing only few complications. Still, time to progression is short.

  8. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  9. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp treated with serial free flaps: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ikander, Peder; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of large full thickness scalp defects is always a challenge. Many different techniques can be used, but larger defects often call for a free tissue transfer. The purpose of this report is to present one successful way of treating multiple large scalp defects. A 61-year-old man was seen with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp. The lesions were of full thickness, about 10-15 cm in diameter and included the calvarial bone and the dura layer. The reconstruction process included split-thickness skin grafting, local flaps, and three free microvascular flaps; two latissimus dorsi flaps and one anterolateral thigh flap. No total flap loss was seen, but partial flap necrosis called for secondarily reconstruction. The final result was cosmetically acceptable and the patient is of good health. In conclusion, serial free microvascular flaps may be used with good results when dealing with large difficult and recurrent scalp defects.

  10. Molecular events in relapsed oral squamous cell carcinoma: Recurrence vs. secondary primary tumor.

    PubMed

    Gleber-Netto, Frederico O; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Takes, Robert P; Kelner, Natalie; Rodrigo, Juan P; Strojan, Primož; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Rapidis, Alexander D; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; Ferlito, Alfio; Kowalski, Luiz P

    2015-08-01

    Relapses have a great impact on both the morbidity and mortality rates of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. Current classification criteria are imprecise and need improvements. Recent advances in understanding of OSCC relapses on a molecular level provide new possibilities to better classify true recurrences and second primary tumors. This review discusses the limitations of the current OSCC relapse classification method and presents possible alternatives to improve this classification based on molecular techniques. Moreover, these molecular techniques add to the further understanding of these lesions and may provide tools for clinical management.

  11. Recurrent Multiple Squamous Cell Carcinomas on the Scalp in a Patient with Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yota; Fujimura, Taku; Kambayashi, Yumi; Tsukada, Akira; Hidaka, Takanori; Tanita, Kayo; Haga, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Aiba, Setsuya

    2017-01-01

    Both long-term administration of immunosuppressive agents and chronic inflammatory conditions, such as autoimmune disease, could be risk factors for the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). In this report, we present a case of recurrent multiple cSCC on the scalp in a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis who had been administered cyclosporine and Predonine since she was a 1-year-old infant. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining revealed IL-17-producing cells adjacent to IL-17R-expressing atypical keratinocytes. Our present case suggested that IL-17/IL-17R signaling might contribute to the carcinogenesis of cSCC. PMID:28203172

  12. Cervical osteomyelitis after carbon dioxide laser excision of recurrent carcinoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, A Jacqueline; Brandsma, Dieta; Smeele, Ludi E; Rosingh, Andert W; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Lohuis, Peter J F M

    2013-04-01

    Two patients with recurrent carcinoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall, previously treated with carbon dioxide (CO2) laser excision and (chemo)radiotherapy, presented with neck pain due to cervical osteomyelitis. In one patient this led to cervical spine instability, for which a haloframe was applied. Our working hypothesis was that cervical osteomyelitis was caused by an infected wound bed induced by CO2 laser excision of the tumor in the already vascular-compromised area of the irradiated posterior pharyngeal wall. We discuss the risks of leaving a wound for secondary granulation after CO2 laser excision of the posterior pharyngeal wall and prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  13. Multiple and Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity After Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiuhong; Xing, Yuzhen; Cheng, Bo

    2017-02-22

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common secondary solid tumors in patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, according to previous reports, multiple and recurrent OSCC is very rare. The presented case shows the susceptibility to the development of secondary malignancies, particularly oral cancer, of patients who present with chronic graft-versus-host disease after HSCT. OSCC after HSCT appears to be more invasive and has a tendency to recur, with a poor prognosis. Therefore, regular and thorough evaluations of the oral mucosa are recommended for all patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and have chronic graft-versus-host disease.

  14. Factors Associated with Recurrence and Regional Adenopathy for Head and Neck Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brianna N; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Rao, Shyam; Moore, Michael G; Farwell, D Gregory; Bewley, Arnaud F

    2017-03-01

    Objective Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. With advanced CSCC of the head and neck, there is conflicting evidence on what constitutes high-risk disease. Our objective is to evaluate which factors are predictive of recurrence and nodal spread and survival. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary academic institution. Subjects and Methods Patients with advanced head and neck CSCC treated with primary resection identified by chart review. Results A total of 212 patients met inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 70.4 years; 87.3% were men. Mean tumor diameter was 3.65 cm, with an average depth of invasion of 1.38 cm. The mean follow-up time was 35 months (median, 21.5), and over that period 67 recurrences were recorded, 49 of which were local. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of disease-free survival for the cohort was 53.2%. On Cox multivariate analysis, recurrent disease, perineural invasion (PNI), and poorly differentiated histology were independent predictors of recurrence. On multinomial logistic regression, patients with primary tumors on the ear, cheek, temple, or lip, as well as those with PNI, were more likely to present with nodal metastasis. Conclusion For advanced CSCCs of the head and neck, patients with recurrent disease, PNI, and poorly differentiated tumors are at highest risk for local recurrence. Patients with tumors or the ear, cheek, temple, or lip, as well as those with PNI, are at increased risk of harboring nodal disease.

  15. Overexpression of flotillin-1 is involved in proliferation and recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yawei; Song, Haiyan; Zhang, Guohui; Ai, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Flotillin-1 (FLOT1) is known to have a role in tumorigenesis; however, the effect of FLOT1 on proliferation and recurrence of human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is unclear. Samples from 156 TCC patients and 142 patients undergoing open bladder surgery for indications other than TCC were used in the present study. FLOT1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, and mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. A FLOT1-expressing pcDEF3 vector was stably transfected into 4 TCC cell lines and FLOT1 expression was decreased by RNAi. Proliferative analysis of TCC cells was detected by the WST-1 assay and a xenograft model using BALB/C nude mice. The association between FLOT1 expression and TCC recurrence was also analyzed by adhesion, migration and invasion assays. FLOT1 expression in TCC was significantly overexpressed compared to normal urothelial tissue, and the level of FLOT1 expression was significantly correlated with tumor size, pathologic grade, clinical stage and recurrence. In addition, FLOT1 significantly increased the proliferative ability of TCC cells in vitro and in vivo. TCC cells with a high level of FLOT1 expression exhibited a higher level of adhesion, migration and invasion. FLOT1 expression was shown to be upregulated in human TCC. These findings suggest that FLOT1 plays an important role in the proliferation and recurrence of TCC and that silencing FLOT1 expression might be a novel therapeutic strategy.

  16. Early recognition of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma utilizing gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Jeffers, L.J.; Reddy, K.R.; Heiba, S.; Schiff, E.R.

    1988-05-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a valuable test together with other screening tests such as alpha feto-protein (AFP) and other imaging modalities in following up recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Three patients were followed in our institution for intervals varying from 2-24 mo after successful resection of uninodular localized hepatomas. In the first patient, gallium scan showed abnormal localized activity while the computed tomography (CT) scan and the magnetic resonance imaging were negative. Liver function tests and AFP were also normal and the patient was operated upon only on the basis of the gallium scan. The second patient had a follow-up gallium scan 2 mo after the first operation that showed an area of increased activity along the inferior aspect of the right lobe. A CT scan done after that showed no evidence of recurrence, but subsequently became positive when repeated 4 mo later. The third patient had abnormal simultaneous gallium scan and CT scan demonstrating a recurrence in the left adrenal gland while both AFP and carcinoembryonic antigen were normal. This has led us to consider every patient a candidate for a baseline and follow-up gallium scan for evaluation for recurrence following HCC.

  17. CD133+ cancer stem cells promoted by VEGF accelerate the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Hao, Meijun; Ouyang, Yabo; Zheng, Jiasheng; Chen, Dexi

    2017-01-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in inducing the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) remains unclear. Here, we found that a dramatic increase in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and an induction of local CD133+ CSCs are associated with early HCC recurrence, suggesting that VEGF expression and tumour stemness contribute to the relapse. In vitro studies demonstrated that VEGF, via activation of VEGFR2, increased the number of CD133+ CSCs and enhanced their capacity for self-renewal by inducing the expression of Nanog. In vivo studies further demonstrated that VEGF-treated CD133+ CSCs formed tumours larger than those developing from unstimulated cells and VEGF pre-treatment increased the tumorigenic cell frequency of primary HCC cells dependently on the presence of Nanog and VEGFR2. In HCC tissue derived from patients with early recurrence, almost all CD133+ cells were Nanog and p-VEGFR2 positive, suggesting that activation of VEGFR2 is critical for RFA-induced tumour stemness in HCC. In summary, RFA-induced VEGF promotes tumour stemness and accelerates tumourigenesis in HCC in a manner dependent on Nanog and VEGFR2, which is valuable for the prediction of HCC recurrence after RFA and the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:28134312

  18. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Donald T.; Walker, Gail; De La Fuente, Adriana C.; Nazarian, Ronen; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Serafini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4+FOXP3+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), that what really represents a prognostic parameter is not the overall expression of FOXP3 but its intracellular localization.While overallFOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells does not correlate with tumor recurrence, its intracellular localization within the CD4 cells does: nuclear FOXP3 (nFOXP3) is associated with tumor recurrence within 3 years, while cytoplasmicFOXP3 (cFOXP3) is associated with a lower likelihood of recurrence. Thus, we propose elevated levels of the cFOXP3/nFOXP3 ratio within tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cells as a predictor of OSCC recurrence. PMID:23977174

  19. Detection of Mucosal Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinomas After Radiotherapy With Narrow-Band Imaging Endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Yen-Chun; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Kam-Fai

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated the feasibility of screening mucosal recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma with narrow-band imaging (NBI) endoscopy. Methods and Materials: One hundred and six patients were enrolled. All patients underwent conventional white-light (WL) endoscopic examination of the nasopharynx followed by NBI endoscopy. Biopsies were performed if recurrence was suspected. Results: We identified 32 suspected lesions by endoscopy in WL and/or NBI mode. Scattered brown spots (BS) were identified in 22 patients, and 4 of the 22 who had negative MRI findings were histopathologically confirmed to be neoplasias that were successfully removed via endoscopy. A comparison of the visualization in NBI closer view corresponded to histopathological findings in 22 BS, and the prevalence rates of neoplasias in tail signs, round signs, and irregularities signs were 0% (0/6), 0% (0/7), and 44.4% (4/9), respectively (p = 0.048). The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic capability were 37.5%, 92.9% and 0.652 for WL, 87.5%, 74.5% and 0.810 for NBI, and 87.5%, 87.8%, and 0.876 for NBI closer view, respectively. NBI closer view was effective in increasing specificity compared with NBI alone (87.8% vs. 74.5%, p < 0.05), and in increasing sensitivity and diagnostic capability compared to WL alone (87.5% vs. 37.5%, p < 0.05; 0.876 vs. 0.652, p = 0.0001). Conclusions: Although NBI in endoscopy can improve sensitivity of mucosal recurrent nasopharyngeal neoplasias, false-positive (nonneoplasia BS) results may be obtained in areas with nonspecific inflammatory changes due to postradiation effects. NBI closer view not only can offer a timely, convenient, and highly reliable assessment of mucosal recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma, it can also make endoscopic removal possible.

  20. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    PubMed Central

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. Material/Methods The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. Results The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery. PMID:25806096

  1. Post-transplantation hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence: Patterns and relation between vascularity and differentiation degree

    PubMed Central

    Pecchi, Annarita; Besutti, Giulia; De Santis, Mario; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Nosseir, Sofia; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Torricelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) vascularity and grade; to describe patterns and vascular/histopathological variations of post-transplantation recurrence. METHODS: This retrospective study included 165 patients (143 men, 22 women; median age 56.8 years, range 28-70.4 years) transplanted for HCC who had a follow-up period longer than 2 mo. Pre-transplantation dynamic computed tomography or magnetic resonance examinations were retrospectively reviewed, classifying HCC imaging enhancement pattern into hypervascular and hypovascular based on presence of wash-in during arterial phase. All pathologic reports of the explanted livers were reviewed, collecting data about HCC differentiation degree. The association between imaging vascular pattern and pathological grade was estimated using the Fisher exact test. All follow-up clinical and imaging data were reviewed for evidence of recurrence. Recurrence rate was calculated and imaging features of recurrent tumor were collected, classifying early and late recurrences based on timing (< or ≥ 2 years after transplantation) and intrahepatic, extrahepatic and both intrahepatic and extrahepatic recurrences based on location. All intrahepatic recurrences were classified as hypervascular or hypovascular and the differentiation degree was collected where available. The presence of variations in imaging enhancement pattern and pathological grade between the primary tumor and the intrahepatic recurrence was evaluated and the association between imaging and histopatholgical variations was estimated by using the χ2 test. RESULTS: Of the 163 patients with imaging evidence of viable tumor, 156 (95.7%) had hypervascular and 7 (4.3%) hypovascular HCC. Among the 125 patients with evidence of viable tumor in the explanted liver, 19 (15.2%) had grade 1, 56 (44.8%) grade 2, 40 (32%) grade 3 and 4 (3.2%) grade 4 HCC, while the differentiation degree was not assessable for 6 patients (4.8%). A significant

  2. [CT guidance (125)I seed implantation for pelvic recurrent rectal cancer assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template].

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J J; Jiang, Y L; Tian, S Q; Ji, Z; Guo, F X; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Xu, Y P

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To analyze the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan of (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template (3D printing template) for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods: From February 2016 to April 2016, a total of 10 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer received (125)I seeds implantation under CT guidance assisted by 3D printing template in Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital.Each patient underwent CT simulation, three-dimentional treatment planning pre-implantation, 3D printing template design, radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing template and dosimetric verification post implantation. The median activity of seed was 0.63 mCi (0.58 to 0.7 mCi) (2.15- 2.59×10(7) Bq), and the median number of seeds was 80 (19 to 192). D90, D100, V100, V150, CI, EI, HI, D5cc, D2cc of bladder and bowel of pre-plan and post-plan were calculated, respectively.Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan. Results: The median D90 of pre-plan and post-plan were 13 761.0 and 12 798.8 cGy, respectively.The median D100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 5 293.6 and 5 397.9 cGy, respectively.The median V100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 90.0% and 90.0%, respectively.The median V150 of pre-plan and post-plan were 63.8% and 62.4%, respectively.The median CI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.73 and 0.67.The median EI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.22 and 0.30, respectively. The median HI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.29 and 0.31.The median bladder D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 3 088.8 and 4 240.4 cGy, respectively.The median bowel D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 7 051.6 and 7 903.9 cGy, respectively. Conclusions: 3D printing template might be helpful for locally recurrent rectal cancer patients who received (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing

  3. Centrally necrotizing breast carcinoma: a rare histological subtype, which was cause of misdiagnosis in an evident clinical local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Centrally necrotizing carcinoma is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma, which is characterized by an extensive central necrotic zone accounting for at least 70% of the cross-sectional area of the neoplasm. This central necrotic zone, in turn, is surrounded by a narrow rim of proliferative viable tumor cells. We report an unusual clinical situation in which a patient whose evident breast mass suggested an ipsilateral local recurrence and for which numerous attempts to confirm the histological diagnosis had failed. The patient was treated with a radical mastectomy based on clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence after an undesirable delay. In this case, the narrow rim of viable malignant tissue had a thickness of 0.5 to 8 mm, and the centrally necrotizing carcinoma had a central zone with a predominance of fibrosis. The special features of this case led to a misdiagnosis and to an evident clinical local recurrence. PMID:22852765

  4. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  5. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Jesus, Eliane C; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Rocha, Rafael M; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C; Silva, Israel T; Nunes, Diana N; Setubal, João C; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  6. Toward automatic segmentation and quantification of tumor and stroma in whole-slide images of H and E stained rectal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geessink, Oscar G. F.; Baidoshvili, Alexi; Freling, Gerard; Klaase, Joost M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    Visual estimation of tumor and stroma proportions in microscopy images yields a strong, Tumor-(lymph)Node- Metastasis (TNM) classification-independent predictor for patient survival in colorectal cancer. Therefore, it is also a potent (contra)indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, quantification of tumor and stroma through visual estimation is highly subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a method for objective quantification of tumor and stroma in standard hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained microscopy slides of rectal carcinomas. A tissue segmentation algorithm, based on supervised machine learning and pixel classification, was developed, trained and validated using histological slides that were prepared from surgically excised rectal carcinomas in patients who had not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Whole-slide scanning was performed at 20× magnification. A total of 40 images (4 million pixels each) were extracted from 20 whole-slide images at sites showing various relative proportions of tumor and stroma. Experienced pathologists provided detailed annotations for every extracted image. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using cross-validation by testing on 1 image at a time while using the other 39 images for training. The total classification error of the algorithm was 9.4% (SD = 3.2%). Compared to visual estimation by pathologists, the algorithm was 7.3 times (P = 0.033) more accurate in quantifying tissues, also showing 60% less variability. Automatic tissue quantification was shown to be both reliable and practicable. We ultimately intend to facilitate refined prognostic stratification of (colo)rectal cancer patients and enable better personalized treatment.

  7. Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma in the Genetically Predisposed Patient: Role of Urinary Markers in Predicting Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Tecle, Nahom; Whelan, Patrick; Strong, Andrea; Deane, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is an uncommon disease that is diagnosed clinically by the selective use of urine cytology, urine biomarkers, and imaging of the upper tract. We present a case of a patient with Lynch syndrome and high-grade UTUC that was diagnosed by an abnormal Cxbladder assay, prompting further endoscopic examination. Case Presentation: A 59-year-old Caucasian female with a history of endometrial cancer and bladder cancer with Lynch syndrome presented for evaluation of recurrent urothelial carcinoma. Her previous bladder tumors have been T1 high grade and Ta high grade and have been treated with resection and multiple cycles of intravesical Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) therapy. She had also undergone a robotic left distal ureterectomy and psoas hitch for a high-grade distal ureteral tumor. Surveillance cystoscopy 7 months after revealed a biopsy-confirmed bladder tumor, which was resected, and she was started on maintenance BCG therapy. At presentation, follow-up urine cytology and UroVysion studies were negative. Cxbladder test was also initially negative. However, during close clinical monitoring, the Cxbladder test became positive. Cystoscopy was once more performed, which was unremarkable. Bilateral ureteroscopy was performed, revealing high-grade upper tract renal papillary carcinoma (UTUC) in the left renal pelvis. The patient declined a nephroureterectomy. She was treated with two sessions of holmium laser ablation of the left renal pelvis tumor and underwent 6 weekly courses of BCG + interferon instilled into her left renal pelvis using a 5F open-ended catheter. Repeat urine cytology, UroVysion, and Cxbladder tests were negative after completion of upper tract BCG therapy. Conclusion: Cxbladder test may be useful and an adjunct to urine cytology and the UroVysion FISH assay to evaluate patients at high risk for recurrent UTUC. PMID:28078326

  8. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, Veliparib, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. CT-guided versus laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation in recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma against the diaphragmatic dome

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huaiyin; Su, Mu; Zhu, Chuandong; Wang, Lixue; Zheng, Qin; Wan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) and laparoscopic RFA (L-RFA) have been used to treat intrahepatic recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) against the diaphragmatic dome. However, the therapeutic safety, efficacy, and hospital fee have never been compared between the two techniques due to scarcity of cases. In this retrospective study, 116 patients were divided into two groups with a total of 151 local recurrent HCC lesions abutting the diaphragm. We compared overall survival (OS), local tumor progression (LTP), postoperative complications, and hospital stay and fee between the two groups. Our findings revealed no significant differences in 5-year OS (36.7% vs. 44.6%, p = 0.4289) or 5-year LTP (73.3% vs. 67.9%, p = 0.8897) between CT-RFA and L-RFA. The overall hospital stay (2.8 days vs. 4.1 days, p < 0.0001) and cost (¥ 19217.6 vs. ¥ 25553.6, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the CT-RFA in comparison to that of L-RFA. In addition, we elaborated on the choice of percutaneous puncture paths depending on the locations of the HCC nodules and 11-year experience with CT-RFA. In conclusion, CT-RFA is a relatively easy and economic technique for recurrent small HCC abutting the diaphragm, and both CT-RFA and L-RFA are effective techniques. PMID:28291254

  10. Risk factors for the Long-Term Efficacy, Recurrence, and Metastasis in Small Hepatocellular Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Gao, She-Gan; Chen, Jian-Min; Wang, Gong-Ping; Wang, Zeng-Fang; Zhou, Bo; Jin, Can-Hui; Yang, Yan-Tong; Feng, Xiao-Shan

    2015-06-01

    We tried to determine the risk factors for the long-term efficacy, recurrence, and metastasis of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, diameter <5 cm). One hundred sixty-eight small liver cancer patients received percutaneous cryoablation therapy by argon-helium superconducting surgery system under the ultrasound guidance. Clinical parameter and the efficacy were analyzed after follow-up. After cryoablation treatment, the median follow-up time for the 168 patients was 36 (7-41) months. Liver functions were impaired as indicated by increased alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin, total protein, albumin, and prothrombin activity. The difference of VEGF expression in liver cancer and the surrounding tissue is significant. 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival were 92.9, 83.9, and 65.5 %, respectively. Relapse-free survival was 76.8, 53.0, and 41.1 %. Less tumor number, higher tumor differentiation, and low VEGF expression predict higher metastasis-free and relapse-free survival rate. Lower Child-Pugh classification is correlated with the higher overall survival after cryoablation. There was no statistical significance in in situ intrahepatic recurrence patients, but VEGF changes were statistically significant for metastasis in other parts of liver or extrahepatic metastasis. Tumor number, differentiation, VEGF expression, large vessel invasion, lymph node, and extrahepatic metastasis all affect the overall and relapse-free survival. VEGF expression can be a predictable factor for liver cancer recurrence and metastasis.

  11. Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma Predictors for Recurrence and Infiltration of the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Furdova, Alena; Lukacko, Pavol

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To present the proportion of patients with periocular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) who underwent orbital exenteration and to evaluate the significance of the risk factors. Design: Retrospective, comparative, interventional case series. Methods: Data of all patients with BCC between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed for patient demographics, previous treatment options, tumor localization, and histopathologic subtype. Results: In group of 256 patients, orbital exenteration underwent 7 patients (2.7%). For 2 patients (5.1%), orbital exenteration was the first procedure performed. In the exenterated group, the most common tumor site was the medial cantus and lower eyelid, whereas in the overall group, it was the lower eyelid (P = 0.011). The proportion of patients initially treated with histopathologic result of infiltration of 1 margin was significantly higher in patients undergoing exenteration (P = 0.282). During the 7-year period observership, the authors have seen 13 recurrences (5.08%). In patients with recurrent BCC after surgery, the authors applied adjuvant high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy. Neoadjuvant therapy with Vismodegib was effective in patient with biorbital infiltration after 1 side exenteration. Conclusions: Orbital invasion may be clinically silent. Recurrence rate of BCC in our group 5% corresponds to date in the literature. The exenteration for BCC may be significantly higher when the lesion involves a medial canthal location and lower eyelid and initial surgery does not include margin-controlled excision. PMID:27906855

  12. CT-guided versus laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation in recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma against the diaphragmatic dome.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huaiyin; Su, Mu; Zhu, Chuandong; Wang, Lixue; Zheng, Qin; Wan, Yuan

    2017-03-14

    Computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) and laparoscopic RFA (L-RFA) have been used to treat intrahepatic recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) against the diaphragmatic dome. However, the therapeutic safety, efficacy, and hospital fee have never been compared between the two techniques due to scarcity of cases. In this retrospective study, 116 patients were divided into two groups with a total of 151 local recurrent HCC lesions abutting the diaphragm. We compared overall survival (OS), local tumor progression (LTP), postoperative complications, and hospital stay and fee between the two groups. Our findings revealed no significant differences in 5-year OS (36.7% vs. 44.6%, p = 0.4289) or 5-year LTP (73.3% vs. 67.9%, p = 0.8897) between CT-RFA and L-RFA. The overall hospital stay (2.8 days vs. 4.1 days, p < 0.0001) and cost (¥ 19217.6 vs. ¥ 25553.6, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the CT-RFA in comparison to that of L-RFA. In addition, we elaborated on the choice of percutaneous puncture paths depending on the locations of the HCC nodules and 11-year experience with CT-RFA. In conclusion, CT-RFA is a relatively easy and economic technique for recurrent small HCC abutting the diaphragm, and both CT-RFA and L-RFA are effective techniques.

  13. Usefulness of PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent or metastasized differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LU, CUN-ZHI; CAO, SU-SHENG; WANG, WEI; LIU, JUN; FU, NING; LU, FENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the usefulness of the positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrence or metastasization of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative findings on the 131I-diagnostic whole-body scanning (dWBS). Fifteen patients with DTC, abnormal thyroglobulin levels, and negative 131I-dWBS findings were scanned using the 18F-FDG PET/CT. Positive diagnosis was based on postoperative histologic findings, and clinical and imaging follow-up results obtained in the subsequent 6 months. In addition, preoperative and postoperative thyroglobulin levels were compared. Using the findings of 18F-FDG PET/CT and data on confirmed positive diagnosis, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated. Sensitivity and PPV of PET/CT in detecting recurrence or metastasisization of DTC were 93.30 and 91.40%, respectively. Furthermore, postoperative thyroglobulin levels were markedly lower compared to the preoperative levels (respectively, 4.67±1.71 vs. 58.53±18.34 ng/ml; p<0.05). PET/CT scan with 18F-FDG is an informative technique for the detection of recurrent or metastasized DTC in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative 131I-dWBS findings. PMID:27073490

  14. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  15. Clinical significance and predictive factors of early massive recurrence after radiofrequency ablation in patients with a single small hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Gil Sun; Sohn, Won; Ahn, Jemma; Sinn, Dong-Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong-Han; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is one of the most frequently applied curative treatments in patients with a single small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the clinical significance of and risk factors for early massive recurrence after RFA—a dreadful event limiting further curative treatment—have not been fully evaluated. Methods In total, 438 patients with a single HCC of size ≤3 cm who underwent percutaneous RFA as an initial treatment between 2006 and 2009 were included. Baseline patient characteristics, overall survival, predictive factors, and recurrence after RFA were evaluated. In addition, the incidence, impact on survival, and predictive factors of early massive recurrence, and initial recurrence beyond the Milan criteria within 2 years were also investigated. Results During the median follow-up of 68.4 months, recurrent HCC was confirmed in 302 (68.9%) patients, with early massive recurrence in 27 patients (6.2%). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 95.4%, 84.7%, and 81.8%, respectively, in patients with no recurrence, 99.6%, 86.4%, and 70.1% in patients with recurrence within the Milan criteria or late recurrence, and 92.6%, 46.5%, and 0.05% in patients with early massive recurrence. Multivariable analysis identified older age, Child-Pugh score B or C, and early massive recurrence as predictive of poor overall survival. A tumor size of ≥2 cm and tumor location adjacent to the colon were independent risk factors predictive of early massive recurrence. Conclusion Early massive recurrence is independently predictive of poor overall survival after RFA in patients with a single small HCC. Tumors sized ≥2 cm and located adjacent to the colon appear to be independent risk factors for early massive recurrence. PMID:28081587

  16. Therapeutic Inhibition of the MDM2-p53 Interaction Prevents Recurrence of Adenoid Cystic Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nör, Felipe; Warner, Kristy A; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Acasigua, Gerson A; Pearson, Alexander T; Kerk, Samuel A; Helman, Joseph I; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Wang, Shaomeng; Nör, Jacques E

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Conventional chemotherapy has modest efficacy in advanced adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC). Tumor recurrence is a major challenge in the management of ACC patients. Here, we evaluated the antitumor effect of a novel small-molecule inhibitor of the MDM2-p53 interaction (MI-773) combined with cisplatin in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) ACC tumors.Experimental Design: Therapeutic strategies with MI-773 and/or cisplatin were evaluated in SCID mice harboring PDX ACC tumors (UM-PDX-HACC-5) and in low passage primary human ACC cells (UM-HACC-2A, -2B, -5, -6) in vitro The effect of therapy on the fraction of cancer stem cells (CSC) was determined by flow cytometry for ALDH activity and CD44 expression.Results: Combined therapy with MI-773 with cisplatin caused p53 activation, induction of apoptosis, and regression of ACC PDX tumors. Western blots revealed induction of MDM2, p53 and downstream p21 expression, and regulation of apoptosis-related proteins PUMA, BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and active caspase-9 upon MI-773 treatment. Both single-agent MI-773 and MI-773 combined with cisplatin decreased the fraction of CSCs in PDX ACC tumors. Notably, neoadjuvant MI-773 and surgery eliminated tumor recurrences during a postsurgical follow-up of more than 300 days. In contrast, 62.5% of mice that received vehicle control presented with palpable tumor recurrences within this time period (P = 0.0097).Conclusions: Collectively, these data demonstrate that therapeutic inhibition of MDM2-p53 interaction by MI-773 decreased the CSC fraction, sensitized ACC xenograft tumors to cisplatin, and eliminated tumor recurrence. These results suggest that patients with ACC might benefit from the therapeutic inhibition of the MDM2-p53 interaction. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 1036-48. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Depsipeptide in Unresectable Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-29

    Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  18. Mirvetuximab Soravtansine and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With FRa-Positive Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-10

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1) or node-positive (N = 9), and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005), bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005), pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005), and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005), with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005). We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that covered by classic

  20. Matching Electron Beams Without Secondary Collimation for Treatment of Extensive Recurrent Chest-Wall Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Mandelzweig, Yuri; Baral, Ed

    2015-01-15

    Matching electron beams without secondary collimators (applicators) were used for treatment of extensive, recurrent chest-wall carcinoma. Due to the wide penumbra of such beams, the homogeneity of the dose distribution at and around the junction point is clinically acceptable and relatively insensitive to positional errors. Specifically, dose around the junction point is homogeneous to within ±4% as calculated from beam profiles, while the positional error of 1 cm leaves this number essentially unchanged. The experimental isodose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom supports this conclusion. Two electron beams with wide penumbra were used to cover the desired treatment area with satisfactory dose homogeneity. The technique is relatively simple yet clinically useful and can be considered a viable alternative for treatment of extensive chest-wall disease. The steps are suggested to make this technique more universal.

  1. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  2. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer or Recurrent Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  3. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Rate and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomonori Ishimaru, Hideki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Daikoku, Manabu; Honda, Sumihisa; Koshiishi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To analyze local recurrence-free rates and risk factors for recurrence following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. One hundred and nine nodules treated by RFA and 173 nodules treated by TACE were included. Hypovascular nodules were excluded from this study. Overall local recurrence-free rates of each treatment group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The independent risk factors of local recurrence and the hazard ratios were analyzed using Cox's proportional-hazards regression model. Based on the results of multivariate analyses, we classified HCC nodules into four subgroups: central nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm and peripheral nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm. The local recurrence-free rates of these subgroups for each treatment were also calculated. Results. The overall local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p = 0.013). The 24-month local recurrence-free rates in the RFA and TACE groups were 60.0% and 48.9%, respectively. In the RFA group, the only significant risk factor for recurrence was tumor size >2 cm in greatest dimension. In the TACE group, a central location was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. In central nodules that were {<=}2 cm, the local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p < 0.001). In the remaining three groups, there was no significant difference in local recurrence-free rate between the two treatment methods. Conclusion. A tumor diameter of >2 cm was the only independent risk factor for local recurrence in RFA treatment, and a central location was the only independent risk factor in TACE treatment. Central lesions measuring {<=}2 cm should be treated by RFA.

  4. Salvage total laryngectomy after conservation laryngeal surgery for recurrent laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Virgilio, A; Greco, A; Bussu, F; Gallo, A; Rosati, D; Kim, S-H; Wang, C-C; Conte, M; Pagliuca, G; De Vincentiis, M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oncological efficacy of salvage total laryngectomy in patients who had previously undergone supracricoid partial laryngectomy or transoral laser microsurgery for treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We retrospectively reviewed the medical, surgical and pathological records of 35 patients who underwent salvage total laryngectomy after recurrence of laryngeal cancer (following supracricoid partial laryngectomy or transoral laser microsurgery). Kaplan-Meier survival curves as well as univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic factors were performed. No statistically significant differences were seen comparing the supracricoid partial laryngectomy group with the transoral laser microsurgery group for overall survival and disease-specific survival at 3 years (OS = 38% vs. 52%, p = 0.16; DSS = 40% vs. 61%, p = 0.057) or locoregional control at 2 years (LRC = 40% vs. 54%, p = 0.056). A trend indicating worse survival and locoregional control for supracricoid partial laryngectomy patients emerged. Preservation of the osteocartilaginous frame in transoral laser microsurgery could hypothetically result in better salvageability of anterior recurrences with extralaryngeal spread.

