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Sample records for recurrent thyroid cancer

  1. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  3. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyung; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Kyu Sun; Baek, Seon Mi; Lee, Younghen; Chong, Semin; Sim, Jung Suk; Huh, Jung Yin; Bae, Jae-Ik; Kim, Kyung Tae; Han, Song Yee; Bae, Min Young; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-01-01

    Thermal ablation using radiofrequency is a new, minimally invasive modality employed as an alternative to surgery in patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the optimal use of radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies, and expert consensus. PMID:22438678

  5. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  6. Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer after optimized surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after optimized surgery requires a full understanding of the disease, especially as it has changed in the last 15 years, what comprises optimized surgery, and the different types and implications of disease relapse that can be encountered. PTC has evolved to tumors that are much smaller than previously seen, largely due to various high quality imaging studies obtained for different reasons, but serendipitously identifying thyroid nodules that prove to be papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC). With rare exception, these cancers are cured by conservative surgery without additional therapy, and seldom result in recurrent disease. PTC is highly curable in 85% of cases because of its rather innocent biologic behavior. Therefore, the shift in emphasis from disease survival to recurrence is appropriate. As a result of three technologic advances—high-resolution ultrasound (US), recombinant TSH, and highly sensitive thyroglobulin (Tg)—disease relapse can be discovered when it is subclinical. Endocrinologists who largely control administration of radioactive iodine have used it to ablate barely detectable or even biochemically apparent disease, hoping to reduce recurrence and perhaps improve survival. Surgeons, in response to this new intense postoperative surveillance that has uncovered very small volume disease, have responded by utilizing US preoperatively to image this disease, and incorporated varying degrees of lymphadenectomy into their initial treatment algorithm. Bilateral thyroid resection—either total or near-total thyroidectomy—remains the standard for PTC >1 cm, although recent data has re-emphasized the value of unilateral lobectomy in treating even some PTC measuring 1-4 cm. Therapeutic lymphadenectomy has universal approval, but when lymph nodes in the central neck are not worrisome to the surgeon’s intraoperative assessment, although that judgment in incorrect up to 50%, whether they should be excised

  7. Evaluation of Thyroid Bed Nodules on Ultrasonography after Total Thyroidectomy: Risk for Loco-Regional Recurrence of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Chitra; Wartofsky, Leonard; Tefera, Eshetu; Burman, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who underwent total thyroidectomy to examine the correlation of the persistence of thyroid bed nodules seen on ultrasonography with subsequent loco-regional recurrence. Methods A total of 60 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were identified who underwent total thyroidectomy, received 131I therapy and had thyroid bed nodules on postoperative surveillance ultrasonography. The ultrasonographic features of the thyroid bed nodules and their progression over time along with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were monitored. Those patients who demonstrated no evidence of recurrence were compared to patients who had recurrence. Results Of the 60 patients, 25% had documented cancer recurrence. Sixty percent of the patients in the recurrence group had an increase in the size of bed nodules as compared to only 7% of the patients in the group without recurrence. An increase in serum Tg of more than 2-fold was seen in 80% of the patients with recurrence and in only 13% (6/45) of the patients without cancer recurrence. The odds of identifying recurrent thyroid cancer in patients with more than a 2-fold increase in serum Tg were 80.5 greater than in patients with a less than 2-fold increase in serum Tg. The odds of identifying recurrent thyroid cancer in patients with the presence of any suspicious thyroid bed nodule were 31.5 times greater than in patients without suspicious thyroid bed nodules. Conclusions Thyroid bed nodules on surveillance ultrasound warrant fine-needle aspiration cytology if they increase in size and number, are persistent and associated with suspicious sonographic features. PMID:26279996

  8. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  9. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  10. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  11. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  12. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  13. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  14. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  15. Charcoal tattoo localization for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence in the central compartment of the neck.

    PubMed

    Soprani, F; Bondi, F; Puccetti, M; Armaroli, V

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer can often require further surgical options. Reoperations may carry significant risk of surgical complications; additionally, as the anatomy is subverted, there is the possibility of leaving residual neoplasm. In order to avoid such problems during reoperation for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence, we have introduced the technique of preoperative ultrasound-guided tattooing localization of the lymphatic structure to be removed with a 4% solution of active charcoal. Using ultrasound guidance, the lesion is identified and 0.5-2 ml of colloidal charcoal is injected near the lesion. The extraction of the needle is accompanied by injection at constant pressure of other charcoal as to leave a trace of colouring along the path of the needle up to the skin. The preoperative injection was well tolerated in all cases. In the last 5 years, we have used this technique in 13 patients with suspected recurrence in the central compartment (all from papillary carcinomas). Postoperative ultrasound and histological examination confirmed the removal of the lesion in all patients; in one case, the lesion was a parathyroid cyst. Complications were observed in two of 13 (15.4%) cases (one transitory hypoparathyroidism, and one transitory vocal cord paresis). Considering our experience, charcoal tattoo localization can be considered a safe, low-cost technique that is extremely useful for facilitating surgical procedures, and reduces the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  16. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-02-01

    Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients.This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II-VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan-Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS).Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72-12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458-3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan-Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation.The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut-off values may prove

  17. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients. This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II–VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan–Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS). Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72–12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458–3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan–Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation. The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut

  18. Aberrant expression of COT is related to recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Lee, Eun Jig; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-02-01

    Aberrant expression of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Oncogene mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (COT) (MAP3K8) is a driver of resistance to B-RAF inhibition. However, the de novo expression and clinical implications of COT in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) have not been investigated.The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of A-, B-, C-RAF, and COT in PTC (n = 167) and analyze the clinical implications of aberrant expression of these genes.Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed on primary thyroid cancers. Expression of COT was compared with clinicopathological characteristics including recurrence-free survival. Datasets from public repository (NCBI) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA).qPCR data showed that the relative mRNA expression of A-, B-, C-RAF and COT of PTC were higher than normal tissues (all P < 0.01). In addition, the expression of COT mRNA in PTC showed positive correlation with A- (r = 0.4083, P < 0.001), B- (r = 0.2773, P = 0.0003), and C-RAF (r = 0.5954, P < 0.001). The mRNA expressions of A-, B,- and C-RAF were also correlated with each other (all P < 0.001). In IHC, the staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were higher in PTC than in normal tissue (P < 0.001). Interestingly, moderate-to-strong staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were more frequent in B-RAF-positive PTC (P < 0.001, P = 0.013, respectively). In addition, aberrant expression of COT was related to old age at initial diagnosis (P = 0.045) and higher recurrence rate (P = 0.025). In multivariate analysis, tumor recurrence was persistently associated with moderate-to-strong staining of COT after adjusting for age, sex, extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, T-stage, N-stage, TNM stage, and B-RAF mutation (odds ratio, 4.662; 95% confidence interval 1.066 - 21.609; P = 0.045). Moreover, moderate-to-strong COT expression in PTC

  19. Aberrant Expression of COT Is Related to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Lee, Eun Jig; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant expression of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Oncogene mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (COT) (MAP3K8) is a driver of resistance to B-RAF inhibition. However, the de novo expression and clinical implications of COT in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) have not been investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of A-, B-, C-RAF, and COT in PTC (n = 167) and analyze the clinical implications of aberrant expression of these genes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed on primary thyroid cancers. Expression of COT was compared with clinicopathological characteristics including recurrence-free survival. Datasets from public repository (NCBI) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). qPCR data showed that the relative mRNA expression of A-, B-, C-RAF and COT of PTC were higher than normal tissues (all P < 0.01). In addition, the expression of COT mRNA in PTC showed positive correlation with A- (r = 0.4083, P < 0.001), B- (r = 0.2773, P = 0.0003), and C-RAF (r = 0.5954, P < 0.001). The mRNA expressions of A-, B,- and C-RAF were also correlated with each other (all P < 0.001). In IHC, the staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were higher in PTC than in normal tissue (P < 0.001). Interestingly, moderate-to-strong staining intensities of B-RAF and COT were more frequent in B-RAFV600E-positive PTC (P < 0.001, P = 0.013, respectively). In addition, aberrant expression of COT was related to old age at initial diagnosis (P = 0.045) and higher recurrence rate (P = 0.025). In multivariate analysis, tumor recurrence was persistently associated with moderate-to-strong staining of COT after adjusting for age, sex, extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, T-stage, N-stage, TNM stage, and B-RAFV600E mutation (odds ratio, 4.662; 95% confidence interval 1.066 − 21.609; P = 0.045). Moreover, moderate

  20. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research.

  1. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research. PMID:22514922

  2. F18-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer: a systematic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haslerud, Torjan; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Reisæter, Lars; Küfner Lein, Regina; Heinecke, Achim; Varhaug, Jan Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluor-18-deoxy-glucose (FDG) is widely used for diagnosing recurrent or metastatic disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Purpose To assess the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET for DTC in patients after ablative therapy. Material and Methods A systematic search was conducted in Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Open Grey looking for all English-language original articles on the performance of FDG-PET in series of at least 20 patients with DTC having undergone ablative therapy including total thyroidectomy. Diagnostic performance measures were pooled using Reitsma’s bivariate model. Results Thirty-four publications between 1996 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 79.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73.9–84.1) and 79.4% (95% CI, 71.2–85.4), respectively, with an area under the curve of 0.858. Conclusion F18-FDG-PET is a useful method for detecting recurrent DTC in patients having undergone ablative therapy. PMID:26163534

  3. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Laryngoscopy (looking inside the throat using a mirror or flexible tube called a laryngoscope placed through ... It may be performed by: Aiming external beam (x-ray) radiation at the thyroid Taking radioactive iodine by ...

