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Sample records for recurrent solar jets

  1. RECURRENT SOLAR JETS INDUCED BY A SATELLITE SPOT AND MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Su, Jiangtao; Yin, Zhiqiang; Priya, T. G.; Zhang, Hongqi; Xu, Haiqing; Yu, Sijie; Liu, Jihong

    2015-12-10

    Recurrent and homologous jets were observed to the west edge of active region NOAA 11513 at the boundary of a coronal hole. We find two kinds of cancellations between opposite polarity magnetic fluxes, inducing the generation of recurrent jets. First, a satellite spot continuously collides with a pre-existing opposite polarity magnetic field and causes recurrent solar jets. Second, moving magnetic features, which emerge near the sunspot penumbra, pass through the ambient plasma and eventually collide with the opposite polarity magnetic field. Among these recurrent jets, a blowout jet that occurred around 21:10 UT is investigated. The rotation of the pre-existing magnetic field and the shear motion of the satellite spot accumulate magnetic energy, which creates the possibility for the jet to experience blowout right from the standard.

  2. Simulations of Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  3. Solar coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  4. solar spicules and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.; Ajabshirizadeh, A.

    2012-06-01

    In order to clear up the origin and possibly explain some solar limb and disc spicule quasi-periodic recurrences produced by overlapping effects, we present a simulation model assuming quasi- random positions of spicules. We also allow a set number of spicules with different physical properties (such as: height, lifetime and tilt angle as shown by an individual spicule) occurring randomly. Results of simulations made with three different spatial resolutions of the corresponding frames and also for different number density of spicules, are analyzed. The wavelet time/frequency method is used to obtain the exact period of spicule visibility. Results are compared with observations of the chromosphere from i/ the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) filtergrams taken at 1600 angstrom, ii/ the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) of Hinode taken in the Ca II H-line and iii/ the Sac-Peak Dunn's VTT taken in H? line. Our results suggest the need to be cautious when interpreting apparent oscillations seen in spicule image sequences when overlapping is present, i.e.; when the spatial resolution is not enough to resolve individual components of spicules.

  5. On Recurrent/Homologous Coronal Jets Emission: Coronal Geyser Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvan Paraschiv, Alin; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    Active region 11302 has shown a vast display of solar jets during its lifetime. We examine the emission mechanism responsible for multiple coronal jet events occurring at the center-east side of the active region. Identified jet events were detected in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), hard X-ray (HXR) and radio emissions, observed by dedicated instruments such as SDO's AIA and HMI, STEREO's EUVI and WAVES, and RHESSI, respectively. We report the detection of a base-arch structure in the lower atmosphere. The site was labelled "Coronal Geyser". The structure had emitted jets quasi-periodically for the entire time the AR was visible in SDO'S field of view. The jets expand into the corona with an apparent line of sight velocity of ~200-300$ km/s. To our knowledge the long time-scale behaviour of jet recurrence and base geyser structure was not previously discussed and data analysis of this phenomena will provide new information for theoretical modelling and data interpretation of jets.

  6. Investigation of recurrent EUV jets from highly dynamic magnetic field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Chandra, Ramesh; Guo, Yang; Magara, Tetsuya; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present observations and interpretations of recurrent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) jets that occurred between 2012 July 1 21:00 UT and 2012 July 2 10:00 UT from the western edge of the NOAA active region 11513. Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly ( SDO/AIA), SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager ( SDO/HMI) and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager ( RHESSI) observations have been used for the present study. Observations as well as potential-field source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation suggest an open field configuration in the vicinity of the jet activity area. 18 EUV jets were observed from the western edge of the active region along the open field channel. All the jet events appeared to be non-homologous and show different morphological properties and evolution. Some of the jets were small and narrow in size while the others were huge and wide. The average speed of these jets ranges from {˜}47 to {˜}308 km s^{-1}. SDO/AIA 171 Å intensity profiles at the base of these jets show bumps corresponding to each jet, which is an evidence of recurrent magnetic reconnections. The magnetic field observation at the foot points of the jets revealed a very complex and dynamic magnetic activity which includes flux emergence, flux cancellation, dynamic motions, merging, separation, etc. We suggest that the recurrent jets are the result of recurrent magnetic reconnections among the various emerging bipolar fields themselves as well as with the open fields.

  7. Solar-powered jet refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, V. W.; Lansing, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    Design criteria are easily evaluated by tool. Thermodynamic analysis of solar-powered vapor-jet refrigerator combines important performance parameters in nomogram that assist design of practical system. Projected coefficients of performance for difference ejector configurations, working fluids, and other design variables are easily obtained from nomogram.

  8. Solar Jets as Sources of Outflows, Heating and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.

    2013-05-01

    Recent space solar observations of the Sun, such as Hinode and SDO, have revealed that magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, ranging from small scale reconnection (observed as nanoflares) to large scale one (observed as long duration flares or giant arcades). Especially recent Hinode observations has found various types of tiny chromospheric jets, such as chromospheric anemone jets, penumbral microjets and light bridge jets from sunspot umbra. It was also found that the corona is full of tiny X-ray jets. Often they are seen as helical spinning jets with Alfvenic waves in the corona. Sometimes they are seen as chromospheric jets with slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves and sometimes as unresolved jet-like events at the footpoint of recurrent outflows and waves at the edge of the active region. There is increasing evidence of magnetic reconnection in these tiny jets and its association with waves. The origin of outflows and waves is one of the issues concerning coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. To answer this question, we had a challenge to reproduce solar jets with laboratory plasma experiment and directly measured outflows and waves. As a result, we could find a propagating wave excited by magnetic reconnection, whose energy flux is 10% of the released magnetic energy. That is enough for solar wind acceleration and locally enough for coronal heating, consistent with numerical MHD simulations of solar jets. Here we would discuss recent observations with Hinode, theories and experimental results related to jets and waves by magnetic reconnection, and discuss possible implication to reconnection physics, coronal heating and solar wind acceleration.

  9. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  10. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Devore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric and coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of signicant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of nominal solar ares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these major phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients closeor at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broadrange of solar-heliospheric problems.

  11. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; Török, T.; Mason, H.; Curdt, W.; Meyer, K.; Dalmasse, K.; Matsui, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  12. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  13. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  14. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. Recurrent Jets Occurred Nearby Active Region NOAA 11931

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-kun, Hu; Zhi, Xu; Zhi-ke, Xue; Xiao-li, Yan; Yuan-deng, Shen; Ning, Wu; Jun, Lin

    2016-10-01

    According to the 171 Å observation of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) in 2013 December 25∼26, a series of homologous jets were continuously found in the southwestern area of the active region NOAA 11931, from which 12 typical jets were selected and studied in this paper. The magnetic field structures in most jets had an obviously untwisting motion in the ejection process, though a few of them didn't have. The process of some jets was divided into two phases: the slow ejection without untwisting, and the rapid untwisting ejection. Before some jets started, a bright point grew along the bottom of magnetic arcade, and extended from the end remote from the jet to the end proximate to the jet, and there were two parts of magnetic structures near the bottom of magnetic arcade untwisted simultaneously in the ejection process. During the final one jet, two magnetic arcades appeared successively in the southeastern end of the magnetic structure on the jet bottom, while a small magnetic loop emerged in the northwestern end. Compared with the line-of-sight magnetogram of SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI), in about 4 h before the first jet appeared, a pair of magnetic dipoles emerged from the bottom of magnetic structure, and continuously lifted during the whole jet event. Although overall the bottom magnetic field emerged before and after the 12 jets, but for each individual jet, the variation of the bottom magnetic field was different from one another: in some jets, the magnetic field near the magnetic arcade on the jet bottom exhibited both magnetic emergence and cancellation; but in other jets, the magnetic field near the jet bottom exhibited only an obvious emergence or cancellation.

  16. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasi-Homologous Solar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (31)) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet, and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  17. Solar Coronal Jets in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Martinez, F.; Falconer, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015, Nature 523, 437), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different process, such as emerging flux. Here we present observations of NOAA active region 12259, over 13-20 Jan 2015, using observations from Hinode/XRT, and from SDO/AIA and HMI. We focused on 13 standout jets that we identified from an initial survey of the XRT X-ray images, and we found many more jets in the AIA data set, which have higher cadence and more continuous coverage than our XRT data. All 13 jets originated from identifiable magnetic neutral lines; we further found magnetic flux cancelation to be occurring at essentially all of these neutral lines. At least 6 of those 13 jets were homologous, developing with similar morphology from nearly the same location, and in fact there were many more jets in the homologous sequence apparent in the higher-fidelity AIA data. Each of these homologous jets was consistent with minifilament-like ejections at the start of the jets. Other jets displayed a variety of morphologies, at least some of which were consistent with minifilament eruptions. For other jets however we have not yet clearly deciphered the driving mechanism. Our overall conclusions are similar to those of our earlier study of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100), where we found: some jets clearly to

  18. DARK JETS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Peter R.

    2015-03-10

    A new solar feature termed a dark jet is identified from observations of an extended solar coronal hole that was continuously monitored for over 44 hr by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft in 2011 February 8–10 as part of Hinode Operation Plan No. 177 (HOP 177). Line of sight (LOS) velocity maps derived from the coronal Fe xii λ195.12 emission line, formed at 1.5 MK, revealed a number of large-scale, jet-like structures that showed significant blueshifts. The structures had either weak or no intensity signal in 193 Å filter images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, suggesting that the jets are essentially invisible to imaging instruments. The dark jets are rooted in bright points and occur both within the coronal hole and at the quiet Sun–coronal hole boundary. They exhibit a wide range of shapes, from narrow columns to fan-shaped structures, and sometimes multiple jets are seen close together. A detailed study of one dark jet showed LOS speeds increasing along the jet axis from 52 to 107 km s{sup −1} and a temperature of 1.2–1.3 MK. The low intensity of the jet was due either to a small filling factor of 2% or to a curtain-like morphology. From the HOP 177 sample, dark jets are as common as regular coronal hole jets, but their low intensity suggests a mass flux around two orders of magnitude lower.

  19. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli; Yan, Xiaoli; Xue, Jianchao

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19-20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ˜280 km s-1. During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ˜8 G.

  20. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    The solar chromospheric jet is one of the most characteristic structures near the solar surface. The quantitative understanding of chromospheric jets is of substantial importance for not only the partially ionized phenomena in the chromosphere but also the energy input and dissipation processes in the corona. In this dissertation, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated using the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We newly develop a numerical code for the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the comprehensive modeling of solar atmosphere. Because the solar chromosphere is highly nonlinear, magnetic pressure dominated, and turbulent, a robust and high-resolution numerical scheme is required. In Chapter 2, we propose a new algorithm for the simulation of magnetohydrodynamics. Through the test problems and accuracy analyses, the proposed scheme is proved to satisfy the requirements. In Chapter 3, the effect of the non-local radiation energy transport, Spitzer-type thermal conduction, latent heat of partial ionization and molecule formation, and gravity are implemented to the magnetohydrodynamic code. The numerical schemes for the radiation transport and thermal conduction is carefully chosen in a view of the efficiency and compatibility with the parallel computation. Based on the developed radiation magnetohydrodynamic code, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated. In Chapter 4, we investigate the dependence of chromospheric jets on the coronal temperature in the two-dimensional simulations. Various scale of chromospheric jets with the parabolic trajectory are found with the maximum height of 2-8 Mm, lifetime of 2-7 min, maximum upward velocity of 10- 50 km/s, and deceleration of 100-350 m/s2. We find that chromospheric jets are more elongated under the cool corona and shorter under the hot corona. We also find that the pressure gradient force caused by the periodic shock waves accelerates some of the

  1. SYSTEMATIC MOTION OF FINE-SCALE JETS AND SUCCESSIVE RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JET OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE/HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.; Isobe, H.

    2012-11-20

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A {lambda}-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets ({approx}1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  2. Systematic Motion of Fine-scale Jets and Successive Reconnection in Solar Chromospheric Anemone Jet Observed with the Solar Optical Telescope/Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A λ-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets (~1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  3. Oscillations in solar jets observed with the SOT of Hinode: viscous effects during reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Transverse oscillatory motions and recurrence behavior in the chromospheric jets observed by Hinode/SOT are studied. A comparison is considered with the behavior that was noticed in coronal X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. A jet like bundle observed at the limb in Ca II H line appears to show a magnetic topology that is similar to X-ray jets (i.e., the Eiffel tower shape). The appearance of such magnetic topology is usually assumed to be caused by magnetic reconnection near a null point. Transverse motions of the jet axis are recorded but no clear evidence of twist is appearing from the highly processed movie. The aim is to investigate the dynamical behavior of an incompressible magnetic X-point occurring during the magnetic reconnection in the jet formation region. The viscous effect is specially considered in the closed line-tied magnetic X-shape nulls. We perform the MHD numerical simulation in 2-D by solving the visco-resistive MHD equations with the tracing of velocity and magnetic field. A qualitative agreement with Hinode observations is found for the oscillatory and non-oscillatory behaviors of the observed solar jets in both the chromosphere and the corona. Our results suggest that the viscous effect contributes to the excitation of the magnetic reconnection by generating oscillations that we observed at least inside this Ca II H line cool solar jet bundle.

  4. ON THE OBSERVATION AND SIMULATION OF SOLAR CORONAL TWIN JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Quanhao; Fang, Fang; McIntosh, Scott W.; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-02-01

    We present the first observation, analysis, and modeling of solar coronal twin jets, which occurred after a preceding jet. Detailed analysis on the kinetics of the preceding jet reveals its blowout-jet nature, which resembles the one studied in Liu et al. However, the erupting process and kinetics of the twin jets appear to be different from the preceding one. Lacking detailed information on the magnetic fields in the twin jet region, we instead use a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional (3D) MHD model as described in Fang et al., and find that in the simulation a pair of twin jets form due to reconnection between the ambient open fields and a highly twisted sigmoidal magnetic flux, which is the outcome of the further evolution of the magnetic fields following the preceding blowout jet. Based on the similarity between the synthesized and observed emission, we propose this mechanism as a possible explanation for the observed twin jets. Combining our observation and simulation, we suggest that with continuous energy transport from the subsurface convection zone into the corona, solar coronal twin jets could be generated in the same fashion addressed above.

  5. Analyses of Simulated Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. A.; Uritsky, V. M.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called "anemone" regions are generally accepted to be regions of opposite polarity, and are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface. Previous analysis of these jets (Pariat et al. 2009,2010) modeled using the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver (ARMS) has supported the claim that magnetic reconnection across current sheets formed at the null point between the highly twisted closed field of the dipole and open field lines surrounding it releases the energy necessary to drive these jets. However, these initial simulations assumed a "static" environment for the jets, neglecting effects due to gravity, solar wind and the expanding spherical geometry. A new set of ARMS simulations taking into account these additional physical processes was recently performed. Initial results are qualitatively consistent with the earlier Cartesian studies, demonstrating the robustness of the underlying ideal and resistive mechanisms. We focus on density and velocity fluctuations within a narrow radial slit aligned with the direction of the spine of the jet, as well as other physical properties, in order to identify and refine their signatures in the lower heliosphere. These refined signatures can be used as parameters by which plasma processes initiated by these jets may be identified in situ by future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  6. Substorm occurrence rates, substorm recurrence times, and solar wind structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.; Yakymenko, Kateryna

    2017-03-01

    Two collections of substorms are created: 28,464 substorms identified with jumps in the SuperMAG AL index in the years 1979-2015 and 16,025 substorms identified with electron injections into geosynchronous orbit in the years 1989-2007. Substorm occurrence rates and substorm recurrence-time distributions are examined as functions of the phase of the solar cycle, the season of the year, the Russell-McPherron favorability, the type of solar wind plasma at Earth, the geomagnetic-activity level, and as functions of various solar and solar wind properties. Three populations of substorm occurrences are seen: (1) quasiperiodically occurring substorms with recurrence times (waiting times) of 2-4 h, (2) randomly occurring substorms with recurrence times of about 6-15 h, and (3) long intervals wherein no substorms occur. A working model is suggested wherein (1) the period of periodic substorms is set by the magnetosphere with variations in the actual recurrence times caused by the need for a solar wind driving interval to occur, (2) the mesoscale structure of the solar wind magnetic field triggers the occurrence of the random substorms, and (3) the large-scale structure of the solar wind plasma is responsible for the long intervals wherein no substorms occur. Statistically, the recurrence period of periodically occurring substorms is slightly shorter when the ram pressure of the solar wind is high, when the magnetic field strength of the solar wind is strong, when the Mach number of the solar wind is low, and when the polar-cap potential saturation parameter is high.

  7. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  8. The Contribution of Coronal Jets to the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, R.; Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Leake, J. E.; Mikić, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Linton, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e., we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here, we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal jets into the outer corona and inner heliosphere. Based on observed jet-occurrence rates, we then estimate the total contribution of coronal jets to the mass and energy content of the solar wind to (0.4-3.0)% and (0.3-1.0)%, respectively. Our results are largely consistent with the few previous rough estimates obtained from observations, supporting the conjecture that coronal jets provide only a small amount of mass and energy to the solar wind. We emphasize, however, that more advanced observations and simulations (including parametric studies) are needed to substantiate this conjecture.

  9. Undercover EUV Solar Jets Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N.-H.; Innes, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions, dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJI), give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT to 17:04:07 UT. Collimated outflows with bright roots were present in SJI 1400 Å (transition region) and 2796 Å (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 304 Å (transition region) and AIA 171 Å (lower corona) images. The Si iv spectra show a strong blue wing enhancement, but no red wing, in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets, indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg ii line profiles produced by the jets spires: reversed and non-reversed. Mg ii lines remain optically thick, but turn optically thin in the highly Doppler shifted wings. The energy flux contained in each recurrent jet is estimated using a velocity differential emission measure technique that measures the emitting power of the plasma as a function of the line-of-sight velocity. We found that all the recurrent jets release similar energy (108 erg cm-2 s-1) toward the corona and the downward component is less than 3%.

  10. Magnetic and Energy Characteristics of Recurrent Homologous Jets from an Emerging Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Wang, Y.; Erdelyi, R.; Liu, R.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Gou, T.; Chen, J.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Pan, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We present the detailed analysis of recurrent homologous jets originating from an emerging negative magnetic flux at the edge of an Active Region. Detailed investigation of the related Poynting flux across the photosphere employing the HMI vector magnetic field data confirms the vital role of the emerging flux in accumulating the necessary free magnetic energy for the associated reconnection to initiate jets. The observed jets show multi-thermal features. Their evolution shows high consistence with the characteristic parameters of the emerging flux, suggesting that with more free magnetic energy, the eruptions tend to be more violent, frequent and blowout-like. The average temperature, average electron number density and axial speed are found to be similar for different jets, indicating that they should have been formed by plasmas from similar origins. Statistical analysis of the jets and their footpoint region conditions reveals a strong positive relationship between the footpoint region total 131 Å intensity enhancement and jets' length/width. Stronger linearly positive relationships also exist between the total intensity enhancement/thermal energy of the footpoint regions and jets' mass/kinetic/thermal energy, with higher cross-correlation coefficients. All the above results, together, confirm the direct relationship between the magnetic reconnection and the jets, and validate the important role of magnetic reconnection in transporting large amount of free magnetic energy into jets. It is also suggested that there should be more free energy released during the magnetic reconnection of blowout than of standard jet events.

  11. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  12. A SOLAR CORONAL JET EVENT TRIGGERS A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S.

    2015-11-10

    In this paper, we present multi-point, multi-wavelength observations and analysis of a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it to propagate at a high speed of over 1000 km s{sup −1}. The jet erupted before the CME and shared the same source region. The temporal and spacial relationship between these two events lead us to the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario hold the promise of enriching our understanding of the triggering mechanism of CMEs and their relations to coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/HMI instrument along with the off-limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA in the 171 Å passband provide the first detailed observation of the three-dimensional reconnection process of a large-scale jet as simulated in Pariat et al. The eruption process of the jet highlights the importance of filament-like material during the eruption of not only small-scale X-ray jets, but likely also of large-scale EUV jets. Based on our observations and analysis, we propose the most probable mechanism for the whole event, with a blob structure overlaying the three-dimensional structure of the jet, to describe the interaction between the jet and the CME.

  13. Solar Active Region Coronal Jets. II. Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/X-ray telescope, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets. The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ≲ 2\\prime\\prime ) miniature-filament (minifilament) “strands” from a magnetic neutral line where magnetic flux cancelation is ongoing, consistent with the magnetic configuration presented for coronal-hole jets in Sterling et al. (2016). Some jets strands are difficult/impossible to detect, perhaps due to, e.g., their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ˜ 1.5× {10}19 Mx hr-1. An average flux of ˜ 5× {10}18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ˜1028-1029 erg of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption build up and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  14. SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR JETS CONFINED BY CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: c.richard.devore@nasa.gov

    2016-03-20

    Coronal jets are collimated, dynamic events that occur over a broad range of spatial scales in the solar corona. In the open magnetic field of coronal holes, jets form quasi-radial spires that can extend far out into the heliosphere, while in closed-field regions the jet outflows are confined to the corona. We explore the application of the embedded-bipole model to jets occurring in closed coronal loops. In this model, magnetic free energy is injected slowly by footpoint motions that introduce twist within the closed dome of the jet source region, and is released rapidly by the onset of an ideal kink-like instability. Two length scales characterize the system: the width (N) of the jet source region and the footpoint separation (L) of the coronal loop that envelops the jet source. We find that both the conditions for initiation and the subsequent dynamics are highly sensitive to the ratio L/N. The longest-lasting and most energetic jets occur along long coronal loops with large L/N ratios, and share many of the features of open-field jets, while smaller L/N ratios produce shorter-duration, less energetic jets that are affected by reflections from the far-loop footpoint. We quantify the transition between these behaviors and show that our model replicates key qualitative and quantitative aspects of both quiet Sun and active-region loop jets. We also find that the reconnection between the closed dome and surrounding coronal loop is very extensive: the cumulative reconnected flux at least matches the total flux beneath the dome for small L/N, and is more than double that value for large L/N.

  15. Revised View of Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the onset of ~20 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jetwas near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ''bright point'' in anedge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. Weexamined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels,including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang,which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptionsof miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. In manycases, much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperaturejet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption andthe hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point formsat the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to theformation of a standard solar flare arcade via flare (``internal'') reconnection in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thespire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergoneinterchange (''external'') reconnection with the erupting field that envelops andcarries the miniature filament. This is consistent with what we found for theonset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014), and theobservations of other workers. It is however not consistent with the basicversion of the ''emerging-flux model'' for X-ray jets. This work was supported byfunding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  16. Solar Polar Jets Driven by Magnetic Reconnection, Gravity, and Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-06-01

    Polar jets are dynamic, narrow, radially extended structures observed in solar EUV emission near the limb. They originate within the open field of coronal holes in “anemone” regions, which are intrusions of opposite magnetic polarity. The key topological feature is a magnetic null point atop a dome-shaped fan surface of field lines. Applied stresses readily distort the null into a current patch, eventually inducing interchange reconnection between the closed and open fields inside and outside the fan surface (Antiochos 1996). Previously, we demonstrated that magnetic free energy stored on twisted closed field lines inside the fan surface is released explosively by the onset of fast reconnection across the current patch (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010). A dense jet comprised of a nonlinear, torsional Alfvén wave is ejected into the outer corona along the newly reconnected open field lines. Now we are extending those exploratory simulations by including the effects of solar gravity, solar wind, and expanding spherical geometry. We find that the model remains robust in the resulting more complex setting, with explosive energy release and dense jet formation occurring in the low corona due to the onset of a kink-like instability, as found in the earlier Cartesian, gravity-free, static-atmosphere cases. The spherical-geometry jet including gravity and wind propagates far more rapidly into the outer corona and inner heliosphere than a comparison jet simulation that excludes those effects. We report detailed analyses of our new results, compare them with previous work, and discuss the implications for understanding remote and in-situ observations of solar polar jets.This work was supported by NASA’s LWS TR&T program.

  17. On the Magnetic and Energy Characteristics of Recurrent Homologous Jets from An Emerging Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Erdélyi, Robertus; Liu, Rui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Gou, Tingyu; Chen, Jun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Lijuan; Pan, Zonghao

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present the detailed analysis of recurrent homologous jets originating from an emerging negative magnetic flux at the edge of an active region. The observed jets show multithermal features. Their evolution shows high consistence with the characteristic parameters of the emerging flux, suggesting that with more free magnetic energy, the eruptions tend to be more violent, frequent, and blowout-like. The average temperature, average electron number density, and axial speed are found to be similar for different jets, indicating that they should have been formed by plasmas from similar origins. Statistical analysis of the jets and their footpoint region conditions reveals a strong positive relationship between the footpoint region total 131 Å intensity enhancement and jets’ length/width. Stronger linearly positive relationships also exist between the total intensity enhancement/thermal energy of the footpoint regions and jets’ mass/kinetic/thermal energy, with higher cross-correlation coefficients. All the above results together confirm the direct relationship between the magnetic reconnection and the jets and validate the important role of magnetic reconnection in transporting large amounts of free magnetic energy into jets. It is also suggested that there should be more free energy released during the magnetic reconnection of blowout than of standard jet events.

  18. Recurrence quantification analysis of two solar cycle indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangalini, Marco; Ermolli, Ilaria; Consolini, Giuseppe; Giorgi, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Solar activity affects the whole heliosphere and near-Earth space environment. It has been reported in the literature that the mechanism responsible for the solar activity modulation behaves like a low-dimensional chaotic system. Studying these kind of physical systems and, in particular, their temporal evolution requires non-linear analysis methods. To this regard, in this work we apply the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) to the study of two of the most commonly used solar cycle indicators; i.e. the series of the sunspot number (SSN), and the radio flux 10.7 cm, with the aim of identifying possible dynamical transitions in the system; a task which is particularly suited to the RQA. The outcome of this analysis reveals the presence of large fluctuations of two RQA measures: namely the determinism and the laminarity. In addition, large differences are also seen between the evolution of the RQA measures of the SSN and the radio flux. That suggests the presence of transitions in the dynamics underlying the solar activity. Besides it also shows and quantifies the different nature of these two solar indices. Furthermore, in order to check whether our results are affected by dataartefacts, we have also applied the RQA to both the recently recalibrated SSN series and the previous one, unveiling the main differences between the two data sets. The results are discussed in light of the recent literature on the subject.

  19. Jets and Plumes: What scale coronal phenomenal can be seen by SWEAP on Solar Probe Plus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korreck, Kelly E.; Case, Anthony; Kasper, Justin C.; Stevens, Michael L.; Whittlesey, Phyllis

    2016-05-01

    Coronal jets are reconnection events that are found most easily in coronal holes both polar and equatorial. Previous studies of coronal jets have associated the jets with microstream peaks in Ulysses solar wind data (Neugebauer, 2012 ). Plumes have been thought to contribute to both the slow and fast solar wind. Utilizing long-term studies of jets and plumes in x-ray and extreme ultraviolet coronal observations, we examine the signatures of these coronal features as seen in simulated Solar Probe Cup data. Simulated moment data representing density, velocity and temperature are created for the first Solar Probe Plus orbit.

  20. Jet Formation in Solar Atmosphere due to Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Avilés, J. J.; Guzmán, F. S.; Fedun, V.

    2017-02-01

    Using numerical simulations, we show that jets with features of type II spicules and cool coronal jets corresponding to temperatures of 104 K can be formed as a result of magnetic reconnection in a scenario with magnetic resistivity. For this, we model the low chromosphere–corona region using the C7 equilibrium solar atmosphere model, assuming that resistive MHD rules the dynamics of the plasma. The magnetic field configurations we analyze correspond to two neighboring loops with opposite polarity. The formation of a high-speed and sharp structure depends on the separation of the loops’ feet. We analyze the cases where the magnetic field strength of the two loops is equal and different. In the first case, with a symmetric configuration the jets rise vertically, whereas in an asymmetric configuration the structure shows an inclination. With a number of simulations carried out under a 2.5D approach, we explore various properties of the excited jets, namely, inclination, lifetime, and velocity. The parameter space involves a magnetic field strength between 20 and 40 G, and the resistivity is assumed to be uniform with a constant value of the order {10}-2{{Ω }}\\cdot m.

  1. Observations of solar X-ray and EUV jets and their related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Bučík, R.; Guo, L.-J.; Nitta, N.

    2016-11-01

    Solar jets are fast-moving, elongated brightenings related to ejections seen in both images and spectra on all scales from barely visible chromospheric jets to coronal jets extending up to a few solar radii. The largest, most powerful jets are the source of type III radio bursts, energetic electrons and ions with greatly enhanced 3He and heavy element abundances. The frequent coronal jets from polar and equatorial coronal holes may contribute to the solar wind. The primary acceleration mechanism for all jets is believed to be release of magnetic stress via reconnection; however the energy buildup depends on the jets' source environment. In this review, we discuss how certain features of X-ray and EUV jets, such as their repetition rate and association with radio emission, depends on their underlying photospheric field configurations (active regions, polar and equatorial coronal holes, and quiet Sun).

  2. A Complex Solar Coronal Jet with Two Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Su, Jiangtao; Deng, Yuanyong; Priest, E. R.

    2017-05-01

    Jets often occur repeatedly from almost the same location. In this paper, a complex solar jet was observed with two phases to the west of NOAA AR 11513 on 2012 July 2. If it had been observed at only moderate resolution, the two phases and their points of origin would have been regarded as identical. However, at high resolution we find that the two phases merge into one another and the accompanying footpoint brightenings occur at different locations. The phases originate from different magnetic patches rather than being one phase originating from the same patch. Photospheric line of sight (LOS) magnetograms show that the bases of the two phases lie in two different patches of magnetic flux that decrease in size during the occurrence of the two phases. Based on these observations, we suggest that the driving mechanism of the two successive phases is magnetic cancellation of two separate magnetic fragments with an opposite-polarity fragment between them.

  3. Tailor cutting of crystalline solar cells by laser micro jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckert, F.; Pilat, E.; Piron, P.; Torres, P.; Carron, B.; Richerzhagen, B.; Pirot, M.; Monna, R.

    2012-03-01

    Coupling a laser into a hair thin water micro jet (Laser Micro Jet, LMJ) for cutting applications offers a wide range of processes that are quite unique. As the laser beam is guided by internal reflections inside of a liquid cylinder, the cuts are naturally straight and do not reflect any divergence as otherwise occurs with an unguided laser beam. Furthermore, having a liquid media at the point of contact ensures a fast removal of heat and eventual debris ensuring clean cuts, which are free of any burrs. Many applications have indeed been developed for a large variety of materials, which are as different as e.g. diamond, silicon, aluminum, ceramic and hard metals. The photovoltaic industry has enjoyed in the last decades tremendous growth rates, which are still projected into the future. We focus here on the segment of Building Integrated PV (BIPV), which requests tailored solutions to actual buildings and not-one-fits-it-all standardized modules. Having the option to tailor cut solar cells opens a new field of BIPV applications. For the first time, finished crystalline solar cells have been LMJ cut into predetermined shapes. First results show that the cut is clean and neat. Preliminary solar performance measurements are positive. This opens a new avenue of tailored made modules instead of having to rely on the one-fits-alloy approach used so far.

  4. A model for straight and helical solar jets. II. Parametric study of the plasma beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.; Dalmasse, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events that develop at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Aims: Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Within the solar atmosphere, jet-like events develop in many different environments, e.g., in the vicinity of active regions, as well as in coronal holes, and at various scales, from small photospheric spicules to large coronal jets. In all these events, signatures of helical structure and/or twisting/rotating motions are regularly observed. We aim to establish that a single model can generally reproduce the observed properties of these jet-like events. Methods: Using our state-of-the-art numerical solver ARMS, we present a parametric study of a numerical tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of solar jet-like events. Within the MHD paradigm, we study the impact of varying the atmospheric plasma β on the generation and properties of solar-like jets. Results: The parametric study validates our model of jets for plasma β ranging from 10-3 to 1, typical of the different layers and magnetic environments of the solar atmosphere. Our model of jets can robustly explain the generation of helical solar jet-like events at various β ≤ 1. We introduces the new result that the plasma β modifies the morphology of the helical jet, explaining the different observed shapes of jets at different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Conclusions: Our results enable us to understand the energisation, triggering, and driving processes of jet-like events. Our model enables us to make predictions of the impulsiveness and energetics of jets as determined by the surrounding environment, as well as the morphological properties of the resulting jets.

  5. Small-scale H(alpha) Jets in the Solar Chromosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    A&A 533, A76 (2011) DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201117427 c© ESO 2011 Astronomy & Astrophysics Small-scale Hα jets in the solar chromosphere D. Kuridze1...activity – Sun: chromosphere – Sun: faculae, plages – Sun: photosphere – Sun: surface magnetism 1. Introduction The solar chromosphere is permeated...by a wide range of highly dynamic features including jets, fibrils, mottles, spicules, Ellerman bombs, and Hα surges. In particular, chromospheric jets

  6. Coronal Jets Simulated with the Global Alfvén Wave Solar Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szente, J.; Toth, G.; Manchester, W. B., IV; van der Holst, B.; Landi, E.; Gombosi, T. I.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical modeling study of coronal jets to understand their effects on the global corona and their contribution to the solar wind. We implement jets into a well-established three-dimensional, two-temperature magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar corona model employing Alfvén-wave dissipation to produce a realistic solar-wind background. The jets are produced by positioning a compact magnetic dipole under the solar surface and rotating the boundary plasma around the dipole's magnetic axis. The moving plasma drags the magnetic field lines along with it, ultimately leading to a reconnection-driven jet similar to that described by Pariat et al. We compare line-of-sight synthetic images to multiple jet observations at EUV and X-ray bands, and find very close matches in terms of physical structure, dynamics, and emission. Key contributors to this agreement are the greatly enhanced plasma density and temperature in our jets compared to previous models. These enhancements arise from the comprehensive thermodynamic model that we use and, also, our inclusion of a dense chromosphere at the base of our jet-generating regions. We further find that the large-scale corona is affected significantly by the outwardly propagating torsional Alfvén waves generated by our polar jet, across 40° in latitude and out to 24 R⊙. We estimate that polar jets contribute only a few percent to the steady-state solar-wind energy outflow.

  7. Chromospheric anemone jets and magnetic reconnection in partially ionized solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.; Nishizuka, N.; Isobe, H.

    2011-11-15

    The solar optical telescope onboard Hinode with temporal resolution of less than 5 s and spatial resolution of 150 km has observed the lower solar atmosphere with an unprecedented detail. This has led to many important findings, one of them is the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets in the solar chromosphere. The chromospheric anemone jets are ubiquitous in solar chromosphere and statistical studies show that the typical length, life time and energy of the chromospheric anemone jets are much smaller than the coronal events (e.g., jets/flares/CMEs). Among various observational parameters, the apparent length and maximum velocity shows good correlation. The velocity of chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfven speed in the lower solar chromosphere. Since the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets by Hinode, several evidences of magnetic reconnection in chromospheric anemone jets have been found and these observations are summarized in this paper. These observations clearly suggest that reconnection occurs quite rapidly as well as intermittently in the solar chromosphere. In the solar corona ({lambda}{sub i} > {delta}{sub SP}), anomalous resistivity arises due to various collisionless processes. Previous MHD simulations show that reconnection becomes fast as well as strongly time-dependent due to anomalous resistivity. Such processes would not arise in the solar chromosphere which is fully collisional and partially-ionized. So, it is unclear how the rapid and strongly time-dependent reconnection would occur in the solar chromosphere. It is quite likely that the Hall and ambipolar diffusion are present in the solar chromosphere and they could play an important role in driving such rapid, strongly time-dependent reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  8. Chromospheric anemone jets and magnetic reconnection in partially ionized solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.; Nishizuka, N.; Isobe, H.

    2011-11-01

    The solar optical telescope onboard Hinode with temporal resolution of less than 5 s and spatial resolution of 150 km has observed the lower solar atmosphere with an unprecedented detail. This has led to many important findings, one of them is the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets in the solar chromosphere. The chromospheric anemone jets are ubiquitous in solar chromosphere and statistical studies show that the typical length, life time and energy of the chromospheric anemone jets are much smaller than the coronal events (e.g., jets/flares/CMEs). Among various observational parameters, the apparent length and maximum velocity shows good correlation. The velocity of chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the lower solar chromosphere. Since the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets by Hinode, several evidences of magnetic reconnection in chromospheric anemone jets have been found and these observations are summarized in this paper. These observations clearly suggest that reconnection occurs quite rapidly as well as intermittently in the solar chromosphere. In the solar corona (λi > δSP), anomalous resistivity arises due to various collisionless processes. Previous MHD simulations show that reconnection becomes fast as well as strongly time-dependent due to anomalous resistivity. Such processes would not arise in the solar chromosphere which is fully collisional and partially-ionized. So, it is unclear how the rapid and strongly time-dependent reconnection would occur in the solar chromosphere. It is quite likely that the Hall and ambipolar diffusion are present in the solar chromosphere and they could play an important role in driving such rapid, strongly time-dependent reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  9. Fan-shaped Jets in Three-dimensional Reconnection Simulation as a Model of Ubiquitous Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rong Lin; Shibata, Kazunari; Isobe, Hiroaki; Fang, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in space and astrophysical plasmas in which the oppositely directed magnetic field changes its connectivity and eventually converts its energy into kinetic and thermal energy of the plasma. Recently, ubiquitous jets (for example, chromospheric anemone jets, penumbral microjets, umbral light bridge jets) have been observed by the Solar Optical Telescope on board the satellite Hinode. These tiny and frequently occurring jets are considered to be a possible evidence of small-scale ubiquitous reconnection in the solar atmosphere. However, the details of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic configuration are still not very clear. Here, we propose a new model based on 3D simulations of magnetic reconnection using a typical current sheet magnetic configuration with a strong guide field. The most interesting feature is that the jets produced by the reconnection eventually move along the guide field lines. This model provides a fresh understanding of newly discovered ubiquitous jets and moreover a new observational basis for the theory of astrophysical magnetic reconnection.

  10. MULTIPLE PLASMA EJECTIONS AND INTERMITTENT NATURE OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.; Isobe, H.; Nishizuka, N. E-mail: nishida@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: isobe@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-11-01

    The recent discovery of chromospheric anemone jets with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode has shown an indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere. However, the basic nature of magnetic reconnection in chromosphere is still unclear. We studied nine chromospheric anemone jets from SOT/Hinode using Ca II H filtergrams, and we found multiple bright, plasma ejections along the jets. In most cases, the major intensity enhancements (larger than 30% relative to the background intensity) of the loop correspond to the timing of the plasma ejections. The typical lifetime and size of the plasma ejecta are about 20-60 s and 0.3-1.5 Mm, respectively. The height-time plot of jet shows many sub-structures (or individual jets) and the typical lifetime of the individual jet is about one to five minutes. Before the onset of the jet activity, a loop appears in Ca II H and gradually increases in size, and after few minutes several jets are launched from the loop. Once the jet activity starts and several individual jets are launched, the loop starts shrinking with a speed of {approx}4 km s{sup -1}. In some events, a downward moving blob with a speed of {approx}35 km s{sup -1} was observed, associated with the upward moving plasma along one of the legs of the loop hosting the jets. The upward moving plasma gradually developed into jets. Multiple plasma ejections in chromospheric anemone jet show the strongly time-dependent as well as intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  11. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2015-06-01

    We study 14 large solar jets observed in polar coronal holes. In EUV movies from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), each jet appears similar to most X-ray jets and EUV jets that erupt in coronal holes; but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R Sun in images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO)/C2 coronagraph. From AIA He ii 304 Å movies and LASCO/C2 running-difference images of these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R Sun at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most of the jets display measureable swaying and bending of a few degrees in amplitude; in three jets the swaying is discernibly oscillatory with a period of order 1 hr. These characteristics suggest that the driver in these jets is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is basically a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfvén wave that is put into the reconnected open field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts. From the measured spinning and swaying, we estimate that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R Sun. We point out that the torsional waves observed in Type-II spicules might dissipate in the corona in the same way as the magnetic-untwisting waves in our big jets, and thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  12. MAGNETIC UNTWISTING IN SOLAR JETS THAT GO INTO THE OUTER CORONA IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2015-06-10

    We study 14 large solar jets observed in polar coronal holes. In EUV movies from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), each jet appears similar to most X-ray jets and EUV jets that erupt in coronal holes; but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R{sub Sun} in images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO)/C2 coronagraph. From AIA He ii 304 Å movies and LASCO/C2 running-difference images of these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R{sub Sun} at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most of the jets display measureable swaying and bending of a few degrees in amplitude; in three jets the swaying is discernibly oscillatory with a period of order 1 hr. These characteristics suggest that the driver in these jets is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is basically a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfvén wave that is put into the reconnected open field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts. From the measured spinning and swaying, we estimate that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R{sub Sun}. We point out that the torsional waves observed in Type-II spicules might dissipate in the corona in the same way as the magnetic-untwisting waves in our big jets, and thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  13. Multiple Plasma Ejections and Intermittent Nature of Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Chromospheric Anemone Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Nishizuka, N.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K.

    2012-11-01

    The recent discovery of chromospheric anemone jets with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode has shown an indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere. However, the basic nature of magnetic reconnection in chromosphere is still unclear. We studied nine chromospheric anemone jets from SOT/Hinode using Ca II H filtergrams, and we found multiple bright, plasma ejections along the jets. In most cases, the major intensity enhancements (larger than 30% relative to the background intensity) of the loop correspond to the timing of the plasma ejections. The typical lifetime and size of the plasma ejecta are about 20-60 s and 0.3-1.5 Mm, respectively. The height-time plot of jet shows many sub-structures (or individual jets) and the typical lifetime of the individual jet is about one to five minutes. Before the onset of the jet activity, a loop appears in Ca II H and gradually increases in size, and after few minutes several jets are launched from the loop. Once the jet activity starts and several individual jets are launched, the loop starts shrinking with a speed of ~4 km s-1. In some events, a downward moving blob with a speed of ~35 km s-1 was observed, associated with the upward moving plasma along one of the legs of the loop hosting the jets. The upward moving plasma gradually developed into jets. Multiple plasma ejections in chromospheric anemone jet show the strongly time-dependent as well as intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  14. Simulated In Situ Measurements and Structural Analysis of Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Merrill A.; Uritsky, Vadim M.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called “anemone” regions are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface (Antiochos 1998). In this study, we analyze simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) that take into account gravity, solar wind, and spherical geometry to generate polar jets by reconnection between a twisted embedded bipole and the surrounding open field (Karpen et al. 2015). These new simulations confirm and extend previous Cartesian studies of polar jets based on this mechanism (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015). Focusing on the plasma density, velocity, and magnetic field, we interpolate the adaptively gridded simulation data onto a regular grid, and analyze the signatures that the jet produces as it propagates outward from the solar surface. The trans-Alfvénic nature of the jet front is confirmed by temporally differencing the plasma mass density and comparing the result with the local Alfvén speed. We perform a preliminary analysis of the magnetized plasma turbulence, and examine how the turbulence affects the overall structure of the jet. We also conduct simulated spacecraft fly-throughs of the jet, illustrating the signatures that spacecraft such as Solar Probe Plus may encounter in situ as the jet propagates into the heliosphere. These fly-throughs are performed in several different velocity regimes to better model the changing velocity of Solar Probe Plus relative to the Sun and its jets over the course of the mission.This research was supported by NASA grant NNG11PL10A 670.036 to CUA/IACS (M.A.R. and V.M.U.) and the Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology (J.T.K. and C.R.D.) program.

  15. EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

  16. Homologous Jet-driven Coronal Mass Ejections from Solar Active Region 12192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    We report observations of homologous coronal jets and their coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The homologous jets originated from a location with emerging and canceling magnetic field at the southeastern edge of the giant active region (AR) of 2014 October, NOAA 12192. This AR produced in its interior many non-jet major flare eruptions (X- and M- class) that made no CME. During October 20 to 27, in contrast to the major flare eruptions in the interior, six of the homologous jets from the edge resulted in CMEs. Each jet-driven CME (˜200-300 km s-1) was slower-moving than most CMEs, with angular widths (20°-50°) comparable to that of the base of a coronal streamer straddling the AR and were of the “streamer-puff” variety, whereby the preexisting streamer was transiently inflated but not destroyed by the passage of the CME. Much of the transition-region-temperature plasma in the CME-producing jets escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the transition-region plasma in non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. Also, the CME-producing jets tended to be faster and longer-lasting than the non-CME-producing jets. Our observations imply that each jet and CME resulted from reconnection opening of twisted field that erupted from the jet base and that the erupting field did not become a plasmoid as previously envisioned for streamer-puff CMEs, but instead the jet-guiding streamer-base loop was blown out by the loop’s twist from the reconnection.