  5. A Global Risk Score (GRS) to Simultaneously Predict Early and Late Tumor Recurrence Risk after Resection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Dekervel, Jeroen; Popovic, Dusan; van Malenstein, Hannah; Windmolders, Petra; Heylen, Line; Libbrecht, Louis; Bulle, Ashenafi; De Moor, Bart; Van Cutsem, Eric; Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris; van Pelt, Jos

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma can arise from the primary tumor (“early recurrence”) or de novo from tumor formation in a cirrhotic environment (“late recurrence”). We aimed to develop one simple gene expression score applicable in both the tumor and the surrounding liver that can predict the recurrence risk. METHODS: We determined differentially expressed genes in a cell model of cancer aggressiveness. These genes were first validated in three large published data sets of hepatocellular carcinoma from which we developed a seven-gene risk score. RESULTS: The gene score was applied on two independent large patient cohorts. In the first cohort, with only tumor data available, it could predict the recurrence risk at 3 years after resection (68 ± 10% vs 35 ± 7%, P = .03). In the second cohort, when applied on the tumor, this gene score predicted early recurrence (62 ± 5% vs 37 ± 4%, P < .001), and when applied on the surrounding liver tissue, the same genes also correlated with late recurrence. Four patient classes with each different time patterns and rates of recurrence could be identified based on combining tumor and liver scores. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, our gene score remained significantly associated with recurrence, independent from other important cofactors such as disease stage (P = .007). CONCLUSIONS: We developed a Global Risk Score that is able to simultaneously predict the risk of early recurrence when applied on the tumor itself, as well as the risk of late recurrence when applied on the surrounding liver tissue. PMID:27084430

  6. Salvage Chemotherapy for Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Huimin; Sha, Guihua; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yue; Lang, Jinghe; Shen, Keng; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of salvage chemotherapy on recurrent or persistent ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) with the goal of identifying a more rational treatment regimen for this lethal disease. The medical records of patients with CCC were retrospectively reviewed to select patients that were subsequently treated for recurrent or persistent disease. Of the 164 women with recurrent or persistent CCC, 485 chemotherapy courses with 1766 cycles were administered. Overall, the clinical benefit rate (CBR) was 39.4%, and the mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.5 months. Grade 3/4 toxicities occurred in 94 courses (19.4%). The CBR for TC was 45.1%, with a PFS of 3.7 months. Compared to that of TC, the CBRs for PC and CC were significantly lower (P = 0.020 and 0.021, respectively). The CBRs and PFS for PAF-C were slightly higher (P = 0.518 and 0.077, respectively), but showed a significantly higher adverse event rate (AER, P = 0.039). The CBR for bevacizumab was 50% with an extraordinarily long PFS (49.8 months). Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin had similar values for CBRs (44.4% and 44.1%) and PFS (2.5 and 3.4 months), respectively. Docetaxel (weekly) exhibited a notably low AER of 2.7%, and topotecan was associated with a relatively long PFS (7.7 months). For cis/carboplatin-pretreated patients, the existing active agents, such as oxaliplatin, gemcitabine, topotecan, and especially bevacizumab, are promising. Docetaxel (weekly) is well tolerated and might offer a particularly viable option for heavily pretreated patients. However, additional research to identify for a continued search for the optimal combination of chemotherapeutics or novel agents is still warranted. PMID:26166110

  7. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. SU-E-T-39: Analyses of Plan Quality Using Different Gantry Rotation Time On Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Z; Li, R; Qiu, R; Cao, Y; Han, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare plan quality of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using different gantry rotation times. Methods: In ten rectal carcinoma patients, plans with different gantry rotation times were designed by Oncentra4.3 planning system, each of them was optimized by experienced planners using almost similar parameters and dose constraints except the different gantry rotation time. The gantry rotation time was increased from 30s to 150s by step of 30(30s, 60s, 90s, 120s, and 150s). Plans (VMAT30s, VMAT60s, VMAT90s, VMAT120s and VMAT150s) were normalized so that at least 95% of PTV would receive the prescription dose 50 Gray in 25 fractions. Dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were evaluated. Conformity indices (CI), homogeneous indices (HI), monitor units (MUs), delivery time were also compared. Results: As the increasing of gantry rotation time, VMAT150s provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT30s. In the normal tissue such as bladder and femurs, the VMAT plans show almost the same V30 and Dmean for them compared with IMRT plans, meanwhile the conformity indices (CI) was better than IMRT plans(p=0.021). However, there was no significant different among the VMAT60s, VMAT90s, VMAT120s and VMAT150s (p=0.054). VMAT150s increased delivery time and monitor units in plans without improving plan quality compared to VMAT60s, VMAT90s and VMAT120s. Conclusion: VMAT60s, VMAT90s, VMAT120s and VMAT150s achieved comparable treatment plans in rectal carcinoma. Slower gantry movement in VMAT150s only improves slight improvement than the others.

  9. Blood Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Tumor Recurrence in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma within Milan Criteria after Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu-Guang; Mao, Wei; Park, Yong-Keun; Xu, Wei-Guang; Kim, Bong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The systemic inflammation biomarker, Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR), has been reported as one of the adverse prognostic factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether NLR could predict the risk of recurrence and death for the HCC patient, according to Milan criteria after hepatectomy. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on a database of HCC patients who underwent hepatectomy between March 2001 and December 2011. The cutoff value of NLR was decided by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictive factors of recurrence and death. Results A total of 213 patients were included in the present study. The median follow-up period was 48 months. One hundred and seven patients were experienced tumor recurrence; forty of them recurred within 12 months (early recurrence). NLR ≥1.505, albumin ≤3.75 g/dL, microvascular invasion and high grade of cirrhosis were found to be independent factors for adverse recurrence-free survival in multivariate regression analysis. And NLR ≥1.945 was also found as a prognosis factor for early recurrence by univariate regression analysis. Conclusion Elevated preoperative NLR can be easily obtained and reliable biomarker for assessing the tumor recurrence and early recurrence of Milan criteria HCC after the initial hepatectomy. PMID:27401641

  10. The role of computed tomography in the investigation of recurrent axillary disease in patients with carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Olliff, J F; Cherryman, G R

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoma of the breast commonly recurs in the axilla. A nodal mass may be palpable and computed tomography (CT) is frequently requested in order to differentiate recurrent tumour from the longer term effects of surgery and radiotherapy. We have reviewed the CT scans of 35 such patients referred consecutively to our CT unit. CT only detected the presence of recurrent tumour in one patient in whom a mass could not be palpated. This patient had a previously irradiated 'wooden' axilla making clinical examination impossible. CT failed to diagnose recurrence in two patients; one with disease in normal sized nodes and the other with axillary vein thrombosis. We conclude that CT of the axilla only appears to be of value when the axilla is impossible to palpate due to previous treatment. The key to the diagnosis of axillary tumour recurrence is careful palpation supplemented by aspiration cytology of any mass. When no mass is evident on clinical examination, CT is unlikely to demonstrate disease.

  11. Anti-viral therapy to reduce recurrence and improve survival in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus accounts for approximately 75%-80% of HCC cases worldwide. In particular, chronic HBV infection is a predominant risk factor for HCC in Asia and Africa. Hepatic resection and radiofrequency ablation are increasingly used for the curative treatment of HCC, and good local control can be achieved. However, the high rate of recurrence is a major obstacle to improving prognosis. A high viral load of HBV DNA is the most important correctable risk factor for recurrence. Furthermore, interferon and/or nucleotide analogues may decrease HBV DNA. Therefore, these drugs may decrease recurrence. In this article, treatment strategies for HBV-related HCC are described in order to reduce recurrence and improve survival.

  12. Pembrolizumab Combined With Cetuximab for Treatment of Recurrent/Metastatic Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    HNSCC; Lip SCC; Oral Cavity Cancer; Oropharynx Cancer; Larynx Cancer; Hypopharynx Cancer; Nasopharynx Cancer; Sinonasal Carcinoma; Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Head and Neck Cancer; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  13. 2-Deoxy-2[F-18]FDG-PET for Detection of Recurrent Laryngeal Carcinoma after Radiotherapy: Interobserver Variability in Reporting

    PubMed Central

    van der Putten, L.; Hoekstra, O. S.; Kuik, D. J.; Comans, E. F. I.; Langendijk, J. A.; Leemans, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate accuracy and interobserver variability in the assessment of 2-deoxy-2[F-18]fluoro-d-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for detection of recurrent laryngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy. Procedures Eleven experienced nuclear physicians from eight centres assessed 30 FDG-PET scans on the appearance of local recurrence (negative/equivocal/positive). Conservative (equivocal analysed as negative) and sensitive (equivocal analysed as positive) assessment strategies were compared to the reference standard (recurrence within 6months after PET). Results Seven patients had proven recurrences. For the conservative and sensitive strategy, the mean sensitivity was 87% and 97%, specificity 81% and 63%, positive predictive values 61% and 46% and negative predictive values 96% and 99%, respectively. Interobserver variability showed a reasonable relation in comparison to the reference standard (kappa = 0.55). Conclusions FDG-PET has acceptable interobserver agreement and yields good negative predictive value for detection of recurrent laryngeal carcinoma. It could therefore be used as first diagnostic step and may reduce futile invasive diagnostics. PMID:18622649

  14. Nivolumab for Recurrent Squamous-Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Robert L; Blumenschein, George; Fayette, Jerome; Guigay, Joel; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Licitra, Lisa; Harrington, Kevin; Kasper, Stefan; Vokes, Everett E; Even, Caroline; Worden, Francis; Saba, Nabil F; Iglesias Docampo, Lara C; Haddad, Robert; Rordorf, Tamara; Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Monga, Manish; Lynch, Mark; Geese, William J; Kopit, Justin; Shaw, James W; Gillison, Maura L

    2016-11-10

    Background Patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck after platinum chemotherapy have a very poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody, was assessed as treatment for this condition. Methods In this randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial, we assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, 361 patients with recurrent squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck whose disease had progressed within 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy to receive nivolumab (at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight) every 2 weeks or standard, single-agent systemic therapy (methotrexate, docetaxel, or cetuximab). The primary end point was overall survival. Additional end points included progression-free survival, rate of objective response, safety, and patient-reported quality of life. Results The median overall survival was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.5 to 9.1) in the nivolumab group versus 5.1 months (95% CI, 4.0 to 6.0) in the group that received standard therapy. Overall survival was significantly longer with nivolumab than with standard therapy (hazard ratio for death, 0.70; 97.73% CI, 0.51 to 0.96; P=0.01), and the estimates of the 1-year survival rate were approximately 19 percentage points higher with nivolumab than with standard therapy (36.0% vs. 16.6%). The median progression-free survival was 2.0 months (95% CI, 1.9 to 2.1) with nivolumab versus 2.3 months (95% CI, 1.9 to 3.1) with standard therapy (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.13; P=0.32). The rate of progression-free survival at 6 months was 19.7% with nivolumab versus 9.9% with standard therapy. The response rate was 13.3% in the nivolumab group versus 5.8% in the standard-therapy group. Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 13.1% of the patients in the nivolumab group versus 35.1% of those in the standard-therapy group. Physical, role, and

  15. Routine clinical estimation of rectal, rectosigmoidal, and bladder doses from intracavitary brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. [X ray; /sup 137/Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, D.E.; Stryker, J.A.; Velkley, D.E.; Chung, C.K.

    1981-05-01

    An evaluation of rectal, rectosigmoidal, and bladder doses from intracavitary brachytherapy in carcinoma of the cervix has been initiated on a routine basis in an effort to obtain the optimum radiotherapeutic dose. Contrast radiography on a radiotherapy simulator is used to image the rectum and bladder, and dose rates are determined at predesignated reference points with the aid of computer calculated dose distributions. Forty-three patients have been reviewed in order to ascertain the correlation between radiation injury and dose at reference points in the rectum and bladder. In a related study involving 77 patients, the doses at points A and B and the prescription in mghr were analyzed in relation to radiation injury. There was no apparent association between the incidence of radiation injury in either the mghr prescription or the doses at points A or B. Computer calculations were supplemented with in vivo and in vitro thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements. We conclude that routine contrast radiography of the rectum and the bladder with dose calculations at selected reference points provides important information for optimizing radiotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix without a significant increase in treatment planning effort or patient discomfort.

  16. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae; Gwak, Geum Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  17. Recurrence of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the ileum diagnosed by elevation of serum SCC: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Mino, Kazuhiro; Kamii, Naoki; Kawanishi, Norio; Okada, Tadao; Todo, Satoru

    2012-06-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the intestine is extremely rare. This report describes a patient with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the small intestine. A 72-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction. She underwent laparotomy owing to the diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction due to a pelvic mass after conservative treatment. The affected ileum was resected, and histopathological examination revealed proliferation of differentiated squamous cell carcinoma at the submucosal area with no adenocarcinoma component. At the 4th month after the operation, the level of serum squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen was elevated. At 6 months after the operation, the serum SCC value was further elevated, and enhanced CT revealed two new pelvic tumors with enhancement at the mesentery and free space. A second laparotomy was performed 8 months after the operation. Histopathological examination showed differentiated squamous cell carcinoma as in the first operation. The level of serum SCC decreased at the 28th postoperative day. Chemotherapy including carboplatin and paclitaxel was performed as an adjuvant regimen. The patient has experienced no recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma for 55 months.

  18. The utility of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the surveillance for postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Min, Yang Won; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the utility of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) in surveillance for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy. This retrospective study analyzed 147 patients who underwent surveillance with alternating multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and Gd-MRI after hepatectomy for HCC. The patients were followed-up every 3 months during the first 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. At each visit, MDCT was performed but once a year (every 12 months), Gd-MRI was performed instead of MDCT. Each HCC recurrence detection rate of MDCT and Gd-MRI was evaluated, and recurrent HCC characteristics were compared according to the detection test. A total of 63 patients had recurrent HCC. Among them, 9 were detected with Gd-MRI and 29 with MDCT. The baseline characteristics of patients with recurrent HCC showed no significant differences according to the detection test. The HCC recurrence detection rate of Gd-MRI and MDCT was 4.8% (9/180) and 4.3% (29/580), respectively, on the per test basis (P = 0.764). However, in the population with a follow-up period of ≥12 months, the detection rate of Gd-MRI and MDCT was 4.3% (7/150) and 1.5% (19/400), respectively (P = 0.035). Recurrent HCCs detected with Gd-MRI were smaller than those detected with MDCT (tumor size < 2 cm, 100% vs 65.5%, P = 0.040). Our data suggest that Gd-MRI has advantages in detecting recurrent HCC after hepatectomy. Surveillance with alternating MDCT and Gd-MRI may identify more recurrent HCC in an early stage than with MDCT alone in patients who received hepatectomy for HCC. PMID:28002336

  19. Recurrence and survival following resection of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of the lung--The Lung Cancer Study Group experience.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, F L; Piantadosi, S

    1989-01-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) of the lung is a controversial form of adenocarcinoma with varying presentations. The 1977 to 1988 Lung Study Group experience with this tumor was reviewed to more precisely define the incidence of recurrence and survival of surgically resected and staged patients, to determine the incidence of BAC in the adenocarcinoma population, and to evaluate the impact of age, sex, smoking, and chronic lung-disease history on the incidence of BAC. Of 1635 patients reviewed, 235 patients had pure BAC. It was found that resectable BAC presents at an earlier disease stage than does adenocarcinoma; BAC occurs more frequently in older patients and in those without smoking history or chronic lung disease than adenocarcinoma; BAC patients have less weight loss, brain recurrences, and recurrences without second primaries than adenocarcinoma; survival and recurrence-free survival are better for BAC than for non-BAC adenocarcinoma and large-cell carcinoma; early BAC survival is better than squamous-cell survival but after 2 years is equivalent; T1-N0 BAC patients have recurrence and survival rates similar to squamous-cell survival rates and better than non-BAC adeno survival rates; T1-N1/T2-N0 and Stage 2 and 3 BAC recurs more frequently than either squamous-cell or non-BAC adenocarcinoma; stage 2 and 3 BAC has a higher mortality rate than does squamous-cell carcinoma or non-BAC adenocarcinoma; BAC is a favorable prognostic factor when adjusted for extent of disease and age; and BAC's better prognosis is a result of presenting at an earlier stage of disease and because it appears to be less aggressive than other adenocarcinomas even after adjustment for extent of disease and other known prognostic factors. It is concluded that early diagnosis and resection are particularly important for patients with BAC. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Figs. 7A and B. Fig. 8. PMID:2543339

  20. Salvage brachytherapy and salvage surgery for recurrent oropharyngeal carcinoma following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, C A; de la Torre, A; Valcárcel, F J; Magallón, R; Aragón, G

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed 21 patients who underwent salvage treatment after a biopsy of proven locally recurrent carcinoma of the oropharynx. Two of these patients underwent a second salvage treatment after failure of the first. Treatment was performed with Ir192 interstitial implant in 17 cases (13 rT1 and 4 rT2); by surgery in five cases (3 rT1, 1 rT2, 1 rTx), including two patients who had relapsed after salvage treatment with Ir192 implant; and by hyperfractionated external beam irradiation plus concomitant Tegafur chemotherapy in one case (rT3). The primary tumour was controlled in four of the 17 cases (23 per cent) treated with Ir192 implant. Of these four patients, two remained disease-free 42 and 59 months after treatment, one died of nodal metastases eight months after treatment and another of distant metastases 19 months after treatment. Four of the five cases (80 per cent) treated with surgery, including two patients who relapsed after salvage brachytherapy, remained free from local, regional and distant relapse 21, 25, 31 and 56 months after treatment.

  1. Emerging and Mechanism-Based Therapies for Recurrent or Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie J.; Bhatia, Shailender; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with a disease-specific mortality of approximately 40 %. The association of MCC with a recently discovered polyomavirus, combined with the increased incidence and mortality of MCC among immunocompromised patients, highlight the importance of the immune system in controlling this cancer. Initial management of MCC is summarized within the NCCN guidelines and in recently published reviews. The high rate of recurrent and metastatic disease progression in MCC, however, presents a major challenge in a cancer that lacks mechanism-based, disease-specific therapies. Traditional treatment approaches have focused on cytotoxic chemotherapy that, despite frequent initial efficacy, rarely provides durable responses and has high morbidity among the elderly. In addition, the immunosuppressive nature of chemotherapy is of concern when treating a virus-associated cancer for which survival is unusually tightly linked to immune function. With a median survival of 9.6 months after development of an initial metastasis (n=179, described herein), and no FDA-approved agents for this cancer, there is an urgent need for more effective treatments. We review diverse management options for patients with advanced MCC, with a focus on emerging and mechanism-based therapies, some of which specifically target persistently expressed viral antigens. These treatments include single-dose radiation and novel immunotherapies, some of which are in clinical trials. Due to their encouraging efficacy, low toxicity, and lack of immune suppression, these therapies may offer viable alternatives to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:23436166

  2. Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Eyelid Presenting as Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Nicole; Shaikh, Naazli; Strickland, Leah

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes two patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the periocular and periorbital skin who presented with trigeminal neuralgia. Both patients had previous cutaneous SCC of the scalp treated successfully with surgical resection but later presented with neuro-ophthalmic findings suggesting perineural invasion (PNI) of SCC. PNI of SCC in the periocular skin or orbit can lead to devastating effects if malignant cells seed into the orbit and adjacent cranial nerves as our two patients developed an orbital apex syndrome. Patients with a history of SCC of the scalp and forehead who later develop neuro-ophthalmological deficits or patients with persistent ocular symptoms should, in particular, be followed with a low threshold for cutaneous SCC or PNI of recurrent disease. SCC metastasizing into the periocular tissues and orbit by neural invasion is rare and carries a poor prognosis. The urgency for a prompt diagnosis and evaluation by a multidisciplinary team is warranted to prevent untoward outcomes of this skin cancer.  PMID:28097083

  3. Solitary osseous metastasis of rectal carcinoma masquerading as osteogenic sarcoma on post-chemotherapy imaging: a case report.

    PubMed

    Udare, Amar; Sable, Nilesh; Kumar, Rajiv; Thakur, Meenakshi; Juvekar, Shashikant

    2015-01-01

    Solitary metastases from colorectal carcinoma in the absence of hepatic or pulmonary metastases are rare. These can have a diverse imaging appearance, particularly after chemotherapy. It is important identify patients with solitary skeletal metastases, as they have a better prognosis than those with multiple skeletal or visceral metastases. We describe an unusual case of a solitary metastasis to the femur in a case of colon carcinoma that went undiagnosed and later presented with imaging features of osteogenic sarcoma.

  4. Recurrent odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) at a reconstructed fibular flap: a case report with immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Li, B-H; Cho, Y-A; Kim, S-M; Kim, M-J; Hong, S-P; Lee, J-H

    2011-08-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC), a malignant counterpart of the odontogenic ghost cell tumor (OGCT), with aggressive growth characteristics, is exceedingly rare. A painful swelling in the jaw with local paresthesia is the most common symptom. We described a case of 47-year Korean woman who had a rare central epithelial odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma which recurred at reconstructed fibular flap. Immunohistochemical differences between OGCT and OGCC analyzed using primary and recurred surgical specimen. On the basis of this case, the tumor started as an OGCT and transformed into OGCC with highly aggressive, rapidly growing, infiltrative tumors. Our findings suggest that some of the cytokines produced by ghost cells may play important roles in causing extensive bone resorption in the odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma. Wide local excision with histologically clean margins is the treatment mode of selection. Also, we recommend close long-term surveillance of OGCT because of high recurrence and potential for malignancy transformation.

  5. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC.

  6. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC. PMID:26274752

  7. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  8. Topotecan for the treatment of recurrent and stage IVB carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Paton, F; Paulden, M; Saramago, P; Manca, A; Misso, K; Palmer, S; Eastwood, A

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of topotecan in combination with cisplatin for the treatment of recurrent and stage IVB carcinoma of the cervix, in accordance with the licensed indication, based upon the evidence submission from the manufacturer to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The outcomes measured were overall survival, progression-free survival, response rates, adverse effects of treatment, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. The manufacturer stated that topotecan plus cisplatin is the only combination regimen to date to have demonstrated a statistically significant survival advantage compared to cisplatin monotherapy in the licensed population. The clinical evidence came from three clinical trials comparing topotecan plus cisplatin with cisplatin monotherapy (GOG-0179), topotecan plus cisplatin with paclitaxel plus cisplatin (GOG-0169), and four cisplatin-based combination therapies: topotecan plus cisplatin, paclitaxel plus cisplatin, gemcitabine plus cisplatin, and vinorelbine plus cisplatin (GOG-0204). Results from GOG-0179 showed greater median overall survival with topotecan plus cisplatin than with cisplatin monotherapy: 9.4 months versus 6.5 months. Similar results were also reported for median progression-free survival. Response rates also showed an advantage with topotecan plus cisplatin compared with cisplatin monotherapy. The response rates in patients receiving cisplatin monotherapy were very low, but the potential reasons for this were not discussed in the manufacturer's submission. Patients receiving topotecan plus cisplatin experienced a greater number of adverse events and the ERG was concerned with some of the assumptions related to HRQoL. In the base-case direct comparison, the incremental cost

  9. Invasive head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: clinical and histopathological characteristics, frequency of local recurrence and metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiza; Melo, Juliana Carneiro; Miot, Hélio Amante; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common type of skin malignancy and may evolve to regional lymph node and distant metastases. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate patients with head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma to identify its clinical and histopathological characteristics, as well as the frequency of local recurrence and metastasis. METHODS A retrospective cohort of patients with head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Inclusion criteria: histopathological confirmation, follow-up for longer than one year after diagnosis. Exclusion criteria: immunosuppression; lip and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma; and non-surgical resection of the lesion. We evaluated demographic, clinical and anatomopathologic findings and explored their associations. RESULTS Sixty-one patients with 79 tumors and followed by 4.8±3.0 years were selected. The average age was 67.1 years, and 63% of tumors had up to two centimeters. Seven tumors (8.9%) recurred and two of them had positive margins. Recurrence was associated with higher Broders' grade (p<0.01). Two patients (3.3%) had regional lymph node metastases. There were no distant metastases. Seventy tumors were considered to be usual tumors (89.7%), and 68 (87.2%) were classified as Broders' grade 1 and 2. Additionally, 64.1% of tumors had a depth of invasion below four millimeters. Thirteen tumors (16.7%) had positive histological margins. CONCLUSIONS Most patients had good prognosis in the first year of follow-up, confirming that head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma has a better prognosis than squamous cell carcinoma of other regions such as mucosa, oral cavity, and internal organs. PMID:25054741

  10. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  11. High-dose rate brachytherapy for local recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma of the tongue base following postoperative external beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm commonly originating from the minor salivary glands. The clinical findings typical of this tumor include slow growth, perineural invasion and high frequency of local recurrence. In this study, a patient presented with a tongue base lesion that was treated with surgical excision and additional postoperative external beam radiotherapy. However, local recurrence occurred 8 months after radiotherapy. If recurrence occurs after radiation therapy, total glossectomy should be considered. However, the patient refused re-operation and, considering the patient's age, brachytherapy was used to ensure organ preservation. Complete remission was achieved following brachytherapy, without serious side effects. There has been no progression of the lesion during a follow-up period of 2 years. PMID:27882233

  12. Peri-Transplant Change in AFP Level: a Useful Predictor of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrence Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Choi, Young Rok; Kim, Hyeyoung; Suh, Suk-Won; Jeong, Jae Hong; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2016-07-01

    Pretransplant alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a useful tumor marker predicting recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Little is known, however, about the relationship between changes in AFP concentration and prognosis. This study investigated the clinical significance of change in peri-transplant AFP level as a predictor of HCC recurrence. Data from 125 HCC patients with elevated pretransplant AFP level who underwent liver transplantation (LT) between February 2000 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with AFP normalization within 1 month after LT were classified into the rapid normalization group (n = 97), with all other patients classified into the non-rapid normalization group (n = 28). Tumor recurrence was observed in 17 of the 97 patients (17.5%) with rapid normalization; of these, 11 patients had high AFP levels and six had normal levels at recurrence. In contrast, tumor recurrence was observed in 24 of the 28 patients (85.7%) without rapid normalization, with all 24 having high AFP levels at recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that non-rapid normalization (harzard ratio [HR], 4.41, P < 0.001), sex (HR, 3.26, P = 0.03), tumor size (HR, 1.15, P = 0.001), and microvascular invasion (HR, 2.65, P = 0.005) were independent risk factors for recurrence. In conclusion, rapid normalization of post-LT AFP level at 1 month is a useful clinical marker for HCC recurrence. Therefore, an adjuvant strategy and/or intensive screening are needed for patients who do not show rapid normalization.

  13. Cabozantinib S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Childhood Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma

  14. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  15. Analysis of urinary metabolic signatures of early hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after surgical removal using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guozhu; Zhu, Bin; Yao, Zhenzhen; Yin, Peiyuan; Lu, Xin; Kong, Hongwei; Fan, Fei; Jiao, Binghua; Xu, Guowang

    2012-08-03

    The objective of present study was to offer insights into the metabolic responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to surgical resection and the metabolic signatures latent in early HCC recurrence (one year after operation). Urinary metabolic profiling employing gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) was utilized to investigate the complex physiopathologic regulations in HCC after operational intervention. It was revealed that an intricate series of metabolic regulations including energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, nucleoside metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, gut floral metabolism, etc., principally leading to the direction of biomass synthesis, could be observed after tumor surgical removal. Moreover, metabolic differences between recurrent and nonrecurrent patients had emerged 7 days after initial operation. The metabolic signatures of HCC recurrence principally comprised notable up-regulations of lactate excretion, succinate production, purine and pyrimidine nucleosides turnover, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, aromatic amino acid turnover, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and glyoxylate metabolism, similar to metabolic behaviors of HCC burden. Sixteen metabolites were found to be significantly increased in the recurrent patients compared with those in nonrecurrent patients and healthy controls. Five metabolites (ethanolamine, lactic acid, acotinic acid, phenylalanine and ribose) were further defined; they were favorable to the prediction of early recurrence.

  16. Mitomycin C pharmacokinetics in patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, C; Rauth, A M; Battistella, R; Fine, S

    1987-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C as a single agent have been determined in 25 treatment courses given to 18 patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay to analyze plasma and urine samples. The plasma pharmacokinetics conformed to a two-compartment linear model in 21 of 25 courses monitored with a mean t1/2 lambda 1 of 9.8 +/- 1.2 (SEM) min and mean t1/2 lambda z of 64.1 +/- 8.9 (SEM) min. The large variation observed in t1/2 lambda z was not related to dose or treatment, but an interaction of these two factors approached significance (p = 0.057). Renal excretion in the 12 courses in which it was determined averaged only 2.3% of the total administered dose during the first 4 h monitored and no mitomycin C metabolites were detected in plasma or urine by the HPLC technique used. The most common toxicity, thrombocytopenia, did not correlate with t1/2 lambda z or the area under the curve. This may be due to a failure to monitor active metabolites of mitomycin C; other factors besides plasma drug concentrations that mediate toxicity towards marrow elements; or the small number of courses associated with thrombocytopenia (less than 100,000/mm3). Our study indicates that an interaction of drug dose and treatment course may be associated with increasing t1/2 lambda z; the renal clearance contributes a small component of mitomycin C elimination; metabolites of mitomycin C cannot be detected by the present HPLC technique; and routine monitoring of mitomycin C using present methods cannot be recommended for clinical use to predict toxicity.

  17. Invasive basal cell carcinoma in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient: facing secondary and tertiary aggressive recurrences.

    PubMed

    Lasso, José M; Yordanov, Yordan P; Pinilla, Carmen; Shef, Aylin

    2014-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by photohypersensitivity of sun-exposed tissues and several thousand-fold increased risk of developing malignant neoplasms of the skin and eyes. Inherited molecular defects in nucleotide excision repair genes cause the autosomal recessive condition XP. A 56-year-old woman with XP presented with an extensive multirecurrence basal cell carcinoma in the left naso-orbital region. At the time of the first visit, the patient had already received several interventions with local reconstructive techniques, a full course of radiotherapy, and bilateral neck dissection. A large tumor resection and free flap reconstruction were performed. Three years 9 months afterward, an aggressive recurrence occurred, and a second resection was needed. A new free flap was transferred, and microvascular anastomoses were done to the pedicle of the previously transferred flap. Nine months later, the patient returned with frontal bone tumoral lesions, and third microsurgical intervention was done. At that time, the reconstruction was practiced by a composite chimeric flap with a rib portion. Its pedicle was anastomosed to the one of the second free flaps. The objective of this article was to report the authors' experience concerning a unique case of XP requiring a complex reconstruction of the anterior skull base. Xeroderma pigmentosum patients need an early diagnosis and removal of cutaneous tumor lesions as some of them behave aggressively, especially those affecting the face. Free flaps are good solutions for reconstruction and should proceed from non-sun-exposed areas of the body. If reconstructed areas are highly radiated and/or skin tumors affect deep anatomical areas, complications are frequent.

  18. Management of Recurrent and Metastatic HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma after Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sims, John R; Van Abel, Kathryn; Martin, Eliot J; Lohse, Christine M; Price, Daniel L; Olsen, Kerry D; Moore, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    Objective To describe management and oncologic outcomes for patients who develop locoregional recurrence (LRR) or distant metastasis (DM) following transoral robotic surgery for human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary care referral center. Subjects and Methods A total of 286 patients with HPV-positive OPSCC who underwent transoral robotic surgery-based treatment from May 2007 to May 2015. Results Of 286 patients (12.2%), 35 met inclusion criteria. Of these, 19 experienced an LRR and 16 developed a DM; 2 patients with LRR subsequently developed DM. In those patients with an LRR, 79% had T1/T2 tumors, and 47% had N0/N1 nodal disease, compared with 75% and 6% in the DM group, respectively. The median time to LRR or DM was 0.6 years (interquartile range [IQR], 0.4-1.0) and 1.8 years (IQR, 1.0-2.1), respectively. Salvage treatment with intent to cure was attempted in 23 patients (16 LRR, 7 DM). The median time from LRR or DM to last follow-up for the 18 patients who were still alive after salvage was 1.9 years (IQR, 0.4-3.8; range, 7 days-6.2 years). Estimated cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years following intent-to-cure treatment were 63% (95% CI, 39-100; number still at risk, 5) in the LRR group and 100% (95% CI, 100-100; number still at risk, 2) in the DM group. Conclusion Overall, LRR and DM for HPV-positive OPSCC following transoral robotic surgery-based therapy are infrequent. In our subset of patients who underwent intent-to-cure treatment, cancer-specific survival rates were favorable. Therefore, aggressive salvage treatment for LRR and DM for HPV-positive OPSCC should be recommended for appropriate candidates.