  4. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. MTC is very rare. It can occur in children and adults. Unlike other types ...

  5. Protection and Dissection of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve in Salvage Thyroid Cancer Surgery to Patients with Insufficient Primary Operation Extent and Suspicious Residual Tumor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Nai-Song

    2015-01-01

    Some thyroid cancer patients undergone insufficient tumor removal in the primary surgery in China . our aim is to evaluate the impact of dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during a salvage thyroid cancer operation in these patients to prevent nerve injury. Clinical data of 49 enrolled patients who received a salvage thyroid operation were retrospectively reviewed. Primary pathology was thyroid papillary cancer. The initial procedure performed included nodulectomy (20 patients), partial thyroidectomy (19 patients) and subtotal thyroidectomy (10 patients). The effect of dissection and protection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the mechanism of nerve injury were studied. The cervical courses of the recurrent laryngeal nerves were successfully dissected in all cases. Nerves were adherent to or involved by scars in 22 cases. Three were ligated near the place where the nerve entered the larynx, while another three were cut near the intersection of inferior thyroid artery with the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Light hoarseness occurred to four patients without a preoperative voice change. In conclusion, accurate primary diagnosis allows for a sufficient primary operation to be performed, avoiding insufficient tumor removal that requires a secondary surgery. The most important cause of nerve damage resulted from not identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve during first surgery , and meticulous dissection during salvage surgery was the most efficient method to avoid nerve damage. PMID:26625744

  6. The Delayed Risk Stratification System in the Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Walczyk, Agnieszka; Pałyga, Iwona; Gąsior-Perczak, Danuta; Gadawska-Juszczyk, Klaudia; Szymonek, Monika; Trybek, Tomasz; Lizis-Kolus, Katarzyna; Szyska-Skrobot, Dorota; Mikina, Estera; Hurej, Stefan; Słuszniak, Janusz; Mężyk, Ryszard; Góźdź, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Context There has been a marked increase in the detection of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) over the past few years, which has improved the prognosis. However, it is necessary to adjust treatment and monitoring strategies relative to the risk of an unfavourable disease course. Materials and Methods This retrospective study examined data from 916 patients with DTC who received treatment at a single centre between 2000 and 2013. The utility of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the European Thyroid Association (ETA) recommended systems for early assessment of the risk of recurrent/persistent disease was compared with that of the recently recommended delayed risk stratification (DRS) system. Results The PPV and NPV for the ATA (24.59% and 95.42%, respectively) and ETA (24.28% and 95.68%, respectively) were significantly lower than those for the DRS (56.76% and 98.5%, respectively) (p<0.0001). The proportion of variance for predicting the final outcome was 15.8% for ATA, 16.1% for ETA and 56.7% for the DRS. Recurrent disease was rare (1% of patients), and was nearly always identified in patients at intermediate/high risk according to the initial stratification (9/10 cases). Conclusions The DRS showed a better correlation with the risk of persistent disease than the early stratification systems and allows personalisation of follow-up. If clinicians plan to alter the intensity of surveillance, patients at intermediate/high risk according to the early stratification systems should remain within the specialized centers; however, low risk patients can be referred to endocrinologists or other appropriate practitioners for long-term follow-up, as these patients remained at low risk after risk re-stratification. PMID:27078258

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  8. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  9. Thyroid Hormone, Cancer, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Chin, Yu-Tan; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Lai, Husan-Yu; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Liu, Leory F; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play important roles in regulating normal metabolism, development, and growth. They also stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Their metabolic and developmental effects and growth effects in normal tissues are mediated primarily by nuclear hormone receptors. A cell surface receptor for the hormone on integrin [alpha]vβ3 is the initiation site for effects on tumor cells. Clinical hypothyroidism may retard cancer growth, and hyperthyroidism was recently linked to the prevalence of certain cancers. Local levels of thyroid hormones are controlled through activation and deactivation of iodothyronine deiodinases in different organs. The relative activities of different deiodinases that exist in tissues or organs also affect the progression and development of specific types of cancers. In this review, the effects of thyroid hormone on signaling pathways in breast, brain, liver, thyroid, and colon cancers are discussed. The importance of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and of the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin [alpha]vβ3 as potential cancer risk factors and therapeutic targets are addressed. We analyze the intracellular signaling pathways activated by thyroid hormones in cancer progression in hyperthyroidism or at physiological concentrations in the euthyroid state. Determining how to utilize the deaminated thyroid hormone analog (tetrac), and its nanoparticulate derivative to reduce risks of cancer progression, enhance therapeutic outcomes, and prevent cancer recurrence is also deliberated. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1221-1237, 2016. PMID:27347891

  10. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  11. Scans Not Worthwhile for Most Thyroid Cancers: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160009.html Scans Not Worthwhile for Most Thyroid Cancers: Study Doctors found checking for recurrences with ... News) -- Having scans after treatment does not improve thyroid cancer patients' chances of survival, a new study ...

  12. [Differentiated thyroid cancer -- 2009].

    PubMed

    Konrády, András

    2011-01-30

    Three years ago continental guidelines were published referring management and follow-up of low risk thyroid cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to summarize the changes and new directions in this field. High risk patients require another protocol. Neck ultrasound plays important role in differential diagnosis and in detecting recurrences. Some new ultrasound techniques are discussed, too. FDG-PET can help to solve the problem of patients having negative scan and increased thyroglobulin level. In recent years there was an expansion of our knowledge about the pathomechanism of thyroid cancer. It appears that genetic alterations frequently play a key role in carcinogenesis. There are molecular methods that allow the detection of these genetic events in thyroid fine needle aspirations samples providing important information for diagnosis, management and prognosis. Instead of diagnostic whole body scanning the posttherapeutic scan became preferable but in high risk cases the diagnostic whole body scintigrams serve useful data. Primary therapy of thyroid cancer is an adequate surgery: total thyreoidectomy and, if necessary, lymph node dissection or limited surgery in selected cases. Nowadays radioguided surgery can help to improve the results. Radioiodine therapy (e.g. rest ablation) proved to be a safe and effective method to complete surgery. It can prevent relapses and results in longer survival. Thyroid hormone withdrawal or recombinant human thyrotropin stimulation can increase thyrotropin level before radioiodine treatment. These two methods have similar success rate of rest ablation but irradiation burden of blood is lower in the case of exogenous stimulation which avoids hypothyroid state and preserves quality of life. Since tumor cells fail to maintain the ability to perform physiological functions they undergo dedifferentiation. Therefore, an important aim is to reactivate some function of differentiated cells, e.g. iodine uptake, production of

  13. Post-PET ultrasound improves specificity of 18F-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer while maintaining sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kråkenes, Jostein; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Heinecke, Achim; Akslen, Lars A; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Brauckhoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluor-18-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) with or without computed tomography (CT) is generally accepted as the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in patients with negative whole body scintigraphy with iodine-131 (I-131). Purpose To assess the potential incremental value of ultrasound (US) over 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Material and Methods Fifty-one consecutive patients with suspected recurrent DTC were prospectively evaluated using the following multimodal imaging protocol: (i) US before PET (pre-US) with or without fine needle biopsy (FNB) of suspicious lesions; (ii) single photon emission computed tomography (≥3 GBq I-131) with co-registered CT (SPECT-CT); (iii) 18F-FDG-PET with co-registered contrast-enhanced CT of the neck; (iv) US in correlation with the other imaging modalities (post-US). Postoperative histology, FNB, and long-term follow-up (median, 2.8 years) were taken as composite gold standard. Results Fifty-eight malignant lesions were identified in 34 patients. Forty lesions were located in the neck or upper mediastinum. On receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, 18F-FDG-PET had a limited lesion-based specificity of 59% at a set sensitivity of 90%. Pre-US had poor sensitivity and specificity of 52% and 53%, respectively, increasing to 85% and 94% on post-US, with knowledge of the PET/CT findings (P < 0.05 vs. PET and pre-US). Multimodal imaging changed therapy in 15 out of 51 patients (30%). Conclusion In patients with suspected recurrent DTC, supplemental targeted US in addition to 18F-FDG-PET-CT increases specificity while maintainin sensitivity, as non-malignant FDG uptake in cervical lesions can be confirmed. PMID:25770086

  14. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  15. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  16. Postoperative recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng‐Hsuan; Kuo, Sheng‐Fong; Hsueh, Chuen; Chao, Tzu‐Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives : The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the features of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) presenting with neck lymph node (LN) metastasis. Methods : The study enrolled 909 patients with PTC who had undergone total thyroidectomy. After a median follow‐up of 14.6 years, 73 (8.0%) patients died of thyroid cancer. A total of 536 patients had the tumor confined to the thyroid (intra‐thyroid), 111 had lymph node (LN) metastasis, 225 showed soft tissue invasion, and 37 had distant metastasis. Results : Compared with the intra‐thyroid group, the group with LN metastases showed larger tumor size, higher postoperative thyroglobulin levels, advanced TNM stage, higher recurrence rates (5.2% vs. 31.5%), and higher disease‐specific mortality (1.3% vs. 12.6%). Of the 111 patients with PTC and LN metastases, 35 (31.5%) were diagnosed with recurrence during a mean follow‐up period of 16.9 ± 0.6 years. Among the 35 patients with recurrent PTC, 14 (40.0%) died of thyroid cancer. The mortality group was characterized by older, mostly male patients who presented with larger initial tumor size compared with survivors. Conclusions : In patients with PTC, the rates of recurrence and cancer mortality were higher in the group with LN metastasis than that in the intra‐thyroid tumor group. J. Surg. Oncol. 2015 111:149–154. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Surgical Oncology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26175314

  17. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  18. Cancer of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 64,300 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.8% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,980 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 637,115 people living with thyroid cancer in ...