  17. Origins of the Solar Polar Jets - Coordinated SOHO and TRACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Deluca, E. E.; Gurman, J. B.; Biesecker, D.; Fludra, A.

    2003-12-01

    The polar jets are dynamic coronal eruptions originating in the low solar atmosphere, in flaring UV bright points within polar coronal holes. They were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO) during last solar minimum in 1996 when the polar holes were dominating coronal structures. UVCS/SOHO obtained ultraviolet spectroscopy of the jet providing us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. As the Sun is currently at the declining phase of its activity, the polar holes again became permanent structures. The SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed to identify and study the jet phenomena that would be counterparts of the solar minimum polar jets. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is ejected together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. We present first results of the campaign and discuss their implications.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Solar Coronal X-Ray Jets Based on the Magnetic Reconnection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takaaki; Shibata, Kazunari

    1996-04-01

    We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of solar coronal X-ray jets by solving the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The simulations were based on the magnetic reconnection model, in which the plasma of an X-ray jet is accelerated and heated by reconnection between the emerging flux and a pre-existing coronal field. Many observed characteristics of X-ray jets could be successfully reproduced. Morphologically, the two observed types of jets, two-sided-loop type and anemone-jet type, were well reproduced. Here, the two-sided-loop type is a pair of horizontal jets (or loops), which occurs when an emerging flux appears in a quiet region where the coronal field is approximately horizontal. In contrast, the anemone-jet type is a vertical jet, which takes place when an emerging flux appears in a coronal hole where the coronal field is vertical or oblique. Quantitatively, the velocity, temperature, thermal energy, kinetic energy, and other parameters obtained in the simulation are in good agreement with the observations. Furthermore, the simulations reveal new features which might be associated with X-ray jets: (1) A fast-mode MHD shock is produced at the collision site of each reconnection jet with the ambient magnetic field. (2) Reconnection produces a cool jet as well as a hot jet (X-ray jet). The hot and cool jets are adjacent to each other, which is consistent with the observed simultaneous coexistence of X-ray jets and {Hα } surges in the sun.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Solar Spicule Jets at a Magnetic Null-Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, V.; Konkol, P. M.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Murawski, K.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of jet-like structures in the solar atmosphere are performed. These structures result from a pressure pulse that is launched at the null point of a potential magnetic arcade. The plasma jet exhibits a double structure with two components: (a) dense, cool, and short vertical stream and (b) a less dense, hot and tall part of the jet. The upper part of the hot and tall jet may represent a direct response of the system to the pressure pulse launched at the null point, and the second, slower cool and dense part of the jet is formed later through the stretching up of the stream as a result of plasma evacuation from the top of the magnetic arcade. Numerical results show that jet-like structures mimic some properties of both type I and type II spicules, according to the classification provided by De Pontieu et al. ( Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, S655, 2007).

  20. Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets to be Encountered by Solar Probe Plus: Simulated In Situ Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Roberts, M. A.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called "anemone" regions are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface (Antiochos 1996). In this study, we analyze simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) that take into account gravity, solar wind, and spherical geometry to generate polar jets by reconnection between a twisted embedded bipole and the surrounding open field (Karpen et al. 2015). These simulations confirm and extend previous Cartesian studies of polar jets based on this mechanism (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015), as well as extending the analyses from our previous work (Roberts et al. 2014,2015) out to radial distances that will be sampled by Solar Probe Plus. Focusing on the plasma density, velocity, magnetic field, and current density, we interpolate the adaptively gridded simulation data onto a regular grid, and analyze the signatures that the jet produces as it propagates outward from the solar surface into the inner heliosphere. We also conduct simulated spacecraft fly-throughs of the jet in several different velocity regimes, illustrating the signatures that Solar Probe Plus may encounter in situ as the jet propagates into the heliosphere. The trans-Alfvénic nature of the jet front is confirmed by temporally differencing the plasma mass density and comparing the result with the local Alfvén speed. Our analysis confirms the presence of a reconnection driven magnetic turbulence in the simulated plasma jet, finding spatial correlations of magnetic fluctuations inside the jet to be in agreement with the scaling model of MHD turbulence. The turbulence cascade is supported by multiscale current sheets combined with filamentary structures representing fluid vorticies. The spatial orientation of these current sheets, combined with the anisotropy

  1. Prevalence of Micro-Jets from the Network Structures of the Solar Transition Region and Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, E. E.; Tian, H.; Cranmer, S. R.; Reeves, K.; Miralles, M. P.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.

    2014-12-01

    IRIS observations in the 1330Å, 1400Å and 2796Å passbands have revealed numerous small-scale jet-like features with speeds of ~80-250 km/s from the chromospheric network. These network jets occur in both the quiet Sun and coronal holes. Their widths are often ~300 km or less. Many of these jets show up as elongated features with enhanced line width in maps obtained with transition region (TR) lines, suggesting that these jets reach at least TR temperatures and they constitute an important element of TR structures. The ubiquitous presence of these high-reaching (often >10 Mm) jets also suggests that they may play a crucial role in the mass and energy budgets of the corona and solar wind. The generation of these jets in the network and the accompanying Alfven waves is also consistent with the "magnetic furnace model" of solar wind proposed by Axford & McKenzie (1992). The large speeds (greater than sound speed) suggest that the Lorentz force (perhaps related to reconnection) must play an important role in the generation and propagation of the network jets. We believe that many network jets are the on-disk counterparts and TR manifestation of type-II spicules.

  2. A Series of Streamer-Puff CMEs Driven by Solar Homologous Jets from Active Region 12192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate characteristics of solar coronal jets that originated from active region NOAA 12192 and produced coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This active region produced many non-jet major flare eruptions (X and M class) that made no CME. A multitude of jets occurred from the southeast edge of the active region, and in contrast to the major-flare eruptions in the core, six of these jets resulted in CMEs. Our jet observations are from multiple SDO/AIA EUV channels, including 304, 171 and 193Å, and CME observations are taken from SOHO/LASCO C2 coronograph. Each jet-driven CME was relatively slow-moving (~200 - 300 km s-1) compared to most CMEs; had angular width (20° - 50°) comparable to that of the streamer base; and was of the “streamer-puff” variety, whereby a preexisting streamer was transiently inflated but not removed (blown out) by the passage of the CME. Much of the chromospheric-temperature plasma of the jets producing the CMEs escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the chromospheric plasma in the non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. We also found that the CME-producing jets tended to be faster in speed and longer in duration than the non-CME-producing jets. We expect that the jets result from eruptions of minifilaments (Sterling et al. 2015). We further propose that the CMEs are driven by magnetic twist injected into streamer-base coronal loops when erupting-twisted-minifilament field reconnects with the ambient field at the foot of those loops. This research was supported by funding from NASA's LWS program.

  3. Minifilament Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-05-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism, such as the hitherto popular ``emerging flux'' model for jets. We present observations of an on-disk active region that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale ~20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode.

  4. Evaluation of the Minifilament-Eruption Scenario for Solar Coronal Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baikie, Tomi K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David; Moore, Ronald L.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are suspected to result from magnetic reconnection low in the Sun's atmosphere. Sterling et al. (2015) looked as 20 jets in polar coronal holes, using X-ray images from the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). They suggested that each jet was driven by the eruption of twisted closed magnetic field carrying a small-scale filament, which they call a 'minifilament', and that the jet was produced by reconnection of the erupting field with surrounding open field. In this study, we carry out a more extensive examination of polar coronal jets. From 180 hours of XRT polar coronal hole observations spread over two years (2014-2016), we identified 130 clearly-identifiable X-ray jet events and thus determined an event rate of over 17 jets per day per in the Hinode/XRT field of view. From the broader set, we selected 25 of the largest and brightest events for further study in AIA 171, 193, 211, and 304 Angstrom images. We find that at least the majority of the jets follow the minifilament-eruption scenario, although for some cases the evolution of the minifilament in the onset of its eruption is more complex than presented in the simplified schematic of Sterling et al. (2015). For all cases in which we could make a clear determination, the spire of the X-ray jet drifted laterally away from the jet-base-edge bright point; this spire drift away from the bright point is consistent with expectations of the minifilament-eruption scenario for coronal-jet production. This work was supported with funding from the NASA/MSFC Hinode Project Office, and from the NASA HGI program.

  5. Small-Scale Filament Eruptions Leading to Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the onset of ~10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Å, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Å, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare arcade in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scalechromospheric filament. The spire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergone interchange reconnection with the erupting field that envelops and carries the miniature filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions via ``internal'' and ``external'' reconnection of the erupting field. This is consistent with what we found for the onset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014). This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  6. ON A CORONAL BLOWOUT JET: THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF A SIMULTANEOUSLY PRODUCED BUBBLE-LIKE CME AND A JET-LIKE CME IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    The coronal blowout jet is a peculiar category among various jet phenomena, in which the sheared base arch, often carrying a small filament, experiences a miniature version of blowout eruption that produces large-scale coronal mass ejection (CME). In this paper, we report such a coronal blowout jet with high-resolution multi-wavelength and multi-angle observations taken from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Big Bear Solar Observatory. For the first time, we find that simultaneous bubble-like and jet-like CMEs were dynamically related to the blowout jet that showed cool and hot components next to each other. Our observational results indicate that (1) the cool component resulted from the eruption of the filament contained within the jet's base arch, and it further caused the bubble-like CME; (2) the jet-like CME was associated with the hot component, which was the outward moving heated plasma generated by the reconnection of the base arch and its ambient open field lines. On the other hand, bifurcation of the jet's cool component was also observed, which resulted from the uncoupling of the erupting filament's two legs that were highly twisted at the very beginning. Based on these results, we propose a model to interpret the coronal blowout jet, in which the external reconnection not only produces the jet-like CME, but also leads to the rising of the filament. Subsequently, internal reconnection starts underneath the rising filament and thereby causes the bubble-like CME.

  7. Ink jet assisted metallization for low cost flat plate solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, K. F.; Vest, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled ink-jet-assisted metallization of the front surface of solar cells with metalorganic silver inks offers a maskless alternative method to conventional photolithography and screen printing. This method can provide low cost, fine resolution, reduced process complexity, avoidance of degradation of the p-n junction by firing at lower temperature, and uniform line film on rough surface of solar cells. The metallization process involves belt furnace firing and thermal spiking. With multilayer ink jet printing and firing, solar cells of about 5-6 percent efficiency without antireflection (AR) coating can be produced. With a titanium thin-film underlayer as an adhesion promoter, solar cells of average efficiency 8.08 percent without AR coating can be obtained. This efficiency value is approximately equal to that of thin-film solar cells of the same lot. Problems with regard to lower inorganic content of the inks and contact resistance are noted.

  8. Ink jet assisted metallization for low cost flat plate solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, K. F.; Vest, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled ink-jet-assisted metallization of the front surface of solar cells with metalorganic silver inks offers a maskless alternative method to conventional photolithography and screen printing. This method can provide low cost, fine resolution, reduced process complexity, avoidance of degradation of the p-n junction by firing at lower temperature, and uniform line film on rough surface of solar cells. The metallization process involves belt furnace firing and thermal spiking. With multilayer ink jet printing and firing, solar cells of about 5-6 percent efficiency without antireflection (AR) coating can be produced. With a titanium thin-film underlayer as an adhesion promoter, solar cells of average efficiency 8.08 percent without AR coating can be obtained. This efficiency value is approximately equal to that of thin-film solar cells of the same lot. Problems with regard to lower inorganic content of the inks and contact resistance are noted.

  9. STABILITY OF ROTATING MAGNETIZED JETS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE. I. KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Ofman, Leon

    2015-11-10

    Observations show various jets in the solar atmosphere with significant rotational motions, which may undergo instabilities leading to heat ambient plasma. We study the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) of twisted and rotating jets caused by the velocity jumps near the jet surface. We derive a dispersion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for total pressure (including centrifugal force of tube rotation), which governs the dynamics of incompressible jets. Then, we obtain analytical instability criteria of KHI in various cases, which were verified by numerical solutions to the dispersion equation. We find that twisted and rotating jets are unstable to KHI when the kinetic energy of rotation is more than the magnetic energy of the twist. Our analysis shows that the azimuthal magnetic field of 1–5 G can stabilize observed rotations in spicule/macrospicules and X-ray/extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets. On the other hand, nontwisted jets are always unstable to KHI. In this case, the instability growth time is several seconds for spicule/macrospicules and a few minutes (or less) for EUV/X-ray jets. We also find that standing kink and torsional Alfvén waves are always unstable near the antinodes, owing to the jump of azimuthal velocity at the surface, while the propagating waves are generally stable. Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) vortices may lead to enhanced turbulence development and heating of surrounding plasma; therefore, rotating jets may provide energy for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  10. Stability of Rotating Magnetized Jets in the Solar Atmosphere. I. Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Ofman, Leon

    2015-11-01

    Observations show various jets in the solar atmosphere with significant rotational motions, which may undergo instabilities leading to heat ambient plasma. We study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of twisted and rotating jets caused by the velocity jumps near the jet surface. We derive a dispersion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for total pressure (including centrifugal force of tube rotation), which governs the dynamics of incompressible jets. Then, we obtain analytical instability criteria of KHI in various cases, which were verified by numerical solutions to the dispersion equation. We find that twisted and rotating jets are unstable to KHI when the kinetic energy of rotation is more than the magnetic energy of the twist. Our analysis shows that the azimuthal magnetic field of 1-5 G can stabilize observed rotations in spicule/macrospicules and X-ray/extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets. On the other hand, nontwisted jets are always unstable to KHI. In this case, the instability growth time is several seconds for spicule/macrospicules and a few minutes (or less) for EUV/X-ray jets. We also find that standing kink and torsional Alfvén waves are always unstable near the antinodes, owing to the jump of azimuthal velocity at the surface, while the propagating waves are generally stable. Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices may lead to enhanced turbulence development and heating of surrounding plasma therefore, rotating jets may provide energy for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  11. Study of Coronal Jets During Solar Minimum Based on STEREO/SECCHI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, A. R.; Lacatus, D. A.; Badescu, T.; Lupu, M. G.; Simon, S.; Sandu, S. G.; Mierla, M.; Rusu, M. V.

    2010-07-01

    During the 2007 - 2008 minimum of solar activity, the internally occulted coronagraphs SECCHI-COR1 onboard the STEREO space mission recorded numerous jet-like ejections over a great range of latitudes. We have found more than 10000 white-light jets in the above-mentioned period. Sometimes they can be identified on the disk with bright points observed in ultraviolet images by EUVI. In this study we present a catalog consisting of jets observed by the SECCHI-COR1 instrument and their association with lower coronal activity (bright points, UV jets). Furthermore, their association with bright points in the context of previously proposed models is discussed. From the complete catalog we have selected 106 jets observed in both STEREO-A and STEREO-B images for which it is possible to derive their kinematics and point of origin.

  12. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from 14 exceptionally high-reaching large solar jets observed in the polar coronal holes. EUV movies from SDO/AIA show that each jet is similar to many other similar-size and smaller jets that erupt in coronal holes, but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most other jets, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R(sub Sun) in images from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. For these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun) at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most jets display oscillatory swaying having an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. We conclude that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is grossly a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the reconnected open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate from the measured spinning and swaying that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun). From these results for these big jets, we reason that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules should dissipate in the corona in the same way and could thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  13. Evaluation of the Minifilament-Eruption Scenario for Solar Coronal Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Baikie, T. K.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are suspected to result from magnetic reconnection low in the Sun's atmosphere. Sterling et al. (2015) looked at 20 jets in polar coronal holes, using X-ray images from the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). They suggested that each jet was driven by the eruption of twisted closed magnetic field carrying a small-scale filament, which they call a "minifilament", and that the jet was produced by reconnection of the erupting field with surrounding open field. In this study, we carry out a more extensive examination of polar coronal jets. From 280 hours of XRT polar coronal hole observations spread over two years (2014-2016), we identified 117 clearly-identifiable X-ray jet events. From the broader set, we selected 25 of the largest and brightest events for further study in AIA 171, 193, 211, and 304 Angstrom images. We find that at least the majority of the jets follow the minifilament-eruption scenario, although for some cases the evolution of the minifilament in the onset of its eruption is more complex then presented in the simplified schematic of Sterling et al. (2015). For all cases in which we could make a clear determination, the spire of the X-ray jet drifted laterally away from the jet-base-edge bright point; this spire drift away from the bright point is consistent with expectations of the minifilament-eruption scenario for coronal-jet production. This work was supported with funding from the NASA/MSFC Hinode Project Office, and from the NASA HGI program.

  14. Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Solar Quiet-region Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Chakrapani, Prithi

    2016-11-01

    We report observations of 10 random on-disk solar quiet-region coronal jets found in high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and having good coverage in magnetograms from the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a small-scale filament (called a minifilament). However, the trigger of these eruptions is still unknown. In the present study, we address the question: what leads to the jet-driving minifilament eruptions? The EUV observations show that there is a cool-transition-region-plasma minifilament present prior to each jet event and the minifilament eruption drives the jet. By examining pre-jet evolutionary changes in the line of sight photospheric magnetic field, we observe that each pre-jet minifilament resides over the neutral line between majority-polarity and minority-polarity patches of magnetic flux. In each of the 10 cases, the opposite-polarity patches approach and merge with each other (flux reduction between 21% and 57%). After several hours, continuous flux cancelation at the neutral line apparently destabilizes the field holding the cool-plasma minifilament to erupt and undergo internal reconnection, and external reconnection with the surrounding coronal field. The external reconnection opens the minifilament field allowing the minifilament material to escape outward, forming part of the jet spire. Thus, we found that each of the 10 jets resulted from eruption of a minifilament following flux cancelation at the neutral line under the minifilament. These observations establish that magnetic flux cancelation is usually the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions.

  15. Twisting solar coronal jet launched at the boundary of an active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Guo, Y.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Aulanier, G.; Yelles Chaouche, L.; Nishizuka, N.; Harra, L. K.; Thalmann, J. K.; Vargas Dominguez, S.; Liu, Y.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: A broad jet was observed in a weak magnetic field area at the edge of active region NOAA 11106 that also produced other nearby recurring and narrow jets. The peculiar shape and magnetic environment of the broad jet raised the question of whether it was created by the same physical processes of previously studied jets with reconnection occurring high in the corona. Methods: We carried out a multi-wavelength analysis using the EUV images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and magnetic fields from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) both on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, which we coupled to a high-resolution, nonlinear force-free field extrapolation. Local correlation tracking was used to identify the photospheric motions that triggered the jet, and time-slices were extracted along and across the jet to unveil its complex nature. A topological analysis of the extrapolated field was performed and was related to the observed features. Results: The jet consisted of many different threads that expanded in around 10 minutes to about 100 Mm in length, with the bright features in later threads moving faster than in the early ones, reaching a maximum speed of about 200 km s-1. Time-slice analysis revealed a striped pattern of dark and bright strands propagating along the jet, along with apparent damped oscillations across the jet. This is suggestive of a (un)twisting motion in the jet, possibly an Alfvén wave. Bald patches in field lines, low-altitude flux ropes, diverging flow patterns, and a null point were identified at the basis of the jet. Conclusions: Unlike classical λ or Eiffel-tower-shaped jets that appear to be caused by reconnection in current sheets containing null points, reconnection in regions containing bald patches seems to be crucial in triggering the present jet. There is no observational evidence that the flux ropes detected in the topological analysis were actually being ejected themselves, as occurs in the violent phase of

  16. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry, gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfvén wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfvén waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  17. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Devore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry,gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfven wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfven waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  18. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  19. A 17 June 2011 polar jet and its presence in the background solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Yang, Y.-H.; Chen, N.-H.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.

    2016-06-01

    High-speed jet responses in the polar solar wind are enigmatic. Here we measure a jet response that emanates from the southern polar coronal hole on 17 June 2011 at the extreme speed of over 1200 km/s. This response was recorded from the Sun-Earth line in Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) and Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph/C2 and both Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Extreme Ultraviolet Imager and COR2 coronagraphs when the three spacecraft were situated ~90° from one another. These certify the coronal 3-D location of the response that is associated with an existing solar plume structure and show its high speed to distances of over 14 RS. This jetting is associated with magnetic flux changes in the polar region as measured by the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrumentation over a period of several hours. The fastest coronal response observed can be tracked to a time near the period of greatest flux changes and to the onset of the brightest flaring in AIA. This high-speed response can be tracked directly as a small patch of outward moving brightness in coronal images as in Yu et al. (2014) where three slower events were followed from the perspective of Earth. This accumulated jet response has the largest mass and energy we have yet seen in 3-D reconstructions from Solar Mass Ejection Imager observations, and its outward motion is certified for the first time using interplanetary scintillation observations. This jet response is surrounded by similar high-speed patches, but these are smoothed out in Ulysses polar measurements, we speculate about how these dynamic activities relate to solar wind acceleration.

  20. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of kink waves in photospheric, chromospheric, and X-ray solar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of kelvins hotter than its surface. Among suggested theories for coronal heating are those that consider the role of various jets of plasma shooting up from just above the Sun's surface through the photosphere and chromosphere to corona. The energy carrying by the waves propagating along the jets can be dissipated and thus transferred to the medium via different mechanisms. Among the various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves which can propagate in the solar atmosphere the most promising for the heating process turns out to be the so cold kink waves. These waves actually are normal modes of the MHD waves running in spatially (or magnetically) bounded flux tubes. When plasma in a flux tube floats the kink mode can become unstable if the jet's speed exceeds some threshold/critical value. The instability which appears is of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type and it can trigger MHD turbulence, more specifically Alvfén waves' turbulence. Notably this kind of turbulence is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of coronal heating. Here, we consider the conditions under which kink waves traveling on three types of solar flowing plasmas, namely photospheric jets, spicules, and X-ray jets, can become unstable against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  1. Water Footprint and Land Requirement of Solar Thermochemical Jet-Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Falter, Christoph; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-10-10

    The production of alternative fuels via the solar thermochemical pathway has the potential to provide supply security and to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. H2O and CO2 are converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar energy mediated by redox reactions of a metal oxide. Because attractive production locations are in arid regions, the water footprint and the land requirement of this fuel production pathway are analyzed. The water footprint consists of 7.4 liters per liter of jet fuel of direct demand on-site and 42.4 liters per liter of jet fuel of indirect demand, where the dominant contributions are the mining of the rare earth oxide ceria, the manufacturing of the solar concentration infrastructure, and the cleaning of the mirrors. The area-specific productivity is found to be 33 362 liters per hectare per year of jet fuel equivalents, where the land coverage is mainly due to the concentration of solar energy for heat and electricity. The water footprint and the land requirement of the solar thermochemical fuel pathway are larger than the best power-to-liquid pathways but an order of magnitude lower than the best biomass-to-liquid pathways. For the production of solar thermochemical fuels arid regions are best-suited, and for biofuels regions of a moderate and humid climate.

  2. Prevalence of small-scale jets from the networks of the solar transition region and chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; DeLuca, E E; Cranmer, S R; De Pontieu, B; Peter, H; Martínez-Sykora, J; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Reeves, K K; Miralles, M P; McCauley, P; Saar, S; Testa, P; Weber, M; Murphy, N; Lemen, J; Title, A; Boerner, P; Hurlburt, N; Tarbell, T D; Wuelser, J P; Kleint, L; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V; McIntosh, S W

    2014-10-17

    As the interface between the Sun's photosphere and corona, the chromosphere and transition region play a key role in the formation and acceleration of the solar wind. Observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal the prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with speeds of 80 to 250 kilometers per second from the narrow bright network lanes of this interface region. These jets have lifetimes of 20 to 80 seconds and widths of ≤300 kilometers. They originate from small-scale bright regions, often preceded by footpoint brightenings and accompanied by transverse waves with amplitudes of ~20 kilometers per second. Many jets reach temperatures of at least ~10(5) kelvin and constitute an important element of the transition region structures. They are likely an intermittent but persistent source of mass and energy for the solar wind.

  3. Magnetic Flux Cancellation as the Origin of Solar Quiet-region Pre-jet Minifilaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the origin of 10 solar quiet-region pre-jet minifilaments, using EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and magnetograms from the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). We recently found that quiet-region coronal jets are driven by minifilament eruptions, where those eruptions result from flux cancellation at the magnetic neutral line under the minifilament. Here, we study the longer-term origin of the pre-jet minifilaments themselves. We find that they result from flux cancellation between minority-polarity and majority-polarity flux patches. In each of 10 pre-jet regions, we find that opposite-polarity patches of magnetic flux converge and cancel, with a flux reduction of 10%-40% from before to after the minifilament appears. For our 10 events, the minifilaments exist for periods ranging from 1.5 hr to 2 days before erupting to make a jet. Apparently, the flux cancellation builds a highly sheared field that runs above and traces the neutral line, and the cool transition region plasma minifilament forms in this field and is suspended in it. We infer that the convergence of the opposite-polarity patches results in reconnection in the low corona that builds a magnetic arcade enveloping the minifilament in its core, and that the continuing flux cancellation at the neutral line finally destabilizes the minifilament field so that it erupts and drives the production of a coronal jet. Thus, our observations strongly support that quiet-region magnetic flux cancellation results in both the formation of the pre-jet minifilament and its jet-driving eruption.

  4. Investigating chaotic features in solar radiation over a tropical station using recurrence quantification analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjo, Samuel T.; Adediji, Adekunle T.; Dada, Joseph B.

    2017-01-01

    The use of solar energy for power generation and other uses is on the increase. This demand necessitate a better understanding of the underlying dynamics for better prediction. Nonlinear dynamics and its associated tools readily lend itself for such analysis. In this paper, nonlinearity in solar radiation data is tested using recurrence plot (RP) and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) in a tropical station. The data used was obtained from an ongoing campaign at the Federal University of Technology, Akure, Southwestern Nigeria using an Integrated Sensor Suite (Vantage2 Pro). Half hourly and daily values were tested for each month of the year. Both were found to be nonlinear. The dry months of the year exhibit higher chaoticity compared to the wet months of the year. The daily average values were found to be mildly chaotic. Using RQA, features due to external effects such as harmattan and intertropical discontinuity (ITD) on solar radiation data were uniquely identified.

  5. Fine Structures and Kinematics of an Intriguing Chromospheric Jet Observed by Hinode Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.; Tarbell, T. D.

    2009-12-01

    Transient, small-scale ejections of plasma from the lower atmosphere are common manifestations of solar activity. Hinode, with its superior resolutions, has spurred renewed interest in solar jets since its launch. Here we report a chromospheric jet lasting for more than 1 hr on 2007 February 9 observed by the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) in unprecedented detail. SOT Ca II H passband observations at high resolution of 0.2 arcsecond and cadence of 8 s allowed us to investigate the fine structures and kinematics of the jet. The ejection occurred in three episodes, rather than continuously, with the amount and velocity of material decreasing with time. The upward velocities along the jet range from ~440 to ~30 km/s, while the downward velocities of the material falling back have much smaller values (mean: -60 km/s) and a narrower distribution. Some tracks in the space-time plot clearly show parabolic shapes and the inferred acceleration is a fraction of the solar gravitational acceleration. The jet consists of fine threads (0.5-2 arcsecond wide), which exhibit coherent, oscillatory transverse motions perpendicular to the jet axis and about a common equilibrium position. These motions propagate upward, with the maximum phase speed of ~740 km/s found at the leading front of the jet. The transverse oscillation velocities range from 150 to 30 km/s, amplitudes from 6 to 2 Mm, and periods from 250 to 550 s. The oscillations slow down with time and cease when the material starts to fall back. The falling material travels along almost straight lines in the original direction of ascent, showing no transverse motions. These observations are consistent with the models suggested by Shibata & Uchida (1985) and Canfield et al. (1996). In this scenario, the jet involves untwisting helical threads, which rotate about the axis of a single large cylinder and shed magnetic helicity into the upper atmosphere. Implications of this event in the context of multiwavelength data in H

  6. Climate Impact and Economic Feasibility of Solar Thermochemical Jet Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Falter, Christoph; Batteiger, Valentin; Sizmann, Andreas

    2016-01-05

    Solar thermochemistry presents a promising option for the efficient conversion of H2O and CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar energy. To explore the potential of this fuel production pathway, the climate impact and economic performance are analyzed. Key drivers for the economic and ecological performance are thermochemical energy conversion efficiency, the level of solar irradiation, operation and maintenance, and the initial investment in the fuel production plant. For the baseline case of a solar tower concentrator with CO2 capture from air, jet fuel production costs of 2.23 €/L and life cycle greenhouse gas (LC GHG) emissions of 0.49 kgCO2-equiv/L are estimated. Capturing CO2 from a natural gas combined cycle power plant instead of the air reduces the production costs by 15% but leads to LC GHG emissions higher than that of conventional jet fuel. Favorable assumptions for all involved process steps (30% thermochemical energy conversion efficiency, 3000 kWh/(m(2) a) solar irradiation, low CO2 and heliostat costs) result in jet fuel production costs of 1.28 €/L at LC GHG emissions close to zero. Even lower production costs may be achieved if the commercial value of oxygen as a byproduct is considered.

  7. Evidence for Alfvén waves in solar x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Lundquist, L; van Ballegooijen, A; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Deluca, E; Tsuneta, S; Sakao, T; Reeves, K; Weber, M; Kano, R; Narukage, N; Shibasaki, K

    2007-12-07

    Coronal magnetic fields are dynamic, and field lines may misalign, reassemble, and release energy by means of magnetic reconnection. Giant releases may generate solar flares and coronal mass ejections and, on a smaller scale, produce x-ray jets. Hinode observations of polar coronal holes reveal that x-ray jets have two distinct velocities: one near the Alfvén speed ( approximately 800 kilometers per second) and another near the sound speed (200 kilometers per second). Many more jets were seen than have been reported previously; we detected an average of 10 events per hour up to these speeds, whereas previous observations documented only a handful per day with lower average speeds of 200 kilometers per second. The x-ray jets are about 2 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(4) kilometers wide and 1 x 10(5) kilometers long and last from 100 to 2500 seconds. The large number of events, coupled with the high velocities of the apparent outflows, indicates that the jets may contribute to the high-speed solar wind.

  8. EFFECT OF CORONAL TEMPERATURE ON THE SCALE OF SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima; Yokoyama, T.H.

    2015-10-20

    We investigate the effect of coronal temperature on the formation process of solar chromospheric jets using two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the region from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. We develop a new radiative magnetohydrodynamic code for the dynamic modeling of the solar atmosphere, employing an LTE equation of state, optically thick radiative loss in the photosphere, optically thin radiative loss in the chromosphere and the corona, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. Many chromospheric jets are produced in the simulations by shock waves passing through the transition region. We find that these jets are projected farther outward when the coronal temperature is lower (similar to that in coronal holes) and shorter when the coronal temperature is higher (similar to that in active regions). When the coronal temperature is high, the deceleration of the chromospheric jets is consistent with the model in which deceleration is determined by the periodic chromospheric shock waves. However, when the coronal temperature is low, the gravitational deceleration becomes more important and the chromospheric jets approach ballistic motion.

  9. Thermodynamic MHD Simulations of Jets in the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, R.; Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Linton, M.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal jets are transient, collimated plasma ejections that occur predominantly in coronal holes and are observed in EUV, soft X-ray, and occasionally in white-light coronagraphs. While these intriguing phenomena have been studied and modeled for more than two decades, the details of their formation mechanism(s) are not yet fully understood, and their potential role for the generation of the fast solar wind remains largely elusive. Here we present 3D MHD simulations of coronal jets which are performed in a large computational domain (up to 20 solar radii) and incorporate the effects of thermal conduction, radiative cooling, empirical coronal heating, and the solar wind. These features allow us to model the plasma properties and energy transfer of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far, and to study the amount of energy and mass transported by these phenomena into the higher corona and inner heliosphere. In order to produce a jet, we consider a simple, purely radial background magnetic field and slowly introduce a magnetic flux rope into the coronal configuration by coupling our model to dynamic flux emergence simulations at the lower boundary of the computational domain. We find two types of jets in our simulations: a very impulsive event reminiscent of so-called blowout jets and a slowly developing, more extended event that produces a long-lasting signature in the corona. We present synthetic satellite images for both types of events and discuss their respective formation mechanisms. Our analysis is supported by a detailed investigation of the magnetic topology for the blowout-type case and of the transport of energy and plasma into the higher corona and inner heliosphere for the long-lasting event.

  10. Jets.

    PubMed

    Rhines, Peter B.

    1994-06-01

    This is a discussion of concentrated large-scale flows in planetary atmospheres and oceans, argued from the viewpoint of basic geophysical fluid dynamics. We give several elementary examples in which these flows form jets on rotating spheres. Jet formation occurs under a variety of circumstances: when flows driven by external stress have a rigid boundary which can balance the Coriolis force, and at which further concentration can be caused by the beta effect; when there are singular lines like the line of vanishing windstress or windstress-curl, or the Equator; when compact sources of momentum, heat or mass radiate jet-like beta plumes along latitude circles; when random external stirring of the fluid becomes organized by the beta effect into jets; when internal instability of the mass field generates zonal flow which then is concentrated into jets; when bottom topographic obstacles radiate jets, and when frontogenesis leads to shallow jet formation. Essential to the process of jet formation in stratified fluids is the baroclinic life cycle described in geostrophic turbulence studies; there, conversion from potential to kinetic energy generates eddy motions, and these convert to quasibarotropic motions which then radiate and induce jet-like large-scale circulation. Ideas of potential vorticity stirring by eddies generalize the notion of Rossby-wave radiation, showing how jets embedded in an ambient potential vorticity gradient (typically due to the spherical geometry of the rotating planet) gain eastward momentum while promoting broader, weaker westward circulation. Homogenization of potential vorticity is an important limit point, which many geophysical circulations achieve. This well-mixed state is found in subdomains of the terrestrial midlatitude oceans, the high-latitude circumpolar ocean, and episodically in the middle atmosphere. Homogenization expels potential vorticity gradients vertically to the top and bottom of the fluid, and sideways to the edges of

  11. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (∼27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  12. Corotating Solar Wind Structures and Recurrent Trains of Enhanced Diurnal Variation in Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T.

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (~27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  13. Investigating the Effect of the Heliosphere with Jets on ENAs as a Function of Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbleuth, M. Z.; Opher, M.; Michael, A.; Zieger, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and INCA, on board the Cassini spacecraft, have been probing the global structure of the heliosphere using energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). IBEX tail measurements show a latitudinal dependence in the ENA flux, where two lobes appear at high latitudes in higher energies (4 keV). These measurements were explained as being representative of the presence of the slow and fast wind (McComas et al. 2013). Recently, Opher et al. (2015) proposed that the heliosphere might have turbulent jets in its tail region, as opposed to the classically accepted quiescent, extended comet-like tail. This proposed model of the heliosphere has a "croissant-like" shape, suggesting the lobes seen by IBEX are a structural feature. Over a given solar cycle, the lobes seen by IBEX should evolve differently based on whether they are a result of the presence of slow/fast wind or if they are a structural feature of the heliosphere. If confirmed, the "croissant-like" heliosphere would significantly change our understanding of how the interstellar medium interacts with the solar wind. We investigate the effect of the solar cycle on the lobe structure of the heliosphere with jets model, and the resulting ENA maps using a multi-ion, multi-fluid model. We compare our results with observations from IBEX to assess the validity of the "croissant-like" model. We find that the jets produce ENA signatures consistent with IBEX measurements of the heliotail, where two lobes are visible in the northern and southern hemispheres (McComas et al. 2013; Schwadron et al. 2014). The jets are associated with a strong ENA flux around 4 keV, while the interstellar medium flowing between the jets generates a lower ENA flux at this IBEX energy band.

  14. Observations of Multiple Blobs in Homologous Solar Coronal Jets in Closed Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Ji, H. S.; Su, Y. N.

    2016-03-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) and jets are ubiquitous small-scale brightenings that are often associated with each other. We here report our multiwavelength observations of two groups of homologous jets. The first group was observed by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) onboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) Behind spacecraft in 171 Å and 304 Å on 2014 September 10, from a location where no data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) could be obtained. The jets (J1 - J6) recurred for six times with intervals of 5 - 15 minutes. They originated from the same primary CBP (BP1) and propagated in the northeast direction along large-scale, closed coronal loops. Two of the jets (J3 and J6) produced sympathetic CBPs (BP2 and BP3) after reaching the remote footpoints of the loops. The time delays between the peak times of BP1 and BP2 (BP3) are 240±75 s (300±75 s). The jets were not coherent. Instead, they were composed of bright and compact blobs. The sizes and apparent velocities of the blobs are 4.5 - 9 Mm and 140 - 380 km s-1. The arrival times of the multiple blobs in the jets at the far end of the loops indicate that the sympathetic CBPs are caused by jet flows and not by thermal conduction fronts. The second group was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard SDO in various wavelengths on 2010 August 3. Similar to the first group, the jets originated from a short-lived BP at the boundary of Active Region 11092 and propagated along a small-scale, closed loop before flowing into the active region. Several tiny blobs with sizes of ˜1.7 Mm and an apparent velocity of ˜238 km s^{-1} were identified in the jets. We carried out differential emission measure (DEM) inversions to investigate the temperatures of the blobs, finding that the blobs were multithermal with an average temperature of 1.8 - 3.1 MK. The estimated number densities of the blobs were (1.7 - 2.8)×109 cm^{-3}.

  15. Small-Scale H-alpha Jets in the Solar Chromosphere (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-15

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2011-0003 TP-2011-0003 SMALL-SCALE Hα JETS IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE (POSTPRINT) D. Kuridze, et al... Chromosphere (Postprint) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2301 D. Kuridze,* M...Sun: chromospheres , Sun: faculae, plages , Sun: photosphere, Sun: surface magnetism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  16. Onset of the Magnetic Explosion in Solar Polar Coronal X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Panesar, Navdeep

    2017-08-01

    We examine the onset of the driving magnetic explosion in 15 random polar coronal X-ray jets. Each eruption is observed in a coronal X-ray movie from Hinode and in a coronal EUV movie from Solar Dynamics Observatory. Contrary to the Sterling et al (2015, Nature, 523, 437) scenario for minifilament eruptions that drive polar coronal jets, these observations indicate: (1) in most polar coronal jets (a) the runaway internal tether-cutting reconnection under the erupting minifilament flux rope starts after the spire-producing breakout reconnection starts, not before it, and (b) aleady at eruption onset, there is a current sheet between the explosive closed magnetic field and ambient open field; and (2) the minifilament-eruption magnetic explosion often starts with the breakout reconnection of the outside of the magnetic arcade that carries the minifilament in its core. On the other hand, the diversity of the observed sequences of occurrence of events in the jet eruptions gives further credence to the Sterlling et al (2015, Nature, 523, 437) idea that the magnetic explosions that make a polar X-ray jet work the same way as the much larger magnetic explosions that make and flare and CME. We point out that this idea, and recent observations indicating that magnetic flux cancelation is the fundamental process that builds the field in and around pre-jet minifilaments and triggers the jet-driving magnetic explosion, together imply that usually flux cancelation inside the arcade that explodes in a flare/CME eruption is the fundamental process that builds the explosive field and triggers the explosion.This work was funded by the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate through its Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology Program, its Heliophsyics Guest Investigators Program, and the Hinode Project.

  17. Ink Jet Printing Approaches to Solar Cell Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaydanova, T.; Miedaner, A.; Curtis, C.; Perkins, J.; Alleman, J.; Ginley, D.

    2003-05-01

    We are developing inkjet printing as a low cost, high through-put approach to the deposition of front contacts for Si solar cells. High deposition rates of 1m per printing pass were achieved with a new metalorganic ink composed of silver (trifluoroacetate) in ethylene glycol. The printing conditions were optimized to achieve a relatively high line resolution of 120 m. The optimal parameters for the piezoelectric inkjet were a pulse frequency of 50 Hz and pulse amplitude of 25 V. The best resolution and the line quality were achieved at a substrate temperature of 180 C and drop separation of 40 m.

  18. Modeling Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets with Gravity and Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    Solar polar jets are dynamic, narrow, radially extended structures observed in EUV emission. They have been found to originate within the open magnetic field of coronal holes in “anemone” regions, which are generally accepted to be intrusions of opposite polarity. The associated embedded-dipole topology consists of a spine line emanating from a null point atop a dome-shaped fan surface. Previous work (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010) has validated the idea that magnetic free energy stored on twisted closed field lines within the fan surface can be released explosively by the onset of fast reconnection between the highly stressed closed field inside the null and the unstressed open field outside (Antiochos 1996). The simulations showed that a dense jet comprising a nonlinear, torsional Alfven wave is ejected into the outer corona on the newly reconnected open field lines. While proving the principle of the basic model, those simulations neglected the important effects of gravity, the solar wind, and an expanding spherical geometry. We introduce those additional physical processes in new simulations of reconnection-driven jets, to determine whether the model remains robust in the resulting more realistic setting, and to begin establishing the signatures of the jets in the inner heliosphere for comparison with observations. Initial results demonstrate explosive energy release and a jet in the low corona very much like that in the earlier Cartesian, gravity-free, static-atmosphere runs. We report our analysis of the results, their comparison with previous work, and their implications for observations. This work was supported by NASA’s LWS TR&T program.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Solar polar jets are dynamic, narrow, radially extended structures observed in EUV emission. They have been found to originate within the open magnetic field of coronal holes in “anemone” regions, which are generally accepted to be intrusions of opposite polarity. The associated

  19. On the dynamic nature of the prolate solar chromosphere: jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B.; Koutchmy, S.; Vilinga, J.

    2007-03-01

    Context: In "cool" spectral lines, the smoothed upper edge of the solar chromosphere is prolate in the South-North direction at the epoch of minimum solar activity and nearly spherically symmetric at the maximum phase. We attribute the effect to the dynamical nature of the upper chromosphere, which consists of a large number of small jet-like structures ascending into the corona. We could not resolve the source region of an individual jetlet, although similar but larger structures are visible, especially in EUV coronal lines. Aims: We consider the problem of the formation of an individual jet above the limb, assuming that a large number of jet-like events is responsible for the prolate solar upper chromosphere. We then assume that spicules, being the cool part of the phenomenon, behave similarly, and we will mainly concentrate the analysis on the magnetic origin of the event. Methods: Image processing is used to reveal the displacement of magnetic field tubes filled with coronal plasma and jet formation due to field aligned motion above the null point created in the corona by the emerging magnetic bipole. Results: The growth of the bipole leads to a reconnection of the field lines and to a specific plasma motion in the vicinity of the null point that results in a plasma flow along the spine line of the 3D null. We assume that similar but smaller processes could happen very often at a smaller scale in the chromosphere, near emerging magnetic ephemeral regions, forming numerous jetlets in the upper chromosphere. As the field aligned motion is guided by the magnetic field, at the epoch of low activity the large-scale structure of the polar magnetic field and the one of the quiet equatorial region is sufficiently different to explain the prolateness of the chromosphere.

  20. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  1. Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in Solar Chromospheric Jets: Theory and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuridze, D.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Henriques, V.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2016-10-01

    Using data obtained by the high-resolution CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter instrument on the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, we investigate the dynamics and stability of quiet-Sun chromospheric jets observed at the disk center. Small-scale features, such as rapid redshifted and blueshifted excursions, appearing as high-speed jets in the wings of the Hα line, are characterized by short lifetimes and rapid fading without any descending behavior. To study the theoretical aspects of their stability without considering their formation mechanism, we model chromospheric jets as twisted magnetic flux tubes moving along their axis, and use the ideal linear incompressible magnetohydrodynamic approximation to derive the governing dispersion equation. Analytical solutions of the dispersion equation indicate that this type of jet is unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), with a very short (few seconds) instability growth time at high upflow speeds. The generated vortices and unresolved turbulent flows associated with the KHI could be observed as a broadening of chromospheric spectral lines. Analysis of the Hα line profiles shows that the detected structures have enhanced line widths with respect to the background. We also investigate the stability of a larger-scale Hα jet that was ejected along the line of sight. Vortex-like features, rapidly developing around the jet’s boundary, are considered as evidence of the KHI. The analysis of the energy equation in the partially ionized plasma shows that ion-neutral collisions may lead to fast heating of the KH vortices over timescales comparable to the lifetime of chromospheric jets.