  19. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  20. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  1. Somatic mutations in plasma cell-free DNA are diagnostic markers for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Masami; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Masuda, Takaaki; Nakahara, Yujiro; Hirata, Hidenari; Uchi, Ryutaro; Niida, Atsushi; Momose, Kota; Sakimura, Shotaro; Chiba, Kenichi; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ito, Shuhei; Sugimachi, Keishi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Suzuki, Yutaka; Miyano, Satoru; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Mimori, Koshi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies owing to the high frequency of tumor recurrence. The identification of markers for early ESCC diagnosis and prediction of recurrence is expected to improve the long-term prognosis. Therefore, we searched for associations between tumor recurrence and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) mutations in blood plasma, which contains genetic markers for various cancer types. Experimental Design Genomic DNA from tumors and cfDNA from plasma were obtained from 13 patients undergoing treatment for newly diagnosed ESCC. Next-generation sequencing of cfDNA in plasma was performed to identify mutations in 53 cancer-related genes, in which recurrent mutations were previously detected in ESCC. cfDNA mutational profiles were compared before and after tumor resection in four patients. Furthermore, somatic mutations in serial plasma samples were monitored after treatment in four patients. Results We identified multiple concordant somatic mutations in cfDNA and primary tumor samples from 10 patients (83.3%) and in cfDNA and metastatic tumor samples from one patient (100%). Furthermore, the allele frequency of the concordant mutations in cfDNA changed concomitantly with tumor burden and increased approximately 6 months earlier than the detection of tumor recurrences by imaging tests in two patients. Conventional biomarkers, such as SCC and p53-Ab, did not reflect tumor recurrences. Conclusions The present multigene panel, which enabled the diagnosis of tumor recurrence with greater accuracy than did using standard tumor markers or imaging methods, is expected to greatly facilitate standard, postoperative follow-up monitoring in ESCC. PMID:27556701

  2. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids maintains the serum albumin level in the course of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kakazu, Eiji; Kondo, Yasuteru; Kogure, Takayuki; Ninomiya, Masashi; Kimura, Osamu; Iwata, Tomoaki; Morosawa, Tatsuki; Iwasaki, Takao; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Serum albumin (Alb) is an important prognostic factor for patients with HCC. Moreover, plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), L-valine, L-leucine, and L-isoleucine, are commonly decreased in patients with cirrhosis. Accordingly, formulations of BCAA has been used to maintain the Alb level and prevent ascites in patients with cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate differences in the changes in Alb between a group that received a BCAA formulation (n = 29) and a group given a standard diet (n = 60) in the course of HCC recurrences. All patients experienced more than one hospitalization (mean: 2.6; range: 2-10) owing to recurrence. The plasma BCAA concentration and BCAA-to-tyrosine ratio (BTR), which is a good indicator of the severity of hepatic parenchymal injury in patients with cirrhosis, were significantly correlated with Alb. We defined the changes in BCAA and Alb between recurrences as ΔBCAA and ΔAlb, respectively, and stratified the patients in both groups based on number of recurrences (3 < early, 3-5 middle, or 5 > later). There was also a positive correlation between ΔBCAA and ΔAlb. Interestingly, in the group with BCAA, ΔAlb and ΔBCAA were significantly smaller, especially in the middle period (3-5 recurrences), than in the group without BCAA. These results indicate that the BCAA supplementation could maintain the BCAA and Alb levels in the middle period (3-5 recurrences). BCAA formulation is useful for hypoalbuminemia in the course of HCC recurrence.

  3. Recurrent myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland treated by rAd-p53 combined with radiotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Chen, Xiangxun; Wang, Hongyan; Shi, Qingming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the case of a patient with recurrent myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland without progression for five years following treatment. A 71-year-old male patient presented to hospital with a painless swelling in the region of the right submandibular gland, and received a radical neck dissection on January 29, 2008. A nodule of ~7×4×2 cm was identified at the site of the right submandibular gland, and the pathological results revealed a diagnosis of myoepithelial carcinoma of the right submandibular gland with no lymph node metastasis. However, this case developed local recurrence with wide-spread metastasis in the lungs. Between April and October 2008, the patient underwent several treatment regimens and demonstrated no improvement following 6 cycles of chemotherapy. From then on, the patient was treated with recombinant adenoviral-p53 (rAd-p53) combined with radiotherapy using a 6 millivolt medical linear accelerator. The foci were relieved and the cancer demonstrated no signs of progression during the 5-year follow-up. rAd-p53 combined with radiotherapy was useful for treating myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland. PMID:27446369

  4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: vismodegib for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Michael; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hong; Kufrin, Dubravka; Palmby, Todd; Dong, Zedong; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The data and regulatory considerations leading to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 30, 2012 approval of Erivedge (vismodegib) capsules for the treatment of patients with recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are described. The FDA's approval decision was based primarily on the results observed in a single-arm, parallel cohort, international trial of vismodegib, administered orally at 150 mg daily until disease progression, in patients with pathologically confirmed, recurrent, locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). An independent review committee confirmed an overall response rate (ORR) of 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6-48.2] in 33 patients with mBCC and an ORR of 42.9% (95% CI: 30.5-56.0) in 63 patients with laBCC; median response durations were 7.6 months and 7.6 months for patients with mBCC and laBCC, respectively. The most common adverse reactions were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, constipation, cough, arthralgias, vomiting, headache, ageusia, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Animal toxicology studies confirmed that vismodegib is a potent teratogenic agent. Approval was based on durable objective tumor responses supported by knowledge of the pathologic role of Hedgehog signaling in BCC and acceptable toxicity in a population without effective alternative therapies.

  5. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  6. Comparison of morphologic features and outcome of resected recurrent and nonrecurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the penis: a study of 81 cases.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Reuter, Victor; Lezcano, Cecilia; Velazquez, Elsa F; Torres, Jose; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2009-09-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is considered a loco-regional disease with a fairly predictable pattern of progression. Widespread dissemination occurs in at least one-third of the patients. Local recurrence (defined as the presence of tumor after a primary treatment affecting any remainder tissue, including skin, erectile corpora, or urethra) present in up to 30% of the patients increases the risk of regional inguinal and pelvic lymph nodes metastases. The aim of this study was to identify adverse pathologic prognostic factors in patients with recurrent tumors. Clinicopathologic features of 81 surgically treated patients (25 with recurrent and 56 with nonrecurrent SCC) were evaluated; 56 patients (19 with recurrent and 37 with nonrecurrent tumors) additionally received groin dissections. Follow-up (2 to 372 mo, mean of 71 mo) was obtained in all patients. Comparison of recurrent tumors at the time of the primary diagnosis and of recurrence showed that histologic subtype and grade were identical in 76% of the cases and converted to a higher grade tumor in 24% of the cases, especially, in patients treated with local excisions and circumcisions. Most of the recurrences (67%) seemed at or before 12 months. Comparison of recurrent and nonrecurrent tumors showed that high grade tumors (basaloid and sarcomatoid) tended to be significantly associated with recurrent tumors, whereas low grade variants (papillary, warty and verrucous) were more frequent in the nonrecurrent group; recurrent tumors invaded into deeper anatomic levels than nonrecurrent tumors. The incidence of inguinal lymph node metastasis was higher in recurrent tumors (79% vs. 49%, P=0.0272). Cancer-specific survival was of 46% versus 76% at 3 years of follow-up in recurrent and nonrecurrent tumors, respectively. Patients with recurrent tumors had a median survival of 2.9 years; no major changes in survival were noted after 3 years of follow-up. Mortality was higher in the recurrent group (56% vs. 29

  7. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  8. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  9. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-15

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy.

  10. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-01

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy.

  11. Interval Between Hysterectomy and Start of Radiation Treatment Is Predictive of Recurrence in Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Richard; Hanna, Rabbie K.; Jacobsen, Gordon; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to improve local control in patients with endometrial carcinoma. We analyzed the impact of the time interval between hysterectomy and RT initiation in patients with endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board-approved study, we identified 308 patients with endometrial carcinoma who received adjuvant RT after hysterectomy. All patients had undergone hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation from 1988 to 2010. Patients' demographics, pathologic features, and treatments were compared. The time interval between hysterectomy and the start of RT was calculated. The effects of time interval on recurrence-free (RFS), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Following univariate analysis, multivariate modeling was performed. Results: The median age and follow-up for the study cohort was 65 years and 72 months, respectively. Eighty-five percent of the patients had endometrioid carcinoma. RT was delivered with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (29%), pelvic RT alone (20%), or both (51%). Median time interval to start RT was 42 days (range, 21-130 days). A total of 269 patients (74%) started their RT <9 weeks after undergoing hysterectomy (group 1) and 26% started ≥9 weeks after surgery (group 2). There were a total of 43 recurrences. Tumor recurrence was significantly associated with treatment delay of ≥9 weeks, with 5-year RFS of 90% for group 1 compared to only 39% for group 2 (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, RT delay of ≥9 weeks (P<.001), presence of lymphovascular space involvement (P=.001), and higher International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade (P=.012) were independent predictors of recurrence. In addition, RT delay of ≥9 weeks was an independent significant predictor for worse DSS and OS (P=.001 and P=.01, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in administering adjuvant RT after hysterectomy was

  12. ALDH7A1 expression is associated with recurrence in patients with surgically resected non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Giacalone, Nicholas J; Den, Robert B; Eisenberg, Rosana; Chen, Heidi; Olson, Sandra J; Massion, Pierre P; Carbone, David P; Lu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to describe the prognostic significance of ALDH7A1 in surgically treated non-small-cell lung carcinoma. (NSCLC). Materials & methods We immunohistochemically analyzed ALDH7A1 expression in surgically resected NSCLC from 89 patients using a tissue microarray. Results ALDH7A1 staining was positive in 43 patients and negative in 44 patients, with two tumor sections missing. For stage I NSCLC patients, ALDH7A1 positivity was associated with decreased recurrence-free and overall survival. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that ALDH7Al-expressing NSCLC tumors had a significantly higher incidence of lung cancer recurrence compared with patients with ALDH7A1-negative tumors, although there was no association with overall survival. Conclusion For patients with NSCLC, low ALDH7A1 expression was associated with a decreased incidence of cancer recurrence. Specifically in stage I patients, negative staining for ALDH7A1 was associated with improved recurrence-free and overall survival, suggesting a predictive role in surgically treated patients. PMID:23647301

  13. FAM83D associates with high tumor recurrence after liver transplantation involving expansion of CD44+ carcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Binyi; Chen, Tianchi; Zhang, Qijun; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Zhiyun; Ding, Jun; Liu, Jinfeng; Yang, Zhe; Geng, Lei; Wu, Liming; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the potential oncogene promoting recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following liver transplantation (LT), throughput RNA sequencing was performed in a subgroup of HCC patients. The up-regulated FAM83D in HCC tissues was found and further verified in 150 patients by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. FAM83D overexpression significantly correlated with high HCC recurrence rate following LT and poor HCC characteristics such as high AFP, poor differentiation. Of cancer stem cells (CSCs) markers, CD44 expression was effectively suppressed when FAM83D was knocked down by siRNA. Meanwhile, the siRNA transfected cells suppressed formation of sphere and ability of self-renew. In a xenograft tumorigenesis model, FAM83D knockdown apparently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Microarray assays revealed that FAM83D promotes CD44 expression via activating the MAPK, TGF-β and Hippo signaling pathways. Furthermore, CD44 knockdown presented reverse effect on above signaling pathways, which suggested that FAM83D was a key activator of loop between CD44 and above signaling pathways. In conclusion, FAM83D promotes HCC recurrence by promoting CD44 expression and CD44+ CSCs malignancy. FAM83D provides a novel therapeutic approach against HCC recurrence after LT. PMID:27769048

  14. A nomogram for predicting the probability of recurrence in patients with carcinomas located in the ampulla of Vater

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keng-Hao; Hsu, Chih-Ho; Hsu, Jun-Te; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Liu, Yu-Yin; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Hung, Yu-Shin; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The standard treatment for carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater (CAV) is surgical resection. Nevertheless, recurrence is observed in half of the patients within five years after cancer surgery. In this study, we aimed to identify predictive factors and develop a nomogram capable of predicting the risk of recurrence in post-resection CAV patients. Methods: Our study cohort was composed of two hundred and twelve patients who had undergone radical surgery for CAV between 2000 and 2012. Clinicopathological variables predictive of recurrence were identified using univariate analysis. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to select the predictive factors used for the nomogram. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cancer-specific survival and disease-free survival rates were 44.3%, 51.1%, and 42.8%, respectively. The five most predictive variables for tumor recurrence were chosen to develop the nomogram. The nomogram had a highly predictive performance, with a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.79). Furthermore, the performance of the nomogram was found to be better than the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system due to better homogeneity, higher ability of discrimination and higher risk stratification of the model. Conclusions: We developed a predictive nomogram for estimating tumor relapse probability in CAV patients after radical surgery. This nomogram might be more informative than the AJCC staging system and may allow for better estimation of the probability of relapse after surgical resections. PMID:28261344

  15. Nomograms to Predict Recurrence-Free and Overall Survival After Curative Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Margonis, Georgios A.; Prescott, Jason D.; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Evans, Douglas B.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed I.; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but aggressive endocrine tumor, and the prognostic factors associated with long-term outcomes after surgical resection remain poorly defined. OBJECTIVES To define clinicopathological variables associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after curative surgical resection of ACC and to propose nomograms for individual risk prediction. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nomograms to predict RFS and OS after surgical resection of ACC were proposed using a multi-institutional cohort of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for ACC at 13 major institutions in the United States between March 17, 1994, and December 22, 2014. The dates of our study analysis were April 15, 2015, to May 12, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The discriminative ability and calibration of the nomograms to predict RFS and OS were tested using C statistics, calibration plots, and Kaplan-Meier curves. RESULTS In total, 148 patients who underwent surgery for ACC were included in the study. The median patient age was 53 years, and 65.5% (97 of 148) of the patients were female. One-third of the patients (35.1% [52 of 148]) had a functional tumor, and the median tumor size was 11.2 cm. Most patients (77.7% [115 of 148]) underwent R0 resection, and 8.8% (13 of 148) of the patients had N1 disease. Using backward stepwise selection of clinically important variables with the Akaike information criterion, the following variables were incorporated in the prediction of RFS: tumor size of at least 12 cm (hazard ratio [HR], 3.00; 95% CI, 1.63–5.70; P < .001), positive nodal status (HR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.47–15.50; P = .01), stage III/IV (HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 0.95–3.39; P = .07), cortisol-secreting tumor (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.27–4.48; P = .01), and capsular invasion (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.02–3.74; P = .04). Factors selected as predicting OS were tumor size of at least 12 cm (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.00–3.17; P = .05), positive

  16. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  17. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  18. Mutational landscape of gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma reveals new recurrently-mutated genes and molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arindam; Biswas, Nidhan K.; Amin, Kishore; Kowtal, Pradnya; Kumar, Shantanu; Das, Subrata; Sarin, Rajiv; Majumder, Partha P.; Bagchi, I; Bairagya, B. B.; Basu, A.; Bhan, M. K.; Chaturvedi, P.; Das, D.; D'Cruz, A.; Dhar, R.; Dutta, D.; Ganguli, D.; Gera, P.; Gupta, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Mujawar, M. H. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Nair, S.; Nikam, S.; Nobre, M.; Patil, A.; Patra, S.; Rama-Gowtham, M.; Rao, T. S.; Roy, B.; Roychowdhury, B.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar-Roy, N.; Sutradhar, D.

    2013-01-01

    Gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC-GB), an anatomical and clinical subtype of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is prevalent in regions where tobacco-chewing is common. Exome sequencing (n=50) and recurrence testing (n=60) reveals that some significantly and frequently altered genes are specific to OSCC-GB (USP9X, MLL4, ARID2, UNC13C and TRPM3), while some others are shared with HNSCC (for example, TP53, FAT1, CASP8, HRAS and NOTCH1). We also find new genes with recurrent amplifications (for example, DROSHA, YAP1) or homozygous deletions (for example, DDX3X) in OSCC-GB. We find a high proportion of C>G transversions among tobacco users with high numbers of mutations. Many pathways that are enriched for genomic alterations are specific to OSCC-GB. Our work reveals molecular subtypes with distinctive mutational profiles such as patients predominantly harbouring mutations in CASP8 with or without mutations in FAT1. Mean duration of disease-free survival is significantly elevated in some molecular subgroups. These findings open new avenues for biological characterization and exploration of therapies. PMID:24292195

  19. NY-ESO-1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma: A potential new marker for early recurrence after surgery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Gu, Na; Liu, Zhao-Bo; Zheng, Min; Xiong, Fang; Wang, Si-Ying; Li, Ning; Lu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer testis antigens (CTA) family, and is identified in a variety of tumors. Certain studies have demonstrated that NY-ESO-1 predicts tumor recurrence and treatment response. No reports are currently available regarding the correlation between NY-ESO-1 and the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following surgery. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between NY-ESO-1 and relapse of HCC and to explore the possible mechanisms for this correlation. A total of 120 HCC patients were analyzed for the expression of NY-ESO-1 by immunohistochemistry (IHC). A stable NY-ESO-1 over-expressed HepG2 cell line (ESO-HepG2) was established to determine the biological effects of NY-ESO-1 on cell proliferation, cell cycle and migration by using the xCELLigence DP system, flow cytometry and xCELLigence SP system. NY-ESO-1 was positive in 28 of 120 (23.3%) HCC tumor tissues. NY-ESO-1 was not detectable in adjacent normal liver tissues. A close correlation was found between NY-ESO-1 expression and the recurrence of HCC following surgery (P=0.007). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) for patients positive for NY-ESO-1 (log-rank test, P=0.003). The Cox regression model demonstrated that NY-ESO-1 expression was a significant independent predictor for the recurrence of HCC following curative surgery (P=0.022). Compared with HepG2 cells, ESO-HepG2 cells have increased migration but not proliferation ability. In conclusion, NY-ESO-1 expression is associated with worse HCC outcome following surgery, and the mechanism for this finding may be that NY-ESO-1 increases tumor cell migration.

  20. Recurrence patterns of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after 3D conformal (chemo)-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To establish recurrence patterns among locally advanced head and neck non-nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with radical (chemo-) radiotherapy and to correlate the sites of loco-regional recurrence with radiotherapy doses and target volumes Method 151 locally advanced HNSCC patients were treated between 2004-2005 using radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients with prior surgery to the primary tumour site were excluded. The sites of locoregional relapses were correlated with radiotherapy plans by the radiologist and a planning dosimetrist. Results Median age was 59 years (range:34-89). 35 patients had stage III disease, 116 patients had stage IV A/B. 36 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 42 with induction chemotherapy, 63 with induction and concomitant chemoradiotherapy and 10 concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 38 months (range 3-62). 3-year cause specific survival was 66.8%. 125 of 151 (82.8%) achieved a complete response to treatment. Amongst these 125 there were 20 local-regional recurrence, comprising 8 local, 5 regional and 7 simultaneous local and regional; synchronous distant metastases occurred in 7 of the 20. 9 patients developed distant metastases in the absence of locoregional failure. For the 14 local recurrences with planning data available, 12 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 1 was out-of-field. Of the 11 regional failures with planning data available, 7 were in-field, 1 was marginal and 3 were out-of-field recurrences. Conclusion The majority of failures following non-surgical treatment for locally advanced HNSCC were loco-regional, within the radiotherapy target volume. Improving locoregional control remains a high priority. PMID:21609453

  1. PI-88 inhibits postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma via disrupting the surge of heparanase after liver resection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo-Yi; Wang, Zheng; Hu, Jie; Liu, Wei-Feng; Shen, Zao-Zhuo; Zhang, Xin; Yu, Lei; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Phosphomannopentaose sulfate (PI-88), an effective inhibitor of heparanase (HPSE), exhibited anti-recurrence and anti-metastasis activity in preliminary clinical trials of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Our aim was to reveal the mechanism by which PI-88 inhibits recurrence and intrahepatic metastasis. A tissue microarray containing samples from 352 HCC patients was used to determine HPSE expression. We performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect plasma levels of HPSE in 40 HCC patients. We also used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemical staining to assess HPSE expression of HCC cell lines and tissues. The in vitro effects of PI-88 were examined by cell proliferation and migration assays. In vivo PI-88 activity was assessed using murine orthotopic HCC models. Intratumoral HPSE was an independent prognostic marker for postsurgical overall survival (P = 0.001) and time to recurrence (P < 0.001) of HCC patients with hepatectomy. Elevated levels of HPSE were detected both in postsurgical plasma of HCC patients and an orthotopic mouse model after hepatectomy. PI-88 inhibited tumor recurrence and metastasis after liver resection in the mouse model. In vitro expression of HPSE was up-regulated by overexpression of early growth response 1 (EGR1), which is induced after hepatectomy. Up-regulation of HPSE enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to PI-88 and the inhibitive effect of PI-88 on cell proliferation and migration. Our data show that PI-88 effectively inhibits postoperative recurrence and intrahepatic metastasis of HCC, providing an experimental basis for the clinical application of PI-88 in HCC patients who have undergone hepatectomy.

  2. Survival outcomes improved in contemporary cohort of patients with pelvic or abdominal recurrence after treatment for Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Melody J.; Chu, Christina; Rubin, Stephen; Lin, Lilie L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pelvic and abdominal recurrences in Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma are associated with poor outcomes, yet prognostic factors for survival after recurrence are not well-described. Herein we identify patients with pelvic or abdominal recurrence after surgery for Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma and describe symptoms at presentation, prognostic factors, and salvage treatment toxicity. Methods This is a retrospective cohort of 20 consecutively treated patients with recurrence after treatment for Stage I/II endometrial carcinoma followed by our Institution’s Radiation Oncology Department from 1998-2015. Results The median time to pelvic or abdominal recurrence was 18.1 months (range, 4.2-59.6 months), with 50% of recurrences at extra-nodal locations. Two year progression-free survival (PFS) was 44% and 2 year overall survival (OS) was 82%. Salvage treatments varied widely, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) (7), surgery and RT (3), and surgery, chemotherapy, and RT (3). On univariate analysis of PFS, symptoms at recurrence (p=0.04) and extra-nodal recurrences (p<0.01) were found to be statistically significant negative prognosticators for PFS. On univariate analysis of OS, increasing age at recurrence and presence of symptoms were found to have a trend toward statistically significant association with negative OS outcomes (p=0.08 and p=0.10, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrates long-term survival for pelvic or abdominal recurrences is possible with curative salvage therapy. The presence of symptoms is a negative prognostic factor in treatment outcome and imaging may be effective for diagnosis in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Larger studies need to be performed to confirm these findings. PMID:26237194

  3. Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Lymph Node Recurrence After Radical Surgery of Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jincheng; Kong Cheng; Tao Hua

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcomes of patients with lymph node recurrence after radical surgery of esophageal cancer, when given radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and December 2005, the data from 73 patients with lymph node recurrence after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups: radiochemotherapy (RC, 31 patients) and radiotherapy alone (RA, 42 patients). Patients in the RC group received at least two cycles of 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-48). The overall survival rate for all patients was 46.7% and 4.7% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median overall survival time was 9 months (95% confidence interval, 6.96-11.04) and 17 months (95% confidence interval, 13.61-20.39) for RA and RC groups, respectively. The survival rate at 1 and 3 years was 62.5% and 10.5% in the RC group and 33.8% and 0% in the RA group (p = .0049, log-rank test; hazard ratio for death, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.92). Acute toxicities were more frequent in the RC group than in the RA group. No significant differences were found in the late toxicity profiles between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of the present retrospective analysis suggest that RC should be considered an effective and well-tolerated treatment of patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and postoperative lymph node recurrence.

  4. Simple Risk Score for Prediction of Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma within the Milan Criteria after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiliang; Wu, Jushan; Zhu, Ruidong; Feng, Dezhao; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Yan; Bu, Dayu; Li, Chenlei; Zhou, Yuyan; Si, Lianghao; Liu, Yuhan; Liang, Ziwei; Xu, Jianing; Wu, Tianjun

    2017-01-01

    Ten to twenty percent of the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients fulfilling the Milan criteria (MC) recurred within three years after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We therefore utilize a training cohort to develop an improved prognostic model for predicting the recurrence in these patients. By univariate and multivariate analysis, AFP level [cut-off value: 321 ng/mL, area under the curve (AUC) = 0.724, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.604–0.843, P < 0.001] and cytokeratin-19 (CK19) and glypican-3 (GPC3) expression pattern from nine putative prognostic factors were entered in risk factor scoring model to conjecture the tumor recurrence. In the training cohort, the AUC value of the model was 0.767 (95% CI = 0.645–0.890, P < 0.001), which was the highest among all the elements. The model’s performance was then assessed using a validation cohort. In the validation cohort, the AUC value of the model was 0.843 (95% CI = 0.720−0.966, P < 0.001) which was higher than any other elements. The results indicated that model had high performance with good discrimination ability and significantly improved the predictive capacity for the recurrence of HCC patients within MC after OLT. PMID:28276470

  5. Analysis of predictability of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in the recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Kyeong; So, Young; Chung, Hyun Woo; Yoo, Young Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Hwang, Tae Sook; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-10-01

    Whether preoperative F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can predict recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remains unclear. Herein, we evaluated the potential of primary tumor FDG avidity for the prediction of tumor recurrence in PTC patients. A total of 412 PTC patients (72 males, 340 females; age: 47.2 ± 12.2 years; range: 17-84 years) who underwent FDG-PET/CT prior to total thyroidectomy (n = 350), subtotal thyroidectomy (n = 2), or lobectomy (n = 60) from 2007 to 2011 were analyzed. The predictive ability for recurrence was investigated among various clinicopathological factors, BRAF(V)(600E) mutation, and preoperative FDG avidity of the primary tumor using Kaplan-Meier (univariate) and Cox proportional hazards regression (multivariate) analyses. Of the 412 patients, 19 (4.6%) experienced recurrence, which was confirmed either by pathology (n = 17) or high serum thyroglobulin level (n = 2), during a mean follow-up period of 43.9 ± 16.6 months. Of the 412 patients, 237 (57.5%) had FDG-avid tumors (maximum standardized uptake value, 7.1 ± 7.0; range: 1.6-50.5). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that tumor size (P = 0.0054), FDG avidity of the tumor (P = 0.0049), extrathyroidal extension (P = 0.0212), and lymph node (LN) stage (P < 0.0001) were significant predictors for recurrence. However, only LN stage remained a significant predictor in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Patients with FDG-avid tumors had higher LN stage (P < 0.0001), larger tumor size (P < 0.0001), and more frequent extrathyroidal extension (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, FDG avidity of the primary tumor in preoperative FDG-PET/CT could not predict the recurrence of PTC. LN stage was the only identified predictor of PTC recurrence.

  6. Clinical-pathological features and treatment modalities associated with recurrence in DCIS and micro-invasive carcinoma: Who to treat more and who to treat less.

    PubMed

    Toss, Angela; Palazzo, Juan; Berger, Adam; Guiles, Frances; Sendecki, Jocelyn Andrel; Simone, Nicole; Anne, Rani; Avery, Tiffany; Jaslow, Rebecca; Lazar, Melissa; Tsangaris, Theodore; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The primary aim in the management of DCIS is the prevention of recurrence and contralateral tumor. Risk factors for DCIS recurrence and appropriate treatments are still widely debated. Adjuvant therapies after surgical resection reduce recurrences and contralateral disease, but these treatments have significant financial costs, side effects and there is a group of low-risk patients who would not gain additional benefit. The aim of our analysis was to identify clinical-pathological features and treatment modalities associated with recurrence in DCIS and microinvasive carcinoma. In the Thomas Jefferson University Cancer Registry of Philadelphia, we identified 865 patients with DCIS or micro-invasive carcinoma treated between 2003 and 2013. Associations between recurrence and demographic factors (age at diagnosis, ethnicity), biological features (ER, PR and HER2) and treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment) were assessed. Our single institution register-based study showed that distribution of age at diagnosis and biological features did not significantly differ among ethnic groups. Younger women and micro-invasive carcinoma patients were more likely to undergo mastectomy, while African Americans were more likely to take endocrine therapy and undergo radiotherapy. In our sample only ER/PR negative DCIS were associated with significantly higher recurrence rate. Moreover, we reported a high rate of HER2 positive recurrences, suggesting that expression of this oncogene may represent a potential biomarker for DCIS at high risk of recurrence. To better define the molecular profile of the subgroup at worse prognosis might help to identify biomarkers predictive of recurrence or second tumors, identifying patients candidates for more appropriate treatments.

  7. Recurrence pattern of squamous cell carcinoma in the midthoracic esophagus: implications for the clinical target volume design of postoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Luo, Yijun; Li, Minghuan; Yan, Hongjiang; Sun, Mingping; Fan, Tingyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative radiotherapy has shown positive efficacy in lowering the recurrence rate and improving the survival rate for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, controversies still exist about the postoperative prophylactic radiation target volume. This study was designed to analyze the patterns of recurrence and to provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for patients with midthoracic ESCC. Patients and methods A total of 338 patients with recurrent or metastatic midthoracic ESCC after radical surgery were retrospectively examined. The patterns of recurrence including locoregional and distant metastasis were analyzed for these patients. Results The rates of lymph node (LN) metastasis were 28.4% supraclavicular, 77.2% upper mediastinal, 32.0% middle mediastinal, 50.0% lower mediastinal, and 19.5% abdominal LNs. In subgroup analyses, the rate of abdominal LN metastasis was significantly higher in patients with histological node-positive than that in patients with histological node-negative (P=0.033). Further analysis in patients with histological node-positive demonstrated that patients with three or more positive nodes are more prone to abdominal LN metastasis, compared with patients with one or two positive nodes (χ2=4.367, P=0.037). The length of tumor and histological differentiation were also the high-risk factors for abdominal LN metastasis. Conclusion For midthoracic ESCC with histological node-negative, or one or two positive nodes, the supraclavicular and stations 2, 4, 5, and 7 LNs should be delineated as clinical target volume of postoperative prophylactic irradiation, and upper abdominal LNs should be excluded. While for midthoracic ESCC with three or more positive nodes, upper abdominal LNs should also be included. The length of tumor and histological differentiation should be considered comprehensively to design the clinical target volume for radiotherapy. PMID

  8. Elevated Pretherapy Serum IL17 in Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Correlate to Increased Risk of Early Recurrence after Curative Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Rong, Weiqi; Wang, Liming; Wang, Ying; Zang, Mengya; Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yawei; Qu, Chunfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually presented in inflamed fibrotic/cirrhotic liver with extensive lymphocyte infiltration. We examined the associations between the HCC early recurrence and alterations in serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. Methods A cohort of 105 HCC patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection were included. Pre-therapy, we quantified their serum concentrations of Th1-, Th2-, Th17-, Treg-related, and other cytokines that have been reported to be associated with poor prognosis in human cancers. IL17-producing T-cells were generated in vitro from HCC patients and co-cultured with HCC cell lines separated by a 0.4 µM transwell. Results All the 105 cases of HCC patients had liver cirrhosis. The patients who suffered from HCC early recurrence had higher pre-therapy serum levels of IL17 and lower levels of IL10 than those who did not suffer from recurrence after curative hepatectomy. After adjustment for general tumor clinicopathological factors, elevated serum levels of IL17 (≥0.9 pg/ml) was found to be an independent risk factor for HCC early recurrence with a hazard ratio of 2.46 (95%CI 1.34–4.51). Patients with bigger tumors (>5 cm in diameter) and elevated serum levels of IL17 had the highest risk of early recurrence as compared to those with only one of these factors (P = 0.009) or without any (P<0.001). These factors showed similar effects on the HCC patient overall survival. Intrahepatic infiltrated T-cells in HCC patients were identified as the major IL17-producing cells. Proliferation of HCC cells, QGY-7703, was augmented QGY-7703, was augmented in the presence of IL17-producing T-cells. This effect diminished after neutralizing antibody against human IL17A or TNFα was included. Conclusion Both tumors and IL17 from liver infiltrated T-cells contributed to HCC early recurrence and progression after curative resection. Pre-therapy serum IL17 levels may serve as an additional indicator for

  9. Recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a focal neurologic deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.N.; Wu, S.Y.; Kim, D.D.; Kollin, J.; Prasasvinichai, S.

    1986-10-01

    Papillary-follicular thyroid carcinoma usually remains localized to the thyroid bed and, in cases of metastasis, almost always involves the lung, bone, or liver. The two patients described here presented with papillary carcinoma and neurologic dysfunction. Total body iodine 131 scans disclosed cerebral uptake, and cerebral masses were confirmed by computed tomographic scan. Both patients presented diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas, and ultimately underwent craniotomy. One patient's cerebral metastasis recurred and was treated by a second craniotomy. The other patient received postoperative external cerebral radiotherapy and a novel intraoperative treatment: implantation of 22 iodine 125 seeds in the tumor bed, estimated to yield 16,000 rad (160 Gy) in one year. To date, cerebral metastases have not recurred in the latter patient, although tumor has reappeared in other sites. There is little reported in the medical literature concerning cerebral metastases of thyroid carcinoma, and the present report reviews this experience and discusses treatment alternatives.