  19. Use of imaging tests after primary treatment of thyroid cancer in the United States: population based retrospective cohort study evaluating death and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Wiebel, Jaime L; Guo, Cui; Gay, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the use of imaging tests after primary treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is associated with more treatment for recurrence and fewer deaths from the disease. Design Population based retrospective cohort study. Setting Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database in the United States. Participants 28 220 patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer between 1998 and 2011. The study cohort was followed up to 2013, with a median follow-up of 69 months. Main outcome measures Treatment for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer (additional neck surgery, additional radioactive iodine treatment, or radiotherapy), and deaths due to differentiated thyroid cancer. We conducted propensity score analyses to assess the relation between imaging (neck ultrasound, radioiodine scanning, or positron emission tomography (PET) scanning) and treatment for recurrence (logistic model) and death (Cox proportional hazards model). Results From 1998 until 2011, we saw an increase in incident cancer (rate ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.06), imaging (1.13, 1.12 to 1.13), and treatment for recurrence (1.01, 1.01 to 1.02); the change in death rate was not significant. In multivariable analysis, use of neck ultrasounds increased the likelihood of additional surgery (odds ratio 2.30, 95% confidence interval 2.05 to 2.58) and additional radioactive iodine treatment (1.45, 1.26 to 1.69). Radioiodine scans were associated with additional surgery (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 3.06 to 3.76), additional radioactive iodine treatment (17.83, 14.49 to 22.16), and radiotherapy (1.89, 1.71 to 2.10). Use of PET scans was associated with additional surgery (odds ratio 2.31, 95% confidence interval 2.09 to 2.55), additional radioactive iodine treatment (2.13, 1.89 to 2.40), and radiotherapy (4.98, 4.52 to 5.49). Use of neck ultrasounds or PET scans did not significantly affect disease specific survival (hazard

  20. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) ...

  1. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... some noncancerous childhood conditions Radiation exposure from nuclear plant disasters Radiation given through a vein (through an IV) during medical tests and treatments does not increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer.

  2. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thyroid Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  4. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  5. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  6. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  7. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  8. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... may show a tumor growing from the thyroid gland. A thyroid biopsy makes the diagnosis. An examination of the ... be cured by surgery. Complete removal of the thyroid gland does not prolong the lives of people who ...

  9. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Having too much thyroid hormone (a condition called hyperthyroidism ) can cause a rapid or irregular heartbeat, trouble ... nodules make too much thyroid hormone and cause hyperthyroidism. Nodules that produce increased thyroid hormone are almost ...

  10. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands make hormones. The thyroid uses iodine , a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, ... Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid : The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The ...

  11. [Thyroid cancer. In search of individualized treatment].

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Cavallo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased exponentially around the world (mostly papillary thyroid carcinoma). This growth may reflect the combined effects of increased screening practices, together with changes in risk factors for thyroid cancer. In spite of this, disease specific mortality remained stable in the last three decades. Due to the fact that patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma often have a very good prognosis, with high survival in the long term follow-up compared with other types of carcinomas, there has been no need to change the standard treatment. The mainstays of thyroid cancer treatment are surgery (total or near-total thyroidectomy) with or without the additional administration of radioiodine (131I). These approaches are now in the center of discussion in all global forums. The current trend is to ensure the most effective and less harmful treatment and the most important issue at this point is to individualize patients according to tumor stage and risk of recurrence, to define which patients will benefit of more aggressive therapy and who could be handled with a more conservative approach.

  12. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... look for the gene mutations found in familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Because of this, most of the familial cases of MTC can be prevented or treated early by removing the thyroid gland. Once the disease is discovered in a family, the rest of ...

  13. Thyroid Cancer Statistics | Did You Know?

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid cancer represents the 8th most common cancer in the United States. Did you know that this cancer, located at the base of the throat in the thyroid gland, is highly treatable and usually curable?

  14. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  15. AZD6244 in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  16. An integrated analysis of cancer genes in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Li; Li, Jia; Lv, Zhongwei

    2016-02-01

    Cancer driver genes are commonly mutationally disrupted in cancer, which confers a growth advantage to tumor cells. Recent studies preferentially search for recurrently mutated driver genes across multiple tumor samples, leading to the neglect of low-frequency mutated cancer genes. The present study was conducted to identify cancer‑driving genes in thyroid cancer with two distinct tools, OncodriveFM and Dendrix, which aim to detect neglected driver genes with low mutation frequency. A total of 23,620 somatic mutations generated by whole‑exome sequencing of 446 tumor/normal pairs of thyroid cancer were obtained from TCGA. Variant classification was conducted with Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor (VEP). OncodriveFM and Dendrix were applied to detect driver genes and pathways with statistical evidence. In addition, we analyzed DNA‑methylation status, copy number variation, expression levels and fusion genes among these driver candidates. In total, non‑synonymous mutations accounted for over 55% (13,091/23,620) of the total variants; 53 and 3 driver genes were determined by OncodriveFM and Dendrix, respectively, including 6 recurrently mutated driver genes, such as BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, EIF1AX, KRAS and 47 new genes. A total of 75 pathways with high function impact bias were identified by OncodriveFM. Two genes, FHOD3 and SRP72, were hypomethylated, overexpressed and involved in major deletions in thyroid cancer. Moreover, we identified 91 pairs of fusion genes, 89 of which were new fusion pairs in thyroid cancer. In conclusion, we successfully identified a list of new cancer genes, pathways and fusion genes, providing better insight into the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer. PMID:26718127

  17. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Na'ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-28

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC.

  18. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... isthmus). The thyroid secretes three main hormones: 1) Thyroxine, that contains iodine, needed for growth and metabolism; ... also contains iodine and similar in function to Thyroxine; and 3) Calcitonin, which decreases the concentration of ...

  19. Psychosocial adjustment to recurrent cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahon, S M; Cella, D F; Donovan, M I

    1990-01-01

    This descriptive study of the perceptions and needs of people with recurrent malignancies asks three questions: How do patients describe the meaning of a recurrence of cancer? Do individuals perceive the diagnosis of recurrence and the initial diagnosis of cancer differently? What are the key psychosocial problems associated with recurrent cancer? The theoretical framework was based on Lazarus and Folkman's theory of stress, appraisal, and coping. Subjects completed the Impact of Event Scale (IES), the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale--Self-Report (PAIS), and a semistructured qualitative interview. The interview elicited perceptions of the event of recurrence and differences between the diagnosis of recurrence and the initial diagnosis. The convenience sample included 40 patients diagnosed with recurrent cancer within the last 30 days. Many subjects (78%) reported that the recurrence was more upsetting than the initial diagnosis. Scores on both the IES and the PAIS were high when compared to normative samples of patients with cancer suggesting that this sample of patients experienced a lot of psychological distress as well as problems at home, work, and in their social lives. These concerns often were unknown to caregivers. Although more research is needed, the authors propose that, with more accurate assessment, more effective intervention could be implemented and the quality of life improved for patients with recurrent cancer.

  20. Recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pujade-Lauraine, E; Combe, P

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence still occurs in a majority of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. However, progress in the management has allowed a significant prolongation of survival for relapsing disease. These last years, the field of interest has moved from chemotherapy to targeted therapy which is dominated by anti-angiogenic and anti-PARP agents. It is assumed that platinum-free interval will not remain the main prognostic and predictive criterion in the future, and will be replaced by a multi-factorial approach. This trend for personalization of therapy has highlighted important neglected fields for clinical research such as multi-line (≥3) relapse, frail patients including elderly and symptomatic and supportive measures. PMID:27141075

  1. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems. PMID:27213120

  2. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and radiation fallout from power plant accidents or nuclear weapons. Having had head or neck radiation treatments in childhood is a risk factor for ... should be done using the lowest dose of radiation that still provides a clear ... from nuclear weapons or power plant accidents. For instance, thyroid ...

  3. Thyroid cancer: some basic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wanebo, H.J.; Andrews, W.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    From these data and data from the literature, our recommended treatment for well-differentiated cancer is as follows: For papillary cancer, resection should be adequate to encompass the entire tumor, which in most cases would be complete lobectomy and possibly isthmusectomy. Prophylactic neck dissection is of no value; therapeutic modified neck dissection should be done for stage II disease. Follicular cancer can be treated by lobectomy (for small lesions) or subtotal thyroidectomy. Although total or near-total thyroidectomy may be required in selected patients with large primary cancers or in those with extensive capsular invasion or extrathyroid extension, the number of cases indicating this is small. There were only a few such patients with large primaries requiring total thyroidectomy in this study. Total thyroidectomy is best avoided in most cases. considering the price of hypoparathyroidism and the lack of a significant improvement in survival compared with lesser ablative techniques. Postoperative ablation with iodine-131 did not improve survival in staged patients with papillary cancer (the number of patients with follicular cancer was too small for analysis). Postoperative thyroid suppression by exogenous thyroid hormone postoperatively appeared to improve survival. Although the data were not adequate for evaluation in follicular cancer, there seems to be no reason not to use this postoperatively in high risk patients with either papillary or follicular cancer.

  4. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic References: Thyroid cancer detailed guide What’s new in thyroid cancer research and treatment? Important research ... RAI) therapy. Doctors and researchers are looking for new ways to treat thyroid cancer that are more ...