  2. DRIVING SOLAR SPICULES AND JETS WITH MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE: TESTING A PERSISTENT IDEA

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2015-10-10

    The solar chromosphere contains thin, highly dynamic strands of plasma known as spicules. Recently, it has been suggested that the smallest and fastest (Type II) spicules are identical to intermittent jets observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. These jets appear to expand out along open magnetic field lines rooted in unipolar network regions of coronal holes. In this paper we revisit a thirty-year-old idea that spicules may be caused by upward forces associated with Alfvén waves. These forces involve the conversion of transverse Alfvén waves into compressive acoustic-like waves that steepen into shocks. The repeated buffeting due to upward shock propagation causes nonthermal expansion of the chromosphere and a transient levitation of the transition region (TR). Some older models of wave-driven spicules assumed sinusoidal wave inputs, but the solar atmosphere is highly turbulent and stochastic. Thus, we model this process using the output of a time-dependent simulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The resulting mode-converted compressive waves are strongly variable in time, with a higher TR occurring when the amplitudes are large and a lower TR when the amplitudes are small. In this picture, the TR bobs up and down by several Mm on timescales less than a minute. These motions produce narrow, intermittent extensions of the chromosphere that have similar properties as the observed jets and Type II spicules.

  3. Driving Solar Spicules and Jets with Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence: Testing a Persistent Idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2015-10-01

    The solar chromosphere contains thin, highly dynamic strands of plasma known as spicules. Recently, it has been suggested that the smallest and fastest (Type II) spicules are identical to intermittent jets observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. These jets appear to expand out along open magnetic field lines rooted in unipolar network regions of coronal holes. In this paper we revisit a thirty-year-old idea that spicules may be caused by upward forces associated with Alfvén waves. These forces involve the conversion of transverse Alfvén waves into compressive acoustic-like waves that steepen into shocks. The repeated buffeting due to upward shock propagation causes nonthermal expansion of the chromosphere and a transient levitation of the transition region (TR). Some older models of wave-driven spicules assumed sinusoidal wave inputs, but the solar atmosphere is highly turbulent and stochastic. Thus, we model this process using the output of a time-dependent simulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The resulting mode-converted compressive waves are strongly variable in time, with a higher TR occurring when the amplitudes are large and a lower TR when the amplitudes are small. In this picture, the TR bobs up and down by several Mm on timescales less than a minute. These motions produce narrow, intermittent extensions of the chromosphere that have similar properties as the observed jets and Type II spicules.

  4. Ulysses observations of a recurrent high speed solar wind stream and the heliomagnetic streamer belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L. ); Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M. ); Harvey, J.W.

    1993-11-05

    Near-ecliptic solar wind observations by Ulysses on its way to the polar regions of the Sun, compared with those from IMP 8 at 1 AU, showed that high-speed streams decay and broaden with heliocentric distance from IMP 8 to Ulysses, as expected. In July 1992 while travelling south at [approximately]13[degrees]S and 5.3 AU, Ulysses encountered a recurrent high-speed stream, that may also have been observed at IMP 8. The stream has been observed a total of 14 times, once in each solar rotation through June 1993 at [approximately]34[degrees]S. The source of the high-speed stream is an equatorward extension of the south polar coronal hole. From July 1992 through June 1993, averages of solar wind peak speed increased while density decreased with heliographic latitude. Both the stream and a low-speed, high-density flow, presumably associated with the heliomagnetic (coronal) streamer belt encircling the heliomagnetic equator, crossed Ulysses with the solar rotation period until April 1993 when the spacecraft was at [approximately]29[degrees]S heliographic latitude. After this time, as the spacecraft climbed to higher latitudes, the central portion of the streamer belt with lowest speed and highest density disappeared. Therefore, at its maximum inclination, the belt was tilted at [approximately]29[degrees] to the heliographic equator at this point in the solar cycle. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Ulysses observations of a recurrent high speed solar wind stream and the heliomagnetic streamer belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gosling, J. T.; Harvey, J. W.; Mccomas, D. J.; Neugebauer, M.; Phillips, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Near-ecliptic solar wind observations by Ulysses on its way to the polar regions of the Sun, compared with those from IMP 8 at 1 AU, showed that high-speed streams decay and broaden with heliocentric distance from IMP 8 to Ulysses, as expected. In July 1992 while traveling south at approximately 13 deg S and 5.3 AU, Ulysses encountered a recurrent high-speed stream, that may also have been observed at IMP 8. The stream has been observed a total of 14 times, once in each solar rotation through June 1993 at approximately 34 deg S. The source of the high-speed stream is an equatorward extension of the south polar coronal hole. From July 1992 through June 1993, averages of solar wind peak speed increased while density decreased with heliographic latitude. Both the stream and a low-speed, high-density flow, presumably associated with the heliomagnetic (coronal) streamer belt encircling the heliomagnetic equator, crossed Ulysses with the solar rotation period until April 1993 when the spacecraft was at approximately 29 deg S heliographic latitude. After this time, as the spacecraft climbed to higher latitudes, the central portion of the streamer belt with lowest speed and highest density disappeared. Therefore, at its maximum inclination, the belt was tilted at approximately 29 deg to the heliographic equator at this point in the solar cycle.

  6. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-01

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the `emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the `legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament.

  7. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Alphonse C; Moore, Ronald L; Falconer, David A; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-23

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the 'emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the 'legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament.

  8. PLASMA JETS AND ERUPTIONS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES: A THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLUX EMERGENCE EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2013-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical experiment of the launching of a hot and fast coronal jet followed by several violent eruptions is analyzed in detail. These events are initiated through the emergence of a magnetic flux rope from the solar interior into a coronal hole. We explore the evolution of the emerging magnetically dominated plasma dome surmounted by a current sheet and the ensuing pattern of reconnection. A hot and fast coronal jet with inverted-Y shape is produced that shows properties comparable to those frequently observed with EUV and X-ray detectors. We analyze its 3D shape, its inhomogeneous internal structure, and its rise and decay phases, lasting for some 15-20 minutes each. Particular attention is devoted to the field line connectivities and the reconnection pattern. We also study the cool and high-density volume that appears to encircle the emerged dome. The decay of the jet is followed by a violent phase with a total of five eruptions. The first of them seems to follow the general pattern of tether-cutting reconnection in a sheared arcade, although modified by the field topology created by the preceding reconnection evolution. The two following eruptions take place near and above the strong-field concentrations at the surface. They show a twisted, {Omega}-loop-like rope expanding in height, with twist being turned into writhe, thus hinting at a kink instability (perhaps combined with a torus instability) as the cause of the eruption. The succession of a main jet ejection and a number of violent eruptions that resemble mini-CMEs and their physical properties suggest that this experiment may provide a model for the blowout jets recently proposed in the literature.

  9. Non-Linear Force-Free Field Modelling of Solar Coronal Jets in Theoretical Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets occur frequently on the Sun, and may contribute significantly to the solar wind. With the suite of instruments avilable now, e.g. on IRIS, Hinode and SDO, we can observe these phenomena in greater detail than ever before. Modeling and simulations can assist further in understanding the dynamic processes involved, but previous studies tend to consider only one mechanism (e.g. emergence or rotation) for the origin of the jet. In this study we model a series of idealised archetypaljet configurations and follow the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. This is a step towards understanding these idealised situations before considering their observational counterparts. Several simple situations are set up for the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field: a single parasitic polarity rotating or moving in a circular path; as well as opposite polarity pairs involved in flyby (shearing), cancellation or emergence; all in the presence of a uniform, open background magneticfield. The coronal magnetic field is evolved in time using a magnetofrictional relaxation method. While magnetofriction cannot accurately reproduce the dynamics of an eruptive phase, the structure of the coronal magnetic field, as well as the build up of electric currents and free magnetic energy are instructive. Certain configurations and motions produce a flux rope and allow the significant build up of free energy, reminiscent of the progenitors of so-called blowout jets, whereas other, simpler configurations are more comparable to the standard jet model. The next stage is a comparison with observed coronal jet structures and their corresponding photospheric evolution.

  10. Innovative second-generation wavelets construction with recurrent neural networks for solar radiation forecasting.

    PubMed

    Capizzi, Giacomo; Napoli, Christian; Bonanno, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Solar radiation prediction is an important challenge for the electrical engineer because it is used to estimate the power developed by commercial photovoltaic modules. This paper deals with the problem of solar radiation prediction based on observed meteorological data. A 2-day forecast is obtained by using novel wavelet recurrent neural networks (WRNNs). In fact, these WRNNS are used to exploit the correlation between solar radiation and timescale-related variations of wind speed, humidity, and temperature. The input to the selected WRNN is provided by timescale-related bands of wavelet coefficients obtained from meteorological time series. The experimental setup available at the University of Catania, Italy, provided this information. The novelty of this approach is that the proposed WRNN performs the prediction in the wavelet domain and, in addition, also performs the inverse wavelet transform, giving the predicted signal as output. The obtained simulation results show a very low root-mean-square error compared to the results of the solar radiation prediction approaches obtained by hybrid neural networks reported in the recent literature.

  11. Origin of the High-speed Jets Fom Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Solar Transition Region as well as Their Mass and Energy Contribuctions to the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liping, Y.; He, J.; Peter, H.; Tu, C. Y.; Feng, X. S.

    2015-12-01

    In the solar atmosphere, the jets are ubiquitous and found to be at various spatia-temporal scales. They are significant to understand energy and mass transport in the solar atmosphere. Recently, the high-speed transition region jets are reported from the observation. Here we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate the mechanism in their formation, as well as their mass and energy contributions to the solar wind. Driven by the supergranular convection motion, the magnetic reconnection between the magnetic loop and the background open flux occurring in the transition region is simulated with a two-dimensional MHD model. The simulation results show that not only a fast hot jet, much resemble the found transition region jets, but also a adjacent slow cool jet, mostly like classical spicules, is launched. The force analysis shows that the fast hot jet is continually driven by the Lorentz force around the reconnection region, while the slow cool jet is induced by an initial kick through the Lorentz force associated with the emerging magnetic flux. Also, the features of the driven jets change with the amount of the emerging magnetic flux, giving the varieties of both jets.With the developed one-dimensional hydrodynamic solar wind model, the time-dependent pulses are imposed at the bottom to simulate the jet behaviors. The simulation results show that without other energy source, the injected plasmas are accelerated effectively to be a transonic wind with a substantial mass flux. The rapid acceleration occurs close to the Sun, and the resulting asymptotic speeds, number density at 0.3 AU, as well as mass flux normalized to 1 AU are compatible with in site observations. As a result of the high speed, the imposed pulses lead to a train of shocks traveling upward. By tracing the motions of the injected plasma, it is found that these shocks heat and accelerate the injected plasma to make part of them propagate upward and eventually escape. The parametric study shows

  12. A Coronal Hole Jet Observed with Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Peter H.; Muglach, Karin

    2014-01-01

    A small blowout jet was observed at the boundary of the south coronal hole on 2011 February 8 at around 21:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) revealed an expanding loop rising from one footpoint of a compact, bipolar bright point. Magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO showed that the jet was triggered by the cancelation of a parasitic positive polarity feature near the negative pole of the bright point. The jet emission was present for 25 mins and it extended 30 Mm from the bright point. Spectra from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode yielded a temperature and density of 1.6 MK and 0.9-1.7 × 10( exp 8) cu cm for the ejected plasma. Line-of-sight velocities reached up to 250 km/s. The density of the bright point was 7.6 × 10(exp 8) cu cm, and the peak of the bright point's emission measure occurred at 1.3 MK, with no plasma above 3 MK.

  13. Non-contact printing of high aspect ratio Ag electrodes for polycrystalline silicone solar cell with electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yonghee; Hartarto Tambunan, Indra; Tak, Hyowon; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Kang, TaeSam; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a non-contact printing mechanism for high aspect ratio silver (Ag) electrodes fabricated by an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technique. Using high viscosity Ag paste ink, we were able to fabricate narrow and high aspect ratio electrodes. We investigated the effect of the surface energy of the substrate and improved the aspect ratio of printed lines through multiple printing. We fabricated the polycrystalline silicone solar cell with the Ag electrode and achieved cell efficiency of around 13.7%. The EHD jet printing mechanism may be an alternative method for non-contact fabrication of solar cells electrodes.

  14. Switch-on Shock and Nonlinear Kink Alfvén Waves in Solar Polar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Uritsky, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    It is widely accepted that solar polar jets are produced by fast magnetic reconnection in the low corona, whether driven directly by flux emergence from below or indirectly by instability onset above the photosphere. In either scenario, twisted flux on closed magnetic field lines reconnects with untwisted flux on nearby open field lines. Part of the twist is inherited by the newly reconnected open flux, which rapidly relaxes due to magnetic tension forces that transmit the twist impulsively into the outer corona and heliosphere. We propose that this transfer of twist launches switch-on MHD shock waves, which propagate parallel to the ambient coronal magnetic field ahead of the shock and convect a perpendicular component of magnetic field behind the shock. In the frame moving with the shock front, the post-shock flow is precisely Alfvénic in all three directions, whereas the pre-shock flow is super-Alfvénic along the ambient magnetic field, yielding a density enhancement at the shock front. Nonlinear kink Alfvén waves are exact solutions of the time-dependent MHD equations in the post-shock region when the ambient corona is uniform and the magnetic field is straight. We have performed and analyzed 3D Cartesian and spherical simulations of polar jets driven by instability onset in the corona. The results of both simulations are consistent with the generation of MHD switch-on shocks trailed predominantly by incompressible kink Alfvén waves. It is noteworthy that the kink waves are irrotational, in sharp contrast to the vorticity-bearing torsional waves reported from previous numerical studies. We will discuss the implications of the results for understanding solar polar jets and predicting their heliospheric signatures. Our research was supported by NASA’s LWS TR&T and H-SR programs.

  15. The Response of A Three-dimensional Solar Atmosphere to Wave-driven Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, E.; Erdélyi, R.; Fedun, V.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Global oscillations from the solar interior are, mainly, pressure-driven (p-modes) oscillations with a peak power of a five-minute period. These oscillations are considered to manifest in many phenomena in the lower solar atmosphere, most notably, in spicules. These small-scale jets may provide the key to understanding the powering mechanisms of the transition region (TR) and lower corona. Here, we simulate the formation of wave-driven (type-I) spicule phenomena in three dimensions and the transmission of acoustic waves from the lower chromosphere and into the corona. The outer atmosphere oscillates in response to the jet formation, and in turn, we reveal the formation of a circular seismic surface wave, which we name as a Transition Region Quake (TRQ). The TRQ forms as a consequence of an upward propelling spicular wave train that repeatedly punctures and energizes the TR. The steep density gradient enables the TRQ to develop and radially fan outward from the location where the spicular plasma column impinges the TR. We suggest the TRQ formation as a formidable mechanism in continuously sustaining part of the energy budget of the TR. We present a supporting numerical model which allow us to determine the level of energy dumping at the TR by upward-propagating p-modes. Upon applying a wavelet analysis on our simulations we identify the presence of a chromospheric cavity which resonates with the jet propagation and leaves behind an oscillatory wake with a distinctive periodicity. Through our numerical analysis we also discover type-I spicule turbulence leading to a convection-based motion in the low corona.

  16. KINEMATICS AND FINE STRUCTURE OF AN UNWINDING POLAR JET OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMIC OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2011-07-10

    We present an observational study of the kinematics and fine structure of an unwinding polar jet, with high temporal and spatial observations taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope. During the rising period, the shape of the jet resembled a cylinder with helical structures on the surface, while the mass of the jet was mainly distributed on the cylinder's shell. In the radial direction, the jet expanded successively at its western side and underwent three distinct phases: the gradually expanding phase, the fast expanding phase, and the steady phase. Each phase lasted for about 12 minutes. The angular speed of the unwinding motion of the jet and the twist transferred into the outer corona during the eruption are estimated to be 11.1 x 10{sup -3} rad s{sup -1} (period = 564 s) and 1.17-2.55 turns (or 2.34-5.1{pi}), respectively. On the other hand, by calculating the azimuthal component of the magnetic field in the jet and comparing the free energy stored in the non-potential magnetic field with the jet's total energy, we find that the non-potential magnetic field in the jet is enough to supply the energy for the ejection. These new observational results strongly support the scenario that the jets are driven by the magnetic twist, which is stored in the twisted closed field of a small bipole, and released through magnetic reconnection between the bipole and its ambient open field.

  17. Influence of the solar cycle on the Polar-night Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yuhji

    2017-04-01

    The Polar-night Jet Oscillation (PJO) is the dominant mode of stratospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), and persists from mid-winter to spring. The influence of the 11-year solar cycle on modulation of the PJO from late winter to spring is examined using observations and three 42-year simulations from a chemistry-climate model. The only variation applied to model boundary conditions was the strength of ultraviolet radiation (UV). This is set at two times larger than observations to enhance the strength of the solar signal. Simulations show a downward propagation of the stratospheric signal into the troposphere from late winter to spring, which tends to be enhanced as UV strength increases. This result is similar to observations, but with a 1-2 month lag. The behavior of the PJO with respect to wave-mean flow interactions is examined using a newly developed momentum budget analysis as well as wave-energy analysis. We suggest that UV modulation of the interactions between planetary waves and zonal-mean flow in the stratosphere, rather than direct diabatic processes as suggested in a previous study, is the source of solar cycle modulation of the PJO.

  18. Influence of the solar cycle on the Polar-night Jet Oscillation in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yuhji; Deushi, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    The Polar-night Jet Oscillation (PJO) is the dominant mode of stratospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere and persists from midwinter to spring. The influence of the 11 year solar cycle on modulation of the PJO from late winter to spring is examined using observations and three 42 year simulations from a chemistry-climate model. The only variation applied to model boundary conditions was the strength of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This is set at 2 times larger than observations to enhance the strength of the solar signal. Simulations show a downward propagation of the stratospheric signal into the troposphere from late winter to spring, which tends to be enhanced as UV strength increases. This result is similar to observations but with a 1-2 month lag. The behavior of the PJO with respect to wave-mean flow interactions is examined using a newly developed momentum budget analysis as well as wave energy analysis. We suggest that UV modulation of the interactions between planetary waves and zonal-mean flow in the stratosphere, rather than direct diabatic processes as suggested in a previous study, is the source of solar cycle modulation of the PJO.

  19. TRIGGER OF A BLOWOUT JET IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION ASSOCIATED WITH A FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Shuhong; Chen, Huadong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-20

    Using the multi-wavelength images and the photospheric magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study the flare that was associated with the only coronal mass ejection (CME) in active region (AR) 12192. The eruption of a filament caused a blowout jet, and then an M4.0 class flare occurred. This flare was located at the edge of the AR instead of in the core region. The flare was close to the apparently “open” fields, appearing as extreme-ultraviolet structures that fan out rapidly. Due to the interaction between flare materials and “open” fields, the flare became an eruptive flare, leading to the CME. Then, at the same site of the first eruption, another small filament erupted. With the high spatial and temporal resolution Hα data from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we investigate the interaction between the second filament and the nearby “open” lines. The filament reconnected with the “open” lines, forming a new system. To our knowledge, the detailed process of this kind of interaction is reported for the first time. Then the new system rotated due to the untwisting motion of the filament, implying that the twist was transferred from the closed filament system to the “open” system. In addition, the twist seemed to propagate from the lower atmosphere to the upper layers and was eventually spread by the CME to the interplanetary space.

  20. DETERMINATION OF SUB-RESOLUTION STRUCTURE OF A JET BY SOLAR MAGNETOSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Verth, G.; McLaughlin, J. A. E-mail: gary.verth@northumbria.ac.uk

    2012-01-01

    A thin dark thread is observed in a UV/EUV solar jet in the 171 A, 193 A, and 211 A, and partially in 304 A. The dark thread appears to originate in the chromosphere but its temperature does not appear to lie within the passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We therefore implement solar magnetoseismology to estimate the plasma parameters of the dark thread. A propagating kink (transverse) wave is observed to travel along the dark thread. The wave is tracked over a range of {approx}7000 km by placing multiple slits along the axis of the dark thread. The phase speed and amplitude of the wave are estimated and magnetoseismological theory is employed to determine the plasma parameters. We are able to estimate the plasma temperature, density gradient, magnetic field gradient, and sub-resolution expansion of the dark thread. The dark thread is found to be cool, T {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}, with both strong density and magnetic field gradients. The expansion of the flux tube along its length is {approx}300-400 km.

  1. Can Kelvin-Helmholtz Instabilities of Jet-Like Structures and Plumes Cause Solar Wind Fluctuations at 1AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, Shyamsundar; Suess, Steven T.; Sulkanen, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    During its south polar passage in 1994, Ulysses sampled the solar wind emerging from the south polar coronal hole. In analysing these data two types of density fluctuations lasting a few hours have been reported, one characterized by fluctuations in velocity gradients ("microstreams") and the other by magnetic plus thermal-pressure balance structures ("PBS"). Microstreams were both temporal and spatial in nature. At higher frequencies, MHD turbulence was observed and found to be less evolved than in the ecliptic, but essentially independent of heliographic latitude. It is argued here that microstreams, PBS, and MHD turbulence could all be the remnant of shears associated with plumes and other filamentary structures ("jets") which have been reported to exist in coronal holes. The shear between a jet and its ambient can become unstable to the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH') instability at 5-10 solar radius and the propagating instability can cause fluctuations like those seen by Ulysses. This motivates us to simulate coronal jets using a 3D MHD ZEUS code. The first 2D results have just started to come and are promising. To study the KH instability the jet is perturbed at the boundary with a linear amplitude and fixed frequency. The jet seems to pass through various distinct phases, one of which Is apparently dominated by KH instabilities. These instabilities drive oblique shocks into the jet as the turbulent eddies contact the jet surface. It is known that KH instabilities and internal shock waves are partially suppressed by magnetic field tension. Hence, in simulating far along the jet the Instability is expected to produce Alfvenic fluctuations like those seen near 1 AU.

  2. Energy Spectrum of the Recurrent Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays During the Solar Minimum of Cycles 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael V.

    2016-08-01

    The Sun during the recent epoch of solar activity operated in a different way than during the last 60 years, being less active. We study temporal changes of the energy spectrum of the first three harmonics of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity during the unusual, recent solar minimum, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24 (SC 23/24) and compare with four previous minima. We show that the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity is hard in the maximum epochs and is soft in the minimum epochs during Solar Cycles 20 - 24, but with peculiarities during the Solar Minimum 23/24. In particular, while the energy/rigidity spectrum of the amplitudes of the first harmonic of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity behaves practically the same as for previous epochs, the energy/rigidity spectrum of the amplitudes of the second and the third harmonics demonstrates a pronounced softening. We attribute this phenomenon to the decrease of the extension of the heliosphere caused by the decrease of the solar-wind dynamic pressure during the unusual Solar Minimum 23/24.

  3. Equilibrium And Instability Of Toroidal Field Bands And Rotational Jets In The Solar Tachocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, P. A.; Rempel, M.; Dikpati, M.

    2002-05-01

    Recently Dikpati & Gilman (2001, ApJ, 552, 348) have shown, using a shallow-water model of the solar tachocline that allows the top surface to deform, that a tachocline with the observed broad differential rotation and a strong toroidal field is prolate. A strong toroidal field ring requires extra mass on its poleward side to provide a hydrostatic latitudinal pressure gradient to balance the poleward curvature stress. In a parallel study using a different approach, Rempel et al (2000, A&A, 363, 789) have shown that a weakly subadiabatic stratification leads to a complementary equilibrium state of the overshoot tachocline in which the magnetic curvature stress is balanced by a prograde rotational jet inside the toroidal ring. We show that the shallow water model yields a similar equilibrium state if we suppress the shell deformation and allow the differential rotation to be modified. We are analyzing the stability of such an equilibrium tachocline by using the MHD shallow-water model of Gilman & Dikpati (2002, ApJ, submitted). We expect to show that the combination of toroidal band and rotational jet is virtually always unstable to disturbances with longitudinal wave number m>0, except perhaps when the band is extremely narrow. This instability could wipe out the jet, and lead to some poleward migration of the toroidal field, as well as the excitation of longitudinally periodic magnetic patterns that might provide sites for magnetic bouyancy to produce spots as well as other photospheric magnetic features. This work is supported by NASA grants W-19752 and S-10145-X. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  4. Prompt particle acceleration and plasma jet formation during current loop coalescence in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi

    1990-06-01

    Numerical simulations based on the theory of Sakai and Tajima (1986) are used to study high-energy particle acceleration during current loop coalescence in solar flares. The results show that the electrons and protons can be quasi-periodically accelerated to relativistic energies in a very short period of time (much less than 1 sec) when the ratio of poloidal (loop current) to toroidal (potential field) components of the magnetic field is greater than one. It is shown that the spiral two-sided plasma jet can be explosively driven by the plasma rotational motion during the two-current loop coalescence process. Also, it is found that the rebound following the plasma collapse caused by the magnetic pinch effect may induce super-magnetosonic flow that can lead to fast magnetosonic shock waves.

  5. Solar X-ray Jets, Type-II Spicules, Granule-size Emerging Bipoles, and the Genesis of the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2011-04-01

    From Hinode observations of solar X-ray jets, Type-II spicules, and granule-size emerging bipolar magnetic fields in quiet regions and coronal holes, we advocate a scenario for powering coronal heating and the solar wind. In this scenario, Type-II spicules and Alfvén waves are generated by the granule-size emerging bipoles (EBs) in the manner of the generation of X-ray jets by larger magnetic bipoles. From observations and this scenario, we estimate that Type-II spicules and their co-generated Alfvén waves carry into the corona an area-average flux of mechanical energy of ~7 × 105 erg cm-2 s-1. This is enough to power the corona and solar wind in quiet regions and coronal holes, and therefore indicates that the granule-size EBs are the main engines that generate and sustain the entire heliosphere.

  6. Preparation of active layers in polymer solar cells by aerosol jet printing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunhe; Zhou, Erjun; Miyanishi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Tajima, Keisuke

    2011-10-01

    Active layers of polymer solar cells were prepared by aerosol jet printing of organic inks. Various solvents and additives with high boiling points were screened for the preparation of high-quality polymer films. The effects on device performance of treating the films by thermal and solvent vapor annealing were also investigated. The components of the solvent were important for controlling the drying rate of the liquid films, reducing the number of particle-like protrusions on the film surface, and realizing high molecular ordering in the polymer phases. The optimized solar cell device with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and a C(60) derivative showed a high fill factor of 67% and power conversion efficiency of 2.53% without thermal annealing. The combination of poly[N-9-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-3,6-bis(thiophen-5-yl)-2,5-diethylhexyl-2,5-dihydropyrrolo-[3,4-]pyrrole-1,4-dione] and a C(70) derivative led to power conversion efficiency of 3.92 and 3.14% for device areas of 0.03 and 1 cm(2), respectively.

  7. Ink jet printable silver metallization with zinc oxide for front side metallization for micro crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Robert; Fritsch, Marco; Eberstein, Markus; Schilm, Jochen; Uhlig, Florian; Waltinger, Andreas; Michaelis, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Ink jet printable water based inks are prepared by a new silver nanoparticle synthesis and the addition of nanoscaled ZnO particles. For the formation of front side contacts the inks are ink jet printed on the front side of micro crystalline silicon solar cells, and contact the cell directly during the firing step by etching through the wafers’ anti-reflection coating (ARC). In terms of Ag dissolution and precipitation the mechanism of contact formation can be compared to commercial glass containing thick film pastes. This avoids additional processing steps, like laser ablation, which are usually necessary to open the ARC prior to ink jet printing. As a consequence process costs can be reduced. In order to optimize the ARC etching and contact formation during firing, zinc oxide nanoparticles are investigated as an ink additive. By utilization of in situ contact resistivity measurements the mechanism of contacting was explored. Our results show that silver inks containing ZnO particles realize a specific contact resistance below 10 mΩṡcm2. By using a multi-pass ink jet printing and plating process a front side metallization of commercial 6  ×  6 inch2 standard micro crystalline silicone solar cells with emitter resistance of 60 Ω/◽ was achieved and showed an efficiency of 15.7%.

  8. Onset of a Large Ejective Solar Eruption from a Typical Coronal-jet-base Field Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Magara, Tetsuya; Moon, Young-Jae

    2017-08-01

    Utilizing multiwavelength observations and magnetic field data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), and RHESSI, we investigate a large-scale ejective solar eruption of 2014 December 18 from active region NOAA 12241. This event produced a distinctive “three-ribbon” flare, having two parallel ribbons corresponding to the ribbons of a standard two-ribbon flare, and a larger-scale third quasi-circular ribbon offset from the other two. There are two components to this eruptive event. First, a flux rope forms above a strong-field polarity inversion line and erupts and grows as the parallel ribbons turn on, grow, and spread apart from that polarity inversion line; this evolution is consistent with the mechanism of tether-cutting reconnection for eruptions. Second, the eruption of the arcade that has the erupting flux rope in its core undergoes magnetic reconnection at the null point of a fan dome that envelops the erupting arcade, resulting in formation of the quasi-circular ribbon; this is consistent with the breakout reconnection mechanism for eruptions. We find that the parallel ribbons begin well before (˜12 minutes) the onset of the circular ribbon, indicating that tether-cutting reconnection (or a non-ideal MHD instability) initiated this event, rather than breakout reconnection. The overall setup for this large-scale eruption (diameter of the circular ribbon ˜105 km) is analogous to that of coronal jets (base size ˜104 km), many of which, according to recent findings, result from eruptions of small-scale “minifilaments.” Thus these findings confirm that eruptions of sheared-core magnetic arcades seated in fan-spine null-point magnetic topology happen on a wide range of size scales on the Sun.

  9. RESOLVING THE FAN-SPINE RECONNECTION GEOMETRY OF A SMALL-SCALE CHROMOSPHERIC JET EVENT WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Chen, Bin; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-03-01

    Jets are ubiquitously present in both quiet and active regions on the Sun. They are widely believed to be driven by magnetic reconnection. A fan-spine structure has been frequently reported in some coronal jets and flares, and has been regarded as a signature of ongoing magnetic reconnection in a topology consisting of a magnetic null connected by a fan-like separatrix surface and a spine. However, for small-scale chromospheric jets, clear evidence of such structures is rather rare, although it has been implied in earlier works that showed an inverted-Y-shaped feature. Here we report high-resolution (0.″16) observations of a small-scale chromospheric jet obtained by the New Solar Telescope (NST) using 10830 Å filtergrams. Bi-directional flows were observed across the separatrix regions in the 10830 Å images, suggesting that the jet was produced due to magnetic reconnection. At the base of the jet, a fan-spine structure was clearly resolved by the NST, including the spine and the fan-like surface, as well as the loops before and after the reconnection. A major part of this fan-spine structure, with the exception of its bright footpoints and part of the base arc, was invisible in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray images (observed by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly and the X-Ray Telescope, respectively), indicating that the reconnection occurred in the upper chromosphere. Our observations suggest that the evolution of this chromospheric jet is consistent with a two-step reconnection scenario proposed by Török et al.

  10. Resolving the Fan-spine Reconnection Geometry of a Small-scale Chromospheric Jet Event with the New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Chen, Bin; Ji, Haisheng; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-03-01

    Jets are ubiquitously present in both quiet and active regions on the Sun. They are widely believed to be driven by magnetic reconnection. A fan-spine structure has been frequently reported in some coronal jets and flares, and has been regarded as a signature of ongoing magnetic reconnection in a topology consisting of a magnetic null connected by a fan-like separatrix surface and a spine. However, for small-scale chromospheric jets, clear evidence of such structures is rather rare, although it has been implied in earlier works that showed an inverted-Y-shaped feature. Here we report high-resolution (0.″16) observations of a small-scale chromospheric jet obtained by the New Solar Telescope (NST) using 10830 Å filtergrams. Bi-directional flows were observed across the separatrix regions in the 10830 Å images, suggesting that the jet was produced due to magnetic reconnection. At the base of the jet, a fan-spine structure was clearly resolved by the NST, including the spine and the fan-like surface, as well as the loops before and after the reconnection. A major part of this fan-spine structure, with the exception of its bright footpoints and part of the base arc, was invisible in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray images (observed by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly and the X-Ray Telescope, respectively), indicating that the reconnection occurred in the upper chromosphere. Our observations suggest that the evolution of this chromospheric jet is consistent with a two-step reconnection scenario proposed by Török et al.

  11. Analysis and modelling of recurrent solar flares observed with Hinode/EIS on March 9, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, V.; Del Zanna, G.; Valori, G.; Pariat, E.; Mason, H. E.; Dudík, J.; Janvier, M.

    2017-05-01

    Three homologous C-class flares and one last M-class flare were observed by both the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) in the AR 11429 on March 9, 2012. All the recurrent flares occurred within a short interval of time (less than 4 h), showed very similar plasma morphology and were all confined, until the last one when a large-scale eruption occurred. The C-class flares are characterized by the appearance, at approximatively the same locations, of two bright and compact footpoint sources of ≈3-10 MK evaporating plasma, and a semi-circular ribbon. During all the flares, the continuous brightening of a spine-like hot plasma (≈10 MK) structure is also observed. Spectroscopic observations with Hinode/EIS are used to measure and compare the blueshift velocities in the Fe xxiii emission line and the electron number density at the flare footpoints for each flare. Similar velocities, of the order of 150-200 km s-1, are observed during the C2.0 and C4.7 confined flares, in agreement with the values reported by other authors in the study of the last M1.8 class flare. On the other hand, lower electron number densities and temperatures tend to be observed in flares with lower peak soft X-ray flux. In order to investigate the homologous nature of the flares, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of the 3D magnetic field configuration in the corona. The NLFFF extrapolation and the Quasi-Separatrix Layers (QSLs) provide the magnetic field context which explains the location of the kernels, spine-like hot plasma and semi-circular brightenings observed in the (non-eruptive) flares. Given the absence of a coronal null point, we argue that the homologous flares were all generated by the continuous recurrence of bald patch reconnection. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Particle-in-cell Simulation of Electron Acceleration in Solar Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, G.; Nordlund, Å.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate electron acceleration resulting from three-dimensional magnetic reconnection between an emerging, twisted magnetic flux rope and a pre-existing weak, open magnetic field. We first follow the rise of an unstable, twisted flux tube with a resistive MHD simulation where the numerical resolution is enhanced by using fixed mesh refinement. As in previous MHD investigations of similar situations, the rise of the flux tube into the pre-existing inclined coronal magnetic field results in the formation of a solar coronal jet. A snapshot of the MHD model is then used as an initial and boundary condition for a particle-in-cell simulation, using up to half a billion cells and over 20 billion charged particles. Particle acceleration occurs mainly in the reconnection current sheet, with accelerated electrons displaying a power law in the energy probability distribution with an index of around -1.5. The main acceleration mechanism is a systematic electric field, striving to maintaining the electric current in the current sheet against losses caused by electrons not being able to stay in the current sheet for more than a few seconds at a time.

  13. High-resolution Observations of Plasma Jets in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    1999-12-01

    We present recent observations of coronal jets, made by TRACE and Yohkoh/SXT on 28 May and 19 August 1998. The high spatial resolution of TRACE enables us to see in detail the process of material ejection; in the line of Fe ix (one million degrees) we see both bright emitting material and dark absorbing/scattering material being ejected, i.e., both hot and cold material, highly collimated and apparently ejected along the direction of the overlying field lines. Bright ejecta are seen simultaneously in Lyman α for one event and Yohkoh/SXT in the other. The jets on the two days are different in that the 19 August jet displays the morphology typical of a one-sided anemone jet while the 28 May jet exhibits a two-sided jet morphology. The 19 August jet shows evidence for rotation and an interesting bifurcation at large distances from the energy release site. We study the physical properties and energetics of these jetting events, and conclude that existing theoretical models capture the essential physics of the jet phenomena.

  14. DISCOVERY OF ULTRA-STEEP SPECTRUM GIANT RADIO GALAXY WITH RECURRENT RADIO JET ACTIVITY IN ABELL 449

    SciTech Connect

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-20

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  15. Corotating high-speed solar-wind streams and recurrent cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2007-05-01

    We studied the solar magnetic cycle dependence of cosmic ray depressions due to the corotating high-speed solar wind streams (CSWS) during different polarity states of the heliosphere. The daily averaged cosmic ray intensity data from Climax, Oulu, and Thule neutron monitors together with simultaneous solar wind plasma and field data were subjected to the superposed epoch analysis with respect to CSWS start time. These analyses were carried out separately in different polarity states of the heliosphere A < 0 and A > 0 during solar minimum as well as during the periods of variable solar activity. Although the average variations in the solar wind velocity, IMF strength, and its variance are almost similar, the amplitudes of CSWS-associated cosmic ray depressions are quite different during different polarity epochs; they are larger during A > 0 than A < 0 periods. Further, correlation analysis between cosmic ray intensity and solar wind velocity during CSWS shows differences in their relationship during A > 0 and A < 0; they are much better during A > 0 than A < 0. Two other solar wind parameters, IMF strength and its variance, do not show a significant relationship with cosmic ray intensity change through the passage of these streams, although the initial depression coincides the enhancement of the two parameters. These results are discussed in the light of existing models of galactic cosmic ray modulation.

  16. Can Kelvin-Helmholtz Instabilities of Jet-Like Structures and Plumes Cause Solar Wind Fluctuations at 1 AU?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyamsundar, Parhi; Suess, Steven T.; Sulkanen, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    The long high latitude sampling of Ulysses provides the opportunity to study fine structures. At latitudes poleward of approx. -60 deg, the solar wind had fluctuations in velocity gradients which were attributed to "microstreams". The data also suggested fluctuations characterized by magnetic plus thermal pressure balance structures ("PBS"). At higher frequencies, MHD turbulence was observed and found to be less evolved than in the ecliptic, but essentially independent of heliographic latitude. It is argued here that microstreams, PBS, and MHD turbulence could all be the remnants of mixing due to shear instabilities associated with plumes and other filamentarystructures ("jets") in coronal holes. To show this we simulate a plume-like jet in the presence of an ambient magnetic field. We find the presence of the ambient field reduces the growth rate of the instability, but the shear between a jet and its ambient still becomes unstable to the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability when the shear speed is larger than the largest local magnetosonic speed - a condition probably satisfied for plumes.

  17. Can Kelvin-Helmholtz Instabilites of Jet-Like Structures and Plumes Cause Solar Wind Fluctuations at 1 AU?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, S.; Suess, S. T.; Sulkanen, M.

    1999-01-01

    The long high-latitude sampling of Ulysses provides the opportunity to study fine structures. At latitudes poleward of about -60 degrees the solar wind had fluctuations in velocity gradients which were attributed to "microstreams." The data also suggested fluctuations characterized by magnetic plus thermal pressure balance structures ('PBS'). At higher frequencies, MHD turbulence was observed and found to be less evolved than it is in the ecliptic but essentially independent of heliographic latitude. It is argued here that microstreams, PBS, and MHD turbulence could all be the remnants of mixing due to shear instabilities associated with plumes and other filamentary structures ("jets") in coronal holes. To show this, we simulate a plume-like jet in the presence of an ambient magnetic field. We find that the presence of the ambient field reduces the growth rate of the instability, but the shear between a jet and its ambient still becomes unstable to the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz instability when the shear speed is larger than the largest local magnetosonic speed, a condition probably satisfied for plumes.

  18. Inward Motions in the Outer Solar Corona Between 6 And 12 R : Evidence For Waves or Magnetic Reconnection Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velli, Marco; Tenerani, Anna; DeForest, Craig

    2016-05-01

    DeForest et al. (2014) used synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft to identify inbound wave motions in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii and inferred, from the observation, that the Alfven surface separating the magnetically dominated corona from the ow dominated wind must be located at least 12 solar radii from the Sun over polar coronal holes and 15 solar radii in the streamer belt. Here we will discuss both this and previous observations of inflows further down and attempt identification of the observed inward signals. We will theoretically reconstruct height-speed diagrams and compare them to the observed profiles. Interpretation in terms of Alfven / magnetoacouatic modes or Alfvenic turbulence appears to be ruled out by the fact that the observed signal shows a deceleration of inward motion when approaching the Sun. Fast magnetoacoustic waves are not directly ruled out in this way, as it is possible for inward waves observed in quadrature, but not propagating exactly radially, to suffer total reflection as the Alfven speed rises close to the Sun. However, the reconstructed signal in the height speed diagram has the wrong concavity. A final possibility is decelerating reconnection jets, most probably from component reconnection, in the accelerating wind: the profile in this case appears to match the observations very well. This interpretation does not alter the conclusion that the Alfven surface must be at least 12 solar radii from the photosphere.

  19. A Solar Blowout Jet Caused by the Eruption of a Magnetic Flux Rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Wang, Huaning; Cheng, Xin; Huang, Chong

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure of a blowout jet originating in the western edge of NOAA active region (AR) 11513 on 2012 July 2 by means of recently developed forced field extrapolation model. The results show that the blowout jet was caused by the eruption of the magnetic flux rope (MFR) consisting of twisted field lines. We further calculate the twist number {{ T }}w and squashing factor Q of the reconstructed magnetic field and find that (1) the MFR corresponds well with the high {{ T }}w region, and (2) the MFR outer boundary corresponds well with the high Q region, probably interpreting the bright structure at the base of the jet. The twist number of the MFR is estimated to be {{ T }}w=-1.54+/- 0.67. Thus, the kink instability is regarded as the initiation mechanism of the blowout jet as {{ T }}w reaches or even exceeds the threshold value of the kink instability. Our results also indicate that the bright point at the decaying phase is actually composed of some small loops that are heated by the reconnection occurring above. In summary, the blowout jet is mostly consistent with the scenario proposed by Moore et al., except that the kink instability is found to be a possible trigger.

  20. ROTATING SOLAR JETS IN SIMULATIONS OF FLUX EMERGENCE WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2014-07-01

    We study the formation of coronal jets through numerical simulation of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope into a pre-existing open magnetic field. Reconnection inside the emerging flux rope in addition to that between the emerging and pre-existing fields give rise to the violent eruption studied. The simulated event closely resembles the coronal jets ubiquitously observed by the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode and demonstrates that heated plasma is driven into the extended atmosphere above. Thermal conduction implemented in the model allows us to qualitatively compare simulated and observed emission from such events. We find that untwisting field lines after the reconnection drive spinning outflows of plasma in the jet column. The Poynting flux in the simulated jet is dominated by the untwisting motions of the magnetic fields loaded with high-density plasma. The simulated jet is comprised of ''spires'' of untwisting field that are loaded with a mixture of cold and hot plasma and exhibit rotational motion of order 20 km s{sup –1} and match contemporary observations.

  1. Inward Motions in the Outer Solar Corona between 7 and 12 R ⊙: Evidence for Waves or Magnetic Reconnection Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco; DeForest, Craig

    2016-07-01

    DeForest et al. used synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft to identify inbound wave motions in the outer corona beyond 7 solar radii and inferred, from the observation, that the Alfvén surface separating the magnetically dominated corona from the flow dominated wind must be located beyond at least 12 solar radii from the Sun over polar coronal holes and beyond 15 solar radii in the streamer belt. Here, we attempt identification of the observed inward signal by theoretically reconstructing height-speed diagrams and comparing them to the observed profiles. Interpretation in terms of Alfvén waves or Alfvénic turbulence appears to be ruled out by the fact that the observed signal shows a deceleration of inward motion when approaching the Sun. Fast magnetoacoustic waves are not directly ruled out in this way, as it is possible for inward waves observed in quadrature, but not propagating exactly radially, to suffer total reflection as the Alfvén speed rises close to the Sun. However, the reconstructed signal in the height-speed diagram has the wrong concavity. A final possibility is decelerating reconnection jets, most probably from component reconnection, in the accelerating wind: the profile in this case appears to match the observations very well. This interpretation does not alter the conclusion that the Alfvén surface must be at least 12 solar radii from the photosphere. Further observations should help constrain this process, never identified previously in this way, in the distance range from 7 to 12 solar radii.

  2. What can We Learn about Solar Coronal Mass Ejections, Coronal Dimmings, and Extreme-ultraviolet Jets through Spectroscopic Observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Xia, Lidong; He, Jiansen; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-01

    Solar eruptions, particularly coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets, have rarely been investigated with spectroscopic observations. We analyze several data sets obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode and find various types of flows during CMEs and jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit, while a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and an RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%), high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. These weak, high-speed outflows may provide a significant amount of mass to refill the corona after the eruption of CMEs, and part of them may experience further acceleration and eventually become solar wind streams that can serve as an additional momentum source of the associated CMEs. Density and temperature diagnostics of the dimming region suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other, and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analysis, we also find several temperature-dependent outflows (speed increases with temperature) immediately outside the (deepest) dimming region. These outflows may be evaporation flows that are caused by the enhanced thermal conduction or nonthermal electron beams along reconnecting field lines, or induced by the interaction between the opened field lines in the dimming region and the closed loops in the surrounding plage region. In an erupted CME loop and an EUV jet

  3. Observations of high-energy jets in the corona above the quiet sun, the heating of the corona, and the acceleration of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution observations of the ultraviolet solar spectrum which reveal high-energy events in the quiet sun are presented. The tandem Wadsworth spectrograph used to make the observations is described along with the observing techniques, and a brief description of the characteristics of high-resolution transition zone spectra is given. The sizes, velocities, line profiles, time behavior, temperature range, differential emission measures, densities, masses, energies, and birthrates of turbulent events and jets in the quiet sun are derived from the observations and discussed. Possible accelerating mechanisms for these events are discussed, and the consequences of these events for the heating of the solar corona are discussed. A cloud model of the solar wind is proposed and possible correlations between the high-energy events and other solar fine-structure features are discussed.