  10. Next Generation Sequencing of Cytokeratin 20-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinoma Reveals Ultraviolet Signature Mutations and Recurrent TP53 and RB1 Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Paul W.; Collie, Angela M. B.; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Cani, Andi K.; Verhaegen, Monique E.; Patel, Rajiv M.; Fullen, Douglas R.; Omata, Kei; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Billings, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma. Cytokeratin-20 (CK20) is expressed in approximately 95% of Merkel cell carcinomas and is useful for distinction from morphologically similar entities including metastatic small cell lung carcinoma. Lack of CK20 expression may make diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma more challenging, and has unknown biological significance. Approximately 80% of CK20-positive Merkel cell carcinomas are associated with the oncogenic Merkel cell polyomavirus. Merkel cell carcinomas lacking Merkel cell polyomavirus display distinct genetic changes from Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma, including RB1 inactivating mutations. Unlike CK20-positive Merkel cell carcinoma, the majority of CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinomas are Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative, suggesting CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinomas predominantly arise through virus-independent pathway(s) and may harbor additional genetic differences from conventional Merkel cell carcinoma. Hence, we analyzed 15 CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma tumors (ten Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative, four Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive, and one undetermined) using the Ion Ampliseq Comprehensive Cancer Panel, which assesses copy number alterations and mutations in 409 cancer-relevant genes. Twelve tumors displayed prioritized high-level chromosomal gains or losses (average 1.9 per tumor). Non-synonymous high confidence somatic mutations were detected in 14 tumors (average 11.9 per tumor). Assessing all somatic coding mutations, an ultraviolet-signature mutational profile was present, and more prevalent in Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative tumors. Recurrent deleterious tumor suppressor mutations affected TP53 (9/15, 60%), RB1 (3/15, 20%), and BAP1 (2/15, 13%). Oncogenic activating mutations included PIK3CA (3/15, 20%), AKT1 (1/15, 7%)) and EZH2 (1/15, 7%). In conclusion, CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma display overlapping

  11. Perioperative plasma glypican-3 level may enable prediction of the risk of recurrence after surgery in patients with stage I hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ofuji, Kazuya; Saito, Keigo; Suzuki, Shiro; Shimomura, Manami; Shirakawa, Hirofumi; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Sawada, Yu; Yoshimura, Mayuko; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Mari; Yoshikawa, Toshiaki; Tada, Yoshitaka; Konishi, Masaru; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2016-12-27

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface protein overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC), and its overexpression is associated with poor prognosis. The diagnostic potential of GPC3 as a serum marker has been reported. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of plasma GPC3 as a predictor for recurrence after surgical resection in stage I HCC patients by newly developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system. Current study demonstrated that high levels of preoperative plasma GPC3 patients tended to experience postoperative recurrence. On the other hand, pre- and postoperative plasma GPC3 positivity of non-recurrence patients was very low. Moreover, even after surgery, approximately half of patients who experienced recurrence were positive for plasma GPC3. Postoperative plasma GPC3 positivity was significantly correlated with worse recurrence-free survival. Immuohistochemical analysis also showed positive rate of GPC3-expression in HCC was higher in recurrence patients than in non-recurrence patients. These results suggested that both pre- and postoperative plasma GPC3 levels may be accurate predictors for recurrence after curative resection of early-stage HCC. It should be noted that the current study only examined a small number of cases; thus, a larger sample size is necessary to validate GPC3 as a predictor for HCC recurrence.

  12. Recurrence of breast carcinoma as Paget disease of the skin at a prior core needle biopsy site: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Calvillo, Katherina Zabicki; Guo, Lifei; Brostrom, Valerie; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Hong, Xuefei; Raza, Sughra; Lester, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Core needle biopsy has become the preferred method of diagnosing breast carcinomas prior to definitive surgery. The possibility of displacing tumor cells into the needle track is a concern. Presentation of case A 38 year old woman was diagnosed with right breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with microinvasion by core needle biopsy. Bilateral skin sparing mastectomies with immediate autologous reconstruction were performed. One and a half years later the patient noted erythema and a scaling crust on the skin of the right breast that progressed over several months. Punch biopsy revealed Paget disease restricted to the epidermis. Subsequent comparison to initial clinical photographs confirmed the cancer was associated with the skin puncture site of the needle biopsy. The patient underwent complete excision with skin grafting and remains free of disease three years later. Discussion Only 13 cases of needle track recurrences have been reported. The majority presented as invasive carcinoma forming a subcutaneous mass. In the current case, detection was delayed due to not initially noting that a skin lesion was at the puncture site of the original needle biopsy. This is the only case of recurrence as tumor limited to the epidermis. Conclusion Although recurrence in a needle track occurs very infrequently, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon and investigate any changes, particularly when occurring at a needle biopsy site. Recording the skin puncture site can aid in early detection of recurrences. Recognition of a recurrence is important for prompt treatment and optimal prognosis. PMID:26395914

  13. Expression Profiling of Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-1 Associated Genes Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival in Human Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Inja; Zhou, Tong; Bang, Hyoweon

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) play a key role in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Both in vivo and in vitro evidences indicate that VDACs are actively involved in tumor progression. Specifically, VDAC-1, one member of the VDAC family, was thought to be a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target. Our previous study demonstrated that the human gene VDAC1 (encoding the VDAC-1 isoform) was significantly up-regulated in lung tumor tissue compared with normal tissue. Also, we found a significant positive correlation between the gene expression of VDAC1 and histological grade in breast cancer. However, the prognostic power of VDAC1 and its associated genes in human cancers is largely unknown. Methods We systematically analyzed the expression pattern of VDAC1 and its interacting genes in breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. The genes differentially expressed between normal and tumor tissues in human carcinomas were identified. Results The expression level of VDAC1 was uniformly up-regulated in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue in breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. Forty-four VDAC1 interacting genes were identified as being commonly differentially expressed between normal and tumor tissues in human carcinomas. We designated VDAC1 and the 44 dysregulated interacting genes as the VDAC1 associated gene signature (VAG). We demonstrate that the VAG signature is a robust prognostic biomarker to predict recurrence-free survival in breast, colon, and lung cancers, and is independent of standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Conclusions VAG represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human cancers, which may enhance prediction accuracy in identifying patients at higher risk for recurrence. Future therapies aimed specifically at VDAC1 associated genes may lead to novel agents in the treatment of cancer. PMID:25333947

  14. Extramammary Paget disease of the penis as a manifestation of recurrent transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Somers, Kathryn; Iorizzo, Luciano; Scott, Glynis; Mercurio, Mary Gail

    2012-08-15

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) mainly affects elderly women in areas with apocrine glands. Only 10 cases have been reported to involve the penis in patients with underlying transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Herein we report a patient with EMPD of the penis after radical cystectomy.

  15. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  16. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  17. Sphincter-saving surgeries for rectal cancer: A single center study from Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shabeer Ahmed; Chowdri, Nisar A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Mir, Parvez Ahmed; Bashir, Yasir; Nafae, Muntakhab

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Background Data: The goals in the treatment of rectal cancer are cure, local control, and preservation of sphincter, bladder and sexual function. Surgical resection using sharp mesorectal dissection is important for achieving these goals. Objectives: The current treatment of choice for carcinoma rectum is sphincter saving procedures, which have practically replaced the previously done abdominoperineal resection. We performed a study in our institute to evaluate the surgical outcome and complications of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: This prospectivestudy included 117 patients, treated for primary rectal cancer by low anterior resection (LAR) from May 2007 to December 2010. All patients underwent standard total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by restoration of continuity. Results: The peri-operative mortality rate was 2.5% (3/117). Post-operative complications occurred in 32% of the patients. After a median follow up of 42 months, local recurrences developed in 6 (5%) patients and distant metastasis in 5 (4.2%). The survival rate was 93%. Conclusion: The concept of total mesorectal excision (TME), advances in stapling technology and neoadjuvant therapy have made it possible to preserve the anal sphincter in most of the patients. Rectal cancer needs to be managed especially in a specialized unit for better results. PMID:24455643

  18. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  19. The immunohistochemical peptidergic expression of leptin is associated with recurrence of malignancy in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gallina, S; Sireci, F; Lorusso, F; DI Benedetto, D V; Speciale, R; Marchese, D; Costantino, C; Napoli, G; Tessitore, V; Cucco, D; Leone, A; Bonaventura, G; Uzzo, M L; Spatola, G F

    2015-02-01

    Leptin is a peptide that plays a key role in the control of satiety, energy expenditure, food intake and various reproductive processes. In the last years, the expression of leptin had been found in malignant cells of various origins. The aim of this study is to evaluate leptin expression in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and to investigate its possible role in predicting prognosis. Leptin expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in pathological and healthy tissue specimens from 24 patients with laryngeal SCC. Specimens were stained with an anti-leptin antibody. All measurements were performed using a computer-based image analysis system and scale of staining intensity was determined. All tumoural specimens showed significant immunoreactivity for leptin compared to healthy tissues (p ≤ 0.05), but showed different immunoreactivity that was related to clinicopathological features. High leptin expression was not significantly related with TNM, histological grading (HG) or advanced (III and IV) clinical stage (p > 0.05). Recurrence of malignancy was found to be significantly related with high expression of leptin by Spearman's rank correlation test (r = 0.59; p = 0.002), Fisher's test (p = 0.017) and Kaplan- Meier product-limit estimate (Log-rank test, p ≤ 0.05). In particular, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that recurrences were significantly related with nodal involvement, HG and leptin expression (p ≤ 0.05). These preliminary results suggest that leptin may be a valuable parameter for predicting prognosis in laryngeal SCC.

  20. Influence of close resection margins on local recurrence and disease-specific survival in oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ling Siew; McMahon, Jeremy; Devine, John; McLellan, Douglas; Thompson, Ewen; Farrow, Adrian; Moos, Khursheed; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2012-03-01

    There is a lack of consistency among published reports in the definition of what constitutes close resection margins (1-5mm) in the surgical treatment of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Our aim was to define what would constitute close resection margins in predicting local recurrence and disease-specific survival. The study comprised 192 previously untreated patients with oral and oropharyngeal SCC who were recruited at the Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, from 2001 to 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Resection was the primary treatment and the surgical margins were recorded for all patients. Statistical analyses were aided by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 15.0, and MedCalc software. The status of the surgical margins was evaluated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to define the cut-off point. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to establish predictive factors for local recurrence and disease-specific survival. Of 192 patients, 23 (12%) had involved margins (<1.0mm), 107 (56%) had close margins (1.0-2.0mm (16.1%); 2.1-3.0mm (12%); 3.1-4.0mm (10.4%); 4.1-5.0mm (17.2%), and 62 (32.3%) had clear margins (>5mm). No predictive cut-off point was found that related close surgical margins to local recurrence. However, there was a significant adverse association between surgical margins ≤1.6mm and disease-specific survival. In recommending postoperative adjuvant treatment for oral and oropharyngeal SCC, we suggest that surgical margins within 2mm should be considered as the cut-off. However, other clinical and pathological prognostic factors should also be taken into consideration when recommending further treatment.

  1. Multiparametric in situ mRNA hybridization analysis to predict disease recurrence in patients with colon carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kitadai, Y.; Ellis, L. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Greene, G. F.; Bucana, C. D.; Cleary, K. R.; Takahashi, Y.; Tahara, E.; Fidler, I. J.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the expression level of several genes that regulate different steps of metastasis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival specimens of primary human colon carcinomas from patients with at least 5 years of follow-up. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor, type IV collagenase, E-cadherin, and multidrug resistance (mdr-1) was examined by a colorimetric in situ mRNA hybridization technique concentrating on reactivity at the periphery of the neoplasms. The in situ hybridization technique revealed inter- and intratumor heterogeneity for expression of the metastasis-related genes. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor, collagenase type IV, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mdr-1 mRNA was higher in Dukes's stage D than in Dukes' stage B tumors. Among the 22 Dukes' stage B neoplasms, 5 specimens exhibited a high expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and collagenase type IV. Clinical outcome data (5-year follow-up) revealed that all 5 patients with Dukes' stage B tumors developed distant metastasis (recurrent disease), whereas the other 17 patients with Dukes' stage B tumors expressing low levels of the metastasis-related genes were disease-free. Multivariate analysis identified high levels of expression of collagenase type IV and low levels of expression of E-cadherin as independent factors significantly associated with metastasis or recurrent disease. More specifically, metastatic or recurrent disease was associated with a high ratio (> 1.35) of expression of collagenase type IV to E-cadherin (specificity of 95%). Collectively, the data show that multiparametric in situ hybridization analysis for several metastasis-related genes may predict the metastatic potential, and hence the clinical outcome, of individual lymph-node-negative human colon cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8909244

  2. Copanlisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  3. Multivariate Analysis of Para-Aortic Lymph Node Recurrence After Definitive Radiotherapy for Stage IB-IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, C.-J.; Chen, H.-C.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, Y.-J.; Wang, C.-Y.; Hsu, H.-C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pretreatment risk factors of para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence after primary radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 1992 and January 2006, the data from 758 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix were retrospectively analyzed. No patient had undergone PALN radiotherapy as their initial treatment. PALN recurrence was diagnosed by computed tomography. PALN relapse-free status was determined clinically or radiographically. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were performed with Cox regression models. Results: Of the 758 patients, 38 (5%) and 42 (6%) had isolated and nonisolated PALN recurrences after a median follow-up of 50 months (range, 2-159 months), respectively. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate after PALN recurrence was 35% and 28%, respectively. A squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) level >40 ng/mL (p <0.001), advanced parametrial involvement (score 4-6; p = 0.002), and the presence of pelvic lymphadenopathy (p = 0.007) were independent factors associated with PALN relapse on multivariate analysis. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate in patients with a SCC-Ag level >40 ng/mL, SCC-Ag level of 20-40 ng/mL, parametrial score of 4-6, pelvic lymphadenopathy, and no risk factors was 57%, 22%, 34%, 37%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix and a high SCC-Ag level, pelvic lymphadenopathy, or advanced PM involvement were predisposed to PALN recurrence after definitive radiotherapy. More intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in high-risk patients.

  4. Late recurrence of sigmoid carcinoma mimicking primary vulvar cancer: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Pabuccu, Emre; Tolunay, Harun Egemen; Kocbulut, Evren; Taskın, Salih; Ortac, Fırat; Sertcelik, Ayse; Sasmaz, Aysegul; Savas, Berna

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate a unique case report about late and isolated vulvar metastasis of sigmoid adeno-carcinoma with review of the literature. Material-method 57 year old postmenopausal patient with prior sigmoid colon cancer history was admitted with isolated vulvar mass. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and KRAS gen mutation analysis following surgery were performed to discriminate the metastasis from a vulvar primary malignancy. Further imaging techniques were also performed to exclude additional tumours. Results Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and KRAS gene mutation analysis revealed isolated metastasis of the colonic adeno-carcinoma in the vulva. Conclusion Isolated and late occurring vulvar metastasis of colonic origin is very unusual. Careful evaluation and IHC is useful for such cases. PMID:22949946

  5. Massive presacral bleeding during rectal surgery: From anatomy to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Meng, Rong-Gui; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate control of two different types of massive presacral bleeding according to the anatomy of the presacral venous system. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed in 1628 patients with middle or low rectal carcinoma who were treated surgically in the Department of Colorectal Surgery, Changhai Hospital, Shanghai, China from January 2008 to December 2012. In four of these patients, the presacral venous plexus (n = 2) or basivertebral veins (n = 2) were injured with massive presacral bleeding during mobilization of the rectum. The first two patients with low rectal carcinoma were operated upon by a junior associate professor and the source of bleeding was the presacral venous plexus. The other two patients with recurrent rectal carcinoma were both women and the source of bleeding was the basivertebral veins. RESULTS: Two different techniques were used to control the bleeding. In the first two patients with massive bleeding from the presacral venous plexus, we used suture ligation around the venous plexus in the area with intact presacral fascia that communicated with the site of bleeding (surrounding suture ligation). In the second two patients with massive bleeding from the basivertebral veins, the pelvis was packed with gauze, which resulted in recurrent bleeding as soon as it was removed. Following this, we used electrocautery applied through one epiploic appendix pressed with a long Kelly clamp over the bleeding sacral neural foramen where was felt like a pit Electrocautery adjusted to the highest setting was then applied to the clamp to “weld” closed the bleeding point. Postoperatively, the blood loss was minimal and the drain tube was removed on days 4-7. CONCLUSION: Surrounding suture ligation and epiploic appendices welding are effective techniques for controlling massive presacral bleeding from presacral venous plexus and sacral neural foramen, respectively. PMID:23840150

  6. The status of Fas and Fas ligand expression can predict recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Monden, M; Takeda, T; Eguchi, H; Umeshita, K; Nagano, H; Nakamori, S; Dono, K; Sakon, M; Nakamura, M; Tsujimoto, M; Nakahara, M; Nakao, K; Yokosaki, Y; Matsuura, N

    2000-01-01

    The status of Fas and Fas ligand (Fas L) expression was investigated in this study for 103 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). We studied the expression of the following three factors, Fas and Fas L expression in carcinoma cells and Fas L expression in stromal mononuclear cells (defined as stromal Fas L index). Fas expression in HCC cells was significantly decreased in cases with poor differentiation (P< 0.0001) and of larger size (P = 0.0058). Fas L expression in carcinoma cells was observed exclusively in moderately or poorly differentiated cases. Furthermore, each factor had prognostic significance for disease-free survival (DFS) (P< 0.0001, P = 0.0222 and 0.0027 respectively). We then scored the results of each factor and defined the total score as ‘Fas-Fas L risk score’. The P -value of the score for DFS was even lower than that of the clinical stage by multivariate analysis. These results suggest that the evaluation of Fas and Fas ligand expression potentially has a significant prognostic value for DFS of HCC patients, in addition to the clinical stage, and can be regarded as a new prognostic marker. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10735508

  7. Capecitabine and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Bolster material granuloma masquerading as recurrent renal cell carcinoma following partial nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhishek; Jai, Shrikant; Ganpule, Sanika; Ganpule, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Nephron sparing surgery has seen a phenomenal rise in its application over the past few decades. The use of Surgicel and gel foam for closure of defect created after partial nephrectomy has become a routine practice at many centers. In this case report, we describe radiological artifact secondary to a surgical bolster mimicking a residual disease or an early recurrence in the kidney. This case highlights two facts; first, reapproximation of the renal tissue is best done without the use of Surgicel bolsters. Second, bolsteroma should always be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis in a case where computed tomography (CT) imaging is showing early recurrence. If the surgeon is sure about the surgical margins being negative and the CT image shows a bolsteroma, the patient should be observed and a repeat scan should be done at 3–6 months, which would show regression or disappearance of the lesion proving it to be an artifact rather than malignant lesion. PMID:27857461

  9. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HBx) were assessed in 328 HBV-associated HCCs and in 155 matched nontumorous tissues by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: The positive rates of HBsAg and cytoplasmic HBx staining in tumor tissue were lower than those in nontumorous tissue (7.3% vs. 57.4%, p < .001; 43.4% vs. 81.3%, p < .001). Conversely, nuclear HBx was detected more frequently in tumors than in nontumorous tissue (52.1% vs. 30.3%, p < .001). HCCs expressing HBsAg, HBcAg, or cytoplasmic HBx had smaller size; lower Edmondson-Steiner (ES) nuclear grade, pT stage, and serum alpha-fetoprotein, and less angioinvasion than HCCs not expressing HBV-associated proteins. Exceptionally, nuclear HBx-positive HCCs showed higher ES nuclear grade and more frequent large-vessel invasion than did nuclear HBx-negative HCCs. In survival analysis, only nuclear HBx-positive HCCs had shorter disease-free survival than nuclear HBx-negative HCCs in pT1 and ES nuclear grade 1–2 HCC subgroup (median, 126 months vs. 35 months; p = .015). Conclusions: Our data confirmed that expression of normal HBV-associated proteins generally decreases in tumor cells in comparison to nontumorous hepatocytes, with the exception of nuclear HBx, which suggests that nuclear HBx plays a role in recurrence of well-differentiated and early-stage HCCs. PMID:27086597

  10. Phase I Study of Cetuximab With RO4929097 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. MV-NIS Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Local management of rectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Touzios, John; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of rectal neoplasia, whether benign or malignant, challenges the surgeon. The challenge in treating rectal cancer is selecting the proper approach for the appropriate patient. In a small number of rectal cancer patients local excision may be the best approach. In an attempt to achieve two goals-cure of disease with a low rate of local failure and maintenance of function and quality of life-multiple approaches can be utilized. The key to obtaining a good outcome for any one patient is balancing the competing factors that impact on these goals. Any effective treatment aimed at controlling rectal cancer in the pelvis must take into account the disease in the bowel wall itself and the disease, or potential disease, in the mesorectum. The major downside of local excision techniques is the potential of leaving untreated disease in the mesorectum. Local management techniques avoid the potential morbidity, mortality, and functional consequences of a major abdominal radical resection and are thus quite effective in achieving the maintenance of function and quality of life goal. The issue for the transanal techniques is how they fare in achieving the first goal-cure of the cancer while keeping local recurrence rates to an absolute minimum. Without removing both the rectum and the mesorectum there is no completely accurate way to determine whether a rectal cancer has moved outside the bowel wall, so any decision on local management of a rectal neoplasm is a calculated risk. For benign neoplasia, the challenge is removing the lesion without having to resort to a major abdominal procedure.

  13. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. Patients treated with radical prostatectomy with positive digital rectal examination findings in the intermediate-risk group are prone to PSA recurrence

    PubMed Central

    FURUBAYASHI, NOBUKI; NEGISHI, TAKAHITO; URA, SHINTARO; MUTAGUCHI, JUN; TAGUCHI, KENICHI; SHIMOKAWA, MOTOTSUGU; NAKAMURA, MOTONOBU

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the possibility of performing radical prostatectomy (RP) alone to achieve a radical cure for prostate cancer in the intermediate-risk group. Samples were collected from 638 Japanese patients who underwent antegrade RP between August 1998 and May 2013; subsequently, 157 patients were excluded. According to the D'Amico criteria, the low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups comprised 107, 222 and 152 patients, respectively. The 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free survival rates in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 96.5, 88.9 and 72.6%, respectively (P<0.001; degrees of freedom=2). In the intermediate-risk group, the difference in PSA failure-free survival between the 0rectal examination findings, and are not considered to be likely to achieve a complete cure with RP surgery alone. In summary, for patients meeting these criteria in the intermediate-risk group, RP surgery alone is likely to be insufficient, and other additional treatments may be considered subsequent to RP. PMID:27313711

  15. Phase II Study of Everolimus and Letrozole in Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Slomovitz, Brian M.; Jiang, Yunyun; Yates, Melinda S.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Johnston, Taren; Nowakowski, Maureen; Levenback, Charles; Zhang, Qian; Ring, Kari; Munsell, Mark F.; Gershenson, David M.; Lu, Karen H.; Coleman, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is frequently dysregulated in endometrial cancer (EC). Hormonal manipulation leads to response in some patients with EC, but resistance derived from PI3K pathway activation has been documented. Targeting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) may overcome endocrine resistance. We conducted a two-institution phase II trial of everolimus and letrozole in women with recurrent EC. Patients and Methods Patients were considered incurable, had measurable disease, and were treated with up to two prior cytotoxic regimens. Everolimus was administered orally at 10 mg daily and letrozole was administered orally at 2.5 mg daily. Each cycle consisted of 4 weeks of therapy. Patients were treated until progression, toxicity, or complete response (CR). The primary end point was the clinical benefit rate (CBR), which was defined as CR, partial response, or stable disease (≥ 16 weeks) by RECIST 1.0 criteria. Translational studies were performed to correlate biomarkers with response. Results Thirty-eight patients were enrolled (median age, 62 years; range, 24 to 82 years). Thirty-five patients were evaluable for response. The CBR was 40% (14 of 35 patients); the median number of cycles among responders was 15 (range, seven to 29 cycles). The confirmed objective response rate (RR) was 32% (11 of 35 patients; nine CRs and two partial responses; median, 15 cycles; range, eight to 29 cycles). Twenty percent of patients (seven of 35 patients) were taken off treatment after a prolonged CR and at the discretion of the treating clinician. None of the patients discontinued treatment as a result of toxicity. Serous histology was the best predictor of lack of response. Patients with endometrioid histology and CTNNB1 mutations responded well to everolimus and letrozole. Conclusion Everolimus plus letrozole results in a high CBR and RR in patients with recurrent EC. Further development of this combination in recurrent endometrioid EC is under way

  16. Do pathological variables have prognostic significance in rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Lionti, Simona; Domati, Federica; Barresi, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To clarify which factors may influence pathological tumor response and affect clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery. METHODS Tumor regression grade (TRG) according to the Dworak system and yTNM stage were assessed and correlated with pre-treatment clinico-pathological variables in 215 clinically locally advanced (cTNM stage II and III) rectal carcinomas. Prognostic value of all pathological and clinical factors on disease free survival (DFS) and cancer specific survival (CSS) was analyzed by Kaplan Meier and Cox-regression analyses. RESULTS cN+ status, mucinous histotype or poor differentiation in the pre-treatment biopsy were significantly associated with lower pathological response (low Dworak grade and TNM remaining unchanged/upstaging). Cases showing acellular mucin pools in surgical specimens all had unremarkable clinical courses with no deaths or recurrences during follow-up. Dworak grade had prognostic significance for DFS and CSS. However, compared to the 5-tiered system, a simplified two-tiered grading system, in which grades 0, 1 and 2 were grouped as absent/partial regression and grades 3 and 4 were grouped as total/subtotal regression, was more reproducible and prognostically informative. The two-tiered Dworak system, yN stage, craniocaudal extension of the tumor and radial margin status were significant independent prognostic variables. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that caution should be applied in using a conservative approach in rectal carcinomas with cN+ status, extensive/lower involvement of the rectum and mucinous histotype or poor differentiation. Although Dworak TRG is prognostically significant, a simplified two-tiered system could be preferable. Finally, cases with acellular mucin pools should be carefully evaluated to definitely exclude residual mucinous carcinoma. PMID:28293088

  17. Evaluation of pretreatment serum interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha as a potential biomarker for recurrence in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brailo, Vlaho; Vidovic-Juras, Danica; Vucicevic-Boras, Vanja; Milenovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 3 percent of all cancers with predominant occurrence in middle aged and elderly males. Tumour recurrence worsens disease prognosis and decreases quality of life in patients with OSCC. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) have been suggested to play a certain role in variety of tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of pretreatment serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels on tumour recurrence in patients with OSCC in order to identify potential biomarkers for the early detection of disease recurrence. Material and Methods The patients with newly diagnosed OSCC were treated and followed from the first visit from November 2006 until January 2008. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were measured. The records of the patients were re-examined in July 2012 and data were recorded about cancer characteristics and tumour recurrence. Disease free survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Serum IL-6 was shown as an independent risk factor for tumour recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment serum IL-6 concentration may be a useful biomarker for identification of OSCC patients with increased risk of the disease recurrence. Key words: Serum IL-6, serum TNF-α, oral cancer, recurrence. PMID:25858079

  18. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  19. NDRG1 as a biomarker for metastasis, recurrence and of poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Xie, Hai-Yang; Xu, Xiao; Wu, Jian; Wei, Xuyong; Su, Rong; Zhang, Wu; Lv, Zhen; Zheng, Shusen; Zhou, Lin

    2011-11-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been reported to be a multifunctional protein associated with carcinogenesis, however, the cellular function of NDRG1 remains elusive in human cancers. Here, our proteomics profile analysis of HCC tissues with different metastatic capabilities revealed that NDRG1 was correlated with metastasis and recurrence in HCC patients after liver transplantation (LT). Immunohistochemical staining of 143 HCC patients after LT showed that NDRG1-positive expression had poor prognosis, either for shorter disease-free survival or overall survival (P < 0.001), compared with NDRG1-negative expression. Multivariate analysis confirmed NDRG1 as an independent prognostic value (P < 0.001). In addition, in vitro experiments HCC cells with small interfering RNA against NDRG1 significantly suppressed its proliferation, colony formation, invasion and migration ability. Microarray analysis revealed that NDRG1 modulated the expression of genes associated with transmembrane transporter activity, chemoattractant activity, immune response, cell adhesion and cell proliferation process. Taken together, these results suggested that NDRG1 was an important molecule in controlling HCC metastasis and thus suggested as a novel biomarker for predicting HCC recurrence after LT.

  20. ESRRA-C11orf20 Is a Recurrent Gene Fusion in Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Green, Ann E.; Nielsen, Julie S.; Nelson, Brad H.; Drescher, Charles W.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2011-01-01

    Every year, ovarian cancer kills approximately 14,000 women in the United States and more than 140,000 women worldwide. Most of these deaths are caused by tumors of the serous histological type, which is rarely diagnosed before it has disseminated. By deep paired-end sequencing of mRNA from serous ovarian cancers, followed by deep sequencing of the corresponding genomic region, we identified a recurrent fusion transcript. The fusion transcript joins the 5′ exons of ESRRA, encoding a ligand-independent member of the nuclear-hormone receptor superfamily, to the 3′ exons of C11orf20, a conserved but uncharacterized gene located immediately upstream of ESRRA in the reference genome. To estimate the prevalence of the fusion, we tested 67 cases of serous ovarian cancer by RT-PCR and sequencing and confirmed its presence in 10 of these. Targeted resequencing of the corresponding genomic region from two fusion-positive tumor samples identified a nearly clonal chromosomal rearrangement positioning ESRRA upstream of C11orf20 in one tumor, and evidence of local copy number variation in the ESRRA locus in the second tumor. We hypothesize that the recurrent novel fusion transcript may play a role in pathogenesis of a substantial fraction of serous ovarian cancers and could provide a molecular marker for detection of the cancer. Gene fusions involving adjacent or nearby genes can readily escape detection but may play important roles in the development and progression of cancer. PMID:21949640

  1. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  2. Management of Recurrent Rectourethral Fistula by York Mason Posterior Transrectal Transsphincteric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, A. Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer; Parlak, Omer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Karalova, Gulen

    2015-01-01

    Rectourethral fistula (RUF) may develop after ureterovesical and rectal intervention or radiation therapy (RT) rarely, but it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The patient will typically present with pneumaturia, faecaluria, and urinary drainage from the rectum. Diagnosis can be easily done with digital rectal examination, cystography, and urethrocystoscopy. Conservative supportive management of RUF does not appear to be successful in most patients, and management with surgical intervention remains the best treatment option. Several surgical techniques have been described including transabdominal, transanal, transperineal, combined abdominoperineal, anterior and posterior transsphincteric, transsacral, laparoscopic, robotic, and endoscopic minimally invasive approaches. There have been very few data about treatment of recurrent RUF. We would like to report the management of recurrent RUF following transurethral resection of prostate and RT for prostate carcinoma in an immunosuppressed, 75-year-old patient by York Mason posterior transrectal transsphincteric approach. PMID:26770864

  3. Metachronous metastasis to the oral cavity from carcinoma rectum - a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Usman, Nawaz; Kattepur, Abhay; Gopinath, Kodaganur S

    2014-12-01

    The common patterns of dissemination and recurrence of rectal cancer are known and well documented. However extravisceral involvement is a relatively uncommon entity. Therefore, these metastases are not well studied in sufficiently large numbers to formulate evidence based recommendations regarding their optimal treatment. This report describes a case of carcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the oral cavity causing symptoms severe enough to necessitate operative management.

  4. Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patient with Crohn's Disease: Incidental or Expected Outcome of Azathioprine?

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Youssef; Mathews, Mary; Patel, Hiren; Shah, Nihar; Baddoura, Walid; de la Torre, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually occurs in patients with underlying risk factors such as liver cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B. Although patients with Crohn's disease (CD) are at an increased risk to develop malignancies such as colon cancer, the incidence of HCC in this population is extremely rare. We report a case of 62-year-old male with long history of CD treated with azathioprine (AZA) and aminosalicylic acid (ASA) who was incidentally diagnosed with HCC, for which left hepatectomy was done. Four years later during routine follow-up, patient had another hepatic lesion and underwent resection of the mass. The mechanism of occurrence of HCC in patient with CD is still controversial and may include immune mediated changes and medication related complications. AZA was reported in all case reports of CD that developed HCC. Through this report we hope to explore the complex pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the development of HCC in the Crohn's disease patient population. PMID:26788381

  5. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R; Latz, J; Schneider, M

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusion on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients received 1 to 8 cycles of therapy. 9 patients (26.5%) had an objective response, with a median response duration of 5.6 months (range 2.9–20 months). 15 (44.1%) had stable disease, and 8 (23.5%) had progressive disease. 2 patients were not assessable for response. Median overall survival was 6.4 months (range 0.7–28.1 months; 95% CI: 3.9–7.7 months). 24 patients (68.6%) experienced grade 3/4 neutropenia, with febrile neutropenia in 4 (11.4%). Grade 3/4 anaemia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 11 (34.3%) and 6 (17.1%) patients, respectively. The most frequent non-haematological toxicity was grade 3/4 mucositis (17.1%; 6 patients). In conclusion, pemetrexed is active in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although substantial haematological toxicities were experienced by patients, subsequent studies have shown that these toxicities can be proactively managed by folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11531245

  6. Recurrent prognostic factors and expression of GLUT-1, PI3K and p-Akt in adenoid cystic carcinomas of the head and neck: Clinicopathological features and biomarkers of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jin; Bao, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Luo, Xing-Mei; Yao, Hong-Tian; He, Jian-Feng; Wang, Qin-Ying

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors associated with the recurrence of adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs). We examined the recurrence values of clinicopathological variables and GLUT-1, p-Akt and PI3K expression in 42 patients with ACC. Of the 42 patients, 17 developed recurrence following initial surgery. The positive rates of GLUT-1, PI3K and p-Akt protein expression in ACC were 38.1, 38.1 and 50.0%, respectively. The expression of GLUT-1, p-Akt or PI3K protein in ACC was higher than that in inflammatory lesions or benign tumors. Our study demonstrated that T stage, a positive resection margin, perineural invasion, surgery without postoperative radiotherapy and the expression of GLUT-1, PI3K and p-Akt were factors predictive of recurrence by univariate analyses. In multivariate analyses, perineural invasion, a positive resection margin and p-Akt were significant predictors of recurrence. Initial surgery is very significant in the recurrence of ACC. Overexpression of GLUT-1, PI3K and p-Akt may also play a role in its development and recurrence.

  7. Estadiaje local del carcinoma rectal: imágenes de ecografía versus resonancia magnética. Revisión sistemática de la literatura y metaanálisis.

    PubMed

    Guenaga, Katia F; Otoch, Jose P; Artifon, Everson L A

    2016-01-01

    New surgical techniques in the treatment of rectal cancer have improved survival mainly by reducing local recurrences. A preoperative staging method is required to accurately identify tumor stage and planning the appropriate treatment. MRI and ERUS are currently being used for the local staging (T stage). In this review, the accuracy of MRI and ERUS with rigid probe was compared against the gold standard of the pathological findings in the resection specimens. Five studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The accuracy was 91.0% to ERUS and 86.8% to MRI (p=0.27). The result has no statistical significance but with pronounced heterogeneity between the included trials as well as other published reviews. We can conclude that there is a clear need for good quality, larger scale and prospective studies.

