Science.gov

Sample records for recurrent small bowel

  1. Mesenteric cysts associated with recurrent small-bowel volvulus: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Anand, Rama; Narula, Mahender K; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Udiya, Alok K; Chauhan, Udit; Shukla, Shailaja; Grover, Jitendra Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Recurrent small-bowel volvulus is a state of recurrent intermittent or long-standing persistent twisting of small-bowel loops around its mesentery. The association of mesenteric cysts with recurrent small-bowel volvulus as the cause or effect is a much debated issue in the literature. We report two cases of mesenteric lymphangioma and one case of enteric duplication cyst seen in association with recurrent small-bowel volvulus of long duration in absence of malrotation.

  2. Laparoscopic Surgery is Useful for Preventing Recurrence of Small Bowel Obstruction After Surgery for Postoperative Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Sato, Takeo; Naito, Masanori; Ogura, Naoto; Yamanashi, Takahiro; Miura, Hirohisa; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Yamashita, Keishi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    Risk factors for recurrence postoperative small bowel obstruction in patients who have postoperative abdominal surgery remain unclear. The study group comprised 123 patients who underwent surgery for ileus that developed after abdominal surgery from 1999 through 2013. There were 58 men (47%) and 65 women (53%), with a mean age of 63 years (range, 17 to 92 y). The following surgical procedures were performed: lower gastrointestinal surgery in 47 patients (39%), gynecologic surgery in 39 (32%), upper gastrointestinal surgery in 15 (12%), appendectomy in 9 (7%), cholecystectomy in 5 (4%), urologic surgery in 5 (4%), and repair of injuries caused by traffic accidents in 3 (2%). Laparoscopic surgery was performed in 75 patients (61%), and open surgery was done in 48 (39%). We examined the following 11 potential risk factors for recurrence of small bowel obstruction after surgery for ileus: sex, age, body mass index, the number of episodes of ileus, the number of previously performed operations, the presence or absence of radiotherapy, the previously used surgical technique, the current surgical technique (laparoscopic surgery, open surgery), operation time, bleeding volume, and the presence or absence of enterectomy. The median follow-up was 57 months (range, 7 to 185 mo). Laparoscopic surgery was switched to open surgery in 11 patients (18%). The reason for surgery for postoperative small bowel obstruction was adhesion to the midline incision in 36 patients (29%), band formation in 30 (24%), intrapelvic adhesion in 23 (19%), internal hernia in 13 (11%), small bowel adhesion in 20 (16%), and others in 1 (1%). Postoperative complications developed in 35 patients (28%): wound infection in 12 (10%), recurrence of postoperative small bowel obstruction in 12 (10%), paralytic ileus in 4 (3%), intra-abdominal abscess in 3 (2%), suture failure in 1 (1%), anastomotic bleeding in 1 (1%), enteritis in 1 (1%), and dysuria in 1 (1%). Enterectomy was performed in 42 patients (38

  3. [A rare cause of recurrent small bowel intussusception. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Haist, T; Behrens, A; Willenbrock, K; Fisseler-Eckhoff, A; Ell, C; Lorenz, D

    2012-06-01

    Small bowel intussusception is a rare cause of abdominal pain in adult patients. Due to varying symptoms and different underlying causes its diagnosis and treatment is challenging for physicians. This case report describes recurrent intussusception in an adult female patient and celiac disease could only be diagnosed as the cause of these symptoms after surgery. In addition a review of the literature regarding adult intussusception is presented.

  4. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  5. Small bowel intussusception by local recurrence of an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zuccarello, C; Arena, F; Fazzari, C; Arena, S; Nicòtina, P A

    2006-10-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the ileum is a rare, usually solitary lesion, that frequently presents small-intestinal intussusception and obstruction. We describe an IMT of the ileum in a 4.5-year old child who presented a small bowel intussusception. During laparotomy, an annular mass around the ileum was resected, and the IMT was histologically diagnosed. Three months after the operation, the patients were hospitalized with the symptoms of intestinal obstruction. Laparotomy showed a ileal intussusception. Along the previous suture line of anastomosis, a smooth polypoid tumor was evident. Segmental resection of the ileum, including the tumor mass, was performed. The IMT was immunohistochemically diagnosed. The patient was asymptomatic at 3 year follow-up. A review of the literature for this rare entity emphasizes the importance of immunohistochemical confirmation of its benign nature. Because of the risk of local recurrence, IMT cases should have a long-term follow-up.

  6. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  7. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  8. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Small bowel resection Patient Instructions Bland diet Crohn ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Cancer Intestinal Obstruction Small Intestine Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  9. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  10. Small Bowel Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the small bowel, known as the jejunum. X-ray studies X-ray studies are sometimes used in people with bleeding ... that can be seen by standard or specialized x-ray studies, such as tumors. There are three x- ...

  11. Small bowel and colon perforation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R

    2014-04-01

    For patients with small bowel and colonic perforations, a definitive diagnosis of the cause of perforation is not necessary before operation. Bowel obstruction and inflammatory bowel disease are the most common causes of nontraumatic intestinal perforations in industrialized countries, whereas infectious causes of intestinal perforations are more common in developing countries. Treatment of small bowel and colonic perforations generally includes intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation, but the specific management of the bowel depends on the underlying cause of the perforation.

  12. Recurrent Crohn's disease in the duodenum and jejunum following extensive small bowel resection and jejunocolonic anastamosis: radiologic findings in twenty-five patients.

    PubMed

    Zalev, A H; Prokipchuk, E J; Jeejeebhoy, K N; Gardiner, G W; Pron, G

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic features of recurrent Crohn's disease after extensive enteric resection and jejunocolostomy. We reviewed the small bowel studies of 25 patients with recurrent enteritis and less than 125 cm of jejunum following enteric resection and jejunocolostomy and the studies of 27 patients with jejunitis in an intact jejunum. Twenty-three patients with recurrences had neoterminal jejunitis, six under 10 cm, 10 over 10 cm and continuous, and seven with skip lesions (six jejunal, one duodenal). Two had isolated jejunitis or duodenitis. Three with continuous disease had lengthy recurrences. Enteritis showed only one or two abnormalities in 12 of 25 patients with recurrences and in two of 27 with disease in the intact jejunum. Recurrent jejunitis and jejunitis in the intact jejunum showed similar frequencies of mucosal thickening, strictures, ulceration and its complications, skip lesions, sacculation, obstructive dilatation, featureless mucosa, and polyps, and significantly different frequencies only of mesenteric masses. Recurrent jejunitis and terminal ileitis showed significantly different frequencies of mucosal thickening, strictures, ulceration and its complications, skip lesions, sacculation, obstructive dilatation, and mesenteric masses, and similar frequencies only of a featureless mucosa. The neoterminal jejunum is the most common site of recurrence and the only site in almost 25%. Jejunitis remote from the fecal stream is also frequent, but duodenitis is not. Recurrences are seldom extensive and often show only one or two radiographic findings. The frequencies of most lesions in recurrent jejunitis do not differ significantly from those in jejunitis in the intact jejunum but do differ from those in terminal ileitis.

  13. Small bowel obstruction- a surprise.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jeffrey Daniel; Cp, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.

  14. Small Bowel Hamartoma: A Huge Diverticulum of Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Eltweri, Amar M.; Salama, Yahya; Gorgees, Neshtman; Naidu, Leena; Bowrey, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A-20-year old male, with no significant medical history, presented with clinical features mimicking a perforated acute appendicitis. Because of features of peritonitis, a laparotomy was performed which showed a segment of small bowel with multiple large diverticula and mesenteric cysts. A segmental small bowel resection was performed. The patient made an uneventful recovery from surgery. Histology revealed features of a small bowel hamartoma. PMID:24454405

  15. Small bowel intussusception in adults

    PubMed Central

    Potts, J; El-Hakeem, A

    2014-01-01

    Intussusception is the telescoping of a proximal segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent distal segment. This rare form of bowel obstruction occurs infrequently in adults. We report a case of small bowel intussusception in an adult male patient. We have also performed a literature review of this rare condition. PMID:24417823

  16. Adult small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark R; Lalani, Nadim

    2013-06-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a clinical condition that is often initially diagnosed and managed in the emergency department (ED). The high rates of potential complications that are associated with an SBO make it essential for the emergency physician (EP) to make a timely and accurate diagnosis. The primary objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the history, physical examination, and imaging modalities associated with the diagnosis of SBO. The secondary objectives were to identify the prevalence of SBO in prospective ED-based studies of adult abdominal pain and to apply Pauker and Kassirer's threshold approach to clinical decision-making to the diagnosis and management of SBO. MEDLINE, EMBASE, major emergency medicine (EM) textbooks, and the bibliographies of selected articles were scanned for studies that assessed one or more components of the history, physical examination, or diagnostic imaging modalities used for the diagnosis of SBO. The selected articles underwent a quality assessment by two of the authors using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2) tool. Data used to compile sensitivities and specificities were obtained from these studies and a meta-analysis was performed on those that examined the same historical component, physical examination technique, or diagnostic test. Separate information on the prevalence and management of SBO was used in conjunction with the meta-analysis findings of computed tomography (CT) to determine the test and treatment threshold. The prevalence of SBO in the ED was determined to be approximately 2% of all patients who present with abdominal pain. Having a previous history of abdominal surgery, constipation, abnormal bowel sounds, and/or abdominal distention on examination were the best history and physical examination predictors of SBO. X-ray was determined to be the least useful imaging modality for the diagnosis of SBO, with a pooled positive likelihood ratio (+LR

  17. Small bowel endometriosis masquerading as regional enteritis.

    PubMed

    Minocha, A; Davis, M S; Wright, R A

    1994-05-01

    A 35-year-old female presented with recurrent right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and vomiting. She was afebrile with diffuse abdominal tenderness. Plain x-ray of abdomen revealed small bowel obstruction. A barium x-ray of the small bowel showed stricture of the terminal ileum. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a 6-cm mass in right lower quadrant. She was empirically managed as having Crohn's disease. She underwent laparotomy after failure of medical management with high-dose steroids. There was ulceration and narrowing of terminal ileum. Frozen sections revealed endometriosis. Ileocecectomy was performed. Histopathology of resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of endometriosis, and there was no evidence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasia. Ileal endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease in menstruating females presenting with perimenstrual symptoms.

  18. Small Bowel and Liver/Small Bowel Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jorge; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Nour, Bakr; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A clinical trial of intestinal transplantation was initiated at the University of Pittsburgh in May 1990. Eleven children received either a combined liver/small bowel graft (n = 8) or an isolated small bowel graft (n = 3). Induction as well as maintenance immunosuppression was with FK-506 and steroids. Four patients were male, and seven were female; the age range was 6 months to 10.2 years. There were 3 deaths (all in recipients of the combined liver/small bowel graft), which were attributed to graft-versus-host disease (n = 1), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (n = 1), and biliary leak (n = 1). Transplantation of the intestine has evolved into a feasible operation, with an overall patient and graft survival rate of 73%. These survivors are free of total parenteral nutrition, and the majority are home. These encouraging results justify further clinical trials. PMID:8062049

  19. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  20. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  1. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Casciani, Emanuele; Vincentiis, Chiara De; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel (SB) has always been challenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times (fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations. PMID:26339463

  2. Small bowel resection - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview The small intestine absorbs much of the liquid from foods. There are three parts of the ... Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed ...

  3. Gastric bezoar with small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Urgancı, Ayvaz Ulaş; Akıncılar, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    In the operation performed on a patient with a history of abdominal surgery, a gastric bezoar and a small bowel bezoar were detected. Adhesive bowel obstruction was suspected; however, the patient was diagnosed with mechanical intestinal obstruction. Small bowel bezoar has resulted in intestinal obstruction. This case was discussed in accordance with the literature. PMID:28149129

  4. Surgical treatment of complex small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Michelassi, Fabrizio; Sultan, Samuel

    2014-08-01

    The clinical presentations of Crohn disease of the small bowel vary from low to high complexity. Understanding the complexity of Crohn disease of the small bowel is important for the surgeon and the gastroenterologist caring for the patient and may be relevant for clinical research as a way to compare outcomes. Here, we present a categorization of complex small bowel Crohn disease and review its surgical treatment as a potential initial step toward the establishment of a definition of complex disease. The complexity of small bowel Crohn disease can be sorted into several categories: technical challenges, namely, fistulae, abscesses, bowel or ureteral obstruction, hemorrhage, cancer and thickened mesentery; extensive disease; the presence of short gut; a history of prolonged use of medications, particularly steroids, immunomodulators, and biological agents; and a high risk of recurrence. Although the principles of modern surgical treatment of Crohn disease have evolved to bowel conservation such as strictureplasty techniques and limited resection margins, such practices by themselves are often not sufficient for the management of complex small bowel Crohn disease. This manuscript reviews each category of complex small bowel Crohn disease, with special emphasis on appropriate surgical strategy.

  5. Malignant Bowel Obstruction in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elizabeth; Spiceland, Clayton; Sandhu, Nicole P; Jatoi, Aminah

    2016-04-01

    We sought to report incidence, risk factors, and survival related to bowel obstruction in 311 ovarian cancer patients with recurrent disease. A total of 68 (22%) had a documented bowel obstruction during their cancer course, and 49 (16%) developed it after cancer recurrence. Surprisingly, 142 (45%) fit into an "unknown" category (3+ months of data lacking from last contact/death). No risk factors were identified; management included surgery (n = 21), conservative measures (n = 21), and other (n = 7). Documented bowel obstruction was not associated with a statistically significant reduction in survival after cancer recurrence. In conclusion, although bowel obstruction occurs in only a subgroup of patients with ovarian cancer and does not appear to detract from survival after cancer recurrence, limited end-of-life information may be resulting in an underestimation of incidence.

  6. Abdominal CT findings in small bowel perforation.

    PubMed

    Zissin, R; Osadchy, A; Gayer, G

    2009-02-01

    Small bowel perforation is an emergent medical condition for which the diagnosis is usually not made clinically but by CT, a common imaging modality used for the diagnosis of acute abdomen. Direct CT features that suggest perforation include extraluminal air and oral contrast, which are often associated with secondary CT signs of bowel pathology. This pictorial review illustrates the CT findings of small bowel perforation caused by various clinical entities.

  7. Small bowel diaphragm disease mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Sarantitis, Ioannis; Gerrard, Adam Daniel; Teasdale, Rebecca; Pettit, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can produce diaphragm disease where multiple strictures develop in the small bowel. This typically presents with anaemia and symptoms of small bowel obstruction. The strictures develop as a result of circumferential mucosal ulceration with subsequent contraction of rings of scar tissue. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with a 6-month history of NSAIDs abuse who presented with subacute small bowel obstruction 1 year after stopping NSAIDs. CT and MRI showed multiple ileal strictures with florid locoregional lymphadenopathy. A malignant diagnosis such as lymphoma was considered likely as florid mesenteric lymphadenopathy has not been previously reported in diaphragm disease. Laparotomy with small bowel resection was therefore performed. Histology showed diaphragm disease with the enlarged mesenteric nodes having reactive features. Gross locoregional lymphadenopathy should not deter a diagnosis of diaphragm disease in cases of multiple small bowel strictures where there is a strong history of NSAIDs use. PMID:26174729

  8. Small bowel obstruction caused by dried apple

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sally; Hong, Khiem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel obstruction in a virgin abdomen is an uncommon surgical condition. While malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease and foreign body are the main reported causes, undigested food bezoar causing bowel obstruction is a rare entity. We report a case of small bowel obstruction secondary to dried preserved apple having re-expanded within the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case A 69 year old male presented with severe abdominal distension, generalized abdominal tenderness and obstipation for 1 week. Small bowel obstruction (SBO) was confirmed on plain abdominal X-ray and CT imaging. An emergency explorative laparatomy identified a sausage-shaped intra-luminal foreign body obstructing the distal ileum. An enterotomy was performed which revealed a rehydrated, donut-shaped piece of dried apple. Discussion Swallowed items that pass through the pylorus rarely cause obstruction as they are usually small enough to pass through the rest of the bowel without difficulty. We postulate that in our patient that the dried apple was originally small enough to pass through the pylorus. However during small bowel, its’ highly absorbable nature resulted in an increase in size that prevented its’ passage through the ileocecal valve. A simple in-vitro experiment discovered that dried apple has a potential to reabsorb fluid and expand up to 35% of its initial size within 72 h. Conclusion This report illustrates the potential for dried food substances to cause intra-luminal SBO after significant expansion with rehydration. PMID:25841159

  9. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  10. Mushroom Bezoar Causing Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Azhar Amir; Keow, Chin Kim; Syazri, Azreen; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Khan, Amer Hayat; Khan, Yusra Habib; Adnan

    2017-03-01

    A bezoar is a concretion of foreign or indigestible matter in the alimentary canal and is usual cause of gastric obstruction. Bezoars can become fragmented and migrate downward leading to intestinal obstruction. Diagnosis of phytobezoar has become challenging in clinical practice due to lack of patient history and inability of patient to correlate preceding events with the episode of bowel obstruction. Bezoar associated small bowel obstruction rarely occurs and is usually found in patients with history of gastrointestinal surgery. Very few cases are reported of small bowel obstruction due to bezoar in healthy population without prior illness or surgery. We present a case of small bowel obstruction due to mushroom bezoar in a 62-year patient with no past history of medical illness or gastric surgery. Enterotomy was performed and a whole piece of undigested mushroom measuring 5 x 3 cm was successfully removed.

  11. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  12. Diagnosing small bowel malabsorption: a review.

    PubMed

    Papadia, Cinzia; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Corazza, Gino Roberto; Forbes, Alastair

    2014-02-01

    Malabsorption encompasses dysfunctions occurring during the digestion and absorption of nutrients. A small proportion of patients presents with chronic diarrhoea. A clinical history supportive of malabsorption may guide investigations toward either the small bowel or pancreas. Serological testing for coeliac disease will determine most cases without invasive investigations. In the clinical context of persisting weight loss and malnutrition, small bowel enteropathy may be investigated with small intestinal biopsies. Small bowel absorptive capacity and permeability might be measured by oral sugar-mix ingestion. Further, approaches to the investigation of malabsorption might also involve the detection in faeces of a substance that has not been absorbed. A variation of the latter is the use of breath testing which relies on the breakdown of the malabsorbed test substance by colonic flora. Measurement of protein absorption is difficult and unreliable; it is, therefore, rarely advocated in clinical settings. No single biological marker confirming a diagnosis of small bowel malabsorption or small bowel integrity is presently available in clinical practice. Plasma citrulline concentration, an amino acid not incorporated into endogenous or exogenous proteins, has been extensively used in research studies and supportive results are establishing its concentration as a reliable quantitative biomarker of enterocyte absorptive capacity.

  13. MR imaging of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2012-08-01

    Small-bowel radiology has undergone dramatic changes in the past 2 decades. Despite important recent advances in small-bowel endoscopy, radiologic imaging remains important for patients suspected of having or with established small-bowel disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques (computed tomography and magnetic resonance [MR] imaging), used to investigate both extraluminal abnormalities and intraluminal changes, have gradually replaced barium contrast examinations, which are, however, still used to examine early mucosal disease. MR imaging techniques clearly highlight endoluminal, mural and extramural enteric details and provide vascular and functional information, thereby enhancing the diagnostic value of these techniques in small-bowel diseases. Two MR imaging based techniques are currently utilized: MR enteroclysis and MR enterography. In enteroclysis, enteric contrast material is administered through a nasoenteric tube, whereas in enterography, large volumes of enteric contrast material are administered orally. MR enteroclysis ensures consistently better luminal distention than does MR enterography in both the jejunum and the ileum and more accurately depicts endoluminal abnormalities and early disease, particularly at the level of the jejunal loops. Moreover, MR enteroclysis provides a high level of accuracy in the diagnosis and exclusion of small-bowel inflammatory and neoplastic diseases and can be used for the first radiologic evaluation, while MR enterography may effectively be used to follow up both Crohn disease patients without jejunal disease and in pediatric patients where nasogastric intubation might be a problem. MR enteroclysis may also reveal subtle transition points or an obstruction in the lower small bowel, which may escape detection when more routine methods, including enterography, are used. MR imaging offers detailed morphologic information and functional data of small-bowel diseases and provides reliable evidence of normalcy, thereby

  14. Small-bowel resection for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheneber, Ibrahim F.; Meterissian, Sarkis H.; Loutfi, Antoine; Watters, A. Kevin; Shibata, Henry R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine whether complete resection of small-bowel metastases from melanoma improves patient survival. Design A computer-aided chart review. Setting Hospitals associated with McGill University. Patients Twenty patients (17 men, 3 women), identified from 1524 patients with melanoma, who underwent surgery to the small bowel for metastases. Patient age and clinical presentation, tumour site and stage were recorded. Intervention Exploratory laparotomy with complete or partial resection of involved small bowel. Main Outcome Measures Operative morbidity, mortality and length of survival related to the extent of small-bowel resection. Results Eleven patients had complete resection, 8 patients had partial resection and 1 patient had a palliative bypass only. Long-term survival (ranging from 2 to 10 years) was 36% in those who had complete resection and 0% in those who had partial resection; operative morbidity and mortality were 20% and 15% respectively. Conclusion Complete resection of small-bowel metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma can result in long-term survival. PMID:8640618

  15. Small bowel magnetic resonance imaging for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Schunk, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    The presented concept of hydro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.5% mannitol solution as an orally applicable intraluminal contrast agent is a meaningful, reproducible, and reliable imaging method for the depiction of the small bowel. Especially in patients with Crohn's disease, hydro-MRI is the imaging method of first choice because hydro-MRI offers the advantage of a superior depiction of the inflamed bowel wall and the extramural complications of this disease without radiation exposure. In addition, hydro-MRI allows for a reliable assessment of the inflammatory activity, especially for the differentiation between an active and an inactive (scarred) stenosis. In particular, the mural enhancement, the length as well as the wall thickness of inflamed bowel segments, are considered to be significant MR parameters for the determination of the activity of Crohn's disease. Hydro-MRI of the colon is suitable for the depiction of pathologic changes in ulcerative colitis, but in contrast to Crohn's disease, the assessment of disease activity by hydro-MRI is unreliable in ulcerative colitis, probably because of the low spatial resolution (mucositis in ulcerative colitis vs. transmural inflammation in Crohn's disease). Hydro-MRI does not allow a reliable classification of inflammatory bowel diseases, but in ambiguous cases, hydro-MRI may provide helpful information for the differentiation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. There are no data of larger patient groups published regarding MR findings in inflammatory bowel diseases besides Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, but hydro-MRI is a promising imaging tool for these entities, which should be assessed in additional studies.

  16. Anatomy and Physiology of the Small Bowel.

    PubMed

    Volk, Neil; Lacy, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Comprehension of small intestine physiology and function provides a framework for the understanding of several important disease pathways of the gastrointestinal system. This article reviews the development, anatomy and histology of the small bowel in addition to physiology and digestion of key nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical treatment of small bowel neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Coco, C; Rizzo, G; Manno, A; Mattana, C; Verbo, A

    2010-04-01

    Small intestinal neoplasms are uncommon cancers. Benign small intestinal tumors (e.g., leiomyoma, lipoma, hamartoma, or desmoid tumor) usually are asymptomatic but may present with complications. Primary malignancies of the small intestine, including adenocarcinoma, leiomyosarcoma, carcinoid, and lymphoma, are often symptomatic and may present with intestinal obstruction, jaundice, bleeding, or pain. Metastatic neoplasms may involve the small intestine via contiguous spread, peritoneal metastases or hematogenous metastases. Because the small intestine is relatively inaccessible to routine endoscopy, diagnosis of small intestinal neoplasms is often delayed for months after onset of symptoms. During last years the increase of small bowel endoscopy and other diagnostic tools allow earlier non-operative diagnosis. Even though radical resection of small bowel cancer plays an important role, the 5 yr overall survival remains low.

  18. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Tagore; Etienne, Denzil; Caughey, Megan E; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-02-01

    While an uncommon occurrence, it is possible for patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis to develop colonic ileus, obstruction, or perforation. By extension, it is also possible to develop a small bowel obstruction following an episode of acute pancreatitis. Here, we present the case of a 44-year-old male, who after repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis, came to the emergency department with continuous, non-bloody vomiting. This patient also complained of both left upper quadrant and epigastric pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction involving the proximal jejunum.

  19. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Tagore; Etienne, Denzil; Caughey, Megan E.; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-01-01

    While an uncommon occurrence, it is possible for patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis to develop colonic ileus, obstruction, or perforation. By extension, it is also possible to develop a small bowel obstruction following an episode of acute pancreatitis. Here, we present the case of a 44-year-old male, who after repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis, came to the emergency department with continuous, non-bloody vomiting. This patient also complained of both left upper quadrant and epigastric pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction involving the proximal jejunum. PMID:28270876

  20. Small bowel adenocarcinoma in Lynch syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-Kang; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma is part of the tumor spectrum of Lynch syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The present study describes the case of a 51-year-old man fulfilling the Amsterdam II criteria for Lynch syndrome, who had a 15-mm early-stage colorectal cancer resected endoscopically from the ascending colon. Due to upper abdominal discomfort after eating and consequent anorexia, a computed tomography scan performed 1 month later showed a tumoral mass of the upper jejunum with local lymphadenopathy. The laparotomy revealed a completely obstructing mass. Intraoperative frozen section showed a small bowel adenocarcinoma. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the germline mutation of mutL homolog 1. The patient received 6 cycles of an adjuvant folinic acid, fluorouracil and ocaliplatin chemotherapy regimen. The latest CT scan, 16 months after the chemotherapy, did not show any recurrence. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with upper bowel obstruction, particularly for patients with Lynch syndrome. PMID:27446478

  1. Small bowel imaging - still a radiologic approach?

    PubMed

    Markova, Ingrid; Kluchova, Katerina; Zboril, Radek; Mashlan, Miroslav; Herman, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in small bowel imaging using a variety of radiologic or endoscopic techniques. This article gives an overview and comparison of old and new techniques used in small bowel imaging. New imaging methods as computed tomography (CT), CT enteroclysis (CTEc), CT enterography (CTEg), ultrasound (US), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), US enteroclysis, US enterography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MR enteroclysis (MREc) and MR enterography (MREg) are compared with the older techniques such as small- bowel follow- through (SBFT), conventional enteroclysis (CE) and endoscopic techniques including push enteroscopy, ezofagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), sonde enteroscopy, ileocolonoscopy, double-balloon enteroscopy, intraoperative enteroscopy and wireless capsule enteroscopy (WCE). Systematic scan of Pubmed, Medline, Ovid, Elsevier search engines was used.. Additional information was found through the bibliographical review of relevant articles. SBFT has only secondary role in small bowel imaging. US is still the method of choice in imaging for pediatric populations. US and CEUS are also accepted as a method of choice especially in inflammatory cases. CE has been replaced by new cross - sectional imaging techniques (CTEc/CTEg or MREc/MREg). CTEc combines the advantages of CT and CE. MREc combines the advantages of MRI and CE. Some authors prefer CTEg or MREg with peroral bowel preparation and they strictly avoid nasojejunal intubation under fluoroscopic control. MREc has better soft tissue contrast, showing it to be more sensitive in detecting mucosal lesions than CTEc in inflammatory diseases. CTEg/MREg are techniques preferred for patients in follow-up of the inflammatory diseases. The radiologic community is not unanimous however about their role in the imaging process. CTEc/MREc as well as CTEg/MREg are superior to endoscopic methods in the investigation of small-bowel tumors. WCE gives unparalleled imaging of the mucosal

  2. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  3. Small bowel evisceration through the anus in rectal prolapse in an Indian male patient

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Mishra, Anand; Gautam, Shefali; Tiwari, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Evisceration of small intestine through anus is a rare presentation in emergency. We reported a case with long history of recurrent complete rectal prolapse presenting in emergency as small bowel protruding out through anal orifice. The small bowel herniated out from a spontaneous perforation in rectosigmoid. After resuscitation, emergency exploratory laparotomy was carried out and small bowel was reposited in the peritoneal cavity through the site of perforation by pulling and pushing maneuvere and the perforated segment of rectosigmoid was exteriorised as double barrel colostomy. PMID:24014329

  4. Cytoprotective agents in experimental small bowel volvulus.

    PubMed

    Goldman, C D; Rudloff, M A; Ternberg, J L

    1987-03-01

    An accepted experimental model for midgut volvulus was used to produce small bowel strangulation obstruction of 48 hours duration in Sprague-Dawley rats. A 93% perioperative mortality rate resulted after release of the volvulus. Treatment with three cytoprotective agents at the time of volvulus release resulted in the following mortality rates: superoxide dismutase, 89%; ibuprofen, 50%; prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 11%. The predominant cause of death in all treatment groups was bowel infarction, with a smaller number succumbing to either sepsis or circulatory collapse. Concomitant administration of ephedrine or indomethacin to suppress prostaglandin E1's splanchnic vasodilatory activity did not cause any increase in mortality. A trial of aspirin, to simulate PGE's antiplatelet actions, showed no reduction in mortality when compared with detorsion alone. Prostaglandin E1 and, to a lesser extent, ibuprofen, appear to have cytoprotective effects during reperfusion of bowel compromised by volvulus, independent of their influence on the mesenteric vasculature and thrombogenesis.

  5. Utility of positron emission tomography/CT in the evaluation of small bowel pathology.

    PubMed

    Cronin, C G; Scott, J; Kambadakone, A; Catalano, O A; Sahani, D; Blake, M A; McDermott, S

    2012-09-01

    We describe the management principles and different roles of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the evaluation of patients with small bowel tumours (adenocarcinoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumour, lymphoma, metastases) from initial staging, monitoring response to treatment, to detection of recurrent disease. We also discuss the various non-malignant aetiologies of small bowel fludeoxyglucose (FDG) PET uptake, and other pitfalls in FDG PET/CT interpretation. Awareness of the imaging appearances of small bowel tumours, patterns of disease spread and potential PET/CT interpretation pitfalls are of paramount importance to optimise diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Audu, Grace K; Nikaki, Kornilia; Crespi, Daniel; Spray, Christine; Epstein, Jenny

    2015-05-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) has been reported in association with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), mostly in children. We describe the UK paediatric experience of CRMO and IBD and review the global literature. Three cases of CRMO and IBD were identified in UK children during the last 10 years. This adds to the previously published 24 cases worldwide (15 children). We provide further evidence for the true association of CRMO and IBD, and a greater understanding of disease course. CRMO may be considered a rare extraintestinal complication of IBD.

  7. Small bowel obstruction attributable to phytobezoar

    PubMed Central

    Razavianzadeh, Nasrin; Foroutan, Behzad; Honarvar, Farhad; Forozeshfard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common condition encountered in surgical practice. Literature shows divers and many different etiologies for intestinal obstruction. However, bezoars are rarely reported as an etiological factor. A bezoar happens most commonly in patients with impaired gastrointestinal motility. There are four types of bezoars: phytobezoars, trichobezoars, pharmacobezoars and lactobezoars. The most common type is phytobezoars, which are composed of undigested fiber from vegetables or fruits especially persimmons. They are mostly composed of cellulose, tannin and lignin. The commonest phytobezoar reported worldwide is related to the persimmon fruit ingestion. The most common symptom of bezoar-induced SBO is abdominal pain (96–100%). Other common symptoms include nausea and vomiting. Primary small bowel phytobezoars almost always present as SBO. We present an unusual case of SBO caused by a phytobezoar in a 35-year-old patient. Many types of bezoar can be removed endoscopically, but some will require operative intervention. PMID:28031856

  8. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death. PMID:27695177

  9. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Avery; Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death.

  10. Primary malignant tumors of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Mittal, V K; Bodzin, J H

    1980-09-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the small bowel are uncommon and are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. A 10 year survey (1967 to 1977) of the clinical records at one hospital revealed 39 cases of primary malignant tumors of the small bowel. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (89.7 percent) and weight loss (77 percent). Six patients presented with complications of enterovesical fistula, bleeding and perforation. Preoperative diagnosis was suspected in 27 cases (69.2 percent). Adenocarcinoma was the most common tumor, followed by carcinoid tumor, lymphoma, leiomyosarcoma and melanoma. The treatment of choice was surgical resection whenever possible. Curative resection was attempted in 25 cases. Adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy was used in four patients with lymphoma. Twenty-seven patients (69.2 percent) are alive from 1 to 6 years after diagnosis and treatment. The 5 year survival rate is 35 percent. Earlier diagnosis is essential if the prognosis for patients with small bowel malignancy is to be improved.

  11. Phytobezoar: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pujar K, Anupama; Pai A, Sreekar; Hiremath V, Bharati

    2013-10-01

    Phytobezoar is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. It accounts for about 0.4%-4% of all mechanical bowel obstruction. However, the symptoms are not very different from those caused by usual aetiologies of small bowel obstruction. The commonest site of obstruction is terminal ileum. Treatment of small bowel obstruction due to Phytobezoar is surgery. Prevention includes avoidance of high fibre diet, prokinetics particularly in patients who have undergone gastric surgery. A 57-year-old male presented with symptoms and signs of small bowel obstruction. On exploratory laparotomy Phytobezoar in the ileum was found to be the cause of obstruction. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology.

  12. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  13. Small bowel evisceration through the anus – report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Berwin, James Theo; Ho, T K; D’Souza, Rovan

    2012-01-01

    An 84-year-old lady with a history of chronic recurrent rectal prolapse, presented to accident and emergency with a significant portion of small bowel and mesentery protruding out of her anus. The small bowel was not contained within peritoneum, nor was this a pararectal herniation. On examination of the rectum, a longitudinal tear was found in the anterior rectal wall, through which the small bowel had prolapsed. Hours after reducing the small bowel back into the anus, it prolapsed a second time. Due to multiple co-morbidities, this patient was not fit for surgery. The defect was temporarily repaired on the ward and the patient treated with aggressive antibiotic therapy. The patient continued to deteriorate, became septic, acidotic, hypotensive and died a day later. PMID:22605863

  14. Diagnosis of small bowel malabsorption syndromes in adults.

    PubMed

    Belaiche, J; Louis, E

    2006-01-01

    Patients with malabsorption represent a small proportion of presentations with chronic diarrhea. In spite of some progress, the last twenty years were not very innovating in malabsorption investigations. Supporting history may direct investigations toward either the small bowel or pancreas. Serological testing for celiac disease will determine most cases without invasive investigation, but individuals suspected to have small bowel malabsorption, despite negative celiac serology, should have endoscopic distal duodenal biopsies taken to exclude other rare forms of small bowel enteropathy. This strategy has largely supplanted many older tests of small bowel function.

  15. Ileal Fecaloma Presenting with Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha Yeong; Park, Hye Won; Chang, Seong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    A fecaloma refers to a mass of accumulated feces that is much harder than a mass associated with fecal impaction. Fecalomas are usually found in the rectosigmoid area. A 10-year-old male with chronic constipation was admitted because of increasing abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography scan and a simple abdominal x-ray revealed rapidly evolving mechanical obstruction in the small intestine. Most of the fecalomas are successfully treated by conservative methods such as laxatives, enemas and rectal evacuation. When conservative treatments have failed, surgical intervention may be needed. In this case, an emergency operation was performed and a 4×3×2.5 cm fecaloma was found in the distal ileum. We thus report a case of ileal fecaloma inducing small bowel obstruction in a patient with chronic constipation, who required surgical intervention. When symptoms of acute small intestinal obstruction develop in a patient with chronic constipation, a fecaloma should be considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:26473140

  16. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease. We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses. The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001). Currently active disease, ileostomy, and

  17. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001).Currently active disease, ileostomy, and remnant small

  18. Where are we at with short bowel syndrome and small bowel transplant

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Baris Dogu

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal failure can be defined as the critical reduction of functional gut mass below the minimal amount necessary for adequate digestion and absorption to satisfy body nutrient and fluid requirements in adults or children. Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by a state of malabsorption following extensive resection of the small bowel. SBS may occur after resection of more than 50% and is certain after resection of more than 70% of the small intestine, or if less than 100 cm of small bowel is left. Several treatment modalities other than total parenteral nutrition, including hormones (recombinant human growth hormone, glucagon-like peptide-2) and tailoring surgeries (Bianchi procedure, serial transverse enteroplasty), had been proposed, however these were either experimental or inefficient. Small bowel transplant is a rather new approach for SBS. The once feared field of solid organ transplantation is nowadays becoming more and more popular, even in developing countries. This is partially secondary to the developments in immunosuppressive strategy. In this regard, alemtuzumab deserves special attention. There are more complex surgeries, such as multivisceral transplantation, for multi-organ involvement including small bowel. This latter technique is relatively new when compared to small bowel transplant, and is performed in certain centers worldwide. In this review, an attempt is made to give an insight into small bowel syndrome, small bowel transplantation, and related issues. PMID:24175201

  19. Capsule endoscopy of the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Yung, Diana; Sidhu, Reena; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a first line small bowel investigative modality which provides more sensitive mucosal imaging than comparators. It is a non-invasive, non-irradiating tool well tolerated by patients. The risk of retention of the capsule can be minimised by ensuring luminal patency using the Agile patency device. Research continues into how to minimise missed pathology and variability in the identification of pathology or interpretation of images. The consensus is that bowel preparation using laxatives improves visibility and diagnostic yield. Research includes the development of image recognition software, both to eliminate sequentially identical images to improve viewing speed and to select or enhance images likely to represent pathology. However, careful reading by experienced capsule endoscopists remains the benchmark. This should be performed at a speed comfortable to the viewer, probably at a maximum of 15 frames per second. Some prior experience of endoscopy appears to be helpful for novice capsule endoscopists and formal training on a hands-on training course seems to improve pathology recognition, for novices and for those with CE experience. PMID:27826572

  20. Diarrhoea due to small bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph A.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Small intestinal diseases are a common, though often overlooked cause of diarrhoeal illness. Fully 1% of the Caucasian population are affected by coeliac disease and a substantial portion of children living in poverty in the developing world are affected by environmental enteropathy. These are but two examples of the many diseases that cause mucosal injury to the primary digestive and absorptive organ in our body. While diarrhoea may be a common, though not universally seen symptom of small bowel mucosal disease, the consequent malabsorption can lead to substantial malnutrition and nutrient deficiencies. The small intestine, unlike the colon, has been relatively inaccessible, and systematic evaluation is often necessary to identify and treat small intestinal mucosal diseases that lead to diarrhoea. Immunodeficiency states, including HIV enteropathy, adult autoimmune enteropathy, drug-associated enteropathy, and tropical sprue continue to occur and require specific therapy. All patients with severe diarrhoea or diarrhoea associated with features suggestive of malabsorption may have a disease of the small intestinal mucosa that requires careful evaluation and targeted management. PMID:23384804

  1. Primary small bowel volvulus: cause and management.

    PubMed

    Duke, J H; Yar, M S

    1977-06-01

    Most reports of patients with primary small bowel volvulus have indicated that the ingestion of a high-bulk vegetable diet in some way contributes to the development of this condition. During a recent 13-month period at Nangarhar University Hospital at Jalalabad, Afghanistan, the frequency of occurrence among 26 patients was found to be related to abrupt changes in dietary intake. The first and last months of the study were Ramadan, the annual period in which Mohammedans abstain from all oral intake during daylight hours and take a single large meal after dark. During these two isolated months, there was a ten fold and nine fold increase, respectively, in the incidence of the condition. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention offer the only possibility for minimizing an otherwise excessive mortality.

  2. Postoperative small bowel fistula: back to basics.

    PubMed

    Bissett, I P

    2000-07-01

    Twenty-one patients presenting between January 1992 and January 1998 with postoperative small bowel fistula were reviewed and their management and outcome were recorded. There were six jejunal and 15 ileal fistulae. Seven fistulae were low output and 14 high output. The management principles included: (i) initial resuscitation and skin care; (ii) early surgery for sepsis, or for a high-output fistula which showed no signs of decrease by 10 days, or total wound breakdown. Surgery involved, where possible, fistula resection with double enterostomy, a feeding gastrostomy and abdominal drainage; and (iii) enteral feeding with refeeding of enterostomy output into the distal stoma if required to correct fluid and electrolyte imbalance and malnutrition. Five patients died and in the other 16 their fistulae closed and they are alive and well.

  3. Small bowel volvulus diagnosed by the CT "whirl sign".

    PubMed

    de Korte, Niels; Grutters, Cornelis T; Snellen, Jacob P

    2008-08-01

    A 24-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute onset, colicky, abdominal pain. A CT scan showed the "whirl sign" diagnostic of small bowel volvulus. Diagnosis of a small bowel volvulus can be challenging, and CT scan is the imaging modality of choice.

  4. An unusual case of small bowel obstruction post caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Marchocki, Z; Brennan, DJ; Mak, C; O’Riordan, M; Greene, RA

    2011-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a very rare complication post-caesarean section (CS). Herniation of small bowel through the rectus muscle with an intact sheath is extremely rare. We present a case of SBO after an uncomplicated c-section and an uneventful early postoperative course. PMID:24972397

  5. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel: etiologies and CT findings.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Rosenblat, Juliana; Duncan, Dameon R; Friedman, Barak; Katz, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and discuss the various etiologies of perforation of the mesenteric small bowel and associated findings on abdominal CT. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel is an uncommon cause of an acute abdomen and can be due to various etiologies. In underdeveloped countries, infection is probably the most common cause, while in industrialized nations, perforation may be due to Crohn disease, diverticulitis, foreign body, trauma, tumor, mechanical obstruction, primary ischemic event, or iatrogenic causes. CT is usually the initial imaging examination in patients with an acute abdomen and is sensitive in diagnosing small bowel perforation. CT findings in the setting of small bowel perforation are often subtle, but when present, may help the radiologist determine a specific cause of perforation. The aims of this pictorial essay are to review the various causes of mesenteric small bowel perforation and to discuss and illustrate the CT findings that can help arrive at the diagnosis.

  6. Small bowel villous atrophy: celiac disease and beyond.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Sidhu, Reena; Guandalini, Stefano; Assiri, Asaad; Rinawi, Firas; Shamir, Raanan; Das, Prasenjit; Makharia, Govind K

    2017-02-01

    Small bowel villous atrophy can represent a diagnostic challenge for gastroenterologists and pathologists. In Western countries small bowel atrophy and mild non-atrophic alterations are frequently caused by celiac disease. However, other pathology can mimic celiac disease microscopically, widening the differential diagnosis. The several novelties on this topic and the introduction of the device-assisted enteroscopy in the diagnostic flowchart make an update of the literature necessary. Areas covered: In this review, a description of the different clinical scenarios when facing with small bowel mucosal damage, particularly small bowel atrophy, is described. The published literature on this subject has been summarized and reviewed. Expert commentary: When an intestinal mucosal alteration is histologically demonstrated, the pathology report forms part of a more complex workup including serological data, clinical presentation and clinical history. A multidisciplinary team, including pathologists and enteroscopy-devoted endoscopists, is frequently required to manage patients with small bowel alterations, especially in cases of severe malabsorption syndrome.

  7. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Hsu, Hsian-He; Yu, Chih-Yung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Chen, Ran-Chou; Chang, Wei-Chou

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. • MDCT examination helps to differentiate phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces. • A higher grade of obstruction is commonly associated with phytobezoar impaction. • Mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid are frequently associated with small-bowel faeces. • Quantitative measurement of the obstructed bowel adds the diagnostic accuracy.

  8. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction.

  9. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  10. A rare cause of small bowel obstruction due to bezoar in a virgin abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Baongoc; Calin, Marius; Shah, Ajay; Gilchrist, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bezoar is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction accounting for 0.4–4% of all mechanical bowel obstruction. The common site of obstruction is terminal ileum. Case report A 28-year-old male with no past surgical history, known to have severe mental retardation presented with anorexia. CT scan demonstrated dilated small bowel loops and intraluminal ileal mass with mottled appearance. At exploratory laparotomy, a bezoar was found impacted in the terminal ileum 5–6 inches away from the ileocecal valve and was removed through an enterotomy. Discussion Bezoars are concretions of fibers or foreign bodies in the alimentary tract. Small bowel obstruction is one of common clinical symptoms. The typical finding of well-defined intraluminal mass with mottled gas pattern in CT scan is suggestive of an intestinal bezoar. The treatment option of bezoar is surgery including manual fragmentation of bezoar and pushing it toward cecum, enterotomy or segmental bowel resection. Thorough exploration of abdominal cavity should be done to exclude the presence of concomitant bezoars. Recurrence is common unless underlying predisposing condition is corrected. Conclusions Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction remains an uncommon diagnosis. It should be suspected in patients with an increased risk of bezoar formation, such as in the presence of previous gastric surgery, a history suggestive of increased fiber intake, or patient with psychiatric disorders. CT scan is helpful for preoperative diagnosis. PMID:26764889

  11. CT enteroclysis in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kołodziej, Marian; Annabhani, Abdulhabib; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: The role of CT enteroclysis is gaining on importance in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. The aim of the study was to present own experiences in CT enteroclysis application, with the use of a 64-detector CT unit. Material/Methods: CT enteroclyses were performed in 60 patients: 53 with the suspicion of the Crohn’s disease, 2 suspected for carcinoid, 1 with suspicion of the fistula between the small bowel and the bladder, 2 suspected for the tumor of the ileo-caecal region, and in 1 case, the aim of examination was to carry out an evaluation of the postsurgical state of the bowel-bowel anastomosis. We used own endoscopic technique of catheter insertion into the bowel, which shortens the examination time and improves patient’s comfort. Results: The catheter was correctly introduced into the small bowel in 58 patients (endoscopy had to be repeated in 4 cases). Only 2 examinations failed, because patients refused repeated endoscopy. Radiological signs of the Crohn’s disease were found in 50 out of 53 patients. In the 3 remaining patients, the appearance of the small bowel was normal. In 5 non-Crohn’s disease patients, CT enteroclysis enabled a good visualization of the pathology (tumors, fistula). Conclusions: CT enteroclysis with the use of the 64-detector CT unit is a valuable method in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. It could supplement or precede capsule endoscopy. PMID:22802779

  12. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  13. Small bowel capsule endoscopy in 2007: indications, risks and limitations.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Mulder, Chris J J; Jacobs, Maarten A J M; de Franchis, Roberto

    2007-12-14

    Capsule endoscopy has revoluzionized the study of the small bowel by providing a reliable method to evaluate, endoscopically, the entire small bowel. In the last six years several papers have been published exploring the possible role of this examination in different clinical conditions. At the present time capsule endoscopy is generally recommended as a third examination, after negative bidirectional endoscopy, in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. A growing body of evidence suggests also an important role for this examination in other clinical conditions such as Crohn's disease, celiac disease, small bowel polyposis syndromes or small bowel tumors. The main complication of this examination is the retention of the device at the site of a previously unknown small bowel stricture. However there are also some other open issues mainly due to technical limitations of this tool (which is not driven from remote control, is unable to take biopsies, to insufflate air, to suck fluids or debris and sometimes to correctly size and locate lesions). The recently developed double balloon enteroscope, owing to its capability to explore a large part of the small bowel and to take targeted biopsies, although being invasive and time consuming, can overcome some limitations of capsule endoscopy. At the present time, in the majority of clinical conditions (i.e. obscure GI bleeding), the winning strategy seems to be to couple these two techniques to explore the small bowel in a painless, safe and complete way (with capsule endoscopy) and to define and treat the lesions identified (with double balloon enteroscopy).

  14. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases.

  15. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Alan H

    2016-03-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use.

  16. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use.

  17. Primary small bowel melanomas: fact or myth?

    PubMed Central

    Hadjittofi, Christopher; Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Shah, Rahul; Ala, Aftab A.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel melanoma (SBM) is a rare entity, which often evades diagnosis and therefore presents late. Its origin, whether arising primarily or metastatically from an unidentified or regressed primary cutaneous melanoma, remains debatable. In this report, we present a rare case of primary SBM and review the current literature. A 60-year-old man presented with melena and microcytic anemia. A series of investigations including abdominal ultrasonography (US), esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy were normal. Abdominal computed tomography revealed no specific pathology. Subsequent capsule endoscopy identified a jejunal mass, which was confirmed on laparotomy, was resected, and histologically diagnosed as melanoma. Extensive postoperative clinical examination revealed no cutaneous lesions. This report discusses gastrointestinal (GI) malignant melanoma, and examines the evidence both for and against the existence of true primary vs. metastatic disease. Furthermore, this case highlights the capabilities of capsule endoscopy in identifying an extremely rare GI tumor, which evaded other diagnostic modalities. Finally, the origins and pathophysiology of this rare cancer are evaluated, with the aim of promoting early diagnosis and treatment, and therefore improving current poor outcomes. PMID:27127766

  18. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  19. Small bowel diverticulitis with severe anemia and abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    De Minicis, Samuele; Antonini, Filippo; Belfiori, Valerio; Lo Cascio, Massimiliano; Marraccini, Barbara; Piergallini, Simona; Mosca, Piergiorgio; Macarri, Giampiero

    2015-01-01

    The current case report is related to a male patient with diabetes, obesity [body mass index (BMI) 33], hypertension and recurrence of anemia associated to melena and deep asthenia. M.P., a 60-year-old obese individual, was referred to our department by the primary care unit (PCU) of our hospital for severe anemia (Hemoglobin 6.5 g/dL) associated to episodes of melena and abdominal pain. In the past 5 mo the patient referred to the local hospital 3 times for episodes of melena (hemoglobin levels showed anemia 9.8 g/dL) but the main gastroenterological exams were completely negative (colonoscopy and gastroscopy). The PCU of our Hospital, after stabilization of the main parameters and blood transfusion for the low levels of hemoglobin, referred the patient to gastroenterologists: the patient was subjected to both colonoscopy and gastroscopy that were negative. Due to the condition of acute severe hemorrhage the patient, during the first 3 h from the access to the PCU, was subjected to arteriography that did not reveal any hemorrhagic foci or vascular alterations. The video capsule for the study of the small bowel showed the presence of blood beginning from the third portion of duodenum but deep gastroscopy did not reveal it. The patient was then subjected to double balloon endoscopy that revealed a severe diverticulosis of the small bowel with blood from the diverticula. The entero-tomografia computerizzata confirmed the diagnosis and revealed an extension of the diverticula for almost the entire small bowel (no diverticula in the colon). The patient was subjected to wide spectrum antibiotic therapy with resolution of the symptoms and stabilization of hemoglobin levels. The surgeon suggests no indication to surgery for the wide area involved from the disease and potential high risk of complication due to the high BMI. At home, the patient started a monthly therapy with rifaximin and probiotics associated to mesalazine. At present, after 12 mo from the last episode of

  20. Identifying decreased peristalsis of abnormal small bowel segments in Crohn's disease using cine MR enterography: the frozen bowel sign.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; O'Kane, Patrick L; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Burach, Ilene; Burns, Aaron; Dulka, Susan; Parker, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether affected bowel in Crohn's disease patients can be identified by observing decreased peristalsis (frozen bowel sign) using cine balanced steady-state free precession (cine BSSFP) images. 5 radiologists independently reviewed cine BSSFP sequences from randomized MR Enterography (MRE) exams for 30 normal and 30 Crohn's disease patients, graded overall small bowel peristalsis from slowest to fastest, and graded peristalsis for the most abnormal small bowel segment. Sensitivity and specificity of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease were calculated. T tests of the peristalsis difference between abnormal segments and overall small bowel were conducted. For 5 readers, the sensitivity and specificity of cine BSSFP of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease ranged from 70% to 100% and 87% to 100%, respectively. There were significant differences in peristalsis between abnormal small bowel segments and the overall small bowel for Crohn's patients, but not in the overall small bowel between normal-MRE patients and Crohn's disease patients. Abnormal Crohn's small bowel segments have significantly decreased peristalsis compared to normal small bowel, which can be identified using cine BSSFP sequences as the frozen bowel sign.

  1. Unique Presentation of Intra-Abdominal Testis: Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Ibrahim E.; Abbas, Tariq O.; Alansari, Amani N.; Ali, Mansour A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a two-year-old male who required urgent laparotomy to relieve a strangulated small bowel caused by internal herniation around an intra-abdominal testis. This clinical presentation has not been reported previously. PMID:22084802

  2. Oral contrast agents for small bowel MRI: comparison of different additives to optimize bowel distension.

    PubMed

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne C; Schneemann, Hubert; Ruehm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jörg F; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two osmotic carbohydrate sugar alcohols (mannitol 2.5% and sorbitol 2.5%, 2.0%, and 1.5% watery solutions) in combination with 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) for small bowel distension for MR imaging. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D TrueFISP images by measuring the diameters of 16 small bowel loops in each of 12 healthy subjects (age range 31-55 years). Additionally, the grade of small bowel distension was rated qualitatively. Patient acceptance concerning nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and diarrhea was noted for each solution, and all results were compared by a Wilcoxon test or t test, respectively. The ingestion of water combined with LBG and either 2.5% mannitol or 2.0% sorbitol showed the best distension of the small bowel. The lowest side effect rate was observed following ingestion of sorbitol in a concentration of 2.0 and 1.5%. Based on these data, we recommend a combination of LBG and 2% sorbitol use for optimal bowel distension and minimal side effects resulting in enhanced patient acceptance.

  3. Small bowel perforation: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

    PubMed

    Bourm, Kelsey; Pfeifer, Cory; Zarchan, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Small bowel perforation is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. When seen, it most commonly affects the stomach or colon. We describe a case and image findings of an 8-year-old female who presented with sepsis and erosion of the VP shunt into the small bowel. The imaging findings were confirmed surgically. We also provide an overview of the current literature discussing previously reported cases, clinical features, and treatment.

  4. Ileal intussusception secondary to small bowel metastases from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Butte, Jean M; Meneses, Manuel; Waugh, Enrique; Parada, Hugo; De La Fuente, Hernán

    2009-07-01

    A 54-year-old man on palliative treatment for disseminated cutaneous malignant melanoma presented with abdominal pain and abdominal distention. A computed tomography scan showed an area in the distal ileum suggesting intussusceptions. In an exploratory laparotomy, a 10-cm mass was found comprised of the distal ileum that had intussuscepted secondary to the small bowel metastases of melanoma. A palliative resection of 2 segments of the small bowel was performed.

  5. Small bowel perforation: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement

    PubMed Central

    Bourm, Kelsey; Pfeifer, Cory; Zarchan, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel perforation is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. When seen, it most commonly affects the stomach or colon. We describe a case and image findings of an 8-year-old female who presented with sepsis and erosion of the VP shunt into the small bowel. The imaging findings were confirmed surgically. We also provide an overview of the current literature discussing previously reported cases, clinical features, and treatment. PMID:27761183

  6. MR enterographic manifestations of small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Damian J M; Greenhalgh, Rebecca; Zealley, Ian A; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is a clinically useful technique for the evaluation of both intraluminal and extraluminal small bowel disease, particularly in younger patients with Crohn disease. MR enterography offers the advantages of multiplanar capability and lack of ionizing radiation. It allows evaluation of bowel wall contrast enhancement, wall thickening, and edema, findings useful for the assessment of Crohn disease activity. MR enterography can also depict other pathologic findings such as lymphadenopathy, fistula and sinus formation, abscesses, and abnormal fold patterns. Even subtle disease manifestations may be detected when adequate distention of the small bowel is achieved, although endoscopic and double-contrast barium small bowel techniques remain superior in the depiction of changes in early Crohn disease (eg, aphthoid ulceration). Further research will be needed to determine whether MR imaging enhancement patterns may reliably help discriminate between active and inactive disease.

  7. Transient small bowel angioedema due to intravenous iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiu-Hua; Gong, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Peng

    2012-03-07

    Three cases of transient proximal small bowel angioedema induced by intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media (CM) are presented. Computed tomography (CT) images in the venous phase displayed the proximal small bowel with circumferential thickening of the wall including the duodenum and proximal segment of the jejunum. The bowel wall was normal in non-enhanced images, and normal or inconspicuous in arterial phase enhanced images. In one of the three cases, the bowel wall was thickened in venous phase but disappeared in the 40 s delayed phase images. No filling defect was seen in the lumen of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. No peritoneal effusion or mesentery abnormality was found. Each of these patients reported only mild abdominal discomfort and recovered without specific treatment within a short time. Only one patient suffered mild diarrhea after scanning which had resolved by the following day. The transient anaphylactic small bowel angioedema due to intravenous iodinated contrast media was easily diagnosed based on its characteristic CT findings and clinical symptoms. Differential diagnosis may include inflammatory and ischemic bowel disease, as well as neoplasms. A three-phase CT protocol and good understanding of this disorder are fundamentally important in the diagnosis of this condition. The supposed etiology behind the transient anaphylactic reaction to intravenous administration of iodinated CM in small bowel is similar to other CM-induced hypersensitive immediate reactions. The predilection location of transient anaphylactic bowel angioedema is the small intestine, particularly the proximal segment. A speculated cause may be the richer supply of vessels in the small intestine, ample mucous folds and loose connective tissue in the duodenum and the jejunum.

  8. [Actual role of MR in the small bowel studies: dynamic sequences and bowel distension].

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Antonio Amato; Losco, Matteo; Fonio, Paolo; Zeppa, Pio; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is even more becoming important in the evaluation of the small bowel, thanks to the technologic advances of the machines and thanks to the improvement of specific diagnostic protocols of study. MR is a pivotal in identifying acute stenosis and alterations of the bowel wall and in differentiating between inflammatory and fibrotic alterations. Diffusion techniques and dynamic MRI allows the assessment of the degree of disease activity of IBD, although nuclear medicine represents the gold standard.

  9. US features of transient small bowel intussusception in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye

    2004-01-01

    To describe the sonographic (US) and clinical features of spontaneously reduced small bowel intussusception, and to discuss the management options for small bowel intussusception based on US findings with clinical correlation. During a five years of period, 34 small bowel intussusceptions were diagnosed on US in 32 infants and children. The clinical presentations and imaging findings of the patients were reviewed. The clinical presentations included abdominal pain or irritability (n = 25), vomiting (n = 5), diarrhea (n = 3), bloody stool (n = 1), and abdominal distension (n = 1), in combination or alone. US showed multi-layered round masses of small (mean, 1.5+/-0.3 cm) diameters and with thin (mean, 3.5+/-1 mm) outer rims along the course of the small bowel. The mean length was 1.8+/-0.5 cm and peristalsis was seen on the video records. There were no visible lead points. The vascular flow signal appeared on color Doppler images in all 21 patients examined. Spontaneous reduction was confirmed by combinations of US (n = 28), small bowel series (n = 6), CT scan (n = 3), and surgical exploration (n = 2). All patients discharged with improved condition. Typical US findings of the transient small bowel intussusception included 1) small size without wall swelling, 2) short segment, 3) preserved wall motion, and 4) absence of the lead point. Conservative management with US monitoring rather than an immediate operation is recommended for those patient with typical transient small bowel intussusceptions. Atypical US findings or clinical deterioration of the patient with persistent intussusception warrant surgical exploration.