  4. Observational study on the fine structure and dynamics of a solar jet. I. Energy build-up process around a satellite spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaue, Takahito; Tei, Akiko; Asai, Ayumi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-10-01

    We report on a solar jet phenomenon associated with successive flares on 2014 November 10. These explosive events were involved with the satellite spots' emergence around a δ-type sunspot in the decaying active region NOAA 12205. The data for this jet were provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the X-Ray Telescope aboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. These abundant data enabled us to present this series of papers to discuss the entire process of the observed phenomena, including the energy storage, event trigger, and energy release. In this paper, we focus on the energy build-up and trigger phases, by analyzing the photospheric horizontal flow field around the active region by an optical flow method. The analysis shows the following results: (1) The observed explosive phenomena involved three satellite spots, the magnetic fluxes of which successively reconnected with their pre-existing ambient fields; (2) All of these satellite spots emerged in the moat region of a pivotal δ-type sunspot, especially near its convergent boundary with the neighboring supergranules or moat regions of adjacent sunspots; (3) Around the jet ejection site, the positive polarities of the satellite spot and adjacent emerging flux encountered the global magnetic field with a negative polarity in the moat region of the pivotal δ-type sunspot, and thus the polarity inversion line was formed along the convergent boundary of the photospheric horizontal flow channels.

  5. Rapid atmospheric pressure plasma jet processed reduced graphene oxide counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Wu, Ting-Jui; Chang, Haoming; Kao, Peng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Chou, Pi-Tai; Cheng, I-Chun

    2014-09-10

    In this work, we present the use of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as the counter electrode materials in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). rGO was first deposited on a fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrate by screen-printing, followed by post-treatment to remove excessive organic additives. We investigated the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment on the DSSC performance. A power conversion efficiency of 5.19% was reached when DSSCs with an rGO counter electrode were treated by APPJs in the ambient air for a few seconds. For comparison, it requires a conventional calcination process at 400 °C for 15 min to obtain comparable efficiency. Scanning electron micrographs show that the APPJ treatment modifies the rGO structure, which may reduce its conductivity in part but simultaneously greatly enhances its catalytic activity. Combined with the rapid removal of organic additives by the highly reactive APPJ, DSSCs with APPJ-treated rGO counter electrode show comparable efficiencies to furnace-calcined rGO counter electrodes with greatly reduced process time. This ultrashort process time renders an estimated energy consumption per unit area of 1.1 kJ/cm(2), which is only one-third of that consumed in a conventional furnace calcination process. This new methodology thus saves energy, cost, and time, which is greatly beneficial to future mass production.

  6. Ionospheric response to CIR-induced recurrent geomagnetic activity during the declining phase of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanhong; Wang, Wenbin; Burns, Alan G.; Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun; Yue, Xinan; Jiang, Guoying; Coster, Anthea

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an epoch analysis of global ionosphere responses to recurrent geomagnetic activity during 79 corotating interaction region (CIR) events from 2004 to 2009. The data used were GPS total electron content (TEC) data from the Madrigal Database at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory and the electron density (Ne) data obtained from CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) observations. The results show that global ionosphere responses to CIR events have some common features. In high and middle latitudes, the total electron content (TEC) showed a significant positive response (increased electron densities) in the first epoch day. A negative TEC response occurred at high latitudes of the American sector following the positive response. The CHAMP Ne showed a daytime positive response in all latitudes and a nighttime negative response in the subauroral region. These negative TEC and Ne responses were found to be related to thermospheric composition (O/N2) changes during the storms. At all latitudes, the maximum of the TEC positive effect always occurred at 2-6 h after the CIR starting during local daytime and 10-18 h later for the CIR onset during local nighttime. Case studies indicate that the TEC and Ne positive response had a strong dependence on the southward component (Bz) of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed. This suggests that penetration electric fields that were associated with changes in solar winds might play a significant role in the positive ionospheric response to storms. During the recovery time of the CIR-produced geomagnetic activity, the TEC positive disturbance at low latitudes sometimes could last for 2-4 days, whereas at middle to high latitudes the disturbance lasted only for 1 day in most cases. A comparison of the ionospheric responses between the American, European and Asian sectors shows that the ionosphere response in the North American sector was stronger than that in the other

  7. HOMOLOGOUS HELICAL JETS: OBSERVATIONS BY IRIS, SDO, AND HINODE AND MAGNETIC MODELING WITH DATA-DRIVEN SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Pontieu, B. De; Tarbell, T. D.; Fu, Y.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Boerner, P.; Wülser, J. P.; Lemen, J.; Title, A. M.; Hurlburt, N.; Tian, H.; Testa, P.; Reeves, K. K.; Golub, L.; McKillop, S.; Saar, S.; Kleint, L.; Kankelborg, C.; Jaeggli, S.; Carlsson, M.; and others

    2015-03-10

    We report on observations of recurrent jets by instruments on board the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and Hinode spacecraft. Over a 4 hr period on 2013 July 21, recurrent coronal jets were observed to emanate from NOAA Active Region 11793. Far-ultraviolet spectra probing plasma at transition region temperatures show evidence of oppositely directed flows with components reaching Doppler velocities of ±100 km s{sup −1}. Raster Doppler maps using a Si iv transition region line show all four jets to have helical motion of the same sense. Simultaneous observations of the region by SDO and Hinode show that the jets emanate from a source region comprising a pore embedded in the interior of a supergranule. The parasitic pore has opposite polarity flux compared to the surrounding network field. This leads to a spine-fan magnetic topology in the coronal field that is amenable to jet formation. Time-dependent data-driven simulations are used to investigate the underlying drivers for the jets. These numerical experiments show that the emergence of current-carrying magnetic field in the vicinity of the pore supplies the magnetic twist needed for recurrent helical jet formation.

  8. Pre-flare Coronal Jet and Evolutionary Phases of a Solar Eruptive Prominence Associated with the M1.8 Flare: SDO and RHESSI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Veronig, Astrid M.; Cho, K.-S.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the triggering, activation, and ejection of a solar eruptive prominence that occurred in a multi-polar flux system of active region NOAA 11548 on 2012 August 18 by analyzing data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation on board the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory. Prior to the prominence activation, we observed striking coronal activities in the form of a blowout jet, which is associated with the rapid eruption of a cool flux rope. Furthermore, the jet-associated flux rope eruption underwent splitting and rotation during its outward expansion. These coronal activities are followed by the prominence activation during which it slowly rises with a speed of ˜12 km s-1 while the region below the prominence emits gradually varying EUV and thermal X-ray emissions. From these observations, we propose that the prominence eruption is a complex, multi-step phenomenon in which a combination of internal (tether-cutting reconnection) and external (i.e., pre-eruption coronal activities) processes are involved. The prominence underwent catastrophic loss of equilibrium with the onset of the impulsive phase of an M1.8 flare, suggesting large-scale energy release by coronal magnetic reconnection. We obtained signatures of particle acceleration in the form of power-law spectra with hard electron spectral index (δ ˜ 3) and strong HXR footpoint sources. During the impulsive phase, a hot EUV plasmoid was observed below the apex of the erupting prominence that ejected in the direction of the prominence with a speed of ˜177 km s-1. The temporal, spatial, and kinematic correlations between the erupting prominence and the plasmoid imply that the magnetic reconnection supported the fast ejection of prominence in the lower corona.

  9. Event Study of a Persistent Coronal Hole, its Solar Wind Signatures at L1, and Recurrent Relativistic Electron Enhancements at Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan; Krista, Larisza

    2017-04-01

    Enhancements of relativistic electrons in Earth's radiation belts statistically exhibit a 27-day periodicity that is attributable to the interaction of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) with the Earth's magnetosphere. These CIRs are the interfaces between tenuous, high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) emitted by coronal holes (CH) and the denser, slower solar wind emitted from the quiet Sun (QS). At these stream interfaces (SI), the plasma is compressed, resulting in increased number density and magnetic field. Subsequent relativistic electron enhancements have been attributed to southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz). This includes southward Bz intensified within the CIR as well as southward Bz associated with Alfvenic turbulence in the following HSS. Although this chain of events is broadly accepted, few studies have studied in depth the evolution of a single persistent CH, its solar wind signatures at L1, and associated recurrent relativistic electron enhancements in the radiation belts. During the second half of 2003, a persistent CH was observed in the northern hemisphere of the Sun. The resulting CIR caused recurrent enhancements in the relativistic electron fluxes observed by the GOES satellites. During these enhancements, the >2 MeV electrons increased from dropout (instrument background) levels to hazardous levels more than an order-of-magnitude greater than the NOAA SWPC alert level. Moreover, for the first time in Solar Cycle 23 (SC23) the >4 MeV electron fluxes exceeded 100 electrons/(cm**2 s sr). This happened in five recurrent extended relativistic electron enhancement events during this period. In context, only five such events with >4 MeV electron fluxes exceeding 100 electrons/(cm**2 s sr) occurred during the rest of SC23, and not in a recurrent fashion. Using this as a geoeffectiveness criterion, neither other CHs during this period, nor the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in later October and November were as geoeffective as this

  10. HELICAL BLOWOUT JETS IN THE SUN: UNTWISTING AND PROPAGATION OF WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E. J.; Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a numerical experiment of the recurrent onset of helical ''blowout'' jets in an emerging flux region. We find that these jets are running with velocities of ∼100-250 km s{sup –1} and they transfer a vast amount of heavy plasma into the outer solar atmosphere. During their emission, they undergo an untwisting motion as a result of reconnection between the twisted emerging and the non-twisted pre-existing magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. For the first time in the context of blowout jets, we provide direct evidence that their untwisting motion is associated with the propagation of torsional Alfvén waves in the corona.

  11. Recurrent recurrent gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Z; Ahmed, M S; Alexander, D J; Miller, G V; Chintapatla, S

    2010-07-01

    We describe the second reported case of three consecutive episodes of gallstone ileus and ask the question whether recurrent gallstone ileus justifies definitive surgery to the fistula itself or can be safely managed by repeated enterotomies.

  12. Tracing Polar Jets into the Inner Heliosphere by Using Images from the LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 Coronagraphs and 3D Tomographic Reconstructions from Interplanetary Scintillation and the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.

    2012-12-01

    During recent years coordinated efforts to gather data from a large number of spacecraft (Hinode, SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and SMEI) and ground-based instruments using interplanetary scintillation (IPS), have allowed a study of the polar jetting process, and tracing the jet response into the heliosphere in a statistical manner. The brightest of these polar jets observed by the Hinode XRT and the SDO/AIA show a positive correlation with high-speed responses traced into the interplanetary medium. LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraph images allow measurement of the coronal response to some of these jets, and the nearby background solar wind velocity giving a determination of their speeds and energies that we compare with Hinode and AIA observations. By using the full data set from white light SMEI images, and IPS velocities, we are able to track these same high speed solar jet responses into the inner heliosphere in order to determine the extent to which they retain their identity at large solar distances.

  13. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  14. A Summary of The 2000-2001 NASA Glenn Lear Jet AM0 Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David; Brinker, David; Snyder, David; Baraona, Cosmo; Jenkins, Phillip; Rieke, William J.; Blankenship, Kurt S.; Tom, Ellen M.

    2002-01-01

    Calibration of solar cells for space is extremely important for satellite power system design. Accurate prediction of solar cell performance is critical to solar array sizing, often required to be within 1%. The NASA Glenn Research Center solar cell calibration airplane facility has been in operation since 1963 with 531 flights to date. The calibration includes real data to Air Mass (AM) 0.2 and uses the Langley plot method plus an ozone correction factor to extrapolate to AM0. Comparison of the AM0 calibration data indicates that there is good correlation with Balloon and Shuttle flown solar cells. This paper will present a history of the airplane calibration procedure, flying considerations, and a brief summary of the previous flying season with some measurement results. This past flying season had a record 35 flights. It will also discuss efforts to more clearly define the ozone correction factor.

  15. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  16. A recurrent neural network approach to quantitatively studying solar wind effects on TEC derived from GPS; preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habarulema, J. B.; McKinnell, L.-A.; Opperman, B. D. L.

    2009-05-01

    This paper attempts to describe the search for the parameter(s) to represent solar wind effects in Global Positioning System total electron content (GPS TEC) modelling using the technique of neural networks (NNs). A study is carried out by including solar wind velocity (Vsw), proton number density (Np) and the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) obtained from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite as separate inputs to the NN each along with day number of the year (DN), hour (HR), a 4-month running mean of the daily sunspot number (R4) and the running mean of the previous eight 3-hourly magnetic A index values (A8). Hourly GPS TEC values derived from a dual frequency receiver located at Sutherland (32.38° S, 20.81° E), South Africa for 8 years (2000-2007) have been used to train the Elman neural network (ENN) and the result has been used to predict TEC variations for a GPS station located at Cape Town (33.95° S, 18.47° E). Quantitative results indicate that each of the parameters considered may have some degree of influence on GPS TEC at certain periods although a decrease in prediction accuracy is also observed for some parameters for different days and seasons. It is also evident that there is still a difficulty in predicting TEC values during disturbed conditions. The improvements and degradation in prediction accuracies are both close to the benchmark values which lends weight to the belief that diurnal, seasonal, solar and magnetic variabilities may be the major determinants of TEC variability.

  17. No Neon, but Jets in the Remarkable Recurrent Nova M31N 2008-12a?—Hubble Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the 2015 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnley, M. J.; Hounsell, R.; Godon, P.; Perley, D. A.; Henze, M.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Williams, B. F.; Williams, S. C.; Bode, M. F.; Harman, D. J.; Hornoch, K.; Link, M.; Ness, J.-U.; Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Sion, E. M.; Shafter, A. W.; Shara, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    The 2008 discovery of an eruption of M31N 2008-12a began a journey on which the true nature of this remarkable recurrent nova continues to be revealed. M31N 2008-12a contains a white dwarf (WD) close to the Chandrasekhar limit, accreting at a high rate from its companion, and undergoes thermonuclear eruptions that are observed yearly and may even be twice as frequent. In this paper, we report on Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy taken within days of the predicted 2015 eruption, coupled with Keck spectroscopy of the 2013 eruption. Together, this spectroscopy permits the reddening to be constrained to E(B-V)=0.10+/- 0.03. The UV spectroscopy reveals evidence for highly ionized, structured, and high-velocity ejecta at early times. No evidence for neon is seen in these spectra, however, but it may be that little insight can be gained regarding the composition of the WD (CO versus ONe).

  18. Behaviour of the 5577Å, 6300Å emissions and the 38.2 MHz absorption during substorms associated with recurrent solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Despirak, Irina; Werner, Rolf; Trondsen, Espen; Honary, Farideh; Marple, Steve; Stauning, Peter; Dahle, Kolbjorn

    The behaviour of the auroral emissions 5577˚ and 6300˚, the ratio I6300/I5577 and the ab-A A sorption at 38.2 MHz during substorms occurred at the time of recurrent streams (RS) has been examined. The development of the substorm bulge is followed up. The variations of the emissions and the absorption at 38.2 MHZ depending on the different locations of the substorm bulge with respect to the point of observation have been studied. Estimations of the particle precipitation spectra at the polar edge of the auroral bulge and inside it have been obtained. For the study, data from the All-Sky Imagers at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Nor-way (69.3N, 16.03E) and at the Auroral Observatory, Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78.20N, 15.83E) from the observational season 2005-2006 have been used, and simultaneous measurements from the ALOMAR Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (AIRIS), 64-beam Imaging Riome-ter at the Auroral Observatory, Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78.20N, 15.83E); IRIS at Kilpisjürvi, a Finland (69.05N, 20.79E).. Additional data concerning the solar wind parameters, IMF, the precipitating particles and the magnetic field are used from the WIND and DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetometer network to determine the recurrent streams, the substorms during RS and the boundaries of the precipitating electrons. Data access has been provided under the Project "ALOMAR eARI" (RITA-CT-2003-506208), Andenes, Norway. This Project received research funding from the European Community's 6th Framework Program.

  19. Jetting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Szarka, D.D.; Schwegman, S.L.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes an apparatus for hydraulically jetting a well tool disposed in a well, the well tool having a sliding member. It comprises positioner means for operably engaging the sliding member of the well tool; and a jetting means, connected at a rotatable connection to the positioner means so that the jetting means is rotatable relative to the positioner means and the well tool, for hydraulically jetting the well tool as the jetting means is rotated relative thereto.

  20. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  1. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  2. Fuzzy jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  3. The anatomy of magnetosheath jets - MMS observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Tomas; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Hietala, Heli; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Archer, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Recently it has been realized that magnetosheath jets, defined as transient and localized increases in dynamic pressure, are a common mode of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, in particular behind the quasi-parallel bow shock. While some properties of magnetosheath jets are known, in particular their statistical properties, much is still unknown about their detailed properties. We here present detailed MMS multipoint observations of a few magnetosheath jets. These include particle properties of different parts of the jet, associated plasma waves, associated magnetic field topology and currents, and forces acting on the jet plasma.

  4. Modeling Coronal Jets with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; Deforest, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    We report on a comparative study of coronal jet formation with and without reconnection using two different simulation strategies. Coronal jets are features on the solar surface that appear to have some properties in common with coronal mass ejections, but are less energetic, massive, and broad. Magnetic free energy is built up over time and then suddenly released, which accelerates plasma outward in the form of a coronal jet. We compare results from the ARMS adaptive mesh and FLUX reconnection-less codes to study the role of reconnection in this system. This is the first direct comparison between FLUX and a numerical model with a 3D spatial grid.

  5. Statistical Study of Network Jets Observed in the Solar Transition Region: a Comparison Between Coronal Holes and Quiet-Sun Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Nancy; Arbacher, Rebecca T.; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Cranmer, Steven R.; DeLuca, Ed E.; McKillop, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Recent IRIS observations have revealed a prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with apparent speeds of 80 - 250 km s^{-1}, emanating from small-scale bright regions inside network boundaries of coronal holes. We find that these network jets appear not only in coronal holes but also in quiet-sun regions. Using IRIS 1330 Å (C II) slit-jaw images, we extracted several parameters of these network jets, e.g. apparent speed, length, lifetime, and increase in foot-point brightness. Using several observations, we find that some properties of the jets are very similar, but others are obviously different between the quiet Sun and coronal holes. For example, our study shows that the coronal-hole jets appear to be faster and longer than those in the quiet Sun. This can be directly attributed to a difference in the magnetic configuration of the two regions, with open magnetic field lines rooted in coronal holes and magnetic loops often present in the quiet Sun. We also detected compact bright loops that are most likely transition region loops and are mostly located in quiet-Sun regions. These small loop-like regions are generally devoid of network jets. In spite of different magnetic structures in the coronal hole and quiet Sun in the transition region, there appears to be no substantial difference for the increase in footpoint brightness of the jets, which suggests that the generation mechanism of these network jets is very likely the same in both regions.

  6. Blowout jets and impulsive eruptive flares in a bald-patch topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, R.; Mandrini, C. H.; Schmieder, B.; Joshi, B.; Cristiani, G. D.; Cremades, H.; Pariat, E.; Nuevo, F. A.; Srivastava, A. K.; Uddin, W.

    2017-02-01

    Context. A subclass of broad extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray jets, called blowout jets, have become a topic of research since they could be the link between standard collimated jets and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Aims: Our aim is to understand the origin of a series of broad jets, some of which are accompanied by flares and associated with narrow and jet-like CMEs. Methods: We analyze observations of a series of recurrent broad jets observed in AR 10484 on 21-24 October 2003. In particular, one of them occurred simultaneously with an M2.4 flare on 23 October at 02:41 UT (SOLA2003-10-23). Both events were observed by the ARIES Hα Solar Tower-Telescope, TRACE, SOHO, and RHESSI instruments. The flare was very impulsive and followed by a narrow CME. A local force-free model of AR 10484 is the basis to compute its topology. We find bald patches (BPs) at the flare site. This BP topology is present for at least two days before to events. Large-scale field lines, associated with the BPs, represent open loops. This is confirmed by a global potential free source surface (PFSS) model. Following the brightest leading edge of the Hα and EUV jet emission, we can temporarily associate these emissions with a narrow CME. Results: Considering their characteristics, the observed broad jets appear to be of the blowout class. As the most plausible scenario, we propose that magnetic reconnection could occur at the BP separatrices forced by the destabilization of a continuously reformed flux rope underlying them. The reconnection process could bring the cool flux-rope material into the reconnected open field lines driving the series of recurrent blowout jets and accompanying CMEs. Conclusions: Based on a model of the coronal field, we compute the AR 10484 topology at the location where flaring and blowout jets occurred from 21 to 24 October 2003. This topology can consistently explain the origin of these events. The movie associated to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  8. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  9. Recurrent vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anna M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Vulvovaginitis (VV) is one of the most commonly encountered problems by a gynecologist. Many women frequently self-treat with over-the-counter medications, and may present to their health-care provider after a treatment failure. Vulvovaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis may occur as discreet or recurrent episodes, and have been associated with significant treatment cost and morbidity. We present an update on diagnostic capabilities and treatment modalities that address recurrent and refractory episodes of VV.

  10. Meningioma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bencze, János; Varkoly, Gréta; Kouhsari, Mahan C; Klekner, Álmos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meningioma accounts for more than 30% of all intracranial tumours. It affects mainly the elderly above the age of 60, at a female:male ratio of 3:2. The prognosis is variable: it is usually favourable with no progression in tumour grade and no recurrence in WHO grade 1 tumours. However, a minority of tumours represent atypical (grade 2) or anaplastic (grade 3) meningiomas; this heterogeneity is also reflected in histopathological appearances. Irrespective of the grade, the size of the tumour and the localisation may have severe, sometimes lethal consequences. Following neurosurgical interventions to remove the tumour, recurrence and progression in WHO grade may occur. Our knowledge on predisposing histomorphological and molecular factors of recurrence is rather limited. These can be classified as I) demographic II) environmental, III) genetic and epigenetic IV) imaging, V) neuropathological, and VI) neurosurgical. In view of the complex background of tumour recurrence, the recognition of often subtle signs of increased risk of recurrence requires close collaboration of experts from several medical specialties. This multidisciplinary approach results in better therapy and fewer complications related to tumour recurrence. PMID:28352788

  11. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  12. Bouncing Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-11-01

    Contrary to common intuition, free jets of fluid can ``bounce'' off each other on collision in mid-air, through the effect of a lubricating air film that separates the jets. We have developed a simple experimental setup to stably demonstrate and study the non-coalescence of jets on collision. We present the results of an experimental investigation of oblique collision between two silicone oil jets, supported by a simple analytical explanation. Our focus is on elucidating the role of various physical forces at play such as viscous stresses, capillary force and inertia. A parametric study conducted by varying the nozzle diameter, jet velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity reveals the scaling laws for the quantities involved such as contact time. We observed a transition from bouncing to coalescence with an increase in jet velocity and inclination angle. We propose that a balance between the contact time of jets and the time required for drainage of the trapped air film can provide a criterion for transition from non-coalescence to coalescence.

  13. Recurrent novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent novae seem to be a rather inhomogeneous group: T CrB is a binary with a M III companion; U Sco probably has a late dwarf as companion. Three are fast novae; two are slow novae. Some of them appear to have normal chemical composition; others may present He and CNO excess. Some present a mass-loss that is lower by two orders of magnitude than classical novae. However, our sample is too small for saying whether there are several classes of recurrent novae, which may be related to the various classes of classical novae, or whether the low mass-loss is a general property of the class or just a peculiarity of one member of the larger class of classical novae and recurrent novae.

  14. Recurrent pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Imazio, M; Battaglia, A; Gaido, L; Gaita, F

    2017-05-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is the most troublesome complication of pericarditis occurring in 15 to 30% of cases. The pathogenesis is often presumed to be immune-mediated although a specific rheumatologic diagnosis is commonly difficult to find. The clinical diagnosis is based on recurrent pericarditis chest pain and additional objective evidence of disease activity (e.g. pericardial rub, ECG changes, pericardial effusion, elevation of markers of inflammation, and/or imaging evidence of pericardial inflammation by CT or cardiac MR). The mainstay of medical therapy for recurrent pericarditis is aspirin or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) plus colchicine. Second-line therapy is considered after failure of such treatments and it is generally based on low to moderate doses of corticosteroids (e.g. prednisone 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg/day or equivalent) plus colchicine. More difficult cases are treated with combination of aspirin or NSAID, colchicine and corticosteroids. Refractory cases are managed by alternative medical options, including azathioprine, or intravenous human immunoglobulins or biological agents (e.g. anakinra). When all medical therapies fail, the last option may be surgical by pericardiectomy to be recommended in well-experienced centres. Despite a significant impairment of the quality of life, the most common forms of recurrent pericarditis (usually named as "idiopathic recurrent pericarditis" since without a well-defined etiological diagnosis) have good long-term outcomes with a negligible risk of developing constriction and rarely cardiac tamponade during follow-up. The present article reviews current knowledge on the definition, diagnosis, aetiology, therapy and prognosis of recurrent pericarditis with a focus on the more recent available literature. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple Null Point Reconnections in a limb faint cool jet ejection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.

    2016-09-01

    Giant spicules and macro- spicules are an important extended rather cool structure between the solar surface and the corona, partly filling the space inside the chromosphere and surrounded by a transition thin region. Their formation and dynamical properties are still mysterious. In order to explain solar limb and disc periodic recurrences of these events, a simulation model assuming quasi- random positions of spicules above the solar limb was studied. We allow a set number of spicules with different physical properties (such as height, lifetime and tilt angle as shown by an individual spicule) randomly occurring. It is assumed that after reaching a maximum length, the spicules are less rapidly falling back to the solar surface. This kind of limb event was often reported in the literature (spike; giant spicule; Ha ejection event; spray etc) but no serious quantitative analysis could be done. Indeed from ground-based observations, it is impossible to deduce precised parameters because the earth atmospheric turbulent effects makes impossible to make small scale measurements. SOT space-borne observations we use are unique in providing well reproducible observations permitting very precise measurements. The study of X-ray jets is an important topic to understand the heating of the solar corona and the origin of the fast wind. The recently launched Hinode mission permitted to observe the cool proxies of these jets with an unprecedented high spatial resolution of 120 km on the Sun. We selected a high cadence sequence of SOT (Hinode) observations taken with both the HCaII and the Hα filter to look at the details of the dynamics revealed by a large jet event. Both wavelet and amplitude spectra analysis were used to analyze the observed kink wave and the time variations of intensities during the event. The results are discussed in the frame of different models implying reconnections with the inference of the dynamical phenomena occurring in the vicinity of several null

  16. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  17. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  18. Recurrent Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Imazio, Massimo; Gribaudo, Elena; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    Recurrent pericarditis is the most common and troublesome complication of pericarditis affecting 20% to 50% of patients. Its pathogenesis is often presumed to be immune-mediated, but additional investigations are needed to clarify the pathogenesis in order to develop etiology-oriented therapies. Imaging with computed tomography and especially cardiac magnetic resonance holds promise to help in the identification of more difficult cases and improve their management. Refractory recurrent pericarditis with corticosteroid dependence and colchicine resistance remain still an unsolved issue in search of new therapies, although old drugs such as azathioprine, intravenous immunoglobulins, and biological agents seem promising, but new randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm their role. Despite compromising the quality of life, idiopathic recurrent pericarditis has an overall good long-term outcome without mortality and significant risk of constrictive pericarditis evolution. The risk of constriction, the most feared complication, is related to the etiology and not the number of recurrences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Inks for Ink Jet Printed Contacts for High Performance Silicon Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-06-199

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.

    2013-01-01

    The work under the proposed CRADA will be a joint effort by BP Solar and NREL to develop new types of high performance inks for high quality contacts to silicon solar cells. NREL will develop inks that have electronic properties that will allow the formation of high quality ohmic contacts to n- and p-type crystalline silicon, and BP Solar will evaluate these contacts in test contact structures.

  20. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  1. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  2. A NUMERICAL MODEL OF STANDARD TO BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report on three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of the formation of jets produced during the emergence and eruption of solar magnetic fields. The interaction between an emerging and an ambient magnetic field in the solar atmosphere leads to (external) reconnection and the formation of ''standard'' jets with an inverse Y-shaped configuration. Eventually, low-atmosphere (internal) reconnection of sheared fieldlines in the emerging flux region produces an erupting magnetic flux rope and a reconnection jet underneath it. The erupting plasma blows out the ambient field and, moreover, it unwinds as it is ejected into the outer solar atmosphere. The fast emission of the cool material that erupts together with the hot outflows due to external/internal reconnection form a wider ''blowout'' jet. We show the transition from ''standard'' to ''blowout'' jets and report on their 3D structure. The physical plasma properties of the jets are consistent with observational studies.

  3. Blowout Jets: Hinode X-Ray Jets that Don't Fit the Standard Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly half of all H-alpha macrospicules in polar coronal holes appear to be miniature filament eruptions. This suggests that there is a large class of X-ray jets in which the jet-base magnetic arcade undergoes a blowout eruption as in a CME, instead of remaining static as in most solar X-ray jets, the standard jets that fit the model advocated by Shibata. Along with a cartoon depicting the standard model, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures expected of blowout jets in coronal X-ray images. From Hinode/XRT movies and STEREO/EUVI snapshots in polar coronal holes, we present examples of (1) X-ray jets that fit the standard model, and (2) X-ray jets that do not fit the standard model but do have features appropriate for blowout jets. These features are (1) a flare arcade inside the jet-base arcade in addition to the small flare arcade (bright point) outside that standard jets have, (2) a filament of cool (T is approximately 80,000K) plasma that erupts from the core of the jetbase arcade, and (3) an extra jet strand that should not be made by the reconnection for standard jets but could be made by reconnection between the ambient unipolar open field and the opposite-polarity leg of the filament-carrying flux-rope core field of the erupting jet-base arcade. We therefore infer that these non-standard jets are blowout jets, jets made by miniature versions of the sheared-core-arcade eruptions that make CMEs

  4. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  5. Jet-Front Speed and the Origin of Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Cirtain, Jonathan; Suess, Steve; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    The area-average strength of the open magnetic field in the polar coronal holes can be estimated from the radial component of the magnetic field measured by Ulysses in the solar wind, the fraction of the solar sphere covered by the polar coronal holes, and the fraction of the heliosphere filled by the fast solar wind from the polar coronal holes. For the present minimum phase of the solar cycle, the estimated strength is approximately 10 G. Using this strength for the ambient open field in the standard reconnection model for jets in coronal holes, we obtain for any given jet-front speed a lower bound on the initial temperature of the expanding jet-front plasma, and an upper bound on the ambient plasma density at the reconnection site. These two bounds indicate the following. For jet-front speeds of approximately 1000 km/s, (1) the reconnection site has to be in the low corona or upper transition region (n(e) is less than 10(exp 9) cm(exp -3)), not in the lower transition region or chromosphere, (2) the jet-front plasma is initially heated to T greater than approximately 10(exp 7) K, and (3) hence a compact X-ray flare is produced at the base of the jet. For jet-front speeds less than approximately 100 km/s, (1) the jet can be produced by reconnection in the lower transition region (approximately 10(exp 9) less than n(e) less than approximately 10(exp 10) cm(exp-3)) or upper chromosphere (approximately 10(exp 10) less than n(e) less than approximately 10(exp 12) cm-3), (2) the initial temperature of the jet-front plasma can be less than 10(exp 6) K, and (3) hence some EUV and H(alpha) jet-type macrospicules may be produced with no detectable X-ray emission.

  6. Jet-Front Speed and the Origin of Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Cirtain, Jonathan; Suess, Steve; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    The area-average strength of the open magnetic field in the polar coronal holes can be estimated from the radial component of the magnetic field measured by Ulysses in the solar wind, the fraction of the solar sphere covered by the polar coronal holes, and the fraction of the heliosphere filled by the fast solar wind from the polar coronal holes. For the present minimum phase of the solar cycle, the estimated strength is approximately 10 G. Using this strength for the ambient open field in the standard reconnection model for jets in coronal holes, we obtain for any given jet-front speed a lower bound on the initial temperature of the expanding jet-front plasma, and an upper bound on the ambient plasma density at the reconnection site. These two bounds indicate the following. For jet-front speeds of approximately 1000 km/s, (1) the reconnection site has to be in the low corona or upper transition region (n(e) is less than 10(exp 9) cm(exp -3)), not in the lower transition region or chromosphere, (2) the jet-front plasma is initially heated to T greater than approximately 10(exp 7) K, and (3) hence a compact X-ray flare is produced at the base of the jet. For jet-front speeds less than approximately 100 km/s, (1) the jet can be produced by reconnection in the lower transition region (approximately 10(exp 9) less than n(e) less than approximately 10(exp 10) cm(exp-3)) or upper chromosphere (approximately 10(exp 10) less than n(e) less than approximately 10(exp 12) cm-3), (2) the initial temperature of the jet-front plasma can be less than 10(exp 6) K, and (3) hence some EUV and H(alpha) jet-type macrospicules may be produced with no detectable X-ray emission.

  7. Solar Jetlets and Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, Craig; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.; Kumar, Pankaj; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine; Roberts, Merrill; Uritsky, Vadim; Wyper, Peter

    2017-08-01

    We present results of a careful deep-field (low-noise) analysis of evolution and structure of solar plumes using multiple wavelength channels from SDO/AIA. Using new noise-reduction techniques on SDO/AIA images, we reveal myriad small, heating events that appear to be the primary basis of plume formation and sustenance. These events ("jetlets") comprise a dynamic tapestry that forms the more distributed plume itself. We identify the "jetlets" with ejecta that have been previously observed spectroscopically, and distinguish them from the quasi-periodic slow mode waves that are seen as large collective motions. We speculate that the jetlets themselves, which are consistent with multiple interchange reconnection events near the base of the plume, are the primary energy driver heating plasma in the plume envelope.Solar polar (and low-latitude) plumes have been analyzed by many authors over many years. Plumes are bright, persistent vertical structures embedded in coronal holes over quasi-unipolar magnetic flux concentrations. They are EUV-bright in the ~1MK lines, slightly cooler (by ionization fraction) than the surrounding coronal hole, persistent on short timescales of a few hours, and recurrent on timescales of a few days. Their onset has been associated with large X-ray jets, although not all plumes are formed that way. Plumes appear to comprise myriad small "threads" or "strands", and may (or may not) contribute significantly to the solar wind, though they have been associated with myriad small, frequent eruptive ejection events.Our results are new and interesting because they are the lowest-noise, time-resolved observations of polar plumes to date; and they reveal the deep association between small-scale magnetic activity and the formation of the plumes themselves.

  8. Jet lag.

    PubMed

    Herxheimer, Andrew

    2008-12-04

    Jet lag affects most air travellers crossing five or more time zones; it tends to be worse on eastward than on westward flights. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to prevent or minimise jet lag? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found five systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: hypnotics, melatonin, and lifestyle and environmental adaptations.

  9. Observational Features of Equatorial Coronal Hole Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-10

    plasma flows associated with solar gran- ulation. The jet morphologies vary widely; one relatively common shape is the so-called Eiffel Tower (ET) jet...the Eiffel Tower); in such a case mag- netic reconnection appears to happen on top of the loop; this may be interpreted as reconnection of the large...STEREO B. At 171 Å the emission pattern seems to initially involve two BPs, in- creasing in intensity, similar to an “ Eiffel -Tower” (ET) shape. Through

  10. The 1995 total solar eclipse: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J.

    A number of experiments were conducted during the total solar eclipse of October 24, 1995. First time efforts were made to photograph the solar corona using IAF jet aircrafts and transport planes ad hot air balloons.

  11. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    -plasma component of coronal X-ray jets. This favors the idea that Type-II spicules are miniature counterparts of coronal X-ray jets. In Moore et al (2011, ApJ, 731, L18), we pointed out that if Type-II spicules are magnetic eruptions that work like coronal X-ray jets, they carry an area-averaged mechanical energy flux of approximately 7x10)(exp 5) erg cm(exp -2) s(exp-1) into the corona in the form of MHD waves and jet outflow, enough to power the heating of the global corona and solar wind. On this basis, from our observations of mini-filament eruptions in blowout X-ray jets, we infer that magnetic explosions of the type that have erupting filaments in them are the main engines of both (1) the steady solar wind and (2) the CMEs that produce the most severe space weather by blasting out through the corona and solar wind, making solar energetic particle storms, and bashing the Earth's magnetosphere. We conclude that in focusing on prominences and filament eruptions, Einar had his eye on the main bet for understanding what powers all space weather, both the extreme and the normal.

  12. Mechanisms of Plasma Acceleration in Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, N.; Reeves, K.; Savcheva, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    magnetically accelerated. The magnetic model for this jet needs to be studied further by using a NLFFF magnetic field model and not just the potential magnetic field. This work supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1560313 and NASA Grant NNX15AF43G

  13. A LABORATORY EXPERIMENT OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION: OUTFLOWS, HEATING, AND WAVES IN CHROMOSPHERIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, N.; Shimizu, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Kuwahata, A.; Kaminou, Y.; Ono, Y.; Inomoto, M.

    2012-09-10

    Hinode observations have revealed intermittent recurrent plasma ejections/jets in the chromosphere. These are interpreted as a result of non-perfectly anti-parallel magnetic reconnection, i.e., component reconnection, between a twisted magnetic flux tube and the pre-existing coronal/chromospheric magnetic field, though the fundamental physics of component reconnection is not revealed. In this paper, we experimentally reproduced the magnetic configuration and investigated the dynamics of plasma ejections, heating, and wave generation triggered by component reconnection in the chromosphere. We set plasma parameters as in the chromosphere (density 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, temperature 5-10 eV, i.e., (5-10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K, and reconnection magnetic field 200 G) using argon plasma. Our experiment shows bi-directional outflows with the speed of 5 km s{sup -1} at maximum, ion heating in the downstream area over 30 eV, and magnetic fluctuations mainly at 5-10 {mu}s period. We succeeded in qualitatively reproducing chromospheric jets, but quantitatively, we still have some differences between observations and experiments such as in jet velocity, total energy, and wave frequency. Some of them can be explained by the scale gap between solar and laboratory plasma, while the others are probably due to the difference in microscopy and macroscopy, collisionality, and the degree of ionization, which have not been achieved in our experiment.

  14. Jet lag

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Jet lag is a syndrome caused by disruption of the "body clock", and affects most air travellers crossing five or more time zones; it tends to be worse on eastward than on westward flights. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to prevent or minimise jet lag? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found five systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: hypnotics, lifestyle and environmental adaptations, and melatonin. PMID:19445780

  15. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods for predicting life of solar cell encapsulants to Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology for the encapsulation task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolyer, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An important principle is that encapsulants should be tested in a total array system allowing realistic interaction of components. Therefore, micromodule test specimens were fabricated with a variety of encapsulants, substrates, and types of circuitry. One common failure mode was corrosion of circuitry and solar cell metallization due to moisture penetration. Another was darkening and/or opacification of encapsulant. A test program plan was proposed. It includes multicondition accelerated exposure. Another method was hyperaccelerated photochemical exposure using a solar concentrator. It simulates 20 year of sunlight exposure in a short period of one to two weeks. The study was beneficial in identifying some cost effective encapsulants and array designs.

  16. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  17. More Macrospicule Jets in On-Disk Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the magnetic structure and dynamics of multiple jets found in coronal holes close to or on disk center. All data are from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on observations of about ten jets in an equatorial coronal hole spanning 2011 February 27 and 28. We show the evolution of these jets in AIA 193 A, examine the magnetic field configuration and flux changes in the jet area, and discuss the probable trigger mechanism of these events. We reported on another jet in this same coronal hole on 2011 February 27, (is) approximately 13:04 UT (Adams et al 2014, ApJ, 783: 11). That jet is a previously-unrecognized variety of blowout jet, in which the base-edge bright point is a miniature filament-eruption flare arcade made by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting field. In contrast, in the presently-accepted 'standard' picture for blowout jets, the base-edge bright point is made by interchange reconnection of initially-closed erupting jet-base field with ambient open field. This poster presents further evidence of the production of the base-edge bright point in blowout jets by internal reconnection. Our observations suggest that most of the bigger and brighter EUV jets in coronal holes are blowout jets of the new-found variety.

  18. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Magnetosheath High Speed Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Hietala, H.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nakamura, R.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamic pressure of the plasma in the dayside magnetosheath is typically much lower than in the solar wind, just upstream of the bow shock. Sometimes, however, transient enhancements in dynamic pressure (called high speed jets) can be observed. Recently, we performed a statistical study of potentially geo-effective jets in the noon sector sheath. These jets exhibit a major velocity component in anti-sunward direction, toward the magnetopause. The study was based on four years (2008-2011) of THEMIS magnetosheath and OMNI solar wind measurements, and resulted in a set of 2859 single-spacecraft-based jet identifications. During those years, by orbit design, the three inner THEMIS spacecraft (THA, THD, and THE) were flying in close configuration near their respective apogees. Hence, dayside magnetosheath jet observations by one of the spacecraft are often complemented by context-providing measurements from the other two spacecraft. The multi-point information enables us to infer the spatial structure and extend of jets. In particular, we are able to compute a distribution of scale sizes (based on a model of probability for simultaneous multi-spacecraft jet observations), due to the high number of jets in our set and the relatively large spread in corresponding distances between the spacecraft. Furthermore, we present statistical results of the plasma flow pattern within jets and in their environment, showing how the magnetosheath plasma flow is modified on jet passage.

  19. A MODEL OF THE HELIOSPHERE WITH JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Opher, M. E-mail: swisdak@umd.edu

    2015-08-01

    An analytic model of the heliosheath (HS) between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP) is developed in the limit in which the interstellar flow and magnetic field are neglected. The heliosphere in this limit is axisymmetric and the overall structure of the HS and HP is controlled by the solar magnetic field even in the limit in which the ratio of the plasma to magnetic field pressure, β = 8πP/B{sup 2}, in the HS is large. The tension of the solar magnetic field produces a drop in the total pressure between the TS and the HP. This same pressure drop accelerates the plasma flow downstream of the TS into the north and south directions to form two collimated jets. The radii of these jets are controlled by the flow through the TS and the acceleration of this flow by the magnetic field—a stronger solar magnetic field boosts the velocity of the jets and reduces the radii of the jets and the HP. MHD simulations of the global heliosphere embedded in a stationary interstellar medium match well with the analytic model. The results suggest that mechanisms that reduce the HS plasma pressure downstream of the TS can enhance the jet outflow velocity and reduce the HP radius to values more consistent with the Voyager 1 observations than in current global models.

  20. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  1. A STANDARD-TO-BLOWOUT JET

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chang; Deng Na; Liu Rui; Wang Shuo; Wang Haimin; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio

    2011-07-01

    The commonly observed jets provide critical information on the small-scale energy release in the solar atmosphere. We report a near disk-center jet on 2010 July 20, observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In this event, the standard interchange magnetic reconnection between an emerging flux spanning 9 x 10{sup 3} km and ambient open fields is followed by a blowout-like eruption. In the 'standard' stage, as the emerging negative element approached the nearby positive network fields, a jet with a dome-like base in EUV grew for 30 minutes before the jet spire began to migrate laterally with enhanced flux emergence. In the 'blowout' stage, the above converging fields collided and the subsequent cancellation produced a UV microflare lasting seven minutes, in which the dome of the jet seemed to be blown out as (1) the spire swung faster and exhibited an unwinding motion before vanishing, (2) a rising loop and a blob erupted leaving behind cusped structures, with the blob spiraling outward in acceleration after the flare maximum, and (3) ejecting material with a curtain-like structure at chromospheric to transition-region temperatures also underwent a transverse motion. It is thus suggested that the flare reconnection rapidly removes the outer fields of the emerging flux to allow its twisted core field to erupt, a scenario favoring the jet-scale magnetic breakout model as recently advocated by Moore et al. in 2010.