  5. Expression, clinical significance and mechanism of Slit2 in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-Liang; Qu, Ning; Liao, Tian; Wang, Yu-Long; Wang, Yu; Sun, Guo-Hua; Ji, Qing-Hai

    2016-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. The last decade has seen exciting progress in understanding thyroid cancer molecular pathogenesis. Several major signaling pathways and related molecular derangements have been elucidated, which represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers for thyroid cancer. Based on the molecular biology of thyroid cancer, a series of therapeutic targets have been developed, which provide unprecedented opportunities. Thus, histological characterization of subgroups of patients and the correct molecular characterization of patients are thought to be key aspects for future clinical management of these patients. In the present study, we identified Slit2 as a prognostic marker for thyroid cancer oncogenesis and recurrence. Mechanistically, Slit2 regulated Warburg effect in thyroid cancer cells through regulation of HIF1α and HIF1α transcriptional activity. Taken together, our present data uncovered Slit2 as a novel predictive marker for thyroid cancer. The mechanism study indicated that Slit2 regulated the Warburg effect. Additional study on the function of Slit2 in thyroid cancer is required to provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of oncogenesis and recurrence potential of thyroid cancer.

  6. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer most frequently occurs in premenopausal women. Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates significantly differed between cases and controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in thyroid cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts might play a role in the initiation of thyroid cancer. PMID:23686454

  7. Thyroid Cancer: Role of RET and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Specific thyroid cancer histotypes, such as papillary and medullary thyroid carcinoma, display genetic rearrangements or point mutations of the RET gene, resulting in its oncogenic conversion. The molecular mechanisms mediating RET rearrangement with other genes and the role of partner genes in tumorigenesis have been described. In addition, the RET protein has become a molecular target for medullary thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:24782993

  8. Overview of the 2015 American Thyroid Association guidelines for managing thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Matti, Bashar; Cohen-Hallaleh, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed numerous publications addressing the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this review is to provide a simplified summary of the newly released guidelines by the American Thyroid Association. A systematic approach has been recommended to evaluate a thyroid nodule through clinical assessment, measurement of serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, neck ultrasonography and Fine Needle Aspiration where appropriate. This is followed by cytology analysis using the Bethesda scoring system to detect malignancy. Once diagnosed, thyroid cancers need to be staged and risk stratification needs to be applied to develop further treatment plans. Lastly, several recommendations have been presented to assure proper follow-up and support for thyroid cancer patients regardless of the treatment received. PMID:27607088

  9. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  10. Thyroglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2015-04-15

    Identification of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is becoming increasingly common. Patients usually have an excellent prognosis. Most undergo total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and treatment with suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Patients require long term follow-up which includes measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg). Interpretation of serum Tg requires knowledge of the concurrent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration, as secretion is TSH dependant, and an awareness of the limitations of the methods used to measure it. These limitations include the heterogeneity of Tg in serum, the ability of assays to recognise forms of Tg secreted by a tumour, assay biases and not least the potential for interference in immunoassays for Tg from endogenous thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in patient serum. This review considers what the clinician wants to know and how Tg results can be interpreted in light of an awareness of assay limitations. PMID:25444737

  11. Cediranib Maleate With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands make hormones. The thyroid uses iodine , a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, ... Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid : The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The ...

  13. Glucose-deprivation increases thyroid cancer cells sensitivity to metformin.

    PubMed

    Bikas, Athanasios; Jensen, Kirk; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; McDaniel, Dennis; Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Larin, Olexander; Hoperia, Victoria; Burman, Kenneth D; Boyle, Lisa; Wartofsky, Leonard; Vasko, Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth. We sought to determine if variable glucose concentrations in medium alter the anti-cancer efficacy of metformin. Thyroid cancer cells (FTC133 and BCPAP) were cultured in high-glucose (20 mM) and low-glucose (5 mM) medium before treatment with metformin. Cell viability and apoptosis assays were performed. Expression of glycolytic genes was examined by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunostaining. Metformin inhibited cellular proliferation in high-glucose medium and induced cell death in low-glucose medium. In low-, but not in high-glucose medium, metformin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and oncosis. At micromolar concentrations, metformin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and blocked p-pS6 in low-glucose medium. Metformin increased the rate of glucose consumption from the medium and prompted medium acidification. Medium supplementation with glucose reversed metformin-inducible morphological changes. Treatment with an inhibitor of glycolysis (2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG)) increased thyroid cancer cell sensitivity to metformin. The combination of 2-DG with metformin led to cell death. Thyroid cancer cell lines were characterized by over-expression of glycolytic genes, and metformin decreased the protein level of pyruvate kinase muscle 2 (PKM2). PKM2 expression was detected in recurrent thyroid cancer tissue samples. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the glucose concentration in the cellular milieu is a factor modulating metformin's anti-cancer activity. These data suggest that the combination of metformin with inhibitors of glycolysis could represent a new strategy for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  14. Unusual metastases of thyroid cancer to mediastinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong Yun; Moadel, Renee; Freeman, Leonard M

    2015-01-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer is a rare thyroid cancer, accounts for approximately 5% of all thyroid cancer cases, and is associated with a poor prognosis. It commonly metastasizes to regional lymph nodes, lung, and bones. We present a patient with poorly differentiated thyroid cancer with unusual extensive spread to mediastinal blood vessels.

  15. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  16. Novel Approaches in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kun-Tai; Yu, Xiao-Min; Audhya, Anjon W.; Jaume, Juan C.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Prolla, Tomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), accounting for less than 2% of all thyroid cancer, is responsible for the majority of death from all thyroid malignancies and has a median survival of 6 months. The resistance of ATC to conventional thyroid cancer therapies, including radioiodine and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression, contributes to the very poor prognosis of this malignancy. This review will cover several cellular signaling pathways and mechanisms, including RET/PTC, RAS, BRAF, Notch, p53, and histone deacetylase, which are identified to play roles in the transformation and dedifferentiation process, and therapies that target these pathways. Lastly, novel approaches and agents involving the Notch1 pathway, nuclear factor κB, Trk-fused gene, cancer stem-like cells, mitochondrial mutation, and tumor immune microenvironment are discussed. With a better understanding of the biological process and treatment modality, the hope is to improve ATC outcome in the future. PMID:25260367

  17. The 'rings of fire' and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Duntas, Leonidas H; Doumas, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have revealed an increased incidence of thyroid cancer in volcanic areas around the world. Hawaii and the Philippines on the rim of the Pacific Ocean, where the greatest number of volcanoes are located at convergent plate boundaries, are among the regions with the highest incidence of thyroid carcinoma worldwide. Iceland is another region also rich in volcanoes in which the highest incidence of thyroid cancer in Europe is found. The common denominator of these regions is their numerous volcanoes and the fact that several constituents of volcanic lava have been postulated as being involved in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. This article aims at presenting pertinent data that could link a volcanic environment to thyroid cancer. PMID:20045797

  18. Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Patients Following Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Weiss, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients following thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer, although a potentially straightforward clinical problem, can present the clinician and patient with a variety of challenges. Most often the problems are related to the dose and preparation of thyroid hormone (TH) to use. Some patients feel less well following thyroidectomy and/or radioiodine ablation than they did before their diagnosis. We present evidence that levothyroxine (L-T4) is the preparation of choice, and keeping the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between detectable and 0.1 mU/L should be the standard of care in most cases. In unusual circumstances, when the patient remains clinically hypothyroid despite a suppressed TSH, we acknowledge there may be as yet unidentified factors influencing the body’s response to TH, and individualized therapy may be necessary in such patients. PMID:26886951

  19. Lenvatinib: Role in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in treatment of advanced thyroid cancers, prognoses remain poor. Treatment of advanced, progressive disease remains challenging, with limited treatment options. Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib, and lenvatinib, which are now FDA-approved for thyroid cancer, have shown clinical benefit in advanced thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib is approved for treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). It has been studied in phase II and III trials for treatment of advanced RAI-refractory DTC, and in a phase II trial for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Lenvatinib targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptors 1-4 (FGFR-1-4), RET, c-kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Its antitumor activity may be due to antiangiogenic properties and direct antitumor effects. Lenvatinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in a variety of solid tumors, including MTC, in phase I and II clinical trials. In a phase II study in advanced RAI-refractory DTC, lenvatinib-treated patients achieved a 50% response rate (RR), with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12.6 months. In a phase III trial in RAI-refractory DTC, median PFS in lenvatinib-treated patients was 18.3 months, with a 65% overall RR, versus 3.6 months in placebo-treated patients, with a 2% RR. Adverse events occurring in >50% of patients included hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue/asthenia, and decreased appetite. Lenvatinib is a promising new agent for treatment of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. PMID:26678514

  20. Unusual CNS presentation of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Heery, Christopher R; Engelhard, Herbert H; Slavin, Konstantin V; Michals, Edward A; Villano, J Lee

    2012-09-01

    As advanced therapies allow cancer patients to live longer, disease failure in the central nervous system increases from limited therapeutic penetration. Primary thyroid malignancies rarely metastasize to the brain and have a small number of investigations in literature on the subject. The majority of brain metastases involve the brain parenchyma, reflecting the mass and blood distribution within the brain and central nervous system. Here, we report two cases of the most common differentiated thyroid cancers; follicular thyroid cancer having brain involvement from extra-axial growth and papillary thyroid cancer having brain involvement from a single intraventricular metastasis, presumed as metastasis from the vascular choroid plexus. Both of our cases had widespread systemic involvement. For our follicular thyroid cancer, brain involvement was a result of extra-axial growth from cavarial bone, and our papillary thyroid cancer had brain involvement from a single intraventricular metastasis that was initially resected and nearly a year later developed extensive brain involvement. Unlike the usual gray-white junction metastases seen in the majority of metastatic brain tumors, including thyroid, our cases are uncommon. They reflect differences in tumor biology that allows for spread and growth in the brain. Although there is growing genetic knowledge on tumors that favor brain metastases, little is known about tumors that rarely involve the brain. PMID:22296651