  8. Intraoperative prognostic factors and atypical patterns of recurrence in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma treated with laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Albert; Huguet, Jorge; García-Cruz, Eduard; Izquierdo, Laura; Mateu, Laura; Musquera, Mireia; Ribal, Maria José; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to identify clinical, intraoperative and pathological prognostic factors for predicting extraurothelial recurrence and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) who had undergone laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy (LRNU), and to investigate the site-specific patterns of recurrence and the associated outcomes. Materials and methods A retrospective revision was undertaken of 117 consecutive patients who had undergone transperitoneal LRNU for UTUC between 2007 and 2012. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify prognostic factors and Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate CSS. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months, 36 patients (30%) developed extraurothelial recurrence (local and/or distant). In the multivariate analysis, entering the urinary tract during LRNU was related to local recurrence (p = 0.04), management of the distal ureter to CSS (p = 0.003), pathological stage and positive margins to local (p = 0.001, p = 0.013), distant (p = 0.028, p = 0.009) and global recurrence (p = 0.05, p = 0.012) and CSS (p = 0.011, p = 0.042), and multifocality to distant recurrence (p = 0.024). Median time to recurrence was 11.4 months after LRNU. Of 36 patients with progression, 23 (64%) had simultaneous local and distant recurrence and eight had atypical metastases: two port-site metastases, five peritoneal, two subcutaneous and two abdominal wall implants. The 5 year CSS was 61% for all patients with UTUC and 9% for those with recurrence. Conclusions Intraoperative events could have a negative impact on the oncological outcomes of patients with UTUC treated with LRNU. The use of laparoscopy for advanced UTUC may be related to atypical ways of spreading.

  9. The Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER) Score for Relapse Prediction in Patients with Surgically Resected Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Soo Fan; Ng, Elizabeth Shu-Hui; Li, Huihua; Ong, Yu-Han; Choo, Su Pin; Ngeow, Joanne; Toh, Han Chong; Lim, Kiat Hon; Yap, Hao Yun; Tan, Chee Kiat; Ooi, London Lucien Peng Jin; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Chow, Pierce Kah Hoe; Foo, Kian Fong; Tan, Min-Han; Cheow, Peng Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Surgery is the primary curative option in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current prognostic models for HCC are developed on datasets of primarily patients with advanced cancer, and may be less relevant to resectable HCC. We developed a postoperative nomogram, the Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER) Score, to predict outcomes of HCC patients who have undergone surgical resection. Methods Records for 544 consecutive patients undergoing first-line curative surgery for HCC in one institution from 1992–2007 were reviewed, with 405 local patients selected for analysis. Freedom from relapse (FFR) was the primary outcome measure. An outcome-blinded modeling strategy including clustering, data reduction and transformation was used. We compared the performance of SLICER in estimating FFR with other HCC prognostic models using concordance-indices and likelihood analysis. Results A nomogram predicting FFR was developed, incorporating non-neoplastic liver cirrhosis, multifocality, preoperative alpha-fetoprotein level, Child-Pugh score, vascular invasion, tumor size, surgical margin and symptoms at presentation. Our nomogram outperformed other HCC prognostic models in predicting FFR by means of log-likelihood ratio statistics with good calibration demonstrated at 3 and 5 years post-resection and a concordance index of 0.69. Using decision curve analysis, SLICER also demonstrated superior net benefit at higher threshold probabilities. Conclusion The SLICER score enables well-calibrated individualized predictions of relapse following curative HCC resection, and may represent a novel tool for biomarker research and individual counseling. PMID:25830231

  10. Array-CGH reveals recurrent genomic changes in Merkel cell carcinoma including amplification of L-Myc.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Kelly G; Lemos, Bianca D; Feng, Bin; Jaimes, Natalia; Peñas, Pablo F; Bi, Xiaohui; Maher, Elizabeth; Cohen, Lisa; Leonard, J Helen; Granter, Scott R; Chin, Lynda; Nghiem, Paul

    2009-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with poorly characterized genetics. We performed high resolution comparative genomic hybridization on 25 MCC specimens using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. Tumors frequently carried extra copies of chromosomes 1, 3q, 5p, and 6 and lost chromosomes 3p, 4, 5q, 7, 10, and 13. MCC tumors with less genomic aberration were associated with improved survival (P=0.04). Tumors from 13 of 22 MCC patients had detectable Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA, and these tumors had fewer genomic deletions. Three regions of genomic alteration were of particular interest: a deletion of 5q12-21 occurred in 26% of tumors, a deletion of 13q14-21 was recurrent in 26% of tumors and contains the well-characterized tumor suppressor RB1, and a previously unreported focal amplification at 1p34 was present in 39% of tumors and centers on L-Myc (MYCL1). L-Myc is related to the c-Myc proto-oncogene, has transforming activity, and is amplified in the closely related small cell lung cancer. Normal skin showed no L-Myc expression, whereas 4/4 MCC specimens tested expressed L-Myc RNA in relative proportion to the DNA copy number gain. These findings suggest several genes that may contribute to MCC pathogenesis, most notably L-Myc.

  11. Exome sequencing reveals recurrent REV3L mutations in cisplatin-resistant squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kie Kyon; Jang, Kang Won; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Han Sang; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Kim, Hye Ryun; Yun, Hwan Jung; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keon Uk; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; McPherson, John R.; Zhang, Shenli; Rhee, Je-Keun; Vettore, André L.; Das, Kakoli; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kim, Joo Hang; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steven G.; Kim, Tae-Min; Tan, Patrick; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER inhibitor, had shown modest clinical activity in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) patients. Therefore, validated predictive biomarkers are required to identify patients most likely to benefit from this therapeutic option. To characterize the genetic landscape of cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes and identify potential predictive biomarkers for dacomitinib sensitivity, we performed whole exome sequencing on 18 cisplatin-resistant metastatic SCCHN tumors and their matched germline DNA. Platinum-based chemotherapy elevated the mutation rates of SCCHN compared to chemotherapy-naïve SCCHNs. Cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes uniquely exhibited a novel mutational signature characterized by C:G to A:T transversions at CCR sequence contexts that may have arisen due to error-prone translesional synthesis. Somatic mutations in REV3L, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ involved in translesional synthesis, are significantly enriched in a subset of patients who derived extended clinical benefit to dacomitinib (P = 0.04). Functional assays showed that loss-of-function of REV3L dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of SCCHN cells to dacomitinib by the loss of both translesion synthesis and homologous recombination pathways. Our data suggest that the ‘platinum’ mutational signature and inactivation of REV3L may inform treatment options in patients of recurrent SCCHN. PMID:26790612

  12. A recurrent germline BAP1 mutation and extension of the BAP1 tumor predisposition spectrum to include basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wadt, K A W; Aoude, L G; Johansson, P; Solinas, A; Pritchard, A; Crainic, O; Andersen, M T; Kiilgaard, J F; Heegaard, S; Sunde, L; Federspiel, B; Madore, J; Thompson, J F; McCarthy, S W; Goodwin, A; Tsao, H; Jönsson, G; Busam, K; Gupta, R; Trent, J M; Gerdes, A-M; Brown, K M; Scolyer, R A; Hayward, N K

    2015-09-01

    We report four previously undescribed families with germline BRCA1-associated protein-1 gene (BAP1) mutations and expand the clinical phenotype of this tumor syndrome. The tumor spectrum in these families is predominantly uveal malignant melanoma (UMM), cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and mesothelioma, as previously reported for germline BAP1 mutations. However, mutation carriers from three new families, and one previously reported family, developed basal cell carcinoma (BCC), thus suggesting inclusion of BCC in the phenotypic spectrum of the BAP1 tumor syndrome. This notion is supported by the finding of loss of BAP1 protein expression by immunochemistry in two BCCs from individuals with germline BAP1 mutations and no loss of BAP1 staining in 53 of sporadic BCCs consistent with somatic mutations and loss of heterozygosity of the gene in the BCCs occurring in mutation carriers. Lastly, we identify the first reported recurrent mutation in BAP1 (p.R60X), which occurred in three families from two different continents. In two of the families, the mutation was inherited from a common founder but it arose independently in the third family.

  13. [Urethral recurrence of invasive carcinoma following BCG treatment for bladder Ca in situ].

    PubMed

    Ruoppolo, M; Gozo, M; Milesi, R; Spina, R; Fragapane, G

    2010-01-01

    CIS is a flat, high-grade, non-invasive microscopic urothelial carcinoma. It is considered a precursor of invasive bladder cancer. CIS is classified as primary, secondary or concurrent, when occurred as isolated CIS without cuncurrent papillary tumors, or detected during the follow-up of patients with a previous papillary tumor, or finally in the presence of bladder neoplasm. BCG is widely established as the treatment of choice for CIS with a success rate of approximately 70%. BCG reduces the risk of progression of CIS into invasive carcinoma in 30 to 50% of cases. Direct and prolonged contact between the urothelium and BCG is a prerequisite for successful therapy. Discovery of CIS in the prostatic or membranous urethra represents an ominous sign. CIS may be present only in the epithelial lining of the prostatic urethra or in the ducts, or in the worst case it may be found in the prostatic tissue stroma. Urethral involvement by CIS is at high risk of tumor progression and development of metastases due to reduced thickness of lamina propria and absence of muscolaris mucosa. 83 patients, enrolled from 1/1996 to 12/2005 at our urological department with CIS: primary (focal and multifocal) in 25, secondary in 7 and cuncurrent in 51 (associated with T1bG3 cancer in 37 cases), and urethral CIS in 5 and conservatively treated by TUR and intravescical instillations of BCG, 4 developed afterwords only invasive cancer of the urethra in the absence of bladder involvement. In 2 cases cancer arised from the prostatic fossa after TURP, in 1 from membranous urethra and in the last from prostatic ducts. Among the 4 patients, 3 were treated by cystoprostatourethrectomy and Platinum-based chemotherapy, 1 refused surgical treatment. Two patients died for disseminated disease. 1 patient is alive at 60-month's follow-up. In the last patient cancer relapsed at 36-month's follow-up. We conclude that prostatic/urethral involvement during follow-up after successful intravesical treatment

  14. Modifying effect of mouse double minute-2 promoter variants on risk of recurrence for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Sturgis, Erich M.; Li, Yuncheng; Wei, Qingyi; Huang, Zhigang; Li, Guojun

    2017-01-01

    Functional mouse double minute-2 (MDM2) promoter variants may alter MDM2 expression and thus affect radiotherapy response and prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx (SCCOP). Thus we assessed association of 2 functional MDM2 promoter variants with recurrence risk of SCCOP. The disease-free survival (DFS) of patients with MDM2rs2279744 TT or MDM2rs937283 AA genotypes was significantly reduced compared with that of patients with corresponding GT/GG or AG/GG genotypes. Multivariable analysis showed patients with TT or AA genotypes had a significantly higher risk of SCCOP recurrence than those with corresponding GT/GG or AG/GG genotypes did. Furthermore, patients with combined risk genotypes of the 2 polymorphisms had significantly worse DFS and a higher recurrence risk than patients with fewer combined risk genotypes did (Ptrend < 0.001). Compared with patients with 0 risk genotypes, patients with 1 or 2 risk genotypes had an approximately 3- or 11-fold increased risk of SCCOP recurrence, respectively. Notably, for both individual and combined polymorphisms, the above similar recurrence risks were particularly higher among patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that MDM2 promoter variants individually, or more likely jointly, play a role in determining the risk of recurrence of SCCOP, particularly HPV-positive SCCOP. PMID:28045062

  15. Clinical impact of HLA class I expression in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speetjens, Frank M.; de Bruin, Elza C.; Morreau, Hans; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Putter, Hein; van Krieken, J. Han; van Buren, Maaike M.; van Velzen, Monique; Dekker-Ensink, N. Geeske; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression in irradiated and non-irradiated rectal carcinomas. Experimental design Tumor samples in tissue micro array format were collected from 1,135 patients. HLA class I expression was assessed after immunohistochemical staining with two antibodies (HCA2 and HC10). Results Tumors were split into two groups: (1) tumors with >50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (high) and (2) tumors with ≤50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (low). No difference in distribution or prognosis of HLA class I expression was found between irradiated and non-irradiated patients. Patients with low expression of HLA class I (15% of all patients) showed an independent significantly worse prognosis with regard to overall survival and disease-free survival. HLA class I expression had no effect on cancer-specific survival or recurrence-free survival. Conclusions Down-regulation of HLA class I in rectal cancer is associated with poor prognosis. In contrast to our results, previous reports on HLA class I expression in colorectal cancer described a large population of patients with HLA class I negative tumors, having a good prognosis. This difference might be explained by the fact that a large proportion of HLA negative colon tumors are microsatellite instable (MSI). MSI tumors are associated with a better prognosis than microsatellite stable (MSS). As rectal tumors are mainly MSS, our results suggest that it is both, oncogenic pathway and HLA class I expression, that dictates patient’s prognosis in colorectal cancer. Therefore, to prevent confounding in future prognostic analysis on the impact of HLA expression in colorectal tumors, separate analysis of MSI and MSS tumors should be performed. PMID:17874100

  16. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  17. Long-term survival with repeated resections of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma in a non-cirrhotic liver: case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Hadjittofi, Christopher; Koti, Rahul S.; Konstantinidou, Sofia K.; Davidson, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    A healthy and asymptomatic 55-year-old woman underwent a complete (R0) non-anatomical resection of an incidentally detected solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a non-cirrhotic liver. Six years following the initial R0 non-anatomical resection, intrahepatic recurrence was diagnosed and the patient underwent a second R0 non-anatomical resection. At 12.5 years following the initial resection, a further intrahepatic recurrence was diagnosed, which was once again completely resected by left lateral hepatectomy. This represents one of the longest reported periods between initial resection and HCC recurrence, following repeated R0 resections in the absence of cirrhosis. The appropriate surveillance period and genetic testing protocol for such cases remains to be established. PMID:27127765

  18. Phase II study of the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a stratified type I-type II study from the GINECO group.

    PubMed

    Heudel, P-E; Fabbro, M; Roemer-Becuwe, C; Kaminsky, M C; Arnaud, A; Joly, F; Roche-Forestier, S; Meunier, J; Foa, C; You, B; Priou, F; Tazi, Y; Floquet, A; Selle, F; Berton-Rigaud, D; Lesoin, A; Kalbacher, E; Lortholary, A; Favier, L; Treilleux, I; Ray-Coquard, I

    2017-01-01

    Backround:Patients with metastatic endometrial carcinoma have a poor prognosis and PIK3CA mutations and amplifications are common in these cancers. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the pure PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma.

  19. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  20. Trop-2 protein overexpression is an independent marker for predicting disease recurrence in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. Trop-2 is a glycoprotein involved in cellular signal transduction and is differentially overexpressed relative to normal tissue in a variety of human adenocarcinomas, including endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EEC). Trop-2 overexpression has been proposed as a marker for biologically aggressive tumor phenotypes. Methods Trop-2 protein expression was quantified using tissue microarrays consisting of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens from 118 patients who underwent surgical staging from 2001–9 by laparotomy for EEC. Clinicopathologic characteristics including age, stage, grade, lymphovascular space invasion, and medical comorbidities were correlated with immunostaining score. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for overall survival, disease-free survival, and progression-free survival in relation to clinical parameters and Trop-2 protein expression. Results Clinical outcome data were available for 103 patients. Strong Trop-2 immunostaining was significantly associated with higher tumor grade (p=0.02) and cervical involvement (p<0.01). Univariate analyses showed a significant association with reduced disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.01), and a trend towards significance for overall and progression-free survival (p=0.06 and p=0.05, respectively). Multivariate analyses revealed Trop-2 overexpression and advanced FIGO stage to be independent prognostic factors for poor DFS (p=0.04 and p <0.001, respectively). Conclusions Trop-2 protein overexpression is significantly associated with higher tumor grade and serves as an independent prognostic factor for DFS in endometrioid endometrial cancer. PMID:23151048

  1. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma with Doxorubicin in Patients Progressing after Paclitaxel/Carboplatin: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience from 1995-2009

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Hensley, Martee L.; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Aghajanian, Carol. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Long-term survival for patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma is poor, and limited options exist for the management of recurrent disease. Our goal was to investigate the activity of doxorubicin in the second-line setting in patients who progressed after paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant treatment. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma who were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-2009, and who received paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy followed by second-line doxorubicin therapy at time of recurrence. The median PFS and OS times following paclitaxel/carboplatin and following second-line doxorubicin therapy were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed by the treating physician at each visit and graded using version 4.0 of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient presentation, treatment, patterns of recurrence, and patient outcomes were summarized. Results Seventeen patients were included in study analyses. The median PFS from completion of paclitaxel/carboplatin was 8.0 months (95% CI: 4.5-13.6 months). At the time of recurrence, all 17 patients were treated with doxorubicin as second-line therapy. No patient achieved objective response of stable disease. The median PFS of this cohort following doxorubicin treatment was 2.1 months (95% CI: 0.95-2.7) months. Median OS was 5.8 months (95% CI: 1.0-15.0 months). There is only one patient still alive; her median follow-up time is 49.4 months. Predominant doxorubicin-related grade 2 toxicities included nausea/vomiting (18.8%), fatigue (18.8%), and neutropenia (12.5%). No grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred. Conclusions Among patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma who had received adjuvant paclitaxel/carboplatin, treatment with doxorubicin at time of disease recurrence failed to achieve any objective responses and was associated with a very short (2 months) time to

  2. AB180. Impact of lymphovascular invasion on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Nan; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection Methods This retrospective study was performed with 155 patients with newly diagnosed pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder who were treated with transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) at our institution from January 2006 to January 2010. The presence or absence of LVI was examined according to our pathologists. Chi-square was performed to identify the correlations between LVI and other clinical and pathological features. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the recurrence-free survival (RFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) curves and difference was determined by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive factors through a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results LVI was detected in a total of 34 patients (21.9%).While LVI was associated with high grade tumors (P<0.001) and intravesical therapy (P=0.009). Correlations with age (P=0.227), gender (P=0.376), tumor size (P=0.969), tumor multiplicity (P=0.196), carcinoma in situ (CIS) (P=0.321) and smoking (P=0.438) were not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant tendency towards higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in LVI-positive patients. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in progression rate between the two groups. Moreover, multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that LVI, tumor size and smoking were independent prognostic predictors of recurrence. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) were 2.042 (1.113–3.746, P=0.021), 1.817 (1.014–3.256, P=0.045) and 2.079 (1.172–3.687, P=0.012) respectively. Conclusions The presence of LVI in TURBT specimens is significantly associated with higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in patients with newly

  3. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  4. Molecular clonality determination of ipsilateral recurrence of invasive breast carcinomas after breast-conserving therapy: comparison with clinical and biologic factors.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S; Vicini, Frank A; Hunter, Susan; Odish, Eva; Forbes, Suzy; Kraus, Daniel; Kestin, Larry L

    2005-05-01

    We established clonality relationships between invasive ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs; local recurrences) and initial invasive carcinomas using a molecular polymerase chain reaction loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay for 26 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy for invasive carcinoma with no distant metastases (DMs) before the IBE LOH was +/- 50% allelic loss. Eighteen IBFs (69%) were related clonally to initial carcinomas; 8 (31%) were clonally distinct, second primary carcinomas. IBFs and initial invasive carcinomas were morphologically similar in 6 (75%) of 8 clonally different cases. Clinical IBF classification and molecular assay results differed in 11 cases (42%). The mean intervals to IBF were 4.7 years in related and 8.7 years in different cases (P = .013). In 6 patients, DMs developed; 5 had related IBFs. In related IBF cases, the mean increase in fractional allelic loss (FAL) of IBFs associated with DMs was 18.9% compared with 7.6% in cases unassociated with DMs (P = .004). Molecular assays can accurately establish the clonality of most IBFs. Morphologic comparison and clinical IBF classification are unreliable methods of determining clonality. Clonally related IBFs occurred sooner than clonally different IBFs. Patients with clonally related IBFs are the main pool in which DMs occur Not all clonally related IBFs have the same DM association; those with large FAL gains were associated with DMs. Molecular clonality assays may provide a reliable means of identifying patients who might benefit from systemic chemotherapy at the time of IBF.

  5. Olaparib or Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib Compared With Standard Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Deleterious BRCA1 Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  7. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in Ireland: Pre-operative alpha-fetoprotein predicts tumour recurrence in a 14-year single-centre national experience

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Donal B; Burke, John P; Hegarty, John; McCormick, Aiden P; Nolan, Niamh; Hoti, Emir; Maguire, Donal; Geoghegan, Justin; Traynor, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the results of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ireland over a 14-year period. METHODS: Cases of HCC receiving OLT between January 1995 and September 2009 in the Irish Liver Transplant Unit were reviewed from a prospectively maintained database. Outcome measures included overall and recurrence free survival, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumour pathological features. RESULTS: On explant pathology, 57 patients had HCC. The median follow-up time was 42.7 mo. The overall 1, 3 and 5 years survival was 87.7%, 72.1% and 72.4%. There was no difference in survival when compared to patients undergoing OLT without malignancy. The tumour recurrence rate was 14%. The Milan criteria were exceeded in 32% of cases but this did not predict overall survival or recurrence. On multivariate analysis pre-operative AFP > 100 ng/mL was an independent risk factor for recurrence (RR = 5.2, CI: 1.1-24.3, P = 0.036). CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing OLT for HCC had excellent survival even when conventional listing criteria were exceeded. Pre-operative AFP predicts recurrence independent of tumour size and its role in selection criteria should be investigated in larger studies. PMID:27358785

  8. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor expressed in non-cancer tissues provides predictive powers for recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Furuya, Shinji; Hara, Michio; Hirayama, Kazuyoshi; Akazawa, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Yuuki; Tsuchiya, Masato; Hosomura, Naohiro; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgery. METHODS Expression of M-CSF, distribution of M2 macrophages (MΦs), and angiogenesis were assessed in the liver, including tumors and peritumoral liver tissues. The prognostic power of these factors was assessed. Mouse isolated hepatic MΦs or monocytes were cultured with media containing M-CSF. The concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in media was assessed. Furthermore, the role of the M-CSF-matured hepatic MΦs on proliferation of the vascular endothelial cell (VEC) was investigated. RESULTS A strong correlation between the expressions of M-CSF and CD163 was observed in the peritumoral area. Also, groups with high density of M-CSF, CD163 or CD31 showed a significantly shorter time to recurrence (TTR) than low density groups. Multivariate analysis revealed the expression of M-CSF or hepatic M2MΦs in the peritumoral area as the most crucial factor responsible for shorter TTR. Moreover, the expression of M-CSF and hepatic M2MΦs in the peritumoral area had better predictable power of overall survival. Values of VEGF in culture media were significantly greater in the hepatic MΦs compared with the monocytes. Proliferation of the VEC was greatest in the cells co-cultured with hepatic MΦs when M-CSF was present in media. CONCLUSION M-CSF increases hepatocarcinogenesis, most likely by enhancing an angiogenic factor derived from hepatic MΦ and could be a useful target for therapy against HCC. PMID:27818593

  9. Olaparib and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma cases with high levels of c-Raf-1 expression may benefit from postoperative adjuvant sorafenib after hepatic resection even with high risk of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianyong; Zhong, Jinjing; Hao, Jingcheng; Liu, Zhengni; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Lixue; Yan, Lunan; Zhu, Jinqiang; Zeng, Yong; Li, Bo; Wen, Tianfu; Wang, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Liver resection combined with postoperative sorafenib to prevent recurrence remains a controversial approach for cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially cases with a high risk of recurrence. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of liver resection combined with sorafenib for HCC with a high risk of recurrence. Results Most of the cases of HCC were caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (23 cases, 92%). Most of these tumors (21 cases, 84%) were stage III according to the TNM staging system (12 cases with IIIa, 9 cases with IIIb). In the months after hepatic resection, 19 of the 25 cases (76%) were diagnosed with HCC recurrence or metastasis. Based on the tumor histological biomarker grading system, the group with higher expression levels of c-Raf-1 showed significantly longer overall survival than the group with lower expression of c-Raf-1 (P = 0.012). However, the long-term tumor-free survival advantage disappeared (P = 0.061). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that higher expression of c-Raf-1 was significantly associated with better overall survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.842; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.211–2.542; P = 0.031) and tumor-free survival (HR: 1.319; 95% CI: 1.017–1.543; P = 0.046) in HCC patients who underwent radical hepatic resection. Patients and Methods We retrospectively collected 25 HCC cases with a high risk of recurrence who underwent radical liver resection and who took sorafenib postoperatively from Jan 2010 to Dec 2012. Factors that might contribute to tumor recurrence and treatment failure such as clinical factors, tumor features, and molecular biomarkers were included in our analysis. Conclusions HCC patients with a high risk of post-hepatic resection recurrence may benefit from postoperative sorafenib administered as an adjuvant therapy, especially in cases with high levels of c-Raf-1 expression on histological examination. PMID:26981887

  11. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck treated by surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy: Prognostic features of recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Bucci, M. Kara . E-mail: mkbucci@mdanderson.org; Weinberg, Vivian; Garcia, Joaquin; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Schechter, Naomi R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Fu, Karen K.; Eisele, David W.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: This study sought to review a single-institution experience with the management of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 140 patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with definitive surgery. Ninety patients (64%) received postoperative radiation to a median dose of 64 Gy (range, 54-71 Gy). Distribution of T stage was: 26% T1, 28% T2, 20% T3, and 26% T4. Seventy-eight patients (56%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 66 months (range, 7-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year rate estimates of local control were 88% and 77%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazards model identified T4 disease (p = 0.0001), perineural invasion (p = 0.008), omission of postoperative radiation (p = 0.007), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) as independent predictors of local recurrence. Radiation dose lower than 60 Gy (p = 0.0004), T4 disease (p 0.005), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) were predictors of local recurrence among those treated with surgery and postoperative radiation. The 10-year overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival were 64% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion: Combined-modality therapy with surgery followed by radiation to doses in excess of 60 Gy should be considered the standard of care for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

  12. Cetuximab for the treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, J; Bagust, A; Boland, A; Fleeman, N; McLeod, C; Dundar, Y; Proudlove, C; Shaw, R

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cetuximab for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The submission's evidence came from a single reasonably high-quality randomised controlled trial (RCT) [EXTREME (Erbitux in First-Line Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer); n = 442] comparing cetuximab plus chemotherapy (CTX) with CTX alone. Cetuximab plus CTX had significant effects compared with CTX alone on the primary outcome of overall survival (10.1 versus 7.4 months respectively) and the secondary outcomes of progression-free survival (PFS) (5.6 versus 3.3 months), best overall response to therapy (35.6% versus 19.5%), disease control rate (81.1% versus 60%) and time-to-treatment failure (4.8 versus 3.0 months), but not on duration of response (5.6 months versus 4.7 months). No safety issues with cetuximab arose beyond those already previously documented. The manufacturer developed a two-arm state-transition Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of cetuximab plus CTX versus CTX alone, using clinical data from the EXTREME trial. The ERG recalculated the base-case cost-effectiveness results taking changes in parameters and assumptions into account. Subgroup and threshold analyses were also explored. The manufacturer reported an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 121,367 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and an incremental cost per life-year gained of 92,226 pounds. Univariate sensitivity analysis showed that varying the cost of day-case infusion and the utility values in the stable/response health state of the cetuximab plus CTX arm had the greatest impact on the ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis

  13. Transanal Approach to Rectal Polyps and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Mishra, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    A transanal approach to rectal polyp and cancer excision is often an appropriate alternative to conventional rectal resection, and has a lower associated morbidity. There has been a steady evolution in the techniques of transanal surgery over the past 30 years. It started with traditional transanal excision and was revolutionized by introduction of transanal endoscopic microsurgery in early 1980s. Introduction of transanal minimally invasive surgery made it more accessible to surgeons around the world. Now robotic platforms are being tried in certain institutions. Concerns have been raised about recurrence rates of cancers with transanal approach and success of subsequent salvage operations. PMID:26929754

  14. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  15. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  16. Elesclomol Sodium and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. S0819: Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  18. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. [Bronchopulmonary squamous cell carcinoma associated with HPV 11 in a 15-year-old girl with a history of severe recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Saumet, L; Damay, A; Jeziorski, E; Cartier, C; Rouleau, C; Margueritte, G; Rodière, M; Segondy, M

    2011-07-01

    Malignant transformation of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare event and the cases reported have been mainly observed in adults. We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a history of severe RRP who died of a HPV 11-associated bronchopulmonary squamous cell carcinoma with pericardial invasion. HPV 11 was identified in nasopharyngeal and tracheal papillomas, as well as in the pericardial fluid. HPV 11 isolate was further analyzed by amplification and sequencing of the E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7 genes. Only one amino acid substitution in E4 due to natural polymorphism was observed. Exons 5-9 of the patient's tumor protein 53 (TP53) gene were sequenced and no mutations were identified. This observation confirms that malignant conversion of juvenile-onset RRP associated with HPV 11 to squamous cell carcinoma may arise in children. HPV 11-induced carcinogenesis needs to be further investigated.

  20. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  1. Trametinib With or Without GSK2141795 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  2. [A case of surgical treatment for solitary lymph node recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma simultaneously developed in the mediastinum and abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Uchinami, Hiroshi; Abe, Yuki; Kikuchi, Isao; Yoshioka, Masato; Kume, Makoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2009-07-01

    We report a surgically treated case of lymph node recurrence from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that occurred simultaneously but individually in the mediastinum and abdominal cavity with no metastasis. A 52-year-old man had undergone left lateral segmentectomy for poorly differentiated HCC. Three months after surgery, abdominal computed tomography revealed an enlarged solitary lymph node along the common hepatic artery. Another isolated mediastinal lymph node was also positive on whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Because no other metastatic lesions were identified, we resected these two lymph nodes under a diagnosis of lymph node metastases from HCC. Histopathologically, both of them were classified as poorly differentiated HCC with solid growth. No further recurrence has been found during 20-month follow-up period. Our experience suggested that even though metastatic lymph nodes of HCC were present in the mediastinum and abdominal cavity, resection may provide survival benefit if each metastasis is individually solitary.

  3. Recurrence of Hyperparathyroid Hypercalcemia in a Patient With the HRPT-2 Mutation and a Previous Parathyroid Carcinoma in Hyperparathyroidism-Jaw Tumor Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mele, Marco; Rolighed, Lars; Jespersen, MarieLouise; Rejnmark, Lars; Christiansen, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer in the parathyroid gland is rare, but parathyroid cancer is occasionally seen in relation to genetic abnormalities. Due to a limited amount of evidence, the optimal handling of these cases is not clear. Furthermore, the presence of a malignant parathyroid tumor is rarely known at the time of the initial operation; therefore, re-operations are often necessary. The aim of this study was to present the case of a patient with a previously diagnosed jaw tumor and parathyroid carcinoma that presents as a recurrence of hyperparathyroid hypercalcemia. Case Presentation A 41-year-old patient who was already diagnosed with a parathyroid carcinoma and a jaw tumor caused by a CDC73 mutation, presented with biochemical evidence of increasing parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium levels after a previous total parathyroidectomy. The patient’s ionized calcium increased to 1.55 mmol/L and PTH increased to 16.0 pmol/L. A previous genetic analysis revealed a mutation in the CDC73 gene. There was no family history of hyperparathyroidism. We performed a sestamibi scintigraphy and an 11-C methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) scan that showed a recurrence on the left side of the trachea. The patient underwent a third neck operation for the removal of a tumor on the left side of the trachea. The pathology report revealed that the tumor was a lymph node metastasis from the previous parathyroid carcinoma. The patient is currently enrolled in our follow-up regime. Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a parathyroid adenoma or carcinoma, fibro-osseous lesions (ossifying fibroma) of the mandible and maxilla, and renal cysts and tumors. This autosomal dominant familial cancer syndrome has been reported with a variable and incomplete penetrance, and up to 10% of gene carriers do not show any clinical manifestations. Here we present a patient’s case and discuss the literature related to this

  4. Impact of epidermal growth factor single-nucleotide polymorphism on recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatectomy in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshiya, Shohei; Fujimoto, Yukiko; Bekki, Yuki; Konishi, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Shirabe, Ken; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with an increased risk of hepatic tumors. The study aimed to elucidate the impact of EGF SNP and EGF receptor (EGFR) expression on the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy. To examine the impact of EGF SNP and EGFR on recurrent HCC, we retrospectively analyzed 141 HCC patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection who underwent curative hepatectomy. The EGF *61 GG allele was present in 69 patients (48.9%), AG in 56 (39.7%) and AA in 16 (11.4%). The AA group had a significantly lower rate of intrahepatic metastasis (0% vs 16.5%, P = 0.02), lower serum EGF concentration (26.3 ± 15.9 pg/mL vs 43.4 ± 30.5 pg/mL, P = 0.02) and lower proportion of early recurrence (≤2 years; 28.6% vs 71.2%, P = 0.03) than the AG/GG group. The AA group had significantly higher recurrence-free survival than the AG/GG group (P = 0.04), but there was no significant difference in overall survival between these two groups (P = 0.97). High versus low EGFR expression analyzed by immunohistochemical staining in cancer cells was not significantly associated with overall survival (P = 0.37) or recurrence-free survival (P = 0.39). Therefore, EGF *61 AA was associated with a lower risk of recurrence after curative hepatectomy for HCC in patients with hepatitis C virus infection than other genotypes, but EGFR expression in cancer cells was not significantly associated with prognosis.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy as a Bridge to Transplantation and for Recurrent Disease in the Transplanted Liver of a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mazloom, Ali; Hezel, Aram F.; Katz, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), recurrent HCC is a major cause of morbidity. In this case report, we evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a bridge to OLT and for recurrence in the transplanted liver of a patient with HCC. A 52-year-old male with a history of chronic hepatitis C presented with a 1.7-cm liver lesion radiographically consistent with HCC, which was subsequently treated with a course of SBRT to 50 Gy in 5 fractions followed by OLT in 2009. The patient had a 2.2-cm recurrence in the transplanted liver in 2012, which was treated with SBRT to 62.5 Gy in 5 fractions. He tolerated the course of radiotherapy well with no significant radiation-related toxicity and remains in complete remission approximately 1 year after SBRT. SBRT is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of recurrent HCC in the transplanted liver of the same patient initially treated with SBRT as a bridge to OLT. PMID:24575010

  6. Hepatic intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Louis; Giap, Huan; Miller, William; Fisher, Jonathan; Hillebrand, Donald J; Marsh, Christopher; Schaffer, Randolph L

    2006-09-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurs with a reported frequency of 12%-18% after liver transplantation. Recurrence is associated with a mortality rate exceeding 75%. Approximately one-third of recurrences develop in the transplanted liver and are therefore amenable to local therapy. A variety of treatment modalities have been reported including resection, transarterial chemo-embolization (TACE), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), ethanol ablation, cryoablation, and external beam irradiation. Goals of treatment are tumor control and the minimization of toxic effect to functional parenchyma. Efficacy of treatment is mitigated by the need for ongoing immunosuppression. Yttrium-90 microspheres have been used as a treatment modality both for primary HCC and for pre-transplant management of HCC with promising results. Twenty-two months after liver transplantation for hepatitis C cirrhosis complicated by HCC, a 42-year old man developed recurrence of HCC in his transplant allograft. Treatment of multiple right lobe lesions with anatomic resection and adjuvant chemotherapy was unsuccessful. Multifocal recurrence in the remaining liver allograft was treated with hepatic intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 microspheres (SIR-Spheres, Sirtex Medical Inc., Lake Forest, IL, USA). Efficacy was demonstrated by tumor necrosis on imaging and a decrease in alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level. There were no adverse consequences of initial treatment.