  10. Small bowel volvulus with intussusception: an unusual revelation of neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Lachhab, Imad; Traoré, Boubacar Zan; Saoud, Omar; Khedid, Yahia Zain Al Abidine; Zouaidia, Fouad; Echarrab, Mahjoub; Chkoff, Mohamed Rachid

    2015-01-01

    The primary malignant tumors of the small bowel are rare, representing 1 to 1.4% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We report a case of a 33 year-old women, admitted to our emergency department of visceral surgery for acute abdomen. The clinical examination revealed diffuse abdominal distension, defenseless, the hernia orifices were free and the rectal examination was normal. The biological test showed no hydro electrolytic disorders with normal hemoglobin and normal renal function. The abdominal CT-Scan showed signs of bowel obstruction due to a volvulus with intussusception without ischemia. The patient was operated urgently; the exploration has revealed a small bowel obstruction in the ileum with volvulus, an intussusceptum associated with a retractile mesenteritis, and the hepatic exploration found no metastases. The patient underwent a bowel resection taking away the intussusceptum with the infiltrated mesentery. The postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological result has proved a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor with five free nodes. Through this observation, we aim to highlight that an obstruction of small bowel with volvulus and intussusception could be exceptionally due to a neuroendocrine tumor, this complication has enabled a relatively early diagnosis in the absence of metastases and a 6-month follow-up without recurrence is a demonstration.

  11. Surgical aspects of radiation enteritis of the small bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Wobbes, T.; Verschueren, R.C.; Lubbers, E.J.; Jansen, W.; Paping, R.H.

    1984-02-01

    Injury to the small bowel is one of the tragic complications of radiotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients operated upon for stenosis, perforation, fistulization, and chronic blood loss of the small bowel after radiotherapy for multiple malignant diseases. In the period 1970 to 1982 in the Department of General Surgery of the St. Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen, and the Department of Surgical Oncology of the State University, Groningen, 27 patients were treated surgically. Twenty patients presented with obstruction. In 17 patients a side-to-side ileotransversostomy was performed; in three the injured bowel was resected. Of the five patients with fistulization, three underwent a bypass procedure; in two cases the affected bowel was resected. In one patient with perforation, a resection was performed, as in a patient with chronic blood loss. Two of the 20 patients (10 per cent) in whom the diseased bowel was bypassed died postoperatively. Of the seven patients whose affected bowel was resected four (57 per cent) died of intra-abdominal sepsis. Management of the patient with chronic radiation enteritis is discussed. We conclude, on the basis of our experience, that in patients with obstruction and fistulization, a bypass procedure of the affected bowel is a safe method of treatment. In case of resection, the anastomosis should be performed during a second operation.

  12. Incarcerated small bowel associated with elective abortion uterine perforation.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Lisa M; Sparks, Dorothy A; Chase, Daniel M; Smith, James

    2013-03-01

    Uterine perforation is a rare but recognized complication of abortion. Perforations may not be recognized at the time of the procedure, and patients may present days or weeks later with sequelae of the complication. To raise awareness of this rare complication that can present days to weeks after the precipitating event. A 21-year-old woman presented 3 weeks after an elective abortion with symptoms of bowel obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy revealed small bowel herniation into a perforated uterus, causing the obstruction. In retrospect, a pre-operative ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan suggested this finding, but it went unrecognized at that time. A small bowel resection was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Intrauterine bowel after abortion has been described only a handful of times in the literature. Uterine perforation during abortion is usually asymptomatic and generally can be managed conservatively, but herniation of bowel through the uterine defect can result in obstruction and strangulation. Intrauterine bowel requires prompt laparotomy and possible resection of non-viable bowel. Although ultrasound and CT scans may aid in diagnosis of this rare complication, a clinical suspicion for uterine perforation should be maintained by health care providers when treating patients who have had an abortion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Small bowel review: normal physiology part 1.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B; Keelan, M; Thiesen, A; Clandinin, M T; Ropeleski, M; Wild, G E

    2001-12-01

    In the past year there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology and therapy. In preparation for this review, over 1500 papers were assessed. The focus is on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist. Selected important clinical learning points include the following: (1) glucose absorption mediated by SGLT1 is controlled by mRNA abundance, as well as by posttranscriptional processes including protein trafficking; (2) inducers of cytochrome P-450 decrease glucose and fructose absorption and increase glucose consumption in the intestine; (3) the regulated release of nutrients from the stomach into the upper intestine ensures that the modest intestinal transport reserve capacity is not exceeded; (4) hepatocyte growth factor and short-chain fatty acids may enhance intestinal adaptation and prevent the atrophy seen when total parenteral nutrition is infused; (5) inhibitors of pancreatic lipase and phospholipase H2 may be useful clinically to reduce absorption as part of a treatment program for obesity and hyperlipidemia; (6) several membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins have been identified in the enterocyte as well as in the hepatocyte and may be the target for the future therapeutic manipulation of bile acid metabolism and control of hyperlipidemia; (7) suspect bile acid malabsorption in the patient with otherwise unexplained chronic diarrhea; (8) a proportion of lipid absorption is protein-mediated, and this opens the way to targeting these proteins and thereby therapeutically modifying lipid absorption; (9) a high protein diet may be useful to increase the intestinal absorption of drugs transported by the H+/dipeptide cotransporter; (10) a metal transporter DCT1 has been identified, and this may open the way to a better understanding of disorders of, for example, iron and zinc metabolism; (11) the nutrient transporters such as SGLT1 are responsible for a portion of the intestinal absorption of

  14. Rare presentation of small bowel intussusception in childhood.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung-Yan Grace; Tsang, Pui-Ki Jane; Chu, Ping-Yung; Wong, Yiu-Chung

    2016-07-01

    Small bowel intussusception complicated simultaneously by volvulus in an older child is rare but clinically significant, necessitating urgent operative management. We report a local case of jejuno-jejunal intussusception complicated by volvulus and bowel infarction in a 9-year-old Chinese girl, with diagnosis made on preoperative computed tomography and confirmed at laparotomy. An intestinal polyp as the lead point for intussusception was identified operatively. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Axial Torsion of Gangrenous Meckel's Diverticulum Causing Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, K.; Noonavath, Ravinder Naik; Sreenath, G. S.; Maroju, Nanda Kishore

    2013-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is a commonly encountered congenital anomaly of the small intestine. We report an extremely unusual case of an axially torted, gangrenous MD presenting as acute intestinal obstruction. A 26-year-old male patient presented to our emergency department with 3 days history of abdominal pain, distention and bilious vomiting. On laparotomy, there was minimal hemorrhagic fluid localized in right iliac fossa and small bowel loops were dilated. A MD was seen attached to the mesentery of nonadjacent small bowel by a peritoneal band. The diverticulum was axially torted and gangrenous. In addition, there was compression of ileum by the peritoneal band resulting in intestinal obstruction, which was relieved on dividing the band. Resection and anastomosis of the small bowel including the MD was performed. We hereby report a rare and unusual complication of a MD. Although treatment outcome is generally good, pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. PMID:24741431

  16. ENETS TNM Staging Predicts Prognosis in Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan; Ahmed, A.; Prachialias, A.; Srinivasan, P.; Heaton, N.; Jervis, N.; Quaglia, A.; Vivian, G.; Ramage, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Small bowel neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are the most common type of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours. The incidence and prevalence of these tumours are on the rise. The aims of this study were to determine prognostic clinicopathological features and whether the ENETS TNM staging system predicts prognosis and also. Method. Clinical data was collected retrospectively from 138 patients with histologically proven small bowel NETs managed at King's College Hospital. Histology was reviewed and small bowels tumours, were staged according to the ENETS TNM staging system. Results. Median age was 65 years (range 29–87). The 5-year survival was 79.5% and the 10-year survival was 48.5%. Resection of the primary tumour was associated with improved survival (120 versus 56 months, P < 0.05). On multivariate analysis prognostic factors were primary tumour resection and not having a carcinoid heart disease. TNM staging significantly separated survival of stage 2 and stage 3 from stage 4 NETs. Conclusion. Small bowel primary tumour resection and not having carcinoid heart disease are prognostic factors. The ENETS TNM staging and grading system appears to be of prognostic relevance to small bowel NETs. PMID:23533809

  17. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Affects the Outcome of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Khoruts, Alexander; Rank, Kevin M; Newman, Krista M; Viskocil, Kimberly; Vaughn, Byron P; Hamilton, Matthew J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    A significant fraction of patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) can break the cycle of CDI recurrence and can be performed without evaluation of the colon. We evaluated the efficacy of colonoscopic FMT in patients with and without IBD, and whether we could identify IBD in patients during this procedure. We collected clinical meta-data and colonoscopy results from 272 consecutive patients that underwent FMT for recurrent CDI at the University of Minnesota from 2008 through 2015. Patients had at least 2 spontaneous relapses of CDI following their initial episode and did not clear the infection after 1 extended antibiotic regimen. We collected random mucosal biopsies from patients' right colons to identify lymphocytic or collagenous colitis during the FMT procedure. Failure or success in clearing CDI was determined within or at 2 months after the FMT. Of patients undergoing FMT, 15% had established IBD and 2.6% were found to have IBD during the FMT procedure. A single colonoscopic FMT cleared CDI from 74.4% of patients with IBD and 92.1% of patients without IBD (P = .0018). Patients had similar responses to FMT regardless of immunosuppressive therapy. More than one-quarter of patients with IBD (25.6%) had a clinically significant flare of IBD after FMT. Lymphocytic colitis was documented in 7.4% of patients with endoscopically normal colon mucosa; only 3 of these patients (20%) required additional treatment for colitis after clearance of CDI. Based on an analysis of 272 patients, FMT is somewhat less effective in clearing recurrent CDI from patients with IBD, compared with patients without IBD, regardless of immunosuppressive therapy. More than 25% of patients with IBD have a disease flare following FMT. Lymphocytic colitis did not affect the outcome of FMT, but a small fraction of these patients required pharmacologic treatment after the procedure. Copyright

  18. Laparoscopic versus open adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction - a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is emerging as an alternative for open surgery in adhesive small bowel obstruction. Retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic approach shortens hospital stay and reduces complications in these patients. However, no prospective, randomized, controlled trials comparing laparoscopy to open surgery have been published. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, prospective, open label, randomized, controlled trial comparing laparoscopic adhesiolysis to open surgery in patients with computed-tomography diagnosed adhesive small bowel obstruction that is not resolving with conservative management. The primary study endpoint is the length of postoperative hospital stay in days. Sample size was estimated based on preliminary retrospective cohort, which suggested that 102 patients would provide 80% power to detect a difference of 2.5 days in the length of postoperative hospital stay with significance level of 0.05. Secondary endpoints include passage of stool, commencement of enteral nutrition, 30-day mortality, complications, postoperative pain, and the length of sick leave. Tertiary endpoints consist of the rate of ventral hernia and the recurrence of small bowel obstruction during long-term follow-up. Long-term follow-up by letter or telephone interview will take place at 1, 5, and 10 years. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this trial is the first one aiming to provide level Ib evidence to assess the use of laparoscopy in the treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01867528. Date of registration May 26th 2013. PMID:25306234

  19. A Case of Small Bowel Ulcer Associated with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Woo, Saet Byul; Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Kon Hee; Shin, Su Rin

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of peptic ulcer disease in children may be primary, associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, or secondary, relied on underlying disease. Ulcerative lesions by H. pylori are mainly distributed in the duodenal bulb and they are rare below the ampulla of Vater because H. pylori growth is inhibited by bile juice. In this reason, there are only some restrictive reports presented small bowel ulcer associated H. pylori. We found multiple small bowel ulcerative lesions associated with H. pylori in an 11-year-old girl without any systemic disease while performing esophagogastroenteroscopy to the level of the proximal jejunum for differentiating bezoar. The abdominal pain improved after the patient was administered H. pylori eradication therapy. Because a small bowel ulcer associated with H. pylori has rarely been reported, we report it here with literature review. PMID:24010097

  20. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease in children.

    PubMed

    Bousvaros, A; Marcon, M; Treem, W; Waters, P; Issenman, R; Couper, R; Burnell, R; Rosenberg, A; Rabinovich, E; Kirschner, B S

    1999-12-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a rare disease of children characterized by aseptic inflammation of the long bones and clavicles. No infectious etiology has been identified, and CRMO has been associated with a number of autoimmune diseases (including Wegener's granulomatosis and psoriasis). The relationship between CRMO and inflammatory bowel disease is poorly described. Through an internet bulletin board subscribed to by 500 pediatric gastroenterologists, we identified six inflammatory bowel disease patients (two with ulcerative colitis, four with Crohn's colitis) with confirmed CRMO. In all cases, onset of the bony lesions preceded the onset of bowel symptoms by as much as five years. Immunosuppressive therapy for the bowel disease generally resulted in improvement of the bone inflammation. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis should be considered in any inflammatory bowel disease patient with unexplained bone pain or areas of uptake on bone scan. CRMO may be a rare extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease; alternatively, certain individuals may be genetically predisposed to the development of both diseases.

  1. Most small bowel cancers are revealed by a complication

    PubMed Central

    Negoi, Ionut; Paun, Sorin; Hostiuc, Sorin; Stoica, Bodgan; Tanase, Ioan; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Beuran, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To characterize the pattern of primary small bowel cancers in a tertiary East-European hospital. Methods A retrospective study of patients with small bowel cancers admitted to a tertiary emergency center, over the past 15 years. Results There were 57 patients with small bowel cancer, representing 0.039% of admissions and 0.059% of laparotomies. There were 37 (64.9%) men, mean age of 58 years; and 72 years for females. Out of 57 patients, 48 (84.2%) were admitted due to an emergency situation: obstruction in 21 (38.9%), perforation in 17 (31.5%), upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 8 (14.8%), and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (3.7%). There were 10 (17.5%) duodenal tumors, 21 (36.8%) jejunal tumors and 26 (45.6%) ileal tumors. The most frequent neoplasms were gastrointestinal stromal tumor in 24 patients (42.1%), adenocarcinoma in 19 (33.3%), lymphoma in 8 (14%), and carcinoids in 2 (3.5%). The prevalence of duodenal adenocarcinoma was 14.55 times greater than that of the small bowel, and the prevalence of duodenal stromal tumors was 1.818 time greater than that of the small bowel. Obstruction was the complication in adenocarcinoma in 57.9% of cases, and perforation was the major local complication (47.8%) in stromal tumors. Conclusion Primary small bowel cancers are usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and revealed by a local complication of the tumor. Their surgical management in emergency setting is associated to significant morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:26676271

  2. Oral distension methods for small bowel MRI: comparison of different agents to optimize bowel distension.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan A; Baumann, Julia A; Stanescu-Siegmund, Nora; Froehlich, Eckhart; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus S

    2016-12-01

    Background Different methods for bowel distension prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were described in recent years. Purpose To compare orally administered psyllium or locust bean gum / mannitol (LBM) with tylose administered through a duodenal catheter for bowel distension in patients undergoing MRI examination of the small bowel. Material and Methods Three different methods of bowel distension prior to MRI were compared: tylose applied through a duodenal catheter and orally administered psyllium and LBM in three groups with 15 patients each. Datasets were blinded and reviewed independently by two experienced radiologists, who assessed the diagnostic value and the maximum luminal diameter. Results Tylose was superior to psyllium and LBM in the examination of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. LBM was superior to the other methods for distension of the ileum and terminal ileum. The greatest luminal diameter of the duodenum was achieved after tylose and distension of the terminal ileum was the best in patients receiving LBM. The psyllium group was inferior to the other two groups in all segments. Conclusion By using LBM as an oral method of bowel distension, many patients can avoid the unpleasant placement of a duodenal catheter without compromising the diagnostic value of the examination.

  3. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-11-02

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. [Conservative management of adult small bowel intussusception detected at abdominal computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Sun; Lim, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Jin Ho; Kim, Wan Sung

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of adult small bowel intussusception detected at CT has increased with advanced imaging techniques and universal utilization of CT scan. We aimed to identify factors that could predict the necessity of surgical intervention in adult patients with small bowel intussusception detected at CT during the past decade. There were 39 cases of adult small-bowel intussusception detected at CT from January 2004 to June 2014. The data on clinical factors, radiological factors and outcomes were collected by retrospectively reviewing all available medical records. Patients were classified as surgical group and conservative group according to the outcome. Association between predictive factors and outcome was assessed by Fisher's exact test and logistic regression models. Among a total of 39 patients, there were 32 patients (82%) in the conservative group and 7 patients (18%) in the surgical group. Spontaneous reduction was confirmed at short-term follow-up studies (abdominal ultrasonography [n=14], single contrast small bowel series [n=14], CT [n=4]) in the conservative group. No recurrence occurred during the median follow-up period of 14.1 months (range, 0-67.5 months). Patients in the surgical group had significantly higher white blood cell (WBC) counts (OR 1.001, p=0.048), more frequent obstruction (n=4 vs. n=4, p=0.022) or leading point (n=5 vs. n=0, p<0.001) and longer intussuception length (OR 1.929, p=0.032). Factors associated with the necessity to resort to surgical intervention in adults with small bowel intussusceptions were higher WBC counts, presence of obstruction or leading point, and longer intussuception length. Conservative management can be considered with short-term follow-up for those without these predictive factors.

  5. MR enterography for assessment and management of small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brian C; Leyendecker, John R

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) utilization has increased for the evaluation of small bowel diseases over the last several years. In addition to performing similarly to computed tomography enterography (CTE) in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease, MRE lacks ionizing radiation, can image the small bowel dynamically, and provides excellent soft tissue contrast resolution. This article reviews imaging protocols for MRE, normal MR imaging appearance of small bowel, and the imaging findings of small bowel Crohn disease. The importance of imaging findings for directing management in patients with small bowel Crohn disease is emphasized throughout.

  6. Mesenteric Meckel's diverticulum: an unusual cause of small bowel intussusception.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Hussain; Akbari, Khalid; Mason, John; Booth, Michael

    2016-04-08

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the commonest congenital anomaly of the small intestine, affecting 1-4% of the population. Cardinal features emphasise an antimesenteric location two feet proximal to the ileocaecal valve, with a separate mesenteric blood supply and involvement of all layers of the small intestine. However, reports of MD arising from the mesenteric border of the small intestine are rare in the surgical literature. This report examines the case of a 45-year-old woman presenting with a 6-month history of episodic central abdominal pain and microcytic anaemia who underwent an elective diagnostic laparoscopy as initial CT findings were inconclusive. Intraoperatively, she was found to have small bowel intussusception approximately 40 cm proximal to the ileocaecal valve. Macroscopic examination of the resected small bowel segment revealed a mesenteric outpouching that was confirmed as mesenteric MD on histopathological analysis. Postoperatively, the patient recovered with no surgical complications and full symptom resolution. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Obturator hernia: An uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shreshtha, S

    2016-01-01

    A 70 year old lady presented to surgery emergency with small bowel obstruction without any obvious etiology. On exploration she was found to have an obstructed obturator hernia, which is a rare pelvic hernia with an incidence of 0.07-1.4% of all intra-abdominal hernias. Diagnosis is often delayed until laparotomy for bowel obstruction. Strangulation is frequent and mortality remains high (25%). Early diagnosis and surgical treatment contributes greatly to reduce the mortality and morbidity rates. A variety of techniques have been described, however surgical repair has not been standardized. It is an important diagnosis to be considered in elderly patients with intestinal obstruction. PMID:27763487

  8. [Small bowel perforation caused by magnetic toys].

    PubMed

    Schroepfer, E; Siauw, C; Hoecht, B; Meyer, T

    2010-06-01

    Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is a common problem in infants and childhood, but ingestion of magnetic construction toys is very rare. In the case of ingestion of multiple parts of these magnetic construction toys, they may attract each other through the intestinal walls, causing pressure necrosis, perforation, fistula formation or intestinal obstruction. A 20-month-old boy presented with a three-day history of abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. Physical examination revealed a slighted distended abdomen. The -white blood cell count was increased, but the C-reactive protein was normal. Ultrasound and X-ray of the abdomen showed a distended bowel loop in the right upper quadrant, a moderate amount of free intraperitoneal liquid and 4 foreign bodies. Emergency laparotomy was performed and 2 perforations in the ileum were detected. The perforations were caused by a magnetic construction toy and 2 iron globes. The fourth foreign body was a glass marble. The foreign bodies were removed, both perforations were primarily sutured. The child was discharged on postoperative day 10 after an uneventful recovery. Parents should be warned against the potential dangers of children's constructions toys that contain these kinds of magnets.

  9. Small Bowel Intussusception: A Dangerous Sequela of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ali; Mahmood, Nadia; Robinson, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman who had successfully undergone bariatric surgery (gastric bypass with Roux-en-Y anastamosis) three years earlier presented with complaints of acute epigastric abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography (CT) showed small bowel intussusception, and the patient was taken to the operating room. A mass the size and shape of a football was found; the mass consisted of the proximal limb of the Roux-en-Y intussuscepted in a retrograde manner. The bowel was gently reduced, deemed viable, and the Roux-en-Y anastamosis was revised with resection of the lead point. We urge the surgeon to be highly suspicious of acute bowel obstruction in the post-bariatric surgery population and believe that CT is essential in evaluating these patients. We further recommend resection of the lead point to avoid repeat bouts of intussusception from the same focal etiology.

  10. Recurrent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recurrent abdominal pain continues to be one of the most ubiquitous conditions faced by the healthcare team, and has a significant emotional and economic impact. We have moved from considering it a psychological condition to recognizing the physiological and environmental contributions, and consider...

  11. Diffuse small bowel thickening in aids patient - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is common in HIV/AIDS patients, caused by both classic enteric pathogens and different opportunistic agents. Infection with these different pathogens may lead to similar radiological findings, thus causing diagnostic confusion. Case presentation A 30-yr-old female with AIDS presented with chronic diarrhea of 4 months duration. She had diffuse small bowel thickening present on CT scan of her abdomen, with stool examination showing no parasites. She was erroneously diagnosed as abdominal tuberculosis and given antituberculosis drugs with which she showed no improvement. Repeat stool examination later at a specialized laboratory revealed Cryptosporidium parvum infection. The patient was given an extended course of nitazoxanide treatment, as her stool examination was positive for Cryptosporidium parvum even after 2 weeks of drug consumption. Parasite clearance was documented after 10 weeks of treatment. Interestingly, the bowel thickening reversed with parasitological clearance. Conclusions Cryptosporidium parvum may lead to small bowel thickening in AIDS patients. This small bowel thickening may reverse following parasitological clearance. PMID:21029408

  12. Electrostimulation to move endoscopes in the small bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Mills, Timothy N.; Appleyard, Mark; Swain, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Background: Methods are required for propulsion of endoscopes through the small bowel and for propelling capsule endoscopes without cables. Aim: To test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation could propel an endoscope by stimulating muscular contraction. Methods: Prototype acrylic devices of ovoid shape were constructed with two stainless steel electrodes mounted on the tapered section. Five devices of 13 to 23 mm diameter with a taper of 16 degree(s) to 20 degree(s) (half angle) were tested. When in contact with the bowel wall electrostimulation was applied causing circular muscle contraction which when applied to the taper of the ovoid resulted in forward propulsion of the device. The method does not induce peristalsis but works by stimulating local contraction. The device was tested in small bowel and oesophagus of anaesthetized pigs. Results: Electrostimulation caused the ovoid to advance rapidly (6 mm/sec) up and down the oesophagus by inducing circular esophageal muscle contraction. When stimulated at 15 Hz with 30 ms pulses the threshold for movement was 12 mA; at 20 mA the device moved reliably in both directions in the small bowel at speeds of up to 4.5 mm/s, negotiating tight curves.

  13. [Small bowel neurofibromatosis in Von Recklinghausen's disease. A rare cause of emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Ben Achour, Jamel; Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Guesmi, Fethi; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2003-11-01

    Two cases of small bowel neurofibromatosis in patients with Von Recklinghausen's disease are reported. Diagnosis of small bowel neurofibromatosis was made on the occasion of a complication for the two cases. We insist on the difficulty of diagnosis as well as in presence or not of complications. Treatment of these most often benign tumours remains surgical based on a segmental small bowel resection.

  14. Allograft biopsy findings in patients with small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jamie; Dawson, David W; Dry, Sarah; French, Samuel W; Naini, Bita V; Wang, Hanlin L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of post-transplant complications including acute cellular rejection (ACR), infection, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in mucosal allograft biopsies in patients with small bowel transplant at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed pathology reports from 5675 small bowel allograft biopsies from 99 patients and analyzed the following: indications for biopsy, frequency and grade of ACR, the presence of infectious agents, results of workup for potential PTLD, results of C4d immunohistochemistry (IHC), features of chronic mucosal injury, and findings in concurrent native bowel biopsies. Findings from 42 allograft resection specimens were also correlated with prior biopsy findings. Indeterminate, mild, moderate, and severe ACR were seen in 276 (4.9%), 409 (7.2%), 100 (1.8%), and 207 (3.6%) of biopsies, respectively. Although ACR may show histologic overlap with mycophenolate mofetil toxicity, we found the analysis of concurrent native bowel biopsies to be helpful in this distinction. Adenovirus was the most common infectious agent seen (11%), and we routinely performed adenovirus IHC on biopsies. Eighteen patients (18%) developed PTLD, 83% of which were EBV associated, but only 28% of PTLD cases were diagnosed on mucosal allograft biopsies. C4d IHC did not correlate with the presence of donor-specific antibodies in limited cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An Uncommon Cause of a Small-Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Ali; Al Share, Bayan; Turk, Issam; Ahsan, Samira; Farra, Waseem

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. Gastrointestinal (GI) system involvement that is clinically recognizable occurs in less than 0.9% of patients with sarcoidosis, with data revealing small intestine involvement in 0.03% of the cases. A high index of suspension is required in patients presenting with small-bowel obstruction and previous history of sarcoidosis. Establishing a definitive diagnosis of GI sarcoidosis depends on biopsy evidence of noncaseating granulomas, exclusion of other causes of granulomatous disease, and evidence of sarcoidosis in at least one other organ system. Treatment of GI sarcoidosis depends on symptomatology and disease activity. Herein, we are presenting a case of 67-year-old female patient who had acute small-bowel obstruction at the level of jejunum with postoperative histopathologic evidence of noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cells, consistent with sarcoidosis.

  16. An Uncommon Cause of a Small-Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Al Share, Bayan; Turk, Issam; Farra, Waseem

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. Gastrointestinal (GI) system involvement that is clinically recognizable occurs in less than 0.9% of patients with sarcoidosis, with data revealing small intestine involvement in 0.03% of the cases. A high index of suspension is required in patients presenting with small-bowel obstruction and previous history of sarcoidosis. Establishing a definitive diagnosis of GI sarcoidosis depends on biopsy evidence of noncaseating granulomas, exclusion of other causes of granulomatous disease, and evidence of sarcoidosis in at least one other organ system. Treatment of GI sarcoidosis depends on symptomatology and disease activity. Herein, we are presenting a case of 67-year-old female patient who had acute small-bowel obstruction at the level of jejunum with postoperative histopathologic evidence of noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cells, consistent with sarcoidosis. PMID:28386490

  17. Small bowel obstruction in the emergency department: MDCT features of common and uncommon causes.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Harika; Vassa, Ravi; Fasih, Najla; Ojili, Vijayanadh

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a common condition encountered by the radiologist in the emergency department. Though intestinal adhesions and obstructed hernias are the most common causes of acute small bowel obstruction, a variety of uncommon and rare conditions can cause acute and subacute bowel obstruction. Imaging plays a key role in the workup of bowel obstruction by identifying the cause, level, and degree of bowel obstruction. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the multi-detector computed tomography features of common and uncommon causes of acute and subacute small bowel obstruction.

  18. Small bowel strangulation due to peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old Korean man was referred to our hospital with cramping abdominal pain. His chest X-ray showed an abnormal air shadow above the diaphragm, and computed tomography showed an abdominal viscera in the pericardium. We performed surgery and confirmed peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia with small bowel strangulation. Postoperative course was uneventful. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia is very rare in humans, so we report the case with a literature review. PMID:24694166

  19. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  20. Small Bowel Angioedema Secondary to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is a rare clinicopathologic entity. It frequently poses a diagnostic challenge and is often not recognized before surgical exploration. The present study illustrates that clinical awareness for this condition and adequate use of radiologic investigations can help make the correct diagnosis of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema, thus avoiding the cost and morbidity associated with unnecessary interventions. PMID:28133581

  1. Endoscopic Scores for Evaluation of Crohn's Disease Activity at Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy: General Principles and Current Applications.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Bruno; Pinho, Rolando; de Ferro, Susana Mão; Almeida, Nuno; Cotter, José; Saraiva, Miguel Mascarenhas

    2016-01-01

    The small bowel is affected in the vast majority of patients with Crohn's Disease (CD). Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has a very high sensitivity for the detection of CD-related pathology, including early mucosal lesions and/or those located in the proximal segments of the small bowel, which is a major advantage when compared with other small bowel imaging modalities. The recent guidelines of European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) advocate the use of validated endoscopic scoring indices for the classification of inflammatory activity in patients with CD undergoing SBCE, such as the Lewis Score or the Capsule Endoscopy Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CECDAI). These scores aim to standardize the description of lesions and capsule endoscopy reports, contributing to increase inter-observer agreement and enabling a stratification of the severity of the disease. On behalf of the Grupo de Estudos Português do Intestino Delgado (GEPID) - Portuguese Small Bowel Study Group, we aimed to summarize the general principles and clinical applications of current endoscopic scoring systems for SBCE in the setting of CD, covering the topic of suspected CD as well as the evaluation of disease extent (with potential prognostic and therapeutic impact), evaluation of mucosal healing in response to treatment and evaluation of post-surgical recurrence in patients with previously established diagnosis of CD.

  2. Evaluation of various solutions for small bowel graft preservation

    PubMed Central

    Li, You-Sheng; Li, Jie-Shou; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yun-Zhao; Li, Nan-Yun; Liu, Fang-Nan

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the effect of various solutions for small bowel graft preservation in pigs under hypothermic storage. METHODS: The swine segmental small bowel graft was autotransplanted after it was preserved with lactated Ringer¡äs (LR), Euro-Collins (EC), hyperosmolarity citrate adenine (HC-A) and WMO-1 solu-tions for 10, 18 and 24 h, respectively. The recipient survival rate, morphological structure, graft mucosal energy substances and Na+ K+ ATPase activity were studied, and graft absorption was estimated with D-xylose absorption test. RESULTS: The morphological study of the grafts preserved with LR or HC-A solution for 10 hours or with EC and WMO-1 solution for 18 h was nor-mal 6 d after operation. Mucosal ATP, total adenine nucleotides (TAN) contents and Na+-K+AT-Pase activity of the graft preserved with EC or WMO solution were higher than that of the graft preserved with LR or HC-A solution. Serum level of D-xylose was higher in EC and WMO-1 groups than in LR and HC-A groups when the graft was preserved for 24 h. CONCLUSIONS: EC and WMO-1 solutions can preserve the swine small bowel up to 18 h, which are superior to LR and HC-A solutions. PMID:11819258

  3. Evaluation of various solutions for small bowel graft preservation.

    PubMed

    Li, You-Sheng; Li, Jie-Shou; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yun-Zhao; Li, Nan-Yun; Liu, Fang-Nan

    1998-04-01

    AIM:To elucidate the effect of various solutions for small bowel graft preservation in pigs under hypothermic storage.METHODS:The swine segmental small bowel graft was autotransplanted after it was preserved with lactated Ringer's (LR), Euro-Collins (EC), hyperosmolarity citrate adenine (HC-A) and WMO-1 solutions for 10,18 and 24 hours,respectively.The recipient survival rate, morphological structure, graft mucosal energy substances and Na( +) -K(+) ATPase activity were studied,and graft absorption was estimated with D-xylose absorption test.RESULTS:The morphological study of the grafts preserved with LR or HC-A solution for 10 hours or with EC and WMO-1 solution for 18 hours was normal 6days after operation. Mucosal ATP,total adenine nucleotides (TAN) contents and Na( +) -K(+)ATPase activity of the graft preserved with EC or WMO solution were higher than that of the graft preserved with LR or HC-A solution.Serum level of D-xylose was higher in EC and WMO-1 groups than in LR and HC-A groups when the graft was preserved for 24 hours.CONCLUSION:EC and WMO-1 solutions can preserve the swine small bowel up to 18 hours, which are superior to LR and HC-A solutions.

  4. Large intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-04-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future.

  5. Cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid as a prognostic marker of bowel ischemia in patients with small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Netz, Uri; Perry, Zvi; Mizrahi, Solly; Kirshtein, Boris; Czeiger, David; Sebbag, Gilbert; Reshef, Avraham; Douvdevani, Amos

    2017-08-07

    Patients with strangulation small bowel obstruction are at a high risk for serious morbidity and mortality due to ischemic bowel. Measuring serum, cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid levels could help recognize early cell death. Our hypothesis was that small bowel ischemia or necrosis is associated with increases in serum cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid and that recovery is associated with a decrease in cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid levels. A prospective cohort study in addition to standard treatment of patients admitted with a diagnosis of small bowel obstruction. The participants were divided into groups depending on the presence of ischemic or necrotic bowel according to operative and clinical outcome. Clinical data and serum-based cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid levels were compared. Cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid levels from these 2 groups also were compared with a third group of healthy controls. In the study, 58 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients (31%) underwent operation. During the operative procedure, ischemic or necrotic bowel was found in 10 cases (17%). Serum levels of cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid at the time of admission in the ischemic/necrotic bowel group were increased compared with patients with well perfused or spontaneously recovered bowel (P = .03). Cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid levels decreased on the day after admission in 88% of the nonoperated patients. No significant differences were found in demographics, medical background, imaging performed, and cause of obstruction nor in clinical admission data. Surgeons currently rely on imprecise clinical parameters, including degree of pain, abdominal tenderness, leukocytosis etc to decide when operative intervention is needed. The association of cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid with small bowel obstruction, ischemia, and recovery supports our hypothesis and suggests that this biomarker is a potential surrogate of small bowel perfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vanek’s tumor of the small bowel in adults

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs), or Vanek’s tumor, are one of the least common benign small bowel tumors. IFP affects both sexes and all age groups, with a peak of incidence in the fifth and seventh decades. They can be found throughout the gastrointestinal tract but most commonly in the gastric antrum or ileum. The underlying cause of IFPs is still unknown. Genetic study of IFP showed mutations in platelet derived growth factor alpha in some cases. At the time of diagnosis most IFPs have a diameter of 3 to 4 cm. The lesions have always been recorded as solitary polyps. Symptoms depend on the location and the size of the lesion, including abdominal pain, vomiting, altered small bowel movements, gastrointestinal bleeding and loss of weight. IFPs arising below the Treitz ligament can present with an acute abdomen, usually due to intussusceptions. Abdominal computed tomography is currently considered the most sensitive radiological method to show the polyp or to confirm intussusceptions. Most inflammatory fibroid polyps can be removed by endoscopy. Surgery is rarely needed. Exploratory laparoscopy or laparotomy is frequently recommended as the best treatment for intussusceptions caused by IFP. The operation should be performed as early as possible in order to prevent the intussusceptions from leading to ischemia, necrosis and subsequent perforation of the invaginated bowel segment. This report aims at reviewing the diagnosis, etiology, genetics, clinical presentation, endoscopy, radiology, and best treatment of IFP. PMID:25944993

  7. [Acute small bowel obstruction: conservative or surgical treatment?].

    PubMed

    Schwenter, F; Dominguez, S; Meier, R; Oulhaci-de Saussure, W; Platon, A; Gervaz, P; Morel, P

    2011-06-22

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common clinical syndrome caused mainly by postoperative adhesions. In complement to clinical and biological evaluations, CT scan has emerged as a valuable imaging modality and may provide reliable information. The early recognition of signs suggesting bowel ischemia is essential for urgent operation. However appropriate management of SBO remains a common clinical challenge. Although a conservative approach can be successful in a substantial percentage of selected patients, regular and close re-assessement is mandatory. Any persistance or progression of the critical symptoms and signs should indeed lead to surgical exploration. Here we review the principles of adhesive SBO management and suggest a decision procedure for conservative versus surgical treatment.

  8. A prospective randomized trial of transnasal ileus tube vs nasogastric tube for adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Ji, Feng; Lin, Qi; Chen, Yi-Peng; Lin, Jian-Jiang; Ye, Feng; Yu, Ji-Ren; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2012-04-28

    To study the therapeutic efficacy of a new transnasal ileus tube advanced endoscopically for adhesive small bowel obstruction. A total of 186 patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction treated from September 2007 to February 2011 were enrolled into this prospective randomized controlled study. The endoscopically advanced new ileus tube was used for gastrointestinal decompression in 96 patients and ordinary nasogastric tube (NGT) was used in 90 patients. The therapeutic efficacy was compared between the two groups. Compared with the NGT group, the ileus tube group experienced significantly shorter time for relief of clinical symptoms and improvement in the findings of abdominal radiograph (4.1 ± 2.3 d vs 8.5 ± 5.0 d) and laboratory tests (P < 0.01). The overall effectiveness rate was up to 89.6% in the ileus tube group and 46.7% in the NGT group (P < 0.01). And 10.4% of the patients in the ileus tube group and 53.3% of the NGT group underwent surgery. For recurrent adhesive bowel obstruction, ileus tube was also significantly more effective than NGT (95.8% vs 31.6%). In the ileus tube group, the drainage output on the first day and the length of hospital stay were significantly different depending on the treatment success or failure (P < 0.05). The abdominal radiographic improvement was correlated with whether or not the patient underwent surgery. Ileus tube can be used for adhesive small bowel obstruction. Endoscopic placement of the ileus tube is convenient and worthy to be promoted despite the potential risks.

  9. A prospective randomized trial of transnasal ileus tube vs nasogastric tube for adhesive small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Ji, Feng; Lin, Qi; Chen, Yi-Peng; Lin, Jian-Jiang; Ye, Feng; Yu, Ji-Ren; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the therapeutic efficacy of a new transnasal ileus tube advanced endoscopically for adhesive small bowel obstruction. METHODS: A total of 186 patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction treated from September 2007 to February 2011 were enrolled into this prospective randomized controlled study. The endoscopically advanced new ileus tube was used for gastrointestinal decompression in 96 patients and ordinary nasogastric tube (NGT) was used in 90 patients. The therapeutic efficacy was compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Compared with the NGT group, the ileus tube group experienced significantly shorter time for relief of clinical symptoms and improvement in the findings of abdominal radiograph (4.1 ± 2.3 d vs 8.5 ± 5.0 d) and laboratory tests (P < 0.01). The overall effectiveness rate was up to 89.6% in the ileus tube group and 46.7% in the NGT group (P < 0.01). And 10.4% of the patients in the ileus tube group and 53.3% of the NGT group underwent surgery. For recurrent adhesive bowel obstruction, ileus tube was also significantly more effective than NGT (95.8% vs 31.6%). In the ileus tube group, the drainage output on the first day and the length of hospital stay were significantly different depending on the treatment success or failure (P < 0.05). The abdominal radiographic improvement was correlated with whether or not the patient underwent surgery. CONCLUSION: Ileus tube can be used for adhesive small bowel obstruction. Endoscopic placement of the ileus tube is convenient and worthy to be promoted despite the potential risks. PMID:22563179

  10. Essential role of small bowel capsule endoscopy in reclassification of colonic inflammatory bowel disease type unclassified

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Sara; Dias de Castro, Francisca; Boal Carvalho, Pedro; Rosa, Bruno; Moreira, Maria João; Pinho, Rolando; Saraiva, Miguel Mascarenhas; Cotter, José

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) on the reclassification of colonic inflammatory bowel disease type unclassified (IBDU). METHODS We performed a multicenter, retrospective study including patients with IBDU undergoing SBCE, between 2002 and 2014. SBCE studies were reviewed and the inflammatory activity was evaluated by determining the Lewis score (LS). Inflammatory activity was considered significant and consistent with Crohn’s disease (CD) when the LS ≥ 135. The definitive diagnosis during follow-up (minimum 12 mo following SBCE) was based on the combination of clinical, analytical, imaging, endoscopic and histological elements. RESULTS Thirty-six patients were included, 21 females (58%) with mean age at diagnosis of 33 ± 13 (15-64) years. The mean follow-up time after the SBCE was 52 ± 41 (12-156) mo. The SBCE revealed findings consistent with significant inflammatory activity in the small bowel (LS ≥ 135) in 9 patients (25%); in all of them the diagnosis of CD was confirmed during follow-up. In 27 patients (75%), the SBCE revealed no significant inflammatory activity (LS < 135); among these patients, the diagnosis of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) was established in 16 cases (59.3%), CD in 1 case (3.7%) and 10 patients (37%) maintained a diagnosis of IBDU during follow-up. A LS ≥ 135 at SBCE had a sensitivity = 90%, specificity = 100%, positive predictive value = 100% and negative predictive value = 94% for the diagnosis of CD. CONCLUSION SBCE proved to be fundamental in the reclassification of patients with IBDU. Absence of significant inflammatory activity in the small intestine allowed exclusion of CD in 94% of cases. PMID:28101306

  11. Effect of longer battery life on small bowel capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Shahidi, Neal; Galorport, Cherry; Takach, Oliver; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if longer battery life improves capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rates. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed at a tertiary, university-affiliated hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Patients who underwent CE with either PillCam™ SB2 or SB2U between 01/2010 and 12/2013 were considered for inclusion. SB2 and SB2U share identical physical dimensions but differ in their battery lives (8 h vs 12 h). Exclusion criteria included history of gastric or small bowel surgery, endoscopic placement of CE, interrupted view of major landmarks due to technical difficulty or significant amount of debris, and repeat CE using same system. Basic demographics, comorbidities, medications, baseline bowel habits, and previous surgeries were reviewed. Timing of major landmarks in CE were recorded, and used to calculate gastric transit time, small bowel transit time, and total recording time. A complete CE study was defined as visualization of cecum. Transit times and completion rates were compared. RESULTS: Four hundred and eight patients, including 208 (51.0%) males, were included for analysis. The mean age was 55.5 ± 19.3 years. The most common indication for CE was gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 254, 62.3%), followed by inflammatory bowel disease (n = 86, 21.1%). There was no difference in gastric transit times (group difference 0.90, 95%CI: 0.72-1.13, P = 0.352) and small bowel transit times (group difference 1.07, 95%CI: 0.95-1.19, P = 0.261) between SB2U and SB2, but total recording time was about 14% longer in the SB2U group (95%CI: 10%-18%, P < 0.001) and there was a corresponding trend toward higher completion rate (88.2% vs 93.2%, OR = 1.78, 95%CI 0.88-3.63, P = 0.111). There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of positive findings (OR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.64-1.51, P = 0.918). CONCLUSION: Extending the operating time of CE may be a simple method to improve completion rate although it does not affect the rate of positive findings. PMID

  12. Combined small and large bowel MR imaging in patients with Crohn's disease: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Narin, Burcu; Ajaj, Waleed; Göhde, Susanne; Langhorst, Jost; Akgöz, Haldun; Gerken, Guido; Rühm, Stefan G; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2004-09-01

    MRI of the small bowel is a new method for the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, inflammatory bowel disease can affect both the small and large bowel. Therefore, our goal was to assess the feasibility of displaying the small bowel and colon simultaneously by MR imaging. Eighteen patients with inflammatory bowel disease were studied. For small bowel distension, patients ingested a solution containing mannitol and locust bean gum. Furthermore, the colon was rectally filled with water. MR examinations were performed on a 1.5-T system. Before and after intravenous gadolinium administration, a T1w data set was collected. All patients underwent conventional colonoscopy as a standard of reference. The oral ingestion and the rectal application of water allowed an assessment of the small bowel and colon in all patients. By means of MRI (endoscopy), 19 (13) inflamed bowel segments in the colon and terminal ileum were detected. Furthermore, eight additional inflammatory lesions in the jejunum and proximal ileum that had not been endoscopically accessible were found by MRI. The simultaneous display of the small and large bowel by MRI is feasible. Major advantages of the proposed MR concept are related to its non-invasive character as well as to the potential to visualize parts of the small bowel that cannot be reached by endoscopy.

  13. Integration between a percutaneous implant and the porcine small bowel.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Martin L; Thomsen, Peter; Hultén, Leif; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Fosse, Erik; Edwin, Bjørn

    2011-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, cancer or trauma may require removal of all or part of the intestines, leaving the patient with a need to wear external stoma appliances for collection of bowel contents. By connecting the small bowel to a percutaneous port, equipped with a sealing lid, a fully continent and leak proof stoma can be created without a need for permanently wearing stoma appliance. The prerequisites for a connection between a permanent, transabdominal implant and a visceral organ are largely unexplored. Stoma ports made of titanium were implanted in the abdominal wall of domestic pigs and a branch of distal ileum was inserted through the ports. After being followed for 1-3 weeks, the ports were removed and subjected to histological evaluation to study the influence of their shape, structure, and position on the tissue response. Particular focus was attended to the attachment of the ileal serosal surface to the implants inner structure consisting of a titanium mesh. Macroscopic examination revealed fistulas and formation of abscesses in 4 of 11 the retrieved implants. Histological examination revealed regenerated and well-vascularized collagenous tissue around the mesh structure inside the implant. The integration was complete or partial for 10 of 11 ports. Despite various degrees of inflammation and tissue ingrowth, it was demonstrated for the first time that the serosal surface of ileum was firmly attached to the internal structure of the implant. These experiments provide a basis for optimization of the implant and surgical procedure before long-term functional animal experiments.

  14. Nonoperative management of patients with a diagnosis of high-grade small bowel obstruction by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Flavio G; Theman, Todd A; Matros, Evan; Ledbetter, Stephen M; Zinner, Michael J; Ferzoco, Stephen J

    2009-11-01

    To determine the natural history and treatment of high-grade small bowel obstruction (HGSBO). Small bowel obstruction is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery. Complete and strangulating obstructions are managed operatively while partial obstructions receive a trial of nonoperative therapy. The management and outcome of patients with HGSBO diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) has not been examined. Retrospective medical record review. Outcomes for nonoperative vs operative management were analyzed using Fisher exact and log-rank tests. Tertiary care referral center. One thousand five hundred sixty-eight consecutive patients admitted from the emergency department with a diagnosis of small bowel obstruction between 2000 and 2005 by CT criteria. Recurrence of symptoms and complications. One hundred forty-five patients (9%) with HGSBO were identified, with 88% follow-up (median, 332 days; range, 4-2067 days). Sixty-six (46%) were successfully managed nonoperatively while 79 (54%) required an operation. Length of stay and complications were significantly increased in the operative group (4.7 days vs 10.8 days and 3% vs 23%; P < .001). Nonoperative management was associated with a higher recurrence rate (24% vs 9%; P < .005) and shorter time to recurrence (39 days vs 105 days; P < .005) compared with operative intervention. Computed tomography signs of ischemia, admission laboratory results, and presence of cancer or inflammatory bowel disease were not predictive of an operation. Patients with HGSBO by CT can be managed safely with nonoperative therapy; however, they have a significantly higher rate of recurrence requiring readmission or operation within 5 years.

  15. Recurrent or residual pelvic bowel cancer: accuracy of MRI local extent before salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip; Carrington, Bernadette M; Swindell, Ric; Shanks, Johnathan H; O'dwyer, Sarah T

    2002-06-01

    To determine pre-operative MRI accuracy in assessing local disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer by comparing MRI assessment and staging examination under anaesthesia (EUA), with laparotomy/histopathological findings. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with recurrent (n = 21) or residual (n = 6) pelvic bowel cancer (13 of the rectum, eleven of the anus and three of the colon) underwent EUA and pelvic MRI (1T) using a phased array pelvic coil. Retrospective analysis of eight specific anatomical regions for tumour involvement on MRI was performed. Findings at EUA and biopsy were recorded. The MRI and EUA findings were correlated with findings at surgery and histopathology. Statistical comparison between MRI and EUA results was performed using the chi-squared test. Overall MRI accuracy in determining tumour invasion for all sites assessed was 452/499 (91%), sensitivity was 95/109 (87%), specificity was 357/390 (92%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 95/128 (74%) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 357/371 (96%). PPV and NPV for specific areas were 21/38 (55%) and 134/136 (99%) for genitourinary tract, 4/6 (67%) and 61/65 (94%) for pelvic side wall, 21/26 (81%) and 40/41 (98%) for pelvic floor, 1/6 (17%) and 40/43 (93%) for the posterior pelvis pre-sacrum/sacrum. For those anatomical sites evaluated by both EUA and MRI, MRI was superior to EUA, with an accuracy of 89% vs 73% (P < 0.05). MRI is an accurate technique for assessing disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer. Copyright 2002 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  16. Repeated Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Chestnut Ingestion without the Formation of Phytobezoars.

    PubMed

    Satake, Ryu; Chinda, Daisuke; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Satake, Miwa; Oota, Rie; Sato, Satoshi; Yamai, Kiyonori; Hachimori, Hisashi; Okamoto, Yutaka; Yamada, Kyogo; Matsuura, Osamu; Hashizume, Tadashi; Soma, Yasushi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A small number of cases of small bowel obstruction caused by foods without the formation of phytobezoars have been reported. Repeated small bowel obstruction due to the ingestion of the same food is extremely rare. We present the case of 63-year-old woman who developed small bowel obstruction twice due to the ingestion of chestnuts without the formation of phytobezoars. This is the first reported case of repeated small bowel obstruction caused by chestnut ingestion. Careful interviews are necessary to determine the meal history of elderly patients and psychiatric patients.

  17. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish.

  18. MRI of the small-bowel: how to differentiate primary neoplasms and mimickers

    PubMed Central

    Masselli, G; Colaiacomo, M C; Marcelli, G; Bertini, L; Casciani, E; Laghi, F; D'Amico, P; Caprasecca, S; Polettini, E; Gualdi, G

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the gastrointestinal tract is gaining clinical acceptance and is increasingly used to evaluate patients with suspected small-bowel diseases. MRI may be performed with enterography or enteroclysis, both of which combine the advantages of cross-sectional imaging with those of conventional enteroclysis. In this paper, MRI features of primary small-bowel neoplasms, the most important signs for differential diagnosis and the diseases that can be considered as mimickers of small-bowel neoplasms, are discussed. PMID:22422388

  19. Percutaneous gastric drainage as a treatment for small bowel obstruction after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Hamoui, Nahid; Crookes, Peter F; Kaufman, Howard S

    2007-10-01

    The authors report the case of a patient who developed small bowel obstruction after laparoscopic gastric bypass. Imaging revealed an obstruction at the enteroenterostomy resulting in dilation of the bypassed stomach and proximal small bowel. The bypassed stomach was percutaneously drained using CT guidance, leading to resolution of the small bowel obstruction. Biliopancreatic limb obstructions can be successfully treated non-operatively after gastric bypass.

  20. [Laparoscopic diagnosis and treatment of early adhesive small bowel obstruction after gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, M E; Breusenko, V G; Shapoval'iants, S G; Fedorov, E D; Larichev, S E; Kretsu, V N

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of diagnostic and curative laparoscopic interventions in 33 patients with acute early adhesive small bowel obstruction. Ileus developed after surgical treatment (laparotomy) of different gynecological diseases. Laparoscopy appeared as the most informative diagnostic method to confirm diagnosis in all patients, to estimate state of abdominal cavity and small pelvis organs what can help to determine method of surgical treatment. Contraindications for laparoscopic surgery were identified in 12 (36.4%) patients and conversion to laparotomy was applied in this group. Postoperative complications were diagnosed in 1 (8.3%) patient. 2 (16.6%) patients died. Early adhesive ileus was resolved laparoscopically in 21 (63.6%) of 33 patients. Recurrent acute early adhesive ileus was detected in 1 (4.7%) patient.

  1. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction. PMID:21951579

  2. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-10-16

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy's lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel.

  3. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel. PMID:25324920

  4. Complicated Jejunal Diverticulosis: Small Bowel Volvulus with Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohi, Rommel Singh; Moudgil, Ashish; Bhatia, Suresh Kumar; Seth, Kaushal; Kaur, Tajinder

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the diverticulum of the small bowel varies from 0.2-1.3% in autopsy studies to 2.3% when assessed on enteroclysis. It occurs mostly in patients in the 6th decade of their life. Of all the small bowel diverticuli, jejunal diverticulum is the most common type. This rare entity is usually asymptomatic. However, they may cause chronic non-specific symptoms for a long period of time like dyspepsia, chronic postprandial pain, nausea, vomiting, borborgymi, alternating diarrhoea and constipation, weight loss, anaemia, steatorrhea or rarely lead to complications like haemorrhage, obstruction, perforation. Obstruction can be due to enterolith, adhesions, intussusception, and volvulus. The condition is difficult to diagnose because patients are generally presented with symptoms that mimic other diseases. It is important for clinicians to have awareness of this entity. Here, we present a case of multiple jejunal diverticuli with a history of repeated attacks of diverticulitis over past 20 years, which were misdiagnosed and now presented with intestinal obstruction due to volvulus of the involved segment along with mesentery around its axis. Resection of the diverticuli segment of jejunum was done with end-to-end jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. The patient is asymptomatic since 10 months of follow-up. PMID:27853337

  5. An undigested cherry tomato as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mortezavi, A; Schneider, P M; Lurje, G

    2015-07-01

    Small bowel obstruction due to undigested fibre from fruits and vegetables is a rare but known medical condition. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato in a patient without a past medical history of abdominal surgery. A 66-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of lower abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. His last bowel movement had occurred on the morning of presentation. He underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT), which showed a sudden change of diameter in the distal ileum with complete collapse of the proximal small bowel segment. Laparoscopy confirmed a small bowel obstruction with a transition point close to the ileocaecal valve. An enterotomy was performed and a completely undigested cherry tomato was retrieved. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato.

  6. Diagnostic approach to small bowel involvement in inflammatory bowel disease: view of the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic small bowel (SB) techniques have revolutionalized the diagnostic approach of patients with suspected or known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has become an important diagnostic tool for the evaluation of suspected CD of the SB or in patients with known IBD to rule out SB involvement. The greatest utility of WCE has been observed in cases of suspected CD, where the initial evaluation with traditional radiographic and endoscopic studies has failed to establish the diagnosis. WCE can detect early SB lesions that can be overlooked by traditional radiological studies. The sensitivity of diagnosing SB CD by WCE is superior to other endoscopic or radiological methods such as push enteroscopy, computed tomography or magnetic resonance enteroclysis. The utility of WCE in patients with known CD, IBD unclassified (IBDU) and a select group of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) can better define the diagnosis and extent of the disease and may lead to reclassification of IBD from UC/IBDU to definitive CD. In addition, previously diagnosed patients with CD may be found to have more significant disease burden in the SB. This information may facilitate more targeted and effective therapies and potentially lead to better patient outcomes. A disadvantage of WCE is its low specificity and the risk of being retained in a strictured area of the SB. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy has essentially replaced push enteroscopy, and has been used to treat CD strictures, obtain biopsies from areas of SB involvement and even retrieving a retained capsule.

  7. [Inflammatory bowel diseases: diagnosis (including new procedures for small intestine examination)].

    PubMed

    Hahne, M; Riemann, J F

    2002-11-20

    Medical history, clinical examination, general laboratory data and microbial stool examinations are basic diagnostics in inflammatory bowel diseases. Specific immunologic parameters can make classification easier in indefinite disease, their use is still in an experimental state. Ultrasound and endoscopic examinations have largely replaced conventional radiological procedures. For the experienced examiner, ultrasound allows assessment of small bowel and colon as well as other organs. Ileo-colonoscopy with biopsies remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases. For small bowel examination, modern methods like push-enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy or the Hydro-MRI can be employed. At the moment, their usage is limited to specialized centers. Because of its broad availability small bowel follow through is still the standard in small bowel examination. After 8 years of colitis ulcerosa, ileo-colonoscopy with biopsy should be performed every year according to the guidelines. If these recommendations also apply to Crohn's disease is not sure yet.

  8. The prevalence of overgrowth by aerobic bacteria in the small intestine by small bowel culture: relationship with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pyleris, Emmannouil; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Tzivras, Dimitrios; Koussoulas, Vassilios; Barbatzas, Charalambos; Pimentel, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Many studies have linked irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), although they have done so on a qualitative basis using breath tests even though quantitative cultures are the hallmark of diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to underscore the frequency of SIBO in a large number of Greeks necessitating upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract endoscopy by using quantitative microbiological assessment of the duodenal aspirate. Consecutive subjects presenting for upper GI endoscopy were eligible to participate. Quantitative culture of aspirates sampled from the third part of the duodenum during upper GI tract endoscopy was conducted under aerobic conditions. IBS was defined by Rome II criteria. Among 320 subjects enrolled, SIBO was diagnosed in 62 (19.4%); 42 of 62 had IBS (67.7%). SIBO was found in 37.5% of IBS sufferers. SIBO was found in 60% of IBS patients with predominant diarrhea compared with 27.3% without diarrhea (P = 0.004). Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most common isolates within patients with SIBO. A step-wise logistic regression analysis revealed that IBS, history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and intake of proton pump inhibitors were independently and positively linked with SIBO; gastritis was protective against SIBO. Using culture of the small bowel, SIBO by aerobe bacteria is independently linked with IBS. These results reinforce results of clinical trials evidencing a therapeutic role of non-absorbable antibiotics for the management of IBS symptoms.

  9. Torsion of Meckel's diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Murruste, Marko; Rajaste, Geidi; Kase, Karri

    2014-10-27

    Axial torsion and necrosis of Meckel's diverticulum causing simultaneous mechanical small bowel obstruction are the rarest complications of this congenital anomaly. This kind of pathology has been reported only eleven times. Our case report presents this very unusual case of Meckel's diverticulum. A 41-year-old man presented at the emergency department with complaints of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and retention of stool and gases. Clinical diagnosis was small bowel obstruction. Because the origin of obstruction was unknown, computer tomography was indicated. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed dilated small bowel loops with multiple air-fluid levels; the oral contrast medium had reached the jejunum and proximal parts of the ileum but not the distal small bowel loops or the large bowel; in the right mid-abdomen there was a 11 cm × 6.4 cm × 7.8 cm fluid containing cavity with thickened wall, which was considered a dilated bowel-loop or cyst or diverticulum. Initially the patient was treated conservatively. Because of persistent abdominal pain emergency laparotomy was indicated. Abdominal exploration revealed distended small bowel loops proximal to the obstruction, and a large (12 cm × 14 cm) Meckel's diverticulum at the site of obstruction. Meckel's diverticulum was axially rotated by 720°, which caused small bowel obstruction and diverticular necrosis. About 20 cm of the small bowel with Meckel's diverticulum was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. We recommend CT-scan as the most useful diagnostic tool in bowel obstruction of unknown origin. In cases of Meckel's diverticulum causing small bowel obstruction, prompt surgical treatment is indicated; delay in diagnosis and in adequate treatment may lead to bowel necrosis and peritonitis.