  1. Analysis of Risk Factors Contributing to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients Who Underwent Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Jiao, De; Liu, Baoguo; Sun, Shanping

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a very common endocrine malignancy, with a rate of total thyroidectomy reported to be up to 27.8%. However, studies analyzing the risk factors that contribute to recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) after total thyroidectomy in China are still scarce. Material/Methods A total of 536 patients with PTC who underwent total thyroidectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with no recurrent tumor were included in group 1 and patients with tumor recurrence were included in group 2. Results Of 536 patients, 65 patients (12.1%) developed a recurrence of PTC, and 471 patients (87.9%) did not have a recurrence. Univariate analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, tumor ≥1 cm, poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, bilaterality, and multifocality may be related to PTC recurrence. Additionally, the results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, primary tumor ≥1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality may be independent factors contributing to PTC recurrence. Conclusions Male sex, age more than 50 years, primary tumor larger than 1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the primary tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality were found to increase the risk of PTC recurrence in patients who underwent total thyroidectomy. Additionally, it is necessary to use strictly aggressive and extensive surgery, as well as close monitoring, after the operation. PMID:27084873

  2. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  3. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Thomas-Teinturier, Cecile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Helene; Jackson, Angela; Munzer, Martine; N'Guyen, Tan Dat; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne; Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Schlumberger, Martin; Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  4. Increased thyroid cancer risk in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dagdelen, Selcuk; Cinar, Nese; Erbas, Tomris

    2014-08-01

    Acromegaly increases cancer risk. We aimed to determine the prevalence and the predictors of tumors in acromegalic patients treated at our department. We retrospectively evaluated 160 acromegalic patients [79 female (mean age 52.0 ± 10.4 years) and 81 male (mean age 49.1 ± 12.4 years)] between 1990 and 2012, with a mean follow up period of 7.1 ± 5.7 years. The patients were screened with colonoscopy, mammography, thyroid and prostate ultrasonography. Malignancy was found in 34 (21.3%) patients. No significant difference was observed in the distribution of malignancy among sexes (20.3% in F vs. 22.2% in M). Thyroid cancer was the most frequent (n = 17, 10.6%) followed by the breast cancer (n = 4, 2.5%) and colorectal cancer (n = 3, 1.8%). Renal cell cancer in two patients, bladder cancer in two patients, periampullary tumor, rectal carcinoid tumor, malignant melanoma, prostate cancer, lung cancer, parotid mucoepidermoid carcinoma and malignant mesenchymal tumor in brain in one patient were detected. One patient had both thyroid and renal cell cancer. Age of patients at diagnosis of acromegaly was significantly higher in patients with cancer (45.8 ± 9.9 vs. 40.9 ± 11.3 years, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in duration of the disease, initial GH levels and IGF-1% upper limit of normal values, the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia and treatment modalities between the patients with/without cancer. In logistic regression analysis, older age at diagnosis was associated with malignancy risk. The risk of cancer in acromegaly especially the thyroid cancer risk seems to be more increased than known in the literature. Therefore, acromegaly patients should be screened routinely for cancer, especially for thyroid cancer due to it being up to four times higher prevalence than breast and colorectal cancer.

  5. Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong; Chen, Guang

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient's neck skin feeling.

  6. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  7. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence. Because of its uncommon occurrence, randomized trials have not been applied to test best-care options in children. Even in adults that have a 10-fold or higher incidence of thyroid cancer than children, few prospective trials have been executed to compare treatment approaches. We recognize that treatment recommendations have changed over the past few decades and will continue to do so. Respecting the aggressiveness of pediatric thyroid cancer, high recurrence rates, and the problems associated with decades of long-term follow-up, a premium should be placed on treatments that minimize risk of recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments and facilitate follow-up. We recommend that total thyroidectomy and central compartment lymph node dissection is the surgical procedure of choice for children with DTC if it can be performed by a high-volume thyroid surgeon. We recommend radioactive iodine therapy for remnant ablation or residual disease for most children with DTC. We recommend long-term follow-up because disease can recur decades after initial diagnosis and therapy. Considering the complexity of DTC management and the potential complications associated with therapy, it is essential that pediatric DTC be managed by physicians with expertise in this area. PMID:21880704

  8. The immune network in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Marone, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    The immune system plays critical roles in tumor prevention, but also in its initiation and progression. Tumors are subjected to immunosurveillance, but cancer cells generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that favors their escape from immune-mediated elimination. During chronic inflammation, immune cells can contribute to the formation and progression of tumors by producing mitogenic, prosurvival, proangiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Thyroid cancer is the most frequent type of endocrine neoplasia and is the most rapidly increasing cancer in the US. In this review, we discuss recent findings on how different immune cells and mediators can contribute to thyroid cancer development and progression. PMID:27471646

  9. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration. PMID:24176541

  10. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration.

  11. Cancer stem cells as a potential therapeutic target in thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; Colarossi, Cristina; Giuffrida, Dario; De Maria, Ruggero; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that tumor growth and proliferation is dependent on a small subset of cells, defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have the capability to self-renew, and are involved with cancer propagation, relapse and metastatic dissemination. CSCs have been isolated from numerous tissues, including normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. A regulatory network of signaling pathways and microRNAs (miRNAs) control the properties of CSCs. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common type of endocrine cancer, with an increasing incidence. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the most rare type of endocrine cancer; however, it also exhibits the highest mortality rate among thyroid malignancies, with an extremely short survival time. Thyroid CSCs are invasive and highly resistant to conventional therapies, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which results in disease relapse even when the primary lesion has been eradicated. Therefore, targeting thyroid CSCs may represent an effective treatment strategy against aggressive neoplasms, including recurrent and radioresistant tumors. The present review summarizes the current literature regarding thyroid CSCs and discusses therapeutic strategies that target these cells, with a focus on the function of self-renewal pathways and miRNAs. Elucidation of the mechanisms that regulate CSC growth and survival may improve novel therapeutic approaches for treatment-resistant thyroid cancers.

  12. Cancer stem cells as a potential therapeutic target in thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; Colarossi, Cristina; Giuffrida, Dario; De Maria, Ruggero; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that tumor growth and proliferation is dependent on a small subset of cells, defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have the capability to self-renew, and are involved with cancer propagation, relapse and metastatic dissemination. CSCs have been isolated from numerous tissues, including normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. A regulatory network of signaling pathways and microRNAs (miRNAs) control the properties of CSCs. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common type of endocrine cancer, with an increasing incidence. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the most rare type of endocrine cancer; however, it also exhibits the highest mortality rate among thyroid malignancies, with an extremely short survival time. Thyroid CSCs are invasive and highly resistant to conventional therapies, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which results in disease relapse even when the primary lesion has been eradicated. Therefore, targeting thyroid CSCs may represent an effective treatment strategy against aggressive neoplasms, including recurrent and radioresistant tumors. The present review summarizes the current literature regarding thyroid CSCs and discusses therapeutic strategies that target these cells, with a focus on the function of self-renewal pathways and miRNAs. Elucidation of the mechanisms that regulate CSC growth and survival may improve novel therapeutic approaches for treatment-resistant thyroid cancers. PMID:27698787

  13. A case of polymyositis associated with papillary thyroid cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kalliabakos, Dimitrios; Pappas, Apostolos; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Papadima, Artemisia; Chrysikos, John; Basagiannis, Christos; Tsakoumagou, Maria; Skanelli, Yasemi; Manouras, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is rarely associated with paraneoplastic events. Polymyositis, an autoimmune inflammatory myopathy, can be manifested as a paraneoplastic syndrome (PS). We report a case of a young woman who developed progressive proximal muscle weakness one and a half year after a total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Clinical features, laboratory results and muscle biopsy led us to the diagnosis of polymyositis, possibly related to her previous malignancy. A search for recurrence of the thyroid carcinoma or other underlying malignancy was fruitless. The patient improved slowly but almost completely after about 6 months of immunosupressive therapy, which she is still receiving. PMID:18973692

  14. Survival discriminants for differentiated thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.P.; Duda, R.B.; Recant, W.; Chmiel, J.S.; Sylvester, J.A.; Fremgen, A. )

    1990-10-01

    Since 1975, the American Cancer Society, Illinois Division, has published end results of major cancer sites drawn from patient data contributed voluntarily by hospital cancer registries throughout the state. The current study was undertaken, in part, to apprehend information regarding contested areas in the management of patients having differentiated (papillary/follicular) thyroid cancer. A total of 2,282 patients with either papillary or follicular carcinoma of the thyroid from 76 different Illinois hospitals and providing 10 years of follow-up information (life-table analysis) were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, disease, and treatment-related predictors of survival. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards method was made for stage, age, race, sex, morphology, history of radiation exposure, presence of positive lymph nodes, initial surgical treatment, postoperative iodine 131 therapy, and replacement/suppressive thyroid hormone treatment. Statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) predictors of favorable survival after thyroid cancer were low stage (I and II), young age (less than 50 years), white race, female sex, and the administration, postoperatively, of either thyroid hormone or radioactive iodine. Factors that had no influence on survival were lymph node status, choice of initial surgical treatment, and a history of prior irradiation. We suggest that where a prospective clinical trial is impracticable, a retrospective analysis of a large and detailed database, such as that available from cooperating hospital-based tumor registries, may yet provide useful insights to solutions of cancer management problems.