  7. Predictive Value of Conventional Ultrasound and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Surgical Resection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibin; Liao, Jintang; Qi, Wenjun; Xie, Lulu; Li, Yueyi

    2016-05-01

    The goals of the work described here were to study the pre-operative risk factors associated with early recurrence (ER) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgical resection and discuss the value of conventional ultrasound (US) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in predicting ER of HCC, so as to provide more information for optimizing clinical treatment and improving prognosis. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 59 patients who underwent both US and CEUS examinations pre-operatively and surgical resection for HCC between December 2010 and January 2014 in our hospital. The patients' clinical data, laboratory examination data and ultrasonic imaging diagnostic data were collected. Univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the independent risk factors for ER of HCC after surgical resection. Diagnostic values of independent risk factors in predicting ER were further evaluated. The 59 patients were divided into the ER group (27 cases) and ER-free group (32 cases). There were no significant differences in age and sex between the two groups (p > 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed that differences in pre-operative serum α-fetoprotein level ≥400 ng/mL (p = 0.008), tumor diameter ≥5 cm (p = 0.012), macroscopic vascular invasion (p = 0.040), "fast wash-out" enhancement pattern (p = 0.006) and inhomogeneous distribution of contrast agent (p = 0.031) statistically significantly differed between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis indicated that pre-operative serum AFP level ≥400 ng/mL (p = 0.024), tumor diameter ≥5 cm (p = 0.042) and "fast wash-out" enhancement pattern (p = 0.009) were independent risk factors for ER of HCC; macrovascular invasion (p = 0.095) and inhomogeneous distribution of contrast agent (p = 0.628) did not statistically significantly differ between two groups (p = 0.628). Predictive values of the independent risk factors were further evaluated. The sensitivity of a "fast wash

  8. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  9. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  10. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  11. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  12. Nintedanib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Corpus Mixed Epithelial and Mesenchymal Neoplasm; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  13. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  14. Intermediate neoadjuvant radiotherapy for T3 low/middle rectal cancer: postoperative outcomes of a non-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bisceglia, Giovanni; Mastrodonato, Nicola; Tardio, Berardino; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Corsa, Pietro; Troiano, Michele; Parisi, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background The benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal carcinoma are well known. However, there is still considerable uncertainty about the optimal radiation treatment. There is an ongoing debate about the choice between very short treatments immediately followed by surgical resection and prolonged treatments with delayed surgery. In this paper, we describe an interim analysis of a non-controlled clinical trial in which radiotherapy delivered with intermediate dose/duration was followed by surgery after about 2 weeks to improve local control and survival after curative radiosurgery for cT3 low/middle rectal cancer. Methods Preoperative radiotherapy (36 Gy in 3 weeks) was delivered in 248 consecutive patients with cT3NxM0 rectal adenocarcinoma within 10 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery within the third week after treatment completion. Results 166 patients (66.94%) underwent anterior resection, 80 patients (32.26%) the Miles' procedure and 2 patients (0.8%) the Hartmann's procedure. Local resectability rate was 99.6%, with 226 curative-intent resections. The overall rate of complications was 27.4%. 5-year oncologic outcomes were evaluated on 223 patients. The median follow-up time was 8.9 years (range 5-17.4 years); local recurrence (LR) rate and distal recurrence (DR) rate after 5 years were 6.28% and 21.97%, respectively. Overall survival was 74.2%; disease free survival was 73.5%; local control was 93.4 % and metastasis-free survival was 82.1%. Conclusions preoperative radiotherapy with intermediate dose/duration and interval between radiotherapy and surgery achieves high local control in patients with cT3NxM0 rectal cancer, and high DR rate seems to be the major limitation to improved survival. PMID:25373926

  15. A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst: delineation of surgical margins and reconstruction with bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps.

    PubMed

    Ota, Y; Karakida, K; Watanabe, D; Miyasaka, M; Tsukinoki, K

    1998-10-01

    A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is reported. A 38-year-old man was admitted to the Tokai University Hospital due to postoperative infection of a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst of the left mandible. He had had a cystectomy for an odontogenic keratocyst 4 years ago. The lesion revealed bony destruction of the mandible with worm-eating shaped margins with extension to the facial skin. A biopsy specimen revealed squamous cell carcinoma. The mandible was resected with facial skin and the sublingual space was dissected to preserve the lingual nerve. The oral and the facial resections were reconstructed with a titanium plate and bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps. The plate was removed due to infection around the margins and readjustment of the flaps was conducted 5 months after the surgery. He has not had a local relapse, metastasis, or incisional hernia for 8 months following surgery. Good occlusion has been attained by the residual mandible, and he is able to eat without any problems.

  16. Perineal Rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier Procedure) as Treatment of Strangulated Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cernuda, Ricardo Baldonedo; Ángel, Janet Pagnozzi; Fernández, Nuria Truan; Sánchez-Farpón, José Herminio; Pérez, Jose Antonio Álvarez

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration of a rectal prolapse is an unusual entity that represents a surgical emergency. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, requiring emergency surgery. When surgery becomes inevitable, the choice of procedure varies. A 57-year-old man who presented with strangulated rectal prolapse is described. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. After a 6-month follow-up, there was no recurrence, but the patient continued with fecal incontinence. This case underlines the importance of the Altemeier procedure as treatment in the patient with a strangulated prolapsed rectal segment.

  17. Association of the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Lei, Jianyong; Chen, Wenjie; Gong, Yanping; Luo, Han; Li, Zhihui; Gong, Rixiang; Zhu, Jingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are known to be prognostic factors in several cancers. However, no previous investigation has been performed to evaluate the significance of the NLR and PLR in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The aim of this study was to identify the ability of the preoperative NLR or PLR to predict lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. Data from all patients with MTC who had undergone surgery at our institution from May 2009 to May 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to identify optimal NLR and PLR cutoff points, and we assessed independent predictors of lymph node metastasis and recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The ideal cutoff points for predicting lymph node involvement were 2.7 for the NLR and 105.3 for the PLR. The optimal cutoff points of the NLR and PLR for predicting recurrence were 2.8 and 129.8, respectively. Using the cutoff values, we found that PLR>105.3 (odds ratio [OR] 4.782, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–16.7) was an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis and that PLR>129.8 (OR 3.838, 95% CI 1.1–13.5) was an independent predictor of recurrence. Our study suggests that the preoperative PLR, but not NLR, was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. PMID:27749581

  18. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  19. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  20. SU-E-T-302: Dosimetric Comparison Between Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J-Y; Huang, B-T; Zhang, J-Y; Ma, C-C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) technique with fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: CT datasets of eleven nasopharyngeal-carcinoma patients were included. Dual-arc VMAT and seven-field IMRT plans were created for each case, and were then compared in terms of conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) and delivery time. Results: The D98% (near-minimal dose) of PTV in the VMAT plans was slightly lower than that of the IMRT plans (P < 0.05), while the CI was higher than that of the IMRT plans (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the HI between the two plans (P > 0.05). Compared with the IMRT plans, the VMAT plans demonstrated lower Dmean (mean dose) of the bilateral temporal lobes and the whole surrounding normal tissue (P < 0.05), but slightly higher Dmean of brainstem (P < 0.05). In terms of the other OARs, no significant differences were found (P > 0.05). The MUs of the VMAT plans (672 ± 112) was significantly lower than that of the IMRT plans (917 ± 206), by 25 ± 13% (P < 0.05). The average delivery time of the VMAT plans (2.3 ± 0.1 min) was less than that of the IMRT plans (5.1 ± 0.4 min), by 54 ± 3%. Conclusion: For locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the VMAT technique could achieve equivalent or superior dose distribution of the target and better protect the bilateral temporal lobes, compared with the IMRT technique. Moreover, it could reduce the MU and delivery time effectively.

  1. Decreased expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 is involved in the proliferation and recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Piao, Yongrui; Liu, Xiankui; Lin, Zhenhua; Jin, Zhehu; Jin, Xuanshun; Yuan, Kuichang; Wu, Wenyuan

    2015-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) has been shown to be involved in the development of a number of types of carcinoma. However, the effect of PTPN12 on the proliferation and recurrence of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the expression and function of PTPN12 in human TCC. Samples from 164 patients with TCC, in addition to 146 patients undergoing bladder surgery for indications other than TCC, were examined. PTPN12 protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and PTPN12 mRNA expression was examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PTPN12 expression was increased following transfection with the PTPN12-expressing, pcDEF3 vector, and PTPN12 expression was decreased by RNA interference, in four TCC cell lines. The proliferation of TCC cells was analyzed by a WST-1 assay and in xenografts on BALB/C nude mice. The effect of PTPN12 on tumor recurrence was analyzed by adhesion, migration and invasion assays in TCC cell lines. PTPN12 expression was significantly decreased in TCC tissues compared with that in normal urothelium, and the level of PTPN12 expression was negatively correlated with tumor size, pathological grade, clinical stage and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, decreased expression of PTPN12 significantly enhanced the proliferation of TCC cells in vitro and in vivo. TCC cells with lower levels of PTPN12 exhibited greater adhesion, migration and invasion. In conclusion, PTPN12 expression is downregulated in human TCC. Restoring PTPN12 activity may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  2. Development of TRAIL Resistance by Radiation-Induced Hypermethylation of DR4 CpG Island in Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Cheol; Lee, Won Hyeok; Min, Young Joo; Cha, Hee Jeong; Han, Myung Woul; Chang, Hyo Won; Kim, Sun-A; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There are limited therapeutic options for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer after radiation therapy failure. To assess the use of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a salvage chemotherapeutic agent for recurrent cancer after radiation failure, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant cumulative irradiation on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Using a previously established HN3 cell line from a laryngeal carcinoma patient, we generated a chronically irradiated HN3R isogenic cell line. Viability and apoptosis in HN3 and HN3R cells treated with TRAIL were analyzed with MTS and PI/annexin V-FITC assays. Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to determine the underlying mechanism of TRAIL resistance. DR4 expression was semiquantitatively scored in a tissue microarray with 107 laryngeal cancer specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing for DR4 were performed for genomic DNA isolated from each cell line. Results: HN3R cells were more resistant than HN3 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis because of significantly reduced levels of the DR4 receptor. The DR4 staining score in 37 salvage surgical specimens after radiation failure was lower in 70 surgical specimens without radiation treatment (3.03 ± 2.75 vs 5.46 ± 3.30, respectively; P<.001). HN3R cells had a methylated DR4 CpG island that was partially demethylated by the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of the TRAIL receptor by hypermethylation of a DR4 CpG island might be an underlying mechanism for TRAIL resistance in recurrent laryngeal carcinoma treated with radiation.

  3. Factors Predictive of Tumor Recurrence and Survival After Initial Complete Response of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Ryu; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Takeuchi, Yoji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Tatsuta, Masaharu; Yano, Masahiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Kinji

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To assess factors predictive of recurrent disease and survival after achieving initial complete response (CR) to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who had clinical Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer and received definitive CRT between 2001 and 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 269 patients with esophageal cancer, 110 who achieved CR after definitive CRT were included in the analyses. Chemoradiotherapy mainly consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin and fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. We identified 28 recurrences and 28 deaths during follow-up. The cumulative 1- and 3-year recurrence rates were 18% and 32%, respectively. By univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor category (hazard ratio [HR] 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-30.2; p = 0.015) was an independent risk factor for local recurrence, whereas age (HR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-14.0; p = 0.034) and primary tumor location (HR 4.5; 95% CI 1.6-12.4; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for regional lymph node or distant recurrences. The cumulative overall 1- and 3-year survival rates were 91% and 66%, respectively. As expected, recurrence was associated with poor survival (p = 0.019). By univariate and multivariate analyses, primary tumor location (HR 3.8; 95% CI 1.2-12.0; p = 0.024) and interval to recurrence (HR 4.3; 95% CI 1.3-14.4; p = 0.018) were independent factors predictive of survival after recurrence. Conclusion: Risk of recurrence after definitive CRT for esophageal cancer was associated with tumor category, age, and primary tumor location; this information may help in improved prognostication for these patients.

  4. High expression of AKR1B10 predicts low risk of early tumor recurrence in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Qi, Lu-Nan; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Qin, Hong-Gui; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Lu, Shi-Dong; Ma, Liang; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun; You, Xue-Mei

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the relationship between aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) expression and early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence, this study detected AKR1B10 expression in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 110 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC underwent liver resection and analyzed its correlations with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of these patients. Detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, AKR1B10 mRNA expression showed significantly higher in HCC tissues than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, with a low level in normal liver tissues. Similar results was confirmed at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. High AKR1B10 expression was negatively correlated with serum alpha-fetoprotein level and positively correlated with HBV-DNA level. Patients with high AKR1B10 expression had significantly higher disease-free survival than those with low expression within 2 years after liver resection. Multivariate analysis also confirmed high AKR1B10 expression to be a predictor of low risk of early HCC recurrence. In addition, high AKR1B10 expression was found to be a favorable factor of overall survival. These results suggest that AKR1B10 is involved in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis, but its high expression could predict low risk of early tumor recurrence in patients with HBV-related HCC after liver resection. PMID:28181486

  5. Risk of recurrence and conditional survival in complete responders treated with TKIs plus or less locoregional therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Daniele; Santoni, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Procopio, Giuseppe; Verzoni, Elena; Galli, Luca; di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Giorgi, Ugo; De Lisi, Delia; Nicodemo, Maurizio; Maruzzo, Marco; Massari, Francesco; Buti, Sebastiano; Altobelli, Emanuela; Biasco, Elisa; Ricotta, Riccardo; Porta, Camillo; Vincenzi, Bruno; Papalia, Rocco; Marchetti, Paolo; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Muto, Giovanni; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We retrospectively analyzed the risk of recurrence and conditional Disease-Free Survival (cDFS) in 63 patients with complete remission during treatment with tirosin kinase inhibitor (TKI), alone or with local treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. RESULTS 37% patients achieve CR with TKI alone, while 63% with additional loco-regional treatments. 49% patients recurred after CR, with a median Disease free survival of 28.2 months. Patients treated with multimodal approaches present lower rate of recurrence (40% vs 61%) and longer Disease free survival compared to patient treated with TKI alone (16.5 vs 41.9 months, p=0.039).Furthermore the rate of recurrence was higher in patients with brain (88%), pancreatic (71%) and bone metastasis (50%). Patients who continued TKI therapy after complete response had a longer disease free survival than patients who stopped therapy, although the difference was not significant (42.1 vs 25.1 months, p=0.254). 2y-cDFS was better in patients treated with multimodal treatment and who continued TKIs than the other patient arms. CONCLUSIONS The prognostic value of CR depends on the site where was obtained and how was obtained (with or without locoregional treatment). Cessation of TKI should be carefully considered in complete responder patients. PMID:27027342

  6. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  7. Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage I Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage II Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin

  8. Trebananib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  9. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  10. A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of ‘in situ’ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC. Methods Patients with locally advanced recurrent HCC, which had been heavily pretreated with various treatments, were enrolled. PBT was performed with the conventional method to the target HCC. Subsequently, CalTUMP was injected into the same irradiated-tumor three times at one-week intervals. Three dose-levels of CalTUMP (1/10, 1/3, and 1/1) were administered to 3 patients each. Vital signs, blood samples, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scans were monitored to evaluate the safety. Results Three intratumoral injections of CalTUMP following PBT (median dose: 72.6 GyE) were accomplished in 9 patients. Transient low-grade fever and minor laboratory changes were observed in 7 patients after CalTUMP injections. No other treatment-related adverse events were observed. Median progression-free survival was 6.0 months (range: 2.1-14.2) and 4 patients were progression-free for more than 1 year. Conclusions Intratumoral injection of CalTUMP following PBT was feasible and safe in patients with heavily pre-treated HCC. Further clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of this in situ tumor vaccination are warranted. PMID:24131485

  11. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Choo, Richard; Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  12. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Angela; Manzo, Gaetana; Fenza, Giacomo; Busto, Giuseppina; Serino, Antonietta; Manto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC). Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm2) compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm2) and ADCratio values (ADCratio = ADC2000/ADC1000 × 100) to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F) underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7) after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm2 and b = 2000 s/mm2, and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.). By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P = 0.001 and P = 0.016, resp.). Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000. PMID:27376081

  13. Higher LPA2 and LPA6 mRNA Levels in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Are Associated with Poorer Differentiation, Microvascular Invasion and Earlier Recurrence with Higher Serum Autotaxin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Sato, Masaya; Kudo, Hiroki; Maki, Harufumi; Koike, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) commonly develops in patients with liver fibrosis; in these patients, the blood levels of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its generating enzyme autotaxin (ATX) increase with the liver fibrosis stage. We aimed to examine the potential relevance of ATX and LPA in HCC. Fifty-eight HCC patients who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in the study. Among the LPA receptors in HCC, higher LPA2 mRNA levels correlated with poorer differentiation, and higher LPA6 mRNA levels correlated with microvascular invasion, which suggested a higher malignant potential of HCC with increased LPA2 and LPA6 expression. In patients with primary HCC, neither LPA2 nor LPA6 mRNA levels were associated with recurrence. However, when serum ATX levels were combined for analysis as a surrogate for plasma LPA levels, the cumulative intra-hepatic recurrence rate was higher in patients in whom both serum ATX levels and LPA2 or LPA6 mRNA levels were higher than the median. However, the mRNA level of phosphatidic acid-selective phospholipase A1ɑ, another LPA-generating enzyme, in HCC patients was not associated with pathological findings or recurrence, even in combination with the expression of LPA receptors. Higher LPA2 mRNA levels were associated with poorer differentiation, and higher LPA6 levels were associated with microvascular invasion in HCC; both became a risk factor for recurrence after surgical treatment when combined with increased serum ATX levels. ATX and LPA receptors merit consideration as therapeutic targets of HCC. PMID:27583415

  14. Treatment Results of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Coexistence of Multiple Minor Risk Factors Results in Higher Recurrence Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). Materials and Methods: This study included 302 OSCC patients who were treated by radical surgery and PORT. Indications for PORT include Stage III or IV OSCC according to the 2002 criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer, the presence of perineural invasion or lymphatic invasion, the depth of tumor invasion, or a close surgical margin. Patients with major risk factors, such as multiple nodal metastases, a positive surgical margin, or extracapsular spreading, were excluded. The prescribed dose of PORT ranged from 59.4 to 66.6Gy (median, 63Gy). Results: The 3-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 73% and 70%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that differentiation, perineural invasion, lymphatic invasion, bone invasion, location (hard palate and retromolar trigone), invasion depths {>=}10mm, and margin distances {<=}4mm were significant prognostic factors. The presence of multiple significant factors of univariate analysis correlated with disease recurrence. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 82%, 76%, and 45% for patients with no risk factors, one or two risk factors, and three or more risk factors, respectively. After multivariate analysis, the number of risk factors and lymphatic invasion were significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: PORT may be an adequate adjuvant therapy for OSCC patients with one or two risk factors of recurrence. The presence of multiple risk factors and lymphatic invasion correlated with poor prognosis, and more aggressive treatment may need to be considered.

  15. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Acampora, Angela; Manzo, Gaetana; Fenza, Giacomo; Busto, Giuseppina; Serino, Antonietta; Manto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC). Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm(2)) compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm(2)) and ADCratio values (ADCratio = ADC2000/ADC1000 × 100) to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F) underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7) after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm(2) and b = 2000 s/mm(2), and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.). By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P = 0.001 and P = 0.016, resp.). Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000.

  16. Recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck: treatment strategies and survival analysis in a 20-year period.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, A; Barth, E L; Kokemueller, H; Wegener, G

    2004-04-01

    Following clinical diagnosis of a recurrent tumor, curative treatment is seldom available. Depending on the size of the recurrent tumor and the patient's general health condition extensive surgical resections and reconstructions are avoided in favor of non-surgical palliative intended treatment modalities. According to the literature location of the tumor, tumor size, as well as R-1- and R-2-resection rates are the most frequent reasons for the development of recurrent tumors. In a retrospective evaluation a population of 1000 patients who were treated for a primary head and neck cancer during the period from 1979 to 1996 were analysed descriptively. Survival probabilities of patients with recurrent tumors were calculated according to the product-limit method by Kaplan-Meier, different treatment concepts were compared and analysed with the log-rank test for significant differences. The largest proportion of primary tumors involved the floor of mouth ( n = 369, 36.9%). A total of 198 patients (19.8%) developed a recurrent cancer; 79.8% of patients experienced a recurrent cancer within two years following primary treatment. Within the group of T1/T2 tumors the incidence of recurrent tumors was 28.9%, whereas the incidence in the T3/T4 group was 44.6%. Tumor infiltration of the resection margins was detected in 12.9%. In line with the literature, tumor infiltration of the resection margins is a relevant prognostic factor, therefore intraoperative frozen section must be recommended. Treatment with curative intention, in particular extensive surgical resections, is seldom possible, and requires always a very intensive discussion with the patient.

  17. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paly, Jonathan J.; Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Roeder, Falk; Martínez-Monge, Rafael; Whitson, Jared; Calvo, Felipe A.; Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix; Wong, William W.; Ellis, Rodney J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  18. Expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and selected cancer/testis antigens in ovarian borderline tumours and primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anne-Katrin; Imig, Jochen; Klar, Agnes; Renner, Christoph; Korol, Dimitri; Fink, Daniel; Stadlmann, Sylvia; Singer, Gad; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger; Caduff, Rosmarie

    2013-05-01

    MAGE-C1/CT7, NY-ESO-1, GAGE and MAGE-A4 are members of the cancer/testis (CT) antigen family, which have been proposed as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. To determine the prevalence and biologic relevance of the novel CT antigen MAGE-C1/CT7 and other antigens, 36 ovarian borderline tumours (BTs), 230 primary ovarian carcinomas (OCs) and 80 recurrent OCs were immunohistochemically analysed using the monoclonal antibodies CT7-33 (MAGE-C1/CT7), E978 (NY-ESO-1), clone 26 (GAGE) and 57B (MAGE-A4). Positivity of at least one CT antigen was present in 39.5 % (81/205) of primary OC and in 50 % (26/52) of all recurrences. Expression of the novel CT antigen MAGE-C1/CT7 was most commonly seen with positivity in 24.5 % of primary and 35.1 % of recurrent OC. MAGE-A4, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 expressions were seen in 22.7, 13.9 and 7.1 % of primary and 22.6, 17.5 and 8.9 % of recurrent OC, respectively. Analysis of histological subtypes (serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and transitional) exhibited variable expression with negativity in all mucinous OC. High-grade serous OC revealed CT antigen expression in 5.6 to 28 % with MAGE-C1/CT7 being the most frequent, but without correlation with stage or overall survival. MAGE-C1/CT7 expression and coexpression of CT antigens were significantly correlated with grade of endometrioid OC. None of the BT showed CT antigen expression. No significant correlation was seen with stage, overall survival or response to chemotherapy. In summary, CT antigens are expressed in a certain subset of OC with no expression in BT or OC of mucinous histology. These findings may have implications for the design of polyvalent vaccination strategies for ovarian carcinomas.

  19. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  20. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  1. [Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with multiple liver metastases successfully treated by cetuximab/CPT-11 chemotherapy followed by curative resection - a case report].

    PubMed

    Tani, Keigo; Seyama, Yasuji; Inada, Kentaro; Matsuoka, Yujiro; Takahashi, Masamichi; Tanizawa, Tohru; Warabi, Masahiro; Nasu, Keiichi; Wada, Ikuo; Maeshiro, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Sachio; Umekita, Nobutaka

    2014-11-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent laparoscopy-assisted partial resection of the rectum to treat rectal cancer diagnosed in September 2011 at a previous hospital. Lymph node dissection was not performed and the vertical margin was positive. When multiple liver tumors were detected 10 months later, the patient was referred to our hospital. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed local recurrence of the rectal cancer, lymph node metastasis, and 9 liver metastases, which had a maximum diameter of 10 cm, and where curative resection would have been difficult. The rectal cancer expressed epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and wild type K-ras gene, and we initiated cetuximab/irinotecan (CPT-11) chemotherapy. After 2 courses of chemotherapy, the liver tumors had markedly decreased in size and anterior resection of the rectum with regional lymph node dissection was performed. The pathological diagnosis of the rectal tumor was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma ( MANEC). Extended right hepatectomy was performed four months later. The liver tumors were also diagnosed as metastases of MANEC of the rectum. The therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy was assessed as Grade 1b. The patient is alive without recurrence 34 months since the initial rectal surgery and 15 months after the liver resection. Thus, an anti-EGFR antibody agent might be effective against MANEC of the colon and rectum.

  2. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  3. Paediatric rectal prolapse in Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Duckett, J; Lewin, J

    1996-01-01

    During the 1994 crisis in Rwanda, a high incidence of full-thickness rectal prolapse was noted among the refugee children in the south-west of the country. The prolapses arose as a result of acute diarrhoeal illness superimposed on malnutrition and worm infestation. We used a modification of the Thiersch wire technique in 40 of these cases during two months working in a refugee camp. A catgut pursestring was tied around the anal margin under local, regional or general anaesthesia. This was effective in achieving short-term control of full-thickness prolapse until the underlying illness was corrected. Under the circumstances, no formal follow-up could be arranged; however, no complications were reported and only one patient presented with recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9014879

  4. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Bevacizumab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  5. Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  7. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  8. Clinical importance of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of patients with bronchoalveolar carcinoma: Role in the detection of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Skoura, Evangelia; Datseris, Ioannis E; Exarhos, Dimitrios; Chatziioannou, Sophia; Oikonomopoulos, Georgios; Samartzis, Alexandros; Giannopoulou, Chariklia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2013-05-01

    [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been reported to have a low sensitivity in the initial diagnosis of bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) due to BAC's low metabolic activity. The aim of this study was to assess the value of [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT in the detection of BAC recurrence. Between February 2007 and September 2011, the [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans that were performed on patients with known, histologically proven BAC were studied. A total of 24 [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans were performed in 22 patients, including 16 males and 6 females, with a mean age of 65±9 years. Among the scans, 15 were performed to assess for possible recurrence with equivocal findings in conventional imaging methods and 9 for restaging post-therapy. In all cases conventional imaging studies (CT and MRI) were performed 5-30 days prior to PET/CT. Among the 24 [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans, 18 were positive and 6 negative. Among the 15 [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT scans performed for suspected recurrence, 34 lesions were detected and the mean maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was 6.8±3.26. In nine scans, upstaging was observed, while two were in agreement with the findings of the conventional modalities. A greater number of lesions were detected in two scans and fewer lesions were detected in one, with no change in staging. Only one scan was negative. By contrast, in patients examined for restaging, there were only five lesions with a mean SUVmax of 4.86±3.18. Agreement between the findings of [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT and the conventional modalities was observed in 8 out of 9 cases. Although [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT has been reported to have a low sensitivity in the initial diagnosis of BAC, the present results indicate that when there is recurrence, the lesions become [(18)F]FDG avid. [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT may provide further information in patients evaluated for recurrence and thus improve patient management.

  9. Role of immunosuppression and tumor differentiation in predicting recurrence after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: A multicenter study of 412 patients

    PubMed Central

    Decaens, Thomas; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Meyer, Carole; Gugenheim, Jean; Durand, Francois; Bernard, Pierre-Henri; Boillot, Olivier; Compagnon, Philippe; Calmus, Yvon; Hardwigsen, Jean; Ducerf, Christian; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Dharancy, Sébastien; Chazouillères, Olivier; Cherqui, Daniel; Duvoux, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess pre-orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) factors that could be evaluated pre-operatively or controlled post-operatively associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence and disease-free survival after liver transplantation (LT). METHODS: Four hundred and twelve patients transplanted for HCC between 1988 and 1998 in 14 French centers, who survived the postoperative period were studied. Kaplan Meier estimates were calculated for 24 variables potentially associated with recurrence of HCC. Uni- and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of recurrence. RESULTS: Overall 5-year disease-free survival was 57.1%. By univariate analysis, variables associated with disease-free survival were: presence of cirrhosis (P = 0.001), etiology of liver disease (P = 0.03), α fetoprotein level (< 200, 200 to 2000, or > 2000; P < 0.0001), γ-GT activity (N, N to 2N or > 2N; P = 0.02), the number of nodules (1, 2-3 or ≥ 4; P = 0.02), maximal diameter of the largest nodule (< 3 cm, 3 to 5 cm or > 5 cm; P < 0.0001), the sum of the diameter of the nodules (< 3 cm, 3 to 5 cm, 5 to 10 cm or >10 cm; P < 0.0001), bi-lobar location (P = 0.01), preoperative portal thrombosis (P < 0.0001), peri-operative treatment of the tumor (P = 0.002) and chemoembolization (P = 0.03), tumor differentiation (P = 0.01), initial type of calcineurin inhibitor (P = 0.003), the use of antilymphocyte antibodies (P = 0.02), rejection episodes (P = 0.003) and period of LT (P < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, 6 variables were independently associated with HCC recurrence: maximal diameter of the largest nodule (P < 0.0001), time of LT (P < 0.0001), tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001), use of anti-lymphocyte antibody (ATG) or anti-CD3 antibody (OKT3) (P = 0.005), preoperative portal thrombosis (P = 0.06) and the number of nodules (P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: This study identifies immunosuppression, through the use of ATG or OKT3, as a predictive factor of tumor

  10. MiR-422a promotes loco-regional recurrence by targeting NT5E/CD73 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, Nathalie; Armandy, Emma; Carras, Julien; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Aubry, Marc; Guihard, Sébastien; Meyronet, David; Foy, Jean-Philippe; Saintigny, Pierre; Ledrappier, Sonia; Jung, Alain; Rimokh, Ruth; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2016-07-12

    At the time of diagnosis, 60% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) present tumors in an advanced stage (III-IV) of disease and 80% will relapse within the first two years post-treatment, due to their frequent radio(chemo)resistance. To identify new molecular targets and companion biomarkers, we have investigated the miRNome of 75 stage III-IV oropharynx tumors without relapse (R) or with loco-regional relapse (non-responder, NR) within two years post-treatment. Interestingly, miR-422a was significantly downregulated in NR tumors, in agreement with the increase in cell proliferation and adhesion induced by miR-422a inhibition in vitro. Furthermore, we identified CD73/NT5E oncogene as target of miR-422a. Indeed, modulation of the endogenous level of miR-422a inversely influences the expression and the enzymatic activity of CD73. Moreover, knocking down CD73 mimics the effects of miR-422a upregulation. Importantly, in tumors, miR-422a and CD73 expression levels are inversely correlated, and both are predictive of relapse free survival - especially considering loco(regional) recurrence - in vitro two independent cohorts of advanced oropharynx or HNSCC (N=255) tumors. In all, we reported, for the first time, that MiR-422a and its target CD73 are involved in early loco(regional) recurrence of HNSCC tumors and are new targets for personalized medicine.