  10. Limitations of somatostatin scintigraphy in primary small bowel neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Jessica E; Sherman, Scott K; Menda, Yusuf; Wang, Donghong; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Howe, James R

    2014-08-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS; octreoscan) is used in neuroendocrine tumors to locate the primary tumor site and delineate the extent of disease. SRS has decreased sensitivity for small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (SBNETs). The reasons for SRS nonlocalization are not clear. We sought to determine factors that correlate with successful primary tumor localization by SRS in patients with resected SBNETs, and also identify factors that confound interpretation of SRS reports. Records of patients with resected SBNETs were reviewed for SRS results, tumor size, multifocality, N, and M status. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) expression was analyzed in resected tumors by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. SRS reports were reviewed and categorized as localizing the primary tumor or not. A nuclear medicine physician independently reviewed available images. Of 37 patients with preoperative SRS, the primary tumor was localized in 37%. Of all the factors tested, only small tumor size correlated significantly with SRS nonlocalization. Overexpression of SSTR2 was not significantly different between tumors that were or were not localized by SRS, regardless of tumor size. There were three instances where the SRS report did not agree with the nuclear medicine physician's interpretation as to whether SRS localized the primary tumor. In each case, uptake in mesenteric nodes was a confounding factor. SBNETs <2 cm are most likely to be missed by SRS. SSTR2 expression did not correlate with SRS nonlocalization of the primary tumor. Uptake in mesenteric nodes may help indicate an SBNET primary but can also interfere with its visualization within the small bowel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Indications and results of small bowel transplantation in adults].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Panis, Yves

    2012-02-01

    immunosuppression to control rejection. By 1990, the development of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression, as well as improved surgical techniques, the increased array of potent immunosuppressive medications, infection prophylaxis, and better patient selection helped to improve actuarial graft and patient survival rates for all types of intestine transplantation. In adult intestinal transplantation, three kinds of graft can be proposed: isolated small bowel, combined liver and small bowel, and multivisceral transplantation. In isolated small bowel transplantation, the length of the graft ranges between 1.5 and 2 meters, but depends on the size of the recipient (and the abdominal cavity volume, which is reduced). The graft is anastomosed with the recipient's duodenum or remnant proximal jejunum. the distal part of the small bowel graft is on a temporary stoma, in order to allow biopsies for early detection of rejection. Vascular anastomoses are usually performed directly on the aorta for the superior mesenteric artery and either the recipient's portal vein or vena cava for the donor superior mesenteric vein. In combined liver and intestinal transplantation, one venous anastomosis is avoided because the graft is in one piece. Finally, one specificity of this transplantation is the fact that it usually concerns patients with numerous previous abdominal operations and with total or subtotal enterectomy. Thus, the residual abdominal cavity is usually very small, and this can be a major problem for graft insertion. For this reason, abdominal closure is performed with a temporary prosthesis, because even cutaneous closure remains impossible if a compartment syndrome is to be avoided.

  12. Small bowel obstruction secondary to transport aircraft: coincidence or reality?

    PubMed

    Massalou, D; Fournier, M; Salucki, B; Baqué, P

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBO) are a leading cause of admission to general surgery, posing the problem of the aetiology and treatment based on the diagnosis. More than 300 patients were admitted for SBO in 2011 in our institution. In our clinical practice, we have had to care for patients with SBO immediately after air travel, all of whom had an antecedent of abdominal surgery by laparotomy. The finding of episodes of acute SBO immediately following a commercial flight has never been reported in the literature. We report the cases of four patients for whom we offer several pathophysiological hypotheses, and we publish the first dietary rules for people with a history of intraperitoneal surgery to adopt during a flight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome following Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Shoumitro; Law-Min, Richard; Fearnley, David

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention. PMID:12446948

  14. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Law-Min, R; Fearnley, D

    We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention.

  15. Adhesive small bowel obstruction: epidemiology, biology and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Attard, Jo-Anne P.; MacLean, Anthony R.

    2007-01-01

    Intraabdominal adhesions develop after abdominal surgery as part of the normal healing processes that occur after damage to the peritoneum. Over the last 2 decades, much research has gone into understanding the biochemical and cellular processes that lead to adhesion formation. The early balance between fibrin deposition and degradation seems to be the critical factor in adhesion formation. Although adhesions do have some beneficial effects, they also cause significant morbidity, including adhesive small bowel obstruction, infertility and increased difficulty with reoperative surgery. Several strategies have been employed over the years to prevent adhesion formation while not interfering with wound healing. This article summarizes much of our current understanding of adhesion formation and strategies that have been employed to prevent them. PMID:17897517

  16. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  17. The use of effervescent agents in the small bowel meal examination.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P D; Hufton, A P; Martin, D F

    1993-10-01

    Some perceived disadvantages of the small bowel meal examination are failure of adequate distension, lack of a double contrast effect and the duration of the procedure. A new use for effervescent granules during the small bowel meal is described which reduces the examination time by 70% and reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  18. Reproductive history and risk of small bowel cancer by histologic type: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxia; Lambe, Mats; Martling, Anna; Lagergren, Jesper

    2012-12-01

    The male predominance of the two main histologic malignancies of the small bowel cancer may reflect a role of sex hormones which will be examined in this study. This was a nationwide population-based nested case-control study, based on a cohort of subjects born between 1932 and 2008, as identified in the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. For each case of small bowel cancer, 10 age- and sex-matched controls were randomly selected. Number of children and age at having the first child were analyzed in relation to the risk of small bowel cancer using conditional logistic regression, providing odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 632 female cases and 894 male cases of small bowel cancer were included. No overall increased risk of small bowel cancer was found in parous compared to non-parous women (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.67-1.54). There was no association between age at first birth and small bowel cancer (>30 years of age vs <20 years; OR = 1.04, 95 % CI 0.72-1.50). No associations were detected in separate analyses of adenocarcinoma or carcinoid of the small bowel. No distinct risk patterns were discerned in men compared to women. Reproductive history does not seem to be associated with the risk of small bowel cancer, independent of histologic type.

  19. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  20. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Children With Bladder and Bowel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Keren, Ron; Gotman, Nathan; Docimo, Steven G.; Mathews, Ranjiv; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Ivanova, Anastasia; Mattoo, Tej K.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Carpenter, Myra A.; Pohl, Hans G.; Greenfield, Saul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little generalizable information is available on the outcomes of children diagnosed with bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD) after a urinary tract infection (UTI). Our objectives were to describe the clinical characteristics of children with BBD and to examine the effects of BBD on patient outcomes in children with and without vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). METHODS: We combined data from 2 longitudinal studies (Randomized Intervention for Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux and Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) in which children <6 years of age with a first or second UTI were followed for 2 years. We compared outcomes for children with and without BBD, children with and without VUR, and children with VUR randomly assigned to prophylaxis or placebo. The outcomes examined were incidence of recurrent UTIs, renal scarring, surgical intervention, resolution of VUR, and treatment failure. RESULTS: BBD was present at baseline in 54% of the 181 toilet-trained children included; 94% of children with BBD reported daytime wetting, withholding maneuvers, or constipation. In children not on antimicrobial prophylaxis, 51% of those with both BBD and VUR experienced recurrent UTIs, compared with 20% of those with VUR alone, 35% with BBD alone, and 32% with neither BBD nor VUR. BBD was not associated with any of the other outcomes investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Among toilet-trained children, those with both BBD and VUR are at higher risk of developing recurrent UTIs than children with isolated VUR or children with isolated BBD and, accordingly, exhibit the greatest benefit from antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26647376

  1. Small bowel capsule endoscopy: Where are we after almost 15 years of use?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bruaene, Cedric; De Looze, Danny; Hindryckx, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The development of capsule endoscopy (CE) in 2001 has given gastroenterologists the opportunity to investigate the small bowel in a non-invasive way. CE is most commonly performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but other indications include diagnosis or follow-up of Crohn’s disease, suspicion of a small bowel tumor, diagnosis and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel lesions and celiac disease. Almost fifteen years have passed since the release of the small bowel capsule. The purpose of this review is to offer the reader a brief but complete overview on small bowel CE anno 2014, including the technical and procedural aspects, the possible complications and the most important indications. We will end with some future perspectives of CE. PMID:25610531

  2. Parameters of small bowel dysfunction in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Patton, T.J.; Follen Mitchell, M.; Neely Atkinson, E.; Eifel, P.; Gastorf, L.; Yancey, C.; Miller, D.; Wharton, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    Small bowel dysfunction is an important problem in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cervical cancer and may take many forms. The spectrum of small bowel dysfunction includes subtle findings such as malabsorption and more obvious complications such as obstruction and fistula formation. Predicting who will experience small bowel dysfunction is important so that prospective studies of these compications can be planned. We undertook a controlled retrospective review of patients with stage IB cervical carcinoma looking for parameters of small bowel dysfunction and their predictors to help in the design of a prospective study. This analysis suggests that the interval to development is long. The best predictor of diarrhea requiring medication was the number of laparotomies. A large sample size of stage IB patients would be necessary to prospectively study small bowel dysfunction in this population.

  3. Review of small-bowel cleansing scales in capsule endoscopy: A panoply of choices

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Ana; Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Carvalho, João

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of small-bowel cleansing is required to assess the reliability of findings in capsule endoscopy (CE). Moreover, consensus regarding the need of intestinal preparation for CE remains to be achieved. The presence of multiple grading scales for small-bowel preparation in CE, which are time-consuming and complicated, adds difficulty to the comparison of different small-bowel cleansing regimens and their application in clinical practice. Nowadays, a validated scale universally accepted for grading small-bowel cleansing is lacking. In fact, there are numerous grading systems with very different technical characteristics, namely, the parameters and the portion of the CE video that are analyzed, the objectivity of the analysis, the lesser or greater dependency on the operator, and the validation of the score. The authors performed a review which aims to systematize and summarize currently available small-bowel grading scales in CE. PMID:27668070

  4. Lubiprostone neither decreases gastric and small-bowel transit time nor improves visualization of small bowel for capsule endoscopy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hooks, S Bennett; Rutland, Travis J; Di Palma, Jack A

    2009-11-01

    Lubiprostone, a selective activator of type 2 chloride channels, is approved for treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation and recently constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. It has been suggested that lubiprostone has a prokinetic effect. This investigation was designed to evaluate lubiprostone as a preparation and propulsive agent for small-bowel capsule endoscopy. The PillCam Small Bowel capsule endoscopy system with the PillCam SB1 capsule and Rapid 5 software platform were used. The study was designed as a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty healthy adults. Gastric transit time (GTT), small-bowel transit time (SBTT), and adequacy of small-bowel cleansing preparation. The study subjects received 24 mug lubiprostone or placebo 30 minutes before PillCam capsule ingestion. Capsule endoscopy studies were read by 2 independent investigators unaware of the study medication received, and differences in interpretation were resolved by consensus. Anatomical landmarks were identified, and GTT and SBTT were calculated. Overall preparation quality assessment of the proximal, mid, and distal small bowel was determined by using a 4-step scale. The percentage of visualized bowel was determined by review of 10-minute video segments at 1-hour intervals after the capsule passed through the pylorus. In the lubiprostone group (n = 20), 2 subjects did not pass the capsule through the pylorus in the 8-hour battery life of the capsule. An additional 3 capsules did not pass into the colon. In the placebo group (n = 20), all capsules passed into the small bowel, but 1 did not pass into the colon. The subjects in whom the capsule did not pass into the small bowel were excluded from the small-bowel analysis. In the subjects in whom the capsule did reach the colon, the SBTT could not be calculated and they were excluded from SBTT analysis. The mean GTT in the lubiprostone group was 126 minutes and 43 minutes in the placebo group (P = .0095). The mean SBTT in the

  5. Historical analysis of experience with small bowel capsule endoscopy in a spanish tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Egea Valenzuela, Juan; Carrilero Zaragoza, Gabriel; Iglesias Jorquera, Elena; Tomás Pujante, Paula; Alberca de Las Parras, Fernando; Carballo Álvarez, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy was approved by the FDA in 2001. Gastrointestinal bleeding and inflammatory bowel disease are the main indications. It has been available in our hospital since 2004. We retrospectively analysed data from patients who underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy in our hospital from October 2004 to April 2015. Indications were divided into: Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (occult and overt), inflammatory bowel disease, and other indications. Findings were divided into: Vascular lesions, inflammatory lesions, other lesions, normal studies, and inconclusive studies. A total of 1027 out of 1291 small bowel studies were included. Mean patient age was 56.45 years; 471 were men and 556 women. The most common lesion observed was angiectasia, as an isolated finding or associated with other lesions. Findings were significant in up to 80% of studies when the indication was gastrointestinal bleeding, but in only 50% of studies in inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnostic yield was low in the group «other indications». No major complications were reported. Small bowel capsule endoscopy has high diagnostic yield in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, but yield is lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Our experience shows that capsule endoscopy is a safe and useful tool for the diagnosis of small bowel disease. The diagnostic yield of the technique in inflammatory bowel disease must be improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  6. Perioperative endoscopy of the whole small bowel in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lescut, D; Vanco, D; Bonnière, P; Lecomte-Houcke, M; Quandalle, P; Wurtz, A; Colombel, J F; Delmotte, J S; Paris, J C; Cortot, A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to search for small bowel lesions by means of a perioperative endoscopy in 20 patients operated on for Crohn's disease. Seven women and 13 men (mean age 29 years) had a total retrograde exploration to the angle of Treitz during an ileocolectomy (16 of 20 patients) or a colonic or ileal resection (four of 20 patients). Endoscopic exploration was completed, through an enterotomy, from the surgical area to the angle of Treitz. Periendoscopic biopsy samples were taken on macroscopic lesions and every 20 cm systematically. In 13 of 20 cases, various lesions scattered over the whole small intestine were found. These were aphthoid ulcerations (10 patients), superficial ulcerations (seven patients), mucosal oedema (three patients), non-ulcerative stenosis (three patients), erythema (two patients), pseudopolyps (two patients), deep ulcerations (two patients), and ulcerative stenosis (one patient). In seven patients none of the lesions detected at perioperative endoscopy had been recognised by preoperative evaluation or surgical inspection of the serosal surface. A typical granuloma was found at biopsy of lesions identified by endoscopy in three cases and at biopsy of an apparently healthy area in one case. Thus 65% of patients operated on for Crohn's disease had lesions of the small intestine detected by endoscopy, which were unrecognised before surgery in more than half of the cases. PMID:8504965

  7. Biomagnetic Techniques for Assessing Gastric and Small Bowel Electrical Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, L. Alan

    2004-09-01

    Recent advances in electrophysiology of the gastrointestinal tract have emphasized the need for methods of noninvasive assessment of gastric and small intestinal electrical activity (GEA and IEA). While the cutaneous electrogastrogram (EGG) may reveal the frequency dynamics of gastric electrical activity, other parameters important for characterizing the propagating electrical activity are not available from EGG recordings. Recent studies on the electroenterogram (EENG) are promising, but low-conductivity abdominal layers have complicated the identification of small intestinal electrical rhythms in cutaneous recordings. The magnetogastrogram (MGG) and magnetoenterogram (MENG) are able to characterize gastric and intestinal electrical activity noninvasively in terms of its frequency, power and characteristics of its propagation. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers are used to detect the minute magnetic fields associated with electrical activity of the gastrointestinal syncytium formed by interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle networks. Changes in GEA and IEA that occur in response to disease or abnormal conditions are reflected in MGG and MENG signals. Magnetic methods for assessing the electrical activity of the stomach and small bowel thus show great clinical promise.

  8. Pilot study of small bowel mucosal gene expression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; O'Neill, Jessica; Eckert, Deborah; Dyer, Roy; Na, Jie; Klee, Eric W; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Prior studies in with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) patients showed immune activation, secretion, and barrier dysfunction in jejunal or colorectal mucosa. We measured mRNA expression by RT-PCR of 91 genes reflecting tight junction proteins, chemokines, innate immunity, ion channels, transmitters, housekeeping genes, and controls for DNA contamination and PCR efficiency in small intestinal mucosa from 15 IBS-D and 7 controls (biopsies negative for celiac disease). Fold change was calculated using 2((-ΔΔCT)) formula. Nominal P values (P < 0.05) were interpreted with false detection rate (FDR) correction (q value). Cluster analysis with Lens for Enrichment and Network Studies (LENS) explored connectivity of mechanisms. Upregulated genes (uncorrected P < 0.05) were related to ion transport (INADL, MAGI1, and SONS1), barrier (TJP1, 2, and 3 and CLDN) or immune functions (TLR3, IL15, and MAPKAPK5), or histamine metabolism (HNMT); downregulated genes were related to immune function (IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL20) or antigen detection (TLR1 and 8). The following genes were significantly upregulated (q < 0.05) in IBS-D: INADL, MAGI1, PPP2R5C, MAPKAPK5, TLR3, and IL-15. Among the 14 nominally upregulated genes, there was clustering of barrier and PDZ domains (TJP1, TJP2, TJP3, CLDN4, INADL, and MAGI1) and clustering of downregulated genes (CCL20, TLR1, IL1B, and TLR8). Protein expression of PPP2R5C in nuclear lysates was greater in patients with IBS-D and controls. There was increase in INADL protein (median 9.4 ng/ml) in patients with IBS-D relative to controls (median 5.8 ng/ml, P > 0.05). In conclusion, altered transcriptome (and to lesser extent protein) expression of ion transport, barrier, immune, and mast cell mechanisms in small bowel may reflect different alterations in function and deserves further study in IBS-D.

  9. Optimization of oral contrast agents for MR imaging of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Schneemann, Herbert; Vogt, Florian M; Herborn, Christoph U; Ruhm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jorg F

    2003-07-01

    Effect on small-bowel distention of additives to water as contrast agents for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was assessed. Oral contrast agents included water and water in combination with mannitol, a bulk fiber laxative, locust bean gum, and a combination of mannitol and locust bean gum. Filling of the small bowel was quantified on coronal images obtained with two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence; bowel diameters were measured. Ingestion of water with locust bean gum and mannitol provided the best distention of the small bowel. MR imaging of the small bowel with oral administration of water can be improved with addition of osmotic and nonosmotic substances that lead to decreased water resorption.

  10. Computerized analysis of bowel sounds in normal and small bowel obstructed rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Richard; Mansy, Hansen; Uhing, Michael; Meyer, Peter; Kimura, Robert

    2003-04-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common surgical emergency which may be mimicked by ileus or other nonsurgical conditions. The aims of this work is to delineate gastrointestinal sound (GIS) correlates in a rat model. Seven rats were studied in paired SBO and control states. Computerized analysis of GIS was performed under continuous IV sedation. After adaptive filtering, every GIS event was isolated and analyzed for duration and dominant frequency. It was found that long duration sounds (greater than 100 ms) occurred in each of the obstructed, but in none of the nonobstructed cases (p=0.02). The overall mean event duration and dominant frequency in SBO compared to control states was both significantly longer and lower (22.42.6 vs 7.0+/-2.6 ms, p=0.001 for duration; and 296+/-34 vs 427+/-33, p=0.001 for frequency). Besides these mean differences, there was also a clear evolution with time in GIS characteristics, with lengthening of the duration (+0.56 ms/min, p=0.001) and lowering of the dominant frequency (-3.3 Hz/min, p=0.01). It is concluded that GIS analysis may prove useful in the noninvasive, rapid, and accurate diagnosis of SBO.

  11. Bowel obstruction secondary to an ectopic pancreas in the small bowels: About 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Haydar A; Sleiman, Youssef A; Hassoun, Ziad A; Elzaatari, Mohamad; Berjawi, Tarek; Hamdan, Wajdi; Allouch, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is most commonly found in the jejunum and stomach. Most patients remain asymptomatic, and the diagnosis is usually made at autopsy or incidentally. We report here 2 cases of intestinal occlusion, secondary to an ectopic pancreatic tissue. Both cases were managed successfully by laparoscopy and laparotomy with subsequent segmental intestinal resection. Case 1 - An elderly patient presented to the ER because of intestinal occlusion. Paraclinical investigations were consistent with occlusion, with ileal suffering signs on CT-scan. After laparotomy and segmental intestinal resection were done, histopathalogy showed evidence of ectopic pancreas obstructing the intestinal lumen. Case 2 - A young man presented to the ER with acute onset of epigastric pain. signs of peritoneal irritation. Ct-scan showed evidence of small bowel intussusception. Exploratory laparoscopy was done, and confirmed the diagnosis. The intussusceptum was at the level of the proximal jejunum. The suffering intestinal part was exteriorized and then resected. Histopathology was consistent with an ectopic pancreas. Symptomatic ectopic pancreas is extremely rare. Symptoms may include, bleeding, intestinal occlusion and intussusception. Few similar cases have been reported in the literature, and the current ones are to be added. As mentioned above, ectopic pancreatic tissue rarely causes symptoms. We presented 2 cases that presented 2 possible complications secondary to this pathology. Both cases were managed successfully. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Distinct Abnormalities of Small Bowel and Regional Colonic Volumes in Subtypes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Revealed by MRI.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ching; Chaddock, Gemma; Marciani Laurea, Luca; Costigan, Carolyn; Cox, Eleanor; Hoad, Caroline; Pritchard, Susan; Gowland, Penny; Spiller, Robin

    2017-02-01

    Non-invasive biomarkers which identify different mechanisms of disease in subgroups of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) could be valuable. Our aim was to seek useful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters that could distinguish each IBS subtypes. 34 healthy volunteers (HV), 30 IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), 16 IBS with constipation (IBS-C), and 11 IBS with mixed bowel habit (IBS-M) underwent whole-gut transit and small and large bowel volumes assessment with MRI scans from t=0 to t=360 min. Since the bowel frequency for IBS-M were similar to IBS-D, IBS-M and IBS-D were grouped together and labeled as IBS non-constipation group (IBS-nonC). Median (interquartile range): fasting small bowel water content in IBS-nonC was 21 (10-42), significantly less than HV at 44 ml (15-70), P<0.01 as was the postprandial area under the curve (AUC) P<0.01. The fasting transverse colon volumes in IBS-C were significantly larger at 253 (200-329) compared with HV, IBS-nonC whose values were 165 (117-255) and 198 (106-270) ml, respectively, P=0.02. Whole-gut transit time for IBS-C was prolonged at 69 (51-111), compared with HV at 34 (4-63) and IBS-D at 34 (17-78) h, P=0.03. Bloating score (VAS 0-10 cm) correlated with transverse colon volume at t=405 min, Spearman r=0.21, P=0.04. The constricted small bowel in IBS-nonC and the dilated transverse colon in IBS-C point to significant differences in underlying mechanisms of disease.

  13. Distinct Abnormalities of Small Bowel and Regional Colonic Volumes in Subtypes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Revealed by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Ching; Chaddock, Gemma; Marciani Laurea, Luca; Costigan, Carolyn; Cox, Eleanor; Hoad, Caroline; Pritchard, Susan; Gowland, Penny; Spiller, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Non-invasive biomarkers which identify different mechanisms of disease in subgroups of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) could be valuable. Our aim was to seek useful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters that could distinguish each IBS subtypes. METHODS: 34 healthy volunteers (HV), 30 IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), 16 IBS with constipation (IBS-C), and 11 IBS with mixed bowel habit (IBS-M) underwent whole-gut transit and small and large bowel volumes assessment with MRI scans from t=0 to t=360 min. Since the bowel frequency for IBS-M were similar to IBS-D, IBS-M and IBS-D were grouped together and labeled as IBS non-constipation group (IBS-nonC). RESULTS: Median (interquartile range): fasting small bowel water content in IBS-nonC was 21 (10–42), significantly less than HV at 44 ml (15–70), P<0.01 as was the postprandial area under the curve (AUC) P<0.01. The fasting transverse colon volumes in IBS-C were significantly larger at 253 (200–329) compared with HV, IBS-nonC whose values were 165 (117–255) and 198 (106–270) ml, respectively, P=0.02. Whole-gut transit time for IBS-C was prolonged at 69 (51–111), compared with HV at 34 (4–63) and IBS-D at 34 (17–78) h, P=0.03. Bloating score (VAS 0–10 cm) correlated with transverse colon volume at t=405 min, Spearman r=0.21, P=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The constricted small bowel in IBS-nonC and the dilated transverse colon in IBS-C point to significant differences in underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:27958282

  14. Outpatient management of small bowel obstruction in terminal ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, M P; Roberts, J A; Morley, G W

    1987-11-01

    A technique for home gastric decompression and hydration was developed for use in patients with terminal ovarian cancer and bowel obstruction. In three of four patients undergoing a standard gastrostomy the results were unsatisfactory, requiring reintubation. The two most recent patients on whom the technique was used were able to leave the hospital within two weeks despite their bowel obstruction.

  15. Mesenteric Vasculature-guided Small Bowel Segmentation on 3D CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Louie, Adeline; Nguyen, Tan B.; Wank, Stephen; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to its importance and possible applications in visualization, tumor detection and pre-operative planning, automatic small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis of small bowel pathology. However, segmenting the small bowel directly on CT scans is very difficult because of the low image contrast on CT scans and high tortuosity of the small bowel and its close proximity to other abdominal organs. Motivated by the intensity characteristics of abdominal CT images, the anatomic relationship between the mesenteric vasculature and the small bowel, and potential usefulness of the mesenteric vasculature for establishing the path of the small bowel, we propose a novel mesenteric vasculature map-guided method for small bowel segmentation on high-resolution CT angiography scans. The major mesenteric arteries are first segmented using a vessel tracing method based on multi-linear subspace vessel model and Bayesian inference. Second, multi-view, multi-scale vesselness enhancement filters are used to segment small vessels, and vessels directly or indirectly connecting to the superior mesenteric artery are classified as mesenteric vessels. Third, a mesenteric vasculature map is built by linking vessel bifurcation points, and the small bowel is segmented by employing the mesenteric vessel map and fuzzy connectness. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors with manually labeled reference standard. The result, 82.5% volume overlap accuracy compared with the reference standard, shows it is feasible to segment the small bowel on CT scans using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. PMID:23807437

  16. Double-balloon enteroscopy in small bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Guo; Shan, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Ming; L, Lin; Yue, Min; Chen, Guang-Wu; Gu, Qing; Zhu, Hua-Tuo; Xu, Guo-Qiang; Chen, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of double-balloon entoroscopy (DBE) in small bowel diseases (SBDs) in China. A retrospective review of 674 consecutive patients who underwent DBE between January 2007 and November 2015 was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups by age, young group (<45 years), middle-aged group (45–65 years), and elderly group (>65 years). Data were collected with regard to demographics, clinical, endoscopic findings, complications, diagnostic yield, and management. A total of 729 DBE procedures were performed successfully in our series. More than 20 types of SBDs were found with the detection rate of 70.9%(517/729). The majority of patients were Crohn's disease (33.4%,225/674), followed by tumor (18.8%,127/674) and angioectasia (7.9%, 53/674). Endoscopic treatment was performed in 60 patients in which hemostasis (17,28.3%) and polypectomy (15,25%) were the predominant form of intervention used. Adverse events occurred in 6 patients (0.96%,6/729) including perforation, hemorrhage, aspiration pneumonia. No acute pancreatitis or other major complications occurred. Adenocarcinoma, GIST, and lymphoma were the most common tumor detected, the majority of tumors located in the jejunum (56.7%), The detection rate of angioectasia was also higher in the jejunum (54.7%),77.8% of Crohn's disease was located in the ileum. The positive rate of DBE in small bowel tumor and Crohn's disease were significantly higher than that of angioectasia (P<0.05). In young cohort, Crohn's disease (48.1%) was the most commonly diseases followed by tumor (10.4%) and nonspecific enteritis (7.1%). Yet in the elderly group, the majority of patients were tumor (27.6%); angioectasia (21.3%) was also detected frequently. The positive rate of capsule endoscopy was 75.44 %(202/268) which was a little high than DBE (67.9%, 182/268) (P > 0.05). The obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) was the most common indication, and

  17. Bowel sounds analysis: a novel noninvasive method for diagnosis of small-volume ascites.

    PubMed

    Liatsos, Christos; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J; Mavrogiannis, Christos; Patch, David; Panas, Stavros M; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2003-08-01

    Ascites is more difficult to detect when only a small quantity is present. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the optimal bowel sound characteristics in order to distinguish no ascites from small-volume ascites by advanced processing of bowel sound wave patterns. This analysis results in the definition of the normal range of bowel sound patterns, thus providing a novel, simple, and noninvasive way of determining on abnormal pattern, which may reflect presence of small volume ascites. Cirrhotic patients with radiologically proven small-volume ascites and a control group were subjected to bowel sound recordings. The latter were analyzed using a denoising wavelet transform-based filter and a higher-order crossings-based technique in a blinded fashion for linearly distinguishing the two classes. Scatter plots of third-order zero crossings reflect distinct changes seen in the denoised bowel sound pattern between patients and controls due to altered transmission path, providing a distinct separation of all cirrhotic patients with small ascites from controls (P < 0.0001). We conclude that the proposed bowel sounds analysis appears to provide new information regarding the changes of the bowel sound patterns due to the presence of small-volume ascites, potentially contributing towards a safe, effective, noninvasive, and easily implemented alternative method for the diagnosis of small volume ascites at the bedside.

  18. Reducing false positives of small bowel segmentation on CT scans by localizing colon regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Automated small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of small bowel pathology, such as tumor detection and pre-operative planning. We previously proposed a method to segment the small bowel using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. The method performed well on small bowel segmentation but produced many false positives, most of which were located on the colon. To improve the accuracy of small bowel segmentation, we propose a semi-automated method with minimum interaction to distinguish the colon from the small bowel. The method utilizes anatomic knowledge about the mesenteric vasculature and a statistical method of colon detection. First, anatomic labeling of the mesenteric arteries is used to identify the arteries supplying the colon. Second, a statistical detector is created by combining two colon probability maps. One probability map is of the colon location and is generated from colon centerlines generated from CT colonography (CTC) data. Another probability map is of 3D colon texture using Haralick features and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. The two probability maps are combined to localize colon regions, i.e., voxels having high probabilities on both maps were labeled as colon. Third, colon regions identified by anatomical labeling and the statistical detector are removed from the original results of small bowel segmentation. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors. The reference standard consisted of manually-labeled small bowel segmentation. The method reduced the voxel-based false positive rate of small bowel segmentation from 19.7%±3.9% to 5.9%±2.3%, with two-tailed P-value < 0.0001.

  19. Knotted bowel: small-bowel obstruction from coiled peritoneal shunt catheters. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sanan, A; Haines, S J; Nyberg, S L; Leonard, A S

    1995-06-01

    Knotting of a peritoneal catheter around a loop of bowel is a rare occurrence, which may lead to bowel obstruction. The incomplete removal of two ventriculoperitoneal shunts resulted in two cases of iatrogenically knotted peritoneal catheters. One patient underwent a laparotomy for relief of obstruction and the other was successfully treated by uncoiling the catheter by means of a wire passed into its lumen. A plan for management of a knotted peritoneal catheter is outlined.

  20. Dietary calcium does not reduce experimental colorectal carcinogenesis after small bowel resection despite reducing cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, G H; Thompson, H; Neoptolemos, J P; Keighley, M R

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that colorectal carcinogenesis is accompanied by increased mucosal cell proliferation and that the converse may also apply. To examine this thesis, the crypt cell production rate (CCPR) was measured in eight groups of rats (n = 187) that had received 1,2 dimethylhydrazine, 70% small bowel resection, supplemental dietary calcium, or a combination of these. Analysis of variance showed the following: (1) the CCPR decreased between the ileum and distal colon; (2) the CCPR decreased between 16 and 32 weeks; (3) 1,2 dimethylhydrazine and small bowel resection increased the CCPR and calcium decreased the CCPR independently of one another; (4) the CCPR interacted with 1,2 dimethylhydrazine x small bowel resection, calcium x 1,2 dimethylhydrazine and interacted between the site of bowel and calcium, 1,2 dimethylhydrazine, small bowel resection, and 1,2 dimethylhydrazine x small bowel resection (p = 0.014 to p < 0.001). The tumour yield was reduced by calcium in 1,2 dimethylhydrazine treated animals (chi 2 = 14.1, df = 3, p < 0.01) but was unaffected by calcium in 1,2 dimethylhydrazine and small bowel resection treated animals despite significant differences in the CCPR. An increase of the CCPR both preceded and accompanied colorectal carcinogenesis but reduction of the CCPR was not invariably accompanied by reduced carcinogenes. PMID:1452077

  1. Noninvasive detection of small bowel electrical activity from SQUID magnetometer measurements using SOBI.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jon; Obioha, Chibuike; Goodale, Adam; Bradshaw, Alan; Richards, William

    2008-01-01

    We report a robust method for noninvasive biomagnetic detection of small bowel electrical activity. Simultaneous Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer (MENG) and serosal electrode recordings were made on pig small bowel. The SOBI blind-source separation algorithm was used to separate the underlying source signals of the MENG. Comparison of identified SOBI components to the serosal recordings validated the underlying MENG sources as being enteric in origin. Non-invasive detection of small bowel electrical activity could have significant implications in a clinical setting.

  2. Evidence-Based Guide on Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is the diagnostic test of choice for the evaluation of overt and occult small bowel bleeding. Its yield is higher in patients presenting with overt bleeding. The yield is also improved if the capsule is performed soon after the presentation of bleeding. Capsule endoscopy has a complementary role with cross-sectional imaging to triage patients for appropriate management, including deep enteroscopy, surgery, or, if negative, conservative management. Although capsule endoscopy is useful to detect vascular and inflammatory lesions, it appears to have a significant miss rate for solitary small bowel lesions, including tumors. The main adverse event is capsule retention in patients with underlying small bowel obstruction. PMID:28450815

  3. Medical Imaging in Small Bowel Crohn's Disease-Computer Tomography Enterography, Magnetic Resonance Enterography, and Ultrasound: "Which One Is the Best for What?".

    PubMed

    Greenup, Astrid-Jane; Bressler, Brian; Rosenfeld, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Small bowel imaging in Crohn's disease (CD) is an important adjunct to endoscopy for the diagnosis, assessment of postoperative recurrence, and detection of complications. The best imaging modality for such indications though remains unclear. This systematic review aims to identify the imaging modality of choice considering the use of ultrasound (US), computed tomography enterography (CTE), and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE). Databases were systematically searched for studies pertaining to the performance of US, CTE, and MRE, as compared with a predefined reference standard in the assessment of small bowel CD. Thirty-three studies, from a total of 1427 studies, were included in the final analysis. A comparable performance was demonstrated for MRE, CTE, and US for the diagnosis of small CD. Ultrasound was found to have the highest accuracy in the differentiation of inflammation and fibrosis. Postoperative recurrence detection was feasible with the use of MRE and US. All 3 modalities were shown to have a role in the detection of small bowel CD complications. The radiation exposure associated with CTE can be minimized by using lower radiation protocols. Ultrasound, CTE, and MRE all play an important role in the diagnosis and management of small bowel CD, with preference for a particular modality being influenced by specific indication, institution resources, and patient preference.

  4. Small bowel carcinoid: Location isn't everything!

    PubMed

    Hari, Danielle M; Goff, Stephanie L; Reich, Heidi J; Leung, Anna M; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Ji Hey; Wolin, Edward; Amersi, Farin

    2013-08-27

    To investigate the prognostic significance of the primary site of disease for small bowel carcinoid (SBC) using a population-based analysis. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was queried for histologically confirmed SBC between the years 1988 and 2009. Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using Log rank testing. Log rank and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify predictors of survival using age, year of diagnosis, race, gender, tumor histology/size/location, tumor-node-metastasis stage, number of lymph nodes (LNs) examined and percent of LNs with metastases. Of the 3763 patients, 51.2% were male with a mean age of 62.13 years. Median follow-up was 50 mo. The 10-year OS and DSS for duodenal primaries were significantly better when compared to jejunal and ileal primaries (P = 0.02 and < 0.0001, respectively). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, after adjusting for multiple factors, primary site location was not a significant predictor of survival (P = 0.752 for OS and P = 0.966 DSS) while age, number of primaries, number of LNs examined, T-stage and M-stage were independent predictors of survival. This 21-year, population-based study of SBC challenges the concept that location of the primary lesion alone is a significant predictor of survival.

  5. Phytobezoar-induced small bowel obstruction associated with a concomitant gastric phytobezoar and ulcer in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    De Cesare, Alessandro; Fiori, Enrico; Bononi, Marco; Ferraro, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Bezoars are aggregates of indigested foreign material that accumulate in the gastroenteric tract, expecially in the stomach and in the narrowest points of the small bowel. They often occur in subjects who follow a diet rich in fruit and vegetables and in those one who previously underwent gastric resective surgery for peptic ulcer. Bezoar formation has even been observed in case of reduced gastric motility and secretion due to diabetes, hypothyroidism, pernicious anemia, myotonic syndromes, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. As they are an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction, phytobezoars are often not considered in the differential diagnosis of occlusive intestinal syndromes and so frequently come as an intraoperative finding. A consequence of this missed diagnosis in the preoperative period is an unnecessary diagnostic delay that can significantly increase morbidity and mortality. This case report illustrates the need to include phytobezoars in the preoperative diagnostic workout of intestinal obstruction in order to rule out the presence of multiple bezoars and prevent recurrent obstruction. Now that phytobezoars are becoming a less infrequent cause of small bowel obstruction than previously thought, such a diagnostic possibility should always be considered.

  6. Prolonged ambulant recordings of small bowel motility demonstrate abnormalities in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kellow, J E; Gill, R C; Wingate, D L

    1990-05-01

    Continuous 72-h recordings of duodenojejunal contractile activity were obtained from 20 freely ambulant subjects; pressure was detected by two strain-gauge sensors incorporated in a transnasal catheter attached to an encoder and a miniature tape recorder. The subjects were 12 patients with irritable bowel syndrome, 6 of whom were constipation predominant and 6 of whom were diarrhea predominant, and 8 healthy controls. The procedure was well tolerated by all subjects and did not interfere with sleep or normal activity. In all subjects, the diurnal migrating motor complex cycle was characterized by a brief phase 1 and a prolonged phase 2; this was reversed during sleep when phase 2 was virtually absent. All subjects showed a circadian variation in migrating motor complex propagation velocity, and there was no difference in the patterns of motor activity during sleep between any of the groups. During the day, the duration of postprandial motor activity was shorter in irritable bowel syndrome patients than in controls, and diurnal migrating motor complex intervals were shorter in diarrhea-predominant than in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. In 11 of 12 inflammatory bowel syndrome patients, episodes of clustered contractions recurring at 0.9-min intervals were noted; these episodes had a mean duration of 46 min and were often associated with transient abdominal pain and discomfort. In both groups of irritable bowel syndrome patients, defecation was significantly (p less than 0.01) prolonged with a greater number of voluntary abdominal contractions (p less than 0.01) than in controls. Prolonged ambulant monitoring of proximal bowel motor activity in subjects who are free to move, eat, and sleep as they choose has, for the first time, clearly defined the striking difference in motility between the sleeping and waking state and shown that abnormalities associated with irritable bowel syndrome are confined to the latter.

  7. Glucagon in the scintigraphic diagnosis of small-bowel hemorrhage by Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Juni, J.

    1984-04-01

    Twelve patients undergoing scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBC) exhibited abnormal small-bowel activity and were given glucagon to assess its role in detecting bleeding from the small bowel. Six demonstrated focal accumulation of activity which was not identified prior to glucagon. Endoscopy, barium studies, angiography, and colonoscopy located the small-bowel bleeding site in 4 patients; in the other 2, studies of the colon failed to show the bleeding site and the origin was presumed to be the small bowel. The authors suggest that intravenous glucagon can be beneficial as an adjuvant to Tc-99m-RBC when diagnosing bleeding from the small bowel.

  8. Two cases of small bowel obstruction secondary to a swallowed potato.

    PubMed

    Castren, E; Hakeem, A; Mahmood, N S; Aryal, K

    2015-12-21

    Bowel obstruction due to bezoars (compaction of ingested material within the gastrointestinal tract) is a rare, but well documented occurrence. In this paper, we present two cases of potato-induced small bowel obstruction. Both patients were approximately 50 years old and had cerebral palsy and learning disabilities, respectively. They presented with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting, with no medical or surgical history. Diagnosis of small bowel obstruction was confirmed by CT prior to taking the patients to the operating theatre, where whole potatoes were found to be obstructing each patient's bowel lumen. Both patients underwent laparotomy with enterotomy and removal of the potato. They both made a good recovery. Through a literature review of bezoar-induced bowel obstruction, these cases highlight important diagnostic and management principles.

  9. Differences of microbiota in small bowel and faeces between irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chang, Pi-Feng; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lee, Tzong-Hsi; Chen, Yun; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggested that colonic microbiota have impacts on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. However, the knowledge about the association of small intestine (SI) microbiota with IBS is limited. We aimed to investigate the gut microbiota composition of SI and stool in IBS patients. Biopsies of jejunum mucosa by balloon-assisted enteroscopy and faecal samples from 28 IBS patients and 19 healthy controls were analysed by next-generation sequencing method. The three major phyla in SI microbiota of case/control groups were Proteobacteria (32.8/47.7%), Bacteroidetes (25.2/15.3%), and Firmicutes (19.8/11.2%), and those of stool were Bacteroidetes (41.3/45.8%), Firmicutes (40.7/38.2%), and Proteobacteria (15.4/7.1%). Analysis based on the family level, IBS patients had a higher proportion of Veillonellaceae (mean proportion 6.49% versus 2.68%, p = 0.046) in stool than controls. Prevotellaceae was more abundant in IBS patients than in control group (14.27% versus 6.13%, p = 0.023), while Mycobacteriaceae (0.06% versus 0.17%, p = 0.024) and Neisseriaceae (6.40% versus 8.94%, p = 0.038) was less abundant in IBS patients' jejunal mucosa than those in controls. This less abundant jejunal Neisseriaceae was associated with more severe IBS (p = 0.03). The ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in the stool of IBS-diarrhoea type patients was approximately three-fold higher, and the ratio of Firmicutes to Actinobacter in SI of IBS-mixed type patients was about nine-fold higher than healthy subjects. Higher abundance of colonic Veillonellaceae and SI Prevotellaceae, and lower amount of oral cavity normal flora in proximal SI were found in IBS patients. We may manipulate these bacteria in IBS patients in future studies (ClinicalTrial.gov Number NCT01679730).

  10. Minimization of small bowel volume within treatment fields utilizing customized belly boards

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, T.G.; Mehta, M.P.; Bertelrud, K.L.; Buchler, D.A.; Frank, L.E.; Gehring, M.A.; Kubsad, S.S.; Utrie, P.C.; Kinsella, T.J. )

    1990-08-01

    Thirty consecutive patients with pelvic malignancies were evaluated prospectively for the impact of a novel bowel minimization device (belly board) on the volume of small bowel included within a four field pelvic radiation plan. A customized polyurethane and styrofoam bowel immobilization mold was created for each patient in the prone position. Using contrast enhanced CT scanning on a dedicated radiation treatment planning scanner, we imaged the location of the small intestine in the supine position and the prone position aided by the belly board. Custom in-house interactive image analysis software was developed to allow volumetric determination of small bowel within the treatment portals. The mean small bowel volume was reduced by 66% (299 cm3 to 102 cm3), comparing the standard supine position to the prone position assisted by the belly board. In 13 patients without prior pelvic surgery, the small bowel volume reduction was a more dramatic 74% (334 cm3 to 88 cm3). All patients were found to benefit from this prone belly board setup regardless of body habitus, weight, and age. Compliance with the set-up including use of bladder distension was excellent. All patients completed their pelvic radiotherapy without requiring a treatment break. Weight loss at completion averaged less than 5%. Seventy-six percent of patients experienced little or no diarrhea. This technique is comfortable, inexpensive, highly reproducible, and permits maximal bowel displacement from standard pelvic radiotherapy fields.

  11. Coffee Enema for Preparation for Small Bowel Video Capsule Endoscopy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-01-01

    Coffee enemas are believed to cause dilatation of bile ducts and excretion of bile through the colon wall. Proponents of coffee enemas claim that the cafestol palmitate in coffee enhances the activity of glutathione S-transferase, an enzyme that stimulates bile excretion. During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), excreted bile is one of the causes of poor preparation of the small bowel. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effect of coffee enema for preparation of the small bowel during VCE. In this pilot study, 17 of 34 patients were assigned to the coffee enema plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2 L ingestion group, whereas the 17 remaining control patients received 2 L of PEG only. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated in the two patient groups. Bowel preparations in the proximal segments of small bowel were not differ between two groups. In the mid and distal segments of the small intestine, bowel preparations tend to be better in patients who received coffee enemas plus PEG than in patients who received PEG only. The coffee enema group did not experience any complications or side effects. Coffee enemas may be a feasible option, and there were no clinically significant adverse events related to coffee enemas. More prospective randomized studies are warranted to improve small bowel preparation for VCE. PMID:25136541

  12. In vivo thermography during small bowel fusion using radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Lim, C Beverly B; Goldin, Robert D; Elson, Daniel S; Darzi, Ara; Hanna, George B

    2010-10-01

    Radiofrequency-controlled tissue fusion is a novel technology but the associated lateral thermal damage has not been determined. Lateral thermal spread of in vivo and ex vivo bowel in a live porcine model fused by radiofrequency energy was evaluated using dynamic infrared thermography and histology. Mean maximum thermal spread measured on histology was <1.2 mm, with no significant difference between thermal spreads for in vivo and ex vivo bowel for radiofrequency energy delivered at 50 V (p = 0.98) and 100 V (p = 0.85). Mean total maximum thermal spread measured by dynamic infrared thermography was <3.9 mm wide on both sides of the instrument with no significant difference between thermal spreads for in vivo and ex vivo bowel for radiofrequency energy delivered at 50 V (p = 0.34) and 100 V (p = 0.19). Fusion quality for in vivo tissue was better when radiofrequency energy was delivered at 100 V compared with 50 V. However, thermal spread measurements and maximum temperatures reached in the tissue were similar in well- and poorly fused bowel. Thermal changes in well-fused bowel were more uniform throughout the different bowel wall layers, whereas in poorly fused tissues, the mucosa did not show thermally induced changes. There were no significant differences between the maximum temperatures detected for in vivo and ex vivo bowel for radiofrequency energy delivered at 50 V (p = 0.25) and 100 V (p = 0.14). The total thermal changes at both sides of fused bowel are <3.9 mm. The heat sink effect of the application instrument overshadowed any effects of perfusion on limiting thermal spread. Also, using greater amounts of radiofrequency energy at 100 V to achieve better quality fusion does not necessarily increase lateral thermal damage compared with 50 V.

  13. Intraoperative transillumination with water-filling of lumen for localizing lesions in occult small bowel bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangheng; Cao, Yuning; Yang, Daogui; Li, Senlin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Occult small bowel bleeding is always difficult to locate by either radiological examination or endoscopy. When the site of bleeding cannot be found by nonsurgical measures, exploratory laparotomy becomes necessary. Patient concerns: A 63-year-old woman with a half-month history of occult gastrointestinal bleeding failed to many conservative therapies. Interventions: Intraoperative transillumination with water-filling of lumen was performed. Diagnoses: Small bowel bleeding was diagnosed intraoperatively. Outcomes: Segmental resection of the diseased small bowel with side-to-side anastomosis was performed while the histology showed no significant abnormality. Lessons: The technique of intraoperative transillumination with water-filling of lumen allows simple, accurate, and rapid localization of lesions in occult small bowel bleeding and facilitates precise and definitive surgery. PMID:28151907

  14. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Low Dose Aspirin-Associated Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shiotani, Akiko; Murao, Takahisa; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Sakakibara, Takashi; Nishio, Kazuto; Haruma, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspirin-induced enteropathy is now increasingly being recognized although the pathogenesis of small intestinal damage induced by aspirin is not well understood and related risk factors have not been established. Aim To investigate pharmacogenomic profile of low dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small bowel bleeding. Methods Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed using the Affymetrix DMET™ Plus Premier Pack. Genotypes of candidate genes associated with small bowel bleeding were determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay kits and direct sequencing. Results In the validation study in overall 37 patients with small bowel bleeding and 400 controls, 4 of 27 identified SNPs: CYP4F11 (rs1060463) GG (p=0.003), CYP2D6 (rs28360521) GG (p=0.02), CYP24A1 (rs4809957) T allele (p=0.04), and GSTP1 (rs1695) G allele (p=0.04) were significantly more frequent in the small bowel bleeding group compared to the controls. After adjustment for significant factors, CYP2D6 (rs28360521) GG (OR 4.11, 95% CI. 1.62 -10.4) was associated with small bowel bleeding. Conclusions CYP4F11 and CYP2D6 SNPs may identify patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced small bowel bleeding. PMID:24367646

  15. Small bowel obstruction following perforation of the uterus at induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Nkor, S K; Igberase, G O; Osime, O C; Faleyimu, B L; Babalola, R

    2009-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is an important contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality. To present a case of small bowel obstruction following perforation of the uterus at induced abortion. A 36-year-old woman, presented at a private hospital, with abdominal pain and weight loss. She had full clinical assessment and laboratory investigations which indicated small bowel obstruction following perforation of the uterus at induced abortion, and was commenced on treatment. She was para 5+0. Her main complaints were abdominal and weight loss following induced abortion of a 12- week pregnancy, four months prior to presentation. At presentation the tools (ultrasound scan, plain abdominal radiograph and barium enema) used for diagnoses only suggested some form of intestinal obstruction and were unremarkable. Correct diagnoses indicating small bowel obstruction was only made at laparotomy. An exploratory laparotomy, adhesiolysis, small bowel resection, end to end anastomosis and bowel decompression was done after bowel preparation. Laparotomy has an enviable place in bowel injuries secondary to uterine perforation especially when there is a diagnostic dilemma. Nigerian female population requires continuous health education on widespread and effective use of contraception. Physicians need training and retraining on abortion techniques and management of abortion complications.

  16. Spontaneous reduction of small bowel herniation through the foramen of Winslow: importance of a timely approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung-Gyo

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of young female patient presenting with acute onset abdominal pain. Abdominopelvic CT revealed herniation through the foramen of Winslow. The patient was transferred to our hospital and underwent laparoscopic exploration. Though spontaneous reduction was detected, segmental resection of the impacted small bowel was inevitable due to ischemic change. Our case suggests that reducing the time until surgery is very important to lower the probability of bowel resection in case of small bowel herniation through the foramen of Winslow. PMID:28203560

  17. Small bowel obstruction in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis related desmoid disease.

    PubMed

    Xhaja, X; Church, J

    2013-12-01

    Intra-abdominal desmoid disease is one of the most common extra-intestinal manifestations of familial adenomatous polyposis. Small bowel obstruction occurs frequently in affected patients and is notoriously difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to review the management and outcome of desmoid-related small bowel obstruction. This was a retrospective, descriptive study of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and intra-abdominal desmoid disease who developed small bowel obstruction. Demographic data and data concerning the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of the bowel obstructions were abstracted from the polyposis database or patients' records. Patients with obstruction unrelated to desmoid disease were excluded. There were 47 patients (30 women and 17 men). Median age at first bowel obstruction was 24.2 (interquartile range 19.2-34.2) years. The median time from index surgery to first bowel obstruction was 4.1 (interquartile range 1.5-9.0) years. Twenty-two patients had a colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis and 21 a proctocolectomy and ileoanal pouch. Obstruction was treated medically in 29% of cases and surgically in 69%. Thirteen patients had total parental nutrition. Thirty (63.8%) had a second episode of small bowel obstruction at a mean of 5.3 years after the first, 50% of which were treated medically. Eighteen (37.5%) patients had more than two episodes of bowel obstruction. There were 118 operations, including lysis of adhesions (29), small bowel resection (14), bypass (12), ileostomy (12), desmoid excision (9) and stricturoplasty (2). Desmoid-related small bowel obstruction in familial adenomatous polyposis patients requires multiple surgical strategies to restore a patent gastrointestinal tract. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO THE LITERATURE?: This is the only series in the literature specifically addressing small bowel obstruction in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and intra-abdominal desmoid disease. The data show that small

  18. Small bowel adenocarcinoma and Crohn's disease: any further ahead than 50 years ago?

    PubMed

    Cahill, Caitlin; Gordon, Philip H; Petrucci, Andrea; Boutros, Marylise

    2014-09-07

    This review of the literature on small bowel carcinoma associated with Crohn's disease specifically addresses the incidence, risk factors, and protective factors which have been identified. It also reviews the clinical presentation, the current modalities of diagnosis, the pathology, treatment, and surveillance. Finally, the prognosis and future direction are addressed. Our experience with small bowel adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease is reported. Readers will be provided with a better understanding of this rare and often poorly recognized complication of Crohn's disease.

  19. Small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar formation within meckel diverticulum: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Frazzini, V.I. Jr.; English, W.J.; Bashist, B.; Moore, E.

    1996-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction due to a phytobezoar within a Meckel diverticulum is exceedingly rare, with only seven reported cases in the surgical literature. The most important precipitating factor is the ingestion of agents high in fiber and cellulose. Small bowel obstruction in all but one case was due to retrograde propagation of the bezoar into the small bowel lumen. We report the clinical and CT findings in such a patient following a vegetarian diet. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors with Inguinal Metastases: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P; Askarian, Farhad; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are frequently characterized by a strong propensity to metastasize to the liver, mesentery, and peritoneum. However, only a few extra-abdominal metastatic sites have been reported in the published literature. The present paper implicates that primary small bowel NETs may unusually metastasize to the inguinal lymph nodes. Furthermore, we discuss the formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with the metastatic NETs. PMID:27555990

  1. Evaluation of Bevacizumab in Advanced Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Dincer; Sendur, Mehmet Ali; Kefeli, Umut; Ustaalioglu, Basak Bala; Aydin, Ozhan; Yildirim, Emre; Isik, Deniz; Ozcelik, Melike; Surmeli, Heves; Oyman, Abdilkerim; Isik, Selver; Sener, Nur; Ercelep, Ozlem; Odabas, Hatice; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet; Gumus, Mahmut

    2017-03-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rarely seen tumors. Data regarding the use of chemotherapy together with bevacizumab in patients with advanced SBA are lacking. The aim of this study was the evaluation of treatment with bevacizumab in advanced SBA. Twenty-eight patients from 5 centers with a diagnosis of advanced SBA who received first-line treatments with modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6; oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil) and FOLFIRI (leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan) chemotherapy regimens were involved in the study. All patients were divided into 2 groups; those who received bevacizumab together with these chemotherapy regimens (Chemo+Bev group) and those who did not receive bevacizumab (Chemo group). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times of all population were 8.7 months and 16.9 months, respectively. The overall response rate was 43.7% in the Chemo group and 58.3% in the Chemo+Bev group. The median PFSs in the Chemo and Chemo+Bev groups were found to be 7.7 months and 9.6 months, respectively, and the median OSs were 14.8 months and 18.5 months, respectively. There was not a significant difference between the groups in terms of overall response rate, PFS, and OS. Although there was no significant difference in any of the outcomes, use of bevacizumab together with chemotherapy is a more effective treatment approach compared with chemotherapy alone, and it does not cause an excess of significant toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Small bowel capsule endoscopy for the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: When we should do it and what should we expect.

    PubMed

    Viazis, N; Anastasiou, J; Karamanolis, D G

    2016-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs (i.e. recurrent or persistent iron deficiency anemia, fecal occult blood test positivity or visible bleeding) after a negative initial workout that necessarily includes gastroscopy and colonoscopy. In clinical practice, small bowel capsule endoscopy is recommended as a third stage examination in these patients, since it is a simple, safe, non-invasive and reliable test. To date there are three available small bowel capsule systems that have gained FDA approval and their diagnostic yield has shown to be superior to other diagnostic modalities for the investigation of the small bowel in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The test should be performed as close to the bleeding episode as possible and the administration of a purgative bowel preparation before the administration of capsule endoscopy is recommended by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). Issues that still remain to be solved are the definition of bleeding lesions and what really represents a positive finding, as well as the question of whether the outcome of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is altered after the test, i.e. to better define subgroups of patients that will mostly benefit from capsule endoscopy. In the future small bowel capsule endoscopy might be able to get guided, while tissue samples might be available as well. (Acta gastro-enterol. belg., 2016, 79, 355-362).

  3. Small bowel transplantation induces adrenergic hypersensitivity in ileal longitudinal smooth muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, N; Balsiger, B M; Anding, W J; Duenes, J A; Sarr, M G

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the effects of small bowel transplantation on contractility of longitudinal muscle in the rat ileum. Full-thickness longitudinal muscle strips from four groups of rats (naive controls, sham-operated controls, and 1 week and 8 weeks after syngeneic orthotopic small bowel transplantation) were studied in vitro. Neither baseline contractility nor response to neural blockade (tetrodotoxin) or adrenergic/cholinergic blockade differed among the groups. Although the dose response to the cholinergic agonist bethanechol and to nitric oxide did not differ among groups, the ED50 (negative log of concentration giving half-maximal effect) for the adrenergic agonist norepinephrine was increased l week and 8 weeks after transplantation, indicating a hypersensitivity response not blocked by tetrodotoxin. Nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were of greater amplitude and occurred at lesser frequencies (>/=5 Hz) 1 week after small bowel transplantation, but returned to control values 8 weeks postoperatively. These inhibitory responses were blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NMMA but not by methylene blue, a nonspecific inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. Small bowel transplantation induces a persistent adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity at the muscle and appears to upregulate, at least transiently, other inhibitory mechanisms mediated by neural release of nitric oxide. Small bowel transplantation does not alter muscle response to cholinergic pathways. These alterations in smooth muscle contractility may affect gut function early after clinical small bowel transplantation.

  4. Strangulated Small Bowel Obstruction After Renal Transplant With No History of Laparotomy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuichi; Sato, Kazushige; Kawagishi, Naoki; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-06-01

    Strangulated small bowel obstruction is a complication after abdominal surgery, which is rare in renal transplant patients. A 61-year-old man with a strangulated small bowel obstruction underwent renal transplant surgery 7 years before the current admission. He was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain, nausea, and abdominal distention. An abdominal computed tomography and an ultrasound examination showed intestinal expansion and fluid collection without ascites. His disease was diagnosed as a small bowel obstruction and conservative treatment was begun. However, because of increasing abdominal pain and the collection of ascites, he underwent an emergency laparotomy and was diagnosed as having a strangulated small bowel obstruction. A fibrous cord had formed between the peritoneum (beside the transplanted kidney) and the root of the sigmoid mesocolon, strangulating the looped ileum and causing bleeding necrosis and hemorrhagic ascites collection. The cord and the necrotic ileum were resected, followed by an end-to-end anastomosis. He was discharged 17 days after the surgery in good condition. This is the first reported case of a person having a strangulated small bowel obstruction by a fibrous cord, who did not have a history of laparotomy after renal transplant. A strangulated small bowel obstruction after a renal transplant in a patient with no history of a laparotomy is a rare, but possible postoperative complications should be considered when making a differential diagnosis.