  2. ELLERMAN BOMBS WITH JETS: CAUSE AND EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, A.; Mathioudakis, M.; Scullion, E.; Gallagher, P.; Doyle, J. G.; Shelyag, S.

    2015-05-20

    Ellerman Bombs (EBs) are thought to arise as a result of photospheric magnetic reconnection. We use data from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to study EB events on the solar disk and at the limb. Both data sets show that EBs are connected to the foot points of forming chromospheric jets. The limb observations show that a bright structure in the Hα blue wing connects to the EB initially fueling it, leading to the ejection of material upwards. The material moves along a loop structure where a newly formed jet is subsequently observed in the red wing of Hα. In the disk data set, an EB initiates a jet which propagates away from the apparent reconnection site within the EB flame. The EB then splits into two, with associated brightenings in the inter-granular lanes. Micro-jets are then observed, extending to 500 km with a lifetime of a few minutes. Observed velocities of the micro-jets are approximately 5–10 km s{sup −1}, while their chromospheric counterparts range from 50 to 80 km s{sup −1}. MURaM simulations of quiet Sun reconnection show that micro-jets with properties similar to those of the observations follow the line of reconnection in the photosphere, with associated Hα brightening at the location of increased temperature.

  3. Ancient Jets of Fiery Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    Chondrules are intriguing millimeter-sized crystallized droplets that are abundant in chondrites, so named because of the presence of numerous chondrules. They have puzzled cosmochemists since they were described by English scientist H. C. Sorby in 1877. Everyone agrees that they formed as molten droplets of silicates, but nobody agrees on how the little things formed. Ideas range from impacts onto asteroids, primary condensation in the solar nebula, shock waves and/or lightening in the solar nebula, or by processes operating as planets began to form. A new twist on this last idea was investigated in a new way by Brandon Johnson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT) and co-authors David Minton and Jay Melosh (Purdue University), and Maria Zuber at MIT. Johnson and coworkers modeled the effects of impacts between planetesimals 100-1000 kilometers in diameter. When such objects hit each other, the first thing that happens is jetting of molten rock. Johnson and colleagues propose that the jets will subdivide into droplets as the jetted material is shot into space. They estimate that the chondrules would have the correct cooling rates (as determined from previous studies of chondrules) and the collision frequency would be high enough to produce abundant chondrules. Johnson and coworkers suggest that chondrules are a "byproduct of [planetary] accretion."

  4. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  5. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Francisco; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime approx.10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called "minifilaments" erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancelation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted, and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sites of magnetic-field cancelation.

  6. Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Quiet-Region Coronal Jet Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal jets are frequent magnetically channeled narrow eruptions. They occur in various solar environments: quiet regions, coronal holes and active regions. All coronal jets observed in EUV (Extreme UltraViolet) and X-ray images show a bright spire with a base brightening, also known as jet bright point (JBP). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by small-scale filament eruptions. Sterling et al. 2015 did extensive study of 20 polar coronal hole jets and found that X-ray jets are mainly driven by the eruption of minifilaments. What leads to these minifilament eruptions?

  7. Recurrent groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. J.; Leach, R. D.; Ellis, Harold

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive recurrences following repair of inguinal hernias have been studied; 62 were direct, 30 indirect, 7 pantaloon and one a femoral hernia. Half the indirect recurrences occurred within a year of repair and probably represented failure to detect a small indirect sac. Later indirect recurrences probably represented failure to repair the internal ring. Nine of the direct hernias were medial funicular recurrences and represented failure to anchor the darn medially. The rest of the direct recurrences were attributable to tissue insufficiency and could probably have been averted by larger tissue bites. Recurrences following inguinal herniorrhaphy remain an all too common problem but can be reduced by meticulous surgical technique. PMID:7339602

  8. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  9. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  10. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  11. Lateral Shock of the R Aquarii Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J. A.; Kafatos, M.

    1997-01-01

    The R Aqr jet was observed with the VLA B-configuration at two epochs separated by approximately 13.2 yr. Comparison of the resulting 6 cm continuum images show that the radio jet has undergone a lateral counterclockwise rotation of approximately 6 deg-12 deg on the plane of the sky. The model of jet parcels on independent trajectories is difficult to reconcile with these observations and leads us to consider a path-oriented jet (i.e., younger parcels follow the same path as older parcels). Comparison of the most recent radio image with a nearly contemporaneous HST/FOC ultraviolet image at approximately 2330 Angstroms suggests that the ultraviolet emission lies along the leading side of the rotating radio jet. In conjunction with a proper motion analysis of the jet material that yields empirical space-velocity and resulting acceleration-magnitude relationships as a function of distance from the central source, we evaluate the observational results in terms of a schematic model in which the jet emission consists of plane-parallel isothermal shocks along the leading edge of rotation. In such a radiating shock, the ultraviolet-emitting region is consistent with the adiabatic region in the form of a high-temperature, low-density sheath that surrounds the cooled postshock radio-emitting region. Within the context of the schematic model, we obtain the temperatures, densities, and pressures within the preshock, adiabatic, and postshock regions as a function of distance from the central source; the physical parameters so derived compare favorably to previously published estimates. We obtain a total jet mass of 3.1 x 10(exp -5) solar mass and an age of approximately 115 yr. We evaluate the model in the context of its density-boundary condition, its applicability to an episodic or quasi-continuous jet, and angular momentum considerations.

  12. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Marrero Calvo, M; Merino Arribas, J; Rodrigo Palacios, J; Bartolomé Albistegui, M; Camino Fernández, A; Grande Sáez, C

    2001-02-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by multiple bone lesions and a variable clinical course. We present a 10 year old boy with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis who improved after treatment with naproxen.

  13. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amit; Shetty, Kishore V

    2011-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral ulcerative disease, affecting 10% to 15% of the general US population. This article reviews the epidemiology and clinical presentations of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, including diagnosis and management.

  14. In situ observations of suprathermal ion acceleration in the near-Earth jet braking region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Vaivads, Andris; Le Contel, Olivier; Fu, Huishan; Zieger, Bertalan; Elena, Kronberg

    2014-05-01

    Plasma jet fronts and braking regions are sites of substantial particle acceleration in planetary magnetospheres and are considered to play a major role in other distant environments such as the solar corona and astrophysical jets. Jet fronts are the boundaries separating ambient from jetting plasma (e.g. due to reconnection) while jet braking regions is where jets are eventually stopped/diverted. A number of recent in situ observations in the Earth's magnetotail have allowed studying in detail electron acceleration mechanisms at jet fronts/braking region therein. Yet, observations of suprathermal ion acceleration are scarce. Here we show Cluster spacecraft observations of suprathermal ions up to ~ 1 MeV (about 10 times the thermal energy) in the near-Earth jet braking region. Observations indicate that ions are trapped between large-scale oppositely-directed jets and accelerated therein by strong electric fields.

  15. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  16. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  17. Fountain-Jet Turbulence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    and 3 times higher than expected from free- jet results. Hill et al., (Reference 6) in work with foun- tain jets impacting fuselage models, detected ...delineate the origins of the turbulent anomalies associated with fountain jets by extending the previous studies. The results are presented herein...jet velocities were detected with a Thermal Systems Inc. Model 1050 dual-channel constant-temperature anemometer equipped with a Thermal Systems Inc

  18. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  19. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  20. The Triggering Mechanism of coronal jets and CMEs: Flux Cancelation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a small-scale filament (10,000 - 20,000 km long, called a minifilament) following magnetic flux cancelation at the neutral line underneath the minifilament. Minifilament eruptions appear to be analogous to larger-scale solar filament eruptions: they both reside, before the eruption, in the highly sheared field between the adjacent opposite-polarity magnetic flux patches (neutral line); jet-producing minifilament and larger-scale solar filament first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt; during the jet-producing minifilament eruption a jet bright point (JBP) appears at the location where the minifilament was rooted before the eruption, analogous to the situation with CME-producing larger-scale filament eruptions where a solar flare arcade forms during the filament eruption along the neutral line along which the filament resided prior to its eruption. In the present study we investigate the triggering mechanism of CME-producing large solar filament eruptions, and find that enduring flux cancelation at the neutral line of the filaments often triggers their eruptions. This corresponds to the finding that persistent flux cancelation at the neutral is the cause of jet-producing minifilament eruptions. Thus our observations support coronal jets being miniature version of CMEs.

  1. The Breakout Model for Coronal Jets with Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal jets are impulsive, collimated plasma outflows originating low in the solar corona. Many of these events exhibit broad, curtain-like morphologies with helical structure and motions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015) [doi:10.1038/nature14556] reported that such jets are associated with the eruption of small filaments and, therefore, are miniature versions of corona mass ejections (CMEs). This account differs from the traditional picture of jets, in that internal flare reconnection, rather than interchange reconnection with the external ambient magnetic field, creates the bright loops observed at the jet base. We present 3D simulations, performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS), which demonstrate how the magnetic breakout mechanism generates mini-CME-type jets in a compact bipolar region energized by simple footpoint motions. Our numerical model captures the formation of the strongly sheared pre-jet filament structure, the post-jet flare-like loops and ribbons, and the curtain-like untwisting dynamics observed higher in the corona. We will discuss the significance of our new results for understanding solar EUV and X-ray jets and CMEs in general. NASA supported this research by awards to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (P.F.W.) and the LWS TR&T and H-SR programs (C.R.D. & S.K.A.).

  2. Statistical Study of Chromospheric Anemone Jets Observed with Hinode/SOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kawate, T.; Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.

    2011-04-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode has revealed numerous tiny jets in all regions of the chromosphere outside of sunspots. A typical chromospheric anemone jet has a cusp-shaped structure and bright footpoint, similar to the shape of an X-ray anemone jet observed previously with the Soft X-ray Telescope on board Yohkoh. The similarity in the shapes of chromospheric and X-ray anemone jets suggests that chromospheric anemone jets are produced as a result of the magnetic reconnection between a small bipole (perhaps a tiny emerging flux) and a pre-existing uniform magnetic field in the lower chromosphere. We examine various chromospheric anemone jets in the solar active region near the solar limb and study the typical features (e.g., length, width, lifetime, and velocity) of the chromospheric anemone jets. Statistical studies show that chromospheric anemone jets have: (1) a typical length ~1.0-4.0 Mm, (2) a width ~100-400 km, (3) a lifetime ~100-500 s, and (4) a velocity ~5-20 km s-1. The velocity of the chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the lower solar chromosphere (~10 km s-1). The histograms of chromospheric anemone jets near the limb and near the disk center show similar averages and shapes of distributions, suggesting that the characteristic behavior of chromospheric anemone jets is independent of whether they are observed on the disk or at the limb. The observed relationship between the velocity and length of chromospheric anemone jets shows that the jets do not follow ballistic motion but are more likely accelerated by some other mechanism. This is consistent with numerical simulations of chromospheric anemone jets.

  3. Characteristics of polar coronal hole jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhar, K.; Bemporad, A.; Banerjee, D.; Gupta, G. R.; Teriaca, L.

    2014-01-01

    Context. High spatial- and temporal-resolution images of coronal hole regions show a dynamical environment where mass flows and jets are frequently observed. These jets are believed to be important for the coronal heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind. Aims: We studied the dynamics of two jets seen in a polar coronal hole with a combination of imaging from EIS and XRT onboard Hinode. We observed drift motions related to the evolution and formation of these small-scale jets, which we tried to model as well. Methods: Stack plots were used to find the drift and flow speeds of the jets. A toymodel was developed by assuming that the observed jet is generated by a sequence of single reconnection events where single unresolved blobs of plasma are ejected along open field lines, then expand and fall back along the same path, following a simple ballistic motion. Results: We found observational evidence that supports the idea that polar jets are very likely produced by multiple small-scale reconnections occurring at different times in different locations. These eject plasma blobs that flow up and down with a motion very similar to a simple ballistic motion. The associated drift speed of the first jet is estimated to be ≈27 km s-1. The average outward speed of the first jet is ≈171 km s-1, well below the escape speed, hence if simple ballistic motion is considered, the plasma will not escape the Sun. The second jet was observed in the south polar coronal hole with three XRT filters, namely, C-poly, Al-poly, and Al-mesh filters. Many small-scale (≈3″-5″) fast (≈200-300 km s-1) ejections of plasma were observed on the same day; they propagated outwards. We observed that the stronger jet drifted at all altitudes along the jet with the same drift speed of ≃7 km s-1. We also observed that the bright point associated with the first jet is a part of sigmoid structure. The time of appearance of the sigmoid and that of the ejection of plasma from the bright

  4. Jet-printed copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Cheong Min

    Macroelectronics is a technology for making electronic circuits over very large areas at low cost. Flat panel displays, sensor arrays, and thin film solar cells are examples of macroelectronics. Crucial to the success of this new technology is the development of inexpensive electronic processes, materials, and devices. Direct printing techniques, which eliminate processing steps and save device and process materials, are the key to high volume and high throughput manufacturing. Copper metallization has been receiving increasing attention in both microelectronics and macroelectronics. Copper has high conductivity, density, melting point, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. However, copper is also hard to dry etch. For these reasons we have developed and demonstrated a directly printed copper source/drain metallization technique and applied it to the fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs). The maximum process temperature of 200°C is compatible with conventional active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) technology. In this dissertation, we show the process of depositing copper films by jet printing. We discuss the preparation and the properties of the copper precursor material used in the jet printing. We survey the conversion process from copper precursor to copper under varying processing conditions. The resulting copper film is probed for its physical, electrical, and mechanical properties. To demonstrate the feasibility of the jet printing technique, we print copper source/drain contacts for a-Si:H TFTs. The photolithography-free TFT fabrication process uses the printed xerographic toner technique developed earlier in this laboratory. We show that functional TFTs can be made with printed copper source and drain contacts. The jet printing of copper contacts represents a further step toward an all-printed thin film transistor technology.

  5. Large bouncing jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, Karl; Weislogel, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the phenomena of large jet rebound (bounce), a mode of fluid transfer following oblique jet impacts on hydrophobic surfaces. We initially seek to describe the regimes of such jet bounce in tests conducted in the weightless environment of a drop tower. A parametric study reveals the dependence of the rebound mode on the relevant dimensionless groups such as Weber number We⊥ defined on the velocity component perpendicular to the surface. We show that significantly larger diameter jets behave similarly as much smaller jets demonstrated during previous terrestrial investigations when We⊥ 1 . For We⊥ > 1 , large jet impacts create fishbone-like structures. We also explore rebounds from nonplanar substrates. Improving our understanding of such jet rebound opens avenues for unique transport capabilities. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A.

  6. Hydroacoustic pulsating jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1987-04-01

    A high pressure turbulent jet generator connected to a low pressure hydraulic tube is studied to investigate water hammer in tubes with fast flow variations, generating high pressure pulsating water jets. The pulsating jet generator consists of a tube, a hydraulic valve, a spring, and a water container. The jet is the effect of the combination of turbulent pipe flow with a valve for flow nozzle. The jet pressure depends on specific oscillation impedance and flow velocity variations. For inlet pressure of 0.5 to 2 bar the pressure rises to 40 bar. The described pulsating jet generator is more effective than the earlier model. A piezoelectric pressure controller is used to register pressure signals and high speed photos are made of the jet. Test results are consistent with theoretical calculation.

  7. Observation of Reconnection Features in the Chromosphere through a Chromospheric Jet Observed by SOT/Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Isobe, H.; Shibata, K.

    2012-08-01

    High-resolution observations from Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard Hinode has shown number of jet-like structures in the solar chromosphere. One of the key features in the observations is the clear presence of tiny, inverted Y-shaped jets called Chromospheric Anemone Jets. These jets are supposed to be formed as a result of the magnetic reconnection, however, whether and how fast magnetic reconnection is realized in partially ionized, fully collisional chromosphere is poorly understood. In this paper, we report the observation of a well resolved jet phenomenon observed from SOT. The jets were found to recur at the same location. We observed multiple blobs ejected along the jet. The jets occur after the ejection of blobs. It is noticed that the brightness enhancements at the footpoint of the jet are related with the height of the jet. These features indicate an important role of plasmoid dynamics and intermittent nature of the chromospheric reconnection. The lifetime of the plasmoid is 30 s - 50 s. We noticed the undulations in chromospheric anemone jets. The evolution of a single jet is consistent with the Sweeping-Magnetic-Twist mechanism proposed by Shibata and Uchida (1986).

  8. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Martinez, F.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime 10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Certain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called ``minifilaments,'' erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancellation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted; and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sights of magnetic-field cancelation. Thus our findings support that, at least in many cases, AR coronal jets result from the same physical processes that produce coronal jets in quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. FM was supportedby the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at

  9. Late recurrence of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brittney; Razzaqi, Faisal; Yu, Lolie; Craver, Randall

    2008-01-01

    We present a child with a cerebellar medulloblastoma, diagnosed at age three, treated with near total surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, that recurred 13 years after the initial diagnosis. This late recurrence exceeds the typical 10-year survival statistics that are in common use, and exceeds the Collins rule. Continued follow-up of these children is justified to increase the likelihood of detecting these late recurrences early and to learn more about these late recurrences.

  10. Solar Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    As a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) scientist Dr. Eldon Haines studied the solar energy source and solar water heating. He concluded he could build a superior solar water heating system using the geyser pumping principle. He resigned from JPL to develop his system and later form Sage Advance Corporation to market the technology. Haines' Copper Cricket residential system has no moving parts, is immune to freeze damage, needs no roof-mounted tanks, and features low maintenance. It provides 50-90 percent of average hot water requirements. A larger system, the Copper Dragon, has been developed for commercial installations.

  11. Recurrence of endometrial polyps.

    PubMed

    Paradisi, Roberto; Rossi, Stefania; Scifo, Maria Cristina; Dall'O', Francesca; Battaglia, Cesare; Venturoli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the recurrence rate of patients with endometrial polyps and to evaluate whether the recurrence can be correlated with the histopathologic features of the polyp. Two hundred and eighty-two women with endometrial polyps in both pre- or postmenopausal period and suffering from abnormal uterine bleeding or not were treated by resectoscopic surgery in a tertiary university hospital and were subsequently followed to check for polyp recurrence. Polyp recurrence rate after hysteroscopic surgery and correlation between recurrence and main demographic, hysteroscopic and histopathologic characteristics were analyzed. During mean ± SD follow-up period of 26.3 ± 19.7 months, the overall recurrence rate was high (13.3%) and did not vary (p = NS) with age, parity, weight or other demographic characteristics of the patients or with the hysteroscopic appearance. On the contrary, the histopathologic features showed significant differences between patients with and without polyp recurrence. Recurrence rate was higher (p < 0.001) in women with histopathologically hyperplastic polyps without atypia and lower (p < 0.001) in women with benign polyps. The study shows that after resectoscopic polypectomy, the recurrence rate of endometrial polyps is high (13.3%). Moreover, the hyperplastic polyps without atypia recur more frequently than benign ones. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Recurrence of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coelingh Bennink, H J

    1977-01-01

    The recurrence rate of gestational diabetes in 58 patients who had had the foregoing pregnancy complicated by diabetes was estimated to be 30% if our former criteria for abnormal glucose tolerance were strictly applied and 25% if our new, more stringent criteria were used. The recurrence rate is not influenced by prophylactic administration of pyridoxine. The perinatal morbidity complicating the 'second' pregnancy of former gestational diabetics was not increased in those patients who were not treated again, as compared with those who were. Recurrent gestational diabetes is associated with a degree of overdiagnosis in an attempt to detect all gestational diabetics. It is suggested that recurrent gestational diabetes occurs mainly in prediabetic patients.

  13. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  14. A Model of the Heliosphere with Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, James; Swisdak, Marc; Opher, Merav

    2015-11-01

    The conventional picture of the heliosphere is that of a comet-shaped structure with an extended tail produced by the relative motion of the sun through the local interstellar medium. Recent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the heliosphere have revealed that the heliosphere drives magnetized jets to the north and south similar to those driven by the Crab Nebula. That the sun's magnetic field can drive such jets when β = 8 πP /B2 >> 1 in the outer heliosphere is a major surprise. An analytic model of the heliosheath (HS) is developed in the limit in which the interstellar flow and magnetic field are neglected. The heliosphere in this limit is axi-symmetric and the overall structure of the HS is controlled by the solar magnetic field even for very high β. The tension of the solar magnetic field produces a drop in the total pressure between the termination shock and the HP. This same pressure drop accelerates the plasma flow into the north and south directions to form two collimated jets. MHD simulations of the global heliosphere embedded in a stationary interstellar medium match well with the analytic model. Evidence from the distribution of energetic neutral atoms from the outer heliosphere from IBEX and CASSINI supports the picture of a heliosphere with jets.

  15. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  16. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  17. Chromospheric anemone jets as evidence of ubiquitous reconnection.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Kazunari; Nakamura, Tahei; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Okamoto, Takenori J; Nishizuka, Naoto; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ueno, Satoru; Kitai, Reizaburo; Nozawa, Satoshi; Tsuneta, Saku; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Tarbell, Theodore D; Berger, Thomas E; Lites, Bruce W; Shine, Richard A; Title, Alan M

    2007-12-07

    The heating of the solar chromosphere and corona is a long-standing puzzle in solar physics. Hinode observations show the ubiquitous presence of chromospheric anemone jets outside sunspots in active regions. They are typically 3 to 7 arc seconds = 2000 to 5000 kilometers long and 0.2 to 0.4 arc second = 150 to 300 kilometers wide, and their velocity is 10 to 20 kilometers per second. These small jets have an inverted Y-shape, similar to the shape of x-ray anemone jets in the corona. These features imply that magnetic reconnection similar to that in the corona is occurring at a much smaller spatial scale throughout the chromosphere and suggest that the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona may be related to small-scale ubiquitous reconnection.

  18. Chromospheric Anemone Jets as Evidence of Ubiquitous Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Nakamura, Tahei; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Nishizuka, Naoto; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Nagata, Shin'ichi; UeNo, Satoru; Kitai, Reizaburo; Nozawa, Satoshi; Tsuneta, Saku; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Berger, Thomas E.; Lites, Bruce W.; Shine, Richard A.; Title, Alan M.

    2007-12-01

    The heating of the solar chromosphere and corona is a long-standing puzzle in solar physics. Hinode observations show the ubiquitous presence of chromospheric anemone jets outside sunspots in active regions. They are typically 3 to 7 arc seconds = 2000 to 5000 kilometers long and 0.2 to 0.4 arc second = 150 to 300 kilometers wide, and their velocity is 10 to 20 kilometers per second. These small jets have an inverted Y-shape, similar to the shape of x-ray anemone jets in the corona. These features imply that magnetic reconnection similar to that in the corona is occurring at a much smaller spatial scale throughout the chromosphere and suggest that the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona may be related to small-scale ubiquitous reconnection.

  19. Energetic electron acceleration at reconnection jet fronts in planetary magnetotails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, A.; Vaivads, A.; Zieger, B.; Nakamura, R.; Fujimoto, M.; Kasahara, S.; Badman, S.; Masters, A.; Coates, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays a crucial role for energetic particle acceleration in many astrophysical environments. Important examples are the solar corona and planetary magnetospheres. A number of recent numerical simulations as well as in situ observations in planetary magnetotails indicate that strong acceleration occurs at reconnection jet fronts, the boundary separating jetting from ambient plasma, and in jet braking regions, where jets eventually stop/dissipate. Yet the details of the acceleration mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we present observations of jet fronts and associated energetic electron acceleration in both Earth's and Saturn's magnetotails, by using Cluster and Cassini spacecraft data. We discuss differences/similarities in the properties of accelerated electrons and electromagnetic fields between the two cases.

  20. Cascade Helps JPL Explore the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we are involved with the unmanned exploration of the solar system. Unmanned probes observe the planet surfaces using radar and optical cameras to take a variety of measurements.

  1. Aging jets from low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Chen, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    An extended faint optical jet is associated with the compact emission region plus faint star known as HH 55. HH 55 is located in the Lupus 2 cloud 2 min SW of the well studied T Tauri star RU Lupi. The HH 55 jet extends 55 sec N and 35 sec S in PA 160 deg. The HH 55 star is an emission line star of spectral type M3.5. Its image in the emission lines of H-alpha and (S II) is slightly elongated by 2 sec - 3 sec to the S but in continuum light is symmetrical and pointlike ((full width at half maximum) (FWHM) = 1.7 sec). The star and jet have several features in common with the star and jet known as Sz 102 = Th 28 in the nearby Lupus 3 cloud. We suggest that these objects are representative of the late evolutionary stage of the HH jet-outflow phenomenon and point out that such objects may be quite common although difficult to detect. With L(sub bol) approximately = 0.005 solar luminosity, and log T(sub e) approximately = 3.5, the HH 55 star is close to the main sequence and evolutionary tracks suggest an age of 3 x 10(exp 7) yr.

  2. Aging jets from low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Chen, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    An extended faint optical jet is associated with the compact emission region plus faint star known as HH 55. HH 55 is located in the Lupus 2 cloud 2 min SW of the well studied T Tauri star RU Lupi. The HH 55 jet extends 55 sec N and 35 sec S in PA 160 deg. The HH 55 star is an emission line star of spectral type M3.5. Its image in the emission lines of H-alpha and (S II) is slightly elongated by 2 sec - 3 sec to the S but in continuum light is symmetrical and pointlike ((full width at half maximum) (FWHM) = 1.7 sec). The star and jet have several features in common with the star and jet known as Sz 102 = Th 28 in the nearby Lupus 3 cloud. We suggest that these objects are representative of the late evolutionary stage of the HH jet-outflow phenomenon and point out that such objects may be quite common although difficult to detect. With L(sub bol) approximately = 0.005 solar luminosity, and log T(sub e) approximately = 3.5, the HH 55 star is close to the main sequence and evolutionary tracks suggest an age of 3 x 10(exp 7) yr.

  3. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Nowak, Michael; Hillwig, Todd; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael; Heinz, Sebastian E-mail: crc@space.mit.edu E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu E-mail: amiodusz@nrao.edu E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-09-20

    We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3 × 10{sup 14} cm apart. The jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that could result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. These perturbations are consistent with a change in jet direction but not jet speed. The proper motions of the radio knots match the kinematic model only if the distance to SS 433 is 4.5 ± 0.2 kpc. Observations during eclipse show that the occulted emission is very hard, seen only above 2 keV and rising to comprise >50% of the flux at 8 keV. The soft X-ray emission lines from the jet are not blocked, constraining the jet length to ∼> 2 × 10{sup 12} cm. The base jet density is in the range 10{sup 10-13} cm{sup –3}, in contrast to our previous estimate based on the Si XIII triplet, which is likely to have been affected by UV de-excitation. There is a clear overabundance of Ni by a factor of about 15 relative to the solar value, which may have resulted from an unusual supernova that formed the compact object.

  4. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  5. The jet in crossflowa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagozian, Ann R.

    2014-10-01

    The jet in crossflow, or transverse jet, is a flowfield that has relevance to a wide range of energy and propulsion systems. Over the years, our group's studies on this canonical flowfield have focused on the dynamics of the vorticity associated with equidensity and variable density jets in crossflow, including the stability characteristics of the jet's upstream shear layer, as a means of explaining jet response to altered types of excitation. The jet's upstream shear layer is demonstrated to exhibit convectively unstable behavior at high jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios, transitioning to absolutely unstable behavior at low momentum flux and/or density ratios, with attendant differences in shear layer vorticity evolution and rollup. These differences in stability characteristics are shown to have a significant effect on how one optimally employs external excitation to control jet penetration and spread, depending on the flow regime and specific engineering application. Yet recent unexpected observations on altered transverse jet structure under different flow conditions introduce a host of unanswered questions, primarily but not exclusively associated with the nature of molecular mixing, that make this canonical flowfield one that is of great interest for more extensive exploration.

  6. The remarkable AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei

    The jets from active galactic nuclei exhibit stability which seems to be far superior compared to that of terrestrial and laboratory jets. They manage to propagate over distances up to a billion of initial jet radii. Yet this may not be an indication of some exotic physics but mainly a reflection of the specific environment these jets propagate through. The key property of this environment is a rapid decline of density and pressure along the jet, which promotes its rapid expansion. Such an expansion can suppress global instabilities, which require communication across the jet, and hence ensure its survival over huge distances. At kpc scales, some AGN jets do show signs of strong instabilities and even turn into plumes. This could be a result of the flattening of the external pressure distribution in their host galaxies or inside the radio lobes. In this regard, we discuss the possible connection between the stability issue and the Fanaroff-Riley classification of extragalactic radio sources. The observations of AGN jets on sub-kpc scale do not seem to support their supposed lack of causal connectivity. When interpreted using simple kinematic models, they reveal a rather perplexing picture with more questions than answers on the jets dynamics.

  7. Recurrent inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwait, R W

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of 584 operations for recurrent inguinal hernia was made in an attempt to determine the cause of the recurrence based on the anatomic findings. The recurrence was indirect in 300, direct in 241, and various other in 43 operations. The causes of the indirect recurrences appeared to be an unrecognized hernia, incomplete dissection or improper ligation of the sac, failure to narrow the cord, or inadequate reconstruction of the internal ring. No cause for the diffuse direct recurrences was apparent. Of the 241 hernias in Hesselbach's triangle, 144 were small localized defects, usually (112) just lateral to the symphysis. These were considered to be caused by the cutting action of a suture placed under tension. On the basis of these findings, suggestions are made for primary inguinal hernia operations. PMID:4073990

  8. JPL tests of a LaJet concentrator facet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Argoud, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    A LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrator facet, 60 in. in diameter, was tested for imaging quality. The following two methods were used: (1) autofocus tests with a point source of light at the facet's radius of curvature; and (2) tests with the Sun close to the horizon as a distant source. The tests of the LaJet facet indicate that all of the solar image reflected by an LEC 460 solar concentrator made of like facets should fall within a 9-in. aperture if the outer facets are carefully adjusted. Such a concentrator would have acceptable performance, but complete evaluation must be made with an assembled concentrator.

  9. A Model of the Heliosphere with Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Opher, M.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional picture of the heliosphere is that of a comet-shaped structure with an extended tail produced by the relative motion of the sun through the local interstellar medium (LISM). On the other hand, the measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) by IBEX and CASSINI produced some surprises. The CASSINI ENA fluxes from the direction of the nose and the tail were comparable, leading the CASSINI observers to conclude that the heliosphere was ``tailless''. The IBEX observations from the tail revealed that the hardest spectrum of ENAs were localized in two lobes at high latitude while the softest spectra were at low latitudes. Recent MHD simulations of the global heliosphere have revealed that the heliosphere drives magnetized jets to the north and south similar to those driven by the Crab Nebula and other astrophysical objects [1]. That the sun's magnetic field can drive such jets when the magnetic pressure in the outer heliosphere is small compared with the local plasma pressure (β=8∏ P/B2 >> 1) is a major surprise. An analytic model of the heliosheath (HS) between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP) is developed in the limit in which the interstellar flow and magnetic field are neglected [2]. The heliosphere in this limit is axisymmetric. The overall structure of the HS and HP are controlled by the solar magnetic field even in the limit of very high β because the large pressure in the HS is to lowest order balanced by the pressure of the LISM. The tension of the solar magnetic field produces a drop in the total pressure between the TS and the HP. This same pressure drop accelerates the plasma flow downstream of the TS into the north and south directions to form two collimated jets. The radii of these jets are controlled by the flow through the TS and the acceleration of this flow by the magnetic field -- a stronger solar magnetic field boosts the velocity of the jets and reduces the radii of the jets and the HP. Magnetohydrodynamic

  10. Coping with Fear of Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Fear of Recurrence Request Permissions Coping With Fear of Recurrence Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... affects your life. Tips for coping with the fear of recurrence Living with uncertainty is never easy. ...

  11. A Strategy for an Enterprise-Wide Data Management Capability at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhrman, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is a Federally Research and Development Center (FFRDC) operated by the California Institute of Technology that is engaged in the quest for knowledge about the solar system, the universe, and the Earth.

  12. A Strategy for an Enterprise-Wide Data Management Capability at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhrman, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is a Federally Research and Development Center (FFRDC) operated by the California Institute of Technology that is engaged in the quest for knowledge about the solar system, the universe, and the Earth.

  13. Predictors of Recurrent AKI

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Sharidan K.; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Eden, Svetlana K.; Peterson, Josh F.; Bansal, Nisha; Hung, Adriana M.; Fly, James; Speroff, Ted; Ikizler, T. Alp; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent AKI is common among patients after hospitalized AKI and is associated with progressive CKD. In this study, we identified clinical risk factors for recurrent AKI present during index AKI hospitalizations that occurred between 2003 and 2010 using a regional Veterans Administration database in the United States. AKI was defined as a 0.3 mg/dl or 50% increase from a baseline creatinine measure. The primary outcome was hospitalization with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge from the index hospitalization. Time to recurrent AKI was examined using Cox regression analysis, and sensitivity analyses were performed using a competing risk approach. Among 11,683 qualifying AKI hospitalizations, 2954 patients (25%) were hospitalized with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge. Median time to recurrent AKI within 12 months was 64 (interquartile range 19–167) days. In addition to known demographic and comorbid risk factors for AKI, patients with longer AKI duration and those whose discharge diagnosis at index AKI hospitalization included congestive heart failure (primary diagnosis), decompensated advanced liver disease, cancer with or without chemotherapy, acute coronary syndrome, or volume depletion, were at highest risk for being hospitalized with recurrent AKI. Risk factors identified were similar when a competing risk model for death was applied. In conclusion, several inpatient conditions associated with AKI may increase the risk for recurrent AKI. These findings should facilitate risk stratification, guide appropriate patient referral after AKI, and help generate potential risk reduction strategies. Efforts to identify modifiable factors to prevent recurrent AKI in these patients are warranted. PMID:26264853

  14. Predictors of Recurrent AKI.

    PubMed

    Siew, Edward D; Parr, Sharidan K; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Eden, Svetlana K; Peterson, Josh F; Bansal, Nisha; Hung, Adriana M; Fly, James; Speroff, Ted; Ikizler, T Alp; Matheny, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent AKI is common among patients after hospitalized AKI and is associated with progressive CKD. In this study, we identified clinical risk factors for recurrent AKI present during index AKI hospitalizations that occurred between 2003 and 2010 using a regional Veterans Administration database in the United States. AKI was defined as a 0.3 mg/dl or 50% increase from a baseline creatinine measure. The primary outcome was hospitalization with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge from the index hospitalization. Time to recurrent AKI was examined using Cox regression analysis, and sensitivity analyses were performed using a competing risk approach. Among 11,683 qualifying AKI hospitalizations, 2954 patients (25%) were hospitalized with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge. Median time to recurrent AKI within 12 months was 64 (interquartile range 19-167) days. In addition to known demographic and comorbid risk factors for AKI, patients with longer AKI duration and those whose discharge diagnosis at index AKI hospitalization included congestive heart failure (primary diagnosis), decompensated advanced liver disease, cancer with or without chemotherapy, acute coronary syndrome, or volume depletion, were at highest risk for being hospitalized with recurrent AKI. Risk factors identified were similar when a competing risk model for death was applied. In conclusion, several inpatient conditions associated with AKI may increase the risk for recurrent AKI. These findings should facilitate risk stratification, guide appropriate patient referral after AKI, and help generate potential risk reduction strategies. Efforts to identify modifiable factors to prevent recurrent AKI in these patients are warranted. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds for different initial magnetic field configurations. The jets are followed from the source to distances, which are resolvable by HST and ALMA observations. Our simulations show that jets are heated along their length by many shocks. The mass of the protostar is a free parameter that can be inserted in the post processing of the data, and we apply the simulations to both low mass and high mass protostars. For the latter we also compute the expected diagnostics when the outflow is photoionized by the protostar. We compute the emission lines that are produced, and find excellent agreement with observations. For a one solar mass protostar, we find the jet width to be between 20 and 30 au while the maximum velocities perpendicular to the jet are found to be 100 km s-1. The initially less open magnetic field configuration simulations result in a wider, two-component jet; a cylindrically shaped outer jet surrounding a narrow and much faster, inner jet. For the initially most open magnetic field configuration the kink mode creates a narrow corkscrew-like jet without a clear Keplerian rotation profile and even regions where we observe rotation opposite to the disk (counter-rotating). This is not seen in the less open field configurations.

  16. Jet lag modification.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emily; McGrane, Owen; Wedmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Athletes often are required to travel for sports participation, both for practice and competition. A number of those crossing multiple time zones will develop jet lag disorder with possible negative consequences on their performance. This review will discuss the etiology of jet lag disorder and the techniques that are available to shorten or minimize its effects. This includes both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches.

  17. Jet measurements in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Peter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    The reconstruction of jets generated in the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of TeV with the ATLAS detector is discussed. Beginning with a brief review of the calorimeter signal definitions relevant for jet finding, and the use of reconstructed charged particle tracks, the jet reconstruction strategy is described in some detail. Emphasis is put on the jet energy scale (JES) calibration strategy applied for first data, which is based on a short sequence of data driven and simulation based calibrations and corrections to restore the measured jet energy to particle level. The level of understanding of the signal patterns entering the JES corrections is shown for selected variables in comparisons to simulations. The present systematic uncertainties on the JES, which can be as low as 2% for central jets, are presented and analyzed with respect to the individual fractional contributions entering their determination. Some characteristic jet reconstruction performance and selected results from the first year of jet physics with ATLAS in a newly accessible kinematic domain are shown in conclusion.

  18. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... be harder to adjust to because you lose time. Jet lag can make you feel like going to bed ... such as trying to adjust to the new time zone before you arrive. Images Jet lag prevention References Berry RB, Wagner MH. Patients with ...

  19. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  20. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  1. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  2. Relativistic Jets and Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    In order to study the relativistic jets from collapsars, we have developed a special relativistic multiple-dimensional hydrodynamics code similar to the GENESIS code (Aloy et al., ApJS, 122, 151). The code is based on the PPM interpolation algorithm and Marquina's Riemann solver. Using this code, we have simulated the propagation of axisymmetric jets along the rotational axis of collapsed rotating stars (collapsars). Using the progenitors of MacFadyen, Woosley, and Heger, a relativistic jet is injected at a given inner boundary radius. This radius, the opening angle of the jet, its Lorentz factor, and its total energy are parameters of the problem. A highly collimated, relativistic outflow is observed at the surface of the star several seconds later. We will discuss the hydrodynamical focusing of the jet, it's break out properties, time evolution, and sensitivity to the adopted parameters.

  3. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  4. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  5. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  6. Characteristics of EUV Coronal Jets Observed with STEREO/SECCHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, G.; Bothmer, V.; Patsourakos, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive statistical study of EUV coronal jets observed with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. A catalogue of 79 polar jets is presented, identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008, when solar activity was at a minimum. The twin spacecraft angular separation increased during this time interval from 2 to 48 degrees. The appearances of the coronal jets were always correlated with underlying small-scale chromospheric bright points. A basic characterization of the morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evolution. Though each jet appeared morphologically similar in the coronagraph field of view, in the sense of a narrow collimated outward flow of matter, at the source region in the low corona the jet showed different characteristics, which may correspond to different magnetic structures. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events there were 37 Eiffel tower-type jet events, commonly interpreted as a small-scale (˜35 arc sec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambient unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its loop tops, and 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipole footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME-type jet events because they resembled the classical coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remaining 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propagation. A few jets are also found in equatorial coronal holes. In this study we present sample

  7. Suprathermal electron acceleration at reconnection jet fronts and braking regions in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro; Vaivads, Andris; Zieger, Bertalan; Fujimoto, Masaki; Kasahara, Satoshi; Nakamura, Rumi; Chasapis, Alexandros; Fu, Huishan

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an efficient mechanisms for accelerating charged particles to energies much higher than their thermal energy. Important examples are the solar corona and planetary magnetospheres. A number of recent numerical simulations as well as in situ observations in Earth's magnetotail indicate that strong acceleration occurs at reconnection jet fronts, the boundary separating jetting from ambient plasma, and in jet braking regions, where jets eventually stop/dissipate. Yet the details of the acceleration mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we present a few examples of jet fronts/braking regions and associated suprathermal electron acceleration in the Earth's magnetotail, by using Cluster spacecraft data. We discuss the properties of accelerated electrons and electromagnetic fields for both jet front and jet braking regions.

  8. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  9. Optimal Jet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, D. Yu.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2003-09-01

    We describe a FORTRAN 77 implementation of the optimal jet definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We discuss details of the implementation, explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (OJF_014) Catalogue identifier: ADSB Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: Any computer with the FORTRAN 77 compiler Tested with: g77/Linux on Intel, Alpha and Sparc; Sun f77/Solaris (thwgs.cern.ch); xlf/AIX (rsplus.cern.ch); MS Fortran PowerStation 4.0/Win98 Programming language used: FORTRAN 77 Memory required: ˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) Number of bytes in distributed program, including examples and test data: 251 463 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Hadronic jets, jet finding algorithms Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [ hep-ph/0301185] provide a brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called optimal jet definition ( OJD). The theory of OJD was developed by Tkachov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; 74 (1995) 2618; Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 12 (1997) 5411; 17 (2002) 2783]. The desired jet configuration is obtained as the one that minimizes Ω R, a certain function of the input particles and jet

  10. Ventral incisional hernia recurrence.

    PubMed

    Clark, J L

    2001-07-01

    During the period October 1993 to December 1996, 31 patients were operated on by the author for primary or recurrent ventral incisional hernia (VIH). Three patients were excluded from analysis because their records were unavailable for review. The median age of the 28 remaining patients at their initial procedure was 57.5 years (range, 37-78 years). The repair was performed with interrupted O-Ethibond sutures in all but 3 cases where Prolene suture was used secondary to noniatrogenic contamination or recurrent hernia. There were no unplanned enterotomies in the entire series and prophylactic intravenous antibiotics were used in all cases. The only significant complications were skin hyperemia after five repairs in 3 patients who were treated empirically with intravenous antibiotics, and 1 patient who had an antibiotic-associated rash. There were no 30-day mortalities. Prolene mesh was used exclusively in all repairs performed with mesh. Seven of these repairs (25%) were for recurrent VIH. Three of these seven patients had previous mesh repairs. Six of these seven patients who presented with recurrent VIH had a mesh repair and four developed a recurrence. Five of seven were active smokers, with one having severe obstructive lung disease. Four of seven related significant occupational lifting. Of the 21 patients having initial repair of VIH, mesh was used in 8 (38%). After a median follow-up of 13 months, there were 2 recurrent hernias (25%). The remaining 13 patients had primary closure of their hernias. After median follow-up of 25 months, there were 5 recurrences (38%). A total of 34 VIH repairs were performed on these 28 patients, of which 13 were for recurrent hernias. Five of thirteen (38%) of the mesh repairs for recurrent VIH failed. The median body mass index (BMI) for the 13 patients having primary repair was 26.4, and that for all 21 cases having mesh repair was 28.8. Patients with recurrent VIH frequently recur despite use of mesh, avoidance of

  11. Rossby wave breaking, the upper level jet, and serial clustering of extratropical cyclones in western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Matthew D. K.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Dacre, Helen F.; Shaffrey, Len C.

    2017-01-01

    Winter 2013/14 was the stormiest on record for the UK and was characterized by recurrent clustering of extratropical cyclones. This clustering was associated with a strong, straight and persistent North Atlantic jet and was also associated with Rossby wave breaking (RWB) on both flanks, pinning the jet in place. The occurrence of RWB and cyclone clustering is further studied in 36 years of the ERA-Interim Reanalysis. Clustering at 55°N is associated with an extended and anomalously strong eddy-driven jet flanked on both sides by RWB. However, clustering at 65(45)°N has a dominance of RWB to the south (north) of the jet, deflecting the jet northward (southward). A positive correlation was found between clustering and RWB occurrence to the north and south of the jet. However, there is considerable spread in these relationships.

  12. Solar collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. I.

    1984-08-01

    Solar dishes, photovoltaics, passive solar building and solar hot water systems, Trombe walls, hot air panels, hybrid solar heating systems, solar grain dryers, solar greenhouses, solar hot water worhshops, and solar workshops are discussed. These solar technologies are applied to residential situations.