  11. Preoperative Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Is Associated with Cancer-Specific Survival and Recurrence-Free Survival of Nonmetastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma with Venous Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cheng; Xu, Ben; Fan, Yu; Yu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) on the subgroup of nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumor thrombus. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the institutional database and collected the medical data of 156 patients with nonmetastatic RCC with venous tumor thrombus between March 2004 and December 2014. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were applied to determine the prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival (CSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results. The median value and optimal cutoff point of preoperative GGT were 23.0 and 37.5 IU/L, respectively. In the entire cohort, 67 (42.9%) patients experienced disease recurrence, and 46 (29.5%) patients died. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the CSS and RFS rates were lower in patients with preoperative GGT ≥ 37.5 IU/L than in those with preoperative GGT < 37.5 IU/L. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis demonstrated that high preoperative GGT was significantly associated with shorter CSS (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.115; 95% CI: 1.164–3.843; p = 0.014) and RFS (HR: 1.955; 95% CI: 1.166–3.276; p = 0.011), after adjusting other covariates. Conclusions. Preoperative GGT can serve as an independent prognostic biomarker of nonmetastatic RCC patients with venous tumor thrombus. Further prospective study is warranted to confirm our results. PMID:28168196

  12. Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase 37, a novel predictor for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence, promotes cell migration and invasion via interacting and deubiquitinating PRP19.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Fu, Da; Tang, Wenqing; Cai, Yu; Ma, Duan; Wang, Huijun; Xue, Ruyi; Liu, Taotao; Huang, Xiaowu; Dong, Ling; Wu, Hao; Shen, Xizhong

    2013-03-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 37 (UCH37) plays a crucial role in numerous biological processes and is also involved in oncogenesis. In this study, clinicopathologic data showed that UCH37 was over-expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cancerous tissues and was a significant predictor for time to recurrence (TTR). In vitro, we discovered that UCH37 could promote cell migration and invasion. Subsequently, we utilized Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) to identify differentially expressed proteins in UCH37 over-expressing cells compared with the control cells, and found that PRP19, an essential RNA splicing factor, was up-regulated. The relationship between UCH37, PRP19 and the capability of cell migration and invasion was further confirmed. Collectively, this study demonstrated that UCH37 could promote cell migration and invasion in HCC cell lines through interacting and deubiquitinating PRP19, and suggested that UCH37 could be a novel predictor for HCC recurrence after curative resection.

  13. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  14. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  15. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  16. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. SU-E-J-265: Feasibility Study of Texture Analysis for Prognosis of Local Tumor Recurrence Within 5-Years for Pharyngeal-Laryngeal Carcinoma Patients Received Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W; Tu, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas (PLC) are among the top leading cancers in Asian populations. Typically the tumor may recur and progress in a short period of time if radiotherapy fails to deliver a successful treatment. Here we used image texture features extracted from images of computed tomography (CT) planning and conducted a retrospective study to evaluate whether texture analysis is a feasible approach to predict local tumor recurrence for PLC patients received radiotherapy treatment. Methods: CT planning images of 100 patients with PLC treated by radiotherapy at our facility between 2001 and 2010 are collected. These patients were received two separate CT scans, before and mid-course of the treatment delivery. Before the radiotherapy, a CT scanning was used for the first treatment planning. A total of 30 fractions were used in the treatment and patients were scanned with a second CT around the end of the fifteenth delivery for an adaptive treatment planning. Only patients who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy and RapidArc were selected. Treatment planning software of Eclipse was used. The changes of texture parameters between two CT acquisitions were computed to determine whether they were correlated to the local tumor recurrence. The following texture parameters were used in the preliminary assessment: mean, variance, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, energy, entropy, inverse difference moment, cluster shade, inertia, cluster prominence, gray-level co-occurrence matrix, and gray-level run-length matrix. The study was reviewed and approved by the committee of our institutional review board. Results: Our calculations suggested the following texture parameters were correlated with the local tumor recurrence: skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and inertia (p<0.0.05). Conclusion: The preliminary results were positive. However some works remain crucial to be completed, including addition of texture parameters for different image

  18. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC. PMID:27679545

  19. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian; Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  20. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Shida, Dai; Nasu, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Warabi, Masahiro; Inoue, Satoru

    2012-10-14

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, metastases to the penis are a rare event. A 57-year-old male, who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier, demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia. No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile lesion. Total penectomy was performed as a curative resection based on a diagnosis of isolated penile metastasis from rectal cancer. A histopathological examination revealed an increase of well differentiated adenocarcinoma in the corpus spongiosum consistent with his primary rectal tumor. The immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and negative staining for cytokeratin 7, which strongly supported a diagnosis of penile metastasis from the rectum. The patient is alive more than two years without any recurrence.

  1. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  2. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma AJCC v7

  4. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  5. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  6. Childhood Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Sara O

    2010-09-01

    Carcinoma in children differs from that occurring in adults. It is far rarer and represents only a small fraction of all pediatric cancer diagnoses. Pediatric sarcomas were among the first tumors in which recurrent chromosomal aberrations were discovered. Once defined, these recurrent aberrations, many of them translocations, became incorporated into the pathologist's diagnostic armamentarium. In the past several years, defining chromosomal rearrangements have been identified in pediatric carcinomas as well, and this has become a new frontier in pathologic diagnosis. This article provides an overview of pediatric carcinoma as well as a detailed review of selected types of carcinoma that in particular can present diagnostic difficulty to the practicing pathologist and illustrate new and emerging concepts in pediatric carcinoma.

  7. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Effectiveness of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT for localizing recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Nah, Kuk Young; Kim, Ra Mi; Oh, Yeon-Ju; An, Young-Sil; Yoon, Joon-Kee; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Soh, Euy-Young; Chung, Woong Youn

    2012-09-01

    Although the prognosis of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is generally encouraging, a diagnostic dilemma is posed when an increasing level of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is noted, without detection of a recurrent tumor using conventional imaging tools such as the iodine-131 whole-body scanning (the [(131)I] scan) or neck ultrasonography (US). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT in terms of accurate detection of both iodine- and non-iodine-avid recurrence, compared with that of conventional imaging such as the [(131)I] scan or neck ultrasonography (US). Between July 2009 and June 2010, we prospectively studied 19 DTC patients with elevated thyroglobulin levels but who do not show pathological lesions when conventional imaging modalities are used. All involved patients had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioiodine (RI) treatment, and who had been followed-up for a mean of 13 months (range, 6-21 months) after the last RI session. Combined [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT data were evaluated for detecting recurrent DTC lesions in study patients and compared with those of other radiological and/or cytological investigations. Nine of 19 patients (47.4%) showed pathological [(18)F]-FDG (5/19, 26.3%) or [(124)I]-PET (4/19, 21.1%) uptake, and were classed as true-positives. Among such patients, disease management was modified in six (66.7%) and disease was restaged in seven (77.8%). In particular, the use of the described imaging combination optimized planning of surgical resection to deal with locoregional recurrence in 21.1% (4/19) of patients, who were shown to be disease-free during follow-up after surgery. Our results indicate that combination of [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT affords a valuable diagnostic method that can be used to make therapeutic decisions in patients with DTC who are tumor-free on conventional imaging studies but who have high Tg levels.

  9. Talazoparib and HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Advanced Solid Tumor or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  10. Multi-institutional study of radiation therapy for isolated para-aortic lymph node recurrence in uterine cervical carcinoma: 84 subjects of a population of more than 5,000

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Yuzuru . E-mail: joe-n@hkg.odn.ne.jp; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Michimoto, Koichi; Takayama, Makoto; Yamauchi, Chikako; Kataoka, Masaaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Ii, Noriko; Uno, Takashi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Keiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tokumaru, Sunao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Most patients who had any recurrent sites of cancer have been considered to be in their last stage of life. However, recent advances of clinical research reveal some patients achieve long-term survival even in recurrence. Furthermore, for patients who had only one recurrent region, radiation therapy could play an important role. As for uterine cervical carcinoma, the most common recurrent site other than the pelvis is the para-aortic lymph nodes. Thus we conducted the current study. Patients and Methods: Between 1994 and 2003, more than 5,000 uterine cervical carcinoma patients were treated with curative intended treatments at 13 Japanese hospitals. Of these patients, 84 developed para-aortic lymph node recurrence as the only site of initial tumor progression. These patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy. Radiation therapy protocol was as follows: 1.7-2.0 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week, and the mean total dose was 50.8 Gy (25-60 Gy). Results: Three- and 5-year overall survival rates of all patients were 49.5% and 31.3%, respectively. Stratified by symptom sign, 3-year overall survival rate of symptom positive was 27.6% and those of the negative was 56.1% (p = 0.018). Three-year overall survival rates of the total dose {>=}51 Gy and that of {<=}50 Gy were 58.0% and 42.8%, respectively (p = 0.07). As for morbidity, no patients received Grade 3 or greater late toxicity. Conclusions: The current study suggested that radiation therapy for isolated para-aortic lymph node recurrence in uterine cervical carcinoma could have a significant impact on survival.

  11. Prognostic significance of extracapsular spread in isolated neck recurrences in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    León, Xavier; Rigó, Antoni; Farré, Nuria; López, Montserrat; García, Jacinto; de Juan, Julia; Quer, Miquel

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have analyzed the appearance of extracapsular spread (ECS) in salvage neck dissections carried out after regional recurrence of the disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of ECS in patients with an isolated regional recurrence treated with a salvage neck dissection, and to assess the influence of ECS on prognosis. We conducted a retrospective study of 123 patients treated with a salvage neck dissection. Eighty-two patients (66.7 %) had nodes with ECS. Five-year salvage-specific survival for patients without ECS was 77.2 %, whereas for patients with ECS it was 32.0 % (P = 0.0001). According to the results of a multivariate analysis, the presence of ECS in the salvage neck dissection was the only variable significantly related to the salvage-specific survival. Sixty-six percent of the patients with nodes with ECS had adjuvant treatment with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Five-year salvage-specific survival for patients with ECS who had not received adjuvant treatment (n = 26) was 15.2 %, whereas for patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (n = 39) or chemotherapy (n = 17), 5-year salvage-specific survival was 36.4 and 47.1 %, respectively. Patients with ECS could benefit from adjuvant treatment with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.

  12. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  13. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  14. Prognostic influence of histopathological regression patterns in rectal adenocarcinoma receiving neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Estrada Muñoz, Lourdes; Sastre Varela, Javier; Corona Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Díaz del Arco, Cristina; García Paredes, Beatriz; Córdoba Largo, Sofía; del Puerto Nevado, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is an important management strategy in rectal carcinoma. Different systems grading response have shown varying prognostic influence. Methods To analyze the prognostic influence of pathological response in a series of 183 patients with rectal carcinoma receiving neoadjuvant therapy. To determine the prognostic significance of the histopathological patterns of response. Results A total of 183 patients from two hospitals. The concordance rate between pathologists was good. In total, 18% of the patients showed grade 0 (complete response), 31.7% grade 1, 19.2% grade 2 and 31.1% grade 3 regression. T down-staging was found in 51.9% of the cases. 46 patients recurred and 18 died of disease (median follow-up time: 39 months). We found a statistically significant association between pathological response and pT stage and down-staging. Inflammatory reaction in the tumor bed was significantly associated to regression and prognosis. Cox’s multivariate analysis of survival revealed that down-staging and presence of mucin pools in the tumor bed behaved as significant predictors of recurrence and regression grade and mucin pools as significant predictors of survival. Conclusions Pathological response is an important surrogate marker of prognosis in some large series, but results are varying. There are many systems to grade regression and this makes it difficult to compare the results by different groups. It is important to report the specific pattern of response, for some of them may have prognostic relevance. We feel there is an urgent need to develop standarized protocols and employ a universal regression scheme if we intend to use this factor to guide therapy. PMID:28280608

  15. Somatic mutations of the ret Protooncogene in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma are not restricted to exon 16 and are associated with tumor recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Romei, C.; Elisei, R.; Pinchera, A.

    1996-04-01

    Germline point mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene have been identified as causative in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and in familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Somatic point mutations of the same gene, exclusively associated with codon 918 of exon 16, have also been reported in few cases of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma. We analyzed the blood and tumor DNA of 19 patients with sporadic MTC and 6 patients with primary parathyroid adenoma for point mutations at exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene by restriction analysis of the PCR-amplified product and by sequence analysis of exons 10 and 11. A Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Tyr mutation was found in both the tumoral and blood DNA of one patient, indicating that he was affected by an hereditary form of MTC, erroneously considered sporadic. In the other 18 patients with MTC, somatic point mutations of ret were found in 8 cases (44.4%). In 5 cases the mutation affected exon 16 (Met{sup 918}{r_arrow}Thr), and in 3 cases it affected exon 11 (Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Arg in 1 and Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Trp in 2); these 3 mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis. The remaining 10 patients had no mutation in exon 10 by either restriction analysis or sequence analysis. Clinical data showed that 75% of the patients whose tumor carried ret mutation had tumor recurrence and/or increased serum calcitonin concentrations during the postsurgical follow-up period as opposed to 10% of the patients without mutations (P < 0.02, by {chi}{sup 2} analysis). No ret mutation was found in the tumoral DNA from parathyroid adenomas. Our findings indicate that the somatic ret point mutation frequently found in sporadic MTC may affect not only exon 16 but also exon 11 and is associated with less favorable clinical outcome. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Atezolizumab and/or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity in Nonsmoking Women: A New and Unusual Complication of Chemotherapy for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dominic W.; Hirsch, David; Delacure, Mark; Downey, Andrea; Kerr, Alexander R.; Bannan, Michael; Andreopoulou, Eleni; Safra, Tamar; Muggia, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe occurrences of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients who had received long-term pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods. In our cohort of patients on maintenance PLD for ovarian and related mullerian epithelial malignancies, we encountered two patients with invasive SCC of the oral cavity (one of them multifocal) and one with high-grade squamous dysplasia. Review of patients at our institution receiving PLD for recurrent ovarian cancer identified three additional patients. The duration of treatment, cumulative PLD dose, human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity, BRCA status, stage at diagnosis, outcome, and other characteristics are reviewed. Results. All five cases were nonsmokers with no known risk factors for HPV and four were negative for p16 expression. Four of the patients had known BRCA mutations whereas one tested negative. Cumulative doses of PLD were >1,600 mg/m2 given over 30–132 months. Three had SCCs staged as T1N0 oral tongue, alveolar ridge (gingival), and multifocal oral mucosa; one had a T2N0 oral tongue; and one had dysplasia. After excision, two were given radiation but recurred shortly thereafter; the others remain well and have had no further exposure to cytotoxic drugs, including PLD. Conclusion. Awareness of this possible long-term complication during PLD treatment should enhance the likelihood of early detection of oral lesions in these patients. Decisions to continue maintenance PLD after complete response of the original cancer should perhaps consider the benefits of delaying ovarian cancer recurrence versus the possible risk for a secondary cancer. PMID:22622148

  18. MiR-422a promotes loco-regional recurrence by targeting NT5E/CD73 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, Nathalie; Armandy, Emma; Carras, Julien; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Aubry, Marc; Guihard, Sébastien; Meyronet, David; Foy, Jean-Philippe; Saintigny, Pierre; Ledrappier, Sonia; Jung, Alain; Rimokh, Ruth; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    At the time of diagnosis, 60% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) present tumors in an advanced stage (III-IV) of disease and 80% will relapse within the first two years post-treatment, due to their frequent radio(chemo)resistance. To identify new molecular targets and companion biomarkers, we have investigated the miRNome of 75 stage III-IV oropharynx tumors without relapse (R) or with loco-regional relapse (non-responder, NR) within two years post-treatment. Interestingly, miR-422a was significantly downregulated in NR tumors, in agreement with the increase in cell proliferation and adhesion induced by miR-422a inhibition in vitro. Furthermore, we identified CD73/NT5E oncogene as target of miR-422a. Indeed, modulation of the endogenous level of miR-422a inversely influences the expression and the enzymatic activity of CD73. Moreover, knocking down CD73 mimics the effects of miR-422a upregulation. Importantly, in tumors, miR-422a and CD73 expression levels are inversely correlated, and both are predictive of relapse free survival - especially considering loco(regional) recurrence - in vitro two independent cohorts of advanced oropharynx or HNSCC (N=255) tumors. In all, we reported, for the first time, that MiR-422a and its target CD73 are involved in early loco(regional) recurrence of HNSCC tumors and are new targets for personalized medicine. PMID:27281619

  19. Integrated analysis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma identifies key variants and pathways linked to risk habits, HPV, clinical parameters and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Neeraja; Gupta, Saurabh; Palve, Vinayak; Varghese, Linu; Pattnaik, Swetansu; Jain, Prach; Khyriem, Costerwell; Hariharan, Arun; Dhas, Kunal; Nair, Jayalakshmi; Pareek, Manisha; Prasad, Venkatesh; Siddappa, Gangotri; Suresh, Amritha; Kekatpure, Vikram; Kuriakose, Moni; Panda, Binay

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCC) are a homogeneous group of tumors characterized by aggressive behavior, early spread to lymph nodes and a higher rate of regional failure. Additionally, the incidence of OTSCC among younger population (<50yrs) is on the rise; many of whom lack the typical associated risk factors of alcohol and/or tobacco exposure. We present data on single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, regions with loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and copy number variations (CNVs) from fifty-paired oral tongue primary tumors and link the significant somatic variants with clinical parameters, epidemiological factors including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor recurrence. Apart from the frequent somatic variants harbored in TP53, CASP8, RASA1, NOTCH and CDKN2A genes, significant amplifications and/or deletions were detected in chromosomes 6-9, and 11 in the tumors. Variants in CASP8 and CDKN2A were mutually exclusive. CDKN2A, PIK3CA, RASA1 and DMD variants were exclusively linked to smoking, chewing, HPV infection and tumor stage. We also performed a whole-genome gene expression study that identified matrix metalloproteases to be highly expressed in tumors and linked pathways involving arachidonic acid and NF-k-B to habits and distant metastasis, respectively. Functional knockdown studies in cell lines demonstrated the role of CASP8 in a HPV-negative OTSCC cell line. Finally, we identified a 38-gene minimal signature that predicts tumor recurrence using an ensemble machine-learning method. Taken together, this study links molecular signatures to various clinical and epidemiological factors in a homogeneous tumor population with a relatively high HPV prevalence. PMID:26834999

  20. Sorafenib therapy following resection prolongs disease-free survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma at a high risk of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yadi; Zheng, Yun; He, Wei; Li, Qijiong; Shen, Jingxian; Hong, Jian; Zou, Ruhai; Qiu, Jiliang; Li, Binkui; Yuan, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is the standard systemic treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, its therapeutic value in patients with HCC following resection remains controversial. The current retrospective study was undertaken to assess the effects of sorafenib treatment following surgical resection in patients with advanced HCC disease who were at a high risk for recurrence. Between July 2010 and July 2013, a consecutive cohort of 42 patients with advanced HCC and at a high risk of recurrence (i.e., those with portal vein tumor thrombosis, adjacent organ involvement or tumor rupture) who underwent resection were analyzed. The patients were categorized into the sorafenib group (n=14) or the best supportive care (BSC) group (n=28). Although the histological grade, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stage, tumor size, nodule number and proportion of patients with high serum α-fetoprotein levels were comparable between the sorafenib and BSC groups, those receiving sorafenib following resection had significantly longer disease-free survival (DFS) of 5.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2–9.2 months] compared with the BSC group [1.8 months (95% CI, 0.6–3.0 months)]. No differences in overall survival were noted between the groups. Furthermore, no drug-related adverse events resulted in discontinuation of sorafenib therapy. Univariate log-rank analysis revealed that sorafenib treatment (P=0.002) and treatment prior to resection (P=0.012) were significantly associated with longer DFS; however, sorafenib therapy (P=0.027) and tumor size (P=0.028) were associated with longer DFS by multivariate analysis. Furthermore, sorafenib was well-tolerated and improved DFS in patients with advanced HCC who underwent hepatic resection. Thus, tumor resection followed by sorafenib therapy may represent an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with advanced HCC. This possibility should be confirmed in larger, multicenter studies. PMID:28356989

  1. A Retrospective Comparison of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for the Reirradiation of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yazici, Gozde; Yildiz, Ferah; Gurkaynak, Murat; Zorlu, Faruk; Yildiz, Demet; Hosal, Sefik; Gullu, Ibrahim; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We assessed therapeutic outcomes of reirradiation with robotic stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LRNPC) patients and compared those results with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with or without brachytherapy (BRT). Methods and Materials: Treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively in 51 LRNPC patients receiving either robotic SBRT (24 patients) or CRT with or without BRT (27 patients) in our department. CRT was delivered with a 6-MV linear accelerator, and a median total reirradiation dose of 57 Gy in 2 Gy/day was given. Robotic SBRT was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Patients in the SBRT arm received 30 Gy over 5 consecutive days. We calculated actuarial local control and cancer-specific survival rates for the comparison of treatment outcomes in SBRT and CRT arms. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 was used for toxicity evaluation. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months for all patients. Two-year actuarial local control rates were 82% and 80% for SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.6). Two-year cancer-specific survival rates were 64% and 47% for the SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.4). Serious late toxicities (Grade 3 and above) were observed in 21% of patients in the SBRT arm, whereas 48% of patients had serious toxicity in the CRT arm (p = 0.04). Fatal complications occurred in three patients (12.5%) of the SBRT arm, and four patients (14.8%) of the CRT arm (p = 0.8). T stage at recurrence was the only independent predictor for local control and survival. Conclusion: Our robotic SBRT protocol seems to be feasible and less toxic in terms of late effects compared with CRT arm for the reirradiation of LRNPC patients.

  2. Recurrent Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Pleural Metastasis Diagnosed by Effusion Cytology: A Report of Cases with Clinicopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Reid I; Sumida, Lauren C; Lum, Christopher AK

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is typically an indolent disease characterized by slow growth and a favorable prognosis. In rare instances, this disease may metastasize to the pleura and manifest as a malignant pleural effusion. We report 3 female patients of Japanese/Okinawan ancestry with a history of PTC who presented with hydrothorax. Cytologic examination in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining enabled a definitive diagnosis of metastatic PTC. Molecular analysis of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways demonstrated the presence of the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF)V600E mutation in 2 of our 3 patients, with the absence of any other clinically significant mutations in all cases. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular and environmental mechanisms involved in this aggressive manifestation of PTC. PMID:25755913

  3. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion following irinotecan-cisplatin administration as a treatment for recurrent ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Youn; Han, Gwan Hee; Ulak, Roshani; Ki, Kyung Do; Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Seon Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) has various causes including central nervous system disorders, pulmonary and endocrine diseases, paraneoplastic syndromes, and use of certain drugs. SIADH induced by chemotherapy with irinotecan-cisplatin is not a common complication. Here, we review a case of SIADH after treatment with irinotecan-cisplatin. A 45-year-old woman received adjuvant chemotherapy (paclitaxel-carboplatin) for ovarian clear cell carcinoma, but the cancer recurred within 9 months of chemotherapy. Subsequently, a second line of combination chemotherapy containing irinotecan-cisplatin was initiated. However, 5 days after chemotherapy administration, her general condition began to deteriorate; her hematological tests revealed hyponatremia. Therefore, it is imperative to consider the possibility of SIADH in patients being treated with irinotecan-cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Proper monitoring of serum sodium levels and assessment of clinical symptoms should be performed in such patients for early diagnosis and prompt management.

  4. Basal cell carcinoma of the nipple in male patients with gastric cancer recurrence: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Shinsuke; Kikuchi, Nobuyuki; Miura, Takashi; Anami, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Hashimoto, Takafumi; Moroga, Toshihiko; Akizuki, Shin-ichiro; Kamei, Mirei; Suehiro, Shuji; Yamashita, Shin-ichi; Kawahara, Katsunobu

    2014-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common dermatological malignancy arising from sun exposed skin, BCC of the nipple is extremely rare. To our knowledge only 34 cases have been reported. We report a 78-year-old man who was undergoing chemotherapy for liver metastasis of gastric cancer 1 year after surgery. The chief complaint was exudation and oozing from the nipple. A mass lesion was palpable and detected on mammography and enhanced computed tomography, and atypical cells were detected on cytological examination. Simple resection was performed because histopathological diagnosis of an intraoperative frozen section revealed BCC. Final pathological diagnosis was also BCC. The authors report this case and review the previous reports, and discuss the clinicopathologic characteristics and adequate treatment for this disease.

  5. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion following irinotecan-cisplatin administration as a treatment for recurrent ovarian clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Do Youn; Han, Gwan Hee; Ulak, Roshani; Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Seon Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) has various causes including central nervous system disorders, pulmonary and endocrine diseases, paraneoplastic syndromes, and use of certain drugs. SIADH induced by chemotherapy with irinotecan-cisplatin is not a common complication. Here, we review a case of SIADH after treatment with irinotecan-cisplatin. A 45-year-old woman received adjuvant chemotherapy (paclitaxel-carboplatin) for ovarian clear cell carcinoma, but the cancer recurred within 9 months of chemotherapy. Subsequently, a second line of combination chemotherapy containing irinotecan-cisplatin was initiated. However, 5 days after chemotherapy administration, her general condition began to deteriorate; her hematological tests revealed hyponatremia. Therefore, it is imperative to consider the possibility of SIADH in patients being treated with irinotecan-cisplatin–based chemotherapy. Proper monitoring of serum sodium levels and assessment of clinical symptoms should be performed in such patients for early diagnosis and prompt management. PMID:28217682

  6. Brivanib Alaninate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  7. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  8. Rectal and appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Sanae, Shahram; Nikkhoo, Bahram

    2006-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are neoplasms characterized by spindle cell proliferation and a fiboinflammatory vascular stroma. Herein, we presented the successful treatment of a rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an 11-year-old boy who presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain of 1(1/2) months duration and an appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a 29-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain of two months duration with associated tenderness and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Histologically, our cases had inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors very similar to that of other sites; the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and muscle-specific actin.

  9. Total mesorectal excision and management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Ilia; Phang, P Terry

    2007-10-01

    Treatment of rectal cancer over the last two decades has evolved with changes in techniques of surgery and radiation based on national and international trials. Preoperative adjuvant radiation is now preferred over postoperative adjuvant radiation, and total mesorectal excision with preservation of pelvic nerves is the gold standard for surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Preservation of the anal sphincter without compromising oncological outcome is an additional benefit for patients with carcinoma in the distal rectum. Further progress in imaging and a multidisciplinary team approach will facilitate individualization of treatment strategy with more focus on quality of life.

  10. Molecular, Pathologic and MRI Investigation of the Prognostic and Redictive Importance of Extramural Venous Invasion in Rectal Cancer (MARVEL) Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Diseases; Colorectal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases

  11. Clinicopathologic and molecular features of sporadic early-onset colorectal adenocarcinoma: an adenocarcinoma with frequent signet ring cell differentiation, rectal and sigmoid involvement, and adverse morphologic features.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel T; Pai, Rish K; Rybicki, Lisa A; Dimaio, Michael A; Limaye, Maneesha; Jayachandran, Priya; Koong, Albert C; Kunz, Pamela A; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Welton, Mark; Shelton, Andrew; Ma, Lisa; Arber, Daniel A; Pai, Reetesh K

    2012-08-01

    carcinoma group compared with the control group (19/55, 35% vs 39/73, 53%, P=0.034). Of the early-onset colorectal carcinomas, only 2/45 cases (4%) demonstrated KRAS mutations compared with 11/73 (15%) of the control group colorectal adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.13). BRAF V600E mutations were not identified in the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group. No difference was identified between the two groups with regard to tumor stage, tumor size, number of lymph node metastases, lymphatic invasion, tumor budding, mucinous histology, or tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Both groups had similar recurrence-free (P=0.28) and overall survival (P=0.73). However, patients in the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group more frequently either presented with or developed metastatic disease during their disease course compared with the control colorectal carcinoma group (25/55, 45% vs 18/73, 25%, P=0.014). In addition, 8/55 patients (15%) in the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group developed local recurrence of their tumor while no patients in the control colorectal carcinoma group developed local recurrence (P<0.001), likely due to the increased incidence of rectal carcinoma in the patients with early-onset colorectal carcinoma. Our study demonstrates that colorectal carcinoma is not infrequently diagnosed in patients ≤40 years of age and is not frequently the result of underlying Lynch syndrome or associated with other cancer-predisposing genetic conditions or chronic inflammatory conditions. These tumors have a striking predilection for the distal colon, particularly the sigmoid colon and rectum and are much more likely to demonstrate adverse histologic factors, including signet ring cell differentiation, venous invasion, and perineural invasion.

  12. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  13. Does elective neck dissection in T1/T2 carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth influence recurrence and survival rates?

    PubMed

    Kelner, Natalie; Vartanian, José Guilherme; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Coutinho-Camillo, Cláudia Malheiros; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of elective neck dissection compared with observation (control group) in selected cases of early carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth. It was a retrospective analysis of 222 patients who had the tumour resected (161 also had elective neck dissection). Occult lymph node metastases were detected in 33/161 (21%), and neck recurrences were diagnosed in 10 of the 61 patients in the control group (16%). Occult lymph node metastases reduced the 5-year disease-specific survival from 90% to 65% (p=0.001) and it was 96% among the controls. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 85% in the group treated by neck dissection and 96% in the observation group (p=0.09). Rigorous follow-up of selected low risk patients is associated with high rates of salvage, and overall survival was similar to the observed survival in patients treated by elective neck dissection. Observation is a reasonable option in the treatment of selected patients.

  14. [An effective case of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy based on biochemical modulation for hepatic recurrence of non-functioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Nishijima, K; Ohta, T; Elnemr, A; Yi, S; Ninomiya, I; Kitagawa, H; Fushida, S; Nishimura, G; Fujimura, T; Kayahara, M; Shimizu, K; Miwa, K

    2000-10-01

    A 55-year-old man had a metastasis in segment 3 of the liver 5 months after surgery for non-functioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. The metastatic lesion increased in size in a short period, and other liver micro-metastases that could not be detected by imaging may exist, so hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was scheduled for 3 months. The patient underwent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (250 mg/day/body for 5 days/week) and adriamycin (10 mg/day/body for 2 days/week) and cisplatin (10 mg/day/body for 5 days/week) and he was put on Leucovorin 30 mg/day as a biochemical modulator of 5-FU and tamoxifen 40 mg/day as a biochemical modulator of ADM. A total 6,000 mg of 5-FU, 100 mg of ADM and 240 mg of CDDP had been administered, until hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was discontinued because of complicated gastric ulcer. Three months later, the size of the metastatic liver tumor was reduced remarkably and no other metastasis was detected on CT scan, so he underwent partial hepatectomy of the metastatic lesion. No recurrence was found and he has survived in good physical condition during the follow-up period of 5 months after the second operation.

  15. Changes in serum thyroglobulin antibody levels as a dynamic prognostic factor for early-phase recurrence of thyroglobulin antibody-positive papillary thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Osamu; Miyauchi, Akira; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Ayako; Yabuta, Tomonori; Masuoka, Hiroo; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Higashiyama, Takuya; Kihara, Minoru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Miya, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that dynamic prognostic markers such as the thyroglobulin (Tg)-doubling time in thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb)-negative papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and changes in pre- and postoperative TgAb levels in TgAb-positive PTC patients more keenly reflect patients' prognosis than conventional static prognostic factors. Here we investigated periodic changes in TgAb levels in 513 TgAb-positive PTC patients who underwent total thyroidectomy. The TgAb levels at 1 year after surgery decreased to <50% of the preoperative values in 407 (79%) patients, and the remaining 106 (21%) patients showed no decrease in TgAb. In 426 patients, TgAb was also measured more than 1 year after surgery. Compared with their TgAb levels 1 year after surgery, 59 patients (14%) showed an increase in TgAb levels of >20% during the follow-up. The postoperative Tg levels at 1 year after surgery remained positive in 44 (9%) patients despite their TgAb positivity. To date (median follow-up period 35 months), 12 of the 426 patients (3%) showed PTC recurrence, and 11 of these patients showed either or both a TgAb elevation later than 1 year after surgery and postoperative Tg positivity. Although further studies with longer follow-ups are necessary, we can conclude that changes in postoperative TgAb levels may be usable as a surrogate tumor marker for TgAb-positive PTC patients after total thyroidectomy.

  16. Galectin-1 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Local Recurrence and Survival After Definitive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao; Wang, Chung-Chi; Wang, Chong-Jong; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of galectin-1 in patients with cervical cancer after definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 154 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma. Patients underwent curative-intent radiation therapy. Paraffin-embedded tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry staining for galectin-1. The rates of cancer-specific survival (CSS), local recurrence (LR), and distant metastasis were compared among patient tissue samples with no, weak, and strong galectin-1 expression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Results: The areas under the curve for the intracellular expression scores of galectin-1 for both LR and CSS were significantly higher than those for stromal expression. There were no significant differences in the demographic data, such as stage and serum tumor markers, between patients with and without intracellular expression of galectin-1 in cancer tissue samples. Using multivariate analyses, the hazard ratios of LR and CSS were 2.60 (95% CI 1.50-4.52) (P=.001) and 1.94 (95% CI 1.18-3.19) (P=.010), respectively. Conclusion: Galectin-1 is an independent prognostic factor associated with LR and CSS in stage I-II cervical cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. Further studies targeting galectin-1 may improve the local control of cervical cancer.