  5. Leiomyosarcoma of the small bowel: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Luis, Joshua; Ejtehadi, Farshid; Howlett, David C.; Donnellan, Imelda M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Leiomyosarcoma of the small bowel is an extremely rare form of gastrointestinal malignancy. Small bowel tumours are usually asymptomatic at the early stages, and difficult to visualise by upper and lower endoscopy. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 83-year-old gentleman presented in surgical outpatient clinic with chronic anaemia, abdominal discomfort and a single episode of malaena. Initial OGD and colonoscopy were both unremarkable. Subsequent CT revealed a mass in the right iliac fossa of likely small bowel origin, leading to an urgent laparotomy and resection with primary anastomosis. Histopathology showed a high grade leiomyosarcoma with no signs of metastasis and confirmatory immunological staining. Post-surgery follow up remains unremarkable. DISCUSSION Leiomyosarcomas of the small bowel are extremely rare entities, particularly following the advent of robust immunohistological diagnostic methods allowing differentiation from GISTs. As small bowel tumours are often not visualised by upper and lower endoscopy, further investigations to visualise the small bowel are crucial, generally in the form of magnetic resonance enterography, CT colonography or wireless capsule endoscopy. CONCLUSION The treatment of such tumours remains predominantly centred around surgical resection, and prognosis is dependent on tumour size and histological staging. PMID:25506852

  6. Small bowel adenocarcinoma in Crohn disease: CT-enterography features with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Philippe; Hristova, Lora; Boudghène, Frank; Hoeffel, Christine; Dray, Xavier; Laurent, Valérie; Fishman, Elliot K; Boudiaf, Mourad

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, pathological, and CT-enterography findings of small bowel adenocarcinomas in Crohn disease patients. Clinical, histopathological, and imaging findings were retrospectively evaluated in seven Crohn disease patients with small bowel adenocarcinoma. CT-enterography examinations were reviewed for morphologic features and location of tumor, presence of stratification, luminal stenosis, proximal dilatation, adjacent lymph nodes, and correlated with findings at histological examination. The tumor was located in the terminal (n = 6) or distal (n = 1) ileum. On CT-enterography, the tumor was visible in five patients, whereas two patients had no visible tumor. Four different patterns were individualized including small bowel mass (n = 2), long stenosis with heterogeneous submucosal layer (n = 2), short and severe stenosis with proximal small bowel dilatation (n = 2), and sacculated small bowel loop with irregular and asymmetric circumferential thickening (n = 1). Stratification, fat stranding, and comb sign were present in two, two, and one patients, respectively. Identification of a mass being clearly visible suggests strongly the presence of small bowel adenocarcinoma in Crohn disease patients but adenocarcinoma may be completely indistinguishable from benign fibrotic or acute inflammatory stricture. Knowledge of these findings is critical to help suggest the diagnosis of this rare but severe complication of Crohn disease.

  7. A very rare case of intussusception of small bowel due to metastasis from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ekbote, Gajanan R; Rajpal, Lalit B; Makam, Shrikant D

    2014-01-01

    Bowel metastasis secondary to renal cell carcinoma causing intussusception is very rare condition. Here a case of a 52-year-old male, who presented with signs and symptoms of small bowel obstruction is reported. CT abdomen showed small bowel obstruction due to ileo-ileal intussusception and left renal mass. On exploratory laparotomy Ileo-ileal intussusception was present. FNAC taken from left kidney at same sitting. Histology of resected specimen reported metastatic nodule in small bowel of renal cell carcinoma. FNAC confirmed primary renal cell carcinoma of left kidney. Although abdominal CT scanning provides the most reliable indications, it is laparotomy, that establishes the diagnosis of intussusception, and the histological examination that determines the cause.

  8. Rare small bowel obstruction: Right paraduodenal hernia. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Manfredelli, Simone; Andrea, Zitelli; Stefano, Pontone; Giovanni, Leonetti; Maria, Marcantonio; Angelo, Forte; Alberto, Angelici; Renato, Mancini

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Paraduodenal hernia (paramesocolic hernia), a rare congenital anomaly due to a midgut malrotation during fetal development, is recognized as the most frequent internal hernias. Two variants have been described: left and right, the latter less common than the first one. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a right paraduodenal hernia case in a 86 years old female patient who developed an acute bowel obstruction syndrome. Final diagnosis was achieved by imaging techniques as abdomen X-ray and CT and confirmed only after surgical operation. DISCUSSION Surgical approach was via median laparotomy, consisting in hernia reduction, replacement and stitching of the bowel in its anatomical orientation, and fixing of the posterior wall defect. At 15 months follow-up from surgical procedure the patient is asymptomatic. CONCLUSION Paraduodenal hernia is a rare pathology but its involvement in bowel obstruction syndrome should be always taken into account during diagnostic process. PMID:23500746

  9. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-01-01

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  10. Crohn disease of the small bowel: MR enteroclysis versus conventional enteroclysis.

    PubMed

    Masselli, G; Vecchioli, A; Gualdi, G F

    2006-01-01

    Enteroclysis has been suggested as the technique of choice for the evaluation of Crohn disease of the small intestine. Adequate distention of the entire small bowel with barium suspension allows the radiologic demonstration of mucosal abnormalities and provides functional information by defining distensibility or fixation of the small bowel loops. The principal disadvantage of conventional enteroclysis is the limited indirect information on the state of the bowel wall and extramural extension of Crohn disease, and its effectiveness may be hindered owing to overlapping bowel loops. Moreover, the radiation dose administered to patients, mostly at a young age, should be considered. Magnetic resonance (MR) enteroclysis is an emerging technique for small bowel imaging and was introduced to overcome the limitations of conventional enteroclysis and MR cross-sectional imaging by combining the advantages of both into one technique. MR enteroclysis has the potential to change how the small bowel is assessed because of the functional information, soft tissue contrast, direct multiplanar imaging capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation.

  11. Bariatric surgery complications leading to small bowel transplant: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Abdal Raheem, Sulieman; Deen, Omer J; Corrigan, Mandy L; Parekh, Neha; Quintini, Cristiano; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a major chronic disease affecting the U.S. population. Bariatric surgery has consistently shown greater weight loss and improved outcomes compared with conservative therapy. However, complications after bariatric surgery can be catastrophic, resulting in short bowel syndrome with a potential risk of intestinal failure, ultimately resulting in the need for a small bowel transplant. A total of 6 patients became dependent on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) after undergoing bariatric surgery at an outside facility. Four of the 6 patients required evaluation for small bowel transplant; 2 of the 6 patients were successfully managed with parenteral nutrition and did not require further small bowel transplant evaluation. Catheter-related bloodstream infection, a serious complication of HPN, occurred in 3 patients despite extensive patient education on catheter care and use of ethanol lock. Two patients underwent successful small bowel transplantation, 1 died before transplant could be performed, and 1 was listed for a multivisceral transplantation. Surgical procedures to treat morbid obesity are common and growing in popularity but are not without risk of serious complications, including intestinal failure and HPN dependency. Despite methods to prevent complications, failure of HPN may lead to the need for transplant evaluation. In selected cases, the best therapeutic treatment may be a small bowel transplant to resolve irreversible, post-bariatric surgery intestinal failure.

  12. Effect of experimental stress on the small bowel and colon in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, SE; Garsed, KC; Hoad, CL; Lingaya, M; Banwait, R; Thongborisute, W; Roberts, E; Costigan, C; Marciani, L; Gowland, PA; Spiller, RC

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are frequently reported to be exacerbated by stress. Animal studies suggest that corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mediates the effect of stress on the bowel. We have shown that stressed IBS patients with diarrhea have constricted small bowels. We hypothesized that we could mimic this effect by applying experimental stress in the form of either hand immersion in ice water or CRH injection in healthy volunteers (HV). Methods The postprandial effect of the cold pressor test (repeated hand immersion in ice cold water) and injection of CRH, were assessed vs control in two groups of 18 HVs. Key Results CRH produced a significant rise from baseline salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.004) not seen with the cold pressor test. Small bowel water content (SBWC) fell postprandially on all four treatments. SBWC was significantly reduced by both stressors but CRH caused a greater effect (anova, p < 0.003 vs p = 0.02). Ascending colon (AC) volume was greater after CRH injection compared with saline (p = 0.002) but no differences were seen with the cold pressor test vs warm water. Postprandial increase in colon volume was also reduced by CRH which also increased the sensations of distension and bloating. Conclusions & Inferences Two experimental stressors were shown to constrict the small bowel, mimicking the effect previously seen in IBS-D patients. CRH increased the volume of the AC. We speculate that stress accelerates transfer of water from the small bowel to the AC. PMID:25703609

  13. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes.

  14. Transvaginal Small Bowel Evisceration in Known Case of Uterine Prolapse Due to Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gheewala, Umesh; Shukla, Radha; Bhatt, Ravi; Srivastava, Shirish

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous transvaginal bowel evisceration is a rare surgical emergency with only a few cases reported and particularly postmenopausal, posthysterectomy, multiparous elderly women are considered to be at higher risk for development of bowel evisceration. It is difficult to manage such a patient for any surgeon and poses significant challenges especially intraoperatively. Here, we report a case of vaginal vault rupture with small bowel evisceration through the vagina in a known case of uterine prolapse and highlight the risk factors, clinical presentation, and treatment options for this rare surgical emergency PMID:25738028

  15. Small bowel adenocarcinoma phenotyping, a clinicobiological prognostic study

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, T; Svrcek, M; Zaanan, A; Beohou, E; Laforest, A; Afchain, P; Mitry, Emmanuel; Taieb, J; Di Fiore, F; Gornet, J-M; Thirot-Bidault, A; Sobhani, I; Malka, D; Lecomte, T; Locher, C; Bonnetain, F; Laurent-Puig, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is a rare tumour with a poor prognosis. Molecular biology data on SBA carcinogenesis are lacking. Methods: Expression of HER2, β-catenin, p53 and mismatch repair (MMR) protein was assessed by immunohistochemistry. KRAS, V600E BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability were investigated. Results: We obtained samples from 63 SBA patients (tumour stages: I–II: 30% III: 35% IV: 32% locally advanced: 3%). HER2 overexpression (3+) was observed in 2 out of 62 patients, overexpression of p53 in 26 out of 62, abnormal expression of β-catenin in 12 out of 61, KRAS mutation in 21 out of 49, BRAF V600E mutation in 1 out of 40 patients, MMR deficiency (dMMR) in 14 out of 61 and was consistent with Lynch syndrome in 9 out of 14 patients. All of the dMMR tumours were in the duodenum or jejunum and only one was stage IV. Median overall survival (OS) was 36.6 months (95% CI, 26.9–72.2). For all patients, in univariate analysis, stages I–II (P<0.001), WHO PS 0–1 (P=0.01) and dMMR phenotype (P=0.02) were significantly associated with longer OS. In multivariate analysis, disease stage (P=0.01) and WHO PS 0–1 (P=0.001) independently predicted longer OS. For stage IV patients, median OS was 20.5 months (95% CI: 14.6; 36.6 months). In multivariate analysis, WHO PS 0–1 (P=0.0001) and mutated KRAS status (P=0.02) independently predicted longer OS. Conclusion: This large study suggests that molecular alterations in SBA are closer to those in colorectal cancer (CRC) than those in gastric cancer, with low levels of HER 2 overexpression and high frequencies of KRAS mutations. The seemingly higher frequency of dMMR than in CRC may be explained by the higher frequency of Lynch syndrome in SBA patients. A dMMR phenotype was significantly associated with a non-metastatic tumour (P=0.02). A trend for a good prognosis and a duodenum or jejunum primary site was associated with dMMR. PMID:24196786

  16. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Stomach and Small Bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Das, Shiva K.; Li, X. Allen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Miften, Moyed

    2010-03-01

    Published data suggest that the risk of moderately severe (>=Grade 3) radiation-induced acute small-bowel toxicity can be predicted with a threshold model whereby for a given dose level, D, if the volume receiving that dose or greater (VD) exceeds a threshold quantity, the risk of toxicity escalates. Estimates of VD depend on the means of structure segmenting (e.g., V15 = 120 cc if individual bowel loops are outlined or V45 = 195 cc if entire peritoneal potential space of bowel is outlined). A similar predictive model of acute toxicity is not available for stomach. Late small-bowel/stomach toxicity is likely related to maximum dose and/or volume threshold parameters qualitatively similar to those related to acute toxicity risk. Concurrent chemotherapy has been associated with a higher risk of acute toxicity, and a history of abdominal surgery has been associated with a higher risk of late toxicity.

  17. Ascaris as a leading point for small-bowel intussusception in an adult: a rare cause of intussusception.

    PubMed

    Karatepe, Oğuzhan; Tükenmez, Mustafa; Hünerli, Kemal; Citlak, Gamze; Salmaslioglu, Artur; Battal, Muharrem; Erbil, Yeşim

    2008-03-01

    Adult intussusception represents 1% of patients with bowel obstructions and requires a surgical approach. Malignancy is associated with 31% of small bowel intussusception and 70% of large bowel intussusception. Intestinal intussusception caused by ascaris, however, is very uncommon. This report describes our experience of this rare cause of intussusception and its clinical findings.

  18. Does passage of a patency capsule indicate small-bowel patency? A prospective clinical trial?

    PubMed

    Boivin, M L; Lochs, H; Voderholzer, W A

    2005-09-01

    At many centers wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) without prior radiographic examination to rule out relevant strictures is considered to be contraindicated in suspected obstructive small-bowel disease. However, the accuracy of radiography in this situation has often been questioned. The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of the recently developed patency capsule, and its predictive value regarding the clinical relevance of radiographic small-bowel strictures. 22 patients with suspected obstructive small-bowel disease and/or radiological evidence of small-bowel strictures underwent a patency capsule examination. Intact passage, patient experience of pain, and capsule disintegration were correlated with radiographic findings, clinical variables, and outcome. 13 patients passed an intact capsule without complaints, despite radiographically observed small-bowel stenosis; the subsequent video capsule examination was uneventful in all. In nine patients either intact passage was painful or the capsule disintegrated; in one of these, impaction of an intact capsule led to an ileus and emergency surgery. The type of capsule passage did not correlate with radiographic presence of a stricture, underlying diagnosis, or previous surgery. There was a statistically significant correlation between outcome (surgery performed or recommended) and occurrence of painful capsule passage and disintegration ( P < or = 0.05). Painless egestion of an intact patency capsule indicates safety of WCE. Patients without obstructive symptoms require neither small-bowel radiography nor a patency capsule study prior to WCE. Disintegration of the patency capsule or painful passage seems to be associated with a clinically relevant small-bowel stricture and with a high probability of surgery.

  19. Reduction of irradiated small bowel volume with Trendelenburg position in gynecologic pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dirier, A; Adli, M; Andic, F; Cifci, S; Ors, Y; Kuzhan, A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Trendelenburg position in comparison to prone position on small bowel volume and treatment dose in gynecologic pelvic external beam radiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal treatment plans. Eight patients with gynecologic cancers, treated with definitive or postoperative pelvic radiotherapy were investigated. Pelvic computerized tomography (CT) scans for treatment planning were performed in prone and 25 degree Trendelenburg positions for each patient. The dose-volume histograms of small bowel within the treatment fields were obtained and compared for both positions. The clinical target volume (CTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) were also defined and evaluated in the subjects. Treatment dose was 5040 cGy to PTV with 180 cGy daily fraction doses in both techniques for all patients. The average irradiated small bowel volume was 726 cc for prone position and 458 cc for the Trendelenburg position. The average irradiated small bowel volume reduction in the Trendelenburg position was 38.0% (95% CI 19.5 +/- 38%) compared with the prone position. The average small bowel percent dose was 25.4% (1280 cGy) for Trendelenburg position and 39.9% (2010 cGy) for prone position. PTV doses were similar in both techniques. The results of this dosimetric study suggest that gynecologic pelvic radiotherapy in the Trendelenburg position decreases the volume of irradiated small bowel compared to prone position and may decrease treatment related small bowel morbidity. Clinical benefit of this position should be evaluated in further clinical studies.

  20. Online adaptive radiotherapy of the bladder: Small bowel irradiated-volume reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Burridge, Nichola . E-mail: nichola.burridge@physics.cr.man.ac.uk; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Sykes, Jonathan; Stratford, Julie; Henry, Ann; McBain, Catherine; Price, Pat; Moore, Chris

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction of small bowel volume receiving high-dose radiation by using kilovoltage X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and quantized margin selection for adaptive bladder cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty bladder patients were planned conformally using a four-field, 15-mm uniform margin technique. Two additional planning target volumes (PTVs) were created using margins quantized to 5 and 10 mm in the superior direction only. CBCTs ({approx}8 scans/patient) were acquired during treatment. CBCT volumes were registered with CT planning scans to determine setup errors and to select the appropriate PTV of the day. Margin reduction in other directions was considered. Outlining of small bowel in every fraction is required to properly quantify the volume of small bowel spared from high doses. In the case of CBCT this is not always possible owing to artifacts created by small bowel movement and the presence of gas. A simpler method was adopted by considering the volume difference between PTVs created using uniform and adapted margins, which corresponds to the potential volume of small bowel sparing. Results: The average small bowel volume that can be spared by this form of adaptive radiotherapy is 31 {+-} 23 cm{sup 3} ({+-}1 SD). The bladder for 1 patient was systematically smaller than the planning scan and hence demonstrated the largest average reduction of 76 cm{sup 3}. The clinical target volume to PTV margins in other directions can be safely reduced to 10 mm except in the anterior direction where, like the superior direction, the bladder showed significant variation. Conclusions: Online CBCT-assisted plan selection based on quantized margins can significantly reduce the volume of small bowel receiving high doses for some bladder patients. CBCT allows the 15-mm margins used in some directions to be safely reduced to 10 mm.

  1. Internal hernia: computed tomography diagnosis and differentiation from adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chao-Hsuan; Chen, Jen-Dar; Tui, Chui-Mei; Chou, Yi-Hong; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Yu, Chun

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the specific computed tomography (CT) features of internal hernia (IH), and to verify CT features useful for the differential diagnosis of IH from adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO), and for the early detection of intestinal strangulation. CT findings for 28 patients with surgically proven IH were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those for 50 patients with surgically proven ASBO. CT features most suggestive of IH versus ASBO included the following: a cluster of small bowel segments (100% vs 4% of patients; p < 0.0001); crowding and convergence of mesenteric vessels (79% vs 4%; p < 0.0001); mesenteric vessel engorgement (79% vs 26%; p = 0.0002); and mass effect to the surrounding bowels (82% vs 44%; p = 0.002). In addition, intestinal strangulation, the most severe complication, occurred more in IH than ASBO (39% vs 10%; p = 0.002), whereas proximal small bowel dilation (46% vs 100%; p < 0.0001) and small-bowel feces sign (0% vs 26%; p = 0.0029) were less common in IH than ASBO. The CT features indicative of intestinal strangulation were localized mesenteric fluid (p < 0.0001), mesenteric infiltrates (p = 0.0005), bowel wall thickening (p = 0.003), intramural hemorrhage (p = 0.005), mesenteric vessel engorgement (p = 0.03), and abnormal bowel wall enhancement (p = 0.008); the first 4 of these features were noted more in patients with IH than ASBO. The most specific CT criteria for the diagnosis of IH, rather than ASBO, were engorged mesenteric vessels, mass effect to surrounding organs, and bowel wall thickening. When associated mesenteric infiltrates were found, intestinal strangulation was highly suspected.

  2. Small intestine perforation due to accidental press-through package ingestion in an elderly patient with Lewy body dementia and recurrent cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Tsuyoshi; Tokumaru, Aya M; Harada, Kazumasa

    2015-12-17

    An octogenarian with Lewy body dementia presented to our hospital in cardiac arrest and was successfully resuscitated. Although he had abdominal pain the previous day, small bowel wall oedema and ascites were the only abnormalities noted on abdominal CT. Despite treatment with catecholamines and antimicrobials, he died of recurrent cardiopulmonary arrest later the same day. An autopsy showed that the patient's death was the result of a small bowel perforation caused by accidental ingestion of a press-through package (PTP). Precautions regarding PTP use and improved packaging design are necessary to prevent PTP ingestion, especially in elderly patients with dementia. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Electrosurgery ignition of a pneumoperitoneum secondary to prior spontaneous perforation of the small bowel: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G P; Willson, P D

    2012-03-01

    We describe explosive combustion of a gas filled peritoneum from a handheld electrosurgery electrode used to enter the abdomen. The pneumoperitoneum was due to small bowel perforation and peritonitis had been established for at least two days. No injury was caused to either the patient or medical staff. This rare occurrence has only been described once before. Surgeons should be aware of the possible combustion of bowel gas, whether on opening bowel or the peritoneum after bowel perforation.

  4. Dose optimization of mannitol solution for small bowel distension in MRI.

    PubMed

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne C; Schneemann, Hubert; Ruehm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jörg F; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2004-10-01

    To optimize the dose of a hydro solution containing 2.5% mannitol and 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) for small bowel MRI in terms of bowel distension and patient acceptance. A total of 10 healthy volunteers ingested a hydro solution containing 2.5% mannitol and 0.2% LBG. Four different volumes (1500, 1200, 1000, and 800 ml) were assessed on four different examination days. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal two-dimensional TrueFISP images by measuring the diameter of eight bowel loops throughout the jejunum and the ileum. In addition, volunteer acceptance was evaluated for every single examination by using a questionnaire. Optimal distension was obtained with either, 1000, 1200, or 1500 ml, with no statistically significant differences in distension between these groups. Administration of 800 ml led to significantly less distension of the small bowel. Significantly less side effects were noted using either 800 or 1000 ml compared to using larger volumes. We recommend a dose of 1000 ml mannitol/LBG solution as an oral contrast agent for optimal bowel distension and minimal side effects. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Spectrum of imaging findings on MDCT enterography in patients with small bowel tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kalra, N; Agrawal, P; Mittal, V; Kochhar, R; Gupta, V; Nada, R; Singh, R; Khandelwal, N

    2014-03-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is the sixth most common extrapulmonary site of involvement. The sites of involvement in abdominal tuberculosis, in descending order of frequency, are lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity, and gastrointestinal tract. The radiological armamentarium for evaluating tuberculosis of the small bowel (SBTB) includes barium studies (small bowel follow-through, SBFT), CT (multidetector CT, CT enterography, and CT enteroclysis), ultrasound (sonoenteroclysis), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; enterography and enteroclysis). In this review, we illustrate the abnormalities at MDCT enterography in 20 consecutive patients with SB TB and also describe extraluminal findings in these patients. MDCT enterography allows non-invasive good-quality assessment of well-distended bowel loops and the adjacent soft tissues. It displays the thickness and enhancement of the entire bowel wall in all three planes and allows examination of all bowel loops, especially the ileal loops, which are mostly superimposed. The terminal ileum and ileocaecal junction are the most common sites of small bowel involvement in intestinal TB. The most common abnormality is short-segment strictures with symmetrical concentric mural thickening and homogeneous mural enhancement. Other findings include lymphadenopathy, ascites, enteroliths, peritoneal thickening, and enhancement. In conclusion, MDCT enterography is a comprehensive technique for the evaluation of SB TB.

  6. Acute Bowel Obstruction in a Giant Recurrent Right Bochdalek's Hernia: A Report of Complication on Both Sides of the Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Massloom, Hasan S.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Diagnosis of congenital Bochdalek's hernia (BH) in adulthood is extremely rare and requires a fastidious surgical repair, the failure of which might result in a recurrence with severe complications. We report a rare case of a giant, right BH that recurred after surgical repair and was complicated with complete bowel obstruction. Case Report: A 51-year-old Saudi male, with past surgical history of laparotomy that failed to repair BH, presented to the emergency room with severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and hypovolemic shock. Computerized tomography (CT) showed an unusual picture of closed-loop bowel obstruction above and below the diaphragm. We carried out laparotomy and thoracotomy that achieved lysis of adhesions, reduction of bowel, and repair of diaphragmatic defect. Conclusion: Acute presentation of complicated BH poses a formidable challenge because of its rarity and complexity. The preferred approach for elective repair of adult BH is debatable, where surgeons—guided by hernia type and biased by their experience—recommend either laparotomy or thoracotomy. Nevertheless, a complicated, giant, recurrent BH typically requires both laparotomy and thoracotomy. PMID:27500130

  7. Lymphangioma of the small bowel mesentery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Kiatipunsodsai, Siriphut; Kwankua, Amolchaya; Chaumrattanakul, Utairat

    2012-11-21

    Lymphangioma is a rare benign condition characterized by proliferation of lymphatic spaces. It is usually found in the head and neck of affected children. Lymphangioma of the small-bowel mesentery is rare, having been reported for less than 1% of all lymphangiomas. Importantly, it can cause fatal complications such as volvulus or involvement of the main branch of the mesenteric arteries, requiring emergency surgery. Moreover, the gross and histopathologic findings may resemble benign multicystic mesothelioma and lymphangiomyoma. Immunohistochemical study for factor VIII-related antigen, D2-40, calretinin and human melanoma black-45 (HMB-45) are essential for diagnosis. Factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 are positive in lymphangioma but negative in benign multicystic mesothelioma. HMB-45 shows positive study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces of the lymphangiomyoma. We report a case of small-bowel volvulus induced by mesenteric lymphangioma in a 2-year-and-9-mo-old boy who presented with rapid abdominal distension and vomiting. The abdominal computed tomography scan showed a multiseptated mass at the right lower quadrant with a whirl-like small-bowel dilatation, suggestive of a mesenteric cyst with midgut volvulus. The intraoperative findings revealed a huge, lobulated, yellowish pink, cystic mass measuring 20 cm × 20 cm × 10 cm, that was originated from the small bowel mesentery with small-bowel volvulus and small-bowel dilatation. Cut surface of the mass revealed multicystic spaces containing a milky white fluid. The patient underwent tumor removal with small-bowel resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Microscopic examination revealed that the cystic walls were lined with flat endothelial cells and comprised of smooth muscle in the walls. The flat endothelial cells were positive for factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 but negative for calretinin. HMB-45 showed negative study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces. Thus

  8. Idiopathic Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Resulting in Small Bowel Ischemia in a Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Lin, Chih-Che; Huang, Wan-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Background. Small bowel ischemia due to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT) is rare during pregnancy. However, additional precipitating factors should usually be identified. Case. A 31-year-old woman, pregnant at 34 weeks, was sent to the emergency department because of acute peritonitis. An emergency exploration revealed a segmental gangrene of the small intestine without any mechanical obstruction. Together with the termination of pregnancy, resection of the damaged small bowel was performed, and an end-to-end enterostomy was followed. Based on the operative and pathological findings, small bowel ischemia might be attributed to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. Conclusion. Hypercoagulation state normally found in pregnant women is believed to lead to this catastrophic condition without other precipitating factors. PMID:22567515

  9. Methylene Blue Enteric Mapping for Intraoperative Localization in Obscure Small Bowel Hemorrhage: Report of a New Technique and Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-12

    controlled hypertension and hyperlipidemia, a pri- or of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and open small bowel resection. The patient reported melena and...ities. The site of previous small bowel resection was inspected and revealed dense adhesions. A self-retaining retractor was placed and small bowel...transillumi- nation, single or multiple enterotomy(ies) for mucosal inspec- tion, and blind resection are associated with failure in up to 50 % of cases

  10. Nitric oxide pathways in circular muscle of the rat jejunum before and after small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, B M; Duenes, J A; Ohtani, N; Shibata, C; Farrugia, G; Anding, W J; Sarr, M G

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that nitric oxide synthase is upregulated after small bowel transplantation which may have implications in enteric dysfunction after small bowel transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide in nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory function after small bowel transplantation in rat jejunal circular muscle. The following four groups of rats (n = >/=8 rats per group) were studied: Neurally intact control animals; 1 week after anesthesia and sham celiotomy, and either 1 week or 8 weeks after isogeneic, orthotopic small bowel transplantation. Full-thickness jejunal circular muscle strips were evaluated under isometric conditions for spontaneous contractile activity, response to electrical field stimulation, and effects of exogenous nitric oxide and nitric oxide antagonists. Spontaneous activity did not differ among groups. Electrical field stimulation inhibited activity similarly in all groups. Exogenous nitric oxide, NG-monomethyl L-arginine monoacetate salt (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), and methylene blue (cGMP antagonist) had no effect on spontaneous activity. Neither nitric oxide antagonist altered the inhibitory response to neural excitation by electrical field stimulation in any group. Nitric oxide, a known inhibitory neurotransmitter in other gut smooth muscle, has no apparent role in rat jejunal circular muscle before or after small bowel transplantation.

  11. From Capsule Endoscopy to Balloon-Assisted Deep Enteroscopy: Exploring Small-Bowel Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D. Matthew; Walker, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 15 years, the use of endoscopic evaluations in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has become more common. Indications for further endoscopic interventions include iron deficiency anemia, suspicion of Crohn’s disease or small-bowel tumors, assessment of celiac disease or of ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and screening for familial adenomatous polyposis. Often, capsule endoscopy is performed in concert with other endoscopic studies and can guide decisions regarding whether enteroscopy should be carried out in an anterograde or a retrograde approach. Retrograde endoscopy is beneficial in dealing with disease of the more distal small bowel. Multiple studies have examined the diagnostic yield of balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy and have estimated a diagnostic yield of 40% to 80%. Some of the studies have found that diagnostic yields are higher when capsule endoscopy is performed before balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy in a search for small-bowel bleeds. Each of these procedures has a role when performed alone; however, research suggests that they are especially effective as complementary techniques and together can provide better-directed therapy. Both procedures are relatively safe, with high diagnostic and therapeutic yields that allow evaluation of the small bowel. Because both interventions are relatively new to the world of gastroenterology, much research remains to be done regarding their overall efficacy, cost, and safety, as well as further indications for their use in the detection and treatment of diseases of the small bowel. PMID:27099585

  12. Reduction of Acute Rejection by Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Rat Small Bowel Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wu, Ben-Juan; Fu, Nan-Nan; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Don, Chong; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have shown immunosuppressive activity in transplantation. This study was designed to determine whether BMMSCs could improve outcomes of small bowel transplantation in rats. Methods Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed from Brown Norway to Lewis rats, followed by infusion of BMMSCs through the superficial dorsal veins of the penis. Controls included rats infused with normal saline (allogeneic control), isogeneically transplanted rats (BN-BN) and nontransplanted animals. The animals were sacrificed after 1, 5, 7 or 10 days. Small bowel histology and apoptosis, cytokine concentrations in serum and intestinal grafts, and numbers of T regulatory (Treg) cells were assessed at each time point. Results Acute cellular rejection occurred soon after transplantation and became aggravated over time in the allogeneic control rats, with increase in apoptosis, inflammatory response, and T helper (Th)1/Th2 and Th17/Treg-related cytokines. BMMSCs significantly attenuated acute cellular rejection, reduced apoptosis and suppressed the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon (IFN)-γ while upregulating IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β expression and increasing Treg levels. Conclusion BMMSCs improve the outcomes of allogeneic small bowel transplantation by attenuating the inflammatory response and acute cellular rejection. Treatment with BMMSCs may overcome acute cellular rejection in small bowel transplantation. PMID:25500836

  13. Inpatient capsule endoscopy leads to frequent incomplete small bowel examinations.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Cemal; Losurdo, John; Brown, Michael D; Oosterveen, Scott; Rahimi, Robert; Keshavarzian, Ali; Bozorgnia, Leila; Mutlu, Ece

    2012-09-28

    To examine the predictive factors of capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rate (CECR) including the effect of inpatient and outpatient status. We identified 355 consecutive patients who completed CE at Rush University Medical Center between March 2003 and October 2005. Subjects for CE had either nothing by mouth or clear liquids for the afternoon and evening of the day before the procedure. CE exams were reviewed by two physicians who were unaware of the study hypotheses. After retrospective analysis, 21 cases were excluded due to capsule malfunction, prior gastric surgery, endoscopic capsule placement or insufficient data. Of the remaining 334 exams [264 out-patient (OP), 70 in-patient (IP)], CE indications, findings, location of the patients [IP vs OP and intensive care unit (ICU) vs general medical floor (GMF)] and gastrointestinal transit times were analyzed. Statistical analysis was completed using SPSS version 17 (Chicago, IL). Chi-square, t test or fisher exact-tests were used as appropriate. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with incomplete CE exams. The mean age for the entire study population was 54.7 years. Sixty-one percent of the study population was female, and gender was not different between IPs vs OPs (P = 0.07). The overall incomplete CECR was 14% in our study. Overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGB) was significantly more common for the IP CE (P = 0.0001), while abdominal pain and assessment of IBD were more frequent indications for the OP CE exams (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively). Occult OGB was the most common indication and arteriovenous malformations were the most common finding both in the IPs and OPs. The capsule did not enter the small bowel (SB) in 6/70 IPs and 8/264 OPs (P = 0.04). The capsule never reached the cecum in 31.4% (22/70) of IP vs 9.5% (25/ 264) of OP examinations (P < 0.001). The mean gastric transit time (GTT) was delayed in IPs compared to OPs, 98.5 ± 139.5 min vs

  14. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Femoral Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Majid; Karami, MohamamdYasin; Zangouri, Vahid; Deilami, Iman; Maalhagh, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of groin hernias, are more common in women, and are more appropriate to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery.This condition may lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction or strangulation and possible bowel resection-anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is few reports of strangulated femoral hernia.We herein present an 82-year-old lady who presented with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On examination, the patient had a generalized tenderness and distention. The working diagnosis at this time was a bowel obstruction. A computed tomography scan revealed the hernia occurring medial to the femoral vessels and below the inguinal ligament .Laparotomy was performed and patient was treated successfully with surgical therapy.Herniawas repaired and a small bowel resection was performed with end to end anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was doing well at a 12-month follow-up visit. Obstructing femoral hernia of the small bowel is rare and the physician should suspect femoral hernia as a bowel obstruction cause. PMID:27162928

  15. Fishbone perforation of the small bowel: laparoscopic diagnosis and laparoscopically assisted management.

    PubMed

    Law, Wai Lun; Lo, Chung Yau

    2003-12-01

    We report a patient with small bowel perforation caused by a piece of fishbone diagnosed by laparoscopy and treated with laparoscopically assisted surgery through a small incision. This uncommon cause of peritonitis and the role of laparoscopy for this condition are discussed.

  16. Do iatrogenic serosal injuries result in small bowel perforation in a rabbit model?

    PubMed

    Tsai, M C; Candy, G; Costello, M A; Grieve, A D; Brand, M

    2017-06-01

    Surgical dogma dictates that serosal injuries should be repaired during laparotomy as these injuries may result in localised areas of bowel ischaemia and may perforate. No study has investigated whether there is a correlation between the extent of serosal injuries and the risk for perforation under normal physiological conditions. We hypothesized that small bowel serosal injuries do not result in early or late perforation at physiological intraluminal pressures regardless of their size. An in-vivo rabbit small bowel serosal injury model was developed and two experiments were conducted. The first - to determine whether and at which pressures various lengths and circumferences of serosal injuries in small bowel result in immediate bowel perforation - was performed infusing saline into isolated bowel segments with or without a variety of serosal injuries. In the second study - to determine whether or not serosal injuries result in delayed perforation - a range of injuries was created in rabbits and the effect assessed at re-laparotomy 5 days after the creation of the injury. No perforations were observed at the site of serosal injuries at physiological intraluminal pressures. Perforations occurred at 43.7+ 18.6 cmH₂O, 23.3+ 14.4 cmH₂O, and 24.4+ 23.9 cmH₂O for controls, 4 cm long and 100% circumference serosal injuries respectively (p-value = 0.18 for various lengths and 0.71 for various circumferences). No serosal injuries perforated within 72 or 120 hours after creation. Small bowel serosal injuries do not perforate or leak at physiological intraluminal pressures, either at the time of creation or up to 120 hours thereafter.

  17. Colonic lesions in patients undergoing small bowel capsule endoscopy: incidence, diagnostic and therapeutic impact.

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, José Francisco; Fernández-Urién Sainz, Iñaki; Zabalza Ollo, Beatriz; Borda Martín, Ana; Vila Costas, Juan José

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, capsule endoscopy is the first-line procedure to assess the small bowel. During small bowel procedures, other segments of the gastrointestinal tract may be visualized. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the incidence of colonic abnormalities in patients undergoing small bowel capsule and its impact on patient management. This study is a retrospective analysis of data from 526 consecutive capsule endoscopy procedures performed at a single tertiary-care centre between 2008 and 2011. Patients with incomplete procedures were excluded from the analysis. Patient baseline characteristics, colonic lesions, diagnosis and management before and after capsule endoscopy were recorded and a descriptive analysis was performed. Four hundred and sixty four patients were finally included in the analysis. Two hundred and ninety three patients were male (57.3%) and the mean age was 61.3 ± 20.03 years (18-86). Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (59%) and inflammatory bowel disease (19%) were the main indications for the procedure. Colonic abnormalities were detected by capsule endoscopy in 47 (9%) of 464 patients. The most common types of missed lesions were vascular lesions (34%) and colonic ulcers (32%). This information had a clinical or diagnostic impact of 7.55% and a therapeutic impact of 6.03%. All images of the colon should be evaluated during small bowel capsule endoscopy as they may provide relevant information that may result in changes in patient management.

  18. Ethanol inhibition of glucose absorption in isolated, perfused small bowel of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, C.F.; Van Thiel, D.H.; Wargo, J.

    1983-08-01

    There is evidence for both humans and rats that malnutrition frequently occurs when ethanol is chronically ingested. Small bowel /sup 14/C-labelled glucose absorption was measured with an ex vivo system in which the small bowel of the rat was surgically removed and then arterially perfused with an artificial medium. Glucose absorption for a control group of seven rats was 248 +/- 8 microM/min/gm dry weight of small bowel (mean +/- SEM). This was significantly greater than the value 112 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight (P less than 0.005) for a group of five rats in which a competitive inhibitor of glucose absorption, phlorizin (0.2 mM), was added to the bowel lumen. In the presence of 3% ethanol within the gut lumen of five rats, glucose absorption was also reduced (to 131 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight) compared to absorption in the control group (P less than 0.005). The calculated amount of glucose absorbed was corrected for metabolism to lactate and carbon dioxide. We conclude that both phlorizin and ethanol inhibit glucose absorption in the isolated and perfused small bowel of rats and that probably at least part of the malnutrition in ethanol-fed rats is due to glucose malabsorption.

  19. [Carcinoid tumor of the small bowel: value of hydro-MR imaging for diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Azoulay, R; Boudiaf, M; Soyer, Ph; Hamzi, L; Abitbol, M; Najmeh, N; Rymer, R

    2003-12-01

    Hydro-MR imaging is a technique based on the use of a strongly T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, similar to that used for MR-cholangiography. We report herein one case of carcinoid tumor of the small bowel diagnosed by hydro-MR imaging. This non invasive MR technique showed suggestive features such as radial convergence and segmental dilatation of a small bowel loop, similar to those seen on conventional follow-through studies. This case illustrates the major role that may be played in the future by hydro-MR imaging for the non invasive diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the small bowel without the use of ionizing radiation.

  20. [Volvulus of the small bowel due to ascaris lumbricoides package: about a case].

    PubMed

    Diouf, Cheikh; Kane, Ahmed; Ndoye, Ndeye Aby; Ndour, Oumar; Faye-Fall, Aimé Lakh; Fall, Mbaye; Alumeti, Désiré Munyali; Ngom, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We report an exceptional case of a 7 year-old patient with necrotic small bowel volvulus due to adult ascaris lumbricoides. At the admission, the child had intestinal obstruction evolving since two days with alteration of general state. Abdominal radiography without preparation showed small bowel air-fluid levels and tiger-stripe appearance evoking the diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction associated with abdominal mass. After resuscitation, the surgical treatment consisted of laparotomy which showed necrotic volvulus of the terminal ileum containing adult ascaris lumbricoides. The patient underwent small bowel resection, approximately one meter of affected section was removed and then an ileostomy was performed. The evolution was favorable. The patient underwent ileorectal anastomosis four weeks later. After a 2 year follow-up period the child had no symptoms.

  1. Safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stents in malignant small bowel obstructions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Akiyoshi; Kuwai, Toshio; Nishimura, Tomoyuki; Iio, Sumio; Mori, Takeshi; Imagawa, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kouno, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present 3 cases of malignant small bowel obstruction, treated with palliative care using endoscopic self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement, with the aim to identify the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Baseline patient characteristics, procedure methods, procedure time, technical and clinical success rates, complications, and patient outcomes were obtained. All 3 patients had pancreatic cancer with small bowel strictures. One patient received the SEMS using colonoscopy, while the other 2 patients received SEMS placement via double balloon endoscopy using the through-the-overtube technique. The median procedure time was 104 min. The technical and clinical success rates were 100%. Post-treatment, obstructive symptoms in all patients improved, and a low-residue diet could be tolerated. All stents remained within the patients until their deaths. The median overall survival time (stent patency time) was 76 d. SEMS placement is safe and effective as a palliative treatment for malignant small bowel obstruction. PMID:27833393

  2. A case of small bowel mesenteric pneumatosis: A multidisciplinary approach to clinical interpretation and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Christopher; Salih, Tamir; Saha, Arin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pneumatosis of the small bowel mesentery is rare and the preserve of case reports. This case report describes the importance of a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) approach to rare pathologies. Case report A 78-year-old man presented to our unit with a two-day history of upper abdominal pain associated with nausea and intermittent vomiting. An urgent computed tomography (CT) scan was organised. The scan was grossly abnormal and difficult to interpret; it was reported as widespread intra-mural gas within the small bowel wall most likely secondary to extensive small bowel ischaemia. Although surgical intervention was very high risk (predicted P-possum mortality of over 60%) and there was a strong possibility that the patient would not recover from surgery, the disparity between clinical and radiological findings meant that a diagnostic laparoscopy was indicated. A diagnostic laparoscopy showed that the small bowel itself was normal but there was extensive gas within the mesentery, caused by a band adhesion which had eroded into the peritoneal layer of the small bowel mesentery. Discussion Pneumatosis of the small bowel mesentery is a pathological sign rather than a diagnosis and is characterised by gas within the mesenteric sleeves. It is likely associated with significant morbidity and therefore rarely observed as the majority with this sign would not be deemed suitable for surgical intervention. Conclusion The case highlights an unusual pathology, rare imaging findings, the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach and the value of clear communication and informed consent when considering major intervention or surgery. PMID:27082993

  3. Small bowel adenocarcinoma and Crohn's disease: Any further ahead than 50 years ago?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Caitlin; Gordon, Philip H; Petrucci, Andrea; Boutros, Marylise

    2014-01-01

    This review of the literature on small bowel carcinoma associated with Crohn’s disease specifically addresses the incidence, risk factors, and protective factors which have been identified. It also reviews the clinical presentation, the current modalities of diagnosis, the pathology, treatment, and surveillance. Finally, the prognosis and future direction are addressed. Our experience with small bowel adenocarcinoma in Crohn’s disease is reported. Readers will be provided with a better understanding of this rare and often poorly recognized complication of Crohn’s disease. PMID:25206256

  4. Small bowel intussusception caused by multiple intestinal metastases from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Y; de Gheldere, C; Vanclooster, P

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) due to intussusception in adults is a rare condition. Diagnosis at the time of admission is usually challenging. More often than not, a bowel intussusception in adults is secondary to an organic condition, frequently malignancies. Therefore, a surgical approach is indicated most of the times. We report the case of a forty-nine years old lady presenting with a SBO secondary to small bowel metastases with two ileo-ileal intussusceptions, one of which was missed at initial surgical exploration. A giant cell carcinoma of the lung (GCCL) with small bowel metastases was diagnosed subsequently. The case is presented as well as a brief review of literature.

  5. Small Bowel Intussusception Caused by Multiple Intestinal Metastases from a Giant Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Y; de Gheldere, C; Vanclooster, P

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) due to intussusception in adults is a rare condition. Diagnosis at the time of admission is usually challenging. More often than not, a bowel intussusception in adults is secondary to an organic condition, frequently malignancies. Therefore, a surgical approach is indicated most of the times. We report the case of a forty-nine years old lady presenting with a SBO secondary to small bowel metastases with two ileo-ileal intussusceptions, one of which was missed at initial surgical exploration. A giant cell carcinoma of the lung (GCCL) with small bowel metastases was diagnosed subsequently. The case is presented as well as a brief review of literature.

  6. Software-assisted quantitative analysis of small bowel motility compared to manual measurements.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, S; Froehlich, J M; Cattin, R; Raible, S; Bouquet, H; Bill, U; Patak, M A

    2014-04-01

    To validate a newly developed software prototype that automatically analyses small bowel motility by comparing it directly with manual measurement. Forty-five patients with clinical indication for small bowel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were retrospectively included in this institutional review board-approved study. MRI was performed using a 1.5 T system following a standard MR-enterography protocol. Small bowel motility parameters (contractions-per-minute, luminal diameter, amplitude) were measured three times each in identical segments using the manual and the semiautomatic software-assisted method. The methods were compared for agreement, repeatability, and time needed for each measurement. All parameters were compared between the methods. A total of 91 small-bowel segments were analysed. No significant intra-individual difference (p > 0.05) was found for peristaltic frequencies between the methods (mean: 4.14/min manual; 4.22/min software-assisted). Amplitudes (5.14 mm; 5.57 mm) and mean lumen diameters (17.39 mm; 14.68) differed due to systematic differences in the definition of the bowel wall. Mean duration of single measurement was significantly (p < 0.01) shorter with the software (6.25 min; 1.30 min). The scattering of repeated measurements was significantly (p < 0.05) lower using the software. The software-assisted method accomplished highly reliable, fast and accurate measurement of small bowel motility. Measurement precision and duration differed significantly between the two methods in favour of the software-assisted technique. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  8. Small bowel volvulus after transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair due to improper use of V-Loc™ barbed absorbable wire - do we always "read the instructions first"?

    PubMed

    Filser, Joerg; Reibetanz, Joachim; Krajinovic, Katica; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Dietz, Ulrich Andreas; Seyfried, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Transabdominal preperitoneal endoscopic hernia repair (TAPP) is part of primary surgical health care. While both, the reported recurrence rate and procedure specific morbidity are consistently low, rare serious complications occur. A 36-year-old male patient developed bowel obstruction three days after both-sided TAPP for inguinal hernia repair. A computer tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a small bowel volvulus in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen requiring urgent revisional surgery. Intraoperatively, the small bowel and its mesenterial vessels were found to be twisted around a 5cm long V-Loc™ barbed absorbable suturing wire. After successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis, removal of the wire and detorquing of the bowel conglomerate, resection of small intestine was not necessary. The patient's further postoperative recovery was uneventful. Due to the barbed configuration of the V-Loc™ wire, a gapless continuous suturing of the peritoneum without laparoscopic knotting is easily and fast to accomplish. In this case the recommendation of the manufacturer to shorten the wire was not strictly followed and neither had the suture stump been extraperitonealized in order to avoid such rare complications. Surgeons need to be aware of relevant "tricks and traps" of routinely performed procedures and have to know all tools and material they use very well. This case may therefore increase our attention when it comes to little things which actually do matter. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain hemorrhage recurrence, small vessel disease type, and cerebral microbleeds

    PubMed Central

    Charidimou, Andreas; Imaizumi, Toshio; Moulin, Solene; Biffi, Alexandro; Samarasekera, Neshika; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Peeters, Andre; Vandermeeren, Yves; Laloux, Patrice; Baron, Jean-Claude; Hernandez-Guillamon, Mar; Montaner, Joan; Casolla, Barbara; Gregoire, Simone M.; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S.; Naka, H.; Smith, Eric E.; Viswanathan, Anand; Jäger, Hans R.; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Greenberg, Steven M.; Cordonnier, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) risk in ICH survivors, stratified by the presence, distribution, and number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) on MRI (i.e., the presumed causal underlying small vessel disease and its severity). Methods: This was a meta-analysis of prospective cohorts following ICH, with blood-sensitive brain MRI soon after ICH. We estimated annualized recurrent symptomatic ICH rates for each study and compared pooled odds ratios (ORs) of recurrent ICH by CMB presence/absence and presumed etiology based on CMB distribution (strictly lobar CMBs related to probable or possible cerebral amyloid angiopathy [CAA] vs non-CAA) and burden (1, 2–4, 5–10, and >10 CMBs), using random effects models. Results: We pooled data from 10 studies including 1,306 patients: 325 with CAA-related and 981 CAA-unrelated ICH. The annual recurrent ICH risk was higher in CAA-related ICH vs CAA-unrelated ICH (7.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2–12.6 vs 1.1%, 95% CI 0.5–1.7 per year, respectively; p = 0.01). In CAA-related ICH, multiple baseline CMBs (versus none) were associated with ICH recurrence during follow-up (range 1–3 years): OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.4–6.8; p = 0.006), 4.3 (95% CI 1.8–10.3; p = 0.001), and 3.4 (95% CI 1.4–8.3; p = 0.007) for 2–4, 5–10, and >10 CMBs, respectively. In CAA-unrelated ICH, only >10 CMBs (versus none) were associated with recurrent ICH (OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1–15; p = 0.001). The presence of 1 CMB (versus none) was not associated with recurrent ICH in CAA-related or CAA-unrelated cohorts. Conclusions: CMB burden and distribution on MRI identify subgroups of ICH survivors with higher ICH recurrence risk, which may help to predict ICH prognosis with relevance for clinical practice and treatment trials. PMID:28747441

  10. Bag and loop small bowel contouring strategies differentially estimate small bowel dose for post-hysterectomy women receiving pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Melody J; Kirk, Maura; Zhai, Huifang; Lin, Lilie L

    2016-07-01

    Background Small bowel (SB) dose-volume relationships established during initial computed tomography (CT) simulations may change throughout therapy due to organ displacement and motion. We investigated the impact of organ motion on SB dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in women with gynecologic malignancies treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and compared PBS SB DVHs to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods Post-hysterectomy patients (n = 11) treated for gynecologic cancers were enrolled on an image-guided proton therapy protocol involving CT simulation with full (CTF) and empty (CTE) bladders and weekly/biweekly on-treatment scans. IMRT plans were generated for comparative analysis. SB was contoured as bowel loops or bowel bag. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for matched-pair comparisons of SB, bladder, and rectum dose-volumes between CT scans and between PBS and IMRT plans. Results In PBS loops analysis, on-treatment DVH was significantly higher than CTF for doses <45 Gy (p < 0.05), and not significantly different than CTE. Specifically, V15 for loops was higher on-treatment (median 240 cm(3)) compared to CTF (median 169 cm(3), p = 0.03). In PBS bag analysis, on-treatment DVH was not significantly different from CTF across all dose ranges. Bowel bag V45 was not significantly different between on-treatment (median 540 cm(3)) and CTF (median 499 cm(3), p = 0.53). Decreasing bladder volume was associated with increasing V15 for loops and V45 for bowel bag (p < 0.005, both). Comparing PBS and IMRT, PBS resulted in significantly lower DVHs at low dose regions (<38 Gy) and higher DVHs at high dose regions (42.5-45.5 Gy) in both loops and bag analysis. IMRT plans demonstrated higher on-treatment SB loop DVHs and only minimal differences in bowel bag DVHs compared to CTF. Conclusions SB DVHs were well estimated by CTF bowel bag and underestimated by CTF loops in the setting of inconsistent

  11. Esophageal pneumatosis in the setting of small bowel ileus with acute resolution after nasogastric tube decompression.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Sanjit O; Wolfe, Allen R; Seguritan, Richard; Faroqui, Raihan; Meshreki, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Esophageal pneumatosis is a rare condition with diverse potential etiologies including traumatic, mechanical, ischemic, obstructive respiratory, autoimmune, immunodeficient, and infectious causes. Here, we present a case of esophageal pneumatosis in the setting of upper gastrointestinal and small bowel ileus, diagnosed on computed tomography (CT), with acute resolution after nasogastric tube decompression. A patient presented to the emergency department with epigastric discomfort. CT of the abdomen/pelvis demonstrated intramural air in the mid-to-distal esophagus, consistent with esophageal pneumatosis, and diffuse dilatation of the visualized esophagus, stomach, and small bowel, consistent with an ileus. Patient was managed with nasogastric tube decompression and bowel rest. Subsequent esophagram did not demonstrate any evidence of perforation and a repeat CT of the abdomen/pelvis, performed 11 hours after initial diagnostic CT, demonstrated interval resolution of patient's esophageal pneumatosis, and improvement of patient's ileus.

  12. Small bowel perforation in a hernia sac after TVT placement at the time of colpocleisis.

    PubMed

    Gurshumov, Emil L; Klapper, Allan S; Sierecki, Ava R

    2010-03-01

    Tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) is commonly considered as the first line of treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with demonstrated efficacy and limited complications. An 82-year-old woman with complete uterine procidentia and SUI underwent a Le Forte colpocleisis, TVT, posterior repair, and cystoscopy. A 4-cm bulge was noted over the site of the left TVT incision on postoperative day 1. On postoperative day 3, she developed bilious vomiting with slight abdominal distention. Computed tomography scan showed a strangulated left inguinal hernia. An immediate exploratory laparotomy noted an inguinal hernia displaced medially with loops of small bowel in the hernia sac. Although properly positioned, one loop of bowel was perforated by the sling mesh. A small bowel resection was performed and the mesh trimmed below the resection on involved side. At 2 months postoperative visit, the patient was asymptomatic, denied stress or urge incontinence. Vaginal examination noted well-supported vaginal walls.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Small Bowel Examination by Capsule Endoscopy for Patients before Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tetsuya, Yasunaka; Yoshiyasu, Kono; Kou, Miura; Toshihiro, Inokuchi; Yoshiro, Kawahara; Yuzo, Umeda; Takahito, Yagi; Hiroyuki, Okada

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gastrointestinal surveillance is a requirement prior to liver transplantation (LT), but small intestine examination is not generally undertaken. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of capsule endoscopy (CE) for patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods. 31 patients who needed LT were enrolled, and 139 patients who underwent CE over the same period of time acted as controls. Results. Frequency of successful achievement of evaluation of the full length of the small bowel, the mean gastric transit time, and the mean small bowel transit time were not significantly different between the two groups. Abnormalities in the small bowel were found in 26 patients. Comparative analysis revealed that history of EV rupture, history of EV treatment, red color sign of EV, and presence of PHG or HCC were significantly associated with patients with >2 two such findings (high score group). Conclusions. Small bowel examination by CE in patients before liver transplantation could be performed safely and is justified by the high rate of abnormal lesions detected particularly in patients with history of EV therapy or bleeding, red color sign, and presence of PHG or HCC. This study was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN 000008672). PMID:28168199

  14. Small bowel intussusception from renal cell carcinoma metastasis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bellio, Gabriele; Cipolat Mis, Tommaso; Kaso, Gladiola; Dattola, Roberto; Casagranda, Biagio; Bortul, Marina

    2016-08-11

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most frequent malignant neoplasia of the kidney accounting for 90 % of all renal solid tumors. Metastases from renal cell carcinoma are rarely located in the small bowel and generally their clinical presentation includes bleeding and obstruction. Intussusception in adults is an extremely rare pathological condition and only 30 to 35 % of small bowel intussusceptions are derived from malignant lesions. We report here a clinical case of a 75-year-old white man hospitalized for anemia and subocclusion. An abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography showed a small bowel intussusception. During a surgical exploration, a polypoid lesion was found to be the lead point of the intussusception. His small intestine was resected and a functional side-to-side anastomosis was performed. The histological features of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Small bowel intussusception from renal cell carcinoma metastasis should always be considered in the setting of unexplained intestinal subocclusion in patients with a history of renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  16. Quantification, validation, and follow-up of small bowel motility in Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Peng, Jennifer Q.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Conklin, Laurie; Sze, Raymond; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become a mainstay in the evaluation, assessment and follow up of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD), thanks to its high image quality and its non-ionizing nature. In particular, the advent of faster MRE sequences less sensitive to image-motion artifacts offers the possibility to obtain visual, structural and functional information of the patient's small bowel. However, the inherent subjectivity of the mere visual inspection of these images often hinders the accurate identification and monitoring of the pathological areas. In this paper, we present a framework that provides quantitative and objective motility information of the small bowel from free-breathing MRE dynamic sequences. After compensating for the breathing motion of the patient, we create personalized peristaltic activity maps via optical flow analysis. The result is the creation of a new set of images providing objective and precise functional information of the small bowel. The accuracy of the new method was also evaluated from two different perspectives: objective accuracy (1.1 ± 0.6 mm/s of error), i.e., the ability of the system to provide quantitative and accurate information about the motility of moving bowel landmarks, and subjective accuracy (avg. difference of 0.7 ± 0.7 in a range of 1 to 5), i.e., the degree of agreement with the subjective evaluation of an expert. Finally, the practical utility of the new method was successfully evaluated in a preliminary study with 32 studies of healthy and CD cases, showing its potential for the fast and accurate assessment and follow up of CD in the small bowel.

  17. Left-sided transmesocolic herniation of small bowel in an otherwise unaffected abdomen.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Akshay Anand; Sonkar, Abhinav Arun; Singh, Kul Ranjan; Rai, Anurag

    2015-05-15

    Transmesocolic hernia is an uncommon type of internal hernia with incidence ranging from approximately 5-10%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a transmesocolic hernia through a gap within the descending mesocolon presenting clinically as an intestinal obstruction. A 75-year-old man was admitted with clinical features of intestinal obstruction. An abdominal X-ray showed multiple small bowel loops with air fluid levels. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed small bowel obstruction not only on the right, but also on the left side of the collapsed descending colon. Emergency surgery was performed. Strangulated bowel loops with gangrenous changes were resected and double-barrel ileostomy was carried out. The postoperative period was uneventful. Restoration of bowel was performed after 6 weeks. Preoperative diagnosis of bowel obstruction caused by a transmesocolic hernia remains difficult despite the currently available imaging techniques. Prompt surgery can prevent serious complications such as peritonitis and sepsis.

  18. Indications and surgical options for small bowel, large bowel and perianal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Toh, James WT; Stewart, Peter; Rickard, Matthew JFX; Leong, Rupert; Wang, Nelson; Young, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Despite advancements in medical therapy of Crohn’s disease (CD), majority of patients with CD will eventually require surgical intervention, with at least a third of patients requiring multiple surgeries. It is important to understand the role and timing of surgery, with the goals of therapy to reduce the need for surgery without increasing the odds of emergency surgery and its associated morbidity, as well as to limit surgical recurrence and avoid intestinal failure. The profile of CD patients requiring surgical intervention has changed over the decades with improvements in medical therapy with immunomodulators and biological agents. The most common indication for surgery is obstruction from stricturing disease, followed by abscesses and fistulae. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in CD is high but the likelihood of needing surgery for bleeding is low. Most major gastrointestinal bleeding episodes resolve spontaneously, albeit the risk of re-bleeding is high. The risk of colorectal cancer associated with CD is low. While current surgical guidelines recommend a total proctocolectomy for colorectal cancer associated with CD, subtotal colectomy or segmental colectomy with endoscopic surveillance may be a reasonable option. Approximately 20%-40% of CD patients will need perianal surgery during their lifetime. This review assesses the practice parameters and guidelines in the surgical management of CD, with a focus on the indications for surgery in CD (and when not to operate), and a critical evaluation of the timing and surgical options available to improve outcomes and reduce recurrence rates. PMID:27833380

  19. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: association with colon motility, bowel symptoms, and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Grover, M; Kanazawa, M; Palsson, O S; Chitkara, D K; Gangarosa, L M; Drossman, D A; Whitehead, W E

    2008-09-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), although the issue is still under debate. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in those with IBS and its association with colonic motility, bowel symptoms and psychological distress. Sucrose hydrogen and methane breath tests were performed in 158 IBS patients and 34 healthy controls (HC). Thresholds for pain and urgency were tested by barostat in the descending colon. The motility index (MI) was calculated as the average area under the curve for all phasic contractions. Questionnaires assessed psychological distress, IBS symptom severity (IBS-SS), IBS quality of life (IBS-QOL) and self-reported bowel symptoms. Fifty-two of 158 (32.9%) IBS patients had abnormal breath tests compared with six of 34 (17.9%) HC (chi(2) = 0.079). SIBO (SIBO+) and non-SIBO (SIBO-) patients did not differ in the prevalence of IBS subtypes, IBS-SS, IBS-QOL and psychological distress variables. IBS patients had a greater post-distension increase in MI than HC, but there was no difference between SIBO+ and SIBO- patients. Predominant methane producers had higher urge thresholds (28.4 vs 18.3, P < 0.05) and higher baseline MI (461 vs 301.45, P < 0.05) than SIBO- IBS patients, and they reported more 'hard or lumpy stools' when compared with predominant hydrogen producers (P < 0.05) and SIBO- IBS patients (P < 0.05). SIBO is unlikely to contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of IBS. Methane production is associated with constipation.