  15. [Recurrent urological cancer--diagnose and treatment].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, H; Akaza, H

    1998-02-01

    Clinical efforts to spare bladder function even in the case of muscle invasive recurrent bladder cancer is taking. Early detection of recurrence is essential for bladder sparing, and both urinary NMP22 and BTA are thought to have potency to detect recurrence of bladder cancer earlier than urinary cytology. Intravesical administration of BCG for superficial bladder cancer and intraarterial injection of chemoagents (Methotrexate and Cisplatin) with radiation for muscle invasive bladder cancer are thought to play important roles in sparing the bladder. Early detection of recurrent prostate cancer is becoming easier by ultrasensitive PSA assay. Though the value of early detection of recurrence is not proven since the benefits of early hormonal treatment have not yet been established, that should be a good indicator to evaluate new and coming treatments and play a important role to develop an effective treatment for recurrent prostate cancer.

  16. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  17. Central Role of RET in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    RET (rearranged during transfection) is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the development of neural crest derived cell lineages, kidney, and male germ cells. Different human cancers, including papillary and medullary thyroid carcinomas, lung adenocarcinomas, and myeloproliferative disorders display gain-of-function mutations in RET. Accordingly, RET protein has become a promising molecular target for cancer treatment. PMID:24296167

  18. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    PubMed

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  19. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    PubMed

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  20. [Association of hyperthyroidism with differentiated thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Haraj, Nassim Essabah; Ahandar, Hayat; El Aziz, Siham; Chadli, Asma

    2016-01-01

    The presence of hyperthyroidism is no longer an insurance against the occurrence of thyroid cancer. The combination of the two is common. This is a retrospective study of 355 files of patients followed for differentiated thyroid cancer in the endocrinology department at CHU IBN ROCHD from 1986 to 2014. 12 of those patients were followed for hyperthyroidism, and a fortuitous association with differentiated thyroid cancer was found during the anatomopathological exam, giving us a 3.38% prevalence. The average age of discovery is 44.8 years, with a marked female predominance (8/12). Eight patients had a toxic nodule, 3 had Basedow's goiters, and one had Graves' disease. All underwent total thyroidectomy. In all patients, the cancer was a papillary carcinoma. Microcarcinoma was the most predominant (6 patients). An insular carcinoma was found in a patient with spinal and retro-orbital metastases. Treatment with radioactive iodine was prescribed to five patients. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism does not eliminate the possibility of an associated thyroid cancer. Malignancy should always be kept in mind and therefore lead to a diagnostic approach comparable to that for any thyroid nodule. PMID:27583082

  1. Management of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Focus on the American Thyroid Association Pediatric Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Marguerite T; Eslamy, Hedieh; Mankoff, David

    2016-03-01

    First introduced in 1946, radioactive iodine (I-131) produces short-range beta radiation with a half-life of 8 days. The physical properties of I-131 combined with the high degree of uptake in the differentiated thyroid cancers (DTCs) led to the use of I-131 as a therapeutic agent for DTC in adults. There are two indications for the potential use of I-131 therapy in pediatric thyroid disorders: nonsurgical treatment of hyperthyroidism owing to Graves' disease and the treatment of children with intermediate- and high-risk DTC. However, children are not just miniature adults. Not only are children and the pediatric thyroid gland more sensitive to radiation than adults but also the biologic behavior of DTC differs between children and adults as well. As opposed to adults, children with DTC typically present with advanced disease at diagnosis; yet, they respond rapidly to therapy and have an excellent prognosis that is significantly better than that in adult counterparts with advanced disease. Unfortunately, there are also higher rates of local and distant disease recurrence in children with DTC compared with adults, mandating lifelong surveillance. Further, children have a longer life expectancy during which the adverse effects of I-131 therapy may become manifest. Recognizing the differences between adults and children with DTC, the American Thyroid Association commissioned a task force of experts who developed and recently published a guideline to address the unique issues related to the management of thyroid nodules and DTC in children. This article reviews the epidemiology, diagnosis, staging, treatment, therapy-related effects, and suggestions for surveillance in children with DTC, focusing not only on the differences between adults and children with this disease but also on the latest recommendations from the inaugural pediatric management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association.

  2. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC. PMID:27679545

  3. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC.

  4. Endosonographic examination of thyroid gland among patients with nonthyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, Amer A.; Mahayni, Abdulah A.; Chawki, Ghaleb R.; Yoder, Leon; Elkhatib, Fateh A.; Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is limited endosonographic literature regarding thyroid gland pathology, which is frequently visualized during upper endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Our objective was to assess the prevalence of benign and malignant thyroid lesions encountered during routine upper EUS within a cancer center setting. Materials and Methods: The data were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. All upper EUS procedures performed between October 2012 and July 2014 were reviewed at a large referral cancer center. Data collected included patient demographics, preexisting thyroid conditions, thyroid gland dimensions, the presence or absence of thyroid lesions, and EUS morphology of lesions if present, and interventions performed to characterize thyroid lesions and pathology results when applicable. Results: Two hundred and forty-five EUS procedures were reviewed. Of these, 100 cases reported a detailed endosonographic examination of the thyroid gland. Most of the thyroid glands were endosonographically visualized when the tip of the scope was at 18 cm from the incisors. Twelve cases showed thyroid lesions, out of which three previously undiagnosed thyroid cancers were visualized during EUS (two primary papillary thyroid cancers and one anaplastic thyroid cancer). Transesophageal EUS-guided fine needle aspiration of thyroid lesions was feasible when the lesion was in the inferior portion of the thyroid gland, and the tip of the scope was at 18 cm or more from the incisors. Conclusions: Routine EUS examination may detect unexpected thyroid lesions including malignant ones. We encourage endosonographers to screen the visualized portions of the thyroid gland during routine withdrawal of the echoendoscope. PMID:27803906

  5. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. PMID:24403010

  6. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  7. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; Pathak, Alok; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to contribute to cancer cell plasticity and capable of enhancing cancer cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. We elucidate the role of DNA repair mechanisms in contributing to therapeutic resistance, with a special emphasis on thyroid cancer. Next, we explore the emerging roles of autophagy and damage-associated molecular pattern responses in EMT and chemoresistance in tumor cells. Finally, we demonstrate how cancer cells, including thyroid cancer cells, can highjack the oncofetal nucleoprotein high-mobility group A2 to gain increased transformative cell plasticity, prevent apoptosis, and enhance metastasis of chemoresistant tumor cells. PMID:24723911

  8. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. This leads to low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism) and causes the pituitary gland to release more ... is that it can cause the symptoms of hypothyroidism, including tiredness, depression, weight gain, sleepiness, constipation, muscle ...

  9. Primary hyperparathyroidism and nonmedullary thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Linos, D.A.; van Heerden, J.A.; Edis, A.J.

    1982-03-01

    Of 2,058 patients who had surgically proven primary hyperparathyroidism at the Mayo Clinic from 1965 through 1979, 51 or 2.5 percent had associated nonmedullary thyroid carcinoma. A history of radiation exposure to the head and neck was obtained in 14 of 43 patients questioned. Thyroid disease consisted of grade 1 papillary adenocarcinoma in 48 cases and pure follicular adenocarcinoma in 3 cases. The parathyroid disease included 41 single adenomas and 5 cases of parathyroid hyperplasia; 5 patients had 2 adenomas. At follow-up, none of the patients had evidence of metastatic thyroid carcinoma. Ten patients were receiving calcium or vitamin D supplementation for protracted hypocalcemia presumably due to the increased insult to the parathyroids from combined bilateral thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy. More consecutive thyroidectomy, along with parathyroid autotransplantation when indicated, will provide definitive treatment of the thyroid cancer and at the same time minimize the risk of postoperative hypoparathyroidism.

  10. Clinical and Pathological Implications of Concurrent Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders and Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, L. L.; Ferreira, R. C.; Marcello, M. A.; Vassallo, J.; Ward, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Cooccurrences of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer (DTC) have been repeatedly reported. Both CLT and DTC, mainly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), share some epidemiological and molecular features. In fact, thyroid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction has been observed in association with PTC at variable frequency, although the precise relationship between the two diseases is still debated. It also remains a matter of debate whether the association with a CLT or even an autoimmune disorder could influence the prognosis of PTC. A better understanding about clinical implications of autoimmunity in concurrent thyroid cancer could raise new insights of thyroid cancer immunotherapy. In addition, elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in autoimmune disease and concurrent cancer allowed us to identify new therapeutic strategies against thyroid cancer. The objective of this article was to review recent literature on the association of these disorders and its potential significance. PMID:21403889

  11. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Pathology and Risk for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paparodis, Rodis; Imam, Shahnawaz; Todorova-Koteva, Kristina; Staii, Anca