  13. Simulating Astrophysical Jets in Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A laboratory plasma configuration based on spheromak [1] magnetic fusion plasma physics technology is used to simulate many important features of magnetically driven astrophysical jets. The experimental sequence starts with a quasi-static seed poloidal magnetic field that links a central disk electrode to a co-planar bounding annular electrode; this arrangement provides a topology analogous to the poloidal magnetic field of a star linking a surrounding accretion disk. After puffing neutral gas from nozzles mounted on the electrodes, plasma is created via application of a large emf between the central disk and the bounding annular electrode. The emf then drives a large poloidal electric current flowing from the central disk electrode (star) to the annulus (accretion disk) along the bias poloidal magnetic field. This electric current produces large magnetohydrodynamic forces which result in dynamics analogous to the dynamics of an astrophysical jet. In particular, the laboratory "astrophysical jet" is observed [2,3] to evolve through a distinct, reproducible sequence consisting of jet formation, collimation, kink instability, and for appropriate parameters, detachment into an unbounded, expanding spheromak-like plasmoid. These observations and related observations on a solar prominence simulation experiment [4] have motivated an analytic model [5] for the collimation physics whereby stagnation of convected, frozen-in toroidal magnetic flux amplifies the toroidal magnetic flux density and then, since the toroidal magnetic field (i.e., toroidal flux density) provides the pinch force, the pinch force is increased, collimating the jet. The following talk (You, Bellan, Yun) will present detailed measurements of the jet formation, acceleration, and collimation process. [1] P. M. Bellan, Spheromaks (Imperial College Press, London, 2000). [2] S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 334, 257 (2002). [3] S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan, Phys. Rev. Letters 90, article

  14. T Pyxidis: The First Cataclysmic Variable with a Collimated Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahbaz, T.; Livio, M.; Southwell, K. A.; Charles, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the first observational evidence for a collimated jet in a cataclysmic variable system; the recurrent nova T Pyxidis. Optical spectra show bipolar components of H(alpha) with velocities approx. 1400 km/s, very similar to those observed in the supersoft X-ray sources and in SS 433. We argue that a key ingredient of the formation of jets in the supersoft X-ray sources and T Pyx (in addition to an accretion disk threaded by a vertical magnetic field), is the presence of nuclear burning on the surface of the white dwarf.

  15. The effect of jet shape on jet injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Geehoon; Modak, Ashin; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the dispersion pattern of a needle-free jet injector are explored. The shape of the jets were compared using a high-speed video camera and jet injections of collimated and dispersed fluid jets with a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector were made into acrylamide gel and post-mortem porcine tissue. A custom-built high-speed X-ray imaging system was used in order to observe the dynamics of the dispersion mechanism for each injection in real time. We show that a collimated jet stream results in greater tissue penetration than a dispersed jet stream.

  16. Directional control of a jet using synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Macovei, Alexandru Cǎtǎlin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Crunteanu, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents an application of synthetic jets in the flow control of a jet. The synthetic jet actuator consists of an oscillating membrane operating at high frequency and separating two cavities with exit slots of different geometries. The synthetic jets work as an alternating push-pull system and the generated vortical structure changes the flow direction of the main jet (jet vectoring). The numerical investigations are performed using a RANS solver with an adequate turbulence model and demonstrates a changing of a jet direction.

  17. Jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-08-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  18. Synthetic Fence Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Apps, Christopher

    2000-11-01

    "Synthetic Jets" have previously been produced where an oscillating flow with zero net mass flux acts on the edges of an orifice. The resulting flow is similar to a normal jet. We have proposed and verified that another type of jet called a "Synthetic Fence Jet" (SFJ or "fe-je") can also be created. We introduced a fence perpendicular to both a wall and an oscillating velocity field. Under certain conditions a jet was formed by vortices of alternating sign. The vortices were shed from the fence and they induced each other away from it. This phenomenon could be used as a method of flow control. The objective of this project was to use flow visualization to prove the existence of and characterize this jet. A test rig was used which incorporates smoke-wire flow visualization; independent oscillation level and frequency control; and computer- controlled data acquisition. It has been discovered that the jet direction can be vectored by altering the forcing waveform shape. To explain this a theory was developed that is based on the Biot-Savart law of vortex dynamics.

  19. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  20. Jet Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sally Seidel

    2004-06-28

    Jets have been studied by the CDF Collaboration [1] as a means of searching for new particles and interactions, testing a variety of perturbative QCD predictions, and providing input for the global parton distribution function (PDF) fits. Unless otherwise indicated below, the jets were reconstructed using a cone algorithm [2] with cone radius R = 0.7 from data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run 2, 2001-2003, with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Central jets, in the pseudorapidity range relative to fixed detector coordinates 0.1 < |{eta}| < 0.7, are used.

  1. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  2. Heterojunction solar cells based on single-crystal silicon with an inkjet-printed contact grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, S. N.; Abramov, A. S.; Ivanov, G. A.; Terukov, E. I.; Emtsev, K. V.; Nyapshaev, I. A.; Bazeley, A. A.; Gubin, S. P.; Kornilov, D. Yu.; Tkachev, S. V.; Kim, V. P.; Ryndin, D. A.; Levchenkova, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Results on the creation of a current-collecting grid for heterojunction silicon solar cells by ink-jet printing are presented. Characteristics of the obtained solar cells are compared with those of the samples obtained using standard screen printing.

  3. Flux Cancelation: The Key to Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald; Chakrapani, Prithi; Innes, Davina; Schmit, Don; Tiwari, Sanjiv

    2017-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are magnetically channeled eruptions that occur in all types of solar environments (e.g. active regions, quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of small-scare filaments (minifilaments). Once the eruption is underway magnetic reconnection evidently makes the jet spire and the bright emission in the jet base. However, the triggering mechanism of these eruptions and the formation mechanism of the pre-jet minifilaments are still open questions. In this talk, mainly using SDOAIA and SDOHIM data, first I will address the question: what triggers the jet-driving minifilament eruptions in different solar environments (coronal holes, quiet regions, active regions)? Then I will talk about the magnetic field evolution that produces the pre-jet minifilaments. By examining pre-jet evolutionary changes in line-of-sight HMI magnetograms while examining concurrent EUV images of coronal and transition-region emission, we find clear evidence that flux cancelation is the main process that builds pre-jet minifilaments, and is also the main process that triggers the eruptions. I will also present results from our ongoing work indicating that jet-driving minifilament eruptions are analogous to larger-scare filament eruptions that make flares and CMEs. We find that persistent flux cancellation at the neutral line of large-scale filaments often triggers their eruptions. From our observations we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process from the buildup and triggering of solar eruptions of all sizes.

  4. Filament Channel Formation, Eruption, and Jet Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism behind filament-channel formation is a longstanding mystery, while that underlying the initiation of coronal mass ejections and jets has been studied intensively but is not yet firmly established. In previous work, we and collaborators have investigated separately the consequences of magnetic-helicity condensation (Antiochos 2013) for forming filament channels (Zhao et al. 2015; Knizhnik et al. 2015, 2017a,b) and of the embedded-bipole model (Antiochos 1996) for generating reconnection-driven jets (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015, 2016; Wyper et al. 2016, 2017). Now we have taken a first step toward synthesizing these two lines of investigation. Our recent study (Karpen et al. 2017) of coronal-hole jets with gravity and wind employed an ad hoc, large-scale shear flow at the surface to introduce magnetic free energy and form the filament channel. In this effort, we replace the shear flow with an ensemble of local rotation cells, to emulate the Sun’s ever-changing granules and supergranules. As in our previous studies, we find that reconnection between twisted flux tubes within the closed-field region concentrates magnetic shear and free energy near the polarity inversion line, forming the filament channel. Onset of reconnection between this field and the external, unsheared, open field releases stored energy to drive the impulsive jet. We discuss the results of our new simulations with implications for understanding solar activity and space weather.

  5. Extinct Radioactivities and the R-Process Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    2001-01-01

    All extinct radioactive species in the solar nebula were injected from a core-collapse supernova. I discuss primarily the products expected from an r-process jet in this supernova, and various supporting astrophysical observations. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Recurrences of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M; Cirpaciu, M D

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell's palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell's palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients' age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which leads to the conclusion that we should have a follow up of patients

  7. Recurrences of Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, CM; Cirpaciu, MD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Bell’s palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell’s palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. Purpose. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. Methods & Materials. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. Results. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell’s palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients’ age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Conclusions. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which

  8. Blinded by the Jets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-04

    This image shows the view from NASA Deep Impact probe 30 minutes before it was pummeled by comet Tempel 1. The picture brightness has been enhanced to show the jets of dust streaming away from the comet.

  9. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  10. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  11. Undercover Jet Exposed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-04

    This image layout shows two views of the same baby star from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Spitzer view shows that this star has a second, identical jet shooting off in the opposite direction of the first.

  12. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  13. Jet propulsion for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckingham, Edgar

    1924-01-01

    This report is a description of a method of propelling airplanes by the reaction of jet propulsion. Air is compressed and mixed with fuel in a combustion chamber, where the mixture burns at constant pressure. The combustion products issue through a nozzle, and the reaction of that of the motor-driven air screw. The computations are outlined and the results given by tables and curves. The relative fuel consumption and weight of machinery for the jet, decrease as the flying speed increases; but at 250 miles per hour the jet would still take about four times as much fuel per thrust horsepower-hour as the air screw, and the power plant would be heavier and much more complicated. Propulsion by the reaction of a simple jet can not compete with air screw propulsion at such flying speeds as are now in prospect.

  14. Recurrent Fever in Children

    PubMed Central

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time. PMID:27023528

  15. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping and for the presence of E. coli virulence factors. For each of four patients, the index and recurrent episodes of bacteremia represented the same strain as defined by PFGE, and the strains were found to carry one or more virulence factors. The remaining patient, with two episodes of bloodstream infection separated by a 4-year interval, was infected with two isolates that did not carry any virulence factors and that were clonally related by ribotype analysis but differed by PFGE. All five patients had either a local host defense defect (three patients) or impaired systemic defenses (one patient) or both (one patient). Thus, recurrent E. coli bacteremia is likely to represent a multifactorial process that occurs in patients with impaired host defenses who are infected with virulent isolates. Images PMID:7910828

  16. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-25

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  17. Automatic Jet Contrail Detection and Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.; Christopher, S. A.; Welch, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Jet contrails are an important subset of cirrus clouds in the atmosphere, and thin cirrus are thought to enhance the greenhouse effect due to their semi-transparent nature. They are nearly transparent to the solar energy reaching the surface, but they reduce the planetary emission to space due to their cold ambient temperatures. Having 'seeded' the environment, contrails often elongate and widen into cirrus-like features. However, there is great uncertainty regarding the impact of contrails on surface temperature and precipitation. With increasing numbers of subsonic aircraft operating in the upper troposphere, there is the possibility of increasing cloudiness which could lead to changes in the radiation balance. Automatic detection and seg- mentation of jet contrails in satellite imagery is important because (1) it is impractical to compile a contrail climatology by hand, and (2) with the segmented images it will be possible to retrieve contrail physical properties such as optical thickness, effective ice crystal diameter and emissivity.

  18. Macrospicule Jets in On-Disk Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the magnetic structure and dynamics of multiple jets found in coronal holes close to or on disk center. All data are from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on observations of six jets in an equatorial coronal hole spanning 2011 February 27 and 28. We show the evolution of these jets in AIA 193 A, examine the magnetic field configuration, and postulate the probable trigger mechanism of these events. We recently reported on another jet in the same coronal hole on 2011 February 27, approximately 13:04 Universal Time (Adams et al 2014, Astrophysical Journal, 783: 11); this jet is a previously-unrecognized variety of blowout jet. In this variety, the reconnection bright point is not made by interchange reconnection of initially-closed erupting field in the base of the jet with ambient open field. Instead, there is a miniature filament-eruption flare arcade made by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting field.

  19. Examining the Properties of Jets in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaulle, Owen; Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to look for triggers of jets in a coronal hole. It has been proposed that bright points affiliated with the jets are caused by either random collisions between magnetic elements or by magnetic flux emerging from the photosphere; either of which can give rise to magnetic reconnection. Images from the 193AA filter of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) were searched to identify and locate jets. Changes in the line-of-sight magnetic field prior to the time of the jet were sought in data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI). In total we studied 15 different jets that occurred over a two day period starting 2011-02-27 00:00:00 UTC and ending 2011-02-28 23:59:55 UTC. All of the jets were contained within a coronal hole that was close to disk center. Of the 15 that we studied 6 were shown to have an increase of the parameter B2 (where B is the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field), within one hour prior to the creation of the jet and 10 were within 3 hours before the event.

  20. A cusp-shaped jet observed by IRIS and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzong; Zhang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    On 2014 August 29, the trigger and evolution of a cusp-shaped jet were captured in detail at 1330 Å by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. At first, two neighboring mini-prominences arose in turn from the low solar atmosphere and collided with a loop-like system over them. The collisions between the loop-like system and the mini-prominences lead to the blowout, and then a cusp-shaped jet formed with a spire and an arch-base. In the spire, many brightening blobs originating from the junction between the spire and the arch-base moved upward in a rotating manner and then in a straight line in the late phase of the jet. In the arch-base, dark and bright material simultaneously tracked in a fan-like structure, and the majority of the material moved along the fan's threads. At the later phase of the jet's evolution, bidirectional flows emptied the arch-base, while downflows emptied the spire, thus making the jet entirely vanish. The extremely detailed observations in this study shed new light on how magnetic reconnection alters the inner topological structure of a jet and provides a beneficial complement for understanding current jet models.

  1. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  2. Relativistic Jets from Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; MacFadyen, A.

    2000-03-01

    Using a collapsar progenitor model of MacFadyen & Woosley, we have simulated the propagation of an axisymmetric jet through a collapsing rotating massive star with the GENESIS multidimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code. The jet forms as a consequence of an assumed (constant or variable) energy deposition in the range of 1050-1051 ergs s-1 within a 30 deg cone around the rotation axis. The jet flow is strongly beamed (approximately less than a few degrees), spatially inhomogeneous, and time dependent. The jet reaches the surface of the stellar progenitor (R*=2.98x1010 cm) intact. At breakout, the maximum Lorentz factor of the jet flow is 33. After breakout, the jet accelerates into the circumstellar medium, whose density is assumed to decrease exponentially and then become constant, ρext=10-5 g cm-3. Outside the star, the flow begins to expand laterally also (v~c), but the beam remains very well collimated. At a distance of 2.54 R*, where the simulation ends, the Lorentz factor has increased to 44.

  3. Entrainment Characteristics for variable-angle plunging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Simulations based on an algebraic VoF method are used to study the entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent pool at angles ranging from 10 to 90 deg. with pool. Our previous study of shallow plunging jets (Deshpande et al. 2012) revealed a discernible frequency in the formation of large air cavities. This contrasts the well-documented chaotic entrainment at steeper inclinations, suggesting a different entrainment mechanism exists for shallow angles. Quantitatively, it is found that larger cavities and greater volume of entrained air occur at shallower angles (10, 12 deg.). A precursor to the formation of these large cavities is the presence of a stagnation region in the zone of impingement. Using a local mass and momentum balance, we show that this stagnation region deflects the incoming jet at wide angles producing large air cavities. Entrainment in shallow jets is similar to the initial impact of the jet with a pool, but it occurs periodically. The recurrence is a consequence of jet disruption by traveling waves on the pool. Qualitative analysis, supported with simulations, demonstrates linear scaling of entrainment period with Froude number.

  4. Axisymmetric wall jet development in confined jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-02-01

    The flow field surrounding an axisymmetric, confined, impinging jet was investigated with a focus on the early development of the triple-layered wall jet structure. Experiments were conducted using stereo particle image velocimetry at three different confinement gap heights (2, 4, and 8 jet diameters) across Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 9000. The rotating flow structures within the confinement region and their interaction with the surrounding flow were dependent on the confinement gap height and Reynolds number. The recirculation core shifted downstream as the Reynolds number increased. For the smallest confinement gap height investigated, the strong recirculation caused a disruption of the wall jet development. The radial position of the recirculation core observed at this small gap height was found to coincide with the location where the maximum wall jet velocity had decayed to 15% of the impinging jet exit velocity. After this point, the self-similarity hypothesis failed to predict the evolution of the wall jet further downstream. A reduction in confinement gap height increased the growth rates of the wall jet thickness but did not affect the decay rate of the wall jet maximum velocity. For jet Reynolds numbers above 2500, the decay rate of the maximum velocity in the developing region of the wall jet was approximately -1.1, which is close to previous results reported for the fully developed region of radial wall jets. A much higher decay rate of -1.5 was found for the wall jet formed by a laminar impinging jet at Re = 1000.

  5. Recurrence of angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Dahlen, G

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of recurrence of angular cheilitis following a successful antimicrobial treatment was studied in 48 patients. Clinical assessments including a microbial examination were carried out 8 months and 5 yr after termination of treatment. Eighty percent of the patients reported recurrence of their angular cheilitis on one or more occasions during the observation period. Patients with cutaneous disorders associated with dry skin or intraoral leukoplakia had an increased incidence of recrudescence. Neither the presence of denture stomatitis nor the type of microorganisms isolated from the original lesions of angular cheilitis, i.e. Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus, were associated with the number of recurrences. The present observations indicate that treatment of the majority of patients with angular cheilitis should be considered in a longer perspective than previously supposed, due to the short lasting therapeutic effects of the antimicrobial therapy.

  6. ON THE ORIGIN OF INTERGRANULAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Abramenko, V. I.; Steiner, O.

    2011-08-01

    We observe that intergranular jets, originating in the intergranular space surrounding individual granules, tend to be associated with granular fragmentation, in particular, with the formation and evolution of a bright granular lane (BGL) within individual granules. The BGLs have recently been identified as vortex tubes by Steiner et al. We further discover the development of a well-defined bright grain located between the BGL and the dark intergranular lane to which it is connected. Signatures of a BGL may reach the lower chromosphere and can be detected in off-band H{alpha} images. Simulations also indicate that vortex tubes are frequently associated with small-scale magnetic fields. We speculate that the intergranular jets detected in the New Solar Telescope (NST) data may result from the interaction between the turbulent small-scale fields associated with the vortex tube and the larger-scale fields existing in the intergranular lanes. The intergranular jets are much smaller and weaker than all previously known jet-like events. At the same time, they appear much more numerous than the larger events, leading us to the speculation that the total energy release and mass transport by these tiny events may not be negligible in the energy and mass-flux balance near the temperature minimum atop the photosphere. The study is based on the photospheric TiO broadband (1.0 nm) filter data acquired with the 1.6 m NST operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The data set also includes NST off-band H{alpha} images collected through a Zeiss Lyot filter with a passband of 0.025 nm.

  7. Coronal Jet Collimation by Nonlinear Induced Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Hejazi, S. M.

    2017-08-01

    Our objective is to study the collimation of solar jets by nonlinear forces corresponding to torsional Alfvén waves together with external forces. We consider a straight, initially non-rotating, untwisted magnetic cylinder embedded in a plasma with a straight magnetic field, where a shear between the internal and external flows exists. By implementing magnetohydrodynamic theory and taking into account the second-order thin flux tube approximation, the balance between the internal nonlinear forces is visualized. The nonlinear differential equation containing the ponderomotive, magnetic tension, and centrifugal forces in the presence of the shear flow is obtained. The solution presents the scale of influence of the propagating torsional Alfvén wave on compressive perturbations. Explicit expressions for the compressive perturbations caused by the forces connected to the torsional Alfvén wave show that, in the presence of a shear flow, the magnetic tension and centrifugal forces do not cancel each other’s effects as they did in its absence. This shear flow plays in favor of the magnetic tension force, resulting in a more efficient collimation. Regarding the ponderomotive force, the shear flow has no effect. The phase relations highlight the interplay of the shear flow and the plasma-β. As the shear flow and plasma-β increase, compressive perturbation amplitudes emerge. We conclude that the jet collimation due to the torsional Alfvén wave highly depends on the location of the jet. The shear flow tightens the collimation as the jet elevates up to the solar corona.

  8. On the Origin of Intergranular Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Abramenko, V. I.; Steiner, O.

    2011-08-01

    We observe that intergranular jets, originating in the intergranular space surrounding individual granules, tend to be associated with granular fragmentation, in particular, with the formation and evolution of a bright granular lane (BGL) within individual granules. The BGLs have recently been identified as vortex tubes by Steiner et al. We further discover the development of a well-defined bright grain located between the BGL and the dark intergranular lane to which it is connected. Signatures of a BGL may reach the lower chromosphere and can be detected in off-band Hα images. Simulations also indicate that vortex tubes are frequently associated with small-scale magnetic fields. We speculate that the intergranular jets detected in the New Solar Telescope (NST) data may result from the interaction between the turbulent small-scale fields associated with the vortex tube and the larger-scale fields existing in the intergranular lanes. The intergranular jets are much smaller and weaker than all previously known jet-like events. At the same time, they appear much more numerous than the larger events, leading us to the speculation that the total energy release and mass transport by these tiny events may not be negligible in the energy and mass-flux balance near the temperature minimum atop the photosphere. The study is based on the photospheric TiO broadband (1.0 nm) filter data acquired with the 1.6 m NST operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The data set also includes NST off-band Hα images collected through a Zeiss Lyot filter with a passband of 0.025 nm.

  9. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Akintoye, Sunday O.; Greenberg, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS) is the most common ulcerative disease affecting the oral mucosa. It occurs mostly in healthy individuals and has atypical clinical presentation in immunocompromised individuals. The etiology of RAS is still unknown, but several local, systemic, immunologic, genetic, allergic, nutritional, and microbial factors, as well as immunosuppressive drugs, have been proposed as causative agents. Clinical management of RAS is based on severity of symptoms, frequency, size and number of lesions using topical and systemic therapies. The goals of therapy are to decrease pain and ulcer size, promote healing and decrease frequency of recurrence. PMID:24655523

  10. Serially recurrent osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2015-06-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a relatively common, benign, painful tumor of bone. It is widely believed to run a course culminating in spontaneous regression. The tumor can usually be eliminated by excision or ablation, although it may recur locally. Although management has classically been surgical, thermocoagulation via percutaneously delivered radiofrequency energy has demonstrated excellent results, typically resulting in durable response following a single treatment. Here, we present an unusual case of serially recurrent pathologically proven pediatric osteoid osteoma, treated by radiofrequency ablation five times over the course of 11 years. Limitations of RF ablation of osteoid osteoma and possible factors predisposing to incomplete treatment or recurrence are discussed.

  11. [Recurrent purulent bacterial meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Janeczko, J; Pogorzelska, E; Lipowski, D; Przyjałkowski, W; Rzadkiewicz, E

    2001-01-01

    During the period of 25 years there were 55 patients treated in our Institute because of recurrent purulent bacterial meningoencephalitis(rpbme). This group consisted of 42 males (76%) and 13 (24%) females, the prevalent number (53%) of patients being under 21 years of age. The diagnosis of rpbme was based on the commonly accepted criteria and confirmed by the laboratory results of CSF examination. The cause of the recurrences was established considering the skull X-ray examination, CT and MRI. The evaluation of the clinical status was based on the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). During the first hospitalisation, severe or critic clinical status was noted in 42 patients (76%) and moderate in 13 (24%). The subsequent recurrences were mostly moderate, rarely severe or mild. The number of recurrences varied from 1 to 9. During the first hospitalisation, the etiologic factor was detected in 39 patients (71%), i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae in 28 (51%), Neisseria meningitidis in 8 (14%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in 2 and 1 patients respectively. In 37 patients (67%) rpbme developed following cranial trauma, in 18 cases (33%) with single or comminuted fractures of the anterior cranial fossa (in 4 cases accompanied by CSF nasal exsudate). In 4 it followed neurosurgical intervention, in 3 it accompanied recurrent purulent highmorities, in 1 case--after removal of the nasal polyps and subsequent CSF nasal exsudate, and in 1 patient with recurrent mastoiditis. In 6 cases (11%) the cause of the recurrences remained unelucidated. The clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic difficulties and the causative treatment of rpbme are discussed. In the authors' opinion, surgical treatment of the communication between the CSF and the external environment prevents the recurrences and is the only successful way of treatment. Special attention is drawn to the great diagnostic value of CT and MRI. The use of other modern techniques, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET

  12. Tackling a recurrent pinealoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Palled, Siddanna; Kalavagunta, Sruthi; Beerappa Gowda, Jaipal; Umesh, Kavita; Aal, Mahalaxmi; Abdul Razack, Tanvir Pasha Chitraduraga; Gowda, Veerabhadre; Viswanath, Lokesh

    2014-01-01

    Pineoblastomas are rare, malignant, pineal region lesions that account for <0.1% of all intracranial tumors and can metastasize along the neuroaxis. Pineoblastomas are more common in children than in adults and adults account for <10% of patients. The management of pinealoblastoma is multimodality approach, surgery followed with radiation and chemotherapy. In view of aggressive nature few centres use high dose chemotherapy with autologus stem cell transplant in newly diagnosed cases but in recurrent setting the literature is very sparse. The present case represents the management of pinealoblastoma in the recurrent setting with reirradiation and adjuvant carmustine chemotherapy wherein the management guidelines are not definitive.

  13. Tackling a Recurrent Pinealoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Palled, Siddanna; Kalavagunta, Sruthi; Beerappa Gowda, Jaipal; Umesh, Kavita; Aal, Mahalaxmi; Abdul Razack, Tanvir pasha Chitraduraga; Gowda, Veerabhadre; Viswanath, Lokesh

    2014-01-01

    Pineoblastomas are rare, malignant, pineal region lesions that account for <0.1% of all intracranial tumors and can metastasize along the neuroaxis. Pineoblastomas are more common in children than in adults and adults account for <10% of patients. The management of pinealoblastoma is multimodality approach, surgery followed with radiation and chemotherapy. In view of aggressive nature few centres use high dose chemotherapy with autologus stem cell transplant in newly diagnosed cases but in recurrent setting the literature is very sparse. The present case represents the management of pinealoblastoma in the recurrent setting with reirradiation and adjuvant carmustine chemotherapy wherein the management guidelines are not definitive. PMID:25210636

  14. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Greenberg, Martin S

    2014-04-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common ulcerative disease affecting the oral mucosa. RAS occurs mostly in healthy individuals and has an atypical clinical presentation in immunocompromised individuals. The etiology of RAS is still unknown, but several local, systemic, immunologic, genetic, allergic, nutritional, and microbial factors, as well as immunosuppressive drugs, have been proposed as causative agents. Clinical management of RAS using topical and systemic therapies is based on severity of symptoms and the frequency, size, and number of lesions. The goals of therapy are to decrease pain and ulcer size, promote healing, and decrease the frequency of recurrence.

  15. Extended magnetic reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause from detection of bi-directional jets

    PubMed

    Phan; Kistler; Klecker; Haerendel; Paschmann; Sonnerup; Baumjohann; Bavassano-Cattaneo; Carlson; DiLellis; Fornacon; Frank; Fujimoto; Georgescu; Kokubun; Moebius; Mukai; Oieroset; Paterson; Reme

    2000-04-20

    Magnetic reconnection is a process that converts magnetic energy into bi-directional plasma jets; it is believed to be the dominant process by which solar-wind energy enters the Earth's magnetosphere. This energy is subsequently dissipated by magnetic storms and aurorae. Previous single-spacecraft observations revealed only single jets at the magnetopause--while the existence of a counter-streaming jet was implicitly assumed, no experimental confirmation was available. Here we report in situ two-spacecraft observations of bi-directional jets at the magnetopause, finding evidence for a stable and extended reconnection line; the latter implies substantial entry of the solar wind into the magnetosphere. We conclude that reconnection is determined by large-scale interactions between the solar wind and the magnetosphere, rather than by local conditions at the magnetopause.

  16. PHOTOSPHERIC ABUNDANCES OF POLAR JETS ON THE SUN OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke

    2015-08-20

    Many jets are detected at X-ray wavelengths in the Sun's polar regions, and the ejected plasma along the jets has been suggested to contribute mass to the fast solar wind. From in situ measurements in the magnetosphere, it has been found that the fast solar wind has photospheric abundances while the slow solar wind has coronal abundances. Therefore, we investigated the abundances of polar jets to determine whether they are the same as that of the fast solar wind. For this study, we selected 22 jets in the polar region observed by Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) simultaneously on 2007 November 1–3. We calculated the First Ionization Potential (FIP) bias factor from the ratio of the intensity between high (S) and low (Si, Fe) FIP elements using the EIS spectra. The values of the FIP bias factors for the polar jets are around 0.7–1.9, and 75% of the values are in the range of 0.7–1.5, which indicates that they have photospheric abundances similar to the fast solar wind. The results are consistent with the reconnection jet model where photospheric plasma emerges and is rapidly ejected into the fast wind.

  17. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  18. Automated Solar-Array Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffa, A.; Bycer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Large arrays are rapidly assembled from individual solar cells by automated production line developed for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Apparatus positions cells within array, attaches interconnection tabs, applies solder flux, and solders interconnections. Cells are placed in either straight or staggered configurations and may be connected either in series or in parallel. Are attached at rate of one every 5 seconds.

  19. Miniature Filament Eruptions and their Reconnections in X-Ray Jets: Evidence for a New Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of approximately10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size less than approximately 10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the jet in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament is ejected, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions. They are evidently produced the same way as an on-disk coronal jet we observed in Adams et al. (2014); that on-disk jet had no obvious emerging magnetic field in its base. We conclude that, for many jets, the standard idea of X-ray jets forming from reconnection between emerging flux and preexisting coronal field is incorrect. ACS and RLM were supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  20. Oscillation of solar radio emission at coronal acoustic cut-off frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylaev, O. S.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Hanslmeier, A.; Panchenko, M.

    2017-05-01

    Recent SECCHI COR2 observations on board STEREO-A spacecraft have detected density structures at a distance of 2.5-15 R0 propagating with periodicity of about 90 min. The observations show that the density structures probably formed in the lower corona. We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts in the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 08:15-11:00 UT on August 1, 2011. Radio emission in this frequency range originated at the distance of 1.5-2.5 R0 according to the Baumbach-Allen density model of the solar corona. Morlet wavelet analysis showed the periodicity of 80 min in radio emission intensity at all frequencies, which demonstrates that there are quasi-periodic variations of coronal density at all heights. The observed periodicity corresponds to the acoustic cut-off frequency of stratified corona at a temperature of 1 MK. We suggest that continuous perturbations of the coronal base in the form of jets/explosive events generate acoustic pulses, which propagate upwards and leave the wake behind oscillating at the coronal cut-off frequency. This wake may transform into recurrent shocks due to the density decrease with height, which leads to the observed periodicity in the radio emission. The recurrent shocks may trigger quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in helmet streamers, where the opposite field lines merge and consequently may generate periodic density structures observed in the solar wind.

  1. MAGNETIZED JETS DRIVEN BY THE SUN: THE STRUCTURE OF THE HELIOSPHERE REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.; Zieger, B.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-02-20

    The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun’s travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for thousands of astronomical units (AUs). Here, we show, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the tension (hoop) force of the twisted magnetic field of the Sun confines the solar wind plasma beyond the termination shock and drives jets to the north and south very much like astrophysical jets. These jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM similar to bent galactic jets moving through the intergalactic medium. The interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail, as happens to some astrophysical jets. Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into the equatorial region between the two jets. As in some astrophysical jets that are kink unstable, we show here that the heliospheric jets are turbulent (due to large-scale MHD instabilities and reconnection) and strongly mix the solar wind with the ISM beyond 400 AU. The resulting turbulence has important implications for particle acceleration in the heliosphere. The two-lobe structure is consistent with the energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the heliotail from IBEX where two lobes are visible in the north and south and the suggestion from the Cassini ENAs that the heliosphere is “tailless.”.

  2. Tracing Massive Protostellar Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, A.

    2014-09-01

    We present new spectroscopy and imaging of four protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in the Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude larger than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (around 2 - 8 solar masses) protostars. Velocities from new proper motion and spectroscopic measurements fall among the velocities typically measured in lower-luminosity sources (100 - 200 km/s). We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exist in a feedback-dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to 8 solar masses form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  3. A gigantic coronal jet ejected from a compact active region in a coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Nitta, N.; Strong, K. T.; Matsumoto, R.; Yokoyama, T.; Hirayama, T.; Hudson, H.; Ogawara, Y.

    1994-08-01

    A gigantic coronal jet greater than 3 x 105 km long (nearly half the solar radius) has been found with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the solar X-ray satellite, Yohkoh. The jet was ejected on 1992 January 11 from an 'anemone-type' active region (AR) appearing in a coronal hole and is one of the largest coronal X-ray jets observed so far by SXT. This gigantic jet is the best observed example of many other smaller X-ray jets, because the spatial structures of both the jet and the AR located at its base are more easily resolved. The range of apparent translational velocities of the bulk of the jet was between 90 and 240 km s-1, with the corresponding kinetic energy estimated to be of order of 1028 ergs. A detailed analysis reveals that the jet was associated with a loop brightening (a small flare) that occurred in the active region. Several features of this observation suggest and are consistent with a magnetic reconnection mechanism for the production of such a 'jet-loop-brightening' event.

  4. Magnetized Jets Driven By the Sun: The Structure of the Heliosphere Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, Merav

    2015-11-01

    The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun's travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for thousands of astronomical units (AUs). Here, we show, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the tension (hoop) force of the twisted magnetic field of the Sun confines the solar wind plasma beyond the termination shock and drives jets to the north and south very much like astrophysical jets. These jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM similar to bent galactic jets moving through the intergalactic medium. The interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail, as happens to some astrophysical jets. Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into the equatorial region between the two jets. As in some astrophysical jets that are kink unstable, we show here that the heliospheric jets are turbulent (due to large-scale MHD instabilities and reconnection) and strongly mix the solar wind with the ISM. The resulting turbulence has important implications for particle acceleration in the heliosphere. The two-lobe structure is consistent with the energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the heliotail from IBEX where two lobes are visible in the north and south and the suggestion from the Cassini ENAs that the heliosphere is ``tailless.''

  5. Magnetized Jets Driven By the Sun: the Structure of the Heliosphere Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.; Zieger, B.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-02-01

    The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun’s travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for thousands of astronomical units (AUs). Here, we show, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the tension (hoop) force of the twisted magnetic field of the Sun confines the solar wind plasma beyond the termination shock and drives jets to the north and south very much like astrophysical jets. These jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM similar to bent galactic jets moving through the intergalactic medium. The interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail, as happens to some astrophysical jets. Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into the equatorial region between the two jets. As in some astrophysical jets that are kink unstable, we show here that the heliospheric jets are turbulent (due to large-scale MHD instabilities and reconnection) and strongly mix the solar wind with the ISM beyond 400 AU. The resulting turbulence has important implications for particle acceleration in the heliosphere. The two-lobe structure is consistent with the energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the heliotail from IBEX where two lobes are visible in the north and south and the suggestion from the Cassini ENAs that the heliosphere is “tailless.”

  6. A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao; Liu Yu

    2010-03-10

    We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

  7. Laboratory-produced MHD plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Because space plasmas are neither confined by vacuum chamber walls nor have magnetic fields produced by physical coils, space plasmas have shapes that are much less determinate than lab plasmas. An experimental program underway at Caltech produces plasmas where the shape is neither fixed by a vacuum chamber wall nor imposed by an external coil set, but rather is allowed to be determined by self-organizing MHD processes subject to the constraint of imposed boundary conditions analogous to the boundary conditions of space plasmas. These self-organizing processes are believed to be fundamental to astrophysical jets, solar coronal loops, and MHD turbulence (e.g. Taylor relaxation). The experimental dynamics are sufficiently reproducible to allow detailed study despite the morphology being complex and dynamic. A surprising result has been the observation that instead of the plasma uniformly filling up the available volume, the plasma is spatially localized in a highly collimated, small diameter magnetic flux tube, the length and axis of which change in time in response to MHD forces. A model shows that the collimation results from stagnation of linked magnetic flux frozen into a MHD-driven jet that accelerates plasma from the wall into the flux tube, filling the flux tube with plasma. Jet flow has been imaged with a high-speed multi-frame camera, diagnosed via Doppler spectroscopy, and most recently (i) the collision between two opposing, color-coded jets flowing from opposite ends of a flux tube has been observed, and (ii) the collision of a jet with a target cloud has been observed.

  8. Principles of free jets

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    The principles of the free jet expansion are well established and only a brief tutorial overview of selected concepts is presented below. Almost every important theoretical and/or experimental aspect of the free jet related to molecular beam sampling has appeared in one of the 19 International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics and many detailed reviews exist. The first stage of pressure reduction in a mass spectrometer sampling system is often simply an aperture or short capillary tube across which a significant pressure ratio is maintained. When this pressure ratio between the system being sampled and the first vacuum stage exceeds about two then the gas flow reaches sonic conditions at the exit, Mach number M = 1, and the exiting flow is known as {open_quotes}choked{close_quotes} flow. It is called choked because for fixed source conditions the mass flux out of the aperture will not exceed this M = 1 condition regardless of how low the exit chamber pressure is taken, ie how much pumping is added. Beyond the exit the gas expands in a supersonic free jet expansion as it adjusts to the low pressure in the exit chamber. The expansion is called a free jet because there are no diverging nozzle walls to constrain the flow, which would lead to viscous boundary layers and a much smaller rate of expansion. Diverging nozzle walls are used in rockets to direct the exiting flows along the axis for better forward thrust, and researchers use them to slow the rate of expansion to, for example, grow clusters or study fast kinetics. Only the free jet is dealt with here. The free jet nozzle only consists of the subsonic nozzle geometry. The nozzle exit to be referred to here is then just the aperture or capillary exit, and the free jet expansion is the unconstrained subsequent supersonic flow downstream of this nozzle exit.

  9. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  10. Recurrent gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Nicolas; Saha, Sanjoy

    2012-11-01

    Mechanical small bowel obstructions caused by gallstones account for 1% to 3% of cases. In these patients, 80% to 90% of residual gallstones in these patients will pass through a remaining fistula without consequence. Recurrent gallstone ileus has been reported in 5% of patients. We report the case of a woman, aged 72 years, who presented with mechanical small bowel obstruction caused by gallstone ileus. After successful surgical therapy for gallstone ileus, the patient's symptoms recurred, and she was diagnosed with recurrent gallstone ileus requiring a repeat operation. While management of gallstone ileus can be achieved through a single-stage operation including enterolithotomy and cholecystectomy with repair of biliary-enteric fistula or by enterolithotomy alone, the literature supports enterolithotomy alone as the treatment of choice for gallstone ileus due to decreased mortality and morbidity. However, the latter approach does not obviate potential recurrence. We present this case of recurrent gallstone ileus to elucidate and review the pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and consensus recommendations regarding management of this disorder.

  11. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  12. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  13. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  14. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Susan L

    2003-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis remains a commonly occurring cause of oral pain and ulceration. Although the ulcerations of RAS are multifactorial and of unknown cause, recognition of the role of patient and environmental factors may be helpful in developing recommendations for treatment and prevention of future ulcers.

  15. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  16. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  17. Jet engine testing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zweifel, T.L.

    1987-03-24

    An apparatus is described for testing jet engines mounted on an aircraft, the jet engines of the type having a high speed rotor and a low speed rotor, comprising: representative signal means for providing first representative signals representative of rotation rates of the low speed rotor in the jet engines and second representative signals representative of rotation rates of the high speed rotor in the jet engines; equivalent signal means coupled to receive the second representative signals for deriving equivalent signals representative of low speed rotor rotation rates of normally operating jet engines having high speed rotor rotation rates represented by the second representative signals; first difference signal means coupled to receive the first representative signals and the equivalent signals for providing first difference signals representative of differences between the first representative signals and the equivalent signals; means for providing threshold signals; first detector means coupled to the threshold signal means and the first difference signal means for comparing the threshold signals and the first difference signals to provide first detected signals representative of values of the first difference signals relative to the threshold signals; and engine failure indicator means coupled to receive the detected signals for determination of engine failures.

  18. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  19. Jet propulsion without inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-08-01

    A body immersed in a highly viscous fluid can locomote by drawing in and expelling fluid through pores at its surface. We consider this mechanism of jet propulsion without inertia in the case of spheroidal bodies and derive both the swimming velocity and the hydrodynamic efficiency. Elementary examples are presented and exact axisymmetric solutions for spherical, prolate spheroidal, and oblate spheroidal body shapes are provided. In each case, entirely and partially porous (i.e., jetting) surfaces are considered and the optimal jetting flow profiles at the surface for maximizing the hydrodynamic efficiency are determined computationally. The maximal efficiency which may be achieved by a sphere using such jet propulsion is 12.5%, a significant improvement upon traditional flagella-based means of locomotion at zero Reynolds number, which corresponds to the potential flow created by a source dipole at the sphere center. Unlike other swimming mechanisms which rely on the presentation of a small cross section in the direction of motion, the efficiency of a jetting body at low Reynolds number increases as the body becomes more oblate and limits to approximately 162% in the case of a flat plate swimming along its axis of symmetry. Our results are discussed in the light of slime extrusion mechanisms occurring in many cyanobacteria.

  20. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  1. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  2. The M87 Jet. "Rosetta Stone" of AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the M87 jet based on multi-frequency VLBI observations and MHD jet theories. Millimeter VLBI cores are considered as innermost jet emissions. The jet structure up to ~ 105 rs is described as a parabolic streamline, indicating the lateral expansion under a confinement by the stratified ISM. Thus, the jet collimation maintains in five orders of magnitude in the distance starting from the vicinity of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), less than 10 rs. We here examine the jet parabolic structure in order to identify the property of a bulk acceleration; observed sub-to-superluminal motions indicate an MHD acceleration from non-relativistic to relativistic regimes. We propose that the M87 jet consists of Poynting-flux dominated flows, powered by nonlinear torsional Alfvén waves. Future sub-mm VLBI observations play an important role in resolving the origin of the M87 jets.

  3. Reconnection, turbulence, and intermittency in coronal-hole jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim; DeVore, Richard; Roberts, Merrill; Karpen, Judith

    2017-04-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray jets occur in magnetically open coronal holes on the Sun, especially at high solar latitudes. We have performed a detailed statistical analysis of such a jet simulated with an adaptively refined magnetohydrodynamics model (Karpen et al., ApJ 2016). The results confirm the generation and persistence of three-dimensional, reconnection-driven magnetic turbulence in the simulation. We calculate the spatial correlations of magnetic fluctuations within the jet and find that they agree best with the Müller-Biskamp scaling model including intermittent current sheets of various sizes coupled via hydrodynamic turbulent cascade. The anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations and the spatial orientation of the current sheets are consistent with an ensemble of nonlinear Alfvén waves generated by an untwisting magnetic field. These properties also reflect the overall collimated jet structure imposed by the geometry of the magnetic reconnection driving the jet. A comparison with Ulysses observations shows a quantitative agreement with turbulence in the fast solar wind.

  4. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  5. Innovative approaches to recurrent training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noon, H.; Murphy, M.

    1984-01-01

    Innovative approaches to recurrent training for regional airline aircrews are explored. Guidelines for recurrent training programs which include in corporation of cockpit resource management are discussed. B.W.

  6. Electric current variations and 3D magnetic configuration of coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Harra, Louise K.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Guo, Yang; Demoulin, Pascal; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando, , Prof

    Coronal jets (EUV) were observed by SDO/AIA on September 17, 2010. HMI and THEMIS measured the vector magnetic field from which we derived the magnetic flux, the phostospheric velocity and the vertical electric current. The magnetic configuration was computed with a non linear force-free approach. The phostospheric current pattern of the recurrent jets were associated with the quasi-separatrix layers deduced from the magnetic extrapolation. The large twisted near-by Eiffel-tower-shape jet was also caused by reconnection in current layers containing a null point. This jet cannot be classified precisely within either the quiescent or the blowout jet types. We will show the importance of the existence of bald patches in the low atmosphere

  7. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  8. The Solar Flare Myth in solar-terrestrial physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1993-07-01

    Early observations of associations between solar flares and large non- recurrent geomagnetic storms, large {open_quote}solar{close_quote} energetic particle events, and transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind led to a paradigm of cause and effect that gave flares a central position in the chain of events leading from solar activity to major transient disturbances in the near-earth space environment. However, research in the last two decades shows that this emphasis on flares is misplaced. In this paper the author outlines briefly the rationale for a different paradigm of cause and effect in solar- terrestrial physics that removes solar flares from their central position as the {open_quote}cause{close_quote} of major disturbances in the near-earth space environment. Instead, this central role of {open_quote}cause{close_quote} is played by events now known as coronal mass ejections, or CMEs.

  9. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  10. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  11. Control of Asymmetric Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    with 5hciir Irycr frequencies arnd miodfy th-e preferied mode. Perforte~d steel plateCs "-leed with tempcratuze-resistatr: mnsulativ- mineral wool reduce...Insulation of the Jet facility was initially ... ovid. d 6y ibuiglass, then mineral wool and at the present there is none for health concerns. The...imerior of the jet’s anechoic chamber was also insulated with mineral wool to foitify acoustic damping, however this too has been removed due to portions

  12. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  13. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  14. Scanning Laser Radar Development for Solar System Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, D.; Menzies, R.; Bartman, R.; Hemmati, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has recently established an accelerated development initiative to enable high-resolution active optical ranging and terrain mapping capabilities for a series of upcoming Solar System exploration missions.