  20. A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to mesenteric penetration.

    PubMed

    Roos, J

    2015-07-01

    A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is described. At laparotomy, the PEG tube was found to have penetrated the jejunal mesentery at two points, thereby acting as a focus for a volvulus. Direct injury and obstruction to the small bowel have been described but volvulus due to mesenteric penetration has not.

  1. Single Cavernous Hemangioma of the Small Bowel Diagnosed by Using Capsule Endoscopy in a Child with Chronic Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Jin; Hwang, Geol; Kang, Hyun Sik; Song, Hyun Joo; Chang, Weon Young; Maeng, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract are extremely rare. In particular, the diagnosis of small bowel hemangiomas is very difficult in children. A 13-year-old boy presented at the outpatient clinic with dizziness and fatigue. The patient was previously diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia at 3 years of age and had been treated with iron supplements continuously and pure red cell transfusion intermittently. Laboratory tests indicated that the patient currently had iron-deficiency anemia. There was no evidence of gross bleeding, such as hematemesis or bloody stool. Laboratory findings indicated no bleeding tendency. Gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy results were negative. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, the patient underwent capsule endoscopy. A purplish stalked mass was found in the jejunum, and the mass was excised successfully. We report of a 13-year-old boy who presented with severe and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia caused by a cavernous hemangioma in the small bowel without symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26240811

  2. Clinical characteristics of small bowel tumors diagnosed by double-balloon endoscopy: KASID multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-In; Choi, Hwang; Choi, Kyu-Yong; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Jang, Hyun-Joo; Eun, Chang-Soo; Cheon, Jae Hee; Shin, Sung Jae; Kim, Jin-Oh; Lee, Moon-Sung; Choi, Jai-Hyun

    2011-10-01

    Small bowel tumors are relatively rare, and their confirmative diagnosis before surgery is not easy. This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with small bowel tumors who received double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Secondary end points were to evaluate the usefulness and safety of DBE for the diagnosis of patients with suspected SB tumors derived from other previous procedures. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive DBE examinations to explore the small intestine in eight university hospitals over a 5-year period. A total of 877 DBE examinations (per oral 487, per anal 390) were performed in 645 patients (405 males, mean age 48.2 years). Small bowel tumors were diagnosed in 112 patients (17.4%), of which 38 patients had benign polyps, 29 had gastrointestinal stromal tumors/leiomyomata, 18 had lymphomas, 14 had adenocarcinomas, five had metastatic or invasive cancers, five had lipomas, and three patients had cystic tumors. The main reasons for DBE among patients with small bowel tumors were obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB, 40.2%) followed by abnormal imaging study (25.2%). The concordance rate of diagnoses based on DBE with diagnoses based on small bowel follow-through, CT, and capsule endoscopy among patients with small bowel tumors was 68.9% (42/61), 75.3% (70/93), and 78.3% (18/23), respectively. Therapeutic plans were changed due to the DBE results in 64.2% of patients with small bowel tumors. Approximately one-sixth of patients who received DBE had small bowel tumors, and the most common reason for DBE among patients with small bowel tumors was OGIB. DBE is a useful method for the confirmative diagnosis of small bowel tumors and has a good clinical impact on therapeutic plans and short-term clinical results.

  3. Urachal Cyst Causing Small Bowel Obstruction in an Adult with a Virgin Abdomen.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Michael P; Ashman, Zane W; Plurad, David S; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A patent urachus is a rare congenital or acquired pathology, which can lead to complications later in life. We describe a case of urachal cystitis as the etiology of small bowel obstruction in an adult without prior intra-abdominal surgery. Case Report. A 64-year-old male presented to the acute care surgery team with a 5-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain, distention, nausea, and vomiting. He had a two-month history of urinary retention and his past medical history was significant for benign prostate hyperplasia. On exam, he had evidence of small bowel obstruction. Computed tomography revealed high-grade small bowel obstruction secondary to presumed ruptured appendicitis. In the operating room, an infected urachal cyst was identified with adhesions to the proximal ileum. After lysis of adhesions and resection of the cyst, the patient was subsequently discharged without further issues. Conclusion. Although rare, urachal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with small bowel obstruction without prior intraabdominal surgery, hernia, or malignancy.

  4. Treating Small Bowel Obstruction with a Manual Physical Therapy: A Prospective Efficacy Study.

    PubMed

    Rice, Amanda D; Patterson, Kimberley; Reed, Evette D; Wurn, Belinda F; Klingenberg, Bernhard; King, C Richard; Wurn, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) caused by adhesions are a common, often life-threatening postsurgical complication with few treatment options available for patients. This study examines the efficacy of a manual physical therapy treatment regimen on the pain and quality of life of subjects with a history of bowel obstructions due to adhesions in a prospective, controlled survey based study. Changes in six domains of quality of life were measured via ratings reported before and after treatment using the validated Small Bowel Obstruction Questionnaire (SBO-Q). Improvements in the domains for pain (p = 0.0087), overall quality of life (p = 0.0016), and pain severity (p = 0.0006) were significant when average scores before treatment were compared with scores after treatment. The gastrointestinal symptoms (p = 0.0258) domain was marginally significant. There was no statistically significant improvement identified in the diet or medication domains in the SBO-Q for this population. Significant improvements in range of motion in the trunk (p ≤ 0.001), often limited by adhesions, were also observed for all measures. This study demonstrates in a small number of subjects that this manual physical therapy protocol is an effective treatment option for patients with adhesive small bowel obstructions as measured by subject reported symptoms and quality of life.

  5. Comparison between small bowel manometric patterns and full-thickness biopsy histopathology in severe intestinal dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Malagelada, C; Karunaratne, T B; Accarino, A; Cogliandro, R F; Landolfi, S; Gori, A; Boschetti, E; Malagelada, J R; Stanghellini, V; Azpiroz, F; De Giorgio, R

    2017-09-22

    Intestinal manometry is the current standard for direct evaluation of small bowel dysmotility. Patients with abnormal motility can either be diagnosed of pseudo-obstruction when there are radiological findings mimicking mechanical intestinal obstruction or of enteric dysmotility when these findings are absent. The aim of the present study was to prospectively compare small bowel manometric abnormalities with histopathological findings in intestinal full-thickness biopsies in patients with severe dysmotility disorders. We investigated 38 patients with intestinal manometry and a subsequent full-thickness intestinal biopsy. Manometric recordings were read by 4 investigators and a diagnostic consensus was obtained in 35 patients. Histopathological analysis, including specific immunohistochemical techniques of small bowel biopsies was performed and compared to manometric readings. Patients with abnormal intestinal manometry had abnormal histopathological findings in 73% of cases. However, manometric patterns did not match with the specific neuromuscular abnormalities. Among patients with a neuropathic manometry pattern and abnormal histopathology, only 23% had an enteric neuropathy, whereas 62% had neuromuscular inflammation, and 15% an enteric myopathy. On the other hand, patients with a myopathic manometry pattern all had abnormal histopathology, however, none of them with signs of enteric myopathy. Small bowel dysmotility detected by intestinal manometry is often associated with abnormal neuromuscular findings in full-thickness biopsies. However, there is no correlation between the specific manometric patterns and the histopathological findings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small-bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pauleau, Ghislain; Commandeur, Diane; Andro, Christophe; Chapellier, Xavier

    2012-07-11

    Persistent omphalomesenteric duct as a cause of small-bowel obstruction is an exceptional finding. A neonate presented with occlusion due to intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Remnants of the duct were successfully resected, and the postoperative course was uneventful. We discuss the presentation of omphalomesenteric duct and its management.

  7. Mechanical small bowel obstruction due to an inflamed appendix wrapping around the last loop of ileum.

    PubMed

    Assenza, M; Ricci, G; Bartolucci, P; Modini, C

    2005-01-01

    Acute apendicitis rarely presents with a clinical picture of mechanical small-bowel obstruction. The Authors report a case of this inusual clinical occurrence, arised like a complication of a common disease, characterized by a chronically inflamed appendix (mucocele) wrapping around the last loop of ileum that produced volvolus and strangulation. The few similar cases reported in the literature are moreover reviewed.

  8. Computed tomographic enteroclysis with air and virtual enteroscopy: protocol and feasibility for small bowel evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toshiyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Kikuyama, Masataka; Takeuchi, Ken; Hanai, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    We describe our optimized protocol for computed tomographic enteroclysis using air as the contrast material and report an early assessment of its clinical performance. Thirty-one examinations of computed tomographic enteroclysis with air were performed in 30 patients in our hospital from September 2008 to September 2010. The volume of injected air and intra-intestinal pressure were monitored in 16 cases. The data were reviewed for ratios of successful whole small bowel depictions out of the total number of examinations for patients without stenosis. Efforts were made to confirm depicted abnormal findings when possible by other imaging techniques, intra-operative findings, histopathological findings, and subsequent history. The injected air volume and final intra-intestinal pressure were 2925 ± 686 ml and 24.5 ± 7.1cm H₂O in cases without stenosis. In 19 examinations with anterograde air injection for patients without stenosis, whole small bowel depiction was achieved in 16 (84.2%). Computed tomographic enteroclysis with air was useful for detecting strictures (in Crohn's disease, malignant lymphoma, metastatic carcinoma), Meckel's diverticulum, and for excluding other obstructive conditions in ileus. Computed tomographic enteroclysis with air has a potential to enable the exploration of the whole small bowel, thereby providing information of small bowel lesions that complements other techniques. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laparoscopic repair of a small bowel herniation through a broad ligament defect

    PubMed Central

    Buero, Agustín; Silberman, Ezequiel A.; Medina, Pablo; Morra, Matias E.; Bogetti, Diego J.; Porto, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old female presented with a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction from unknown origin. Laparoscopy revealed herniation of small bowel trough a defect in the left broad ligament. After reduction, the defect was corrected laparoscopically. The post operative recovery was uneventful. PMID:25013338

  10. Urachal Cyst Causing Small Bowel Obstruction in an Adult with a Virgin Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, Zane W.; Plurad, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A patent urachus is a rare congenital or acquired pathology, which can lead to complications later in life. We describe a case of urachal cystitis as the etiology of small bowel obstruction in an adult without prior intra-abdominal surgery. Case Report. A 64-year-old male presented to the acute care surgery team with a 5-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain, distention, nausea, and vomiting. He had a two-month history of urinary retention and his past medical history was significant for benign prostate hyperplasia. On exam, he had evidence of small bowel obstruction. Computed tomography revealed high-grade small bowel obstruction secondary to presumed ruptured appendicitis. In the operating room, an infected urachal cyst was identified with adhesions to the proximal ileum. After lysis of adhesions and resection of the cyst, the patient was subsequently discharged without further issues. Conclusion. Although rare, urachal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with small bowel obstruction without prior intraabdominal surgery, hernia, or malignancy. PMID:27900227

  11. [A case of protein-losing enteropathy associated with small bowel villous atrophy].

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Hee; Lee, Oh Young; Eun, Chang Su; Roh, Byoung Joo; Sohn, Won; Baeg, Seung Sam; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2007-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy is described as a diverse group of disorders associated with excessive loss of serum proteins into the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The etiology of protein losing enteropathy is various. Increased mucosal permeability to protein as a result of cell damage, mucosal erosion, or lymphatic obstruction may develop protein losing enteropathy. Celiac disease is a common cause of protein losing enteropathy associated with small bowel villous atrophy in Europe. We experienced a case of protein losing enteropathy associated with small bowel villous atrophy of unknown origin. A 36-year-old woman was admitted due to chronic watery diarrhea and weight loss. Laboratory findings showed total protein 4.7 g/dL, albumin 2.7 g/dL, cholesterol 100 mg/dL, WBC 6,000/mm3 (lymphocyte 13.6%) with the absence of proteinuria. On esophagogastroduodenoscopic examination, duodenal ulcer scar was noted on the bulb and colonoscopic finding was nonspecific. On small bowel enteroscopy, jejunal and ileal villi was scantly noticed. Small bowel biopsy showed marked villous atrophy. Her symptoms did not improve after supportive care. Gluten free diet was tried because celiac disease could not be ruled out completely. Diarrhea ceased and body weight regained after gluten free diet.

  12. Inverted Meckel diverticulum as a lead point of small bowel intussusception: misinterpreting case as a lipoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Ho; Kang, Kyung A; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Kyung Goo; Kwon, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Inverted Meckel diverticulum is an uncommon cause of intussusception in adults. It may be confused for an intraluminal lipoma. We present a case of small bowel intussusception due to inverted Meckel diverticulum with characteristic computed tomography finding potentially distinguishable from lipoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inferior Vena Cava Repair Using Serosal Patch of Small Bowel: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hodjati, Hossein; Hoseinzadeh, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Dehghani Nazhavi, Seifollah; Kumar, Viginda; Sehhatpour, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and results of using serosal patch of small bowel for repair and replacement of inferior vena cava (IVC) after resection of a part of infra-renal IVC in an animal model, as it may be encountered in extensive tumors of retroperitoneal and trauma patients. Methods: Five healthy sheep of both sexes were prepared. After general anesthesia and laparotomy, a defect with 1 cm width and 4cm length was made on anterior aspect of infra-renal IVC, and then an adjacent loop of small bowel was brought and sutured continuously to cover the defect of IVC as a patch graft. The observation period was two months. Results: Three of five IVCs were macroscopically patent without stenosis and thrombosis. Pathologic assay revealed complete endothelialization of serosal surface of the patch of small bowel loop. One of IVCs was completely occluded in gross evaluation and fibrous formation in pathologist review. The sheep had no sign of venous hypertension and edema of limbs. One sheep died at the night of first operation due to internal bleeding.   Conclusion: Serosal patch of small bowel is an accessible and feasible alternative in repair and reconstruction of IVC especially when there is restriction for use of prosthetic material in a contaminated space of abdomen. PMID:28246620

  14. A new method for insertion of long intestinal tube for small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sekiba, Kazuma; Ohmae, Tomoya; Odawara, Nariaki; Moriyama, Makoto; Kanai, Sachiko; Tsuboi, Mayo; Saito, Tomotaka; Uchino, Koji; Akamatsu, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is often difficult to insert a long intestinal tube (LT) in patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO). We developed a novel technique for inserting an LT without endoscopy called nonendoscopic over-the-wire method via short nasogastric tube (NEWSt). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of NEWSt. We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent LT insertion for SBO without any indications of strangulation with either NEWSt (n = 16) or endoscopy (n = 17) between November 2011 and February 2015 at our hospital. Univariate analysis was used to assess the success rate of LT placement beyond the duodenojejunal flexure, time required for the procedure, clinical outcomes, and adverse events. The success rate was 100% in both groups. Procedure time was numerically, but not statistically, shorter in the NEWSt group compared with the endoscopy group (24 ± 13 vs 30 ± 13 min; P = 0.174). There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of surgery rate (31% vs 12%; P = 0.225), fasting period (11.3 ± 6.3 vs 9.9 ± 4.5 days; P = 0.482), hospital stay (26.4 ± 22.1 vs 18.7 ± 7.0 days; P = 0.194), and recurrence rate (19% vs 24%; P = 1.0). No serious adverse event was observed in the NEWSt group, whereas serious aspiration pneumonia was observed in 2 patients after LT insertion in the endoscopy group. Without endoscopy, NEWSt enabled the high success rate and the short procedure time for the LT insertion. Prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed. PMID:27893689

  15. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth: a negative factor in gut adaptation in pediatric SBS.

    PubMed

    Cole, Conrad R; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-12-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) is common in infants and children with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Its occurrence is due to alterations in anatomy, motility, and secretion, which promote the abnormal growth of bacteria. SBBO is associated with significant clinical problems, including prolonged dependence on parenteral nutrition, liver injury, and malabsorption. A major clinical challenge is in making the correct diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth. Management of this disorder is still poorly understood and should be evaluated adequately. This review addresses the current understanding of bacteria in the intestines and issues related to bacterial overgrowth in pediatric SBS.

  16. Incarcerated inguinal hernia and small bowel obstruction as a rare complication of a penile prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Serio, S J; Schafer, P; Merchant, A M

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present a rare case of a small bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated inguinal hernia as a short-term complication of a penile prosthesis implantation. The patient underwent prosthesis implantation to treat refractory erectile dysfunction after a robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. He presented 2 weeks later with the incarcerated hernia to our emergency department and surgical service. The hernia was repaired in a tension-free manner, and the bowel was uncompromised. The patient is symptom free at follow-up.

  17. Risk of Small Bowel Obstruction After Robot-Assisted vs Open Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Stacy; Meyer, Christian P; Krasnova, Anna; Curnyn, Caitlin; Reznor, Gally; Kibel, Adam S; Lepor, Herbert; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2016-12-01

    Whereas open radical prostatectomy is performed extraperitoneally, minimally invasive radical prostatectomy is typically performed within the peritoneal cavity. Our objective was to determine whether minimally invasive radical prostatectomy is associated with an increased risk of small bowel obstruction compared with open radical prostatectomy. In the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we identified 14,147 men found to have prostate cancer from 2000 to 2008 treated by open (n = 10,954) or minimally invasive (n = 3193) radical prostatectomy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the impact of surgical approach on the diagnosis of small bowel obstruction, as well as the need for lysis of adhesions and exploratory laparotomy. During a median follow-up of 45 and 76 months, respectively, the cumulative incidence of small bowel obstruction was 3.7% for minimally invasive and 5.3% for open radical prostatectomy (p = 0.0005). Lysis of adhesions occurred in 1.1% of minimally invasive and 2.0% of open prostatectomy patients (p = 0.0003). On multivariable analysis, there was no significant difference between minimally invasive and open prostatectomy with respect to small bowel obstruction (HR 1.17, 95% CI 0.90, 1.52, p = 0.25) or lysis of adhesions (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.50, 1.40, p = 0.57). Limitations of the study include the retrospective design and use of administrative claims data. Relative to open radical prostatectomy, minimally invasive radical prostatectomy is not associated with an increased risk of postoperative small bowel obstruction and lysis of adhesions.

  18. Cost effectiveness of alternative imaging strategies for the diagnosis of small-bowel Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Barrett G; Cipriano, Lauren E; Chang, Steven L; Lee, Keane K; Owens, Douglas K; Garber, Alan M

    2010-03-01

    The cost effectiveness of alternative approaches to the diagnosis of small-bowel Crohn's disease is unknown. This study evaluates whether computed tomographic enterography (CTE) is a cost-effective alternative to small-bowel follow-through (SBFT) and whether capsule endoscopy is a cost-effective third test in patients in whom a high suspicion of disease remains after 2 previous negative tests. A decision-analytic model was developed to compare the lifetime costs and benefits of each diagnostic strategy. Patients were considered with low (20%) and high (75%) pretest probability of small-bowel Crohn's disease. Effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. Parameter assumptions were tested with sensitivity analyses. With a moderate to high pretest probability of small-bowel Crohn's disease, and a higher likelihood of isolated jejunal disease, follow-up evaluation with CTE has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of less than $54,000/QALY-gained compared with SBFT. The addition of capsule endoscopy after ileocolonoscopy and negative CTE or SBFT costs greater than $500,000 per QALY-gained in all scenarios. Results were not sensitive to costs of tests or complications but were sensitive to test accuracies. The cost effectiveness of strategies depends critically on the pretest probability of Crohn's disease and if the terminal ileum is examined at ileocolonoscopy. CTE is a cost-effective alternative to SBFT in patients with moderate to high suspicion of small-bowel Crohn's disease. The addition of capsule endoscopy as a third test is not a cost-effective third test, even in patients with high pretest probability of disease. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Is it really small-bowel obstruction in patients with paradox after IPAA?

    PubMed

    Silva-Velazco, Jorge; Hull, Tracy L; Stocchi, Luca; Gorgun, Emre

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosing outlet obstruction after IPAA can be challenging because the etiology is multifactorial. The aim of this study was to assess possible factors associated with outlet obstruction from paradoxical anal muscle contraction (paradox) after IPAA unrelated to strictures or structural abnormalities. This was a retrospective study from a prospectively maintained pouch database. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral center. All of the patients with paradox after ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis verified by anal physiology were identified from our prospectively maintained database. Patients with endoscopic or digital evidence of strictures or other anatomic abnormalities were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and perioperative factors were obtained, including previous abdominal operations, history of pouchitis, need for anal intubation, diagnosis of small-bowel obstruction, and radiologic findings at the time of paradox diagnosis. There were 40 patients (17 women) with an overall mean age of 39 years (range, 17-60 years) and a mean follow-up of 15 years (range, 1-28 years) after IPAA. Pathologic diagnoses at the time of ileal pouch creation were ulcerative colitis (n = 27), indeterminate colitis (n = 11), Crohn's disease, and familial adenomatous polyposis (1 case each). A total of 15 (37%) of 40 patients were diagnosed with small-bowel obstruction before their paradox diagnosis, 8 of whom underwent surgery, which revealed diffusely dilated small bowel and pouch without intraoperative identification of a transition point. The time from ileal pouch creation to paradox diagnosis was significantly longer in patients receiving a diagnosis of small-bowel obstruction than in the remaining paradox patients (7.2 vs 2.6 years; p < 0.001). This study was limited by its nonrandomized retrospective nature. After an IPAA, patients with outlet obstruction from paradox can appear to have a small-bowel obstruction. A high incidence of suspicion is needed to make the correct

  20. Value of in vivo electrophysiological measurements to evaluate canine small bowel autotransplants.

    PubMed Central

    Meijssen, M A; Heineman, E; de Bruin, R W; Veeze, H J; Bijman, J; de Jonge, H R; ten Kate, F J; Marquet, R L; Molenaar, J C

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a non-invasive method for in vivo measurement of the transepithelial potential difference in the canine small bowel and to evaluate this parameter in small bowel autotransplants. In group 0 (control group, n = 4), two intestinal loops were created without disturbing their vascular, neural, and lymphatic supplies. In group I (successful autotransplants, n = 11), two heterotopic small bowel loops were constructed. Long term functional sequelae of vascular, neural, and lymphatic division were studied. Group II (n = 6) consisted of dogs with unsuccessful autotransplants suffering thrombosis of the vascular anastomosis, which resulted in ischaemic small bowel autografts. In group I, values of spontaneous transepithelial potential difference, an index of base line active electrolyte transport, were significantly lower compared with group 0 (p less than 0.05), probably as a result of denervation of the autotransplants. Both theophylline and glucose stimulated potential difference responses, measuring cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated chloride secretion and sodium coupled glucose absorption respectively, showed negative luminal values in group I at all time points after transplantation. These transepithelial potential difference responses diminished progressively with time. From day 21 onwards both theophylline and glucose stimulated potential difference responses were significantly less than the corresponding responses at day seven (p less than 0.05). Morphometric analysis showed that the reduction of transepithelial potential difference responses preceded degenerative mucosal changes in the heterotopic small bowel autografts. In group II, potential difference responses to theophylline and glucose showed positive luminal values (p<0.01 v group I), probably as a result of passive potassium effusion from necrotic enterocytes. Images Figure 3 PMID:1752464

  1. Laparoscopic surgery for small-bowel obstruction caused by Meckel’s diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takatsugu; Nagai, Motoki; Koike, Daisuke; Nomura, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of abdominal distention and vomiting. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a blind loop of the bowel extending to near the uterus and a fibrotic band connecting the mesentery to the top of the bowel, suggestive of Meckel’s diverticulum (MD) and a mesodiverticular band (MDB). After intestinal decompression, elective laparoscopic surgery was carried out. Using three 5-mm ports, MD was dissected from the surrounding adhesion and MDB was divided intracorporeally. And subsequent Meckel’s diverticulectomy was performed. The presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa was confirmed histologically. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged 5 d after the operation. She has remained healthy and symptom-free during 4 years of follow-up. This was considered to be an unusual case of preoperatively diagnosed and laparoscopically treated small-bowel obstruction due to MD in a young adult woman. PMID:26981191

  2. [Recurrent intestinal ischemia due to factor VIII].

    PubMed

    Castellanos Monedero, Jesús Javier; Legaz Huidobro, María Luisa; Galindo Andugar, María Angeles; Rodríguez Pérez, Alvaro; Mantrana del Valle, José María

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is difficult to diagnose and can be caused by several etiologic processes. We report the case of a female patient with recurrent bowel ischemia due to small vessel thrombosis, which is caused by factor VIII, a procoagulant factor.

  3. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy. PMID:26664542

  4. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy.

  5. [The role of contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan in clinical decision in the management of adhesive small bowel obstruction].

    PubMed

    Quezada-Sanhueza, Nicolás; León-Ferrufino, Felipe; Bächler-González, Jean; Riquelme-Pizarro, Carlos; Crovari-Eulufi, Fernando; Jarufe-Cassis, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the exam of choice for bowel obstruction. The test reports the etiology, site and grade of obstruction, and the presence of bowel ischemia, affecting the surgical decision. We undertook this study to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT for bowel ischemia and the probability of surgery depending on signs of bowel ischemia and grade of bowel obstruction observed in CT in patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction. We carried out a retrospective study including patients from 2007-2010 admitted due to adhesive bowel obstruction and with intravenous contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT at admission. Tomographic signs of bowel ischemia were established and diagnostic accuracy was calculated. We also determined the probability of surgery depending on tomographic grade of obstruction and signs of bowel ischemia by subgroup analysis. This was a cohort of 164 patients with a mean age of 60.4 ± 20 years; 87% had previous abdominal surgery and 86 patients required surgery (52%). In regard to tomographic signs of bowel ischemia, sensitivity was 72.5%, specificity 97.5%, positive predictive value 90%, negative predictive value 91%, positive likelihood ratio 29.9, and negative likelihood ratio 0.28. Tomographic signs of bowel ischemia simultaneously with high-grade obstruction presented an 83% probability of surgery; high-grade obstruction alone presented a 57% probability and in absence of both signs was 36%. There is good diagnostic accuracy for tomographic signs of bowel ischemia and its definitive presence. Tomographic signs of bowel ischemia simultaneously with high-grade bowel obstruction significantly increase the probability of surgery.

  6. Effectiveness of MR enterography for the assessment of small-bowel diseases beyond Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Amzallag-Bellenger, Elisa; Oudjit, Ammar; Ruiz, Ana; Cadiot, Guillaume; Soyer, Philippe A; Hoeffel, Christine C

    2012-01-01

    The use of cross-sectional imaging techniques for the noninvasive evaluation of small-bowel disorders is increasing. The effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR) enterography for the evaluation of Crohn disease, in particular, is well described in the literature. In addition, MR enterography has an evolving though less well documented role to play in the evaluation of other small-bowel diseases, including various benign and malignant neoplasms arising in isolation or in polyposis syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers, inflammatory conditions such as vasculitis and treatment-induced enteritis, infectious processes, celiac disease, diverticular disease, systemic sclerosis, and bowel duplication. MR enterography may be useful also for the evaluation of intermittent and low-grade small-bowel obstructions. Advantages of MR imaging over computed tomography (CT) for enterographic evaluations include superb contrast resolution, lack of associated exposure to ionizing radiation, ability to acquire multiplanar primary image datasets, ability to acquire sequential image series over a long acquisition time, multiphasic imaging capability, and use of intravenous contrast media with better safety profiles. MR enterography also allows dynamic evaluations of small-bowel peristalsis and distensibility of areas of luminal narrowing and intraluminal masses by repeating sequences at different intervals after administering an additional amount of the oral contrast medium. Limitations of MR enterography in comparison with CT include higher cost, less availability, more variable image quality, and lower spatial resolution. The advantages and disadvantages of MR enterography performed with ingestion of the oral contrast medium relative to MR enteroclysis performed with infusion of the oral contrast medium through a nasoenteric tube are less certain.

  7. A Minor Innovation in Constructing a Small Bowel Stoma in Neonates with Small Bowel Atresia to Reduce the Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naeem; Bakht, Saba; Zaheer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intestinal atresia has still significant morbidity in developing countries. Stomas are now not recommended in every case of intestinal atresia; primary anastomosis is the goal of surgery after resection of dilated adynamic gut. A new type of stoma formation along with primary anastomosis is being presented here. Materials and Methods: This report is based on our experience of many cases with this technique in last 12 years but all the details and long follow-up of each case is not available. However the method of surgical procedure, progress, complications, and advantages encountered have been highlighted. Results: Presently we have data of 7 patients; others are lost to follow up. Three had died with other associated problems, namely one with multiple atresias, two with septic shock and prematurity. Two stomas did not require formal closure because stoma shriveled and disappeared. Two other stomas had grown very long like a diverticulum when these were closed after 5 and 8 months. Conclusion: This technique is another attempt to decrease morbidity of patients of intestinal atresia especially in those cases where short bowel syndrome is feared after resection of proximal dilated gut. PMID:27896153

  8. The effect of adjuvant immunotherapy on tumor recurrence after segmental resection of carcinogen-induced Wistar/Furth primary bowel adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, G. Jr.; Harte, P.J.; Rayner, A.A.; Corson, J.M.; Madara, J.; Munroe, A.E.; King, V.P.; Wilson, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Primary bowel tumors were induced in Wistar/Furth (W/Fu) rats by 16 weekly subcutaneous injections of 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH). After ''curative'' resection of primary adenocarcinomas of the colon, 75% of control rats who received no further treatment developed local or regional recurrence within 22 wk. In 4 separate experiments, rats immunized after primary tumor resection by 3 weekly subcutaneous inoculations of 1 x 10/sup 6/ irradiated (10,000 rad) DMH-W15 sarcoma cells (no tumor-associated antigens cross-reacting with bowel adenocarcinomas) developed recurrent tumor at a rate similar to the controls. By contrast, after primary bowel tumor resection, rats immunized with DMH-W-163 colon adenocarcinoma (possessing tumor-associated antigens cross-reactive with W/Fu bowel adenocarcinomas) showed a consistently reduced rate of local or regional recurrence compared to either of the controls (x/sup 2/ = 4.62, p < 0.05) or the rats immunized with sarcomas (X/sup 2/ = 5.42, p < 0.05)= 4.62, p < 0.05). By 22 wk after primary tumor resection, only 35% of the DMH-W-163-immunized animals in each of the 4 experiments showed recurrence. No deaths from recurrences were note in any of the experimental groups after this time, and selected animals sacrificed in the immunized groups up to 30 wk after primary tumor resection were documented to be disease-free. Protection against tumor recurrence was, therefore, a reflection of increased disease-free survival. No change in the effectiveness of immunoprotection in this model could be demonstrated after resection of less invasive primary tumors. These data reflect the utility of a new model in which modification of the natural history of individual primary bowel adenocarcinomas can be examined. The similarities and differences between this system and humans with colon cancer are discussed.

  9. Computed tomography findings of internal hernia after gastric bypass that may precede small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Chung, M; Teixeira, J; Baer, J; Frager, D

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates computed tomography signs of internal hernia in gastric bypass patients, including several previously unreported signs suggestive of internal hernia. Eighteen patients with surgically proven internal hernia were included in the study cohort. The signs analyzed included the mesenteric swirl, hurricane eye, mushroom sign, and dilated small bowel loops, as well as previously non-investigated signs such as bowel wall edema, engorged mesenteric vessels, engorged mesenteric lymph nodes, and hazy mesenteric fat. We also separately examined internal hernia patients without overt small bowel obstruction (SBO), since these are the patients most likely to get overlooked by radiologists. The most prevalent sign in all internal hernia patients was mesenteric vessel engorgement, seen in approximately 79-84 % of patients overall and 73-75 % of patients without overt SBO. The level of agreement between our two readers for the eight total signs reviewed was all moderate to substantial (using Cohen kappa values), reflecting their reliability as markers of internal hernia. The highest level of agreement was seen in vessel engorgement at 0.91, followed by three other signs [hurricane eye, SBO, bowel edema] with levels of agreement at 0.86. We conclude that more subtle signs of internal hernia should be included in radiologist search patterns for patients with internal hernia, especially those presenting multiple times for abdominal pain, as these may reflect surgically correctable intermittent herniations.

  10. Adult intussusception caused by myoepithelial hamartoma in the small bowel: A case report.

    PubMed

    Adetunji, Adeyanju; Healy, Donagh; O'Donnell, Nessa; Davitt, Stephen; O'Hanrahan, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Intussusception is rare in adults and can have acute, intermittent or chronic presentations. We present an unusual case of intussusception in an adult. A 25 year old male presented with sudden severe abdominal pain and vomiting. He had no relevant medical history. Mechanical small bowel obstruction was confirmed on imaging and laparotomy revealed a nodular lead point in the submucosa of the ileum. He had resection of a segment of small bowel with a primary anastamosis. Histopathology of the lesion demonstrated myoepithelial hamartoma (MEH), a rare cause of intussusception. Although intussusception is not uncommon in children, it is rare in adults. Management delays are a major cause of morbidity. This report details our management of a case of intussusception caused by MEH in an otherwise healthy adult. Intussusception caused by MEH is a rare but serious cause of mechanical bowel obstruction. We propose that surgeons should consider this diagnosis in atypical cases of bowel obstruction and expedite laparotomy when it is suspected. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical malpractice in the management of small bowel obstruction: A 33-year review of case law.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Asad J; Haddad, Nadeem N; Rivera, Mariela; Morris, David S; Zietlow, Scott P; Schiller, Henry J; Jenkins, Donald H; Chowdhury, Naadia M; Zielinski, Martin D

    2016-10-01

    Annually, 15% of practicing general surgeons face a malpractice claim. Small bowel obstruction accounts for 12-16% of all surgical admissions. Our objective was to analyze malpractice related to small bowel obstruction. Using the search terms "medical malpractice" and "small bowel obstruction," we searched through all jury verdicts and settlements for Westlaw. Information was collected on case demographics, alleged reasons for malpractice, and case outcomes. The search criteria yielded 359 initial case briefs; 156 met inclusion criteria. The most common reason for litigation was failure to diagnose and timely manage the small bowel obstruction (69%, n = 107). Overall, 54% (n = 84) of cases were decided in favor of the defendant (physician). Mortality was noted in 61% (n = 96) of cases. Eighty-six percent (42/49) of cases litigated as a result of failing to diagnose and manage the small bowel obstruction in a timely manner, resulting in patient mortality, had a verdict with an award payout for the plaintiff (patient). The median award payout was $1,136,220 (range, $29,575-$12,535,000). A majority of malpractice cases were decided in favor of the defendants; however, cases with an award payout were costly. Timely intervention may prevent a substantial number of medical malpractice lawsuits in small bowel obstruction, arguing in favor of small bowel obstruction management protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolated Small Bowel Mesentery Injury After Steering Wheel Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Imtiaz; Bhat, Rayees A; Wani, Shayiq; Khan, Nawab; Wani, Rauf A; Parray, Fazal Q

    2012-01-01

    Background Isolated small gut mesentery injury after blunt abdominal trauma from the steering wheel in road traffic accidents is rare. These are always challenging to diagnose and pose a diagnostic dilemma. Objectives To study the pattern of small gut mesenteric injury by steering wheel blunt abdominal trauma in road traffic accidents in patients who had laparotomy. Patients and Methods A 10-year retrospective study was done to study isolated small gut mesentery injury. Results All patients who had isolated mesenteric small gut injury were males. Jejunal mesentery was involved in 13 whereas 4 had ileal mesentery injury. Tear were longitudinal or transverse. Conclusions Isolated small mesentery injury after blunt abdominal trauma from the steering wheel in road traffic accidents is rare. Tears are either longitudinal or transverse. Suture repair is to be done. Delay in reaching hospital or reaching the diagnosis could lead to morbidity and mortality. Isolated mesenteric injury should be considered in any patient with blunt abdominal trauma from steering wheel injury with no evidence of any solid organ injury in unstable patients. PMID:24350106

  13. Management of necrotising appendicitis associated with widespread necrotising enterocolitis of the small and large bowel and perforated duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vaibhav; Zani, Augusto; Jackson, Paul; Singh, Shailinder

    2015-06-08

    A 7-year-old boy presented in septic shock secondary to appendicitis with generalised peritonitis. Following crystalloid resuscitation, he underwent surgery. Faecopurulent contamination and free air were found. This was secondary to a perforated and gangrenous appendix, multiple large and small bowel segments with perforations, patches of necrosis, interspersed with healthy bowel and segments of questionable viability. There was also a perforated duodenal ulcer. Necrotic segments were resected using a 'clip-and-drop' technique to shorten operative duration and guide resection to preserve bowel length. After six laparotomies and multiple bowel resections, the child was discharged home with an ileostomy that was subsequently reversed. He is currently on a normal diet and pursuing all activities appropriate for his age. Perforated appendicitis can be associated with widespread bowel necrosis and multiple perforations. A conservative damage limitation approach using the 'clip-and-drop' technique and relook laparotomies is useful in the management of extensive bowel necrosis in children.

  14. Single-balloon enteroscopy efficacy and degree of concordance with noninvasive evaluation of small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Margarida; Antunes, João; Coelho, Rosa; Cardoso, Hélder; Vilas Boas, Filipe; Ribeiro, Armando; Macedo, Guilherme

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Clinical impact of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) is fairly known, as well as its diagnostic yield comparing with other small bowel gastrointestinal investigations. This study represents a contribution to better understand it and is designed to evaluate SBE efficacy and degree of concordance with previous evaluation of small bowel. Patients and methods This is a single-center retrospective study of patients that underwent SBE with suspected small bowel disease based on non-invasive imaging. Demographic, clinical, procedural and outcome data were collected for analysis. Agreement beyond positive findings was evaluated using κ-coefficient. Results A total of 197 SBEs were performed in 168 patients; mainly men (64.3 %) with mean age 53.3±17.6 years. Most SBEs (86.3 %) performed were preceded by a noninvasive evaluation: in 61.4 % (n = 119) of cases, capsule enteroscopy (CE) was performed, in 18.8 % (n = 37), computed tomography was performed, and in 6.1 % (n = 12) magnetic resonance enterography was performed. Fourty-three patients (25.6 %) underwent endoscopic treatments, mainly: argon plasma coagulation in angioectasias (53.4 %) and polypectomy (34.9 %). The most common diagnoses made with SBE were findings consistent with inflammatory small bowel disease (21.8 %) and vascular lesions (14.2 %). The diagnostic yield of SBE was of 69 %, confirming the suspicion of small bowel disease. The degree of concordance between CE and SBE for positive findings was substantial, κ-coefficient = 0.635 (P < 0.001). However, the degree of concordance between imaging examinations (CT or MR) and SBE was only moderate, κ-coefficient = 0.410 (P < 0.001). SBE had an immediate effect in 20 % of patients, changing diagnostic approaches, medical and surgical treatments. Conclusions Our study supports the idea that for suspected small bowel disease, CE and SBE have an overall good degree of

  15. Effect of parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids on adaptation to massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Settle, R G; Zimmaro, D M; Rombeau, J L

    1988-09-01

    After massive small bowel resection, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is prescribed to maintain nutritional status. However, TPN reduces the mass of the remaining intestinal mucosa, whereas adaptation to small bowel resection is associated with increased mucosal mass. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to stimulate mucosal cell mitotic activity. This study determined whether the addition of SCFAs to TPN following small bowel resection would prevent intestinal mucosal atrophy produced by TPN. Adult rats underwent an 80% small bowel resection and then received either standard TPN or TPN supplemented with SCFAs (sodium acetate, propionate, and butyrate). After 1 wk, jejunal and ileal mucosal weights, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein contents were measured and compared with the parameters obtained at the time of resection. Animals receiving TPN showed significant loss of jejunal mucosal weight, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein and ileal mucosal weight and deoxyribonucleic acid after small bowel resection, whereas animals receiving SCFA-supplemented TPN showed no significant change in the jejunal mucosal parameters and a significant increase in ileal mucosal protein. These data demonstrate that SCFA-supplemented TPN reduces the mucosal atrophy associated with TPN after massive bowel resection and thys may facilitate adaptation to small bowel resection.

  16. Racial and ethnic variation in the incidence of small-bowel cancer subtypes in the United States, 1995-2008.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Marc T; Matsuno, Rayna K; Shvetsov, Yurii B

    2013-04-01

    Small-bowel cancer is uncommon and, accordingly, little is known about the epidemiology of this malignancy, especially by race and subtype. The objective of this analysis was to describe the distribution of small-bowel cancer in the United States by demographic, pathological, and clinical features. This study was retrospective in design. Data from 26 population-based cancer registries in the United States from 1995 to 2008 were used. Patients diagnosed with small-bowel cancer (topography codes C17.0-17.3 and C17.8-17.9) were included. The primary outcomes measured were race- and histology-specific incidence (age-adjusted rate trends and age-specific rates) of small-bowel cancer. A total of 56,223 men and women diagnosed with small-bowel cancer were identified. The overall age-adjusted incidence rates for small-bowel cancer were 26.1 in men and 17.7 in women. Neuroendocrine tumors were the most common histological types of small-bowel cancer in men and women, followed by carcinoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma. In comparison with whites, the rate of small-bowel cancer was 42% greater in black men, 46% greater in black women, 34% lower in Asian-Pacific Islander men, and 37% lower in Asian-Pacific Islander women. Rates of small-bowel cancer were 24% lower in Hispanic men and 15% lower in Hispanic women than rates in non-Hispanics. The excess of small-bowel cancer in blacks and the deficit in Asian-Pacific Islanders were attributable mainly to the incidence of adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumors. The incidence of GI stromal tumor was significantly higher among Asian-Pacific Islanders. This is one of the largest studies of small-bowel cancer to date. These cancer registry data showed substantial racial and ethnic variation in the incidence of histological subtypes of small-bowel malignancy that suggest possible etiologic diversity and/or disparities in detection.

  17. CT enteroclysis/enterography findings in drug-induced small-bowel damage

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, K; Hashimoto, S; Onoda, H; Washida, Y; Sakaida, I; Matsunaga, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT enteroclysis (CTE)/enterography findings of patients with small-bowel mucosal damage induced by aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and to compare these findings with the duration of drug use and endoscopic findings. Methods: CTE findings of 11 patients (22 lesions) with drug-induced small-bowel damage were reviewed, including 8 NSAID users and 3 aspirin users. Three patients were short-term users (6 months or shorter) and eight were long-term users (3 years or longer). Nine patients also underwent videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) or double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Results: Small-bowel abnormalities were visible in 8 of 11 patients (73%) on CTE. Multiple lesions were seen in five patients, including all short-term users. Lesions were classified into three types. Type 1 (mucosal patchy enhancement) was found in four of eight patients (50%, 12 lesions) all were short-term users. Small erosions with mild oedema/redness were shown by DBE. Type 2 (homogeneous hyperenhancement) was found in two of eight patients (25%, four lesions) who were long-term users. Large ulcers with marked oedema/redness were shown by DBE. Type 3 (stratification enhancement) was found in four of eight patients (50%, six lesions), both short-term and long-term users. Annular or large ulcers with strictures were shown by VCE or DBE. Conclusion: On CTE, Type 1 lesions in patients with mostly short-term aspirin or NSAID use, Type 2 lesions in patients with long-term use and Type 3 lesions in both types of patients were detected. CTE may have usefulness for the detection of mild damage. Advances in knowledge: Small-bowel abnormalities owing to aspirin or NSAID present with three different patterns on CTE. PMID:25348282

  18. Neonatal small bowel epithelia: enhancing anti-bacterial defense with lactoferrin and Lactobacillus GG.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael P; Bennett, Stephen H; Hwang, Freda F Y; Yu, Camille

    2004-06-01

    Extremely preterm human infants have increased susceptibility to small bowel infection. We hypothesized that early colonization of the immature small intestine with Lactobacillus GG (LGG), and use of a recombinant lactoferrin (rhLF) to promote growth of LGG, would enhance gut defenses against enteroinvasive Escherichia coli. Newborn rat pups were treated with nothing, intra-gastric LGG, or rhLF + LGG on days 3 and 4 of life. Gut colonization by LGG was quantified in lavaged jejunal and ileal fluid and gut wall homogenates on day 5 of life. Separate studies used similarly treated litters of newborn rats that were infected late on day 4 of life with E. coli [10(12) CFU/kg]. Sixteen hours later, the numbers of E. coli were measured in small bowel fluid and gut wall homogenates. Control pups initially had lactic acid bacteria colonize the bowel, but these bacteria were not LGG. Pups treated with LGG or rhLF + LGG had significantly higher numbers of LGG in the ileum versus jejunum. Contrary to our hypothesis, rhLF did not augment LGG colonization. After E. coli-related gut infection, planktonic [lavage fluid] and epithelia-adherent growth [gut wall homogenates] of E. coli in the small bowel were most effectively reduced by pre-treatment with rhLF and LGG (P < .05). Prophylactic therapy with recombinant human lactoferrin and the probiotic, Lactobacillus GG, act to enhance defenses against invasive E. coli in the nascent small intestine. We suggest that rhLF and LGG are therapeutic agents that may reduce necrotizing enterocolitis and gut-related sepsis in preterm human infants.

  19. Aspirin-induced small bowel injuries and the preventive effect of rebamipide

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Kazunari; Abe, Takashi; Inoue, Kunimitsu; Uchida, Masahiro; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the influence of taking low-dose aspirin for 4 wk on small intestinal complications and to examine the preventive effect of rebamipide. METHODS: This study was conducted as a single-center, randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study. Eleven healthy male subjects were enrolled. Each subject underwent video capsule endoscopy after 1 and 4 wk of taking aspirin and omeprazole, along with either rebamipide or placebo therapy. The primary endpoint was to evaluate small bowel damage in healthy subjects before and after taking low-dose aspirin for 4 wk. RESULTS: The number of subjects with mucosal breaks (defined as multiple erosions and/or ulcers) were 1 at 1 wk and 1 at 4 wk on the jejunum, and 6 at 1 wk (P = 0.0061) and 7 at 4 wk on the ileum (P = 0.0019). Rebamipide significantly prevented mucosal breaks on the ileum compared with the placebo group (P = 0.0173 at 1 wk and P = 0.0266 at 4 wk). CONCLUSION: Longer-term, low-dose aspirin administration induced damage in the small bowel. Rebamipide prevented this damage, and may be a candidate drug for treating aspirin-induced small bowel complications. PMID:22171147

  20. Model predictions of myoelectrical activity of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Miftakhov, R N; Abdusheva, G R; Wingate, D L

    1996-02-01

    A mathematical model for the periodic electrical activity of a functional unit of the small intestine is developed. Based on real morphological and electrophysiological data, the model assumes that: the functional unit is an electromyogenic syncytium; the kinetics of L, T-type Ca2+, mixed Ca(2+)-dependent K+, potential sensitive K+ and Cl- channels determines electrical activity of the functional unit; the basic neural circuit, represented by a single cholinergic neurone, provides an excitatory input to the functional unit via receptor-linked L-type Ca2+ channels. Numerical simulation of the model has shown that it is capable of displaying the slow waves and that slight modifications of some of the parameters result in different electrical responses. The effects of the variations of the main parameters have been analyzed for their ability to reproduce various electrical patterns. The results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with results of experiments conducted on the small intestine.

  1. Molecular and cellular biology of small-bowel mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Paul A.; Walters, Julian R.F.

    2001-03-01

    Study of the molecular and cellular biology of the small-intestinal mucosa is providing insights into the remarkable properties of this unique tissue. With its structured pattern of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and its ability to adapt following exposure to luminal nutrients or injury from surgery or pathogens, it functions in a regulated but responsive manner. We review recent publications on factors affecting development, gene expression, cell turnover, and adaptation.

  2. Adhesive small bowel adhesions obstruction: Evolutions in diagnosis, management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; De Simone, Belinda; Sartelli, Massimo; Van Goor, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions following abdominal surgery represent a major unsolved problem. They are the first cause of small bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation, water-soluble contrast follow-through and computed tomography scan. For patients presenting no signs of strangulation, peritonitis or severe intestinal impairment there is good evidence to support non-operative management. Open surgery is the preferred method for the surgical treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction, in case of suspected strangulation or after failed conservative management, but laparoscopy is gaining widespread acceptance especially in selected group of patients. "Good" surgical technique and anti-adhesive barriers are the main current concepts of adhesion prevention. We discuss current knowledge in modern diagnosis and evolving strategies for management and prevention that are leading to stratified care for patients. PMID:27022449

  3. Radiation-induced small bowel disease: latest developments and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Rhodri

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is commonly used to treat a number of malignancies. Although highly effective and now more targeted, many patients suffer side effects. The number of cancer survivors has increased and so there are more patients presenting with symptoms that have arisen as a result of radiotherapy. Radiation damage to small bowel tissue can cause acute or chronic radiation enteritis producing symptoms such as pain, bloating, nausea, faecal urgency, diarrhoea and rectal bleeding which can have a significant impact on patient’s quality of life. This review outlines the pathogenesis of radiation injury to the small bowel along with the prevention of radiation damage via radiotherapy techniques plus medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and probiotics. It also covers the treatment of both acute and chronic radiation enteritis via a variety of medical (including hyperbaric oxygen), dietetic, endoscopic and surgical therapies. PMID:24381725

  4. Small Bowel Melanoma Metastasing to Inguinal Lymph Node - a Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Chisthi M, Meer; M, Rahul; A, Sreekumar

    2015-06-01

    Malignant Melanoma is one of the commonest cutaneous malignancies affecting human beings. The gastrointestinal tract is a common site for melanoma, both as primary and metastases. However it is rare for gastrointestinal melanoma to metastase oustide of the abdominal cavity. In the literature, there is no evidence about inguinal lymph node metastases from small bowel melanoma. Here we present a case report of an old lady who underwent laparoscopic resection of small bowel for melanoma and presented 4 years later with metastatic lymph node in inguinal lymph node. Though it could not be verified, we hypothesise that the tumour disseminated to the lymph node through a port-site metastases. Literature review shows several mechanisms which were put forward to explain the mechanism of port-site metastases.

  5. Concurrent small bowel adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in Crohn's disease--case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron; Levi, Zohar; Halpern, Marisa; Fraser, Gerald M

    2011-10-01

    Adenocarcinomas of the large and small bowel, as well as intestinal carcinoid tumors have been reported at increased rates in Crohn's disease. We herein report a rare case of concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor of the small bowel presenting as intestinal obstruction and found incidentally at laparotomy in a 55 year old male with longstanding ileal Crohn's disease. We performed a Medline Pubmed search for cases of synchronous or composite adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in the setting of Crohn's disease and identified four similar cases. Concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor occurred both in newly diagnosed and longstanding Crohn's disease, most commonly involved the terminal ileum and presented with symptoms mimicking Crohn's disease. Diagnosis was made incidentally at laparotomy in all cases. Lymph node involvement was variable. Clinicians should be aware of this rare entity for expeditious surgical intervention.

  6. Transanal evisceration of the small bowel a rare complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kornaropoulos, Michael; Makris, Marinos C.; Yettimis, Evripides; Zevlas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transanal evisceration of small bowel is an extremely rare surgical emergency. Of the nearly 70 cases reported in the literature, rectal prolapse is the predisposing factor that has been most frequently related to this pathology. Presentation of case We report a 78-year-old female with history of chronic rectal prolapse who presented in our emergency department with evisceration of small intestinal loops through the anus. In surgery after complete reduction of the eviscerated bowel into the peritoneal cavity, almost 20 cm of the terminal ileum up to the ileocecal valve were necrotic and therefore a right hemicolectomy with primary anastomosis was performed. Additionally a 2 cm craniocaudally tear was revealed in the antimesenteric border of the upper rectum and a Hartman procedure was also performed. The patient was discharged after 10 days. Discussion Early recognition and timely surgical intervention offers the best prognosis, avoiding a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. PMID:26708948

  7. Intestinal calcium-binding protein 3 months after massive small bowel resection in the piglet.

    PubMed

    Margolis, A; Ricour, C; Harouchi, A; Guyot, M; Laouari, D; Balsan, S

    1977-12-01

    Changes in intestinal calcium-binding protein and calcium binding activity were studied at resection and 3 months after 90% small bowel resection in piglets and one adult pig. A calcium-binding protein (MW congruent to 11.000) with calcium-dependent eletrophoretic mobility was partially purified from mucosal extract of proximal jejunum, mid-gut, and ileum. The concentration of calcium-binding protein and the calcium-binding activity of the intact animals were found highest in the proximal jejunal segment, lowest in the ileal segment. After resection in the four surviving animals out of nine, a significant increase in calcium-binding activity was observed in the proximal jejunum and in the distal ileal segment. The change in calcium-binding activity was much more marked in the ileum than the jejunum. These data demonstrate that pig intestinal mucosa possesses an adaptive capacity to increase the synthesis of calcium-binding protein after massive small bowel resection.

  8. A case of small bowel metastasis from spinal Ewing sarcoma causing intussusception in an adult female.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qing Ting; Teo, Jin Yao; Ahmed, Syed Salahuddin; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui

    2016-04-16

    Ewing sarcomas are highly aggressive malignant tumours occurring predominantly in the long bones of the extremities in children and young adults. About 20 % of patients will present with metastases at diagnosis with the commonest sites being the lungs, bone and bone marrow. Cases of primary small bowel Ewing sarcomas have been described but are nonetheless exceedingly rare, even more so cases of metastasis to the small bowel. We describe a case of vertebral Ewing sarcoma in a 44 year-old female which metastasized to the jejunum causing intussusception. Ewing's sarcoma is highly aggressive and presence of metastases, overt or subclinical, is thought to be present in almost all patients at diagnosis. As evidenced by our patient, metastatic disease can progress rapidly to cause further complications and confer a poorer survival. The possibility of metastasis, no matter how rare or unlikely the site is, should be considered and actively investigated to expedite treatment of the primary disease.

  9. Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis after Laparoscopic Exploration for Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kunizaki, Shozo; Shimaguchi, Mayu; Yoshinaga, Yasuo; Kanda, Yukihiro; Lefor, Alan T.; Mizokami, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of intestinal ischemia which is potentially life-threatening because it can lead to intestinal infarction. Mesenteric venous thrombosis rarely develops after abdominal surgery and is usually associated with coagulation disorders. Associated symptoms are generally subtle or nonspecific, often resulting in delayed diagnosis. A 68-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic exploration for small bowel obstruction, secondary to adhesions. During the procedure, an intestinal perforation was identified and repaired. Postoperatively, the abdominal pain persisted and repeat exploration was undertaken. At repeat exploration, a perforation was identified in the small bowel with a surrounding abscess. After the second operation, the abdominal pain improved but anorexia persisted. Contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography was performed which revealed superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy with heparin was started immediately and the thrombus resolved over the next 6 days. Although rare, this complication must be considered in patients after abdominal surgery with unexplained abdominal symptoms. PMID:24455391

  10. Perforation of the small bowel due to metastasis from tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Keiji; Shimada, Ryu; Horiuchi, Atsushi; Shibuya, Hajime; Nakamura, Keisuke; Iinuma, Hisae; Hayama, Tamuro; Yamada, Hideki; Nozawa, Keijiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Distant small bowel metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are extremely rare, and tongue cancer metastasizing to the small bowel has not been previously reported. We describe a 40-year-old male patient who underwent subtotal gross laryngectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in February 2007 and then presented in November 2008 with severe abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and X-rays revealed free air, suggesting intestinal perforation. Emergency surgery revealed a 10-mm perforation at the ileum and a palpable hard tumor at the perforation site. The ileum was resected, and pathologic findings showed squamous cell carcinoma at the perforation site, which was consistent with metastasis from tongue cancer.

  11. Small Bowel Limb Lengths and Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Kumar, Parveen; Parmar, Chetan; Graham, Yitka; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2016-03-01

    There is currently no consensus on the combined length of small bowel that should be bypassed as biliopancreatic or alimentary limb for optimum results with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A number of different limb lengths exist, and there is significant variation in practice amongst surgeons. Inevitably, this means that some patients have too much small bowel bypassed and end up with malnutrition and others end up with a less effective operation. Lack of standardisation poses further problems with interpretation and comparison of scientific literature. This systematic review concludes that a range of 100-200 cm for combined length of biliopancreatic or alimentary limb gives optimum results with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in most patients.

  12. Pulmonary aspiration complicating intraoperative small-bowel decompression: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ian; Jamieson, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    When conservative management of intestinal obstruction fails, the surgeon has two operative choices for decompression: the open procedure with enterotomies and suction and the closed procedure consisting of retrograde stripping and nasogastric suction. A previously undocumented complication of the latter procedure — pulmonary aspiration — is reported in a 20-year-old man with small-bowel obstruction. Practical modifications to the technique of small-bowel decompression are suggested. They include feeding the nasogastric tube into the distal duodenum, using a wider bore tube, inserting an esophageal balloon before extubation, using a nasogastric tube with suction throughout extubation and, immediately postoperatively, making a more conscious effort to remove all gastric contents before extubation, and milking the contents distally through the ileocecal valve. PMID:8956817

  13. Color Doppler sonography of small bowel wall changes in 21 consecutive cases of acute mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Danse, E M; Kartheuser, A; Paterson, H M; Laterre, P-F

    2009-01-01

    To describe the small bowel wall changes observed with color Doppler sonography in acute mesenteric ischemia with comparison with its outcome. We reviewed the sonographic findings of 21 patients with a final diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia (12 acute arterial forms and 9 acute venous forms). These examinations included identification of non peristaltic thin-walled fluid-filled intestinal loops (with or without pneumatosis), thickened intestinal wall (> 3 mm) (noted as stratified or not), and preserved or absent mural flow assessed with color Doppler. Sonographic findings were compared with the surgical data (n = 16) or with the clinical outcome (n = 5). In acute arterial ischemia, non-peristaltic thin-walled intestinal loops were detected with sonography in five cases, with visualization of pneumatosis in one. Bowel infarction was diagnosed in four of these five patients including one patient with pneumatosis. Thickened bowel loops were sonographically detected in four cases, of which 3 required resection. Conservative therapy was performed in the remaining case having preserved wall stratification and mural flow with color Doppler. In acute venous ischemia, thickened bowel loops were detected with sonography in six cases. Conservative therapy was performed in three cases for whom preserved mural flow was noted. Stratification was present in two of these three cases. In acute arterial ischemia, intestinal resection is frequently required when non-peristaltic, thin-walled, fluid-filled loops are detected with sonography. In arterial and venous ischemia, absence of wall stratification and mural flow are frequently associated with ischemia requiring surgery.