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been found to coexist with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in surgical specimens, but an association between the two conditions has been discounted by the medical literature. Therefore, we performed this study to determine any potential relationship between HT and the risk of developing DTC. Methods: We collected data for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T4), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) titers, surgical pathology, and weight-based levothyroxine (LT4) replacement dose for patients who were referred for thyroid surgery. Patients with HT at final pathology were studied further. To estimate thyroid function, patients with preoperative hypothyroid HT (Hypo-HT) were divided into three equal groups based on their LT4 replacement: LT4-Low (<0.90 μg/kg), LT4-Mid (0.90–1.43 μg/kg), and LT4-High (>1.43 μg/kg). A group of preoperatively euthyroid (Euth-HT) patients but with HT by pathology was also studied. All subjects were also grouped based on their TPO-Ab titer in TPO-high (titer >1:1000) or TPO-low/negative (titer <1:1000 or undetectable) groups. The relationship of HT and DTC was studied extensively. Results: Of 2811 subjects, 582 had HT on surgical pathology, 365 of whom were Euth-HT preoperatively. DTC was present in 47.9% of the Euth-HT, in 59.7% of LT4-Low, 29.8% of LT4-Mid, and 27.9% of LT4-High groups. The relative risk (RR) for DTC was significantly elevated for the Euth-HT and LT4-Low groups (p<0.001), but not for the LT4-Mid or LT4-High replacement dose groups. TPO-low/negative status conferred an increased RR in the Euth-HT and LT4-Low replacement dose groups (p<0.001 both), while TPO-high status decreased it in Euth-HT group (p<0.05) and made it nonsignificant in the LT4-Low group. Conclusions: HT pathology increases the risk for DTC only in euthyroid subjects and those with partially functional thyroid glands (LT4-Low) but not in fully hypothyroid HT (LT4-Mid and LT4-High). High TPO-Ab titers

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bano, Gul; Hodgson, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are largely divided into medullary (MTC) and non-medullary (NMTC) cancers , depending on the cell type of origin. Familial non-medullary thyroid cancer (FNMTC) comprises about 5-15% of NMTC and is a heterogeneous group of diseases, including both non-syndromic and syndromic forms. Non-syndromic FNMTC tends to manifest papillary thyroid carcinoma , usually multifocal and bilateral . Several high-penetrance genes for FNMTC have been identified, but they are often confined to a few or single families, and other susceptibility loci appear to play a small part, conferring only small increments in risk. Familial susceptibility is likely to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental influences. The current focus of research in FNMTC is to characterise the susceptibility genes and their role in carcinogenesis. FNMTC can also occur as a part of multitumour genetic syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis , Cowden's disease , Werner's syndrome and Carney complex . These tend to present at an early age and are multicentric and bilateral with distinct pathology. The clinical evaluation of these patients is similar to that for most patients with a thyroid nodule. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) arises from the parafollicular cells of the thyroid which release calcitonin. The familial form of MTC accounts for 20-25% of cases and presents as a part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) syndromes or as a pure familial MTC (FMTC). They are caused by germline point mutations in the RET oncogene on chromosome 10q11.2. There is a clear genotype-phenotype correlation, and the aggressiveness of FMTC depends on the specific genetic mutation, which should determine the timing of surgery. PMID:27075347

  13. NADPH oxidases: new actors in thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a crucial substrate for thyroid peroxidase, a key enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. However, as a potent oxidant, H2O2 might also be responsible for the high level of oxidative DNA damage observed in thyroid tissues, such as DNA base lesions and strand breakages, which promote chromosomal instability and contribute to the development of tumours. Although the role of H2O2 in thyroid hormone synthesis is well established, its precise mechanisms of action in pathological processes are still under investigation. The NADPH oxidase/dual oxidase family are the only oxidoreductases whose primary function is to produce reactive oxygen species. As such, the function and expression of these enzymes are tightly regulated. Thyrocytes express dual oxidase 2, which produces most of the H2O2 for thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyrocytes also express dual oxidase 1 and NADPH oxidase 4, but the roles of these enzymes are still unknown. Here, we review the structure, expression, localization and function of these enzymes. We focus on their potential role in thyroid cancer, which is characterized by increased expression of these enzymes. PMID:27174022

  14. Diagnostic imaging techniques in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Toriumi, D.M.; Mafee, M.F.

    1988-02-01

    With the refinement of fine-needle aspiration, the specific applications of thyroid imaging techniques need to be reevaluated for efficiency and cost containment. No thyroid imaging test should be routinely obtained. Radionuclide scanning is most beneficial in evaluating the functional status of thyroid nodules when fine-needle aspiration is inadequate, the findings are benign, or when there is no discrete nodule that is palpated in an enlarged gland. When fine-needle aspiration is unavailable or unreliable, radionuclide scanning becomes a first-line diagnostic tool. Ultrasonography should be used primarily for identifying a solid component of a cystic nodule, determining the size of nodules on thyroxine suppression that are not easily palpable, or for performing guided fine-needle aspiration. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging both have a definite role in the evaluation of thyroid tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to computerized tomography for the evaluation of metastatic, retrotracheal, or mediastinal involvement of large thyroid tumors or goiters. Careful selection of the diagnostic techniques will ensure more accurate diagnosis and reduce unnecessary patient costs in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  15. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  16. Molecular perspectives in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Buffet, C; Groussin, L

    2015-02-01

    Progress in understanding the molecular genetics of thyroid cancer in the last 20 years has accelerated recently with the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies known as Next-Generation Sequencing. Besides classical molecular abnormalities involving the MAPK (Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase) and PI3K (PhosphoInositide 3-Kinase) pathways that play a key role in follicular-derived thyroid tumorigenesis, new molecular abnormalities have been discovered. The major advances in recent years have been the discovery of new somatic driver gene point mutations (such as RASAL1 [RAS protein activator Like 1] mutations in follicular cancer) and/or mutations that have prognostic value (such as TERT [Telomerase reverse transcriptase] promoter mutations); new chromosomal rearrangements, usually having close connection with exposure to ionizing radiation (such as ALK [Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase] rearrangements); and deregulation of some gene or microRNA expression representing a molecular signature. Progress made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of thyroid cancer offers new perspectives for the diagnosis of the benign or malignant status of a thyroid nodule, to refine prognosis and offer new perspectives of targeted therapy for radioiodine-refractory cancers.

  17. Management of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hadoux, Julien; Pacini, Furio; Tuttle, R Michael; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer arises from calcitonin-producing C-cells and accounts for 3-5% of all thyroid cancers. The discovery of a locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer that is not amenable to surgery or of distant metastases needs careful work-up, including measurement of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (and their doubling times), in addition to comprehensive imaging to determine the extent of the disease, its aggressiveness, and the need for any treatment. In the past, cytotoxic chemotherapy was used for treatment but produced little benefit. For the past 10 years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and RET (rearranged during transfection) have been used when a systemic therapy is indicated for large tumour burden and documented disease progression. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have shown benefits on progression-free survival compared with placebo in this setting, but their toxic effect profiles need thorough clinical management in specialised centres. This Review describes the management and treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer with emphasis on current targeted therapies and perspectives to improve patient care. Most treatment responses are transient, emphasising that mechanisms of resistance need to be better understood and that the efficacy of treatment approaches should be improved with combination therapies or other drugs that might be more potent or target other pathways, including immunotherapy. PMID:26608066

  18. Expression of YY1 in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Jéssica; Castellví, Josep; Marcos, Ricard; Zafón, Carles; Velázquez, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) has an important regulatory role in tumorigenesis, but its implication in thyroid cancer has not been yet investigated. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer and assessed the association of YY1 expression with clinical features. Expression of YY1 was evaluated in human thyroid cancer cell lines, a series of matched normal/tumor thyroid tissues and in a thyroid cancer tissue microarray, using real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. YY1 was overexpressed in thyroid cancer cells, at transcription and protein levels. A significant increase of YY1 mRNA was also observed in tumor thyroid tissues. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the thyroid cancer tissue microarray revealed that both papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) present increased YY1 protein levels (48 and 19%, respectively). After stratification by the level of YY1 protein, positive YY1 expression identifies 88% of patients with PTC. The association of YY1 expression with clinicopathological features in PTC and FTC showed that YY1 expression was related with age at diagnosis. Our data indicates for the first time overexpression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer, with YY1 being more frequently overexpressed in the PTC subtype.

  19. Lenvatinib: A Review in Refractory Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-02-01

    Lenvatinib (Lenvima®) is an oral, multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1, 2 and 3, fibroblast growth factor receptors 1, 2, 3 and 4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, and RET and KIT signalling networks, which are implicated in tumour growth and maintenance. In the EU and USA, lenvatinib is indicated for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). This approval was based on the results of the randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase 3 SELECT study, in which lenvatinib significantly improved median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate compared with placebo in patients with RR-DTC. The PFS benefit with lenvatinib was seen in all pre-specified subgroups, including patients who had received either one or no prior VEGF-targeted therapy. Moreover, the PFS benefit with lenvatinib was maintained regardless of BRAF or RAS mutation status. The safety and tolerability profile of lenvatinib in SELECT was consistent with that of other VEGF/VEGF receptor-targeted therapies and was mostly manageable. Hypertension was the most common treatment-related adverse event in lenvatinib-treated patients, but only infrequently led to discontinuation of the drug. Although not collected in SELECT, information on quality of life would be useful in assessing the overall impact of therapy on the patient. This notwithstanding, the data which are available indicate that lenvatinib is an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment option for patients with RR-DTC. Lenvatinib, therefore, offers an acceptable alternative to sorafenib--currently, the only other TKI approved for this indication. PMID:26867945

  20. Radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Nostrand, Douglas; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    This article presents an overview of the use of radioactive iodine (131-I) in the treatment of patients who have well differentiated thyroid cancer. We review definitions; staging; the two-principal methods for selection of a dosage of 131-I for ablation and treatment; the objectives of ablation and treatment; the indications for ablation and treatment; the recommendations for the use of 131-I for ablation and treatment contained in the Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association, the European Consensus, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine; the dosage recommendations and selection of dosage for 131-I by the these organizations; and the Washington Hospital Center approach.