  17. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  18. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  19. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  20. Study to Determine Adequate Margins in Radiotherapy Planning for Esophageal Carcinoma by Detailing Patterns of Recurrence After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Button, Michael R. Morgan, Carys A.; Croydon, Elizabeth S.; Roberts, S. Ashley; Crosby, Thomas D.L.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the adequacy of radiotherapy (RT) margins by studying the relapse patterns after definitive chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study assessing the first site of disease relapse after definitive chemoradiotherapy that included four 3-weekly cycles of cisplatin and continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, with conformal RT (50 Gy in 25 fractions) concurrent with Cycles 3 and 4. The RT planning target volume was the endoscopic ultrasonography/computed tomography-defined gross tumor volume with 1.5-cm lateral and 3-cm superoinferior margins. Results: A total of 145 patients were included. Their average age was 65.4 years, 45% had adenocarcinoma, 61% had lower third esophageal tumors, and 75% had Stage III-IVA disease. After RT, of 142 patients, 85 (60%) had evidence of relapse at a median follow-up of 18 months. The relapse was local (within the RT field) in 55; distant (metastatic) in 13, and a combination of local and distant in 14. The local relapse rates were not influenced by tumor stage, lymph node status, or disease length. Three patients developed a relapse in regions adjacent to the RT fields; however, it is unlikely that larger field margins would have been clinically acceptable or effective in these cases. The median overall survival was 15 months. Conclusion: The gross tumor volume-planning target volume margins in this study appeared adequate. Future efforts to improve outcomes using definitive chemoradiotherapy should be directed toward reducing the high rates of in-field and distant relapses.

  1. [Combination chemotherapy composed of mFOLFOX 6, FOLFIRI 2 and surgery and radiation therapy for locoregional recurrences and multiple lung metastases from rectal cancer--a case report].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hidefumi; Kitahara, Masahiro; Kanekiyo, Shinsuke; Tada, Kosuke; Katayama, Setsu

    2008-07-01

    A 61-year-old man underwent amputation of the rectum for advanced lower rectal cancer in April 2005. UFT-E granules were administered orally daily at 400 mg/body/day following surgery. He developed perineal pain and perineal discharges following an increase the CEA level in April 2006. PET revealed a tumor in the perineum and multiple lung metastases. Chemotherapy with mFOLFOX 6 for 8 courses and FOLFIRI 2 for 4 courses were administered since July in 2006. Although CT revealed a the reduction in multiple lung metastases, CEA was increased to over a maximum 109, high fever continued and the pinealtumor was enlarged in December 2006. The patient underwent resection of the perinealmass, but he developed perinealsevere pain and perinealdischarge. So radiotherapy of the pelvic region was given at a total dose of 40 Gy(given 2 Gy each fragment)followed by administration of FOLFIRI 2 for 12 courses. After chemoradiotherapy, the CEA level was remarkably decreased. PET could not detect any mass in lung fields and revealed a little accumulation in the pelvic region. Chemotherapy with FOLFIRI 2 is administered monthly now, and the CEA level has been within the normal range since July of 2007. The pineal pain and pineal discharge disappeared, so the quality of life has improved dramatically.

  2. Unique considerations in the patient with rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-08-01

    In the past two decades, substantial progress has been made in the adjuvant management of colorectal cancer. Chemotherapy has improved overall survival in patients with node-positive (N+) disease. In contrast with colon cancer, which has a low incidence of local recurrence, patients with rectal cancer have a higher incidence requiring the addition of pelvic radiation therapy (chemoradiation). Patients with rectal cancer have a number of unique management considerations: for example, the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? This review will address these and other controversies specific to patients with rectal cancer.

  3. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  4. Continuous-Course Reirradiation With Concurrent Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Locally Recurrent, Nonmetastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head-and-Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Choong, Nicholas; Wang, Dian; Firat, Selim; Schultz, Christopher; Sadasiwan, Chitra; Wong, Stuart

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy and toxicity of continuous-course, conformal reirradiation with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent, nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in a previously irradiated field. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with continuous course-reirradiation with concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Clement J. Zablocki VA from 2001 through 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included in the analysis had prior radiation at the site of recurrence of at least 45 Gy. The analysis included patients who received either intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) or three-dimensional conformal RT techniques. All patients received weekly concurrent carboplatin (AUC2) and paclitaxel (30-50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Thirty-eight patients with nonmetastatic SCCHN met the entry criteria for analysis. The primary sites at initial diagnosis were oropharyngeal or laryngeal in most patients (66%). Median reirradiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 54-70 Gy). Acute toxicity included Grade 2 neutropenia (5%), Grade 3 neutropenia (15%), and Grade 1/2 thrombocytopenia (8%). No deaths occurred from hematologic toxicity. Chemotherapy doses held (50%) was more prevalent than radiation treatment break (8%). Sixty-eight percent of patients required a gastrostomy tube in follow-up. Significant late toxicity was experienced in 6 patients (16%): 1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 pharyngocutaneous fistula, 3 with osteoradionecrosis, and 1 patient with a lingual artery bleed. Patients treated with three-dimensional conformal RT had more frequent significant late toxicites than patients treated with intensity-modulated RT (44% and 7% respectively, p < 0.05). The median time to progression was 7 months and progression-free rates at 1, 2, and 5 years was 44%, 34%, and 29% respectively. The median overall survival was 16 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 54

  5. Association of global levels of histone modifications with recurrence-free survival in stage IIB and III esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Joungho; Park, Joobae; Kim, Kwhanmien; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Shim, Young Mog

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the effects of histone modifications on recurrence-free survival (RFS) after esophagectomy in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The acetylation of histone H3 lysine (H3K9Ac), histone H3 lysine 18 (H3K18Ac), and histone H4 lysine 12 (H4K12Ac), and the dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9diMe) and histone H4 arginine 3 (H4R3diMe) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 237 ESCCs. The K-means clustering algorithm was used to identify unique patterns of histone modifications. At a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 109 (46%) of 237 patients had developed recurrence of disease. Mean global levels of H3K9Ac, H3K18Ac, H3K9diMe, H4K12Ac, and H4R3diMe were 81.5%, 65.1%, 80.3%, 45.9%, and 27.4%, respectively. In the analysis of individual histones, a 1% increase in the global level of H3K18Ac in pathologic stage III worsened RFS at 1.009 times [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.001-1.016; P = 0.03], after adjusting for age, sex, and operative method. Cluster analysis also showed significant effects of histone modifications on RFS. For stage IIB cancers, Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that RFS of cluster 1, with high global levels of H3K18Ac and H4R3diMe, was 2.79 times poorer (95% CI, 1.14-6.27; P = 0.008) than that of cluster 2, with low levels. RFS for stage III cancers was also poorer in cluster 1 than cluster 2 (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.10-5.34; P = 0.02). In conclusion, the present study suggests that global levels of histone modifications in ESCC may be an independent prognostic factor of RFS.

  6. Soy Isoflavones in Preventing Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  7. Olaparib and Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; High Grade Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  8. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  9. Metachronous bilateral isolated adrenal metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jabir, H; Tawfiq, N; Moukhlissi, M; Akssim, M; Guensi, A; Kadiri, B; Bouchbika, Z; Taleb, A; Benchekroun, N; Jouhadi, H; Sahraoui, S; Zamiati, S; Benider, A

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of adrenal metastasis from colorectal cancer in a 54-year-old woman. Nine months after resection for advanced rectal carcinoma, a computed tomography scan revealed bilateral adrenal metastasis. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen was normal. A bilateral adrenalectomy was performed after chemotherapy. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. Adrenal metastasis should be considered in the patients' follow-up for colorectal cancer.

  10. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  11. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Intermittent Hepatic Inflow Occlusion During Partial Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Does Not Shorten Overall Survival or Increase the Likelihood of Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiwei; Tang, Wei; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Bertens, Kimberly A.; Wu, Hong; Liao, Mingheng; Li, Jiaxin; Zeng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To investigate whether the long-term outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was adversely impacted by intermittent hepatic inflow occlusion (HIO) during hepatic resection. Methods: 1549 HCC patients who underwent hepatic resection between 1998 and 2008 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Intermittent HIO was performed in 931 patients (HIO group); of which 712 patients had a Pringle maneuver as the mechanism for occlusion (PM group), and 219 patients had selective hemi-hepatic occlusion (SO group). There were 618 patients that underwent partial hepatectomy without occlusion (occlusion-free, OF group). Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5- year overall survival (OS) rates were 79%, 59%, and 42% in the HIO group, and 83%, 53%, and 35% in the OF group, respectively. The corresponding recurrence free survival (RFS) rates were 68%, 39%, and 22% in the HIO group, and 74%, 41%, and 18% in the OF group, respectively. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in OS or RFS (P = 0.325 and P = 0.416). Subgroup analysis showed patients with blood loss over 3000 mL and those requiring transfusion suffered significantly shorter OS and RFS. Blood loss over 3000 mL and blood transfusion were independent risk factors to OS and RFS. Conclusions: The application of intermittent HIO (PM and SO) during hepatic resection did not adversely impact either OS or RFS in patients with HCC. Intermittent HIO is still a valuable tool in hepatic resection, because high intraoperative blood loss resulting in transfusion is associated with a reduction in both OS and RFS. PMID:25526466

  13. Clinical benefit of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma resistant to cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya M; Daly, Kristin; Oppelt, Peter; Adkins, Douglas

    2017-02-01

    The clinical benefit of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RM-HNSCC) that progressed on other taxanes (cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel) is unknown. A retrospective analysis of patients treated at a single institution with nab-paclitaxel for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The exploratory hypothesis was that nab-paclitaxel would result in clinical benefit (tumor response) in patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. Twelve patients who were treated with nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC and met all eligibility criteria were identified. The majority of patients (n = 9; 75%) received three or more lines of therapy for RM-HNSCC. All patients had platin-resistant, and ten patients (83%) had cetuximab-resistant disease. Patients had RM-HNSCC that progressed on cremophor-based paclitaxel (8), docetaxel (1), or both (3). With prior taxane, the best tumor response was partial (PR) in 4 patients (33%), stable (SD) in 3 (25%), and progression in 5 (42%). The median time-to-progression (TTP) with prior taxane was 1.7 (range 0.7-9.0) months. The median interval from last dose of taxane to first dose of nab-paclitaxel was 3 (0.7-31.3) months. With nab-paclitaxel, tumor response occurred in two patients (17%; PR in both) and disease control (PR and SD) occurred in five (42%). Median TTP with nab-paclitaxel was 2.1 months (range 0.6-6.2), and median overall survival was 4.9 months (range 1.9-13.5). nab-Paclitaxel provided clinical benefit in some patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The median TTP with nab-paclitaxel and with prior taxane were similar. This exploratory observation warrants further investigation in prospective studies.

  14. Recurrent rearrangements of the Myb/SANT-like DNA-binding domain containing 3 gene (MSANTD3) in salivary gland acinic cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, Nicholas; Gong, Xue; Kwei, Kevin A.; Varma, Sushama; Biscocho, Jewison; Qu, Kunbin; Xiao, Nan; Lipsick, Joseph S.; Pelham, Robert J.; West, Robert B.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic gene fusions have been identified in several histologic types of salivary gland neoplasia, but not previously in acinic cell carcinoma (AcCC). To discover novel gene fusions, we performed whole-transcriptome sequencing surveys of three AcCC archival cases. In one specimen we identified a novel HTN3-MSANTD3 gene fusion, and in another a novel PRB3-ZNF217 gene fusion. The structure of both fusions was consistent with the promoter of the 5’ partner (HTN3 or PRB3), both highly expressed salivary gland genes, driving overexpression of full-length MSANTD3 or ZNF217. By fluorescence in situ hybridization of an expanded AcCC case series, we observed MSANTD3 rearrangements altogether in 3 of 20 evaluable cases (15%), but found no additional ZNF217 rearrangements. MSANTD3 encodes a previously uncharacterized Myb/SANT domain-containing protein. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated diffuse nuclear MSANTD3 expression in 8 of 27 AcCC cases (30%), including the three cases with MSANTD3 rearrangement. MSANTD3 displayed heterogeneous expression in normal salivary ductal epithelium, as well as among other histologic types of salivary gland cancer though without evidence of translocation. In a broader survey, MSANTD3 showed variable expression across a wide range of normal and neoplastic human tissue specimens. In preliminary functional studies, engineered MSANTD3 overexpression in rodent salivary gland epithelial cells did not enhance cell proliferation, but led to significant upregulation of gene sets involved in protein synthesis. Our findings newly identify MSANTD3 rearrangement as a recurrent event in salivary gland AcCC, providing new insight into disease pathogenesis, and identifying a putative novel human oncogene. PMID:28212443

  15. Microcalcifications in 1657 Patients with Pure Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast: Correlation with Clinical, Histopathologic, Biologic Features and Local Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Gaiane M.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Scoggins, Marion E.; Benveniste, Ana P.; Park, Young Mi; Caudle, Abigail S.; Fox, Patricia S.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Adrada, Beatriz E.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Yang, Wei T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship of microcalcification morphology and distribution with clinical, histopathologic, biologic features and local recurrence (LR) in patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Methods All patients with pure DCIS who underwent preoperative mammography at our institution from 1996 through 2009 were identified. Mammographic findings were classified according to the ACR BI-RADS lexicon. Associations between mammographic findings and clinical, histopathologic, biologic characteristics and LR were analyzed. Statistical inference used multiple logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age and confounding due to bias from nonrandomized selection of radiation therapy. Results We identified 1657 patients with microcalcifications visualized on mammography. The mean age at diagnosis was 55 years (SD, 11). The mean follow-up was 7 years (range, 1–16). Ipsilateral LR was 4% in segmentectomy (987) and 1.5% in mastectomy (670) patients. Increased LR risk was seen in patients with dense breast tissue (p<0.05) and larger DCIS size (p<0.01). Radiation therapy was associated with a 2.8-fold decrease in the LR risk. Fine linear (branching) microcalcifications were associated with 5.2-fold increase in LR. Extremely dense breast tissue was associated with positive/close margins (p=0.04) and multicentricity (p<0.01). Younger women were more likely to have extremely dense breast tissue (p<0.0001), multicentric disease (p<0.0004), and undergo mastectomy (p<0.0001). Conclusions Dense breast tissue, large DCIS size, and fine linear (branching) microcalcifications were associated with increased LR, yet overall LR rates remained low. Extremely dense breast tissue was a risk factor for multicentricity and positive margins in DCIS. PMID:26416712

  16. Bladder and rectal complications following radiotherapy for cervix cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.; Velkley, D.E.; Cunningham, D.E.; Mortel, R.; Craycraft, G.; Shafer, J.

    1988-01-01

    One-hundred and thirty-two patients with cervix carcinoma who were treated with whole pelvis irradiation and two intracavitary applications had bladder and rectal dosimetry during brachytherapy with contrast agents placed into the bladder and rectum prior to orthogonal simulator radiographs. Doses were computer calculated at points A and B, F (bladder), R1 (rectum), and R2 (rectosigmoid). Late occurring bladder and rectal complications were graded on a severity scale of 1 to 3, and 14% had grade 2 or 3 injuries (9% developed fistulas). Statistical evaluation of the data showed that severe bladder and rectal injuries occur more commonly in stage IIIA and IIIB disease and in those receiving high external beam doses (5000 rad +). Analysis of variance tests revealed a significant correlation of brachytherapy dose to points R1 and R2 with severe rectal injuries but there was not a correlation of dose to F with bladder injuries. Nor was there correlation of injuries with dose to point A or the milligram-hour dose. We conclude that our technique for rectal dosimetry is adequate but that an improved technique of bladder dosimetry is needed. Also, when combining whole pelvis irradiation with two intracavitary applications (4000 rad to point A), the whole pelvis dose should probably not exceed 4000-4500 rad.

  17. Intraperitoneal Bortezomib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  18. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib or Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Resistant or -Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Deleterious BRCA1 Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  20. Recurrent recurrent gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Z; Ahmed, M S; Alexander, D J; Miller, G V; Chintapatla, S

    2010-07-01

    We describe the second reported case of three consecutive episodes of gallstone ileus and ask the question whether recurrent gallstone ileus justifies definitive surgery to the fistula itself or can be safely managed by repeated enterotomies.

  1. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  2. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  3. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  4. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  5. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Results of radical surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Heald, R J; Karanjia, N D

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the hypothesis that a reduction in the distal mural margin during anterior resection for sphincter conservation in rectal cancer excision is safe, provided total mesorectal excision is undertaken with wash-out of the clamped rectum. One hundred ninety-two patients underwent anterior resection and 21 (less than 10%) patients underwent abdomino-perineal excision (APE) by one surgeon (RJH). Anterior resections were classified as "curative" (79%) and "non-curative" (21%); in the "curative" sub-group less than 4% of patients developed local recurrence. The series was retrospectively analyzed for the effect of mural margins on local recurrence with 152 patients undergoing "curative" anterior resections and 40 patients undergoing "non-curative" resections. In the 152 specimens from curative resections, 110 had a resection margin greater than 1 cm and 42 had a resection margin less than 1 cm. Four patients developed local recurrence in the greater than 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0.8%-7.8%) and no patients developed local recurrence in the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0%-5.9%). In each patient with local recurrence a cause for failure was apparent. There was no statistically significant difference in local recurrence rate between the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group and the greater than 1 cm margin group. A reduction in resection margin therefore did not compromise survival after anterior resection. The significance of lateral resection margins is discussed. The role of deep radiotherapy and cytotoxics are considered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for rectal adenomas: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Samalavicius, Narimantas Evaldas; Mikelis, Kipras; Samalavicius, Robertas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a method of choice for the local treatment of rectal adenomas. Though generally considered as a safe method, some authors have expressed skepticism about the anorectal function following TEM. Aim To review our experience in using TEM for removal of rectal adenomas. We focused on morbidity, local recurrence rates, and anorectal function following the operation. Material and methods The study included 72 patients who underwent TEM for rectal adenomas from December 2009 to November 2014 at the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute. Of the 72 patients, 31 (43.1%) were lost in the follow-up. We recorded the demographics, operative details, final pathology, post-operative length of stay, post-operative complications, recurrences and functional outcome for each of the 41 (56.9%) remaining participants. Results Of the 41 eligible patients, 19 (46.3%) were male and 22 (53.7%) were female. The mean age of our patients was 66.8 years. There were no intraoperative complications. In 4 (9.8%) cases, postoperative complications were observed – urinary retention (2 cases, 4.9%) and postoperative hemorrhage (2 cases, 4.9%). All complications were treated conservatively. There was a single case (2.4%) of adenoma recurrence during the follow-up period. The mean score of the FISI questionnaire was 7.6 ±9.2 (ranging from 0 to 36), and the mean Wexner score was 2.3 ±3.4 (ranging from 0 to 17). Conclusions Transanal endoscopic microsurgery in our experience demonstrated low complication and recurrence rates, and good functional results. We conclude that TEM is an effective and safe method for the treatment of rectal adenomas. PMID:28133497

  8. Results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy containing multimodality treatment for locally unresectable T4 rectal cancer: a pooled analysis of the Mayo Clinic Rochester and Catharina Hospital Eindhoven

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Fabian A.; Haddock, Michael G.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Kusters, Miranda; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A. P.; van den Berg, Hetty A.; Nelson, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyse the pooled results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) containing multimodality treatment of locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, initially unresectable for cure, from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA (MCR) and Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (CHE), both major referral centers for locally advanced rectal cancer. A rectal tumor is called locally unresectable for cure if after full clinical work-up infiltration into the surrounding structures or organs has been demonstrated, which would result in positive surgical margins if resection was the initial component of treatment. This was the reason to refer these patients to the IOERT program of one of the centers. Methods In the period from 1981 to 2010, 417 patients with locally unresectable T4 rectal carcinomas at initial presentation were treated with multimodality treatment including IOERT at either one of the two centres. The preferred treatment approach was preoperative (chemo) radiation and intended radical surgery combined with IOERT. Risk factors for local recurrence (LR), cancer specific survival, disease free survival and distant metastases (DM) were assessed. Results A total of 306 patients (73%) underwent a R0 resection. LRs and metastases occurred more frequently after an R1-2 resection (P<0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). Preoperative chemoradiation (preop CRT) was associated with a higher probability of having a R0 resection. Waiting time after preoperative treatment was inversely related with the chance of developing a LR, especially after R+ resection. In 16% of all cases a LR developed. Five-year disease free survival and overall survival (OS) were 55% and 56% respectively. Conclusions An acceptable survival can be achieved in treatment of patients with initially unresectable T4 rectal cancer with combined modality therapy that includes preop CRT and IOERT. Completeness of the resection is the most important predictive and

  9. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  10. The Importance of Preoperative Staging of Rectal Cancer Using Multiparametric MRI. A Systematic Review

    PubMed

    Bauer, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    A correct preoperative stadialization of rectal carcinoma has a direct influence upon its therapeutic strategy, resulting in a significant improvement of the survival rate and life quality after the treatment. The therapeutic strategy refers to the option of undergoing or not preoperative radiochemotherapy before the total mesorectal excision (TME). The technical advances in the magnetic resonance domain makes possible the multiparametric examinations (mp MRI) with medical equipments (3T models are common) good enough to obtain images having an excellent quality, which allow a correct diagnosis of the local tumour spread. These multiparametric examinations include T2 multiplan sequences and T1 sequences, which offer valuable morphological information due to the high resolution of anatomic structures and DWI functional sequences, with a decisive role in tracing residual tumours after post-surgery radiochemotherapy. The functional examination using DWI is the only highly accurate non-invasive diagnostic method which can differentiate the fibrosis from vital tumoral remnants. The dynamic contrast-enhanced examination (DCE) combined with DWI and volumetry can give supplementary information as to the complete and incomplete response to RCT, and is efficient in detecting a local recurrence after TME. Also, MRI is the only diagnostic method which has the necessary accuracy to assess the meso-rectal fascia, which represents the circumferential resection margin (CRM) in the case of TME. With the help of MRI we can measure with a precision similar to histology the minimal distance to the mesorectal fascia, essential in planning the surgical treatment, and more important than the T stadialization. This allows the selection of patients with an unfavourable prognosis factor who would benefit from radiotherapy or from RCT. The evaluation of other prognostic factors as the condition of nodes, their number and primary site, and the extramural venous invasion (EMVI) have an

  11. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  12. The impact of lobular carcinoma in situ in association with invasive breast cancer on the rate of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Shruti; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Goldstein, Neal S.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The significance of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) associated with invasive breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) remains controversial. We examined the impact of the presence and extent of LCIS associated with invasive breast cancer on clinical outcome in BCT patients. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 607 cases of invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT. All slides were reviewed by a single pathologist. Positive margin was defined as presence of invasive carcinoma/ductal carcinoma in situ at the inked margin. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed for their association with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM). Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Results: Fifty-six patients (9%) had LCIS in association with invasive cancer. On univariate analysis, positive final margin, positive/no reexcision, smaller maximum specimen dimension, and the presence of LCIS predicted for IBTR. The 10-year IBTR rate was 14% for cases with LCIS vs. 7% without LCIS (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, positive margin (p < 0.01), positive/no reexcision (p = 0.04), and presence of LCIS (p = 0.02) remained independently associated with IBTR; positive margin (p < 0.01) and LCIS (p = 0.04) were also associated with TR/MM failure. When examining only cases with negative final margins, the presence of LCIS remained associated with higher IBTR and TR/MM rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The presence of LCIS was independently associated with higher rate of IBTR and TR/MM after BCT for invasive breast cancer. LCIS may have significant premalignant potential and progress to an invasive IBTR at the site of index lesion. The adequacy of excision of LCIS associated with invasive carcinoma should be considered in patients undergoing BCT.

  13. Pure Primary Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma Perforating the Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Aiko; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Rectal perforation is uncommon in ovarian cancer, even in advanced stages. Pure primary ovarian squamous cell carcinoma is a very rare subtype of ovarian cancer and has not been reported to cause rectal perforation. A 50-year-old woman presented with rectal bleeding. Rectosigmoidoscopy suggested perforation of a pelvic tumor into the rectum. Abdominopelvic magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 9 cm heterogeneous mass in the pouch of Douglas. We performed complete cytoreduction, including an en-bloc resection of the tumor and rectosigmoid colon. Histopathology showed squamous cell carcinoma of the left ovary penetrating the rectal wall. A common symptom of rectal bleeding was caused by a very rare entity of ovarian cancer penetrating the rectal wall, but thorough evaluation led to its accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:28316851

  14. A randomized, phase II study of afatinib versus cetuximab in metastatic or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck†

    PubMed Central

    Seiwert, T. Y.; Fayette, J.; Cupissol, D.; del Campo, J. M.; Clement, P. M.; Hitt, R.; Degardin, M.; Zhang, W.; Blackman, A.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that has shown activity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated lung cancer. We hypothesized that the agent would have greater antitumor activity compared with cetuximab in recurrent or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, whose disease has progressed after platinum-containing therapy. Patients and methods An open-label, randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 43 centers; 124 patients were randomized (1 : 1) to either afatinib (50 mg/day) or cetuximab (250 mg/m2/week) until disease progression or intolerable adverse events (AEs) (stage I), with optional crossover (stage II). The primary end point was tumor shrinkage before crossover assessed by investigator (IR) and independent central review (ICR). Results A total of 121 patients were treated (61 afatinib, 60 cetuximab) and 68 crossed over to stage II (32 and 36 respectively). In stage I, mean tumor shrinkage by IR/ICR was 10.4%/16.6% with afatinib and 5.4%/10.1% with cetuximab (P = 0.46/0.30). Objective response rate was 16.1%/8.1% with afatinib and 6.5%/9.7% with cetuximab (IR/ICR). Comparable disease control rates were observed with afatinib (50%) and cetuximab (56.5%) by IR; similar results were seen by ICR. Most common grade ≥3 drug-related AEs (DRAEs) were rash/acne (18% versus 8.3%), diarrhea (14.8% versus 0%), and stomatitis/mucositis (11.5% versus 0%) with afatinib and cetuximab, respectively. Patients with DRAEs leading to treatment discontinuation were 23% with afatinib and 5% with cetuximab. In stage II, disease control rate (IR/ICR) was 38.9%/33.3% with afatinib and 18.8%/18.8% with cetuximab. Conclusion Afatinib showed antitumor activity comparable to cetuximab in R/M HNSCC in this exploratory phase II trial, although more patients on afatinib discontinued treatment due to AEs. Sequential EGFR/ErbB treatment with afatinib and cetuximab provided sustained clinical benefit in patients

  15. Phase II trial of dasatinib for recurrent or metastatic c-KIT expressing adenoid cystic carcinoma and for nonadenoid cystic malignant salivary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S. J.; Karrison, T.; Hayes, D. N.; Kies, M. S.; Cullen, K. J.; Tanvetyanon, T.; Argiris, A.; Takebe, N.; Lim, D.; Saba, N. F.; Worden, F. P.; Gilbert, J.; Lenz, H. J.; Razak, A. R. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Vokes, E. E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a subtype of malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGT), in which 90% of cases express cKIT. Dasatinib is a potent and selective inhibitor of five oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)/kinase families including cKIT. We conducted a phase II study to determine the antitumor activity of dasatinib in ACC and non-ACC MSGT. Patients and methods In a two-stage design, patients with progressive, recurrent/metastatic ACC (+cKIT) and non-ACC MSGT (separate cohort) were treated with dasatinib 70 mg p.o. b.i.d. Response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST. Results Of 54 patients: 40 ACC, 14 non-ACC (1, ineligible excluded); M:F = 28 : 26, median age 56 years (range 20–82 years), ECOG performance status 0 : 1 : 2 = 24 : 28 : 2, prior radiation: 44, prior chemotherapy: 21. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) (as % of patients, worst grade 2 or higher) were: fatigue (28%), nausea (19%), headache (15%), lymphopenia (7%), dyspnea (11%), alanine aminotransferase increased (7%), anorexia (7%), vomiting (7%), alkaline phosphatase increased (6%), diarrhea (6%), neutropenia (6%), and noncardiac chest pain (6%). No grade 4 AE occurred, 15 patients experienced a grade 3 AE, primarily dyspnea (5) and fatigue (4), and cardiac toxicity (1 prolonged QTc). Among ACC patients, best response to dasatinib: 1 patient (2.5%) had partial response, 20 patients (50%) had stable disease (SD) (3–14 months), 12 patients (30%) had PD, 2 withdrew, 3 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 2 died before cycle 2. Median progression-free survival was 4.8 months. Median overall survival was 14.5 months. For 14 assessable non-ACC patients, none had objective response, triggering early stopping rule. Seven had SD (range 1–7 months), 4 PD, 2 discontinued therapy due to AE, and 1 died before cycle 2. Conclusion Although there was only one objective response, dasatinib is well tolerated, with tumor stabilization achieved by 50% of ACC patients. Dasatinib

  16. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratios as Predictors of Survival and Metastasis for Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wenzhe; Zhang, Yingqiang; Wang, Yu; Yao, Xuehua; Yang, Jianyong; Li, Jiaping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) predict survival and metastasis in patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (RHCC). Materials and Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 132 RHCC patients treated with TACE from January 2003 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Prognostic factors were assessed by multivariate analysis, and the predictive values of NLR and PLR for overall survival (OS) and extrahepatic metastases were compared. Results Pretreatment mean NLR and PLR were 3.1 and 137, respectively. The 0.5-, 1-, and 2-year OS rates were 93.7%, 67.1%, and 10.1% in the low NLR group and 81.1%, 18.9%, and 3.8% in the high NLR group, respectively (P = 0.017). The corresponding OS rates in the low and high PLR groups were 92.5%, 58.1%, and 9.7% and 84.6%, 23.1%, and 2.6%, respectively (P = 0.030). The discriminatory performance predicting 1-year survival probability was significantly poorer for NLR (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.685, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.598–0.763) than for PLR (AUC = 0.792, 95% CI 0.712–0.857; P = 0.0295), but was good for both ratios for predicting post-TACE extrahepatic metastasis. Multivariate analysis indicated that high PLR (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.373, 95% CI = 0.216-0.644, P < 0.001, vascular invasion (HR = 0.507, 95% CI = 0.310–0.832, P = 0.007), and multiple tumors (HR= 0.553, 95% CI = 0.333–0.919, P = 0.022) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions High NLR and PLR were both associated with poor prognosis and metastasis in RHCC patients treated with TACE, but high PLR was a better predictor of 1-year OS. High PLR, vascular invasion, and multiple tumors were independent, unfavorable prognostic factors. PMID:25742141

  17. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Ohr, James; Clump, David A.; Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on day −7 and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time.

  18. Anti-3-[18F]FACBC Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomography and 111In-Capromab Pendetide Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography-Computerized Tomography for Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Amzat, Rianot; Bowman, F. DuBois; Halkar, Raghuveer K.; Master, Viraj A.; Nye, Jonathon A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun A.; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Alaei-Taleghani, Pooneh; Goodman, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the amino acid analogue positron emission tomography radiotracer anti-3-[18F]FACBC compared to ProstaScint® (111In-capromab pendetide) single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography to detect recurrent prostate carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 93 patients met study inclusion criteria who underwent anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography plus 111In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for suspected recurrent prostate carcinoma within 90 days. Reference standards were applied by a multidisciplinary board. We calculated diagnostic performance for detecting disease. Results In the 91 of 93 patients with sufficient data for a consensus on the presence or absence of prostate/bed disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 90.2% sensitivity, 40.0% specificity, 73.6% accuracy, 75.3% positive predictive value and 66.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromab pendetide with 67.2%, 56.7%, 63.7%, 75.9% and 45.9%, respectively. In the 70 of 93 patients with a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 55.0% sensitivity, 96.7% specificity, 72.9% accuracy, 95.7% positive predictive value and 61.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromabpendetide with10.0%, 86.7%, 42.9%, 50.0% and 41.9%, respectively. Of 77 index lesions used to prove positivity histological proof was obtained in 74 (96.1%). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC identified 14 more positive prostate bed recurrences (55 vs 41) and 18 more patients with extraprostatic involvement (22 vs 4). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography correctly up-staged 18 of 70 cases (25.7%) in which there was a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic involvement. Conclusions Better diagnostic performance was noted for anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography than for 111In

  19. Rectal adenocarcinoma infiltrating the bulbar urethra and metastasising to the penis.

    PubMed

    James, Mathews; Amaranathan, Anandhi; Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Toi, Pampa Chakrabarty

    2016-06-16

    Secondary penile tumours from rectal carcinoma is a known clinical entity but can be missed unless carefully evaluated. We report a case of rectal adenocarcinoma with synchronous painless penile nodules. A patient presented with constipation and rectal bleeding. He had an anorectal growth as well as palpable nodules on his penis. Rectal biopsy yielded adenocarcinoma. Imaging revealed direct infiltration of tumour into the bulb of the penis as well as distal shaft lesions. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the penile nodule showed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Diversion colostomy was performed and the patient referred for chemoradiation. Since he did not have any urinary symptoms, the penile lesions were left unaltered. Repeat imaging after concurrent chemoradiotherapy showed no response. The prognosis was explained and the patient was given palliative clinic care.

  20. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  1. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis with embolic cerebral vascular accidents in a patient with advanced, recurrent clear cell carcinoma of the ovary: A case report.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lusha W; Perez, Alexander R; Cangemi, Nicholas A; Young, Robert J; Makker, Vicky

    2016-04-01

    •Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis can occur in ovarian clear cell carcinoma.•We report on NBTE-associated embolic cerebrovascular infa