  14. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology, there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part I of this Editorial Review, seven topics are considered: intestinal development; proliferation and repair; intestinal permeability; microbiotica, infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy. These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician. PMID:22807604

  15. Intestinal Dilation and Platelet:Albumin Ratio Are Predictors of Surgery in Stricturing Small Bowel Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Stidham, Ryan W; Guentner, Amanda S; Ruma, Julie L; Govani, Shail M; Waljee, Akbar K; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-08-01

    It is a challenge to predict how patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) will respond to intensified medical therapy. We aimed to identify factors that predicted surgery within 2 years of hospitalization for CD, to guide medical versus surgical management decisions. We performed a retrospective review of adults hospitalized for small bowel CD from 2004 through 2012 at a single academic referral center. Subjects underwent abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging within 3 weeks of hospitalization. Imaging characteristics of small bowel dilation, bowel wall thickness, and disease activity were assessed by a single, blinded radiologist. Multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards regression techniques was used to generate a prediction model of intestinal resection within 2 years. A total of 221 subjects met selection criteria, with 32.6% undergoing surgery within 2 years of index admission. Bivariate analysis showed high-dose steroid use (>40 mg), ongoing treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents at admission, platelet count, platelet:albumin ratio, small bowel dilation (≥35 mm), and bowel wall thickness to predict surgery (P ≤ .01). Multivariate modeling demonstrated small bowel dilation >35 mm (hazard ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.73-4.94) and a platelet:albumin ratio ≥125 (hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.95) to predict surgery. Treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents at admission conferred a nonsignificant increased trend for risk of surgery (hazard ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.994-2.65). Small bowel dilation >35 mm and high platelet:albumin ratios are independent and synergistic risk factors for future surgery in patients with structuring small bowel CD. Platelet:albumin ratios may capture the relationship between acute inflammation and cumulative damage and serve as markers of intestinal disease that cannot be salvaged with medical therapy. Copyright © 2016 AGA

  16. Accuracy and inter-operator variability of small bowel length measurement at laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazer, Benny; Rosin, Danny; Bar-Zakai, Barak; Willenz, Udi; Doron, Ofer; Gutman, Mordechai; Nevler, Avinoam

    2017-04-13

    Measurement of bowel length is an essential surgical skill for laparoscopic and open gastrointestinal surgery in order to achieve favorable outcomes and avoid long-term complications. Variations in accuracy between the two surgical approaches may exist. However, only few studies have tried to assess these differences. Our aim was to assess reliability and inter-rater variability of small bowel length assessment during laparoscopy in an in vivo porcine model. This is a single-institution, double-blinded, technical assessment study in a porcine in vivo model. Fourteen participants (ten senior surgeons with >1000 laparoscopic procedures and four junior surgeons) had to assess and mark lengths of small bowel in both laparoscopic and open surgical approaches. Each participant was assigned to measure and mark specific, randomized distances (range 25-197 cm) in both laparoscopic and open approaches using color-coded vessel loops. Actual participant-marked distances were compared to the assigned distances followed by Bland-Altman plots and linear regression analysis to determine accuracy and proportional error trends. Study data were further compared to available data sets from previously published studies. Laparoscopy measurements were significantly shorter than required (difference 33.8 ± 28.7 cm, P < 0.001, 95% CI 17.8-49.7). The measuring error was proportional to the length of the measured segment (63% of the required distances, IQR 58.9-79.0%, P = 0.02). At laparotomy, mean difference and standard deviation were lower (1.5 cm ± SD 15 cm) and not statistically significant (P = 0.7). Re-analysis of previously published data sets validated the observed errors in laparoscopic bowel measurement (P < 0.01). Small bowel length assessment during laparoscopy is inaccurate and associated with substantial variability. There is a need to develop a standardized laparoscopic technique for measuring small bowel length which is simple, reproducible, and easy to

  17. Does magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy improve small bowel capsule endoscopy completion rate? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Melissa F.; Drew, Kaye; Sidhu, Reena; McAlindon, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Delayed gastric emptying is a significant factor in incomplete small bowel capsule examinations. Gastric transit could be hastened by external magnetic control of the capsule. We studied the feasibility of this approach to improve capsule endoscopy completion rates. Patients and methods: Prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial involving 122 patients attending for small bowel capsule endoscopy using MiroCam Navi. Patients were randomized to either the control group (mobilisation for 30 minutes after capsule ingestion, followed by intramuscular metoclopramide 10 mg if the capsule failed to enter the small bowel) or the intervention group (1000 mL of water prior to capsule ingestion, followed by positional change and magnetic steering). Outcome measures were capsule endoscopy completion rate, gastric clarity and distention, relationship of body habitus to capsule endoscopy completion rate (CECR), and patient comfort scores. Results: 122 patients were recruited (61 each to the control and intervention groups: mean age 49 years [range 21 – 85], 61 females). There was no significant difference in CECR between the two groups (P = 0.39). Time to first pyloric image was significantly shorter in the intervention group (P = 0.03) but there was no difference in gastric transit times (P = 0.12), suggesting that magnetic control hastens capsular transit to the gastric antrum but does not influence duodenal passage. Gastric clarity and distention were significantly better in the intervention group (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions: Magnetic steering of a small bowel capsule is unable to overcome pyloric contractions to enhance gastric emptying and improve capsule endoscope completion rate. Excellent mucosal visualisation within the gastric cavity suggests this technique could be harnessed for capsule examination of the stomach. PMID:26878053

  18. Prospective evaluation of oral gastrografin(®) in the management of postoperative adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Nasrin; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Khoshnood, Peyman; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Assadpour, Sara

    2013-06-01

    Oral Gastrografin®, a hyperosmolar water-soluble contrast medium, may have a therapeutic effect in adhesive small bowel obstruction. However, findings are still conflicting, as some authors did not find a therapeutic advantage. So, this prospective, randomized, and clinical trial study was designed to determine the value of Gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction. The primary end points were the evaluation of the operative rate reduction and shortening the hospital stay after the use of Gastrografin. A total of 84 patients were randomized into two groups: the control group received conventional treatment, whereas the study group received in addition of 100 mL Gastrografin meal. Patients were followed up within 4 days after admission, and clinical and radiological (if needed) improvements were evaluated. Although the results showed that Gastrografin can decrease the need for surgical management by 14.5 %, no statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups (P = 0.07). Nevertheless, the length of hospital stay revealed a significant reduction from 4.67 ± 1.18 days to 2.69 ± 1.02 days (P = 0.00). The use of Gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction is safe and reduces the length of hospital stay. As a result, the cost of hospital bed occupancy is reduced. Hence, if there was no indication of emergency surgery, administration of oral Gastrografin as a nonoperative treatment in adhesive small bowel obstruction is also recommended.

  19. Pericecal hernia manifesting as a small bowel obstruction successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ogami, Takuya; Honjo, Hirotaka; Kusanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A pericecal hernia is a type of internal hernia, which rarely causes small bowel obstruction (SBO). At our institution, a 92-year-old man presented with vomiting and abdominal pain. He was conservatively treated with a diagnosis of SBO. After 2 weeks of copious drainage output, he was taken to the operating room. Laparoscopy revealed a pericecal hernia that was successfully reduced. We conclude that laparoscopic surgery is an effective way to treat SBOs secondary to pericecal hernias. PMID:26933000

  20. Effects of neurotensin on small bowel propulsion in intact and vagotomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wilén, T; Gustavsson, S; Jung, B

    1982-09-01

    The effects of intravenous infusion of neurotensin on small bowel motility was studied in conscious rats. During 1 h a standardized test meal of glucose, polyethyleneglycol (PEG) 3000, phenol red and 125I-labelled polyvinylpyrrolidone was administered via a permanent gastric catheter and simultaneously the bile-excreted radio-pharmaceutic 99Tcm-Solco-HIDA was infused intravenously. Immediately after the infusions the gastrointestinal specimen was excised and examined for distribution of radioactivity. Both doses of neurotensin (0.1 and 0.3 microgram . kg-1 . h-1) resulted in an increase in the neurotensin-like immunoreactivity (NTLI) of plasma to levels similar to that found after a fatty meal. Concurrently the small bowel transport pattern was changed from an interdigestive state to one similar to that found after a meal. In animals not receiving the gastric test meal, neurotensin (0.1-0.5 microgram . kg-1 . h-) had no effect on motility. Infusion of the gastric test meal alone did not change the interdigestive motility or the NTLI value. This indicates that the presence of gastric infusates potentiates the effect of neurotensin on small bowel motility. The motility response to neurotensin did not differ between intact and vagotomized animals. This contrasts to earlier findings that the small bowel motility response to a fatty meal is dependent on intact vagal function. Thus, a difference in the mechanism responsible for the motility responses between a fatty meal and neurotensin exists. In view of this finding it seems reasonable to assume that neurotensin cannot be the only factor responsible for the shift in motility found after a fatty meal.

  1. Clinicoradiological score for predicting the risk of strangulated small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schwenter, F; Poletti, P A; Platon, A; Perneger, T; Morel, P; Gervaz, P

    2010-07-01

    Intestinal ischaemia as a result of small bowel obstruction (SBO) requires prompt recognition and early intervention. A clinicoradiological score was sought to predict the risk of ischaemia in patients with SBO. A clinico-radiological protocol for the assessment of patients presenting with SBO was used. A logistic regression model was applied to identify determinant variables and construct a clinical score that would predict ischaemia requiring resection. Of 233 consecutive patients with SBO, 138 required laparotomy of whom 45 underwent intestinal resection. In multivariable analysis, six variables correlated with small bowel resection and were given one point each towards the clinical score: history of pain lasting 4 days or more, guarding, C-reactive protein level at least 75 mg/l, leucocyte count 10 x 10(9)/l or greater, free intraperitoneal fluid volume at least 500 ml on computed tomography (CT) and reduction of CT small bowel wall contrast enhancement. The risk of intestinal ischaemia was 6 per cent in patients with a score of 1 or less, whereas 21 of 29 patients with a score of 3 or more underwent small bowel resection. A positive score of 3 or more had a sensitivity of 67.7 per cent and specificity 90.8 per cent; the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.87 (95 per cent confidence interval 0.79 to 0.95). By combining clinical, laboratory and radiological parameters, the clinical score allowed early identification of strangulated SBO. Copyright (c) 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Biochemical prognostic indicators for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and small bowel neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cavaness, Keith; Celinski, Scott; Preskitt, John

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) and small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (SBNETs) are rare tumors that are frequently diagnosed late in the course of the disease. Several biomarkers have been proposed in the literature as prognostic factors for patients with these tumors. This article discusses a recent publication in Annals of Surgical Oncology from the University of Iowa analyzing the effect of different biomarkers on survival in patients with PNETs and SBNETs. PMID:25493250

  3. Is double-balloon enteroscopy an accurate method to diagnose small-bowel disorders?

    PubMed

    Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kuga, Rogério; Ishida, Robson; Furuya, Carlos; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Cecconello, Ivan; Ishioka, Shinichi; Sakai, Paulo

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the contribution of the double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for diagnosis of the small bowel disorders. Forty-four patients (20 women, 24 men; mean age 53.5 years-old, range 21-89 years) with chronic gastrointestinal bleeding, diarrhea, polyposis, weight-loss, Roux-en-Y surgery, and other indications underwent DBE. Twenty patients had occult or obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The source of bleeding was identified in 15/20 (75%): multiple angiodysplasias in four, arterial-venous malformation beyond the ligament of Treitz in two that could be treated with injection successfully. Other diagnoses included: duodenal adenocarcinoma, jejunal tuberculosis, erosions and ulcer of the jejunum. Of 24 patients with other indications, the diagnosis could be achieved in 18 of them (75%), including: two lymphomas, plasmocytoma, Gardner's syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, Behçet's disease, jejunal submucosal lesion, lymphangiectasia due to blastomycosis and unspecific chronic jejunitis. Of three cases with Roux-en-Y reconstruction, two underwent DBE in order to perform biopsies of the excluded duodenum. Additionally, two patients underwent DBE to exclude Crohn's disease and lymphoma of the small bowel. The mean length of small bowel examination was 240 +/- 50 cm during a single approach. The diagnostic yield was 75% (33/44 cases) and therapeutic yield was 63.6%. No major complications were observed, only minor complication such as sore throat in 4/44 (9.1%). 1. DBE is a safe and and accurate method to diagnose small bowel disorders; 2. this method permits chromoscopy, biopsies and treatment of the lesions.

  4. The magnetism of surgery: small bowel obstruction in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R; Everett, T; Watts, A; Qureshi, T

    2010-10-12

    An 8-year-old boy with Asperger's syndrome presented with right-sided abdominal pain, which was consistent with a probable appendicitis, but revisiting the history with a high index of suspicion confirmed multiple foreign body ingestion to be the cause of his symptoms. An emergency laparotomy was performed. Multiple toy magnets and other metal objects were found, which were causing small bowel obstruction with interloop fistulation. Following removal and repair, the patient made an excellent recovery.

  5. The magnetism of surgery: small bowel obstruction in an 8-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R; Everett, T; Watts, A; Qureshi, T

    2010-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy with Asperger's syndrome presented with right-sided abdominal pain, which was consistent with a probable appendicitis, but revisiting the history with a high index of suspicion confirmed multiple foreign body ingestion to be the cause of his symptoms. An emergency laparotomy was performed. Multiple toy magnets and other metal objects were found, which were causing small bowel obstruction with interloop fistulation. Following removal and repair, the patient made an excellent recovery. PMID:22789732

  6. In vitro allograft irradiation prevents graft-versus-host disease in small-bowel transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.; Schraut, W.H.

    1985-04-01

    In small-bowel transplantation, the transfer of large numbers of donor lymphocytes with the intestinal allograft may provoke a lethal graft-versus-host reaction. The effectiveness of allograft irradiation in vitro as a method of preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied in a rat model of small-bowel transplantation, with the Lewis----Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrid strain combination. Cold harvested small-bowel allografts were irradiated immediately prior to heterotopic or orthotopic transplantation. Animals that had received heterotopic allografts irradiated with 0, 250, or 500 rad all died of GVHD after 14.4 +/- 3.0, 15.0 +/- 1.3, and 14.2 +/- 1.9 days, respectively. None of the animals that had received allografts treated with 1000 rad developed clinical or pathologic evidence of GVHD, however, and all survived for more than 6 months (P less than 0.001). Allograft function was studied in animals that underwent orthotopic transplantation. Recipients of nonirradiated orthotopic allografts all died of GVHD after 14.0 +/- 0.7 days, whereas recipients of allografts irradiated with 1000 rad all survived for more than 5 months (P less than 0.001). After 120 days, weight gain (51.8 +/- 11.7%), serum albumin (3.9 +/- 0.7 g/dl), serum triglycerides (67.0 +/- 24.3 mg/dl), CBC, and differential in these animals were not statistically different from those in either age-matched isograft recipients or normal animals, and when the rats were sacrificed, irradiated allografts showed no changes suggestive of radiation injury. These results indicate that irradiation of small-bowel allografts in vitro prevents development of GVHD, and that this can be achieved at a dose which does not cause injury to or malfunction of the allograft.

  7. Combined mesothelial cyst and lymphangioma of the small bowel: a distinct hybrid intra-abdominal cyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jayson; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2014-09-01

    Intra-abdominal cysts have a variety of origins, of which lymphatic and mesothelial types are the most commonly encountered. Here we describe a combined mesothelial cyst and lymphangioma arising within the small bowel subserosa of an 80-year-old woman. This was found incidentally at laparotomy performed for an unrelated condition. To date, such a hybrid lesion has not been previously reported. The ways by which this lesion might have arisen are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  9. Pediatric Small Bowel Crohn Disease: Correlation of US and MR Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ethan A.; Sanchez, Ramon J.; DiPietro, Michael A.; DeMatos-Maillard, Vera; Strouse, Peter J.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel Crohn disease is commonly diagnosed during the pediatric period, and recent investigations show that its incidence is increasing in this age group. Diagnosis and follow-up of this condition are commonly based on a combination of patient history and physical examination, disease activity surveys, laboratory assessment, and endoscopy with biopsy, but imaging also plays a central role. Ultrasonography (US) is an underutilized well-tolerated imaging modality for screening and follow-up of small bowel Crohn disease in children and adolescents. US has numerous advantages over computed tomographic (CT) enterography and magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, including low cost and no required use of oral or intravenous contrast material. US also has the potential to provide images with higher spatial resolution than those obtained at CT enterography and MR enterography, allows faster examination than does MR enterography, does not involve ionizing radiation, and does not require sedation or general anesthesia. US accurately depicts small bowel and mesenteric changes related to pediatric Crohn disease, and US findings show a high correlation with MR imaging findings in this patient population. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:25839736

  10. Pediatric Small Bowel Crohn Disease: Correlation of US and MR Enterography.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Smith, Ethan A; Sanchez, Ramon J; DiPietro, Michael A; DeMatos-Maillard, Vera; Strouse, Peter J; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel Crohn disease is commonly diagnosed during the pediatric period, and recent investigations show that its incidence is increasing in this age group. Diagnosis and follow-up of this condition are commonly based on a combination of patient history and physical examination, disease activity surveys, laboratory assessment, and endoscopy with biopsy, but imaging also plays a central role. Ultrasonography (US) is an underutilized well-tolerated imaging modality for screening and follow-up of small bowel Crohn disease in children and adolescents. US has numerous advantages over computed tomographic (CT) enterography and magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, including low cost and no required use of oral or intravenous contrast material. US also has the potential to provide images with higher spatial resolution than those obtained at CT enterography and MR enterography, allows faster examination than does MR enterography, does not involve ionizing radiation, and does not require sedation or general anesthesia. US accurately depicts small bowel and mesenteric changes related to pediatric Crohn disease, and US findings show a high correlation with MR imaging findings in this patient population. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  11. Intussusception caused by an inverted Meckel's diverticulum: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction in adults.

    PubMed

    Bouassida, Mahdi; Feidi, Bilel; Ben Ali, Mechaal; Chtourou, Mohamed Fadhel; Krifa, Marouene; Sassi, Selim; Chebbi, Fathi; Mighri, Mohamed Mongi; Touinsi, Hassen; Sassi, Sadok

    2011-01-01

    Adult intussusception due to Meckel's diverticulum is an uncommon cause of intestinal obstruction. However, the surgeon should still be suspicious of this condition since the non specific symptoms and the rarity of it make a preoperative diagnosis uncertain. Considering the secondary nature of adult intussusception and the necessity of early surgical intervention to avoid morbidity and mortality, we report one case of intussusception due to Meckel's diverticulum in an adult. A 22-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and abdominal pain. The abdomen was hard with tenderness. We diagnosed an acute small bowel obstruction and performed emergency surgery. The intra operative findings were distention of the small bowel and intussusception of ileus due to an inverted Meckel's diverticulum located 70 cm from the ileocecal valve. 30 cm ischemic loop was identified. A segmental small bowel resection and hand-sewn anastomosis was performed. Histopathology distinguished Meckel's diverticulum measuring 5 cm x 3.5 cm x 1 cm and no signs of malignancy.

  12. Mucosal healing effect of mesalazine granules in naproxen-induced small bowel enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rácz, István; Szalai, Milán; Kovács, Valéria; Regőczi, Henriett; Kiss, Gyöngyi; Horváth, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of mesalazine granules on small intestinal injury induced by naproxen using capsule endoscopy (CE). METHODS: This was a single center, non-randomized, open-label, uncontrolled pilot study, using the PillCam SB CE system with RAPID 5 software. The Lewis Index Score (LIS) for small bowel injury was investigated to evaluate the severity of mucosal injury. Arthropathy patients with at least one month history of daily naproxen use of 1000 mg and proton pump inhibitor co-therapy were screened. Patients with a minimum LIS of 135 were eligible to enter the 4-wk treatment phase of the study. During this treatment period, 3 × 1000 mg/d mesalazine granules were added to ongoing therapies of 1000 mg/d naproxen and 20 mg/d omeprazole. At the end of the 4-wk combined treatment period, a second small bowel CE was performed to re-evaluate the enteropathy according to the LIS results. The primary objective of this study was to assess the mucosal changes after 4 wk of mesalazine treatment. RESULTS: A total of 18 patients (16 females), ranging in age from 46 to 78 years (mean age 60.3 years) were screened, all had been taking 1000 mg/d naproxen for at least one month. Eight patients were excluded from the mesalazine therapeutic phase of the study for the following reasons: the screening CE showed normal small bowel mucosa or only insignificant damages (LIS < 135) in five patients, the screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed gastric ulcer in one patient, capsule technical failure and incomplete CE due to poor small bowel cleanliness in two patients. Ten patients (9 female, mean age 56.2 years) whose initial LIS reached mild and moderate-to-severe enteropathy grades (between 135 and 790 and ≥ 790) entered the 4-wk therapeutic phase and a repeat CE was performed. When comparing the change in LIS from baseline to end of treatment in all patients, a marked decrease was seen (mean LIS: 1236.4 ± 821.9 vs 925.2 ± 543.4, P = 0.271). Moreover, a

  13. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced diaphragm disease: an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Coolsen, Mme; Leedham, S J; Guy, R J

    2016-11-01

    Surgeons frequently deal with small bowel obstruction. However, small bowel obstruction caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced diaphragm disease is very rare. The diagnosis is challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and radiological studies remain inconclusive. We present a case of a 63-year-old man who, after an extensive diagnostic work-up and small bowel resection for obstructive symptoms, was finally diagnosed with NSAID-induced diaphragm disease as confirmed by histology. An unusual aspect of this case is that the patient stopped using NSAIDs after he was diagnosed with a gastric ulcer 2-years previously. This suggests that NSAID-induced diaphragms of the small bowel take some time to develop and underlines the importance of careful history taking.

  14. [Comparison of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate adhesive and suturing for wound closure in the canine small bowel model].

    PubMed

    Escalante-Piña, Oscar; García-Nieto, Gabriela; Hernández-Jasso, Alma Rocío; Reyes-Castellanos, Liliana; Flores-Aragón, Mariana; Rivera-Cruz, Jose María

    2009-01-01

    We undertook this study to evaluate 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (2OCA) glue and suture for wound closure in the small bowel. This was a comparative and experimental study. Male and female domestic dogs (n = 10) underwent a 2.0-cm small bowel closure of two wounds. All of these had closure with 2OCA in the first wound. The controls (second wound in the same dog) were closed with suture. Four weeks later the wounds were observed to evaluate the repair. Wound closure time and macrophage count were lower with the 2OCA glue than in the suture group. 2OCA glue has the strength to seal a small bowel wound. The inflammatory response to the glue is less than that of the suture at 4 weeks. These properties may make it a suitable material for replacing suture in a small bowel wound.

  15. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Praneeth, Kokkula; Rathore, Yashwant; Waran, Vignesh; Singh, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair. PMID:26917927

  16. Can a computed tomography scoring system predict the need for surgery in small-bowel obstruction?

    PubMed

    Jones, Kory; Mangram, Alicia J; Lebron, Ricardo A; Nadalo, Lennard; Dunn, Ernest

    2007-12-01

    Small-bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common dilemma faced by general surgeons. A timely and accurate diagnosis is crucial, based on history, physical examination, and radiographic studies. A computed tomography (CT) scan has become an increasingly common diagnostic modality. The aim of this study was to define a set of CT criteria that may help determine whether a patient would require operative intervention. A retrospective chart review was performed over an 18-month period. Patients diagnosed with SBO or partial SBO (PSBO) who had a CT scan performed were included. CT scans were then reviewed independently by a staff radiologist blinded to the clinical outcome. A scoring system based on 7 radiographic criteria was then developed. Statistical analysis was performed on the data. From March 1, 2004, to August 30, 2005, 96 patients were found to have the diagnosis of SBO or PSBO and a documented CT scan. Seventy-four patients had undergone prior intra-abdominal procedures. Fifty-five percent were taken to the operating room (OR) over an average of 1.9 days (range 1-12 days). Seventy-nine percent of these patients went to the OR within the first 24 hours. Lysis of adhesions was performed in 38%, small bowel was resected in 47%, and incarcerated ventral hernias were found in 11%. Ischemic bowel was found in 11% of the cases. The CT scoring system was then correlated with the actual treatment. A score of 8 or higher predicted the need for surgery 75% of the time. When looking at the criteria individually, patients with a CT reading of complete obstruction, dilated small bowel, or free fluid were operated on 77%, 66%, and 65% of the time, respectively. A CT scoring system can successfully predict the need for surgery 75% of the time. Likewise, specific criteria, when present in combination, can predict the need for operative intervention in 79% of cases with SBO.

  17. Small bowel mucosal damage in familial Mediterranean fever: results of capsule endoscopy screening.

    PubMed

    Demir, Abdurrahman; Akyüz, Filiz; Göktürk, Suut; Evirgen, Sami; Akyüz, Umit; Örmeci, Aslı; Soyer, Özlem; Karaca, Cetin; Demir, Kadir; Gundogdu, Gökcen; Güllüoğlu, Mine; Erer, Burak; Kamalı, Sevil; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin; Besisik, Fatih; Gül, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common form of autoinflammatory diseases. We aimed to evaluate the small bowel mucosa by capsule endoscopy (CE) in FMF patients for investigation of other possible causes of abdominal pain. The study group consisted of 41 patients with FMF. A standard questionnaire was used to record the gastrointestinal symptoms, other clinical findings, Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) mutations, and history of medications including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Gastroscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel CE were performed in all patients, and biopsies were taken from terminal ileum and duodenum. The mean age of the patients was 34 ± 11 years, 63% of them were female, and 76.5% of them were carrying MEFV exon 10 mutations. Only one patient used NSAIDs in addition to colchicine. In endoscopic investigations, gastric erosion was detected in only one patient, and no significant findings were detected in colonoscopy. CE showed small bowel mucosal defects in 44% (erosions in 26.8%, ulcer in 17.1%) and edema in 29.3% of the patients. Most (64%) of the ulcer and erosions were localized to jejunum, and only 24% were in ileum. Mitotic changes as an indirect finding of colchicine toxicity were not different from the changes observed in samples of independent group of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Mucosal defect was observed in half of the FMF patients, which may be associated with underlying inflammation or chronic colchicine exposure. Detection of nonspecific chronic inflammation without mitotic changes supports that mucosal defects may be associated with the autoinflammatory process.

  18. The computer as referee in the analysis of human small bowel motility.

    PubMed

    Benson, M J; Castillo, F D; Wingate, D L; Demetrakopoulos, J; Spyrou, N M

    1993-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether visual analysis of graphic records of small bowel motility is a reliable method of discriminating pressure events caused by bowel wall contraction from those of extraenteric origin and to compare this method with computerized analysis. Each of six independent observers was supplied with the same pair of records of 1 h of fasting diurnal duodenojejunal motility, acquired with a 3-channel ambulant data-logging system; one record included many artifacts due to body movement while the other did not. The observers were asked to identify and classify pressure events and to measure the duration and amplitude of "true" contractions. A computer program for on-line analysis is described; the algorithm was designed to overcome the problems of a variable baseline and sudden changes in pressure due to body movements that are unavoidable in prolonged recording from the small bowel of ambulant subjects. For regular contractions (phase III of migrating motor complex) there was good agreement between observers but not for irregular contractions, particularly when movement artifacts were abundant. When the observers were asked to repeat the analysis 6 mo later, there was poor agreement with their original identification of irregular contractions and artifacts. There was, however, good agreement between the computer analysis, which was totally reproducible, and the median decisions of the observer group; this agreement supports the validity of our computer algorithm. We conclude that computer analysis is not merely a valuable ergonomic aid for analysis of large quantity of data acquired in prolonged ambulatory monitoring, but also that, even for brief recordings, it provides a standard of reproducibility unmatched by "expert" inspection. Visual analysis is unreliable and thus susceptible to subjective bias; this may, in part, account for conflicting reports of small bowel motility under similar conditions reported by different workers in

  19. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  20. Treatment and Survival of Small-bowel Adenocarcinoma in the United States: A Comparison With Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, John I; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Wieghard, Nicole; Mori, Motomi; Vaccaro, Gina M; Sheppard, Brett C; Tsikitis, Vassilki L

    2016-04-01

    Small-bowel adenocarcinoma is rare and fatal. Because of data paucity, there is a tendency to extrapolate treatment from colon cancer, particularly in the adjuvant stetting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current surgical and adjuvant treatments of small-bowel adenocarcinoma and compare with colon cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study. The linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare database was used at a tertiary referral hospital. Patients with small-bowel adenocarcinoma and colon cancer identified from 1992 to 2010, using International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, 3 Revision, site, behavior, and histology codes were included. Overall survival and cancer-specific survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and competing risk analysis. A total of 2123 patients with small-bowel adenocarcinoma and 248,862 patients with colon cancer were identified. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with small-bowel adenocarcinoma and colon cancer were 34.9% and 51.5% (p < 0.0001). A total of 1550 patients with small-bowel adenocarcinoma (73.0%) underwent surgery, compared with 177,017 patients with colon cancer (71.1%). The proportion of patients who received chemotherapy was similar, at 21.3% for small bowel and 20.0% for colon. In contrast to colon cancer, chemotherapy did not improve overall or cancer-specific survival for patients with small-bowel adenocarcinoma, regardless of stage. Predictors of poor survival for small-bowel adenocarcinoma on multivariate analysis included advanced age, black race, advanced stage, poor tumor differentiation, high comorbidity index, and distal location. Chemotherapy did not confer additional survival benefit compared with surgery alone (HR, 1.04 (95% CI, 0.90-1.22)). This was a retrospective review. The reliance on Medicare data limited granularity and may have affected the generalizability of the results. The prognosis for small-bowel adenocarcinoma is worse than that

  1. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma Frequently Exhibits Lynch Syndrome-associated Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency But Does Not Harbor Sporadic MLH1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Xia, Michelle; Singhi, Aatur D; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2017-07-01

    Universal screening for Lynch syndrome has been advocated for colorectal carcinoma but its utility in small bowel adenocarcinoma has not been reported. We analyzed a consecutive series of 71 small bowel adenocarcinomas identified over an 8-year period for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression to (1) compare the clinicopathologic features of small bowel adenocarcinoma stratified into MMR-deficient (MMRD) and MMR-proficient (MMRP) groups and (2) examine the patterns of MMR protein expression in small bowel adenocarcinoma compared with colorectal carcinoma. Six of 71 (8.5%) small bowel adenocarcinomas and 149 of 1291 (11.5%) colorectal carcinomas demonstrated MMRD. The 6 MMRD small bowel adenocarcinomas had the following expression pattern: 3 with concurrent loss of MSH2 and MSH6, 1 with isolated loss of MSH6, and 2 with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 in patients with a family history suggestive of genetic cancer susceptibility. Histopathology suggestive of MMR protein deficiency as proposed by the revised Bethesda guidelines was commonly seen in both MMRP (63%) and MMRD (67%) small bowel adenocarcinomas (P>0.05). MMRD small bowel adenocarcinoma more frequently demonstrated abnormalities of MSH2 and/or MSH6 (4/6, 67%) compared with MMRD colorectal carcinoma (23/149, 15%) (P=0.01). None of the MMRD small bowel adenocarcinomas harbored the BRAF V600E mutation, whereas 60% of MMRD colorectal carcinomas were positive for BRAF V600E with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expression. Small bowel adenocarcinoma more frequently harbored Lynch syndrome-associated MMRD compared with colorectal carcinoma, providing support for screening of small bowel adenocarcinoma to identify patients at risk for Lynch syndrome. In contrast to colorectal carcinoma, sporadic MLH1 deficiency is not seen in small bowel adenocarcinoma. Clinicopathologic and histologic features do not distinguish between MMRP and MMRD small bowel adenocarcinoma indicating that universal screening in small

  2. Obstructive Bezoars of the Small Bowel Treated with Coca-Cola Zero through a Long Intestinal Tube and Endoscopic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Kei; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2017-09-25

    An 82-year-old Japanese man visited our hospital with abdominal fullness accompanied by lower abdominal pain. He presented with small bowel obstruction due to multiple diospyrobezoars. The bezoars were successfully removed without any surgical intervention by the administration of Coca-Cola Zero through a long intestinal tube and subsequent endoscopic manipulation. Such a combination may be the treatment of choice for small bowel obstruction due to bezoars.

  3. Non-Meckel’s Small Bowel Diverticular Bleeding: Two Case Reports and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding from non-Meckel’s small bowel diverticulosis is uncommon. Depending on the diverticulum’s location, a patient’s presentation can suggest either an upper or lower gastrointestinal source. We present two cases of bleeding from non-Meckel’s small bowel diverticula. One patient was managed successfully with endoscopic therapy, and the second required surgical resection after two failed attempts at achieving hemostasis endoscopically. PMID:28008410

  4. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy: A ten-point contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Karargyris, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of capsule endoscopy (CE) in clinical practice increased the interest for the study of the small-bowel. Consequently, in about 10 years, an impressive quantity of literature on indications, diagnostic yield (DY), safety profile and technical evolution of CE has been published as well as several reviews. At present time, there are 5 small-bowel capsule enteroscopy (SBCE) models in the worldwide market. Head-to-head trials have showed in the great majority of studies comparable results in terms of DY, image quality and completion rate. CE meta-analyses formed the basis of national/international guidelines; these guidelines place CE in a prime position for the diagnostic work-up of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, known and/or suspected Crohn’s disease and possible small-bowel neoplasia. A 2-L polyethylene glycol-based purge, administered the day before the procedure, is the most widely practiced preparation regimen. Whether this regimen can be further improved (i.e., by further decreasing its volume, changing the timing of administration, coupling it with prokinetics and/or other factors) or if it can really affect the DY, is still under discussion. Faecal calprotectin has been used in SBCE studies in two settings: in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to evaluate the type and extent of mucosal damage and, more importantly from a clinical point of view, in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease for assessment of inflammation activity. Although there is still a lot of debate around the exact reasons of SBCE poor performance in various small-bowel segments, it is worth to remember that the capsule progress is non-steerable, hence more rapid in the proximal than in lower segments of the small-bowel. Capsule aspiration, a relatively unexpected complication, has been reported with increasing frequency. This is probably related with the increase in the mean age of patients undergoing CE. CE video review is

  5. Lubiprostone improves visualization of small bowel for capsule endoscopy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled 2-way crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Mizue; Inamori, Masahiko; Inou, Yumi; Kanoshima, Kenji; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Iida, Hiroshi; Endo, Hiroki; Nonaka, Takashi; Kusakabe, Akihiko; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims  Lubiprostone has been reported to be an anti-constipation drug. The aim of the study was to investigate the usefulness of lubiprostone both for bowel preparation and as a propulsive agent in small bowel endoscopy. Patients and methods  This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover study of subjects who volunteered to undergo capsule endoscopy (CE). A total of 20 subjects (16 male and 4 female volunteers) were randomly assigned to receive a 24-μg tablet of lubiprostone 120 minutes prior to capsule ingestion for CE (L regimen), or a placebo tablet 120 minutes prior to capsule ingestion for CE (P regimen). Main outcome was gastric transit time (GTT) and small-bowel transit time (SBTT). Secondary outcome was adequacy of small-bowel cleansing and the fluid score in the small bowel. The quality of the capsule endoscopic images and fluid in the small bowel were assessed on 5-point scale. Results  The capsule passed into the small bowel in all cases. Median GTT was 57.3 (3 – 221) minutes for the P regimen and 61.3 (10 – 218) minutes for the L regimen ( P  = 0.836). Median SBTT was 245.0 (164 – 353) minutes for the P regimen and 228.05 (116 – 502) minutes for the L regimen ( P  = 0.501). The image quality score in the small bowel was 3.05 ± 1.08 for the P regimen and 3.80 ± 0.49 for the L regimen ( P  < 0.001). The fluid score in the small bowel was 2.04 ± 1.58 for the P regimen and 2.72 ± 1.43 for the L regimen ( P  < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the 2 regimens with regard to image quality. The fluid score was more plentiful for the L regimen than for the P regimen. There were no cases of capsule retention or serious adverse events in this study. Conclusion  Our study showed that use of lubiprostone prior to CE significantly improved visualization of the small bowel during CE as a result of inducing fluid secretion into the small bowel. PMID

  6. The glucose breath test: a diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, Daniel; Boston, Francis M; Blank, David; Yalovsky, Morty; Mishkin, Seymour

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an indirect noninvasive indicator of proximal bacterial overgrowth, the glucose breath test, was of diagnostic value in inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty four of 71 Crohn's disease patients tested had a positive glucose breath test. No statistical conclusions could be drawn between the Crohn's disease activity index and glucose breath test status. Of patients with radiologic evidence of small bowel stricture(s), 96.0% had a positive glucose breath test, while only one of 46 negative glucose breath test patients had a stricture. The positive and negative predictive values for a positive glucose breath test as an indicator of stricture formation were 96.0% and 97.8%, respectively. This correlation was not altered in Crohn's disease patients with fistulae or status postresection of the terminal ileum. The data in ulcerative colitis were nondiagnostic. In conclusion, the glucose breath test appears to be an accurate noninvasive inexpensive diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) and secondary bacterial overgrowth in Crohn's disease.

  7. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by an Incarcerated Hernia after Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    PubMed Central

    d'Hondt, Steven; Soysal, Savas; Kirchhoff, Philipp; Oertli, Daniel; Heizmann, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The iliac crest has become an often used site for autogenous bone graft, because of the easy access it affords. One of the less common complications that can occur after removal is a graft-site hernia. It was first reported in 1945 (see the work by Oldfield, 1945). We report a case of iliac crest bone hernia in a 53-year-old male who was admitted for elective resection of a pseudarthrosis and reconstruction of the left femur with iliac crest bone from the right side. One and a half months after initial surgery, the patient presented with increasing abdominal pain and signs of bowel obstruction. A CT scan of the abdominal cavity showed an obstruction of the small bowel caused by the bone defect of the right iliac crest. A laparoscopy showed a herniation of the small bowel. Due to collateral vessels of the peritoneum caused by portal hypertension, an IPOM (intraperitoneal onlay-mesh) occlusion could not be performed. We performed a conventional ventral hernia repair with an onlay mesh. The recovery was uneventful. PMID:22084778

  8. Misoprostol in the intestinal lumen protects against radiation injury of the mucosa of the small bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.P.; Bonsack, M.E.; Felemovicius, I. )

    1994-03-01

    Systemically administered misoprostol, a PGE analog, has been shown to be an intestinal radioprotector. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of misoprostol into the intestinal lumen can also reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis. The rat small bowel was operatively exteriorized and segmented by means of suture ties. The remainder of the intestine and the rat were shielded in a lead box. Misoprostol was introduced into the lumen in various doses. After 30 min exposure to misoprostol, the isolated, exteriorized, segmented bowel was subjected to 11 Gy X irradiation. Five days later the animals were sacrificed and the intestines harvested for evaluation. Surviving crypt numbers per circumference and mucosal height were the criteria used for quantification of damage. Mucosa exposed to misoprostol at the time of radiation delivery showed significantly increased crypt numbers and mucosal height compared to adjacent saline-filled intestine. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Small bowel injury after suprapubic catheter insertion presenting 3 years after initial insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kevin M; Good, Daniel W; Brush, John P; Al-hasso, Ammar; Stewart, Grant D

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to urology with blockages of her suprapubic catheter (SPC). The catheter was replaced easily in the emergency department, however, no urine was draining, only a cloudy green fluid was visible. On cystoscopy bilious material was identified in the bladder. There was no catheter visible. There seemed to be a fistulous tract entering the bladder at the left dome. The urethra was dilated, a urethral catheter was placed and the SPC was removed. A CT demonstrated that the SPC tract transfixed a loop of pelvic small bowel and entered the bladder with no intraperitoneal contrast leak. The patient recovered well and did not require laparotomy. This case emphasises that bowel perforation, although rare, must be considered as a complication of SPC placement even years after initial insertion when catheter problems arise. Unusually, we learn that this complication may not present with abdominal pain or peritonism. PMID:24326435

  10. [Impact of purified drinking water use on the small bowel lymphatic region].

    PubMed

    Baksheeva, Iu A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Chepik, V I

    2008-01-01

    The structures of the mesenteric lymph nodes, small bowel, microvascular bed, and a mast cell population of the mesentery of rats were studied by light microscopy. Tap water, filtered water, and macro- and microelement-balanced water were used. The use of the filtered and macro- and micro-element water caused increases in lymph transport in the mesenteric lymph nodes and in the height of small intestinal villi, activated humoral immunity, and produced the most optimum level of a mast cell population and the structure of the mesenteric microvascular bed.

  11. MRI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in pediatric small bowel Crohn disease: correlation with MRI findings of active bowel wall inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ream, Justin M; Dillman, Jonathan R; Adler, Jeremy; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; McHugh, Jonathan B; Strouse, Peter J; Dhanani, Muhammad; Shpeen, Benjamin; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2013-09-01

    Restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences during magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has been shown in segments of bowel affected by Crohn disease. However, the exact meaning of this finding, particularly within the pediatric Crohn disease population, is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of bowel wall restricted diffusion in children with small bowel Crohn disease by correlating apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with other MRI markers of disease activity. A retrospective review of pediatric patients (≤ 18 years of age) with Crohn disease terminal ileitis who underwent MRE with DWI at our institution between May 1, 2009 and May 31, 2011 was undertaken. All of the children had either biopsy-proven Crohn disease terminal ileitis or clinically diagnosed Crohn disease, including terminal ileal involvement by imaging. The mean minimum ADC value within the wall of the terminal ileum was determined for each examination. ADC values were tested for correlation/association with other MRI findings to determine whether a relationship exists between bowel wall restricted diffusion and disease activity. Forty-six MRE examinations with DWI in children with terminal ileitis were identified (23 girls and 23 boys; mean age, 14.3 years). There was significant negative correlation or association between bowel wall minimum ADC value and established MRI markers of disease activity, including degree of bowel wall thickening (R = (-)0.43; P = 0.003), striated pattern of arterial enhancement (P = 0.01), degree of arterial enhancement (P = 0.01), degree of delayed enhancement (P = 0.045), amount of mesenteric inflammatory changes (P < 0.0001) and presence of a stricture (P = 0.02). ADC values were not significantly associated with bowel wall T2-weighted signal intensity, length of disease involvement or mesenteric fibrofatty proliferation. Increasing bowel wall restricted diffusion

  12. Pediatric small bowel intussusception disease: feasibility of screening for surgery with early computed tomographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Hsieh, Chie-Song; Huang, Fu-Chen; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Shin-Yee; Chen, Min-Chi

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of early computed tomographic (CT) evaluation and the operative results of pediatric small bowel intussusception with deteriorating ischemic or obstructive symptoms, so-called small bowel intussusception disease (SBID). Between 1988 and 1999, among 18 patients surgically proven SBID (conventional group), 12 mimicked ileocolic intussusception and were conventionally managed with abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, reduction enema, and eventually operation. Between 2000 and 2008, we applied a modified approach with inclusion of early CT evaluation if ultrasonography showed a target lesion suspicious for SBID (diameter bowel complications (44.4% vs 6.7%; P = .02). Pediatric SBID may present with nonspecific symptoms and may mimic ileocolic intussusception leading to delayed operative intervention. Early CT evaluation of patients with suspicious SBID ultrasonographic features is effective in avoiding futile reduction enema and significantly reducing the waiting time for operative management and the resultant incidence of bowel complications. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic attraction leading to a small bowel obstruction in a child.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Stephen J; Torgenson, Marcus; Holsti, Maija; Black, Richard E

    2007-12-01

    Foreign body ingestion in small children is common yet only 1% of cases require operative management of associated complications (Arana et al. in Eur J Pediatr 160:468-472, 2001). A 6-year-old boy was referred to our institution with a 12 h history of abdominal pain. This pain was diffuse and crampy in nature and associated with multiple episodes of non-bilious, non-bloody emesis. On evaluation he was stable and his abdomen demonstrated slight distention and tenderness without peritoneal signs. Plain abdominal radiographs demonstrated some distended loops of small bowel and a radio-opaque foreign object within the mid-abdomen. A small bowel obstruction secondary to foreign body ingestion was diagnosed and an emergent laparotomy performed. Upon exploration, a transition zone was noted near the ileocecal valve. Further exploration revealed the obstruction to be caused secondary to the apposition of two small (8 mm) magnets, one in the proximal ileum and the other near the ileocecal valve, resulting in an internal hernia. The magnets were easily separated relieving the obstruction and both were removed via two small bowel enterotomies. After being presented with the magnets, his parents suspected that they came from the clothes of a Polly Pocket (Mattel, Inc., El Segundo, CA) doll. The patient had an uneventful post-operative course and was discharged to home on the second post-operative day. This case demonstrates the complications that may occur with multiple magnet ingestion. It highlights the need for close observation and early surgical intervention in children with a suspected history of foreign body ingestion, a clinical picture of gastrointestinal distress, and radiographic evidence of a radio-opaque foreign object.

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... work? How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? Who gets inflammatory bowel disease? How is inflammatory ... top How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? When the small intestine becomes inflamed, as in ...

  15. The "Pavia model" of experimental small bowel transplantation in pigs: technical variations for ischemia reperfusion injury studies.

    PubMed

    Alessiani, M; Cobianchi, L; Viganò, J; Dominioni, T; Bottazzi, A; Zonta, S; Dionigi, P

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major field of study in small bowel transplantation because of its implications regarding intestinal immunity. In this study, we have introduced some variations to the described models of IRI in pigs to make possible a complete isolation of the small bowel for IRI studies. In swine, two anatomical barriers make impossible a complete isolation of the small bowel at the origin of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and vein (SMV): the main colic vessels, which originate distally to form SMA and SMV, and the blood supply of the distal portion of the duodenum and the cephalic part of the pancreas. In a group of Large White pigs (n = 5), we have performed a complete isolation of the small bowel, including sub-total colectomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy. Both SMA and SMV were isolated at the origin from the aorta and at the junction of the splenic vein, respectively. Intestinal continuity was restored with duodenojejunal anastomosis and with ileotransverse colon anastomosis. One pig died on postoperative day 5 from intestinal occlusion due to adhesions. The remaining four pigs were killed on postoperative day 7 after an uneventful postoperative course. No complications were found at autopsy. In swine, resection of part of the pancreas and duodenum and removal of the large bowel does not affect short-term survival, allowing a full isolation of the entire small bowel mimicking the transplantation procedure. Thus, this model appears to be attractive for IRI studies in the field of intestinal transplantation.

  16. Small bowel volvulus in the adult populace of the United States: results from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Coe, Taylor M; Chang, David C; Sicklick, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare entity in Western adults. Greater insight into epidemiology and outcomes may be gained from a national database inquiry. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998 to 2010), a 20% stratified sample of United States hospitals, was retrospectively reviewed for small bowel volvulus cases (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition [ICD-9] code 560.2 excluding gastric/colonic procedures) in patients greater than or equal to 18 years old. There were 2,065,599 hospitalizations for bowel obstruction (ICD-9 560.x). Of those, there were 20,680 (1.00%) small bowel volvulus cases; 169 were attributable to intestinal malrotation. Most cases presented emergently (89.24%) and operative management was employed more frequently than nonoperative (65.21% vs 34.79%, P < .0001). Predictors of mortality included age greater than 50 years, Charlson comorbidity index greater than or equal to 1, emergent admission, peritonitis, acute vascular insufficiency, coagulopathy, and nonoperative management (P < .0001). As the first population-based epidemiological study of small bowel volvulus, our findings provide a robust representation of this rare cause of small bowel obstruction in American adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  18. Microscopic colitis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth--diagnosis behind the irritable bowel syndrome?

    PubMed

    Stoicescu, Adriana; Andrei, M; Becheanu, G; Stoicescu, M; Nicolaie, T; Diculescu, M

    2012-01-01

    Some patients previously diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may develop microscopic colitis or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). To estimate the prevalence of microscopic colitis and SIBO in patients with IBS, to evaluate the symptoms and the efficacy of treatment. We examined patients with IBS admitted in our clinic during a three-year period. We identified patients with microscopic colitis by performing total colonoscopy with multiple biopsies from normal intestinal mucosa and those with SIBO by performing a H2-breath test with glucose. We compared the symptoms and the effectiveness of the treatment. Out of the 132 patients initially diagnosed with IBS 3% (n=4) had microscopic colitis and 43.9% (n=58) had SIBO. Diarrhea was the main symptom in patients with microscopic colitis and SIBO (p=0.041), while abdominal pain, abdominal bloating and flatulence were prominent in IBS patients (p=0.042; p=0.039; p=0.048). Specific treatment with rifaximin in SIBO patients negativated H2-breath test in 70.9% cases. Patients suspected to have irritable bowel syndrome should be evaluated for microscopic colitis and SIBO. The proper diagnosis and the specific treatment may cure some difficult cases of the so called "irritable bowel syndrome".

  19. Endoscopic management of intraoperative small bowel laceration during natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery: a blinded porcine study.

    PubMed

    Fyock, Christopher J; Forsmark, Chris E; Wagh, Mihir S

    2011-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently gained great enthusiasm, but there is concern regarding the ability to endoscopically manage complications purely via natural orifices. To assess the feasibility of endoscopically managing enteral perforation during NOTES using currently available endoscopic accessories. Twelve pigs underwent transgastric or transcolonic endoscopic exploration. Full-thickness enterotomies were intentionally created to mimic accidental small bowel lacerations during NOTES. These lacerations were then closed with endoclips. In the blinded arm of the study, small bowel repair was performed by a second blinded endoscopist. Adequate closure of the laceration was confirmed with a leak test. Primary access sites were closed with endoclips or T-anchors. At necropsy, the peritoneal cavity was inspected for abscesses, bleeding, or damage to surrounding structures. The enterotomy site was examined for adequacy of closure, adhesions, or evidence of infection. Fifteen small bowel lacerations were performed in 12 animals. Successful closure was achieved in all 10 cases in the nonblinded arm. Survival animals had an uncomplicated postoperative course and all enterotomy sites were well healed without evidence of necrosis, adhesions, abscess, or bleeding at necropsy. Leak test was negative in all animals. In the blinded arm, both small intestinal lacerations could not be identified by the blinded endoscopist. Necropsy revealed open small bowel lacerations. Small intestinal injuries are difficult to localize with currently available flexible endoscopes and accessories. Endoscopic clips, however, may be adequate for closure of small bowel lacerations if the site of injury is known.

  20. Hydro-MRI of the small bowel: effect of contrast volume, timing of contrast administration, and data acquisition on bowel distention.

    PubMed

    Kuehle, Christiane A; Ajaj, Waleed; Ladd, Susanne C; Massing, Sandra; Barkhausen, Joerg; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess oral contrast agents, volumes of the agents, and time points of data acquisition in regard to small-bowel distention and patient acceptance. Six healthy volunteers underwent imaging on 16 different days. Four volumes (450, 900, 1,350, and 1,800 mL) of each of the four contrast compounds (0.2% locust bean gum plus 2.5% mannitol, VoLumen containing 2.0% sorbitol, VoLumen containing 1.4% sorbitol, and tap water) were used. Two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state free precession data sets were acquired at 5-minute intervals after contrast ingestion. Distention values for small-bowel segments (duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum) and occurrence of side effects were documented. Analysis of bowel distention revealed significantly greater distention for all carbohydrate sugar alcohol-containing solutions compared with water but no significant difference among the three contrast agents. Sufficient duodenal distention was achieved with 900 mL of any of the contrast agents, but imaging had to be performed soon after ingestion. For MRI of the distal jejunum and ileum, a volume of 1,350 mL is preferable, and the time point of data acquisition plays a minor role. Ingestion of 1,800 mL of the carbohydrate sugar alcohol solutions led to a significantly higher rate of side effects such as abdominal cramps than did ingestion of smaller volumes. The data indicate that sufficient contrast consumption and optimal timing of data acquisition are essential to distention of the small bowel. Oral contrast agent protocols should be adapted to the bowel region in question.

  1. Disruption of the Murine Glp2r Impairs Paneth Cell Function and Increases Susceptibility to Small Bowel Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Lee, Jennifer; Li, Karen K.; Holland, Dianne; Maughan, Heather; Guttman, David S.; Yusta, Bernardo; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP-2R) activation elicits proliferative and cytoprotective responses in the gastrointestinal mucosa and ameliorates experimental small and large bowel gut injury. Nevertheless, the essential physiological role(s) of the endogenous GLP-2R remain poorly understood. We studied the importance of the GLP-2R for gut growth, epithelial cell lineage allocation, the response to mucosal injury, and host-bacterial interactions in Glp2r−/− and littermate control Glp2r+/+ mice. Glp2r−/− mice exhibit normal somatic growth and preserved small and large bowel responses to IGF-I and keratinocyte growth factor. However, Glp2r−/− mice failed to up-regulate intestinal epithelial c-fos expression in response to acute GLP-2 administration and do not exhibit changes in small bowel conductance or small or large bowel growth after administration of GLP-2R agonists. The crypt and villus compartment and the numbers and localization of Paneth, enteroendocrine, and goblet cells were comparable in Glp2r+/+ vs. Glp2r−/− mice. Although the severity and extent of colonic mucosal injury in response to 3% oral dextran sulfate was similar across Glp2r genotypes, Glp2r−/− mice exhibited significantly increased morbidity and mortality and increased bacterial translocation after induction of enteritis with indomethacin and enhanced mucosal injury in response to irinotecan. Moreover, bacterial colonization of the small bowel was significantly increased, expression of Paneth cell antimicrobial gene products was reduced, and mucosal bactericidal activity was impaired in Glp2r−/− mice. Although the Glp2r is dispensable for gut development and the response to colonic injury, Glp2r−/− mice exhibit enhanced sensitivity to small bowel injury, and abnormal host-bacterial interactions in the small bowel. PMID:22253424

  2. Management of small-bowel polyps at double-balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masanao; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirata, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel tumors (SBTs) are uncommon, insidious in presentation, and frequently represent a diagnostic challenge. The advent of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is a significant breakthrough for visual diagnosis of SBTs throughout the small bowel. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and fluoroscopic enteroclysis had significantly lower diagnostic yields of tumors that were 10 mm or smaller in diameter, but VCE and DBE had high diagnostic yields regardless of tumor size. Regarding SBTs larger than 10 mm in diameter, CECT had a significantly lower diagnostic yield of epithelial tumors compared to subepithelial tumors, whereas fluoroscopic enteroclysis and DBE had high diagnostic yields regardless of the tumor type. VCE had a slightly lower diagnostic yield of subepithelial tumors (78%) compared to epithelial tumors. Therefore, a combined examination method by using CECT and VCE is useful for screening of SBTs. In case suspicious of stenosis, patency capsule should be performed to confirm passage before VCE. DBE is useful for further precise examination including biopsy and ultrasonography by using miniature probe, and enteroscopic treatment. After medical, enteroscopic, and surgical treatment, VCE is helpful for follow-up. DBE is safe and useful in resecting the SBTs deep within the small bowel without laparotomy. Indications of enteroscopic resection may be benign tumors regardless of epithelial or subepithelial type, localizing in the mucosal or submucosal layer, which are symptomatic at present or possibly symptomatic or transforming in the future. Malignant tumors localized in the mucosal layer may be indications although detecting at an early stage is challenging. In this review article, we describe management of SBTs/polyps by various modalities. PMID:25333006

  3. [Estimation of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with constipation and diarrhea irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Łokieć, Katarzyna; Klupińska, Grazyna; Walecka-Kapica, Ewa; Błońska, Aleksandra

    2014-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common reason for gastroenterology consultations. The diverse in symptomatology of the disease comes from its rich etiopathogenesis. Recently studies talk about infectious etiology of IBS and because of that it is necessary to expand its diagnostics by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) test. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with constipation (IBS-C) and diarrhea (IBS-D) irritable bowel syndrome with regard to nutrition. The study involved 46 subjects (33 women and 13 men) in average age of 44 years, which were divided into two groups: diarrhea and constipation IBS. All patients underwent hydrogen breath test studying bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. In addition, each person had fulfilled a feeding questionnaire. Student's t-test, Pearson test. It has been shown that there is no statistical significances between the prevalence of SIBO in form of diarrheal IBS and constipation IBS and gender. Average value of increments of hydrogen in breath during the test was higher in IBS-C in comparison with IBS-D, which was the highest in the intestine bacterial overgrowth in patients with IBS-C. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS showed that there is no relationship between the type and frequency of consumption of milk, meat, fruit and vegetables, sweets and coffee and the prevalence of SIBO in form of diarrhea and constipation IBS. The occurrence of constipation or diarrhea irritable bowel syndrome is not related to gender. SIBO is more common in patients with IBS-C than in IBS-D group. There is no relationship between the type of food consumed and the amount of SIBO in people with IBS. Type of food intake do not affect the status of the intestinal flora of people with IBS.

  4. Postoperative small bowel and colonic anastomotic bleeding. Therapeutic management and complications.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Sevilla Gómez, Elena; Vallribera Valls, Francesc; Espin Basany, Eloy; Valverde Lahuerta, Silvia; Pérez Lafuente, Mercedes; Segarra Medrano, Antonio; Armengol Carrasco, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative small bowel or colic anastomotic bleeding (PSCAB) is often a mild complication and is generally treated by a conservative approach. Other therapeutic options are surgery, endoscopic management and angiographic embolization. Our aim is to review our cases of postoperative anastomotic bleeding in patients with small bowel or colic anastomosis, with special attention to their treatment and complications. Observational retrospective study including patients with PSCAB in the department of General and Digestive Surgery in Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, between 2007 and 2012. Demographic and bleeding characteristics as well as therapeutic management were reviewed, including complications derived from the different therapeutic options. There were 44 cases of bleeding after performing small bowel or colic anastomosis, 25 patients were men (56.8%), with a mean age of 68.2 years (R: 28-92). The mean hematocrit decrease was 8 points (R: 0-17), and hemodynamic instability was detected in 13 patients (29.5%). A conservative management was undertaken in 27 patients (61.3%), surgery in 6 (13.6%), endoscopic treatment in 2 (4.5%) and embolization in 9 (20.5%). 4 patients of cases treated with embolization presented anastomotic leak (44.5%). Mortality was 13.6% (6 patients). A total of 4 of 6 deaths were in the group of patients treated with embolization. Most patients with PSCAB have a good response to conservative management. When there is failure of this approach, there are different therapeutic options, including angiographic embolization. In our series, we have seen a high incidence of post embolization anastomotic leak; further trials will be necessary to provide valuable evidence of the risk of this therapeutic option. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptation of electrolytes and fluid transport in rat small and large intestine after distal small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, C M; Molina, M T; Ilundain, A

    1988-06-01

    Na+, Cl- and water transport were studied in jejunum, caecum and colon after either 50% or 80% of small bowel resection (SBR). Four weeks after surgery, dry and wet weights, net absorption in vivo of sodium, chloride and water were determined. There was a significant intestinal growth after 50% or 80% SBR except for the colon which only showed increased tissue mass after 80% SBR. Net transport was stimulated both, per organ and per unit mass. In the small intestine and caecum both organ growth and changes in cell function appear to be involved in the adaptive response, regardless the extent of the small intestine resected. In the colon, compensatory growth appear to contribute to the adaptive response only after 80% SBR, whilst the transport function of the colonocytes seems to be stimulated after both types of SBR.

  6. Migration of eroded laparoscopic adjustable gastric band causing small bowel obstruction and perforation.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, Ashvini; Lee, Jerry; Ghosh, Simon; Hacking, Craig

    2017-05-12

    We present an unusual and rare complication caused by gastric band erosion into the stomach after band placement 15 years ago. The complication was only picked up after the band had subsequently migrated from the stomach at the site of erosion, to the distal ileum causing acute small bowel obstruction and focal perforation requiring emergency laparotomy.Abdominal pain in patients with gastric band should always be treated as serious until proven otherwise. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. A rare complication of small bowel intussusception: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pietro, Impellizzeri; Astra, Borruto Francesca; Simona, Montalto Angela; Carmelo, Romeo

    2013-01-01

    Volvulus and intussusception are rare conditions in children. We describe an unusual case of intussusception due to a solitary Peutz-Jeghers type hamartomatous polyp complicated by volvulus, which occurred in an 11-year-old girl. A laparotomy allows to successfully treat the pathology. The postoperative course was favourable. We discuss the clinical findings and the values of the preoperative instrumental diagnosis. The literature is reviewed. Identifying a midgut volvulus, as complication of a small bowel intussusception, during the diagnostic phase could help in choosing the most appropriate surgical approach.