  15. 'Photonic jets' from dielectric microaxicons

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Panina, E K

    2015-08-31

    We consider a specific spatially localised light structure, namely, a 'photonic jet' formed in the near field upon scattering of an optical wave in a dielectric micron particle. Dimensional parameters and intensity of a photonic jet from microaxicons of different spatial orientation are studied theoretically. It is found for the first time that an axicon-generated photonic jet has in this case a substantially larger length compared with the case of a jet formed on a spherical particle. (scattering of light)

  16. Cooperative Investigation of Jet Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    high and low Reynolds number jets. Controlling the jet with pure tone excitation, that enhances the helical mode of its instability, resulted in a... helical modes and upstream influence appear to be key mechanisms in our findings 3.- -- - Disatributio~n/ Availit- UNCLASSIFIED 89CUMIIY CLAWIPCAT OF...and low Reynolds number*’ jets. Controlling the jet with pure tone excitation, that enhances the helical mode of its instability, resulted in a

  17. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2004-09-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a clinical entity distinct from bacterial osteomyelitis. It occurs mainly in children and adolescents and is characterized by a prolonged, fluctuating course with recurrent episodes of pain occurring over several years. CRMO is often multifocal and most often seen in tubular bones, the clavicle, and less frequently the spine and pelvic bones; other locations are rare. The radiographic appearance suggests subacute or chronic osteomyelitis. Histopathological and laboratory findings are nonspecific and bacterial culture is usually negative. CRMO is often diagnosed by exclusion of the two main differential diagnoses--bacterial infections and tumor--by assessing for a characteristic course and the findings by conventional radiography, if necessary supplemented by scintigraphy and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI appearance of CRMO lesions in tubular bones and the spine is often rather characteristic and support the diagnosis. It is important to diagnose CRMO to avoid unnecessary diagnostic procedures and initiate an appropriate therapy.

  18. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Costa-Reis, Patrícia; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2013-08-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare auto-inflammatory condition that primarily affects children and adolescents. It presents with recurrent episodes of pain related to the presence of foci of sterile bone inflammation. The long bones of the lower extremities are more frequently affected and the spine can also be involved. Imaging studies, including whole-body magnetic resonance, are important for diagnosis and detection of asymptomatic lesions. Bone biopsies may be necessary to exclude other diseases, including malignancy and infections. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause relief of symptoms in the majority of cases. Bisphosphonates and TNF-α blockers are alternatives for patients who do not respond or who have spinal involvement.

  19. Paediatric recurrent herpetic whitlow.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik; Kumar, Hemant; More, Bharat; Patricolo, Mario

    2013-07-31

    We present a case of recurrent painful blisters of middle phalanx of the left ring finger of a 15-month-old previously healthy and immunocompetent female child. These lesions initially were confused with infective bacterial whitlow, treated with incision and drainage, and later with cigarette burns which led to referral to child protection team. Paediatric dermatologist finally diagnosed after scrapping and virology culture. The patient had recovery following full treatment with topical and systemic acyclovir. She presented again at the age of 4 with recurrence which required topical and systemic acyclovir therapy with good recovery. It is important to be aware of the danger of incorrect diagnosis, raising child protection concerns and management leading to danger of cross infection and serious illness especially in the immunocompromised patients.

  20. Recurrent hyperphosphatemic tumoural calcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Sonal; Agarwal, Asha; Nigam, Anand; Rao, Yashwant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Tumoural calcinosis (TC) is a benign gradually developing disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical settings, characterised by subcutaneous deposition of calcium phosphate with or without giant cell reaction. We describe a case of 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent hard swellings in the vicinity of shoulder and hip joints associated with elevated serum phosphate and normal serum calcium levels. TC has been mainly reported from Africa, with very few cases reported from India. After the diagnosis of hyperphosphatemic TC was established, the patient was treated with oral sevelamer and is under constant follow-up to detect recurrence, if any. The present case highlights the fact that although an uncommon lesion, TC must be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous hard lump in the vicinity of a joint. PMID:23010461

  1. Reconnection-driven Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in a Simulated Coronal-hole Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Roberts, Merrill A.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2017-03-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray jets occur frequently in magnetically open coronal holes on the Sun, especially at high solar latitudes. Some of these jets are observed by white-light coronagraphs as they propagate through the outer corona toward the inner heliosphere, and it has been proposed that they give rise to microstreams and torsional Alfvén waves detected in situ in the solar wind. To predict and understand the signatures of coronal-hole jets, we have performed a detailed statistical analysis of such a jet simulated by an adaptively refined magnetohydrodynamics model. The results confirm the generation and persistence of three-dimensional, reconnection-driven magnetic turbulence in the simulation. We calculate the spatial correlations of magnetic fluctuations within the jet and find that they agree best with the Müller-Biskamp scaling model including intermittent current sheets of various sizes coupled via hydrodynamic turbulent cascade. The anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations and the spatial orientation of the current sheets are consistent with an ensemble of nonlinear Alfvén waves. These properties also reflect the overall collimated jet structure imposed by the geometry of the reconnecting magnetic field. A comparison with Ulysses observations shows that turbulence in the jet wake is in quantitative agreement with that in the fast solar wind.

  2. Transverse Oscillations in a Coronal Loop Triggered by a Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Pant, V.; Srivastava, A. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-11-01

    We detect and analyse transverse oscillations in a coronal loop, lying at the south-east limb of the Sun as seen from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The jet is believed to trigger transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. The jet originates from a region close to the coronal loop on 19 September 2014 at 02:01:35 UT. The length of the loop is estimated to be between 377 - 539 Mm. Only one complete oscillation is detected with an average period of about 32±5 min. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seismologic inversion techniques, we estimate the magnetic field inside the coronal loop to be between 2.68 - 4.5 G. The velocity of the hot and cool components of the jet is estimated to be 168 km s^{-1} and 43 km s^{-1}, respectively. The energy density of the jet is found to be greater than the energy density of the oscillating coronal loop. We therefore conclude that the jet triggered transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. To our knowledge, this is the first coronal loop seismology study using the properties of a jet propagation to trigger oscillations.

  3. COUNTERROTATION IN MAGNETOCENTRIFUGALLY DRIVEN JETS AND OTHER WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sauty, C.; Cayatte, V.; Lima, J. J. G.; Matsakos, T.; Tsinganos, K.

    2012-11-01

    Rotation measurement in jets from T Tauri stars is a rather difficult task. Some jets seem to be rotating in a direction opposite to that of the underlying disk, although it is not yet clear if this affects the totality or part of the outflows. On the other hand, Ulysses data also suggest that the solar wind may rotate in two opposite ways between the northern and southern hemispheres. We show that this result is not as surprising as it may seem and that it emerges naturally from the ideal MHD equations. Specifically, counterrotating jets neither contradict the magnetocentrifugal driving of the flow nor prevent extraction of angular momentum from the disk. The demonstration of this result is shown by combining the ideal MHD equations for steady axisymmetric flows. Provided that the jet is decelerated below some given threshold beyond the Alfven surface, the flow will change its direction of rotation locally or globally. Counterrotation is also possible for only some layers of the outflow at specific altitudes along the jet axis. We conclude that the counterrotation of winds or jets with respect to the source, star or disk, is not in contradiction with the magnetocentrifugal driving paradigm. This phenomenon may affect part of the outflow, either in one hemisphere, or only in some of the outflow layers. From a time-dependent simulation, we illustrate this effect and show that it may not be permanent.

  4. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Wedman, Jan; van Weissenbruch, Ranny

    2005-01-01

    We report what is, to our best knowledge, the first case of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) in which the frontal and sphenoid bones were involved. Characterized by a prolonged and fluctuating course of osteomyelitis at different sites, CRMO is self-limited, although sequelae can occur. The diagnosis is one of exclusion. It is important to publish cases like this, because the recognition of CRMO can prevent aggressive surgical and medical treatment.

  5. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Király, Balázs; Feith, Sándor; Barta, Miklós; Oroszlán, György

    2003-12-21

    The chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis has been reported very rarely in the literature. However, its significance must be emphasized, because it is a spontaneously healing, benign disease, as compared to the classical forms of osteomyelitis. It leaves behind almost no residual symptoms, and many operations, long antimicrobial therapy may be avoided by diagnosing it. In this case report the authors provide the review of the disease through the history of a 9-year-old boy.

  6. Treatment of recurrent concussion.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Paul

    2002-02-01

    The management of an athlete with recurrent concussions, whether persistently symptomatic or not, remains anecdotal. Currently, there are no evidence-based guidelines upon which a team physician can advise the athlete. All doctors involved in athlete care need to be aware of the potential for medicolegal problems if athletes are inappropriately returned to sport prematurely or, in the case of professional athletes, held out of sport or retired on the basis of nonscientific recommendations. This paper discusses such issues.

  7. Recurrent central neurocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bertalanffy, Alexander; Roessler, Karl; Koperek, Oskar; Gelpi, Ellen; Prayer, Daniela; Knosp, Engelbert

    2005-07-01

    Since the first description of Central neurocytomas (CNs) as a benign tumor entity in 1982, there has been great enthusiasm regarding the benign course and the curative surgical approach to this disease. The current study was performed to investigate the frequency of disease recurrence during long-term follow-up. A retrospective analysis of the medical files with emphasis on clinicoradiologic findings and histologic and immunohistochemical features was performed. Between 1985-2003. surgical resection was performed in 14 patients with CNs ages 16-43 years (7 were female and 7 were male). Two patients (14%) died postoperatively and one patient had a malignant disease course (7%). In the remaining 11 patients, one patient with an incompletely resected CN had disease progression after 37 months but at the time of last follow-up had had stable disease for 10 years. In addition, the authors reported 5 patients with disease recurrence occurring at a median of 67 months after surgery (range, 51-79 months after surgery), all of which occurred after complete surgical resection was performed. The observation period for the remaining 5 patients was short (median of 34 months [range, 5-44 months]). Extensive histologic and immunohistochemical workup did not identify any significant prognostic parameters. The MIB-1 proliferation index ranged from 0.8-11% (median of 4.6%), but was reported to be 46.8% in the malignant transformed tumor. All patients with disease recurrence responded well to different forms of focal radiation therapy (gamma knife radiosurgery in three patients and interstitial irradiation in one patient) and for one patient with a recently detected recurrence, gamma knife radiosurgery was planned. CNs appear to have a higher tendency to recur during long-term follow-up than previously reported, even after complete resection. Therefore, periodic neuroradiologic follow-up examinations should be considered mandatory in all patients, even after several years.

  8. Jet Noise Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Huff,Dennis

    2009-01-01

    A presentation outlining current jet noise work at NASA was given to the Naval Research Advisory Committee. Jet noise tasks in the Supersonics project of the Fundamental Aeronautics program were highlighted. The presentation gave an overview of developing jet noise reduction technologies and noise prediction capabilities. Advanced flow and noise diagnostic tools were also presented.

  9. Jet Noise Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    A presentation outlining current jet noise work at NASA was given at the NAVAIR Noise Workshop. Jet noise tasks in the Supersonics project of the Fundamental Aeronautics program were highlighted. The presentation gave an overview of developing jet noise reduction technologies and noise prediction capabilities. Advanced flow and noise diagnostic tools were also presented.

  10. Multiplex Recurrence Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, Deniz; Marwan, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    The complex nature of a variety of phenomena in physical, biological, or earth sciences is driven by a large number of degrees of freedom which are strongly interconnected. Although the evolution of such systems is described by multivariate time series (MTS), so far research mostly focuses on analyzing these components one by one. Recurrence based analyses are powerful methods to understand the underlying dynamics of a dynamical system and have been used for many successful applications including examples from earth science, economics, or chemical reactions. The backbone of these techniques is creating the phase space of the system. However, increasing the dimension of a system requires increasing the length of the time series in order get significant and reliable results. This requirement is one of the challenges in many disciplines, in particular in palaeoclimate, thus, it is not easy to create a phase space from measured MTS due to the limited number of available obervations (samples). To overcome this problem, we suggest to create recurrence networks from each component of the system and combine them into a multiplex network structure, the multiplex recurrence network (MRN). We test the MRN by using prototypical mathematical models and demonstrate its use by studying high-dimensional palaeoclimate dynamics derived from pollen data from the Bear Lake (Utah, US). By using the MRN, we can distinguish typical climate transition events, e.g., such between Marine Isotope Stages.

  11. Meteorological aspects of elves and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. B.; Tsai, L.; Lee, L.; Chou, J.; Su, H.; Hsu, R.; Wu, C.; Lin, P.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Takahashi, Y.; Lee, L.

    2008-12-01

    Evidence for ocean-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling is revealed in recent studies of ISUAL transient luminous events (TLEs) [Chen et al., 2008]. The results suggest that the meteorological systems below the stratosphere, primarily driven by sea surface temperature and solar radiation, play essential roles in inducing TLEs between the cloud top and the lower ionosphere. Through analyzing the ISUAL-recorded TLEs since July 2004, we realize that different types of TLEs are likely associated with different meteorological systems. For example, the elves are mainly located above Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ); elves also are strongly correlated with the atmospheric updraft and the precipitation. The fall/winter elves distribute along storm tracks poleward of 30 degrees north or south, implying their association with extratropical cyclones. Numerous blue jets and gigantic jets are recorded around tropical cyclones by ISUAL. Several recent examples indicate that blue jets and lightning often occur in rapid successions in the strong convective regions associated with the spiral rainbands of typhoons or hurricanes. Illustrative data and some of the probable mechanisms will be presented in the conference.

  12. Flares and MHD Jets in Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    We present a magnetic reconnection model for hard X-ray emission and flare-like hard X-ray variabilities associated with protostars detected by ASCA. The energy released by protostellar flares is 102 - 105 times larger than solar flares. Moreover, the spectrum is harder. A new ingredient in protostellar flare is the existence of a protostellar disk which can twist the magnetic fields threading the protostellar disk. We carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. Hot, outgoing plasmoid and post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011-1012cm), the total energy of X-ray flares (~1035-36erg). Furthermore, along the opening magnetic loops, hot jet is ejected in bipolar directions with speed 200-400 km/s. The speed and mass flow rate of the jet is consistent with those of optical jets. Our model can explain both the X-ray flare-like variability and mass outflow in star forming region.

  13. Coronal Jets in Closed Magnetic Regions on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter Fraser; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Coronal jets are dynamic, collimated structures observed in solar EUV and X-ray emission. They appear predominantly in the open field of coronal holes, but are also observed in areas of closed field, especially active regions. A common feature of coronal jets is that they originate from the field above a parasitic polarity of opposite sign to the surrounding field. Some process - such as instability onset or flux emergence - induces explosive reconnection between the closed “anemone” field and the surrounding open field that generates the jet. The lesser number of coronal jets in closed-field regions suggests a possible stabilizing effect of the closed configuration with respect to coronal jet formation. If the scale of the jet region is small compared with the background loop length, as in for example type II spicules, the nearby magnetic field may be treated as locally open. As such, one would expect that if a stabilizing effect exists it becomes most apparent as the scale of the anemone region approaches that of the background coronal loops.To investigate if coronal jets are indeed suppressed along shorter coronal loops, we performed a number of simulations of jets driven by a rotation of the parasitic polarity (as in the previous open-jet calculations by Pariat et. al 2009, 2010, 2015) embedded in a large-scale closed bipolar field. The simulations were performed with the state of the art Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver. We will report here how the magnetic configuration above the anemone region determines the nature of the jet, when it is triggered, and how much of the stored magnetic energy is released. We show that regions in which the background field and the parasitic polarity region are of comparable scale naturally suppress explosive energy release. We will also show how in the post-jet relaxation phase a combination of confined MHD waves and weak current layers are generated by the jet along the background coronal loops, both of which

  14. Determination of a Definition of Solar Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. E.; Gutsche, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    A definition of solar grade silicon was determined by investigating the singular and the combined effect of the impurities usually found in metallurgical grade silicon on solar cell device performance. The impurity matrix was defined by Jet Propulsion Laboratory Technical Direction Memorandum. The initial work was focussed on standardizing the solar cell process and test procedure, growing baseline crystals, growing crystals contaminated with carbon, iron, nickel, zirconium, aluminum and vanadium, solar blank preparation, and material characterization.

  15. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  16. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  17. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... zones. Jet lag occurs when your body's biological clock is not set with the time zone you ... Your body follows a 24-hour internal clock called a circadian rhythm. It tells your body when to go to sleep and when to wake up. Cues from your environment, such ...

  18. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  19. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  20. The physics of jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1987-09-01

    Recent data on the fragmentation of quarks and gluons is discussed in the context of phenomenological models of parton fragmentation. Emphasis is placed on the experimental evidence for parton showers as compared to a fixed order QCD treatment, on new data on inclusive hadron production and on detailed studies of baryon production in jets.

  1. Marvelous Mini-Jet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    This image, taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft, shows A beautiful mini-jet appearing in the dynamic F ring of Saturn. Saturn A ring including the Keeler gap and just a hint of the Encke gap at the upper-right also appears.

  2. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    factors include: – Maceration of the thin skin of the ear canal leading to pain/and or infection. – Ear canal infection (external otitis ...145 – 150 dB) around jet aircraft. The magnitude and impact of noise transmitted via bone and other media such as fluid is largely unknown. The ear

  3. Jet Inlet Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-08

    AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2014-044 Jet Inlet Efficiency Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes -Green Keith Williams John Wohleber Munitions Aerodynamics Sciences...CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes -Green Keith Williams John

  4. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  5. Jet Screech Noise Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2003-01-01

    The near-field screech-tone noise of a typical underexpanded circular jet issuing from a sonic nozzle is simulated numerically. The self-sustained feedback loop is automatically established in the simulation. The computed shock-cell structure, acoustic wave length, screech tone frequencies, and sound pressure levels in the near field are in good agreement with existing experimental results.

  6. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  7. Recurrent Magnetic Reconnection in Protostellar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Mitsuru; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    The solar X-ray satellite Yohkoh, has found extensive evidence for magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here we extend the magnetic reconnection model of solar flares to hard X-ray flares observed in star forming regions. A new ingredient is a protostellar disk which can inject helicity into the magnetosphere if the disk is threaded by the dipole magnetic field of the protostar. We carried out 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. A hot, outgoing plasmoid and hot post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011 - 1012cm), and the velocity of optical jets (200 - 400km/s). We use high-resolution numerical simulations to show that multiple magnetic islands are created in the current sheet due to the growth of the tearing mode instability. The magnetic islands are ejected quasi-periodically. Intermittent flaring activity continues as long as the disk matter twists the dipole magnetic field

  8. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C A; McKnight, R L

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a laparoscopic approach to recurrent inguinal hernia repair which dissected the entire inguinal floor and repaired all potential areas of recurrence without producing tension. Both a transabdominal preperitoneal and a totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach were utilized. Ninety recurrent hernias were repaired in 81 patients. The patients had 26 indirect, 36 direct, and 26 pantaloon recurrent hernias of which eight had a femoral component. In all but one patient the primary operations were open anterior repairs. The median follow-up was 14 months, ranging from 1 to 28 months. Patients returned to normal activities in an average of 1 week. The only recurrence observed was in the one patient whose primary repair was laparoscopic. When the entire inguinal floor of the recurrent hernia was redissected and buttressed with mesh, early recurrence was eliminated and recovery was shortened.

  9. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions in SCET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements, based upon semi-inclusive jet functions in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). As a first example, we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron h is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function {{G}}_i^h(z={ω}_J/ω, {z}_h={ω}_h/{ω}_J,{ω}_J,R,μ ) , which depends on the jet radius R and the large light-cone momenta of the parton ` i' initiating the jet ( ω), the jet ( ω J ), and the hadron h ( ω h ). The jet fragmentation function can then be expressed as a semi-inclusive observable, in the spirit of actual experimental measurements, rather than as an exclusive one. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations of this observable at next-to-leading order (NLO). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function {{G}}_i^h(z,{z}_h,{ω}_J,R,μ ) are also derived and shown to follow exactly the usual timelike DGLAP evolution equations for fragmentation functions. The newly obtained RG equations can be used to perform the resummation of single logarithms of the jet radius parameter R up to next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL R ) accuracy. In combination with the fixed NLO calculation, we obtain NLO+NLL R results for the hadron distribution inside the jet. We present numerical results for pp → (jet h) X in the new framework, and find excellent agreement with existing LHC experimental data.

  10. Jet injection into polyacrylamide gels: investigation of jet injection mechanics.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Katrencik, Jeffrey; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-08-01

    Jet injectors employ high-velocity liquid jets that penetrate into human skin and deposit drugs in the dermal or subdermal region. Although jet injectors have been marketed for a number of years, relatively little is known about the interactions of high-speed jets with soft materials such as skin. Using polyacrylamide gels as a model system, the mechanics of jet penetration, including the dependence of jet penetration on mechanical properties, was studied. Jets employed in a typical commercial injector, (orifice diameter: 152 microm, velocity: 170-180 m/s) were used to inject fluid into polyacrylamide gels possessing Young's moduli in the range of 0.06-0.77 MPa and hardness values in the range of 4-70 H(OO). Motion analysis of jet entry into polyacrylamide gels revealed that jet penetration can be divided into three distinct events: erosion, stagnation, and dispersion. During the erosion phase, the jet removed the gel at the impact site and led to the formation of a distinct cylindrical hole. Cessation of erosion induced a period of jet stagnation ( approximately 600 micros) characterized by constant penetration depth. This stage was followed by dispersion of the liquid into the gel. The dispersion took place by crack propagation and was nearly symmetrical with the exception of injections into 10% acrylamide (Young's modulus of 0.06 MPa). The penetration depth of the jets as well as the rate of erosion decreased with increasing Young's modulus. The mechanics of jet penetration into polyacrylamide gels provides an important tool for understanding jet injection into skin.

  11. The jet-disk symbiosis without maximal jets: 1D hydrodynamical jets revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumley, Patrick; Ceccobello, Chiara; Connors, Riley M. T.; Cavecchi, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    In this work we discuss the recent criticism by Zdziarski (2016, A&A, 586, A18) of the maximal jet model derived in Falcke & Biermann (1995, A&A, 293, 665). We agree with Zdziarski that in general a jet's internal energy is not bounded by its rest-mass energy density. We describe the effects of the mistake on conclusions that have been made using the maximal jet model and show when a maximal jet is an appropriate assumption. The maximal jet model was used to derive a 1D hydrodynamical model of jets in agnjet, a model that does multiwavelength fitting of quiescent/hard state X-ray binaries and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. We correct algebraic mistakes made in the derivation of the 1D Euler equation and relax the maximal jet assumption. We show that the corrections cause minor differences as long as the jet has a small opening angle and a small terminal Lorentz factor. We find that the major conclusion from the maximal jet model, the jet-disk symbiosis, can be generally applied to astrophysical jets. We also show that isothermal jets are required to match the flat radio spectra seen in low-luminosity X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, in agreement with other works.

  12. Blowout Jets: Evidence from Hinode/XRT for X-Ray Jets Made by Blowout Eruption of the Emerging Bipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Yamauchi et al (2004, ApJ, 605, 511) found that there are two structurally and dynamically distinct types of H macrospicules in polar coronal holes: single-column jet macrospicules and erupting-loop macrospicules. The structure and motion of the single-column jet macrospicules fit the standard Shibata reconnection picture for solar X-ray jets (Shibata et al 1992, PASJ, 44, L173). The form and motion of the erupting-loop macrospicules is reminiscent of the ejective eruption of the sheared-core-field flux rope in the filament-eruption birth of a bubble-type coronal mass ejection (CME). That roughly half of all polar H macrospicules were observed to be erupting-loop macrospicules suggests that there should be a corresponding large class of X-ray jets in which the emerging bipole at the base of the jet undergoes a blowout eruption as in a bubble-type CME, instead of staying closed as in the standard picture for X-ray jets. Along with a cartoon of the standard picture, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures to be expected of a blowout jet in high-resolution coronal X-ray movies such as from Hinode/XRT. From Hinode/XRT movies in polar coronal holes, we show: (1) examples of X-ray jets that fit the standard picture very well, and (2) other examples that do not fit the standard picture but do show signatures appropriate for blowout jets. These signatures are (1) a flare arcade inside the emerging bipole in addition to the flare arcade produced between the emerging bipole and the ambient high-reaching unipolar field by reconnection of these two fields as in the standard picture, and (2) in addition to the jet prong expected from the standard reconnection, a second jet prong or strand, one that could not be produced by the standard reconnection but could be produced by reconnection between the ambient unipolar field and one leg of an erupting core-field flux rope that has blown out the emerging bipole. We therefore infer that these "two pronged" jets are made by

  13. Blowout Jets: Evidence from Hinode/XRT for X-Ray Jets Made by Blowout Eruption of the Emerging Bipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Yamauchi et al (2004, ApJ, 605, 511) found that there are two structurally and dynamically distinct types of H macrospicules in polar coronal holes: single-column jet macrospicules and erupting-loop macrospicules. The structure and motion of the single-column jet macrospicules fit the standard Shibata reconnection picture for solar X-ray jets (Shibata et al 1992, PASJ, 44, L173). The form and motion of the erupting-loop macrospicules is reminiscent of the ejective eruption of the sheared-core-field flux rope in the filament-eruption birth of a bubble-type coronal mass ejection (CME). That roughly half of all polar H macrospicules were observed to be erupting-loop macrospicules suggests that there should be a corresponding large class of X-ray jets in which the emerging bipole at the base of the jet undergoes a blowout eruption as in a bubble-type CME, instead of staying closed as in the standard picture for X-ray jets. Along with a cartoon of the standard picture, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures to be expected of a blowout jet in high-resolution coronal X-ray movies such as from Hinode/XRT. From Hinode/XRT movies in polar coronal holes, we show: (1) examples of X-ray jets that fit the standard picture very well, and (2) other examples that do not fit the standard picture but do show signatures appropriate for blowout jets. These signatures are (1) a flare arcade inside the emerging bipole in addition to the flare arcade produced between the emerging bipole and the ambient high-reaching unipolar field by reconnection of these two fields as in the standard picture, and (2) in addition to the jet prong expected from the standard reconnection, a second jet prong or strand, one that could not be produced by the standard reconnection but could be produced by reconnection between the ambient unipolar field and one leg of an erupting core-field flux rope that has blown out the emerging bipole. We therefore infer that these "two pronged" jets are made by

  14. Geoeffective jets impacting the magnetopause are very common.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, F; Hietala, H; Angelopoulos, V; Nakamura, R

    2016-04-01

    The subsolar magnetosheath is penetrated by transient enhancements in dynamic pressure. These enhancements, also called high-speed jets, can propagate to the magnetopause, causing large-amplitude yet localized boundary indentations on impact. Possible downstream consequences of these impacts are, e.g., local magnetopause reconnection, impulsive penetration of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere, inner magnetospheric and boundary surface waves, drop outs and other variations in radiation belt electron populations, ionospheric flow enhancements, and magnetic field variations observed on the ground. Consequently, jets can be geoeffective. The extend of their geoeffectiveness is influenced by the amount of mass, momentum, and energy they transport, i.e., by how large they are. Their overall importance in the framework of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling is determined by how often jets of geoeffective size hit the dayside magnetopause. In this paper, we calculate such jet impact rates for the first time. From a large data set of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) multispacecraft jet observations, we find distributions of scale sizes perpendicular and parallel to the direction of jet propagation. They are well modeled by an exponential function with characteristic scales of 1.34RE (perpendicular) and 0.71RE (parallel direction), respectively. Using the distribution of perpendicular scale sizes, we derive an impact rate of jets with cross-sectional diameters larger than 2RE on a reference area of about 100RE2 of the subsolar magnetopause. That rate is about 3 per hour in general, and about 9 per hour under low interplanetary magnetic field cone angle conditions (<30°), which are favorable for jet occurrence in the subsolar magnetosheath.

  15. Geoeffective jets impacting the magnetopause are very common

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Hietala, H.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nakamura, R.

    2016-04-01

    The subsolar magnetosheath is penetrated by transient enhancements in dynamic pressure. These enhancements, also called high-speed jets, can propagate to the magnetopause, causing large-amplitude yet localized boundary indentations on impact. Possible downstream consequences of these impacts are, e.g., local magnetopause reconnection, impulsive penetration of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere, inner magnetospheric and boundary surface waves, drop outs and other variations in radiation belt electron populations, ionospheric flow enhancements, and magnetic field variations observed on the ground. Consequently, jets can be geoeffective. The extend of their geoeffectiveness is influenced by the amount of mass, momentum, and energy they transport, i.e., by how large they are. Their overall importance in the framework of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling is determined by how often jets of geoeffective size hit the dayside magnetopause. In this paper, we calculate such jet impact rates for the first time. From a large data set of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) multispacecraft jet observations, we find distributions of scale sizes perpendicular and parallel to the direction of jet propagation. They are well modeled by an exponential function with characteristic scales of 1.34RE (perpendicular) and 0.71RE (parallel direction), respectively. Using the distribution of perpendicular scale sizes, we derive an impact rate of jets with cross-sectional diameters larger than 2RE on a reference area of about 100 RE2 of the subsolar magnetopause. That rate is about 3 per hour in general, and about 9 per hour under low interplanetary magnetic field cone angle conditions (<30°), which are favorable for jet occurrence in the subsolar magnetosheath.

  16. Magnetized jets driven by the Sun: The structure of the heliosphere revisited—Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.; Zieger, B.; Swisdak, M.; Toth, G.

    2016-05-01

    As the solar system moves through the interstellar medium, the solar wind is deflected forming the heliosphere. The standard picture of the heliosphere is a comet-shape like structure with the tail extending for 1000s of astronomical units. This standard picture stems from a view where magnetic forces are negligible and the solar magnetic field is convected passively down the tail. Recently, we showed that the magnetic tension of the solar magnetic field plays a crucial role on organizing the solar wind in the heliosheath into two jet-like structures. The two jets are separated by the interstellar medium that flows between them. The heliosphere then has a "croissant"-like shape where the distance to the heliopause downtail is almost the same as towards the nose. This new view of the heliosphere is in agreement with the energetic neutral atoms maps taken by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer and INCA/CASSINI. We developed as well an analytic model of the heliosheath in the axisymmetric limit that shows how the magnetic tension force is the driver for the north and south jets. We confirmed that the formation of these jets with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The main reason why previous global MHD simulations did not see these jets is due to spurious magnetic dissipation that was present at the heliospheric current sheet. We instead kept the same polarity for the interplanetary (solar) magnetic field in both the northern and southern hemispheres, eliminating spurious magnetic dissipation effects at the heliospheric current sheet. In this paper, we extend these previous results to include additional cases where we used: (a) weaker solar magnetic field; (b) solar magnetic field that reverses polarity at the solar equator in the axisymmetric limit; and (c) slower motion through the interstellar system. We discuss as well future challenges regarding the structure of the heliosphere.

  17. Magnetized jets driven by the Sun: The structure of the heliosphere revisited—Updates

    SciTech Connect

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Zieger, B.; Toth, G.

    2016-05-15

    As the solar system moves through the interstellar medium, the solar wind is deflected forming the heliosphere. The standard picture of the heliosphere is a comet-shape like structure with the tail extending for 1000s of astronomical units. This standard picture stems from a view where magnetic forces are negligible and the solar magnetic field is convected passively down the tail. Recently, we showed that the magnetic tension of the solar magnetic field plays a crucial role on organizing the solar wind in the heliosheath into two jet-like structures. The two jets are separated by the interstellar medium that flows between them. The heliosphere then has a “croissant”-like shape where the distance to the heliopause downtail is almost the same as towards the nose. This new view of the heliosphere is in agreement with the energetic neutral atoms maps taken by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer and INCA/CASSINI. We developed as well an analytic model of the heliosheath in the axisymmetric limit that shows how the magnetic tension force is the driver for the north and south jets. We confirmed that the formation of these jets with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The main reason why previous global MHD simulations did not see these jets is due to spurious magnetic dissipation that was present at the heliospheric current sheet. We instead kept the same polarity for the interplanetary (solar) magnetic field in both the northern and southern hemispheres, eliminating spurious magnetic dissipation effects at the heliospheric current sheet. In this paper, we extend these previous results to include additional cases where we used: (a) weaker solar magnetic field; (b) solar magnetic field that reverses polarity at the solar equator in the axisymmetric limit; and (c) slower motion through the interstellar system. We discuss as well future challenges regarding the structure of the heliosphere.

  18. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  19. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  20. Interacting jets from binary protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Lery, T.; O'Sullivan, S.; Spicer, D.; Bacciotti, F.; Rosen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Aims: We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. Methods: We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. Results: We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. Conclusions: While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly parallel, as in most observed cases, we show that the magnetic field can help the collimation and refocusing of both of the two jets.

  1. News on two jets in Lupus 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, F.; Fernández, M.

    2011-04-01

    Context. Jets from solar-type and low-mass stars are typical manifestations of stellar youth. Shocks along these jets produce visible, generally fast-moving Herbig-Haro objects whose proper motions are easily measured in nearby star-forming regions using images taken just a few years apart. Herbig-Haro objects have now been observed in association with objects close to the substellar boundary. Aims: We present second-epoch observations of the central area of the Lupus 3 star-forming region that include two of its most interesting Herbig-Haro systems. One is HH 228, produced by the classical T Tauri star Th 28 (=Sz 102), whereas the other is HH 600, which has its origin in the very low-mass star Par-Lup3-4. Methods: Narrow-band imaging through filters centered on the Hα and the [SII] lines was obtained with the FORS2 instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in mid-2010. The images obtained were compared to others obtained in early 2003, leading to the discovery of HH 600. Results: New Herbig-Haro objects are found at large distances from Th 28 and to be associated with it, representing an extension of the HH 228 jet to a projected distance of 0.32 pc from Th 28. The farthest Herbig-Haro object is HH 989, whose possible relationship with Th 28 had been already suggested in a previous study but is now kinematically confirmed. We find other likely Herbig-Haro objects whose proper motions are less indicative of a connection with Th 28, but which may be caused by oblique shocks near the outer walls of its jet. For the HH 600 jet, the knot discovered by ourselves in 2003 to the southeast of Par-Lup3-4 is found to have clearly moved and faded. Using high resolution spectroscopy obtained in 2003 and the proper motion that we can measure now, we determine a spatial velocity of 170 ± 30 km s-1. The northwestern jet is found to have grown in prominence in the intervening years. The possible relationship of other Herbig-Haro objects in the region with Th 28, Par-Lup3

  2. A Series of Jets that Drove Streamer-Puff CMEs from Giant Active Region of 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate characteristics of solar coronal jets that originated from active region NOAA 12192 and produced coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This active region produced many non­-jet major flare eruptions (X and M class) that made no CME. A multitude of jets occurred from the southeast edge of the active region, and in contrast to the major-­flare eruptions in the core, six of these jets resulted in CMEs. Our jet observations are from SDO/AIA EUV channels and from Hinode/XRT, and CME observations are from the SOHO/LASCO C2 coronograph. Each jet-­driven CME was relatively slow-­moving (approx. 200 - 300 km/s) compared to most CMEs; had angular width (20deg - 50deg) comparable to that of the streamer base; and was of the "streamer­-puff" variety, whereby a pre-existing streamer was transiently inflated but not removed (blown out) by the passage of the CME. Much of the chromospheric-­temperature plasma of the jets producing the CMEs escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the chromospheric plasma in the non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. We also found that the CME-producing jets tended to be faster in speed and longer in duration than the non-CME-­producing jets. We expect that the jets result from eruptions of mini-filaments. We further propose that the CMEs are driven by magnetic twist injected into streamer-­base coronal loops when erupting twisted mini-filament field reconnects with the ambient field at the foot of those loops.

  3. A Series of Jets that Drove Streamer-Puff CMEs from Giant Active Region of 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate characteristics of solar coronal jets that originated from active region NOAA 12192 and produced coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This active region produced many non-jet major flare eruptions (X and M class) that made no CME. A multiitude of jets occurred from the southeast edge of the active region, and in contrast to the major-flare eruptions in the core, six of these jets resulted in CMEs. Our jet observations are from multiple SDO/AIA EUV channels, including 304, 171 and 193 Angstrom, and CME observations are taken from SOHO/LASCO C2 coronograph. Each jet-driven CME was relatively slow-moving (approximately 200 - 300 km s(sup-1) compared to most CMEs; had angular width (20deg - 50deg) comparable to that of the streamer base; and was of the "streamer-puff" variety, whereby a preexisting streamer was transiently inflated but not removed (blown out) by the passage of the CME. Much of the chromospheric-temperature plasma of the jets producing the CMEs escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the chromospheric plasma in the non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. We also found that the CME-producing jets tended to be faster in speed and longer in duration than the non-CME-producing jets. We expect that the jets result from eruptions of mini-filaments. We further propose that the CMEs are driven by magnetic twist injected into streamer-base coronal loops when erupting twisted mini-filament field reconnects with the ambient field at the foot of those loops.

  4. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  5. Acoustic characteristics of twin jets.

    PubMed

    He, F; Zhang, X W

    2002-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of underexpanded supersonic twin jets in different azimuthal measurement planes. Compared with two independent jets, the twin jets produced additional noise due to the enhanced mixing and entrainment. The larger pressure ratio for switching from the axisymmetric mode to the helical mode led to lower noise levels at 90 degrees than for two independent jets. For pressure ratios greater than 5.00, the noise reduction was due to cessation of screeching of the twin jets while screeching of a single jet was still detected. The apparent shielding phenomenon was measured for the screech helical mode. The screech tone intensities were attenuated largely due to the shielding effects. The noise reductions due to shielding were obtained over a wide range of pressure ratios relative to the sum of two independent jets.

  6. The three-dimensional analysis of hinode polar jets using images from LASCO C2, the STEREO COR2 coronagraphs, and SMEI

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Shimojo, M.; Sako, N.

    2014-04-01

    Images recorded by the X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode spacecraft are used to provide high-cadence observations of solar jetting activity. A selection of the brightest of these polar jets shows a positive correlation with high-speed responses traced into the interplanetary medium. LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraph images measure the coronal response to some of the largest jets, and also the nearby background solar wind velocity, thereby giving a determination of their speeds that we compare with Hinode observations. When using the full Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) data set, we track these same high-speed solar jet responses into the inner heliosphere and from these analyses determine their mass, flow energies, and the extent to which they retain their identity at large solar distances.

  7. Recurrent brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G; Madrid, R; Thrush, D C; Campbell, M J

    1975-09-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and pathological changes in 3 patients with recurrent attacks of non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy have been described. Two had recurrent attacks and a dominant family history of similar attacks, together with evidence of lesser degrees of nerve involvement outside the brachial plexus. In one patient the attacks were moderately painful, while in the other there was little or no pain. Only one showed undue slowing of motor nerve conduction during ischaemia, but in both cases the sural nerves had the changes of tomaculous neuropathy, with many sausage-shaped swellings of the myelin sheaths, and extensive segmental demyelination and remyelination. The third patient had two attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy which were both extremely painful. The clinical features were compatible with a diagnosis of neuralgic amuotrophy. In the second attack, there was vagus nerve involvement and the sural nerve showed evidence of healed extensive segmental demyelination. The various syndromes presenting with acute non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy are reviewed, and a tentative nonsological classification advanced. Most patients fall into the category of acute, painful paralysis with amyotrophy, with no family history and no evidence of lesions outside the brachial plexus. It is suggested that the term "neuralgic amyotrophy" be restricted to this group. Patients with features outside this clinical picture probably suffer from other disease entities presenting with brachial plexus neuropathy. The familial cases constitute one or more aetioliogical subgroups, differing from neuralgic amyotrophy in the frequency of recurrences, the relative freedom from pain in the attacks, the frequency of nerve lesions outside the brachial plexus, and of hypotelorism. Individual attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy, however, may be identical in patients with the different diseases, and further pathological and biochemical studies are

  8. Multiscale recurrence quantification analysis of order recurrence plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengjia; Shang, Pengjian; Lin, Aijing

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of multiscale recurrence quantification analysis (MSRQA) to analyze the structure of order recurrence plots. The MSRQA is based on order patterns over a range of time scales. Compared with conventional recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), the MSRQA can show richer and more recognizable information on the local characteristics of diverse systems which successfully describes their recurrence properties. Both synthetic series and stock market indexes exhibit their properties of recurrence at large time scales that quite differ from those at a single time scale. Some systems present more accurate recurrence patterns under large time scales. It demonstrates that the new approach is effective for distinguishing three similar stock market systems and showing some inherent differences.

  9. Jet production in super-Eddington accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggum, G. E.; Coroniti, F. V.; Katz, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional, radiation-coupled, Newtonian hydrodynamic simulation is reported for a super-Eddington, mass accretion rate, M = 4 M(E) disk accretion flow onto a 3-solar mass pseudoblack hole. Near the disk midplane, convection cells effectively block the accretion flow, even though viscous heating maximizes there. Accretion predominantly occurs in a supersonic inflow which follows streamlines of approximately constant angular momentum. The optically thick inflow traps radiation so that 80 percent of the luminosity is absorbed by the black hole; the emergent power is sub-Eddington. An axial jet self consistently forms just outside a conical photosphere which bounds the accretion zone; radiation pressure accelerates the jet to about 10 to the 10th cm/s. The jet's mass efflux is only 0.4 percent of the total mass accretion rate.

  10. Recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, John S

    2014-09-01

    Recurrence of tarsal tunnel syndrome after surgery may be due to inadequate release, lack of understanding or appreciation of the actual anatomy involved, variations in the anatomy of the nerve(s), failure to execute the release properly, bleeding with subsequent scarring, damage to the nerve and branches, persistent hypersensitivity of the nerves, and preexisting intrinsic damage to the nerve. Approaches include more thorough release, use of barrier materials to decrease adherence of the nerve to surrounding tissues to avoid traction neuritis, excisions of neuromas using conduits, and consideration of nerve stimulators and systemic medications to deal with persistent neural pain.

  11. Recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Vishal; Ganguly, Ishita

    2014-09-28

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is commonly encountered, but less commonly understood clinical entity, especially idiopathic RAP, with propensity to lead to repeated attacks and may be chronic pancreatitis if attacks continue to recur. A great number of studies have been published on acute pancreatitis, but few have focused on RAP. Analysing the results of clinical studies focusing specifically on RAP is problematic in view due to lack of standard definitions, randomised clinical trials, standard evaluation protocol used and less post intervention follow-up duration. With the availability of newer investigation modalities less number of etiologies will remains undiagnosed. This review particularly is focused on the present knowledge in understanding of RAP.

  12. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Pine, Harold S; Underbrink, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, benign disease with no known cure. RRP is caused by infection of the upper aerodigestive tract with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Passage through the birth canal is thought to be the initial transmission event, but infection may occur in utero. HPV vaccines have helped to provide protection from cervical cancer; however, their role in the prevention of RRP is undetermined. Clinical presentation of initial symptoms of RRP may be subtle. RRP course varies, and current management focuses on surgical debulking of papillomatous lesions with or without concurrent adjuvant therapy.

  13. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  14. Off-equatorial jets in Jupiter's and Saturn's atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjun; Schneider, T.