  8. Amebic perforation of small bowel: an unexpected localization of a fatal complication.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Mehmet; Ergul, Emre; Donmez, Cem; Sisman, Ibrahim Cagatay; Ulger, Burak Veli; Kusdemir, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite E. histolytica is the causative organism responsible for human amebiasis and amebic dysentery. Although it is primarily an infection of the colon, it may also be spread by hematogenous path to other organs, especially the liver. In general, the clinical spectrum of colorectal amebiasis ranges from the state of asymptomatic carrier to severe fulminant necrotizing colitis with bleeding and perforation. Here we present an extremely rare case of necrotizing amebiasis of small bowel with a fatal outcome (Fig. 1, Ref. 4). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  9. Small bowel volvulus in pregnancy with associated superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Esterson, Yonah B; Villani, Robert; Dela Cruz, Ronald A; Friedman, Barak; Grimaldi, Gregory M

    Here we report the case of a pregnant 28-year-old who presented with acute upper abdominal pain. CT demonstrated midgut volvulus with short segment occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Emergent detorsion of the small bowel was performed, at which time underlying intestinal malrotation was discovered. Following detorsion, the SMA had a bounding pulse and did not require thrombectomy or revascularization. Fewer than 25 cases of midgut volvulus during pregnancy have been reported over the past 20years. To our knowledge, this is the first report of maternal midgut volvulus in which imaging captures the resultant occlusion of the SMA.

  10. Small bowel motor activity in response to physiological meals of different chemical composition in man.

    PubMed

    V Schönfeld, J

    2006-03-01

    Meals disrupt the interdigestive pattern of small bowel motor activity and convert it into the more irregular postprandial pattern. Previous animal studies suggest that the duration of and contractile activity within the postprandial period depend on the chemical composition of a meal. It is not clear whether this is also true for man. In 8 healthy volunteers I investigated how physiological and isocaloric meals of different chemical composition affect small bowel motor activity. Volunteers underwent two separate, ambulatory 24-hour small bowel manometry studies. Volunteers had a total of four meals on the two study days. They ingested two identical fish meals rich in protein, a pasta meal rich in carbohydrates, and a meat meal rich in fat. Records were analyzed visually for the reappearance of phase III of the migrating motor complex, and a validated computer program calculated the incidence of contractions during the postprandial period, as well as the amplitude and propagation of contractions. The durations of the postprandial periods were similar after the two protein meals (238 +/- 35 and 227 +/- 25 min), the carbohydrate (220 +/- 23 min) and the fat meal (242 +/- 43 min). The incidence of contractions was not significantly different after the protein meals (1.6 +/- 0.3 and 1.0 +/- 0.2 contractions per min), the carbohydrate meal (1.0 +/- 0.2 contractions per min) and the fat meal (1.5 +/- 0.2 contractions per min). The amplitude of contractions was similar after the protein meals (14 +/- 0.1 and 13 +/- 0.1 mmHg), the carbohydrate meal (14 +/- 0.1 mmHg) and the fat meal (14 +/- 0.1 mmHg). Propagation of contractions was similar after the protein meals (13 +/- 3 and 18 +/- 3 %), after the carbohydrate meal (15 +/- 2 %) and after the fat meal (13 +/- 2 %). Contractile activity within consecutive 30-min periods of the postprandial period was also not different between the meals. I conclude that physiological, isocaloric meals of different chemical composition

  11. Transient small bowel intussusception in adults: an overlooked feature of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, James Henry; McKean, David; Palmer, Jonathan S; Bungay, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease is the commonest immunological gastrointestinal disorder in the Western world. The symptoms of coeliac disease in adults are often non-specific, and a high index of suspicion may be required for timely diagnosis. We describe the case of a 46-year-old woman, with known dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension, who presented with non-specific abdominal symptoms, not initially attributed to gastrointestinal disease. Radiological investigations demonstrated transient small bowel intussusception without other abnormality, leading to the suggestion of coeliac disease as a cause, which was subsequently confirmed as the diagnosis. PMID:24951596

  12. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  13. [Well-differentiated endocrine carcinoma of the small bowel. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Antonio; Barrera-Rodríguez, Francisco Javier; Alvarez-Trasgallo, José Francisco; Márquez-García, Miguel Angel

    2007-01-01

    Of all cancers, only 0.3% are carcinoid tumors of the small bowel. The diagnostic approach of these patients is difficult because they may appear asymptomatic for a long time and also because of the low specificity of the currently available diagnostic tests. We present a case in which the laparoscopic approach allowed not just the diagnosis but facilitated surgery. A 58-year-old male had 2 months with mid-intestinal subocclusive symptoms (late postprandial abdominal pain relieved by vomiting). No abnormalities were found on physical examinations or with laboratory tests. Barium plain x-rays and CT scan revealed a retention stomach and proximal dilation of the small bowel without demonstrating cause. Laparoscopically, we found a 5-cm jejunal tumor. We performed intestinal resection and anastomosis by mini-laparotomy (7 cm). There were no postoperative complications. Pathology report disclosed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. At 1-year follow-up there are no signs of tumor activity. Laparoscopic surgery contributes to diagnosis and facilitates the management of patients with mid-intestinal subocclusive disease. Due to previous reports, the frequency of small intestine carcinoids may be underestimated. There are carcinoid tumors 2 cm or larger without metastases at the time of diagnosis.

  14. Impact of a procalcitonin-based algorithm on the management of adhesion-related small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Cossé, C; Sabbagh, C; Carroni, V; Galmiche, A; Rebibo, L; Regimbeau, J-M

    2017-09-01

    Adhesion-related small bowel obstruction (ASBO) management is difficult if there are no signs of strangulation or peritonitis when intestinal transit has not been restored. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of combining a procalcitonin (PCT)-based algorithm with clinical signs on the management of uncomplicated ASBO. We performed a pilot, retrospective, single-center "before-after" study. During the "before" period (2007 to 2012), patients with uncomplicated ASBO (n=93, the Gastrografin(®) group) underwent a clinical examination and a Gastrografin(®) index. During the "after" period (2013 to 2016), patients with uncomplicated ASBO (n=70, the algorithm group) underwent a clinical examination and were assessed with the PCT-based algorithm. The study's primary outcome was the appropriateness of ASBO management. The secondary outcomes were the need for surgery and the time to surgery, the LOS, the morbidity and mortality rates, and the recurrence rate. The proportion of well-managed patients was higher in the algorithm group than in the Gastrografin(®) group (86% vs. 47%; P<0.001). The time to surgery (48h vs 72h; P=0.02) and the LOS (4 vs. 6days, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the algorithm group. The need for surgery was similar in both groups (31% vs. 37%, P=0.49). The morbidity (P=0.69), mortality (P=0.82) and recurrence rates (P=0.57) were similar in the two groups. The use of a PCT-based algorithm is of value in the routine clinical management of ASBO; it reduces the LOS and the time to surgery without increasing the need for surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Constipation Is Related to Small Bowel Disturbance Rather Than Colonic Enlargement in Acquired Chagasic Megacolon.

    PubMed

    Bafutto, Mauro; Luquetti, Alejandro Ostermayer; Gabriel Neto, Salustiano; Penhavel, Felix Andre Sanches; Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2017-08-01

    Constipation is the main symptom of acquired chagasic megacolon. However, a number of patients with Chagas disease without colon involvement also have the same complain. This study evaluated the role of small bowel in constipated patients with Chagas disease with and without megacolon. Orocecal transit time (OCTT) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in constipated non-chagasic and chagasic patients with and without megacolon were performed. One hundred fifteen patients were included in this study and were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of constipation, which is defined as at least 7 days without bowel movements for more than 1 year. These two groups were further divided into three subgroups based on the serology test results for Trypanosoma cruzi and the presence and absence of megacolon on barium enema. All patients were subjected to OCTT and OGTT. Among 70 constipated patients, 64.3% had OCTT longer than 120 min, higher than the non-constipated patients (31.1%, P < 0.000). The proportion of patients within the three subgroups in the non-constipated group was not different from each other (P = 0.345). Among the constipated subgroup, 94.44% of the chagasic megacolon subgroup had OCTT longer than 120 min, higher than the other two subgroups (P = 0.005). Chagas patients with constipation, without or without megacolon, showed higher blood glucose levels at 30, 60, and 90 min after oral ingestion of 70 g glucose than normal subjects with or without constipation. Constipated, either non-chagasic or chagasic, patients have a prolonged OCTT. This result suggests that slow small bowel transit may be a significant factor for constipation.

  16. Influence of PACAP on oxidative stress and tissue injury following small-bowel autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Andrea; Racz, Boglarka; Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Lubics, Andrea; Nemeth, Jozsef; Nedvig, Klara; Kalmar-Nagy, Karoly; Horvath, Ors Peter; Weber, Gyorgy; Roth, Erzsebet

    2009-02-01

    Tissue injury caused by cold preservation and reperfusion remains an unsolved problem during small-bowel transplantation. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is present and plays a central role in the intestinal physiology. This study investigated effect of PACAP-38 on the oxidative stress and tissue damage in autotransplanted intestine. Sham-operated, ischemia/reperfusion, and autotransplanted groups were established in Wistar rats. In ischemia/reperfusion groups, 1 h (group A), 2 h (group B), and 3 h (group C) ischemia followed by 3 h of reperfusion was applied. In autotransplanted groups, total orthotopic intestinal autotransplantation was performed. Grafts were preserved in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and in UW containing 30 microg PACAP-38 for 1, 2, 3, and 6 h. Reperfusion lasted 3 h in all groups. Endogenous PACAP-38 concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. To determine oxidative stress parameters, malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase were measured in tissue samples. Tissue damage was analyzed by qualitative and quantitative methods on hematoxylin/eosin-stained sections. Concentration of endogenous PACAP-38 significantly decreased in groups B and C compared to sham-operated group. Preservation solution containing PACAP-38 ameliorated bowel tissue oxidative injury induced by cold ischemia and reperfusion. Histological results showed that preservation caused destruction of the mucous, submucous, and muscular layers, which were further deteriorated by the end of reperfusion. In contrast, PACAP-38 significantly protected the intestinal structure. Ischemia/reperfusion decreased the endogenous PACAP-38 concentration in the intestinal tissue. Administration of PACAP-38 mitigated the oxidative injury and histological lesions in small-bowel autotransplantation model.

  17. Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome in an adolescent with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ester; Estanqueiro, Paula; Almeida, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; Tellechea, Oscar; Salgado, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome (BADAS) is a neutrophilic dermatosis, characterized by the occurrence of arthritis and skin lesions related to bowel disease with or without bowel bypass. We report an unusual case of BADAS in a 15-year-old white male with congenital aganglionosis of the colon and hypoganglionosis of the small intestine and multiple bowel surgeries in childhood complicated by short bowel syndrome. He presented with recurrent peripheral polyarthritis, tenosynovitis, and painful erythematous subcutaneous nodules located on the dorsolateral regions of the legs and on the dorsa of the feet. Histological examination disclosed a neutrophilic dermatosis confirming the diagnosis of BADAS.Although an uncommon disease, especially at pediatric age, it is important to evoke the diagnosis of BADAS in children and adolescents with bowel disease, because treatment options and prognosis are distinct from other rheumatologic conditions.

  18. Postoperative oligo-recurrence of non-small-cell lung cancer: clinical features and survival†.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Aokage, Keiju; Nagai, Kanji; Tsuboi, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative recurrences of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are usually disseminated and systemic. Recently, the concept of oligo-recurrence, which is theoretically curable by definitive local therapy (DLT), has been proposed in several cancers. The aim of this study was to clarify clinical features and outcomes of patients with postoperative oligo-recurrence of NSCLC. From 3275 patients with resected pathological stage IA-IIIB NSCLC between 1993 and 2011, a total of 768 patients who developed recurrence were included in this study. Oligo-recurrence was defined as 1-3 loco-regional or distant recurrent lesions restricted to a single organ. Other recurrences were classified as poly-recurrence. Second primary lung cancers and suspected lesions were excluded. DLT included surgery, stereotactic radiotherapy and radiotherapy with a 45 Gy or higher dose, performed with curative intent. Oligo-recurrence was identified in 162 (21%) patients, mainly as a solitary recurrence (n = 129, 80%) in regional lymph nodes, brain, lung, bone and adrenal gland, and the proportion of patients with oligo-recurrence increased gradually year by year. The patients with oligo-recurrence had more early-staged disease at initial surgery and a longer time to recurrence than those with poly-recurrence. The entire population of oligo-recurrence patients had better post-recurrence survival (PRS) than those with poly-recurrence (5-year PRS: 32.9 vs 9.9%, P < 0.001). For oligo-recurrence, DLT was totally conducted in 105 (65%) patients as initial treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that the initial DLT was associated with improved PRS [odds ratio (OR) 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-0.68]. The recurrence location and initial pathological stage did not affect PRS. The 5-year PRS and postoperative progression-free survival rates after DLT were 38.6 and 22.3%, respectively. Of the 10 long-term (≥5-year) progression-free survivors, 9 were those with a solitary recurrence. Initial DLT

  19. Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in childhood.

    PubMed

    Huertas-Ceballos, A; Logan, S; Bennett, C; Macarthur, C

    2008-01-23

    Between 4% and 25% of school-age children complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with daily activities. For the majority no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation and although most children are likely managed by reassurance and simple measures, a large range of interventions have been recommended. To determine the effectiveness of medication for recurrent abdominal pain in school-age children. The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) 2006 (Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to Dec 2006), EMBASE (1980 to Dec 2006), CINAHL (1982 to Dec 2007), ERIC (1966 to Dec 2006), PsycINFO (1872 to Dec 2006), LILACS (1982 to Dec 2006), SIGLE (1980 to March 2005), and JICST (1985 to 06/2000) were searched with appropriate filters Studies on school age children with RAP (Apley or the Rome II criteria for gastrointestinal diseases) allocated by random or quasi-random methods to a drug treatment vs. placebo/ no treatment were included. References identified by the searches were screened against the inclusion criteria by two independent reviewers. Data was extracted and analysed using RevMan 4.2.10. Three trials met the inclusion criteria. Symon et al report a cross-over trial comparing pizotifen and placebo in 16 children with "abdominal migraine". Data before cross-over was not available. Results for 14 children showed Mean fewer days in pain of 8.21 (95% CI 2.93, 13.48) while taking the active drug. Kline et al compared peppermint oil capsules with placebo in a randomised trial in 50 children with RAP and IBS. 42 children completed the study. OR for improvement was 3.33 (95% CI 0.93-12.1)See et al compared famotidine with placebo in a randomised cross-over trial in 25 children with RAP and dyspepsia. OR for improvement before cross-over was 11 (95%CI 1.6, 75.5). This review provides weak evidence of benefit on medication in children with RAP. The lack of clear evidence of effectiveness for any of the recommended drugs

  20. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  1. Investigation of Small Bowel Abnormalities in HIV-Infected Patients Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Eiji; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Hosono, Kuhihiro; Ueda, Atsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is reportedly associated with an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and can cause HIV enteropathy, which occurs independently of opportunistic infections. However, the characteristics of small bowel abnormalities attributable to HIV infection are rarely investigated. In the present study, we assessed the intestinal mucosal changes found in HIV-infected patients and compared them with the mucosa of healthy control subjects using capsule endoscopy (CE). Three of the 27 HIV-infected patients harbored gastrointestinal opportunistic infections and were thus excluded from subsequent analyses. The endoscopic findings of CE in HIV-infected patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (55% versus 10%, P = 0.002); however, most lesions, such as red spots or tiny erosions, were unlikely to cause abdominal symptoms. After validating the efficacy of CE for the diagnosis of villous atrophy, we found that the prevalence of villous atrophy was 54% (13/24) among HIV-infected patients. Interestingly, villous atrophy persisted in patients receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy, though most of them exhibited reconstituted peripheral blood CD4+ T cells. Although we could not draw any conclusions regarding the development of small bowel abnormalities in HIV-infected patients, our results may provide some insight regarding the pathogenesis of HIV enteropathy. PMID:28408924

  2. Endoscopic techniques to detect small-bowel neuroendocrine tumors: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Dario; Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of small-bowel neuroendocrine tumors (SbNETs) has improved with the advent of video capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The data describing the efficacy of CE/DBE in the detection of SbNETs are scanty. Aim The aim of this article is to review the current evidence on the role of DBE and CE in the diagnosis of SbNETs. Material and methods A bibliographical search was performed in PubMed using the following keywords: “neuroendocrine tumors and enteroscopy/and capsule endoscopy” and “small bowel neuroendocrine tumors.” Results CE and DBE can be complementary and show a similar diagnostic yield. The number of false-negative results has not been established yet because of the “work-up bias” observed in the majority of the studies. Conclusions DBE and CE appear to be both safe and effective procedures useful in the diagnosis of SbNETs. Further studies are required to clarify their potential complications and relationship with other techniques, particularly nuclear imaging. PMID:28405316

  3. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Muhammad A; McArt, Darragh G; Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A; Wilson, Richard H; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-08-28

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman -0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers.

  4. Effect of antrectomy on gastric hypersecretion induced by distal small bowel resection.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A W; Moossa, A R; Wood, R A; Block, G E; Skinner, D B

    1977-01-01

    Seven male Rhesus monkeys, with demonstrated gastric hypersecretory response to 50% distal small bowel resection, were studied. This increase in gastric acid output had persisted for more than 6 months. Precise, anatomical antrectomy without vagotomy was performed and intestinal continuity restored by gastroduodenostomy. Complete abolition of basal acid secretion and of the secretory response to histamine occurred. These effects could not be reversed by continuous (5 hour) infusions of pentagastrin at 0.2 microgram/kg hr-1 or 2 microgram/kg hr-1. The dose response curve to gastrin pentapeptide was altered; maximum secretion was greatly reduced and occurred at 10 microgram/kg hr-1. Neither basal serum gastrin or basal serum GIP was significantly reduced by antrectomy. These findings indicate that in this animal model the antrum is essential in the genesis of the hypersecretory state. If these findings are relevant to man precise antrectomy may be the procedure of choice for symptomatic acid hypersecretion after small bowel resection or disease. PMID:406866

  5. Evaluation of small bowel blood flow in healthy subjects receiving low-dose aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Urara; Kato, Mototsugu; Nishida, Mutsumi; Kamada, Go; Yoshida, Takeshi; Ono, Shouko; Shimizu, Yuichi; Asaka, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between low-dose aspirin-induced small bowel mucosal damage and blood flow, and the effect of rebamipide. METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups: a placebo group given low-dose aspirin plus placebo and a rebamipide group given low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide for a period of 14 d. Capsule endoscopy and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were performed before and after administration of drugs. Areas under the curves and peak value of time-intensity curve were calculated. RESULTS: Absolute differences in areas under the curves were -1102.5 (95% CI: -1980.3 to -224.7, P = 0.0194) in the placebo group and -152.7 (95% CI: -1604.2 to 641.6, P = 0.8172) in the rebamipide group. Peak values of time intensity curves were -148.0 (95% CI: -269.4 to -26.2, P = 0.0225) in the placebo group and 28.3 (95% CI: -269.0 to 325.6, P = 0.8343) in the rebamipide group. Capsule endoscopy showed mucosal breaks only in the placebo group. CONCLUSION: Short-term administration of low-dose aspirin is associated with small bowel injuries and blood flow. PMID:21245996

  6. Segmental small bowel necrosis associated with antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Ye, Xiao-Hua; Ding, Jin; Wu, Xiao-Kang

    2015-04-07

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a multi-system disease characterized by the formation of thromboembolic complications and/or pregnancy morbidity, and with persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. We report the case of a 50-year-old, previously healthy man who presented with fever and new-onset, dull abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan showed segmental small bowel obstruction, for which an emergency laparotomy was performed. Histopathologic examination of resected tissues revealed multiple intestinal and mesenteric thromboses of small vessels. Laboratory tests for serum antiphospholipid (anticardiolipin IgM) and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies were positive. Despite proactive implementation of anticoagulation, steroid, and antibiotic therapies, the patient's condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 22 d after admission. This case highlights that antiphospholipid syndrome should be suspected in patients with unexplainable ischemic bowel and intestinal necrosis presenting with insidious clinical features that may be secondary to the disease, as early diagnosis is critical to implement timely treatments in order to ameliorate the disease course.

  7. Small bowel obstruction in the virgin abdomen: the need for a mandatory laparotomy explored.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Christian; Furtado, Ruelan; Mosse, Charles; Gananadha, Sivakumar; Fergusson, James; Jeans, Phil; Beenen, Edwin

    2014-08-01

    A laparotomy is still considered mandatory for patients without previous abdominal surgery presenting with a small bowel obstruction (SBO) because of a perceived high incidence of underlying lesions. However, there is no evidence in literature to support this assumption. We analyzed the etiology of SBO in this subgroup of patients to establish the need for a mandatory laparotomy. A retrospective analysis was conducted over a 5-year period. Basic demographics, radiology results, operative findings, and outpatient investigations were analyzed. Of 689 patients presenting with an SBO, a total of 62 patients, 9.0%, had a virgin abdomen. A known underlying disease (inflammatory bowel disease, malignancy) was the cause in 13 patients. The remaining 49 patients had adhesions in 75.5% and a newly diagnosed malignancy in 10.2% as a cause. Adhesions are by far the most likely cause of SBO in patients without previous abdominal surgery followed by a small number of newly diagnosed malignancies. Both prevalences are in equal proportion to patients with previous abdominal surgery. A trial of nonoperative management may therefore be justified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transient small bowel intussusception in an adult: case report with intraoperative video and literature review.

    PubMed

    Aref, Hager; Nawawi, Abrar; Altaf, Abdulmalik; Aljiffry, Murad

    2015-04-03

    The term intussusception refers to invagination of a segment of the gastrointestinal tract into the lumen of an adjacent segment. This is a rare entity and it is more prevalent in children and less common in adults. The diagnosis of intussusception in adults is difficult as a result of the nonspecific signs and symptoms. As there are many common causes of acute abdomen, intussusception should be considered when more frequent etiologies have been ruled out. The laparoscopic approach offers both a diagnostic option and a therapeutic one for intussusception in adults. We report a forty-one year old male patient, who presented to our Emergency Department complaining of peri-umbilical pain associated with nausea and vomiting for 1 day. Diagnosed with transient small bowel intussusception without any obvious underlying pathology. This report is the first to present an intra-operative video showing the small bowel intussuscepting and reducing spontaneously. Furthermore, the authors present a review about this rare condition, including previously reported similar cases in literature. Transient intussusception is extremely rare and is a challenging condition. Imaging techniques, especially CT scan, are helpful in the diagnosis of intussusception. However, laparoscopy offers the advantage of distinguishing transient intussusception from persistent intussusception.

  9. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M.; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B.; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W.; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A.; Wilson, Richard H.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman −0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers. PMID:26315110

  10. Resveratrol Attenuates Both Small Bowel and Liver Changes in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Temi, Volkan; Okay, Erdem; Güneş, Abdullah; Şimşek, Turgay; Çekmen, Mustafa; Bilgili, Ümit; Gürbüz, Yeşim

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well known that mucosal changes and alterations in liver function occur in the experimental obstructive jaundice model. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on obstructive jaundice-induced changes in the small bowel mucosa and liver using ischaemia-modified albumin as a marker of oxidative damage. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The study used a rodent experimental model of obstructive jaundice, including a sham group (1), a control group (2), and a study group (3). Wistar albino rats were used. Jaundice was produced by ligation of the bile duct in Groups 2 and 3. In Group 3, resveratrol was administered intraperitoneally for 14 days. Results: In terms of the structure and the size of the mucosal villi, significant thickening and blunting were detected in Group 2 compared with Group 1. These changes were significantly less noticeable in Group 3 compared with Group 2. Levels of ischaemia-modified albumin were significantly higher in Group 2 compared with those in Group 1, and they were significantly decreased in Group 3 compared with Group 2. Conclusion: Resveratrol administration to obstructive jaundiced rats reduced the organic effects of obstructive jaundice on small bowel mucosa and liver oxidative stress. We believe that this reduction might attenuate bacterial translocation and systemic effects of secreted cytokines. PMID:25207176

  11. Geriatric Small Bowel Obstruction: An Analysis of Treatment and Outcomes Compared to a Younger Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Krause, William R.; Webb, Travis P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common condition, but little is known about its presentation, management, and outcomes in geriatric patients. Methods A retrospective review was performed comparing geriatric (≥65 years of age) and non-geriatric patients admitted with SBO. Admission characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were compared. Data analysis included Student’s t test and chi-square test or Fisher exact test. Results Among 80 geriatric and 136 non-geriatric patients no difference was observed between admission characteristics, treatment, time to or type of surgery, length of post-op stay, or overall complications. Cardiac complications (15% vs 0%, p=0.0082) and sub-acute care facility discharge (29% vs 5%, p<0.001) were more common for geriatric patients. Conclusions Compared to younger adults, elderly patients with SBO have similar presentations and overall outcomes with the exception of cardiac morbidity and discharge disposition. Pre-operative attention to cardiac risk profile and discharge disposition discussion should be encouraged. Summary This study analyzes geriatric patients presenting with small bowel obstruction when cared for by an Acute Care Surgery service. Compared to younger adults, the presentation, treatment response, and outcomes are similar with the exception of cardiac complications and discharge destination. PMID:25048569

  12. Measurement of hepatic insulin sensitivity early after the bypass of the proximal small bowel in humans

    PubMed Central

    Herring, R.; Vusirikala, A.; Shojaee‐Moradi, F.; Jackson, N. C.; Chandaria, S.; Jackson, S. N.; Goldstone, A. P.; Hakim, N.; Patel, A. G.; Umpleby, A. M.; Le Roux, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Unlike gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy procedures, intestinal bypass procedures, Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass in particular, lead to rapid improvements in glycaemia early after surgery. The bypass of the proximal small bowel may have weight loss and even caloric restriction‐independent glucose‐lowering properties on hepatic insulin sensitivity. In this first human mechanistic study, we examined this hypothesis by investigating the early effects of the duodeno‐jejunal bypass liner (DJBL; GI Dynamics, USA) on the hepatic insulin sensitivity by using the gold standard euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp methodology. Method Seven patients with obesity underwent measurement of hepatic insulin sensitivity at baseline, 1 week after a low‐calorie liquid diet and after a further 1 week following insertion of the DJBL whilst on the same diet. Results Duodeno‐jejunal bypass liner did not improve the insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose production beyond the improvements achieved with caloric restriction. Conclusions Caloric restriction may be the predominant driver of early increases in hepatic insulin sensitivity after the endoscopic bypass of the proximal small bowel. The same mechanism may be at play after Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass and explain, at least in part, the rapid improvements in glycaemia.

  13. Relationship of Bowel MR Imaging to Health-related Quality of Life Measures in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Small Bowel Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Carlos, Ruth C; Smith, Ethan A; Davenport, Matthew S; De Matos Maillard, Vera; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine if utility measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric small bowel Crohn disease (a) change in response to infliximab therapy, (b) correlate with proxy parent or guardian assessments, and (c) correlate with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and laboratory markers of intestinal active inflammation. Materials and Methods This prospective single-center cohort study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Parental informed consent and subject assent were obtained from all study participants. Twenty-six children with newly diagnosed small bowel Crohn disease receiving infliximab therapy were prospectively enrolled. All subjects underwent measurement of HRQOL utilities (visual analog scale [VAS], time trade-off [TTO], and standard gamble [SG]), MR enterography, and laboratory assessment at baseline and 6 months later. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare paired nonparametric data; Spearman correlation (ρ) was used to assess bivariate relationships. Results The median VAS score was 47.5 (interquartile range [IQR]: 20.0-52.2) before infliximab therapy and 83.0 (IQR: 62.0-92.0) at follow-up (P = .0003). There was positive correlation between subject and parent or guardian change in VAS score between baseline and follow-up (ρ = 0.71; P = .0006). The authors identified significant negative correlations between VAS score and MR imaging bowel wall arterial phase enhancement after contrast material administration at baseline (ρ = -0.57, P = .0032) as well as between change in VAS score and change in bowel wall enhancement in the arterial phase at contrast-enhanced MR imaging over time (ρ = -0.51, P = .02). No correlations between VAS score and laboratory inflammatory markers were identified. Conclusion VAS assessment of HRQOL changes over time in response to infliximab therapy in children with small bowel Crohn disease. There are statistically significant correlations between child

  14. Detection of Small Bowel Slow Wave Frequencies from Noninvasive Biomagnetic Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jonathan C.; Obioha, Chibuike; Goodale, Adam; Bradshaw, L. Alan; Richards, William O.

    2009-01-01

    We report a novel method for identifying the small intestine electrical activity slow wave frequencies from noninvasive biomagnetic measurements. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements are pre-processed to remove baseline drift and high frequency noise. Subsequently, the underlying source signals are separated using the well-known SOBI algorithm. A simple classification scheme identifies and assigns some of the SOBI components to a section of small bowel. Slow wave frequencies were clearly identified in 10 out of 12 test subjects to within 0.09–0.25 cycles per minute. The method is sensitive at the 40.3–55.9% level, while false positive rates were 0–8.6%. This technique could potentially be used to help diagnose gastrointestinal ailments and obviate some exploratory surgeries. PMID:19497806

  15. Unusual Presentation of Intussusception of the Small Bowel with Peutz Jeghers Syndrome: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Akshara; Gupta, Achal; Shrivastava, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    The Peutz Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterised by hamartomatous polyposes of the gastrointestinal tract, melanin pigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes, and an increased risk for cancer. We are reporting a case of a 15-year-old male with Peutz Jeghers syndrome, who presented to us with features of chronic intestinal obstruction and anaemia. Initially, patient was managed conservatively, but later on, an elective exploratory laparotomy was done for definitive management of intussusception. Laparotomy revealed a jejuno-jejunal intussusception with spontaneous recanalisation of gut which contained a long segment of gangrenous small bowel in the lumen. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment was done. To the best of our knowledge, this might be the first case report on spontaneous recanalisation of small intestine. PMID:24298508

  16. Increased Expression of Toll-Like Receptors 4, 5, and 9 in Small Bowel Mucosa from Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zakikhany, Katherina; Acevedo, Nathalie; D'Amato, Mauro; Lindberg, Greger

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls regarding the expression of toll-like receptors 2, 4, 5, and 9 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), the primary mucosal receptors of bacterial components, in small and large bowel mucosa. Methods. We analysed biopsies from jejunum and sigmoid colon of 22 patients (17 females) with IBS aged 18–66 (median: 39) years and 14 healthy volunteers (12 females) aged 22–61 (median: 42) years. Eight patients had constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS), 7 had diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS), and 7 had IBS without predominance of constipation or diarrhoea. We analysed mRNA levels for TLRs using quantitative PCR and distribution of TLRs in mucosa using immunohistochemistry. Results. We found increased mRNA expression of TLR4 (mean fold change 1.85 ± 0.31 versus 1.0 ± 0.20; p < 0.05), TLR5 (1.96 ± 0.36 versus 1.0 ± 0.20; p < 0.05) and TLR9 (2.00 ± 0.24 versus 1.0 ± 0.25; p < 0.01) but not of TLR2 in the small bowel mucosa from patients with IBS compared to the controls. There was no significant difference in mRNA levels for TLRs in colon mucosa between patients and controls. Conclusion. Upregulation of TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 suggests the involvement of bacteria or dysregulation of the immune response to commensal flora in small bowel mucosa in IBS patients. PMID:28246611

  17. Double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy of intestinal hemodynamics following massive small bowel resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Rowland, Kathryn J.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Warner, Brad W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Massive small bowel resection (SBR) results in villus angiogenesis and intestinal adaptation. The exact mechanism that causes intestinal villus angiogenesis remains unknown. We hypothesize that hemodynamic changes within the remnant bowel after SBR will trigger intestinal angiogenesis. To validate this, we used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to image the microvascular system of the intestine in C57B6 mice and to measure blood flow and oxygen saturation (sO2) of a supplying artery and vein. Baseline measurements were made 6 cm proximal to the ileal-cecal junction (ICJ) prior to resection. A 50% proximal bowel resection was then performed, and measurements were again recorded at the same location immediately, 1, 3 and 7 days following resection. The results show that arterial and venous sO2 were similar prior to SBR. Immediately following SBR, the arterial and venous sO2 decreased by 14.3 +/- 2.7% and 32.7 +/- 6.6%, respectively, while the arterial and venous flow speed decreased by 62.9 +/- 17.3% and 60.0 +/- 20.1%, respectively. Such significant decreases in sO2 and blood flow indicate a hypoxic state after SBR. Within one week after SBR, both sO2 and blood flow speed had gradually recovered. By 7 days after SBR, arterial and venous sO2 had increased to 101.0 +/- 2.9% and 82.7 +/- 7.3% of the baseline values, respectively, while arterial and venous flow speed had increased to 106.0 +/- 21.4% and 150.0 +/- 29.6% of the baseline values, respectively. Such increases in sO2 and blood flow may result from angiogenesis following SBR.

  18. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  19. Evaluation of gastric and small bowel transit times in coeliac disease with the small bowel PillCam®: a single centre study in a non gluten-free diet adult Italian population with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Urgesi, R; Cianci, R; Bizzotto, A; Costamagna, G; Riccioni, M E

    2013-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying bowel disturbances in coeliac disease are still relatively unclear. Past reports suggested that small bowel motor abnormalities may be involved in this pathological condition; there are no studies addressing small bowel transit in coeliac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. The objective of this study was to determine whether capsule endoscopy (CE) could serve as a test for measurement of gastric and small bowel transit times in a group of symptomatic or asymptomatic coeliac patients at the time of diagnosis with respect to a control group. Thirty coeliac untreated patients and 30 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy controls underwent CE assessment of whole gut transit times. All subjects completed the study per protocol and experienced natural passage of the pill. No statistical significant differences between gastric emptying and small bowel transit times both in coeliac and control group were found (p = 0.1842 and p = 0.7134; C.I. 95%, respectively). No correlation was found in coeliac patients and control group between transit times and age, sex and BMI. By using the Pearson's correlation test, significant correlation emerged between gastric emptying time and small bowel transit times in coeliac disease (r = 0.1706). CE reveals unrecognized gender differences and may be a novel outpatient technique for gut transit times' assessment without exposure to radiation and for the evaluation of upper gut dysfunction in healthy patients suffering from constipation without evidence of intestinal malabsorption. Nevertheless, CE does not seem to be the most suitable method for studying gut transit times in untreated coeliac patients; this might be ascribed to the fact that CE consists of inert (non-digestible, non-absorbable) substances.

  20. Sluggish small bowel motility is involved in determining increased biliary deoxycholic acid in cholesterol gallstone patients.

    PubMed

    Azzaroli, F; Mazzella, G; Mazzeo, C; Simoni, P; Festi, D; Colecchia, A; Montagnani, M; Martino, C; Villanova, N; Roda, A; Roda, E

    1999-09-01

    Our aim was to establish whether small intestine transit time is defective in subjects with cholesterol gallstones. We enrolled 10 patients (eight women, two men; mean age, 48.7 yr; mean body mass index [BMI], 22.4 Kg/m2) with recently diagnosed cholelithiasis, with no liver pathology, who were not taking any drugs, and 11 comparable healthy volunteers (eight women, three men; mean age, 46.2 yr; mean BMI, 22.7 Kg/m2), who served as controls. All subjects underwent orocecal (by starch breath test technique and serum assays of salazopyrin), oroileal (by serum assays of tauroursodeoxycholic acid), and duodenoileal (by serum assays of taurocholic acid) transit times; cholesterol saturation index; and bile acid composition and gallbladder motility studies (by ultrasound). For serum assays, blood samples were collected over a period of 7 h. Gallbladder motility and orocecal transit time were evaluated simultaneously. All four means of assessing transit time gave longer times in cholesterol gallstone patients than in controls: orocecal transit time (salazopyrin) = 366 +/- 13 vs 258 +/- 16 min, p < 0.0005; orocecal transit time (starch breath test) = 415 +/- 139 vs 290 +/- 15 min, p < 0.01; duodenoileal transit time: 272 +/- 23 vs 205 +/- 23 min, p < 0.03; and oroileal transit time: 308 +/- 18 vs 230 +/- 19 min, p < 0.009. Cholesterol gallstone patients showed an increase in percent molar biliary deoxycholic acid (30% +/- 4.5% vs 16% +/- 1.3%, p < 0.02) and a decrease in percent molar cholic acid 32% +/- 2.2% vs 40% +/- 1.3%, p < 0.03) and chenodeoxycholic acid (34% +/- 3% vs 41% +/- 1.8%, p < 0.03), compared with controls; patients also had greater percent molar biliary cholesterol. A linear relationship (r2 = 0.6324, p = 0.0012) between biliary deoxycholic acid and small bowel transit time was found. Residual gallbladder volumes were larger in cholesterol gallstone patients (11.38 +/- 1.27 vs 7.55 +/- 0.39 ml, p < 0.04), whereas basal gallbladder volumes, although higher

  1. Changes in microbial ecology after fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent C. difficile infection affected by underlying inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sahil; Vazquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; González, Antonio; Weiss, Sophie; Schmidt, Bradley; Muñiz-Pedrogo, David A; Rainey, John F; Kammer, Patricia; Nelson, Heidi; Sadowsky, Michael; Khoruts, Alexander; Farrugia, Stefan L; Knight, Rob; Pardi, Darrell S; Kashyap, Purna C

    2017-05-15

    Gut microbiota play a key role in maintaining homeostasis in the human gut. Alterations in the gut microbial ecosystem predispose to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and gut inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from a healthy donor can restore gut microbial diversity and pathogen colonization resistance; consequently, it is now being investigated for its ability to improve inflammatory gut conditions such as IBD. In this study, we investigated changes in gut microbiota following FMT in 38 patients with CDI with or without underlying IBD. There was a significant change in gut microbial composition towards the donor microbiota and an overall increase in microbial diversity consistent with previous studies after FMT. FMT was successful in treating CDI using a diverse set of donors, and varying degrees of donor stool engraftment suggesting that donor type and degree of engraftment are not drivers of a successful FMT treatment of CDI. However, patients with underlying IBD experienced an increased number of CDI relapses (during a 24-month follow-up) and a decreased growth of new taxa, as compared to the subjects without IBD. Moreover, the need for IBD therapy did not change following FMT. These results underscore the importance of the existing gut microbial landscape as a decisive factor to successfully treat CDI and potentially for improvement of the underlying pathophysiology in IBD. FMT leads to a significant change in microbial diversity in patients with recurrent CDI and complete resolution of symptoms. Stool donor type (related or unrelated) and degree of engraftment are not the key for successful treatment of CDI by FMT. However, CDI patients with IBD have higher proportion of the original community after FMT and lack of improvement of their IBD symptoms and increased episodes of CDI on long-term follow-up.

  2. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  3. Effect of 50% distal small bowel resection on gastric emptying in Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A W; Moossa, A R; Skinner, D B

    1977-01-01

    The effect of bowel resection, sufficient to cause gastric secretory changes, on gastric emptying is unknown. Gastric evacuation was characterized in 8 Rhesus monkeys by a modification of George's double sampling test meal. Fifty per cent distal small bowel resection was then performed. Gastric emptying was again studied at 6 weeks and 6 months. The rate constant fell from -0.00289 +/- 0.000467 (+/-1 SEM) to -0.00232 +/- 0.00106 during the early phase, but role to -0.00308 +/- 0.00186 by 6 months, neither value being statistically different from the preoperative values. T1/2 rose from 125.2 +/- 19.2 mins to 367 +/- 173.4 mins by 6 weeks and to 380.9 +/- 161.6 mins by the end of the experiments. Corresponding values for T were: control period 425.8 +/- 63.2 mins, early phase 1223 +/- 589 mins and late phase 1245.9 +/- 529.6 mins. None of these changes were statistically significant. Alterations in emptying time within each animal were consistent at the two postoperative phases. Although the two animals showing acceleration of evacuation were those with least change in secretion, compensation for the observed increase in output of gastric juice did not materially alter the results. PMID:402124

  4. Microscopic polyangiitis: Atypical presentation with extensive small bowel necrosis, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segraves, Justin M; Iyer, Vivek N

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an uncommon systemic vasculitis of varying severity that is associated with myeloperoxidase (MPO) and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic (p-ANCA) antibodies. The most commonly affected organs are the lungs and kidneys. We report on a very unusual case of microscopic polyangiitis presenting with severe mesenteric ischemia in addition to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and acute renal failure. The patient was initially diagnosed with acute pancreatitis at an outside facility given his severe abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes. Further investigations after transfer to our facility determined that the patient was actually suffering from a severe exacerbation of previously diagnosed microscopic polyangiitis. He quickly developed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) necessitating intubation and acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring dialysis. He subsequently developed mesenteric ischemia and bowel necrosis resulting in emergent laparotomy and extensive small bowel resection. Physicians need to be aware that microscopic polyangiitis can very rarely present with severe involvement of the abdominal viscera and mesenteric vessels. Severe disease necessitates the use of high dose IV steroids, rituximab or cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange (PLEX).

  5. High-Protein Diet Improves Postoperative Weight Gain After Massive Small-Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Raphael C.; Choi, Pamela M.; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a morbid clinical condition that results from massive small-bowel resection (SBR). After SBR, there is a dramatic weight loss in the acute postoperative period. Our aim was to determine the impact of a high-protein diet (HPD) on weight gain and body composition in mice after SBR. Methods C57BL/6 mice underwent 50 % proximal SBR. Postoperatively, mice were randomly selected to receive standard rodent liquid diet (LD) (n=6) or an isocaloric HPD (n=9) for 28 days. Mice weights were recorded daily. Body composition analyses were obtained weekly. Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons with p<0.05 considered significant. Results Mice that were fed HPD after SBR returned to baseline weight on average at postoperative day (POD) 8 versus mice that were fed LD that returned to baseline weight on average at POD 22. Total fat mass and lean mass were significantly greater by POD 14 within the HPD group. Both groups of mice demonstrated normal structural adaptation. Conclusion HPD results in greater weight gain and improved body composition in mice after SBR. This finding may be clinically important for patients with SBS since improved weight gain may reduce the time needed for parenteral nutrition. PMID:25519080

  6. [Post-recurrence survival after surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer with local recurrence].

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Hideoki; Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Tsuji, Fumio; Ebisui, Chikara; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of 192 consecutive patients with local recurrence after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer NSCLC). The initial local recurrent site was the resection stump in 5 patients the chest wall in 3 patients, mediastinum in 1 patient, and diaphragm in 1 patient), and the hilar and/or mediastinal lymph node (HMLN) in 17 patients. The sites of distant metastasis were the lungs in 10 patients, pleura in 4 patients, brain in 7 patients, liver in 5 patients, bone in 4 patients, and other sites in 4 patients. Treatments after initial recurrence included surgery in 2 patients, radiotherapy in 5 patients, chemotherapy in 9 patients, and chemo-radiotherapy in 5 patients. Only 1 patient received supportive care. The response to radiotherapy was a complete response (R) in 1 patient, partial response (PR) in 5 patients, stable disease (SD )in 3 patients, and progressive disease (PD )in 1 patient. The best response of all lines of chemotherapy was CR in 3 patients, PR in 4 patients, SD in 3 patients, and PD in 4 patients. The median post-recurrence survival (PRS) time with local recurrence was better than that with distant metastasis (23 vs 14 months); however, the best PRS was obtained in patients with recurrence in the lungs (29 months). A CR for more than 2 years was obtained in 1 patient after surgery, in 1 patient after radiotherapy, and in 2 patients after chemotherapy. Although local recurrence of resected NSCLC can be potentially controlled by using local treatments - such as surgery and radiotherapy - or systemic chemotherapy, curative aggressive treatment should be considered when required.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in patients with small bowel transplantation: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Sait Murat; Kılınç, Selçuk; Kebapçı, Eyüp; Tuğmen, Cem; Gürkan, Alp; Baran, Maşallah; Kurtulmuş, Yusuf; Olmez, Mustafa; Karaca, Cezmi

    2014-07-07

    To study the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy on the prevention of acute rejection and graft vs host disease following small bowel transplantation. In our transplantation center, 6 isolated intestinal transplants have been performed with MSC therapy since 2009. The primary reasons for transplants were short gut syndrome caused by surgical intestine resection for superior mesenteric artery thrombosis (n = 4), Crohn's disease (n = 1) and intestinal aganglionosis (n = 1). Two of the patients were children. At the time of reperfusion, the first dose of MSCs cultured from the patient's bone marrow was passed into the transplanted intestinal artery at a dose of 1000000 cells/kg. The second and third doses of MSCs were given directly into the mesenteric artery through the arterial anastomosis using an angiography catheter on day 15 and 30 post-transplant. The median follow-up for these patients was 10.6 mo (min: 2 mo-max: 30 mo). Three of the patients developed severe acute rejection. One of these patients did not respond to bolus steroid therapy. Although the other two patients did respond to anti-rejection treatment, they developed severe fungal and bacterial infections. All of these patients died in the 2(nd) and 3(rd) months post-transplant due to sepsis. The remaining patients who did not have acute rejection had good quality of life with no complications observed during the follow-up period. In addition, their intestinal grafts were functioning properly in the 13(th), 25(th) and 30(th) month post-transplant. The patients who survived did not encounter any problems related to MSC transplantation. Although this is a small case series and not a randomized study, it is our opinion that small bowel transplantation is an effective treatment for intestinal failure, and MSC therapy may help to prevent acute rejection and graft vs host disease following intestinal transplantation.

  8. Small bowel volvulus after transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair due to improper use of V-Loc™ barbed absorbable wire – do we always “read the instructions first”?

    PubMed Central

    Filser, Joerg; Reibetanz, Joachim; Krajinovic, Katica; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Dietz, Ulrich Andreas; Seyfried, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transabdominal preperitoneal endoscopic hernia repair (TAPP) is part of primary surgical health care. While both, the reported recurrence rate and procedure specific morbidity are consistently low, rare serious complications occur. Presentiation of case A 36-year-old male patient developed bowel obstruction three days after both-sided TAPP for inguinal hernia repair. A computer tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a small bowel volvulus in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen requiring urgent revisional surgery. Intraoperatively, the small bowel and its mesenterial vessels were found to be twisted around a 5 cm long V-Loc™ barbed absorbable suturing wire. After successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis, removal of the wire and detorquing of the bowel conglomerate, resection of small intestine was not necessary. The patient's further postoperative recovery was uneventful. Discussion Due to the barbed configuration of the V-Loc™ wire, a gapless continuous suturing of the peritoneum without laparoscopic knotting is easily and fast to accomplish. In this case the recommendation of the manufacturer to shorten the wire was not strictly followed and neither had the suture stump been extraperitonealized in order to avoid such rare complications. Conclusion Surgeons need to be aware of relevant “tricks and traps” of routinely performed procedures and have to know all tools and material they use very well. This case may therefore increase our attention when it comes to little things which actually do matter. PMID:25704567

  9. Operative versus non-operative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hajibandeh, Shahab; Hajibandeh, Shahin; Panda, Nilanjan; Khan, Rao Muhammad Asaf; Bandyopadhyay, Samik Kumar; Dalmia, Sanjay; Malik, Sohail; Huq, Zahirul; Mansour, Moustafa

    2017-09-01

    To investigate outcomes of operative and non-operative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (SBO). We performed a systematic review in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement standards. We conducted a search of electronic information sources to identify all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies investigating outcomes of operative versus non-operative management of patients with adhesive SBO. We used the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa scale to assess the risk of bias of RCTs and observational studies, respectively. Fixed-effect or random-effects models were applied to calculate pooled outcome data. We found one RCT, two prospective and three retrospective observational studies, enrolling a total of 876 patients. The analyses showed that operative management of adhesive SBO was associated with a lower risk of future recurrence [odds ratio (OR) 0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.76, P = 0.0005] but a higher risk of mortality [risk difference (RD) 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.06, P = 0.01] and complications (OR 5.39, 95% CI 2.97-9.78, P < 0.00001). There was no difference in need for surgical re-intervention rate (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.35-1.47, P = 0.36) and length of stay [mean difference (MD) 5.07, 95% CI -2.36-12.49, P = 1.0] between operative and non-operative managements. The baseline suspicion of strangulation was a major confounding factor. When the baseline suspicion of strangulation was higher in the operative group, the risk of mortality (RD 0.04, 95% CI 0.02-0.07, P = 0.0006) and complications (OR 8.14, 95% CI 4.16-15.94, P = 0.00001) were higher in the operative group but the risk of recurrence was lower (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.43-0.90, P = 0.01). When the baseline suspicion of strangulation was low in both groups, there was no difference in any of the outcomes except recurrence (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02-0.37, P = 0.0009) which was lower in the

  10. Small Bowel Carcinomas in Coeliac or Crohn's Disease: Clinico-pathological, Molecular, and Prognostic Features. A Study From the Small Bowel Cancer Italian Consortium.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Alessandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Furlan, Daniela; Klersy, Catherine; Grillo, Federica; Fiocca, Roberto; Mescoli, Claudia; Rugge, Massimo; Nesi, Gabriella; Fociani, Paolo; Sampietro, Gianluca; Ardizzone, Sandro; Luinetti, Ombretta; Calabrò, Antonio; Tonelli, Francesco; Volta, Umberto; Santini, Donatella; Caio, Giacomo; Giuffrida, Paolo; Elli, Luca; Ferrero, Stefano; Latella, Giovanni; Ciardi, Antonio; Caronna, Roberto; Solina, Gaspare; Rizzo, Aroldo; Ciacci, Carolina; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Salemme, Marianna; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Cannizzaro, Renato; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Biancone, Livia; Monteleone, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; Santeusanio, Giuseppe; Macciomei, Maria C; D'Incà, Renata; Perfetti, Vittorio; Sandri, Giancarlo; Silano, Marco; Florena, Ada M; Giannone, Antonino G; Papi, Claudio; Coppola, Luigi; Usai, Paolo; Maccioni, Antonio; Astegiano, Marco; Migliora, Paola; Manca, Rachele; Martino, Michele; Trapani, Davide; Cerutti, Roberta; Alberizzi, Paola; Riboni, Roberta; Sessa, Fausto; Paulli, Marco; Solcia, Enrico; Corazza, Gino R

    2017-08-01

    An increased risk of small bowel carcinoma [SBC] has been reported in coeliac disease [CD] and Crohn's disease [CrD]. We explored clinico-pathological, molecular, and prognostic features of CD-associated SBC [CD-SBC] and CrD-associated SBC [CrD-SBC] in comparison with sporadic SBC [spo-SBC]. A total of 76 patients undergoing surgical resection for non-familial SBC [26 CD-SBC, 25 CrD-SBC, 25 spo-SBC] were retrospectively enrolled to investigate patients' survival and histological and molecular features including microsatellite instability [MSI] and KRAS/NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, HER2 gene alterations. CD-SBC showed a significantly better sex-, age-, and stage-adjusted overall and cancer-specific survival than CrD-SBC, whereas no significant difference was found between spo-SBC and either CD-SBC or CrD-SBC. CD-SBC exhibited a significantly higher rate of MSI and median tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes [TIL] than CrD-SBC and spo-SBC. Among the whole SBC series, both MSI─which was the result of MLH1 promoter methylation in all but one cases─and high TIL density were associated with improved survival at univariable and stage-inclusive multivariable analysis. However, only TILs retained prognostic power when clinical subgroups were added to the multivariable model. KRAS mutation and HER2 amplification were detected in 30% and 7% of cases, respectively, without prognostic implications. In comparison with CrD-SBC, CD-SBC patients harbour MSI and high TILs more frequently and show better outcome. This seems mainly due to their higher TIL density, which at multivariable analysis showed an independent prognostic value. MSI/TIL status, KRAS mutations and HER2 amplification might help in stratifying patients for targeted anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a rare twist: small-bowel ischemia and necrosis secondary to knotting of peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; Moftakhar, Roham; Munoz, Lorenzo F

    2014-09-01

    Small-bowel ischemia and necrosis due to knotting of the peritoneal catheter is an extremely rare complication related to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS). A 3-month-old girl, with a history of Chiari II malformation and myelomeningocele (MM) after undergoing right occipital VPS insertion and MM repair at birth, presented to the emergency department with a high-grade fever. Examination of a CSF sample obtained via shunt tap raised suspicion for the presence of infection. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, and subsequently the VPS was removed and an external ventricular drain was placed. Intraoperatively, as attempts at pulling the distal catheter from the scalp incision were met with resistance, the distal catheter was cut and left in the abdomen while the remainder of the shunt system was successfully removed. While the patient was awaiting definitive shunt revision surgery to replace the VPS, she developed abdominal distension due to small-bowel obstruction. An emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed a knot in the distal catheter looping around and strangulating the distal ileum, causing small-bowel ischemia and necrosis in addition to the obstruction. A small-bowel resection with ileostomy was performed, with subsequent placement of ventriculoatrial shunt for treatment of hydrocephalus. The authors report this exceedingly rare clinical scenario to highlight the fact that any retained distal catheter must be carefully managed with immediate abdominal exploration to remove the distal catheter to avoid bowel necrosis as pulling of a knotted peritoneal catheter may strangulate the bowel and cause ischemia, with significant clinical morbidity and possible mortality.

  12. Assessment of Bowel Wall Enhancement for the Diagnosis of Intestinal Ischemia in Patients with Small Bowel Obstruction: Value of Adding Unenhanced CT to Contrast-enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Anh Minh; Corno, Lucie; Beaussier, Hélène; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Millet, Ingrid; Hodel, Jérôme; Taourel, Patrice; Chatellier, Gilles; Zins, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine whether adding unenhanced computed tomography (CT) to contrast material-enhanced CT improves the diagnostic performance of decreased bowel wall enhancement as a sign of ischemia complicating mechanical small bowel obstruction (SBO). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived the requirement for informed consent. Two gastrointestinal radiologists independently performed retrospective assessments of 164 unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT studies from 158 consecutive patients (mean age, 71.2 years) with mechanical SBO. The reference standard was the intraoperative and/or histologic diagnosis (in 80 cases) or results from clinical follow-up in patients who did not undergo surgery (84 cases). Decreased bowel wall enhancement was evaluated with contrast-enhanced images then and both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images 1 month later. Diagnostic performance of decreased bowel wall enhancement and confidence in the diagnosis were compared between the two readings by using McNemar and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed by using κ statistics and compared with bootstrapping. Results Ischemia was diagnosed in 41 of 164 (25%) episodes of SBO. For both observers, adding unenhanced images improved decreased bowel wall enhancement sensitivity (observer 1: 46.3% [19 of 41] vs 65.8% [27 of 41], P = .02; observer 2: 56.1% [23 of 41] vs 63.4% [26 of 41], P = .45), Youden index (from 0.41 to 0.58 for observer 1 and from 0.42 to 0.61 for observer 2), and confidence score (P < .001 for both). Specificity significantly increased for observer 2 (84.5% [104 of 123] vs 94.3% [116 of 123], P = .002), and interobserver agreement significantly increased, from moderate (κ = 0.48) to excellent (κ = 0.89; P < .0001). Conclusion Adding unenhanced CT to contrast-enhanced CT improved the sensitivity, diagnostic confidence, and interobserver agreement of the diagnosis of ischemia

  13. Polyarthritis and massive small bowel bleed: An unusual combination in scrub typhus.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Nayyar; Titus, Solomon; Basheer, Aneesh; George, Sanjoy; George, Sanjoy; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Nair, Shashikala; Alexander, Thomas; Ramdas, Anita; Periyasamy, Sivakumar; Anitha, Patricia; Kanungo, Reba

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by the intracellular parasite Orientia tsutsugamushi. Although most cases present with mild symptoms and signs and recover spontaneously, some cases can be severe with multi-organ dysfunction and a protracted course, which may be fatal if left untreated. Apart from fever and constitutional symptoms, atypical presentations allow this disease to mimic several common conditions. We report a case of scrub typhus in an 18-year-old male who presented with severe polyarthritis involving all large joints and a massive lower gastrointestinal bleed from ulcers in the terminal ileum, secondary to vasculitis in the small bowel. This combination of pathologies has not previously been reported in cases of scrub typhus. The patient improved following surgical intervention and specific anti-rickettsial therapy with azithromycin.

  14. A rare case of blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with small bowel perforation from air bags.

    PubMed

    Liverani, A; Pezzatini, M; Conte, S; Mari, F; Milillo, A; Gasparrini, M; Marino, G; Catracchia, V; -Favi, F

    2009-05-01

    Vehicle collisions represent more than 75% of mechanism of blunt abdominal trauma. In spite of the incomparable improvement of car safety devices, recent studies pointed out that the air bags might cause injuries, specially when it is not associated with seatbelt. In fact, some studies pointed out that crash victims using air bags alone have increased injury severity, hospitalisations, thoracoabdominal procedure, and rehabilitation. Some of the most frequently injured organs reported from air bag deployment are the liver (38%), the spleen (23%) and digestive system (17%). Injury of the hollow viscera are far less common. In particular, blunt abdominal trauma resulting in small bowel perforation is an infrequent lesion. These injuries are difficult to diagnose because specific signs are poor and a delay in treatment increases mortality and morbidity of the patients. We describe a case of thoracoabdominal trauma that occurred during a head-on collision after an air bag deployment without seatbelt use.

  15. The problems of massive small bowel resection and difficulties encountered in management.

    PubMed Central

    Barros D'Sa, A. A.; Parks, T. G.; Roy, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Massive small bowel resection is imperative in the management of several pathological conditions and is accompanied by high operative mortality. In those that survive, serious nutritional disturbances are inevitable. Intestinal adaptation is said to occur but cannot be relied upon. Long-term parenteral nutrition is problematical and often unsuccessful. Many surgical procedures have been adopted in an effort to improve prognosis and have been found wanting. Controlled experimental studies in the use of reversed segments and a limited number of reported clinical cases using the method after massive resection suggest that this technique may improve the function of the residual intestine to such an extent that other supportive measures are unnecessary. PMID:97646

  16. 131 I-MIBG Therapy in a Metastatic Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Behruz; Makis, William; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B; Morrish, Don

    2017-02-24

    Systemic radioisotope therapy with I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-MIBG) is an effective form of targeted therapy for neuroendocrine tumors. One of the absolute contraindications to administering I-MIBG therapy listed in the 2008 European Association of Nuclear Medicine guidelines is renal insufficiency requiring dialysis, although this contraindication is not evidence based. We describe a 68-year-old woman with a metastatic small bowel neuroendocrine tumor who developed renal insufficiency requiring hemodialysis. Imaging and dosimetry with I-MIBG were performed and showed that the radiation doses to the whole body and lungs were within safe limits. She was treated with 1820 MBq of I-MIBG with no short-term adverse reactions.

  17. Point-of-care ultrasonography for the diagnosis of small bowel obstruction in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Joshua; Stone, Michael B; Kimberly, Heidi H; Rempell, Joshua S

    2015-03-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common cause of acute abdominal pain presenting to the emergency department (ED). Although the literature is limited, point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) has been found to have superior diagnostic accuracy for SBO compared to plain radiography; however, it is rarely used in North America for this. We present the case of a middle-aged man who presented with abdominal pain where POCUS by the emergency physician early in the hospital course expedited the diagnosis of SBO and led to earlier surgical consultation. The application of POCUS for SBO is easily learned and applied in the ED. POCUS for SBO may obviate the need for plain radiography and expedite patient care.