    2013-10-01

    Jupiter and Saturn have similar radii, rotation rates, and atmospheres. Yet their off-equatorial jets differ markedly: Jupiter has 1 20 off-equatorial jets, with speeds at the level of the visible clouds around 20 m/s; Saturn has only 10 wider off-equatorial jets, with speeds around 100 m/s. Here it is shown that the differences between the off-equatorial jets can be accounted for by differences in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drag the jets experience in the planetary interiors. The relation between jet characteristics and drag strength is examined systematically through simulations with a general circulation model (GCM). The GCM domain is a thin spherical shell in the upper atmosphere of a giant planet, with flow parameters relevant for Jupiter. Rayleigh drag at an artificial lower boundary (with mean pressure of bar) is used as a simple representation of the MHD drag the flow on giant planets experiences at depth. The drag coefficient is varied to investigate how it affects characteristics of off-equatorial jets. As the drag coefficient decreases, the eddy length scale and eddy kinetic energy increase. Jets become wider and stronger, with increased interjet spacing. Generally, the jet widths scale with the Rhines scale, which is of similar magnitude as the Rossby radius in the simulations. The jet strengths increases primarily through strengthening of the barotropic component, which increases as the drag coefficient decreases because the overall kinetic energy dissipation remains roughly constant: an increasing mean flow strength in the drag layer roughly balances a decreasing drag coefficient to lead to the same kinetic energy dissipation. The overall kinetic energy dissipation remains roughly constant presumably because it is controlled by baroclinic conversion of potential to kinetic energy in the upper troposphere, where differential solar heating has an influence; this baroclinic conversion is only weakly dependent on bottom drag and barotropic flow

  15. Off-equatorial Jets in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.; Liu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Jupiter and Saturn have similar radii, rotation rates, and atmospheres. Yet their off-equatorial jets differ markedly: Jupiter has 15--20 off-equatorial jets, with speeds at the level of the visible clouds around 20 m/s; Saturn has only 5--10 wider off-equatorial jets, with speeds around 100 m/s. Here it is shown that the differences between the off-equatorial jets can be accounted for by differences in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drag the jets experience in the planetary interiors. The relation between jet characteristics and drag strength is examined systematically through simulations with a general circulation model (GCM). The GCM domain is a thin spherical shell in the upper atmosphere of a giant planet, with flow parameters relevant for Jupiter. Rayleigh drag at an artificial lower boundary (with mean pressure of 3~bar) is used as a simple representation of the MHD drag the flow on giant planets experiences at depth. The drag coefficient is varied to investigate how it affects characteristics of off-equatorial jets. As the drag coefficient decreases, the eddy length scale and eddy kinetic energy increase. Jets become wider and stronger, with increased interjet spacing. Coherent vortices also become more prevalent. Generally, the jet widths scale with the Rhines scale, which is of similar magnitude as the Rossby radius in the simulations. The jet strengths increases primarily through strengthening of the barotropic component, which increases as the drag coefficient decreases because the overall kinetic energy dissipation remains roughly constant: an increasing mean flow strength in the drag layer roughly balances a decreasing drag coefficient to lead to the same kinetic energy dissipation, which is dominated by the drag on the mean flow. The overall kinetic energy dissipation remains roughly constant presumably because it is controlled by baroclinic conversion of potential to kinetic energy in the upper troposphere, where differential solar heating has an

  16. Determining the Composition of the Vela Pulsar's Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, Hakki

    1997-01-01

    The pulsar jet is significant in explaining how the Vela pulsar's rotational energy is transported outward to the rest of the SNR, since direct radiation from the pulsar only accounts for a small percentage of the total power. Our previous ROSAT observations presented the first evidence that the pulsar is driving a narrow, collimated, and remarkably symmetrical jet into the SNR (Markwardt, C. and Oegelman, H., 1995, Nature, 375, p. 40) which we interpret to be from a 'cocoon' of hot gas surrounding the jet itself. We obtained an ASCA exposure of the jet in order to determine whether the spectrum is thermal or power-law continuum. The jet cocoon is detected with ASCA at approximately 2-3 x 10(exp -3) ct/s. The X-ray spectrum of the jet is remarkably similar to the surrounding supernova remnant spectrum and extends to X-ray energies of at least 7 keV, with a total flux of approximately 2 x 10(exp -13) erg/s sq cm sq arcmin. The only strong emission line is from He-like Neon at approx. 0.9 keV; otherwise the spectrum is quite smooth. The spectrum cannot be fit by any one standard plasma emission model, so we used models with two-components. The lower energy component is thermal and has a temperature of 0.29 +/- 0.03 keV; the higher energy portion can either be fit by a thermal component of temperature approx. 4 keV or a power law with photon index approx. 2.0. If the observed spectrum is of a 'traditional' jet cocoon, then we estimate the speed of the jet to be at least 800 km/s, depending on the angle of inclination of the jet axis to our line of sight. The mechanical power driving the jet is greater than or equal to 10(exp 36) erg/s which is comparable to the pulsar's spin-down luminosity of 7 x 10(exp 36) erg/s. and the mass flow rate at the head is greater than or equal to 10(exp -6) solar radius/yr. We conclude that the jet must be entraining material all along its length in order to generate such a large mass flow rate.

  17. The impact of solar variability on climate

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, J.D.

    1996-05-17

    A general circulation model that simulated changes in solar irradiance and stratospheric ozone was used to investigate the response of the atmosphere to the 11-solar activity cycle. At solar maximum, a warming of the summer stratosphere was found to strengthen shifts in the positions of the subtropical westerly jets, broadening of the tropical Hadley circulations, and poleward shifts of storm tracts. These effects are similiar to, although generally smaller in magnitude than, those observed in nature. A simulation in which only solar irradiance was changed showed a much weaker response. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. The Impact of Solar Variability on Climate

    PubMed

    Haigh

    1996-05-17

    A general circulation model that simulated changes in solar irradiance and stratospheric ozone was used to investigate the response of the atmosphere to the 11-year solar activity cycle. At solar maximum, a warming of the summer stratosphere was found to strengthen easterly winds, which penetrated into the equatorial upper troposphere, causing poleward shifts in the positions of the subtropical westerly jets, broadening of the tropical Hadley circulations, and poleward shifts of the storm tracks. These effects are similar to, although generally smaller in magnitude than, those observed in nature. A simulation in which only solar irradiance was changed showed a much weaker response.

  19. Magnetotail Reconnection Jets at Lunar Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Eastwood, J. P.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T.; Mistry, R.; McFadden, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection redistributes energy by releasing magnetic energy into particle energies—high speed bulk flows, heating, and particle acceleration. With near-Earth in situ observations, we have access to different parameter regimes: The magnetotail has typically a very large magnetic shear and symmetric boundary conditions. Reconnection at the magnetopause, in contrast, usually takes place under asymmetric boundary conditions and a variety of shear angles. Finally, reconnecting current sheets in the solar wind are typically large scale and not affected by nearby obstacles, and observations are typically made extremely far downstream from the X-line. As such, magnetotail reconnection, especially at lunar distances where the effect of the Earth's dipole is small, should be closest to simple models. Ion heating has recently been studied systematically in solar wind and magnetopause reconnection, but not in the magnetotail. The energetics of magnetotail reconnection jets are particularly interesting as the available magnetic energy per particle (Bin2/μ0nin = miVA,in2) is typically orders of magnitude higher and the inflow plasma beta much lower than in the solar wind and at the magnetopause. We survey ARTEMIS data from 2011-2014 for fast reconnection flows and analyse their statistical properties. In particular, we address (i) the ion temperature increase (ii) ion temperature anisotropy and firehose instability, and (iii) the underlying ion dynamics. We examine the spatial structure of the ion temperature across the exhaust, and compare with particle-in-cell simulations. We find that the temperature parallel to the magnetic field dominates near the edges of the jet, while the very center of the exhaust has Tperp > Tpara, indicating Speiser-like ion motion.

  20. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  1. [Chronic recurrent parotitis].

    PubMed

    Zenk, J; Koch, M; Klintworth, N; Iro, H

    2010-03-01

    Chronic recurrent parotitis is a non-obstructive disease with episodes of mostly painful swelling of the gland. It is categorized into a juvenile and an adult form, even without clear information on its actual origin. As to the etiology of the juvenile form, genetic factors and duct malformations as well as bacterial infections are discussed. Very rarely a complete lymphatic transformation of the gland might take place. Juvenile chronic recurrent parotitis is self-limiting in about 90% of all cases, as patients grow up. The diagnosis is based on patient history and clinical findings. Sonography is the imaging method of choice. Sialendoscopy shows a typical whitish pattern of the ducts in juvenile disease. Strictures or stenoses are typical for the adult form. The therapy of choice is gland massage and sialagogues, in addition to the administration of antibiotics. In more severe cases sialendoscopy together with rinsing of the ducts and instillation of cortisone are indicated. Total parotidectomy remains the last choice and is rarely necessary.

  2. Jets from a Distance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    Enceladus' intriguing south-polar jets are viewed from afar, backlit by sunlight while the moon itself glows softly in reflected Saturn-shine. Observations of the jets taken from various viewing geometries provide different insights into these remarkable features. Cassini has gathered a wealth of information in the hopes of unraveling the mysteries of the subsurface ocean that lurks beneath the moon's icy crust. This view looks toward the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Enceladus (313 miles or 504 kilometers across). North is up. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 13, 2017. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 502,000 miles (808,000 kilometers) from Enceladus and at a sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 176 degrees. Image scale is 3 miles (5 kilometers) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21338

  3. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  4. Plasma jet takes off.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, L

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a series of joint research projects by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Beta Squared of Allen, Texas, and the University of California at Los Angeles, there is now a more environmentally sound method for cleaning semiconductor chips that may also be effective in cleaning up chemical, bacterial, and nuclear contaminants. The Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet uses a type of ionized gas called plasma to clean up contaminants by binding to them and lifting them away. In contrast to the corrosive acids and chemical solvents traditionally used to clean semiconductor chips, the jet oxidizes contaminants, producing only benign gaseous by-products such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. The new technology is also easy to transport, cleans thoroughly and quickly, and presents no hazards to its operators. PMID:10417375

  5. Jet Transport Rejected Takeoffs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    r _ _ _ _ _ _ N AD—A05 6 032 FEDERAL AVIATIO N ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON 0 C FLIGHT—ETC FIG 1/2 ~,JET TRANSPORT REJECTED TAKEOFFS • (U)FED 77 0 S...AF~~16O-77-2 FOR FURTHER IRAN JET TRANSPORT R&JECTED TAKEDFFS DAVID W. OSTROWSKILI~~ H c ,~ ~~~~ C ...) ~~~~ O~ —1 w DDU FEB~JARY 1977U... FINAL...Pag. .po ,t No. 2 C.o.,,nm.rr, A c c . s s on No . 3. R.c ,pr. ns s Cat alog No. AFS-16~~-77-2_ j

  6. Synthesis of Silane and Silicon in a Non-equilibrium Plasma Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The original objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of high volume, low-cost production of high purity silane or solar cell grade silicon using a non equilibrium plasma jet. The emphasis was changed near the end of the program to determine the feasibility of preparing photovoltaic amorphous silicon films directly using this method. The non equilibrium plasma jet should be further evaluated as a technique for producing high efficiency photovoltaic amorphous silicon films.

  7. Far Noise Field of Air Jets and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Coles, Willard D

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study and compare the acoustic radiation of air jets and jet engines. A number of different nozzle-exit shapes were studied with air jets to determine the effect of exit shape on noise generation. Circular, square, rectangular, and elliptical convergent nozzles and convergent-divergent and plug nozzles were investigated. The spectral distributions of the sound power for the engine and the air jet were in good agreement for the case where the engine data were not greatly affected by reflection or jet interference effects. Such power spectra for a subsonic or slightly choked engine or air jet show that the peaks of the spectra occur at a Strouhal number of 0.3.

  8. Jet hadrochemistry as a characteristic of jet quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapeta, S.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2008-05-01

    Jets produced in nucleus nucleus collisions at the LHC are expected to be strongly modified due to the interaction of the parton shower with the dense QCD matter. Here, we point out that jet quenching can leave signatures not only in the longitudinal and transverse jet energy and multiplicity distributions, but also in the hadrochemical composition of the jet fragments. In particular, we show that even in the absence of medium-effects at or after hadronization, the medium-modification of the parton shower may result in significant changes in jet hadrochemistry. We discuss how jet hadrochemistry can be studied within the high-multiplicity environment of nucleus nucleus collisions at the LHC.

  9. Jet decorrelation and jet shapes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Heuring, T.C.

    1996-07-01

    We present results on measurements of jet shapes and jet azimuthal decorrelation from {bar p}P collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using data collected during the 1992-1993 run of the Fermilab Tevatron. Jets are seen to narrow both with increasing Awe {sub TTY} and increasing rapidity. While HERWIG, a puritan shower Monte Carlo, predicts slightly narrower jets, it describes the trend of the data well; NO CD described qualitative features of the data but is sensitive to both renormalization scale and jet definitions. Jet azimuthal decorrelation has been measured out to five units of pseudorapidity. While next-to-leading order CD and a leading-log approximation based on BFKL resummation fail to reproduce the effect, HERWIG describes the data well.

  10. What can we learn about extragalactic jets from galactic jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer; Biretta, John

    2002-05-01

    Jets are powerful features of extragalactic radio sources; yet jets are also seen in young stellar objects and X-ray binaries within our own galaxy. These occupy a very different parameter space from the extragalactic jets, and yet many are similar in appearance and nature to their powerful extragalactic cousins. In many cases far more information is available for the galactic jets, due to, e.g., rapid evolution and knowledge of emission line ratios and Doppler velocities. We review properties of galactic jets and speculate at implications they have for extragalactic ones. Specifically we consider central engine mass, jet opening angle and Mach number, the nature of the emission knots, the symmetry of the ejection process, and the source history.

  11. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  12. Outdoor Performance Analysis of a Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) Collector with Jet Impingement and Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    PubMed Central

    Jaaz, Ahed Hameed; Hasan, Husam Abdulrasool; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of jet impingement of water on a photovoltaic thermal (PVT) collector and compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) on electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and power production of a PVT system. A prototype of a PVT solar water collector installed with a jet impingement and CPC has been designed, fabricated and experimentally investigated. The efficiency of the system can be improved by using jet impingement of water to decrease the temperature of the solar cells. The electrical efficiency and power output are directly correlated with the mass flow rate. The results show that electrical efficiency was improved by 7% when using CPC and jet impingement cooling in a PVT solar collector at 1:00 p.m. (solar irradiance of 1050 W/m2 and an ambient temperature of 33.5 °C). It can also be seen that the power output improved by 36% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 20% without CPC in the photovoltaic (PV) module at 1:30 p.m. The short-circuit current ISC of the PV module experienced an improvement of ~28% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 11.7% without CPC. The output of the PV module was enhanced by 31% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 16% without CPC. PMID:28763048

  13. Outdoor Performance Analysis of a Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) Collector with Jet Impingement and Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC).

    PubMed

    Jaaz, Ahed Hameed; Hasan, Husam Abdulrasool; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A

    2017-08-01

    This paper discusses the effect of jet impingement of water on a photovoltaic thermal (PVT) collector and compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) on electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and power production of a PVT system. A prototype of a PVT solar water collector installed with a jet impingement and CPC has been designed, fabricated and experimentally investigated. The efficiency of the system can be improved by using jet impingement of water to decrease the temperature of the solar cells. The electrical efficiency and power output are directly correlated with the mass flow rate. The results show that electrical efficiency was improved by 7% when using CPC and jet impingement cooling in a PVT solar collector at 1:00 p.m. (solar irradiance of 1050 W/m² and an ambient temperature of 33.5 °C). It can also be seen that the power output improved by 36% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 20% without CPC in the photovoltaic (PV) module at 1:30 p.m. The short-circuit current ISC of the PV module experienced an improvement of ~28% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 11.7% without CPC. The output of the PV module was enhanced by 31% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 16% without CPC.

  14. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  15. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  16. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  17. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-26

    The Twin Jet Nebula, or PN M2-9, is a striking example of a bipolar planetary nebula. Bipolar planetary nebulae are formed when the central object is not a single star, but a binary system, Studies have shown that the nebula’s size increases with time, and measurements of this rate of increase suggest that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1200 years ago.

  18. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  19. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  20. JET Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise prediction has been an important and challenging research area since James Lighthill first introduced his Acoustic Analogy Approach over fifty years ago. This talk attempts to provide a unified framework for the subsequent theoretical developments in this field. It assumes that there is no single approach that is optimal in all situations and uses the framework as a basis for discussing the strengths weaknesses of the various approaches to this topic. But the emphasis here will be on the important problem of predicting the noise from high speed air jets. Specific results will presented for round jets in the 0.5 to 1.4 Mach number range and compared with experimental data taken on the Glenn SHAR rig. It is demonstrated that non-parallel mean flow effects play an important role in predicting the noise at the supersonic Mach numbers. The results explain the failure of previous attempts based on the parallel flow Lilley model (which has served as the foundation for most jet noise analyses during past two decades).

  1. Plasma jets merging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.; Hughes, T. P.; Welch, D. R.; Golovkin, I.; Macfarlane, J.

    2007-11-01

    The progress on numerical 3D simulations of high density high Mach number plasma jets merging is presented. The modeling was conducted with the particle-in-cell LSP code [1]. A few hypersonic plasma jets (Mach number between 5 and 50) with high density (within the range of 10^15-10^17 cm-3) were injected for merging in a low density low temperature neutral background gas ( 10^13 cm-3). The dynamics of the merging was studied. Onset of a strong instability, which was observed in the modeling of two, three and five plasma merging jets [2], can essentially affect the front formation and finally can lead to a high turbulent flow. The nature of the instability is discussed. The progress on HyperV plasma accelerator experiment simulation and comparison with a recent experimental data is also reported. [1] T. P. Hughes, S. S. Yu, and R. E. Clark, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 110401, 1999. [2] S. A. Galkin, I. N. Bogatu, J. S. Kim, to be published in PPPS/ICOP 2007 Conference Proceedings. Work is supported by the US DOE SBIR grant and by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.

  2. Recurrence theorems: A unified account

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, David

    2015-02-15

    I discuss classical and quantum recurrence theorems in a unified manner, treating both as generalisations of the fact that a system with a finite state space only has so many places to go. Along the way, I prove versions of the recurrence theorem applicable to dynamics on linear and metric spaces and make some comments about applications of the classical recurrence theorem in the foundations of statistical mechanics.

  3. [Treatment of recurrent posterior epistaxis].

    PubMed

    Bro, Søren Pauli; Bille, Jesper; Petersen, Kristian Bruun

    2017-08-21

    30% of the patients presenting with epistaxis at emergency wards and otorhinolaryngeal specialist departments have posterior bleeding. Traditional treatment with packing often leads to initial treatment failure, and many patients experience recurrent bleeding within the following month. Recurrent posterior epistaxis should be treated with local electrocautery or endoscopic ligation of the sphenopalatine artery to reduce patient discomfort, hospital stay, risk of treatment failure and recurrence.

  4. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜<2‧‧) miniature-filament (minifilament) “strands” from a magnetic neutral line where magnetic flux cancelation is ongoing, consistent with the magnetic configuration presented for coronal-hole jets in Sterling et al. (2015, Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  5. Analysis of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities of Plasma Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Mark J.; Hollingsworth, Blane J.

    1999-01-01

    Ulysses data indicates density fluctuations which axe theorized to be the result of shear between a solar jet and its ambient. The MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability causes such fluctuations as observed by Ulysses. A new dispersion relationship which accounts for this KH instability is derived via the linearization of the MHD equations. This generalizes an earlier result by Hardee. This dispersion relationship has the form of eight non-linear equations with nine unknowns.

  6. Analysis of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities of Plasma Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Mark J.; Hollingsworth, Blane J.

    1999-01-01

    Ulysses data indicates density fluctuations which are theorized to be the result of shear between a solar jet and its ambient. The MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability causes such fluctuations as observed by Ulysses. A new dispersion relationship which accounts for this KH instability is derived via the linearization of the MHD equations. This generalizes an earlier result by Hardee. This dispersion relationship has the form of eight non-linear equations with nine unknowns.

  7. Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wordsworth, R. D.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2008-12-01

    We report an analog laboratory study of planetary-scale turbulence and jet formation. A rotating annulus was cooled and heated at its inner and outer walls, respectively, causing baroclinic instability to develop in the fluid inside. At high rotation rates and low temperature differences, the flow became chaotic and ultimately fully turbulent. The inclusion of sloping top and bottom boundaries caused turbulent eddies to behave like planetary waves at large scales, and eddy interaction with the zonal flow then led to the formation of several alternating jets at mid-depth. The jets did not scale with the Rhines length, and spectral analysis of the flow indicated a distinct separation between jets and eddies in wavenumber space, with direct energy transfer occurring nonlocally between them. Our results suggest that the traditional ``turbulent cascade'' picture of zonal jet formation may be an inappropriate one in the geophysically important case of large-scale flows forced by differential solar heating.

  8. Epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, D.D.; Lijfering, W.M.; Barreto, S.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Rezende, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed. PMID:22183247

  9. Synthetic Jets in Cross-flow. Part 1; Round Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation on synthetic jets from round orifices with and without cross-flow are presented. Jet Reynolds number up to 46,000 with a fully turbulent approach boundary layer, and Stokes number up to 400. are covered. The threshold of stroke length for synthetic jet formation. in the absence of the cross-flow, is found to be Lo /D approximately 0.5. Above Lo /D is approximately 10, the profiles of normalized centerline mean velocity appear to become invariant. It is reasoned that the latter threshold may be related to the phenomenon of saturation of impulsively generated vortices. In the presence of the cross-flow, the penetration height of a synthetic jet is found to depend on the momentum- flux ratio . When this ratio is defined in terms of the maximum jet velocity and the cross-flow velocity. not only all data collapse but also the jet trajectory is predicted well by correlation equation available for steady jets-in-cross-flow. Distributions of mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as turbulence intensity for a synthetic jet in cross-flow are found to be similar to those of a steady jet-in-cross-flow. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, corresponding to the bound vortex pair of the steady case, is clearly observed. Mean velocity distribution exhibits a dome of low momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer, and the entire domain is characterized by high turbulence.

  10. Rapid Confined Mixing Using Transverse Jets Part 2: Multiple Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forliti, David; Salazar, David

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base to investigate the properties of confined mixing devices that employ transverse jets. The experiment considers the mixing of water with a mixture of water and fluorescein, and planar laser induced fluorescence was used to measure instantaneous mixture fraction distributions in the cross section view. Part one of this study presents the scaling law development and results for a single confined transverse jet. Part two will describe the results of configurations including multiple transverse jets. The different regimes of mixing behavior, ranging from under to overpenetration of the transverse jets, are characterized in terms of a new scaling law parameter presented in part one. The level of unmixedness, a primary metric for mixing device performance, is quantified for different jet diameters, number of jets, and relative flow rates. It is apparent that the addition of a second transverse jet provides enhanced scalar uniformity in the main pipe flow cross section compared to a single jet. Three and six jet configurations also provide highly uniform scalar distributions. Turbulent scalar fluctuation intensities, spectral features, and spatial eigenfunctions using the proper orthogonal decomposition will be presented. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12656.

  11. Evidence for Coexisting Hot and Cool Polar Coronal Jets - Coordinated Observations of SOHO and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Deluca, E. E.; Gurman, J.; Biesecker, D.; Fludra, A.

    2004-05-01

    The polar coronal jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the last solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The polar holes disappeared at solar maximum and the jets were not visible anymore. Currently, however, as the Sun's activity declines, the polar holes again became permanent structures and new polar coronal jets were observed by specially designed SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155). Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from last solar minimum. Also, the speed of ˜ 400~km~s-1 at 1.6~R⊙ is consistent with typical velocities of polar jets in 1996-1998. The ejections are believed to be triggered by the field line reconnection between the emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is ejected together with another jet made of cool material. The coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations within JOP 155 provide unique opportunity to test this prediction. We will present observations and discuss evidence supporting the model.

  12. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  13. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  14. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  15. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  16. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  17. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  18. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  19. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  20. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  1. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  2. W + jet production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, Andrea; /INFN, Rome

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of W {yields} e{nu} + n-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the i{sup th} jet are measured. For W+ {ge} 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass m{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} and angural separation {Delta} R{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Abemaciclib in Children With DIPG or Recurrent/Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-10

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Brain Tumor, Recurrent; Solid Tumor, Recurrent; Neuroblastoma, Recurrent, Refractory; Ewing Sarcoma, Recurrent, Refractory; Rhabdomyosarcoma, Recurrent, Refractory; Osteosarcoma, Recurrent, Refractory; Rhabdoid Tumor, Recurrent, Refractory

  4. FAST EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DIMMING ASSOCIATED WITH A CORONAL JET SEEN IN MULTI-WAVELENGTH AND STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi; Innes, D. E.; Shibata, K.; Park, Y.-D.

    2013-03-20

    We have investigated a coronal jet observed near the limb on 2010 June 27 by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS), and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), and by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and on the disk by STEREO-A/EUVI. From EUV (AIA and EIS) and soft X-ray (XRT) images we have identified both cool and hot jets. There was a small loop eruption seen in Ca II images of the SOT before the jet eruption. We found that the hot jet preceded its associated cool jet by about 2 minutes. The cool jet showed helical-like structures during the rising period which was supported by the spectroscopic analysis of the jet's emission. The STEREO observation, which enabled us to observe the jet projected against the disk, showed dimming at 195 A along a large loop connected to the jet. We measured a propagation speed of {approx}800 km s{sup -1} for the dimming front. This is comparable to the Alfven speed in the loop computed from a magnetic field extrapolation of the photospheric field measured five days earlier by the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the loop densities obtained from EIS Fe XIV {lambda}264.79/274.20 line ratios. We interpret the dimming as indicating the presence of Alfvenic waves initiated by reconnection in the upper chromosphere.

  5. [Jet ventilation in laryngotracheal surgery].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, G; Mausser, G; Gugatschka, M

    2008-12-01

    Conventional endotracheal intubation can be a limiting factor in endolaryngeal and endotracheal surgery. Tubeless jet ventilation can overcome this problem and provides an unlimited operation field to the surgeon. Since the development of first jet ventilation systems, many modifications have been performed and are used permanently in daily clinical routine. The aim of this work is to provide an overview of widely used jet ventilation systems and furthermore to list all advantages, as well as disadvantages of this technique in laryngotracheal surgery.

  6. Impeller for Water Jet Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center engineers helped North American Marine Jet (NAMJ), Inc. improve the proposed design of a new impeller for jet propulsion system. With a three-dimensional computer model of the new marine jet engine blades, engineers were able to quickly create a solid ploycarbonate model of it. The rapid prototyping allowed the company to avoid many time-consuming and costly steps in creating the impeller.

  7. Recurrence plots revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casdagli, M. C.

    1997-09-01

    We show that recurrence plots (RPs) give detailed characterizations of time series generated by dynamical systems driven by slowly varying external forces. For deterministic systems we show that RPs of the time series can be used to reconstruct the RP of the driving force if it varies sufficiently slowly. If the driving force is one-dimensional, its functional form can then be inferred up to an invertible coordinate transformation. The same results hold for stochastic systems if the RP of the time series is suitably averaged and transformed. These results are used to investigate the nonlinear prediction of time series generated by dynamical systems driven by slowly varying external forces. We also consider the problem of detecting a small change in the driving force, and propose a surrogate data technique for assessing statistical significance. Numerically simulated time series and a time series of respiration rates recorded from a subject with sleep apnea are used as illustrative examples.

  8. Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) is a common cause of significant morbidity in women in all strata of society affecting millions of women worldwide. Previously, RVVC occurrence was limited by onset of menopause but the widespread use of hormone replacement therapy has extended the at-risk period. Candida albicans remains the dominant species responsible for RVVC, however optimal management of RVVC requires species determination and effective treatment measures are best if species-specific. Considerable progress has been made in understanding risk factors that determine susceptibility to RVVC, particularly genetic factors, as well as new insights into normal vaginal defense immune mechanisms and their aberrations in RVVC. While effective control of RVVC is achievable with the use of fluconazole maintenance suppressive therapy, cure of RVVC remains elusive especially in this era of fluconazole drug resistance. Vaccine development remains a critical challenge and need.

  9. Ink Jet Printing for Silicon Photovoltaics: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-00139

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D. S.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to combine the strengths of NREL and Evergreen Solar in the area of ink jet printing to develop a new manufacturing technology necessary to produce Si solar cells based on ribbon technology comparable to or exceeding current technologies.

  10. Sunlight is an important causative factor of recurrent herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the role of exposure to solar UV radiation (UVR) in primary and recurrent herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, we investigated the self-reported cause of infection among diagnosed patients in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Among 4295 infected patients, 3678 had HSV-1, and 2656 of those patients (72.2%) had a recurrent flare-up. Fatigue was the most commonly reported cause of a flare-up among all patients, followed by the common cold and sun exposure. Sun-induced HSV-1 flare-up was reported by 10.4% of the total study population. However, this increased to 19.7% among patients diagnosed in July and August, to 28% among patients younger than 30 years diagnosed in July and August, and to 40% among patients younger than 30 years diagnosed in July and August with a recurrent infection. These results suggest the important role of solar UVR in the development of recurrent HSV-1, possibly due to UVR-induced immunosuppression or direct reactivation of HSV-1 in the neural ganglia.

  11. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  12. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  13. Cyanogen jets in comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, Michael F.; Hoban, Susan; Birch, Peter V.; Bowers, Craig; Martin, Ralph; Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III

    1986-01-01

    Emission-band and continuum data were obtained of Comet Halley with a CCD camera system at the Perth Observatory during the post-perihelion phase. The image processing techniques which were applied and which revealed jets in the CN band are described. The jets had a spiral shape due to nucleus rotation at a rate which was not precisely determined. Estimates are made of the FWHM and half-width half-maximum spatial extent of the jets. Possible parent molecules of the CN jets are discussed.

  14. Triggering of Solar Magnetic Eruptions on Various Size Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2010-01-01

    Solar eruptions occur on many different scales. (Schrijver 2010: bipole eruptions more frequent as size decreases.) Trigger might be any of several different candidates, working independently or in tandem. How about larger scales than (solar) CMEs? (Stellar eruptions.) How about smaller scales than X-ray jets? (Spicules? Moore 1989)

  15. A users evaluation of SAMIS. [Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    SAMIS, the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation computer program was developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) to provide a method whereby manufacturers or potential manufacturers of photovoltaics could simulate a solar industry using their own particular approach. This paper analyzes the usefulness of SAMIS to a growing photovoltaic industry and clearly illustrates its limitations as viewed by an industrial user.

  16. A users evaluation of SAMIS. [Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    SAMIS, the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation computer program was developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) to provide a method whereby manufacturers or potential manufacturers of photovoltaics could simulate a solar industry using their own particular approach. This paper analyzes the usefulness of SAMIS to a growing photovoltaic industry and clearly illustrates its limitations as viewed by an industrial user.

  17. Small-scale chromospheric jets above a sunspot light bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Rohan E.; Beck, Christian; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Context. The chromosphere above sunspot umbrae and penumbrae shows several different types of fast dynamic events such as running penumbral waves, umbral flashes, and penumbral microjets. Aims: The aim of this paper is to identify the physical driver responsible for the dynamic and small-scale chromospheric jets above a sunspot light bridge. Methods: High-resolution broadband filtergrams of active region NOAA 11271 in Ca ii H and G band were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We identified the jets in the Ca ii H images using a semi-automatic routine and determined their length and orientation. We applied local correlation tracking (LCT) to the G-band images to obtain the photospheric horizontal velocity field. The magnetic field topology was derived from a Milne-Eddington inversion of a simultaneous scan with the Spectropolarimeter. Results: The chromospheric jets consist of a bright, triangular-shaped blob that lies on the light bridge, while the apex of this blob extends into a spike-like structure that is bright against the dark umbral background. Most of the jets have apparent lengths of less than 1000 km and about 30% of the jets have lengths between 1000-1600 km. The jets are oriented within ±35° to the normal of the spine of the light bridge. Most of them are clustered near the central part of the light bridge within a 2'' area. The jets are seen to move rapidly along the light bridge and many of them cannot be identified in successive images taken with a 2 min cadence. The jets are primarily located on one side of the light bridge and are directed into the umbral core. The Stokes profiles at or close to the location of the blobs on the LB exhibit both a significant net circular polarization and multiple components, including opposite-polarity lobes. The magnetic field diverges from the light bridge towards the umbral cores that it separates. The LCT reveals that in the photosphere there is a predominantly uni-directional flow with

  18. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  19. Treatment of juvenile recurrent parotitis.

    PubMed

    Katz, Philippe; Hartl, Dana M; Guerre, Agnès

    2009-12-01

    Juvenile recurrent parotitis (JRP) can be a debilitating illness in children. Knowing how to recognize and diagnose it for early treatment avoids recurrences that could lead to significant destruction of the glandular parenchyma. This article discusses the various therapeutic modalities proposed in the literature (medical treatment or sialendoscopy) and describes the authors' treatment of choice of combining antibiotics and iodinated oil sialography.

  20. Recurrent Bell's palsy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A D

    1990-09-01

    A case of recurrent Bell's palsy occurring in two successive pregnancies in a 37-year-old woman is presented. The causes of facial nerve paralysis of the lower motor neurone type are discussed. The rate of recurrence of Bell's palsy during pregnancy is unknown. Treatment with corticosteroids of Bell's palsy during pregnancy poses the threat of possible side effects on the fetus.

  1. Nocturnal lagophthalmos and recurrent erosion.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, G. D.

    1976-01-01

    The symptoms and corneal changes caused by sleeping with one or both eyes open are described in 102 patients. The clinical picture is identical to that of the microform recurrent erosion. The close relationship between the micro- and macro-forms of recurrent corneal erosion suggests that the latter condition is also precipitated by nocturnal lagophthalmos. Images PMID:1268178

  2. Solar Cookers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of solar cookers in the science classroom. Includes instructions for construction of a solar cooker, an explanation of how solar cookers work, and a number of suggested activities. (DS)

  3. Instabilities in astrophysical jets. II - Numerical simulations of slab jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael L.; Sulkanen, Martin E.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an unstable supersonic slab-symmetric jet are described. The instabilities within the jet are characterized by growing internal body waves and their coupled surface waves that are also predicted in linear perturbation theory. The characteristic theory of fluid dynamics is used to help interpret the wave morphologies. It is demonstrated that these waves can be excited by imposing an arbitrary disturbance. From the numerical simulations, it is found that the sound waves propagating against the flow slow down as they propagate outward, and they grow in amplitude. These waves eventually disrupt the jet at a certain length. This disruption length is related to the jet Mach number and the perturbation intensity. Thus, the Mach number of a jet observed with a radio telescope can be estimated by measuring the disruption length and estimating the perturbation intensity. The jet Mach numbers in radio tailed sources determined in this way agree quite well with estimates from ram pressure bending arguments. The wiggles and flares observed in many extragalactic jets, especially in tailed radio sources, appear to be intimately related to instabilities and the jet disruption process.

  4. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Natalie Rose; Saleh, Dahlia; Miller, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from idiopathic benign causes to inherited fever syndromes, to connective tissue disease, or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A thorough history and review of systems can assist the clinician in determining whether it is related to a systemic inflammatory process or truly idiopathic. Management of aphthous stomatitis is challenging. For recurrent aphthous stomatitis or recalcitrant aphthous stomatitis from underlying disease, first-line treatment consists of topical medications with use of systemic medications as necessary. Herein, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment ladder of aphthous stomatitis as described in the literature.

  5. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Dahlia; Miller, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from idiopathic benign causes to inherited fever syndromes, to connective tissue disease, or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A thorough history and review of systems can assist the clinician in determining whether it is related to a systemic inflammatory process or truly idiopathic. Management of aphthous stomatitis is challenging. For recurrent aphthous stomatitis or recalcitrant aphthous stomatitis from underlying disease, first-line treatment consists of topical medications with use of systemic medications as necessary. Herein, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment ladder of aphthous stomatitis as described in the literature. PMID:28360966

  6. Control of asymmetric jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chih-Ming

    1992-06-01

    A passive method of enhancing the rate of entrainment by as much as 500 percent in subsonic open nozzle flows has been obtained by modifying axisymmetric nozzle geometry to a 2:1 aspect-ratio elliptic nozzle. Small aspect-ratio elliptical nozzles have been demonstrated to more efficiently control mixing processes and to exhibit increased rates of spreading, entrainment, and fine-scale mixing than axisymmetric nozzles at subsonic and supersonic conditions in a confined dump combustor and in high-temperature ramjets. Vortex self-induction is the principle mechanism controlling mixing processes in asymmetric jet nozzles.

  7. Lear jet telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Dix, M. G.; Hitchman, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The telescope system was designed as a multi-user facility for observations of celestial objects at infrared wavelengths, where ground-based observations are difficult or impossible due to the effects of telluric atmospheric absorption. The telescope is mounted in a Lear jet model 24B which typically permits 70 min. of observing per flight at altitudes in excess of 45,000 ft (13 km). Telescope system installation is discussed, along with appropriate setup and adjustment procedures. Operation of the guidance system is also explained, and checklists are provided which pertain to the recommended safe operating and in-flight trouble-shooting procedures for the equipment.

  8. Boosted Jets at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Jets are collimated streams of high-energy particles ubiquitous at any particle collider experiment and serve as proxy for the production of elementary particles at short distances. As the Large Hadron Collider at CERN continues to extend its reach to ever higher energies and luminosities, an increasingly important aspect of any particle physics analysis is the study and identification of jets, electroweak bosons, and top quarks with large Lorentz boosts. In addition to providing a unique insight into potential new physics at the tera-electron volt energy scale, high energy jets are a sensitive probe of emergent phenomena within the Standard Model of particle physics and can teach us an enormous amount about quantum chromodynamics itself. Jet physics is also invaluable for lower-level experimental issues including triggering and background reduction. It is especially important for the removal of pile-up, which is radiation produced by secondary proton collisions that contaminates every hard proton collision event in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. In this talk, I will review the myriad ways that jets and jet physics are being exploited at the Large Hadron Collider. This will include a historical discussion of jet algorithms and the requirements that these algorithms must satisfy to be well-defined theoretical objects. I will review how jets are used in searches for new physics and ways in which the substructure of jets is being utilized for discriminating backgrounds from both Standard Model and potential new physics signals. Finally, I will discuss how jets are broadening our knowledge of quantum chromodynamics and how particular measurements performed on jets manifest the universal dynamics of weakly-coupled conformal field theories.

  9. Solar energy: Account of a mission to the USA from 27 April to 3 May 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, J. P.; Genier, R.; Roche, M.

    1982-05-01

    The state of progress of the Solar One solar tower is described. The parabolic collectors program of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is outlined. The Los Alamos National Laboratory research program on the geothermal characteristics of dry rocks is summarized. The ASME solar energy conference is mentioned.

  10. A universal model for solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter F.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-04-01

    Magnetically driven eruptions on the Sun, from stellar-scale coronal mass ejections to small-scale coronal X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet jets, have frequently been observed to involve the ejection of the highly stressed magnetic flux of a filament. Theoretically, these two phenomena have been thought to arise through very different mechanisms: coronal mass ejections from an ideal (non-dissipative) process, whereby the energy release does not require a change in the magnetic topology, as in the kink or torus instability; and coronal jets from a resistive process involving magnetic reconnection. However, it was recently concluded from new observations that all coronal jets are driven by filament ejection, just like large mass ejections. This suggests that the two phenomena have physically identical origin and hence that a single mechanism may be responsible, that is, either mass ejections arise from reconnection, or jets arise from an ideal instability. Here we report simulations of a coronal jet driven by filament ejection, whereby a region of highly sheared magnetic field near the solar surface becomes unstable and erupts. The results show that magnetic reconnection causes the energy release via ‘magnetic breakout’—a positive-feedback mechanism between filament ejection and reconnection. We conclude that if coronal mass ejections and jets are indeed of physically identical origin (although on different spatial scales) then magnetic reconnection (rather than an ideal process) must also underlie mass ejections, and that magnetic breakout is a universal model for solar eruptions.

  11. A Universal Model for Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyper, Peter F.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Devore, C. Richard

    2017-01-01

    Magnetically driven eruptions on the Sun, from stellar-scale coronal mass ejections1 to small-scale coronal X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet jets, have frequently been observed to involve the ejection of the highly stressed magnetic flux of a filament. Theoretically, these two phenomena have been thought to arise through very different mechanisms: coronal mass ejections from an ideal (non-dissipative) process, whereby the energy release does not require a change in the magnetic topology, as in the kink or torus instability; and coronal jets from a resistive process, involving magnetic reconnection. However, it was recently concluded from new observations that all coronal jets are driven by filament ejection, just like large mass ejections. This suggests that the two phenomena have physically identical origin and hence that a single mechanism may be responsible, that is, either mass ejections arise from reconnection, or jets arise from an ideal instability. Here we report simulations of a coronal jet driven by filament ejection, whereby a region of highly sheared magnetic field near the solar surface becomes unstable and erupts. The results show that magnetic reconnection causes the energy release via 'magnetic breakout', a positive feedback mechanism between filament ejection and reconnection. We conclude that if coronal mass ejections and jets are indeed of physically identical origin (although on different spatial scales) then magnetic reconnection (rather than an ideal process) must also underlie mass ejections, and that magnetic breakout is a universal model for solar eruptions.

  12. Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a multiwavelength analysis of 20 EUV jets which occurred at the periphery of active regions close to sunspots. We discuss the physical parameters of the jets and their relation with other phenomena such as Hα surges, nonthermal type-III radio bursts and hard X-ray (HXR) emission. Methods: These jets were observed between August 2010 and June 2013 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument that is onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). We selected events that were observed on the solar disk within +/-60° latitude. Using AIA wavelength channels that are sensitive to coronal temperatures, we studied the temperature distribution in the jets using the line of sight (LOS) differential emission measure (DEM) technique. We also investigated the role of the photospheric magnetic field using the LOS magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. Results: It has been observed that most of the jets originated from the western periphery of active regions. Their lifetimes range from 5 to 39 min with an average of 18 min and their velocities range from 87 to 532 km s-1 with an average of 271 km s-1. All the jets are co-temporally associated with Hα surges. Most of the jets are co-temporal with nonthermal type-III radio bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES spacecraft in the frequency range from 20 kHz to 13 MHz. We confirm the source region of these bursts using the potential field source surface (PFSS) technique. Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations, we found that half of the jets produced HXR emission and they often shared the same source region as the HXR emission (6-12 keV). Ten out of 20 events showed that the jets originated in a region of flux cancellation and six jets in a region of flux emergence. Four events showed flux emergence and then cancellation during the jet evolution. DEM analyses showed that for most of the spires of the jets, the DEM peaked at around log

  13. Recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis of human motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josiński, Henryk; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Świtoński, Adam; Szczesna, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The authors present exemplary application of recurrence plots, cross recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis for the purpose of exploration of experimental time series describing selected aspects of human motion. Time series were extracted from treadmill gait sequences which were recorded in the Human Motion Laboratory (HML) of the Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology in Bytom, Poland by means of the Vicon system. Analysis was focused on the time series representing movements of hip, knee, ankle and wrist joints in the sagittal plane.

  14. Launching and propagation of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh

    2013-07-01

    We present resistive MHD simulations of jet launching and propagation using the PLUTO code. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? We investigate the jet-disk interaction applying different profiles of the disk magnetic diffusivity and derive the corresponding accretion and ejection rates for bipolar outflows. We determine the launching disk area of the fast component of protostellar jets. We further investigate numerically symmetry aspects of jet and counter jet. Finally, we present a model explaining the observationally indicated jet rotation by MHD shocks of the helical magnetic field in the propagating jet.

  15. Constraining reconnection region conditions using imaging and spectroscopic analysis of a coronal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean; Kankelborg, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets typically appear as thin, collimated structures in EUV and X-ray wavelengths, and are understood to be initiated by magnetic reconnection in the lower corona or upper chromosphere. Plasma that is heated and accelerated upward into coronal jets may therefore carry indirect information on conditions in the reconnection region and current sheet located at the jet base. On 2017 October 14, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observed a series of jet eruptions originating from NOAA AR 12599. The jet structure has a length-to-width ratio that exceeds 50, and remains remarkably straight throughout its evolution. Several times during the observation bright blobs of plasma are seen to erupt upward, ascending and subsequently descending along the structure. These blobs are cotemporal with footpoint and arcade brightenings, which we believe indicates multiple episodes of reconnection at the structure base. Through imaging and spectroscopic analysis of jet and footpoint plasma we determine a number of properties, including the line-of-sight inclination, the temperature and density structure, and lift-off velocities and accelerations of jet eruptions. We use these properties to constrain the geometry of the jet structure and conditions in reconnection region.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  18. Latest results from jet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A first stage in understanding the phenomenon of jet quenching in the hot and dense nuclear matter has been successfully reached at RHIC through measurements of inclusive hadron suppression and di-hadron azimuthal correlations. A significant step forward in this field is being obtained by full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions, that in principle should give access to the energy of the hard scattering independent of the presence of the medium and should enable the study of jet quenching at the partonic level. Due to the intrinsic difficulties of such a measurement in the high multiplicity environment, this is an innovative analysis and the first results of full jet reconstruction were obtained only over the last year thanks to the recently developed jet-finding techniques. We discuss the current methods to treat the large background, which is the main critical aspect that makes full jet reconstruction a challenge at RHIC. New measurements directed to address the mechanisms of partonic energy loss in hot QCD matter are presented. These measurements include the ratio of inclusive jet cross sections in Au+Au and p+p and the comparison of jet fragmentation functions in Au+Au and p+p.

  19. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  20. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.