  18. Graft-versus-host disease after liver and small bowel transplantation in a child

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jorge; Todo, Satoru; Green, Michael; Yunis, Eduardo; Schoner, David; Kocoshis, Samuel; Furukawa, Hiro; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Tzakis, Andreas; Bueno, Javier; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    An 8-month-old child with an immunodeficiency disorder characterized by abnormal lymphocyte function and by low IgG and IgA levels had combined liver and small bowel transplantation under tacrolimus and steroid immunosuppression for the treatment of short gut syndrome and hepatic cirrhosis. The patient developed an early postoperative episode of Pnemocystis carinii pneumonia, and a subsequent surgical complication, prompting discontinuance of tacrolimus. A skin rash eventually shown to be graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in the flank on the 12th post-transplant day and gradually became generalized. Peritonitis, sepsis, multisystem organ failure including the liver allograft led to death on the 23rd post-operative day. The mechanisms leading to post-transplant GVHD under the specific circumstances in this case are discussed. PMID:9361921

  19. Freeze-fracture study of the filamentous, segmented microorganism attached to the murine small bowel.

    PubMed Central

    Snellen, J E; Savage, D C

    1978-01-01

    A freeze-fracture study has provided new information about the filamentous, segmented microorganism known to live in the murine small bowel. The intracellular bodies produced by this microbe appear to arise by a modified sporogenesis so that they are enclosed in an envelopment membrane at least prior to release by the filament mother cell. At least some of the intracellular bodies divide while still within the mother cell, suggesting a reproductive role for these structures. The host epithelial membrane remains intact at the site of attachment, but does appear to have a reduced concentration of intramembrane particles. Changes in the host cytoplasm adjacent to the attachment site are documented and interpreted to be a sol-gel transformation which may stabilize the attachment socket. Images PMID:659364

  20. Proximal small bowel obstruction caused by a massive intraluminal thrombus from a stress ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Siddiky, AH; Gupta, P

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of proximal small bowel obstruction caused by an occlusive thrombus as a result of bleeding from a duodenal ulcer, which is likely to be stress induced. Initial presentation was confused as a bleeding duodenal ulcer and resultant ileus. Such reports are incredibly rare in the literature and never has one been reported as a result of a stress ulcer. Obstructive symptoms in the acute postoperative patient may be confused for an ileus but mechanical causes must be excluded. The presence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding must not detract from that possibility. Future identification of an occlusive clot on endoscopy that is impossible to circumnavigate may benefit from intraluminal injection of thrombolytic agents to prevent obstruction but this must be weighed with the risk of exacerbating any bleeding. Clearly a risk versus benefit analysis will be necessary on an individual basis. PMID:24960721

  1. Small bowel angiodysplasia associated with von Willebrand's disease: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Patti, Rosalia; Almasio, Piero L; Buscemi, Salvatore; Tripodo, Claudio; Di Vita, Gaetano

    2006-01-01

    The association between angiodysplasia (AD) and von Willebrand's disease (vWD) was first described by Quick in 1967. The clinical course of patients with vWD and AD is characterized by multiple admissions to hospital for gastrointestinal bleeding, necessitating transfusions of packed red cells, factor VIII, and von Willebrand factor concentrates. The therapeutic management of these patients is difficult. Both medical and endoscopic techniques have been tried, but no treatment modality has been completely successful. We describe the clinical course of a patient affected by vWD, who suffered repeated massive gastrointestinal bleeding caused by small bowel AD. Intestinal resection was the only effective treatment, resulting in complete remission of the gastrointestinal bleeding.

  2. Carcinoid syndrome from small bowel endocrine carcinoma in the absence of hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sayan; Williams, Nigel; Suortamo, Sari; Mahmood, Asif; Oliver, Colin; Hedley, Nicholas; Ray, Pijush

    2011-11-01

    An 80-year-old male patient presented with abdominal pain, paroxysmal diaphoresis, diarrhoea and vomiting. CT scan revealed a small bowel endocrine carcinoma (or 'carcinoid' tumour), but the absence of hepatic disease. The lesion was excised 'en-bloc'. Intra-operatively, there was wide fluctuation in blood pressure associated with tumour manipulation, with hyper- and hypotension. Carcinoid syndrome usually occurs from gastrointestinal tumours when hepatic metastases occur, causing flushing, diarrhoea, bronchoconstriction and murmurs from cardiac valvular lesions. This patient did not have radiological evidence of hepatic metastasis, but the syndrome could still occur with midgut tumours via local invasion of the retroperitoneal circulation, or by action of substances other than serotonin that do not undergo hepatic metabolism.

  3. Vomiting gallstones as a presenting feature of small bowel obstruction secondary to inflammatory stricture.

    PubMed

    McGowan, David Ross; Norris, Joseph M; Zia, Khawaja

    2013-04-22

    Patients presenting with symptoms caused by gallstones are common on a surgical take. Understanding the different ways in which this common condition can present is important to enable the correct diagnosis and thus management plan. The immediate management of gallstones depends on the presenting features and can range from analgesia to surgical intervention. Obstructive cases require intervention, either by ERCP or surgery; the non-obstructive cases are usually left to settle before an elective operation at a later date. In surgery, the presence of a clinical sign where it 'should not be' can be a sign of another underlying pathology and this is the embodiment of surgery-to assimilate seemingly disparate pieces of information and act in a way to treat the cause. This case study highlights a rare presentation of one disease state, in vomiting of gallstones, that raised the diagnosis of another pathology, a small bowel obstruction.

  4. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease.

    PubMed

    Naess, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G E; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A; Boberg, Kirsten M; Karlsen, Tom H; Hov, Johannes R

    2014-11-01

    Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C and HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4, P = 0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4, P = 0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4-65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P = 0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Carter, D; Lang, A; Eliakim, R

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel imaging and endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) underwent a lot of change and advancement in the recent years. Modalities have shifted from gastroscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel follow through, to ileo-colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR), enteroscopy, wireless video capsule endoscopy and balloon assisted enteroscopy. Nowadays endoscopy has a major role in the diagnosis of IBD, assessing its extent, treating some of its complications (stricture, bleeding), assessing the success of various treatments (mucosal healing), and as a predictor of disease course. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new "toy" allowing direct, patient friendly, visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa. It has gained a substantial role in the evaluation of patients with suspected Chron's Disease (CD) and indeterminate colitis. WCE has a high positive predictive value in patients with suspected CD, when one uses more than two of the International Conference on Capsule Endoscopy (ICCE) criteria, and not less important, a very high negative predictive value in patients with suspected CD. Its role in patients with known CD, assessing their disease activity and extent, its role in assessing postsurgical small bowel recurrence and its role in the evaluation of mucosal healing are still unclear. Balloon assisted enteroscopy has established its role as a complementary tool in cases where there is need of biopsies or treatment (dilatation of strictures). The present review will summarize the role of endoscopy in the diagnosis of IBD, in assessing its activity, its management, interventional endoscopy and cancer surveillance.

  6. Impact of introduction of an acute surgical unit on management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Musiienko, Anton M; Shakerian, Rose; Gorelik, Alexandra; Thomson, Benjamin N J; Skandarajah, Anita R

    2016-10-01

    The acute surgical unit (ASU) is a recently established model of care in Australasia and worldwide. Limited data are available regarding its effect on the management of small bowel obstruction. We compared the management of small bowel obstruction before and after introduction of ASU at a major tertiary referral centre. We hypothesized that introduction of ASU would correlate with improved patient outcomes. A retrospective review of prospectively maintained databases was performed over two separate 2-year periods, before and after the introduction of ASU. Data collected included demographics, co-morbidity status, use of water-soluble contrast agent and computed tomography. Outcome measures included surgical intervention, time to surgery, hospital length of stay, complications, 30-day readmissions, use of total parenteral nutrition, intensive care unit admissions and overall mortality. Total emergency admissions to the ASU increased from 2640 to 4575 between the two time periods. A total of 481 cases were identified (225 prior and 256 after introduction of ASU). Mortality decreased from 5.8% to 2.0% (P = 0.03), which remained significant after controlling for confounders with multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.08-0.73, P = 0.012). The proportion of surgically managed patients increased (20.9% versus 32.0%, P = 0.003) and more operations were performed within 5 days from presentation (76.6% versus 91.5%, P = 0.02). Fewer patients received water-soluble contrast agent (27.1% versus 18.4%, P = 0.02), but more patients were investigated with a computed tomography (70.7% versus 79.7%, P = 0.02). The ASU model of care resulted in decreased mortality, shorter time to intervention and increased surgical management. Overall complications rate and length of stay did not change. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Threshold level of NF-kB activation in small bowel ischemic preconditioning procedure.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, A; Rácz, B; Gasz, B; Kalmár-Nagy, K; Horváth, O P; Röth, E

    2006-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), which is obtained by exposure to brief periods of vascular occlusion, improves organ tolerance to prolonged ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the threshold level of NF-kB activation in small intestine during an IPC procedure. Various intestinal IPC were performed on 20 Wistar rats in seven groups: group I (GI, nonpreconditioned); group II (GII, 1-minute ischemia and 1-minute reperfusion); group III (GIII, two cycles of 1-minute ischemia and 1-minute reperfusion); group IV (GIV, 2-minutes ischemia and 2-minutes reperfusion); group V (GV, two cycles of 2-minute ischemia and 2-minute reperfusion); group VI (GVI, 5-minute ischemia and 10-minute reperfusion); group VII (GVII, two cycles of 5-minute ischemia and 10-minute reperfusion). Bowel biopsies were collected after laparotomy (control) as well as at 30, 60, and 120 minutes following IPC. We determined the cytoplasmic and nuclear NF-kB by a chemiluminescence-based ELISA method. Our results showed low, constant NF-kB levels in GI. In the preconditioned groups (GII-GVII), NF-kB was significantly elevated at 30 minutes following IPC (P < .05 vs control). After 1 hour, NF-kB activity decreased to the control level. However, 2 hours after IPC both forms of NF-kB were elevated significantly again, which was independent of the number of IPC cycles (P < .05 vs control). Our experiments revealed that one cycle of 1-minute ischemia and 1-minute reperfusion is a critical threshold level for NF-kB activation during small bowel IPC. Longer and more IPC cycles did not result in further elevation of NF-kB activation.

  8. Initial design of a novel suction enteroscope for endoscopic locomotion in the small bowel (with video).

    PubMed

    Wagh, Mihir S; Montane, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    The upper GI tract and the colon are readily accessible endoscopically, but the small intestine is relatively difficult to evaluate. To demonstrate the feasibility of using suction as a means of locomotion and to assess the initial design of a suction enteroscope. Feasibility study. Animal laboratory. Various prototype suction devices designed in our laboratory were tested in swine small intestine in a force test station. For in vivo experiments in live anesthetized animals, two suction devices (1 fixed tip and 1 movable tip) were attached to the outside of the endoscope. By creating suction in the fixed tip, the endoscope was anchored while the movable tip was advanced. Suction was then applied to the extended tip to attach it to the distal bowel. Suction on the fixed tip was then released and the movable tip with suction pulled back, resulting in advancement of the endoscope. These steps were sequentially repeated. Intestinal segments were sent for pathologic assessment after testing. Force generated ranged from 0.278 to 4.74 N with 64.3 to 88 kPa vacuum pressure. A linear relationship was seen between the pull force and vacuum pressures and tip surface area. During in vivo experiments, the endoscope was advanced in 25-cm segmental increments with sequential suction-and-release maneuvers. No significant bowel trauma was seen on pathology and necropsy. The enteroscopy system requires further refinement. A novel suction enteroscope was designed and tested. Suction tip characteristics played a critical role impacting the functionality of this enteroscopy system. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of recurrences of ovarian cancer in the small pelvis].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, I M; Bulanova, T V; Burenchev, D V

    2005-01-01

    The paper provides the results of small pelvic magnetic resonance tomography (MRI) in 62 patients with ovarian cancer after primary special treatment. Out of them 50 patients were found to have recurrences and metastases of the underlying disease, 12 patients had clinical remission. The study yielded MR signs and MR semiotics of recurrences of ovarian cancer in the small pelvis. The capacities of MRI with low and high intensities of a magnetic field were comparatively studied in the diagnosis of recurrences and metastases of ovarian cancer.

  10. MR enterography-histology comparison in resected pediatric small bowel Crohn disease strictures: can imaging predict fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Daniel T; Dillman, Jonathan R; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud; Heider, Amer; Davenport, Matthew S; Smith, Ethan A; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that can lead to intestinal strictures. The presence of fibrosis within strictures alters optimal management but is not reliably detected by current imaging methods. To correlate the MRI features of surgically resected small-bowel strictures in pediatric Crohn disease with histological inflammation and fibrosis scoring. We included children with Crohn disease who had symptomatic small-bowel strictures requiring surgical resection and had preoperative MR enterography (MRE) within 3 months of surgery (n = 20). Two blinded radiologists reviewed MRE examinations to document stricture-related findings. A pediatric pathologist scored stricture histological specimens for fibrosis (0-4) and inflammation (0-4). MRE findings were correlated with histological data using Spearman correlation (ρ) and exact logistic regression analysis. There was significant positive correlation between histological bowel wall fibrosis and inflammation in resected strictures (ρ = 0.55; P = 0.01). Confluent transmural histological fibrosis was associated with pre-stricture upstream small-bowel dilatation >3 cm at univariate (odds ratio [OR] = 51.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.6- > 999.9; P = 0.0002) and multivariate (OR = 43.4; 95% CI: 6.1- > 999.9; P = 0.0006, adjusted for age) analysis. The degree of bowel wall T2-weighted signal intensity failed to correlate with histological bowel wall fibrosis or inflammation (P-values >0.05). There were significant negative correlations between histological fibrosis score and patient age at resection (ρ = -0.48, P = 0.03), and time from diagnosis to surgery (ρ = -0.73, P = 0.0002). Histological fibrosis and inflammation co-exist in symptomatic pediatric Crohn disease small-bowel strictures and are positively correlated. Pre-stenotic upstream small-bowel dilatation greater than 3 cm is significantly associated with confluent transmural fibrosis.

  11. PillCam small bowel capsule endoscopy gastric passage interval association with patient's complaints and pathological findings: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Eliakim, Rami; Har-Noy, Ofir; Goldstein, Shulamit; Derazne, Estela; Bardan, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged gastric transit interval of small bowel video capsule endoscopy (SBCE) can potentially indicate a motility disorder and disrupt whole small bowel visualization. The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the association of prolonged gastric passage interval with symptoms, anthropometric and laboratory factors, and factors related to the SBCE examination, such as indications and pathological findings. This was a prospective single-center study that included 100 patients who underwent SBCE for any indication. Before the examination, clinical, demographic, and anthropometric data were recorded. The patients filled the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptoms Index (GCSI) questionnaire. We assessed the difference in the study parameters between the prolonged gastric transit (≥45 min) group and the group with a normal gastric transit. Seventy-six patients had normal gastric passage interval and 24 patients had prolonged gastric passage interval. No significant differences were found between the groups in age, sex, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, use of antimotility drugs, indications for the exam and levels of hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, and albumin. Esophageal and small bowel transition intervals did not vary between both groups. The mean score for any GCSI item and the mean total GCSI score did not differ significantly between the normal and the prolonged gastric passage interval groups. There were no significant differences between the groups in pathological findings in the small bowel. In the study population, prolonged SBCE gastric transit interval had no clinical significance, and therefore, probably does not mandate any further gastrointestinal evaluation.

  12. Uncovering the uncertainty: Risk factors and clinical relevance of P1 lesions on small bowel capsule endoscopy of anemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Cúrdia Gonçalves, Tiago; Barbosa, Mara; Rosa, Bruno; Moreira, Maria João; Cotter, José

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify risk factors for P1 lesions on small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) and to describe the natural history of anemic patients with such type of lesions. METHODS One hundred patients were consecutively selected for a case-control analysis performed between 37 cases with P1 lesions and 63 controls with negative SBCE. Age, gender, comorbidities and regular medication were collected. Rebleeding, further investigational studies and death were also analyzed during the follow-up. RESULTS No significant differences on gender, median age or Charlson index were found between groups. Although no differences were found on the use of proton pump inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) was associated with a higher risk of P1 lesions (OR = 12.00, 95%CI: 1.38-104.1). From the 87 patients followed at our center, 39 were submitted to additional studies for investigation of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), and this was significantly more common in those patients with no findings on SBCE (53.7% vs 30.3%, P = 0.033). A total of 29 patients had at least one rebleeding or IDA recurrence episode and 9 patients died of non-anemia related causes but no differences were found between cases and controls. CONCLUSION P1 lesions are commonly found in patients with IDA submitted to SBCE. The use of NSAID seems to be a risk factor for P1 lesions. The outcomes of patients with P1 lesions do not differ significantly from those with P0 lesions or normal SBCE. PMID:27784969

  13. Effects of specific active immunization on tumor recurrence following primary tumor resection in WF rats with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced bowel cancer.

    PubMed

    Ross, D S; Steele, G; Madara, J; Lahey, S J; Ravikumar, T S; Wilson, R E; Munroe, A E; Wright, D; King, V P

    1984-09-01

    Primary gastrointestinal tumors were induced in male WF rats by 16 weekly sc injections of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine [(DMH) CAS: 540-73-8; 20 mg/kg/wk]. Twenty-four to 28 weeks after the start of DMH injections, all rats were surgically explored and gastrointestinal tumors were resected. Rats with no remaining microscopic disease after operation were immunized with one of four tumor isografts. The first isograft, DMH-W163, is a poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma explanted from a colon cancer in a DMH-treated animal. It has been shown to possess antigens that cross-react with other DMH-induced bowel adenocarcinoma isografts. The second isograft, DMH-W49, is a carcinosarcoma explanted from a DMH-treated primary colon cancer. It has intermediate antigenic cross-reactivity with other colon adenocarcinoma isografts in the WF model. The third isograft, DMH-W15, is a sarcoma explanted from a DMH-induced colon cancer that does not possess antigens cross-reactive with other DMH-induced colon adenocarcinomas. The fourth isograft, SPK, is a spontaneous (non-DMH-induced) renal cell carcinoma that is immunogenic but should not contain tissue-type-specific antigens cross-reacting with the bowel cancers. Immunized rats received three sc weekly injections of 1 X 10(3) irradiated cells. Concomitant control rats received no immunization after resection of the primary tumor. Within 24 weeks of primary tumor resection, 12 of 16 (75%) rats not immunized had tumor recurrence. Only 8 of 24 (34%) rats immunized with DMH-W163 had tumor recurrence (P less than .025 compared to controls). Fifty percent of animals (10/20) immunized with the carcinosarcoma DMH-W49 had a recurrence. Animals immunized with the non-cross-reacting DMH-W15 sarcoma isograft had a recurrence rate similar to that of controls (16/20, 75%). The rats immunized with SPK were not protected from recurrence. Twelve of 19 (63%) had a recurrence at or near the suture line within 24 weeks following primary tumor

  14. Transgastric small bowel resection with the new multitasking platform EndoSAMURAI™ for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Karl-Hermann; Breithaupt, Wolfram

    2012-08-01

    Recently, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery has been introduced using flexible endoscopic technology. Traditional endoscopes lack several capabilities that are needed to perform complex surgical procedures safely. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the new multitasking platform for transgastric small bowel resection including dissection of the mesentery and suturing an anastomosis. A new prototype of endoscopic multifunctional platform, EndoSAMURAI™ (ES), was tested. A standardized in vitro setting was established with segments of small bowel and an anastomosis was sutured with the device and compared with that by stapler (ST) and hand-sewn (HS). Leak pressure was measured. In addition, the system was tested in an experimental in vivo situation by performing a transgastric small bowel segmental resection under general anesthesia. Median time to perform an anastomosis in the bench test was 41 min; median leak pressure for the anastomosis by ES was 14 mmHg, by ST 25 mmHg, and HS 15 mmHg. For the in vivo study, the median total procedure time was 110 min and leak pressure 53 mmHg. These results show that the end-to-end small bowel anastomosis can be sutured sufficiently. This study has shown that with a multifunctional platform such as the EndoSAMURAI™, the majority of complex surgical tasks can be performed if technically independently moving instruments can be used via an ergonomic workstation interface that allows for laparoscopy-like maneuvers by the operator. Even with the shortcomings of the prototype, it was possible to perform an anastomosis of the small bowel of acceptable quality within a reasonable time.

  15. Effect of CXCR3/HO-1 genes modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on small bowel transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming-Li; Song, Hong-Li; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Liu, Tao; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2017-06-14

    To investigate whether bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) modified with the HO-1 and CXCR3 genes can augment the inhibitory effect of BMMSCs on small bowel transplant rejection. Lewis rat BMMSCs were cultured in vitro. Third-passage BMMSCs were transduced with the CXCR3/HO-1 genes or the HO-1 gene alone. The rats were divided into six groups and rats in the experimental group were pretreated with BMMSCs 7 d prior to small bowel transplant. Six time points (instant, 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 10 d, and 14 d) (n = 6) were chosen for each group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to observe pathologic rejection, while immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect protein expression. Flow cytometry was used to detect T lymphocytes and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect cytokines. The median survival time of BMMSCs from the CXCR3/HO-1 modified group (53 d) was significantly longer than that of the HO-1 modified BMMSCs group (39 d), the BMMSCs group (26 d), and the NS group (control group) (16 d) (P < 0.05). Compared with BMMSCs from the HO-1 modified BMMSCs, BMMSCs, and NS groups, rejection of the small bowel in the CXCR3/HO-1 modified group was significantly reduced, while the weight of transplant recipients was also significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Furthermore, IL-2, IL-6, IL-17, IFN-γ, and TNF-α levels were significantly decreased and the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β were significantly increased (P < 0.05). BMMSCs modified with the CXCR3 and HO-1 genes can abrogate the rejection of transplanted small bowel more effectively and significantly increase the survival time of rats that receive a small bowel transplant.

  16. Smooth muscle adaptation and recovery of contractility after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wen, Jie; Cai, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that massive small bowel resection (mSBR) compromises the normal intestinal processes of digestion and absorption, and requires an adaptive response to regain full function and reinstate coordinated contractile activity of the circular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate spontaneous contractile activity of circular smooth muscle using the mSBR rat model and to determine the functional role of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in this process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an 80% proximal SBR or sham operation. Markers of adaptation, including villus and microvillus height, were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. Contractility was measured by attaching the distal ileum strips to strain gauge transducers and exposing the tissue to varying doses of the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Protein expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR in intestinal smooth muscle (ISM) were detected by Western blot. Following mSBR, the ISM showed perturbed spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude and slow frequency by muscle strip test. However, by two weeks after mSBR, the contractile function of circular smooth muscle was found to have returned to normal levels. Protein expression of M(2)-mAChR was down-regulated following mSBR but up-regulated during the adaptive process when contractile activity of circular smooth muscle was regained. These results indicate that smooth muscle contractility was spontaneously restored in rats following mSBR, and involved the acetylcholine receptors M(2) and M(3). Thus, the disrupted contractile response of smooth muscle in short bowel syndrome may be corrected by therapeutic intervention to restore the expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR to pre-mSBR levels.

  17. Plasma citrulline: A marker of enterocyte mass in villous atrophy-associated small bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Crenn, Pascal; Vahedi, Kouroche; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Cynober, Luc; Matuchansky, Claude; Messing, Bernard

    2003-05-01

    Plasma citrulline, a nonprotein amino acid produced by enterocytes, was suggested as a marker of remnant enterocyte mass in patients with short bowel. Our objective was to evaluate citrulline as a marker of severity and extent of villous atrophy in patients without intestinal resection. Forty-two patients with celiac disease and 10 patients with non-celiac villous atrophy disease were studied by plasma postabsorptive citrulline and biological dosages, biopsies of proximal (duodenojejunal) small bowel and distal ileum (n = 25), or measurement of vitamin B(12) absorption (n = 4). Nine patients were reevaluated after following a gluten-free diet for 1 year. Controls were 51 healthy subjects and 10 severely malnourished patients with anorexia nervosa with no intestinal mucosal abnormalities. Plasma citrulline concentration was lower (P < 0.001) in patients with villous atrophy (24 +/- 13 micromol/L) than in healthy subjects (40 +/- 10 micromol/L) and patients with anorexia nervosa (39 +/- 9 micromol/L). Three thresholds were individualized: <10 micromol/L for patients with diffuse total villous atrophy (n = 10), 10-20 micromol/L for patients with proximal-only total villous atrophy (n = 12), and 20-30 micromol/L for patients with partial villous atrophy (n = 10). Plasma citrulline concentration was correlated to the severity and extent of villous atrophy (r = 0.81; P < 0.001) and to albuminemia (r = 0.47; P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that plasma citrulline concentration was the best biological variable to predict villous atrophy. Following a 1-year gluten-free diet, plasma citrulline concentration increased in histologically responsive (n = 6) but not in unresponsive (n = 3) patients. In patient villous atrophy diseases, plasma citrulline concentration may prove to be a simple and reliable marker of reduced enterocyte mass.

  18. A 17-year-old male with a Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumor: flushing differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Forero Molina, Maria Alejandra; Garcia, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-Devia, Deyanira; García-Duperly, Rafael; Vera, Alonso

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are heterogeneous neoplasms that originate from cells with a secretory function. Small bowel NETs (SB-NETs) are related to serotonin hypersecretion which causes: flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, bronchoconstriction and heart involvement, also known as carcinoid syndrome (CS). CS can be confused with an allergic reaction and thus should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the allergy consult. We present the case of a pediatric patient initially referred under the suspicion of food allergies. We present the case of a 17-year-old male with evanescent non-pruriginous erythematous lesions- flushing that appeared with food consumption, associated with conjunctival injection, warmth and diaphoresis after the lesions disappeared. He denied abdominal pain, diarrhea, cough or wheezing. The 24-h urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) excretion was elevated. The CT scan showed thickening of the distal ileum and multiple lesions on both hepatic lobules and the colonoscopy revealed a tumor in the ileocecal valve. Hepatic and intestinal biopsies reported a well-differentiated NET of the ileocecal valve with hepatic metastasis. He was started on octreotide and underwent a wide hepatectomy and right hemicolectomy with improvement of symptoms. NETs can present as carcinoid syndrome (flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, wheezing), which constitutes vague symptomatology and represents a challenging diagnosis for physicians. They can be confused with an allergic reaction and the allergist should consider it as a differential diagnosis. Accurate diagnostic tests will help to diagnose NETs earlier and potentially prevent carcinoid heart disease, bowel obstruction, and improve quality of life and mortality in these patients.

  19. Elevated ST2 Distinguishes Incidences of Pediatric Heart and Small Bowel Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, L.R.; Lott, J. M.; Isse, K.; Lesniak, A.; Landsittel, D.; Demetris, A. J.; Sun, Y.; Mercer, D. F.; Webber, S. A.; Zeevi, A.; Fischer, R. T.; Feingold, B.; Turnquist, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated serum soluble (s) Suppressor of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is observed during cardiovascular and inflammatory bowel diseases. To ascertain whether modulated ST2 levels signify heart (HTx) or small bowel transplant (SBTx) rejection, we quantified sST2 in serially obtained pediatric HTx (n=41) and SBTx recipient (n=18) sera. At times of biopsy-diagnosed HTx rejection (cellular and/or antibody-mediated), serum sST2 was elevated compared to rejection-free time points (1714±329 vs. 546.5±141.6 pg/ml; P=0.0002). SBTx recipients also displayed increased serum sST2 during incidences of rejection (7536±1561 vs. 2662±543.8 pg/ml; P=0.0347). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that serum sST2>600 pg/ml could discriminate time points of HTx rejection and non-rejection (Area under the curve (AUC)=0.724±0.053; P=0.0003). ROC analysis of SBTx measures revealed a similar discriminative capacity (AUC=0.6921±0.0820; P=0.0349). Quantitative evaluation of both HTx and SBTx biopsies revealed rejection significantly increased allograft ST2 expression. Pathway and Network Analysis of biopsy data pinpointed ST2 in the dominant pathway modulated by rejection and predicted TNF-α and IL-1β as upstream activators. In total, our data indicate that alloimmune-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines increase ST2 during rejection. They also demonstrate that routine serum sST2 quantification, potentially combined with other biomarkers, should be investigated further to aid in the non-invasive diagnosis of rejection. PMID:26663613

  20. Third place 1989 Alpha Cradle Award winner. Technical aspects in the use of "belly boards" for small bowel minimization.

    PubMed

    Frank, L E; Rowley, L A; Shanahan, T G; Mehta, M P

    1990-03-01

    The position in which a patient is treated for pelvic irradiation has been shown to have dramatic significance in regard to the volume of small bowel within the treatment field. Previous studies in the literature have repeatedly supported the fact that volume may be the leading factor in both acute and chronic morbidity. We have prospectively evaluated and treated 30 patients utilizing a custom-made polyurethane foam and styrofoam "belly board" with a dropout cut from the level of the xyphoid process to the superior border of the treatment field, specifically designed to allow maximal superior and anterior displacement of small bowel by bladder distention and gravity, while allowing reliable daily reproducibility, accurate immobilization and equally important, increased patient comfort and compliance. By evaluating all patients (in both the supine position alone, and prone in the "Belly Board") with a dedicated treatment planning CT scanner, we have been able to achieve 80-100% reduction in the volume of small bowel within the radiation portals. We will discuss data on the technical set-up, cost, and variations which allow the "Belly Board" to be specifically tailored for use when treating other intraabdominal sites. This technique is simple, inexpensive, highly reproducible, and permits maximal bowel displacement outside the treatment fields.

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Small Bowel Cancers Using Radioactive Gold Nanoparticles and Wireless Fluorescence Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, M.; Qaradaghi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic and diagnosis properties of radioactive gold nanoparticle (198-AuNPs) cause them to be suitable for detection and treatment of tumors. Objective Electrical and optical properties of PEG-198AuNPs were examined in this paper. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-198 AuNPs can be used for treatment and diagnosis of small intestine tumors. Methods Wireless fluorescence capsule endoscopy will be able to detect emission lights of triggered Au by external light. First, the output electrical field was calculated by DDSCAT software. Secondly, tumor and distribution of PEG-198 gold nanoparticles were modeled using Monte Carlo simulation and finally dose delivered throughout a solid tumor when the PEG-198 gold nanoparticles linked to each cell was calculated. Results Polyethylene Glycol functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) possess optimized sizes (30 nm core diameter and 70 nm hydrodynamic diameters) to target individual tumor cells. Surface distribution to receive doses of up to 50Gy was simulated.  Activities and absorbed doses by the tumors with 0.25cm and 0.5cm radius were 187.9mCi and 300mCi and 72 and 118 Gy,respectively. Conclusion Therapeutic and diagnosis properties of 198-AuNPs show that it can be used for treatment and detection of small bowel tumors in early stage of growing. PMID:27026950

  2. The role of enteral fat as a modulator of body composition after small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pamela M; Sun, Raphael C; Sommovilla, Joshua; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Khil, Jaclyn; Erwin, Christopher R; Guo, Jun; Warner, Brad W

    2014-08-01

    After massive small bowel resection (SBR), a postoperative diet high in fat is associated with enhanced villus growth. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the quantity and composition of enteral fat in structural and metabolic changes after SBR. C57/Bl6 mice underwent a 50% proximal SBR. Mice were then randomized to receive a low-fat diet (12% kcal fat), medium-fat diet (44% kcal fat), or high-fat diet (HFD; 71% kcal fat) ad libitum. In a separate experiment, mice underwent 50% proximal SBR and then were randomized to liquid diets of 42% kcal of fat in which the fat was composed of menhaden oil, milk fat, or olive oil. After 2 weeks, mice underwent body composition analysis and the small intestine was harvested. Mice that ingested the greatest amount of enteral fat (HFD) had the greatest percent lean mass. When the effects of the different kinds of enteral fat were analyzed, mice that consumed menhaden oil had the greatest percent lean mass with the greatest overall retention of preoperative weight. These findings suggest that enteral fat enriched in omega-3 fatty acids may offer clinically relevant metabolic advantages for patients with short gut syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory bowel disease with altered bowel anatomy under conscious sedation without fluoroscopy. Carefully planned stricture therapy with balloon dilation or needle knife stricturotomy can be performed for simple, short, and fibrotic strictures. A multidisciplinary approach involving a team of endoscopist, endoscopy nurse, colorectal surgeon, gastrointestinal pathologist, and gastrointestinal radiologist is important for a safe and effective endoscopy. We attempt to review the aspects that need consideration before the endoscopy, the technique of endoscopy, and briefly the therapies that can be performed during endoscopy of the bowel through an ileostomy, a colostomy, in the diverted large bowel or ileal pouch, and small bowel after stricturoplasty and bowel bypass surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25806847

  4. Arterial hypertension due to fructose ingestion: model based on intermittent osmotic fluid trapping in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Based on recently reported data that fructose ingestion is linked to arterial hypertension, a model of regulatory loops involving the colon role in maintenance of fluid and sodium homeostasis is proposed. In normal digestion of hyperosmolar fluids, also in cases of postprandial hypotension and in patients having the "dumping" syndrome after gastric surgery, any hyperosmolar intestinal content is diluted by water taken from circulation and being trapped in the bowel until reabsorption. High fructose corn sirup (HFCS) soft drinks are among common hyperosmolar drinks. Fructose is slowly absorbed through passive carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion, along the entire small bowel, thus preventing absorption of the trapped water for several hours. Here presented interpretation is that ingestion of hyperosmolar HFCS drinks due to a transient fluid shift into the small bowel increases renin secretion and sympathetic activity, leading to rise in ADH and aldosterone secretions. Their actions spare water and sodium in the large bowel and kidneys. Alteration of colon absorption due to hormone exposure depends on cell renewal and takes days to develop, so the momentary capacity of sodium absorption in the colon depends on the average aldosterone and ADH exposure during few previous days. This inertia in modulation of the colon function can make an individual that often takes HFCS drinks prone to sodium retention, until a new balance is reached with an expanded ECF pool and arterial hypertension. In individuals with impaired fructose absorption, even a higher risk of arterial hypertension can be expected. PMID:20579372

  5. Huge peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the small bowel mesentery at nonage: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Ge, Chun-Lin; Long, Jin; Du, Rui-Xia; Guo, Ke-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (E-EWS/pPNET) is a rare aggressive malignant small round cell tumor. In this report, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who suffered from acute abdominal pain accompanied by hematemesis and melena, and was eventually diagnosed with E-EWS/pPNET. To date, there have been only five reported cases of E-EWS/pPNET of the small bowel including the patient in this report. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a pPNET of the small bowel mesentery at nonage. All these have made this report rare and significant. PMID:27672649

  6. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  7. Small-Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Adhesions After Open or Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smolarek, Sebastian; Shalaby, Mostafa; Paolo Angelucci, Giulio; Missori, Giulia; Capuano, Ilaria; Franceschilli, Luana; Quaresima, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Small-bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common surgical emergency that occurs in 9% of patients after abdominal surgery. Up to 73% are caused by peritoneal adhesions. The primary purpose of this study was to compare the rate of SBOs between patients who underwent laparoscopic (LPS) and those who had open (OPS) colorectal surgery. The secondary reasons were to evaluate the rate of adhesive SBO in a cohort of patients who underwent a range of colorectal resections and to assess risk factors for the development of SBO. Method: This was a retrospective observational cohort study. Data were analyzed from a prospectively collected database and cross checked with operating theater records and hospital patient management systems. Results: During the study period, 707 patients underwent colorectal resection, 350 of whom (49.5%) were male. Median follow-up was 48.3 months. Of the patients included, 178 (25.2%) underwent LPS, whereas 529 (74.8%) had OPS. SBO occurred in 72 patients (10.2%): 20 (11.2%) in the LPS group and 52 (9.8%) in the OPS group [P = .16; hazards ratio (HR) 1.4 95% CI 0.82–2.48] within the study period. Conversion to an open procedure was associated with increased risk of SBO (P = .039; HR 2.82; 95% CI 0.78–8.51). Stoma formation was an independent risk factor for development of SBO (P = .049; HR, 0.63; 95% CI 0.39–1.03). The presence of an incisional hernia in the OPS group was associated with SBO (P = .0003; HR, 2.85; 95% CI 1.44–5.283). There was no difference in SBO between different types of procedures: right colon, left colon, and rectal surgery. Patients who developed early small-bowel obstruction (ESBO) were more often treated surgically compared to late SBO (P = .0001). Conclusion: The use of laparoscopy does not influence the rate of SBO, but conversion from laparoscopic to open surgery is associated with an increased risk of SBO. Stoma formation is associated with a 2-fold increase in SBO. Development of ESBO is

  8. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented.

  9. Assessment of small bowel motility in patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction using cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Kessoku, Takaomi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Inamori, Masahiko; Fujii, Tetsuro; Kawamura, Harunobu; Hata, Yasuo; Manabe, Noriaki; Chiba, Toshimi; Kwee, Thomas C; Haruma, Ken; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takahara, Taro

    2013-07-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare, serious motility disorder, with life-threatening complications over time. However, lack of an established, non-invasive diagnostic method has caused delays in the diagnosis of this intractable disease. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging technique, with a potential to evaluate the motility of the entire bowel. We compared small bowel motility in healthy volunteers, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and those with CIPO, using cine-MRI, and evaluated the usefulness of cine-MRI as a novel diagnostic method for CIPO. Twelve healthy volunteers, IBS patients, and CIPO patients prospectively underwent cine-MRI at 1.5 T. Luminal diameter, contraction ratio, and contraction cycle were measured and compared between the groups. Cine-MRI provided sufficient dynamic images to assess the motility of the entire small bowel. Luminal diameter (mean±s.d.) in CIPO patients was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers and IBS patients (43.4±14.1, 11.1±1.5, and 10.9±1.9 mm, respectively), and contraction ratio was significantly lower in CIPO patients than that in healthy volunteers and IBS patients (17.1±11.0%, 73.0±9.3%, and 74.6±9.4%, respectively). No significant differences were observed in the contraction cycle. This study is the first to assess the clinical utility of cine-MRI in CIPO patients. Cine-MRI clearly detected contractility impairments in CIPO patients. Cine-MRI is noninvasive, radiation-free, and can directly evaluate the entire small bowel peristalsis, and can detect the affected loops at a glance; therefore, it might be extremely useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of CIPO patients in clinical practice.

  10. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and

  11. P.O.P.A. study: prevention of postoperative abdominal adhesions by icodextrin 4% solution after laparotomy for adhesive small bowel obstruction. A prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Di Saverio, Salomone; Pinna, Antonio D

    2012-02-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is an important cause of hospital admission, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and therefore is a substantial burden for healthcare systems worldwide. Icodextrin 4% solution (Adept, Shire Pharmaceuticals, UK) is a high-molecular-weight a-1,4 glucose polymer approved in Europe for use as intraoperative lavage and postoperative instillation to reduce the occurrence of post-surgery intra-abdominal adhesions. The present clinical study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of icodextrin 4% in decreasing the incidence, extent, and severity of adhesions in patients after abdominal surgery for ASBO. The study was a single-center prospective, randomized investigation. The study is designed and conducted in compliance with the principles of Good Clinical Practice regulations. Safety and efficacy of icodextrin 4% in the study group are compared to no anti-adhesion treatment in a parallel control group with blinded evaluation of primary endpoints. Primary endpoints are the evaluation of the therapeutic role of icodextrin 4% in reducing ASBO recurrence incidence and the need of laparotomies for ASBO recurrence, as well as adhesion formation (with evaluation of their incidence, extent, and severity). A sum of 181 patients with ASBO and surgical indication to laparotomy were enrolled and randomized in two groups. Patients were submitted to adhesiolysis with bowel resection if required with or without anastomosis. The first group received traditional treatment (control group), whereas the second group was treated with the addition of icodextrin 4% solution before the abdominal closure. Ninety-one patients were randomized to have icodextrin 4% solution administered intraperitoneally, and 90 patients were randomized to have the traditional treatment. The two study groups were homogeneous regarding their baseline characteristics. The ASBO recurrence rate was 2.19% (2/91) in the icodextrin groups vs 11.11% (10

  12. Oral insulin stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover following massive small bowel resection in a rat and a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Ben Lulu, Shani; Coran, Arnold G; Shehadeh, Naim; Shamir, Raanan; Mogilner, Jorge G; Sukhotnik, Igor

    2012-02-01

    We have recently reported that oral insulin (OI) stimulates intestinal adaptation after bowel resection and that OI enhances enterocyte turnover in correlation with insulin receptor expression along the villus-crypt axis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of OI on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis in a rat model of short bowel syndrome (SBS) and in a cell culture model. Caco-2 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of insulin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by FACS cytometry. Cell viability was investigated using the Alamar Blue technique. Male rats were divided into three groups: Sham rats underwent bowel transection, SBS rats underwent a 75% bowel resection, and SBS-OI rats underwent bowel resection and were treated with OI given in drinking water (1 U/ml) from the third postoperative day. Parameters of intestinal adaptation, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis were determined on day 15. Real time PCR was used to determine the level of bax and bcl-2 mRNA and western blotting was used to determine bax, bcl-2, p-ERK and AKT protein levels. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA test, with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with insulin resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation (twofold increase after 24 h and 37% increase after 48 h) and cell viability (in a dose-dependent manner), but did not change cell apoptosis. In a rat model of SBS, treatment with OI resulted in a significant increase in all parameters of intestinal adaptation. Elevated cell proliferation rate in insulin treated rats was accompanied by elevated AKT and p-ERK protein levels. Decreased cell apoptosis in SBS-INS rats corresponded with a decreased bax/bcl-2 ratio. Oral insulin stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover after massive small bowel resection in a rat model of SBS and a cell culture model.

  13. Appropriateness of the study of iron deficiency anemia prior to referral for small bowel evaluation at a tertiary center

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jaime Pereira; Pinho, Rolando; Silva, Joana; Ponte, Ana; Sousa, Mafalda; Silva, João Carlos; Carvalho, João

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the adequacy of the study of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in real life practice prior to referral to a gastroenterology department for small bowel evaluation. METHODS All consecutive patients referred to a gastroenterology department for small bowel investigation due to iron deficiency anemia, between January 2013 and December 2015 were included. Both patients referred from general practitioners or directly from different hospital departments were selected. Relevant clinical information regarding prior anemia workup was retrospectively collected from medical records. An appropriate pre-referral study was considered the execution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) investigation, colonoscopy with quality standards (recent, total and with adequate preparation) and celiac disease (CD) screening (through serologic testing and/or histopathological investigation). RESULTS A total of 77 patients (58.4% female, mean age 67.1 ± 16.7 years) were included. Most (53.2%) patients were referred from general practitioners, 41.6% from other hospital specialties and 5.2% directly from the emergency department. The mean pre-referral hemoglobin concentration was 8.8 ± 2.0 g/dL and the majority of anemias had microcytic (71.4%) and hypochromic (72.7%) characteristics. 77.9% of patients presented with an incomplete pre-referral study: EGD in 97.4%, with H. pylori investigation in 58.3%, colonoscopy with quality criteria in 63.6%, and CD screening in 24.7%. Patients with an appropriate study at the time of referral were younger (48.7 ± 17.7 vs 72.3 ± 12.3 years, P < 0.001). Small bowel evaluation was ultimately undertaken in 72.7% of patients, with a more frequent evaluation in patients with a quality colonoscopy at referral (78.6% vs 23.8%); P < 0.001 (OR = 11.7, 95%CI: 3.6-38.6). The most common diagnosis regarded as the likely cause of IDA was small bowel angioectasia (18.2%) but additional causes were also found in the upper

  14. How much helpful is the capsule endoscopy for the diagnosis of small bowel lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Osman; Sivri, Bulent; Arslan, Serap; Batman, Figen; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the practically usefulness and diagnostic yield of this new method in a group of patients with suspected small bowel lesions. METHODS: Capsule endoscopic (CE) examination by using M2A capsule endoscope TM (Given Imaging, Yoqneam, Israel) was performed in thirty nine patients (26 males, 13 females) with suspected small intestinal lesions. The composing of the patients was as follows: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in twenty three patients, known Crohn’s disease in 6 patients, in whom CE was used to evaluate the severity and extension of the diseases, chronic diarrhea in 8 patients, abdominal pain in one patient and malignancy in one patient with unknown origin. RESULTS: In two patients CE failed. Different abnormalities were revealed in 26 patients overall. Detection rate of abnormalities was highest among patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the source of bleeding was demonstrated in 17 of 23 patients with obscure bleeding (73.9%). Entero-Behcet was diagnosed in two patients by CE as a source of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. In 6 patients with known Crohn's disease, CE revealed better evaluation of the disease extension. In 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with chronic diarrhea; CE revealed some mucosal abnormalities as the cause of chronic diarrhea. In a patient with unexplained abdominal pain and in a cancer patient with unknown origin, CE examination was normal. CONCLUSION: In our relatively small series, we found that capsule endoscopy is a useful diagnostic tool particularly in diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea and in estimating the extension of Crohn’s disease. PMID:16804980

  15. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  16. Implications of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of capsule endoscopy: A multivariable multicenter study of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Soncini, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    AIM To define the role of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of significant small-bowel lesions. METHODS Small-bowel capsule endoscopy records, prospectively collected from 30 participating centers in the Lombardy Registry from October 2011 to December 2013, were included in the study if the clinical indication was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the capsule reached the cecum. Based on capsule findings, we created two groups: P2 (significant findings) and P0-1 (normal/negligible findings). Groups were compared for age, gender, small-bowel transit time, type of instrument, modality of capsule performance (outpatients vs inpatients), bowel cleanliness, and center volume. RESULTS We retrieved and scrutinized 1,433 out of 2,295 capsule endoscopy records (62.4%) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Patients were 67 ± 15 years old, and 815 (57%) were males. In comparison with patients in the P0-1 group, those in the P2 group (n = 776, 54%) were older (P < 0.0001), had a longer small-bowel transit time (P = 0.0015), and were more frequently examined in low-volume centers (P < 0.001). Age and small-bowel transit time were correlated (P < 0.001), with age as the sole independent predictor on multivariable analysis. Findings of the P2 group were artero-venous malformations (54.5%), inflammatory (23.6%) and protruding (10.4%) lesions, and luminal blood (11.5%). CONCLUSION In this selected, prospectively collected cohort of small-bowel capsule endoscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, a longer small-bowel transit time was associated with a higher detection rate of significant lesions, along with age and a low center volume, with age serving as an independent predictor. PMID:28216977

  17. Implications of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of capsule endoscopy: A multivariable multicenter study of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Soncini, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele

    2017-01-28

    To define the role of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of significant small-bowel lesions. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy records, prospectively collected from 30 participating centers in the Lombardy Registry from October 2011 to December 2013, were included in the study if the clinical indication was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the capsule reached the cecum. Based on capsule findings, we created two groups: P2 (significant findings) and P0-1 (normal/negligible findings). Groups were compared for age, gender, small-bowel transit time, type of instrument, modality of capsule performance (outpatients vs inpatients), bowel cleanliness, and center volume. We retrieved and scrutinized 1,433 out of 2,295 capsule endoscopy records (62.4%) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Patients were 67 ± 15 years old, and 815 (57%) were males. In comparison with patients in the P0-1 group, those in the P2 group (n = 776, 54%) were older (P < 0.0001), had a longer small-bowel transit time (P = 0.0015), and were more frequently examined in low-volume centers (P < 0.001). Age and small-bowel transit time were correlated (P < 0.001), with age as the sole independent predictor on multivariable analysis. Findings of the P2 group were artero-venous malformations (54.5%), inflammatory (23.6%) and protruding (10.4%) lesions, and luminal blood (11.5%). In this selected, prospectively collected cohort of small-bowel capsule endoscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, a longer small-bowel transit time was associated with a higher detection rate of significant lesions, along with age and a low center volume, with age serving as an independent predictor.

  18. Small- bowel mucosal changes and antibody responses after low- and moderate-dose gluten challenge in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the restrictive nature of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients are looking for alternative therapies. While drug-development programs include gluten challenges, knowledge regarding the duration of gluten challenge and gluten dosage is insufficient. We challenged adult celiac patients with gluten with a view to assessing the amount needed to cause some small-bowel mucosal deterioration. Methods Twenty-five celiac disease adults were challenged with low (1-3 g) or moderate (3-5g) doses of gluten daily for 12 weeks. Symptoms, small-bowel morphology, densities of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and celiac serology were determined. Results Both moderate and low amounts of gluten induced small-bowel morphological damage in 67% of celiac patients. Moderate gluten doses also triggered mucosal inflammation and more gastrointestinal symptoms leading to premature withdrawals in seven cases. In 22% of those who developed significant small- intestinal damage, symptoms remained absent. Celiac antibodies seroconverted in 43% of the patients. Conclusions Low amounts of gluten can also cause significant mucosal deterioration in the majority of the patients. As there are always some celiac disease patients who will not respond within these conditions, sample sizes must be sufficiently large to attain to statistical power in analysis. PMID:22115041

  19. Epidemiological investigation of Candida species causing bloodstream infection in paediatric small bowel transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Mallory J; Gomes-Neto, João Carlos; Banjara, Nabaraj; Florescu, Diana F; Mercer, David F; Iwen, Peter C; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2017-06-01

    Small bowel transplantation (SBT) can be a life-saving medical procedure. However, these recipients experience high risk of bloodstream infections caused by Candida. This research aims to characterise the SBT recipient gut microbiota over time following transplantation and investigate the epidemiology of candidaemia in seven paediatric patients. Candida species from the recipients' ileum and bloodstream were identified by internal transcribed spacer sequence and distinguished to strain by multilocus sequence typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream isolates was determined against nine antifungals. Twenty-two ileostomy samples harboured at least one Candida species. Fungaemia were caused by Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida pelliculosa. All but three bloodstream isolates showed susceptibility to all the antifungals tested. One C. glabrata isolate showed multidrug resistance to itraconazole, amphotericin B and posaconazole and intermediate resistance to caspofungin. Results are congruent with both endogenous (C. albicans, C. glabrata) and exogenous (C. parapsilosis) infections; results also suggest two patients were infected by the same strain of C. parapsilosis. Continuing to work towards a better understanding of sources of infection-particularly the exogenous sources-would lead to targeted prevention strategies. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Accuracy of automatic detection of small-bowel mucosa by second-generation colon capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Adler, Samuel; Hassan, Cesare; Metzger, Yoav; Sompolinsky, Yishai; Spada, Cristiano

    2012-12-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is a noninvasive technique for the detection of colorectal lesions. However, for CCE to be offered as an out-of-clinic procedure, the system needs to automatically alert the patient when to ingest the laxative (booster). We tested the reliability of the automatic detection of the small-bowel (SB) mucosa and the subsequent alert for booster ingestion by the Data Recorder 3 (DR3) of the second-generation CCE (CCE-2). Retrospective analysis. Data from 120 consecutive cases of CCE-2 were analyzed for proper DR3 automatic detection of the capsule entering the SB to prompt the patient to ingest the laxative booster. Accuracy of the DR3 for detecting the SB mucosa. The DR3 correctly identified the proper time for ingestion of the laxative (booster) in 118 of 120 cases, corresponding to a sensitivity of 98.3% (95% CI, 97%-100%). The median time difference between DR3 automatic SB detection to the observed entrance of the capsule into the SB was 3 minutes 30 seconds (interquartile range 2 minutes 35 seconds to 5 minutes 57 seconds). Retrospective analysis. The 98.3% sensitivity of the DR3 for automatic identification of the SB mucosa and subsequent alert for the first laxative (booster) ingestion paves the way for CCE-2 to be offered as an out-of-clinic procedure. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transient versus surgically managed small bowel intussusception in children: Role of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Rengarajan; Mishra, Nitin; Yadav, Nitin; Jhanwar, Vikas; Thakur, Ajit; Mannan, Naima

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the ultrasound (US) features of transient small bowel intussusception (SBI) with those which required surgical management. US features of 26 children with 32 intussusceptions from January 2014 to August 2014 were recorded and compared with follow-up imaging or surgical findings. Transient SBI when compared to surgically managed intussusception has shorter length of intussusception (mean 2.25 cm, range 1.8-4.5 cm vs. mean 5.6 cm, range, 2.3-7.8 cm), smaller transverse diameter (mean, 1.2 cm, range 0.8-2.3 cm vs. mean, 3.3 cm, range 2.9-5.4 cm) and thin wall (mean, 3.3 mm, 2.3-4.9 mm vs. mean, 6.8 mm, range, 4.3-11.2 mm). Four out of five surgically managed intussusceptions were associated with the lead point while none of the transient SBI had any lead point. Peristalsis was absent in all surgically managed intussusceptions. Transient SBI is associated with a shorter length of intussusception, smaller transverse diameter, thin walls, absence of the lead point and visible peristalsis. All these findings may help in distinguishing it from those requiring surgical management.

  2. Early small bowel perforation and cochleovestibular impairment as rare complications of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    van Wolfswinkel, Marlies E; Lahri, Hakima; Wismans, Pieter J; Petit, Pieter L C; van Genderen, Perry J J

    2009-09-01

    Two Indian migrant workers suffering from fever and malaise were admitted to the hospital directly after arrival in the Netherlands. The first patient was 25-year-old man who had fever and rigors on admission. The patient was treated for presumptive typhoid fever with ciprofloxacin. Cefotaxime was added the following day because of the possibility of a nalidixic-acid resistant strain of S. typhi. The clinical course was complicated by a small bowel perforation on the third day of the disease. Blood cultures grew a nalidixic acid resistant strain of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi. The patient recovered completely. The second patient, a 22-year-old man, suffered from fever, malaise and hearing loss. A sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular dysfunction was diagnosed. Cultures of blood and bone marrow aspirate showed a nalidixic acid resistant strain of S. typhi. Treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime improved the hearing loss significantly. The clinical features of typhoid fever are heterogeneous and rare complications may occur. The emergence of multidrug and nalidixic acid resistance may complicate further the treatment of this serious systemic infection.

  3. Conservative treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction in children: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lung-Huang; Lee, Chee-Yew; Hung, Min-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment for adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) in children. Design Systematic review of studies involved children with ASBO who received initial conservative/non-operative treatment. Setting The search was performed in April 2013 using PubMed (see online supplementary file 1), current contents, and the Cochrane database. Participants Children with ASBO. Interventions Conservative treatment included nasogastric decompression, parenteral fluids and correction of electrolyte and fluid imbalance. Primary outcome Treatment success. Secondary outcomes Length of hospital stay and the time to first feeding after hospital admission. Results 7 studies (six retrospective, one prospective), involving 8–109 patients (age: 1 month to 16 years) treated conservatively, were included in the review. The nature of conservative treatment was generally consistent between studies (nasogastric decompression, parenteral fluids and correction of electrolyte and fluid imbalance), although patients in one study also received Gastrografin. The rate of conservative treatment success ranged from 16% to 75% among the five studies, but one trial showed 0% successful rate. The hospital length of stay ranged from 3 to 6.5 days for conservative treatment (vs 10.2–13 days for operative treatment). The time to first feeding ranged from 31 to 84 h for conservative treatment. Conclusions In conclusion, in the majority of cases, conservative treatment is an effective means of managing ASBO in children. PMID:25223569

  4. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Bridge between Functional Organic Dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C.; Shukla, Ratnakar; Ghoshal, Ujjala

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), once thought to be largely psychogenic in origin, is now understood to be multifactorial. One of the reasons for this paradigm shift is the realization that gut dysbiosis, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), causes IBS symptoms. Between 4% and 78% of patients with IBS and 1% and 40% of controls have SIBO; such wide variations in prevalence might result from population differences, IBS diagnostic criteria, and, most importantly, methods to diagnose SIBO. Although quantitative jejunal aspirate culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, noninvasive hydrogen breath tests have been popular. Although the glucose hydrogen breath test is highly specific, its sensitivity is low; in contrast, the early-peak criteria in the lactulose hydrogen breath test are highly nonspecific. Female gender, older age, diarrhea-predominant IBS, bloating and flatulence, proton pump inhibitor and narcotic intake, and low hemoglobin are associated with SIBO among IBS patients. Several therapeutic trials targeting gut microbes using antibiotics and probiotics have further demonstrated that not all symptoms in patients with IBS originate in the brain but rather in the gut, providing support for the micro-organic basis of IBS. A recent proof-of-concept study showing the high frequency of symptom improvement in patients with IBS with SIBO further supports this hypothesis. PMID:28274108

  5. A case of small-bowel obstruction secondary to inadvertent ingestion of impression material.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James P; Webb, David E; Hutchison, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Small-bowel obstruction (SBO) is responsible for approximately 12 to 16 percent of surgical hospital admissions and more than 300,000 operations annually in the United States. This has resulted in more than $2.3 billion in health care delivery per year. SBO is a serious complication, carrying a 10 percent risk of mortality. The authors report a case of SBO resulting from inadvertent ingestion of polysulfide impression material. A 74-year-old man visited the emergency department with diffuse, nonradiating, colicky periumbilical pain. The patient was admitted to the general surgery service of the hospital, and after four days of supportive therapy without evidence of progression of the foreign body, he underwent an exploratory laparotomy. The authors later identified the foreign body as polysulfide impression material. SBO is a rare but significant complication that can result from a procedure that clinicians perform on a routine basis. Dentists should consider this complication whenever they are concerned that a high-risk patient may have ingested dental materials.

  6. Adhesions small bowel obstruction in emergency setting: conservative or operative treatment?

    PubMed Central

    ASSENZA, M.; DE GRUTTOLA, I.; ROSSI, D.; CASTALDI, S.; FALASCHI, F.; GIULIANO, G.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions small bowel obstructions (aSBO) are among the leading causes of emergency operative intervention. About the 80% of aSBO cases resolve without a surgical treatment. It’s important to identify which patients could undergo a conservative treatment to prevent an useless surgery The aim of this study is to determine findings that can indicate whether patients with aSBO should undergo a conservative or a surgical treatment. 313 patients with diagnosis of submission of aSBO were restudied. Patients were divided into two groups based on the different type of treatment received, 225 patients who underwent surgical treatment within 24 hours after admission, 88 patients which underwent conservative treatment successfully. For each patient, clinical, hematochemical and radiological findings have been analysed. The treatment of aSBO should be, at the beginning, conservative except that cases that presents clinical and/or CT-scan findings predictive for a surgical treatment (free peritoneal fluid, mesenterial edema, transitional point) or a peritonitis (pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumoperitoneum). PMID:27938529

  7. Is Multifocality an Indicator of Aggressive Behavior in Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors?

    PubMed

    Choi, Allen B; Maxwell, Jessica E; Keck, Kendall J; Bellizzi, Andrew J; Dillon, Joseph S; OʼDorisio, Thomas M; Howe, James R

    2017-10-01

    Many patients with small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (SBNETs) have multifocal tumors (MFTs), but the frequency of MFTs has varied widely across SBNET studies. It is also unclear whether patients with MFTs have more advanced disease or worse clinical course than do those with unifocal SBNETs. We set out to determine the frequency of multifocal and unifocal SBNETs and compare clinicopathologic factors, somatostatin receptor 2 expression, and survival. Clinicopathologic variables from 179 patients with surgically managed SBNETs were collected. Statistical comparisons were made using Welch t-test, Wilcoxon t