  1. Differentiated pediatric thyroid cancer: correlates with adult disease, controversies in treatment.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Marguerite T; Mankoff, David

    2007-09-01

    The biologic behavior of differentiated thyroid cancer can differ between adults and children, especially in those children younger than 10 years of age. Unlike adults, young children typically present with advanced disease at diagnosis. Despite this, children respond rapidly to therapy and have an excellent prognosis that is significantly better than that of their adult counterparts with advanced disease. In contradistinction to adults, children with thyroid cancer also have higher local and distant disease recurrences with progression-free survival of only 70% at 5 years, mandating life-long surveillance. Although thyroid cancer is the most common carcinoma in children, overall incidence is low, a factor that has prevented performance of a controlled, randomized, prospective study to determine the most efficacious treatment regimen in this age group. So, although extensively investigated, treatment of pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid cancer remains controversial. This article reviews the current controversies in the treatment of pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer, focusing on issues of optimal initial and subsequent therapy as well as that of long-term follow-up. Our approach to treatment is presented. In so doing, similarities and differences between adults and children with differentiated thyroid cancer as regards unique considerations in epidemiology, diagnosis, staging, treatment, therapy-related late effects, and disease surveillance are presented. The expanding use of and appropriate roles for thyrogen and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in disease evaluation and surveillance will be addressed.

  2. Induction of thyroid cancer by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report assesses the potential for cancer induction in the thyroid gland after exposure of the gland to external x radiation and gamma radiation and/or some internally deposited radionuclides. Data and assumptions from existing human and animal studies are used to develop average risk estimates for populations over various ranges of radiation dose to the thyroid. The carcinogenicity of various iodine isotopes is examined. A specific model for risk estimation is developed which involves numerous modifications of an absolute risk model for factors such as age at exposure, sex, ethnic background, radiation source, exposure range, and time since exposure. Risk estimates are presented which are considered to be application to the population of the US for mean thyroidal doses in the range from 6 to 1500 rads. 146 references, 1 figures, 18 tables.

  3. Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Monitoring and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Douglas W.

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and then focuses on current use of molecular, biochemical, and imaging disease markers as a basis for selection of appropriate therapy. Clinicians treating MTC patients face a series of challenges: 1) distinguishing MTC as early as possible from benign nodular disease and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in order to choose appropriate initial surgery; 2) managing low-level residual cancer in otherwise asymptomatic individuals; and 3) treating progressive metastatic disease. Early clinical trials employing small molecules targeting Ret and/or VEGF receptors suggest that such approaches could be effective and well-tolerated. This review highlights early progress in targeted therapy of MTC, along with significant challenges in disease monitoring to appropriately select and evaluate patients being treated with these therapies. PMID:17673130

  4. Sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Abdulwahid M.; Fatih, Salah M.; Kakamad, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic, idiopathic disease. It has a highly variable clinical course. It has been reported to present in association with malignancy. Coexistence of sarcoidosis and thyroid cancer is rarely reported in the literature. Presentatioin of the case We present a case with neck swelling for 3 months, and symmetrical painless thyroid enlargement without fixation to deep tissues of the neck. Multiple nodules on the both thyroid lobes, hard irregular, grade two goiter with lymphadenopathy all over anterior neck compartments. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done under ultrasound guide from right thyroid nodule and showed papillary thyroid carcinoma. Excisional biopsy of the neck lymphnode showed picture typical for sarcoidosis. Discussion Most researchers believe that patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis are predisposed to develop malignancies, less than a dozen of cases are reported in the literature to be associated with PTC with a very wide range of presentations and clincal coarses. An interesting finding of our case is that in contrast to what is reported, both diseases were not known by the physician until the time of presentation. Conclusion Cervical lymphadenopathy in association with goiter could be metastasis, sarcoidosis or mixed, therefore should be seperately biopsied. PMID:26432997

  5. Thyroid Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the thyroid gland Hyperthyroidism - when your thyroid gland makes more thyroid hormones than your body needs Hypothyroidism - when your thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormones Thyroid cancer ...

  6. Thyroid autoimmunity and obstetric outcomes in women with recurrent miscarriage: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Kusum; Dutta, Pinaki; Sridhar, Subbiah; Rohilla, Minakshi; Srinivasan, Anand; Prashad, G R V; Shah, Viral N; Bhansali, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Thyroid antibody positivity during pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes including miscarriage and preterm delivery. The aim of the study is to evaluate the obstetric outcome in pregnant women with recurrent miscarriage and their response to levothyroxine (l-T4) therapy. Study design and methods All pregnant and non-pregnant women between 21 and 35 years of age with a history of two or more consecutive miscarriages were included in the study. A third group comprising 100 pregnant women without a history of miscarriage were taken as healthy controls. Thyroid autoimmunity, prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and maternal and foetal complications were analysed in all the groups with appropriate statistical methods. Results The mean age of the patients included in the study was 27.0±3.1 years. Of 100 pregnant patients with previous recurrent miscarriage, thyroid autoimmunity (thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb+) >34 U/ml) was found in 31% of the cases. The incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism was higher in TPOAb+ group than in TPOAb− group (52 vs 16%; P=0.0002). There was no difference in the prevalence of miscarriage or obstetric outcomes between recurrent miscarriage and healthy pregnant women group irrespective of TPO status. Conclusions The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity was higher in pregnant women with a history of recurrent abortion compared with healthy pregnant control population. Following l-T4 treatment, there was no difference in prevalence of miscarriage between hypothyroid and euthyroid individuals in TPOAb+ women. PMID:23802061

  7. Increased Pleiotrophin Concentrations in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Youn Hee; Sadowski, Samira M.; Celi, Francesco S.; Xi, Liqiang; Raffeld, Mark; Sacks, David B.; Remaley, Alan T.; Wellstein, Anton; Kebebew, Electron; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid nodules are common, and approximately 5% of these nodules are malignant. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor which is overexpressed in many cancers. The expression of PTN in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is unknown. Method and Findings 74 subjects (age 47 ± 12 y, 15 males) who had thyroidectomy with a histological diagnosis: 79 benign nodules and 23 PTCs (10 classic, 6 tall cell, 6 follicular variant and 1 undetermined). Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) samples were obtained ex vivo from surgically excised tissue and assayed for PTN and thyroglobulin (Tg). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on tissue sections. In FNA samples, PTN concentration normalized to Tg was significantly higher in PTC than in benign nodules (16 ± 6 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 ng/mg, p < 0.001). In follicular variant of PTC (n = 6), the PTN/Tg ratio was also higher than in benign nodules (1.3 ± 0.6 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 ng/mg, P < 0.001, respectively). IHC showed cytoplasmic localization of PTN in PTC cells. Conclusion In ex vivo FNA samples, the PTN to thyroglobulin ratio was higher in PTCs, including follicular variant PTC, than in benign thyroid nodules. The findings raise the possibility that measurement of the PTN to Tg ratio may provide useful diagnostic and/or prognostic information in the evaluation of thyroid nodules. PMID:26914549

  8. The role of thyroid hormone signaling in the prevention of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Simmen, Frank A

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  9. The Revised 2016 Korean Thyroid Association Guidelines for Thyroid Nodules and Cancers: Differences from the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Increased detection of thyroid nodules using high-resolution ultrasonography has resulted in a world-wide increase in the incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Despite the steep increase in its incidence, the age-standardized mortality rate of thyroid cancer has remained stable, which leads toward a trend of more conservative treatment. The latest American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines for thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer revised in 2015 suggested that fine needle aspiration biopsy should be performed for thyroid nodules larger than 1 cm and lobectomy might be sufficient for 1 to 4 cm intrathyroidal DTC. In addition, active surveillance instead of immediate surgical treatment was also recommended as a treatment option for papillary thyroid microcarcinoma based on the results of a few observational studies from Japan. The Korean Thyroid Association (KTA) has organized a task force team to develop revised guidelines for thyroid nodules and DTC after an extensive review of articles and intense discussion on whether we should accept the changes in the 2015 ATA guidelines. This paper introduces and discusses the updated major issues and differences in the ATA and the KTA guidelines. PMID:27704738

  10. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; Pacini, F.; Lippi, F.; Elisei, R.; Arganini, M.; Miccoli, P.; Pinchera, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report on 49 patients younger than 18 years at diagnosis, of 776 patients with thyroid cancer, seen in our institution in the last 17 years. Female/male ratio was 2.2:1. Histologic type was papillary in 44, follicular in 4, and medullary in 1. Initial treatment was near-total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection. Surgical complications (vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, or both) were found in 25 patients and were usually associated with more advanced primary tumors. At surgery, node metastases were present in 73% of the patients and lung metastases, detected by chest x ray films, in 6%. Patients were treated with thyroid suppressive therapy and, except the one with medullary cancer, with radioiodine (131I) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 +/- 4.4 years (range, 1 to 17 years), one patient with lung metastases died of respiratory failure. Of 36 patients who have been followed up more than 4 years, 22 (61.1%) are now cured, and 14 have metastases (to lymph nodes, 2; to nodes and lung, 10; and to lung, 2). Since 1977 serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was used routinely as a tumor marker for differentiated thyroid cancer. After operation, Tg was elevated in all patients both not receiving (mean +/- SE, 902 +/- 380 ng/ml) and receiving (44 +/- 15 ng/ml) suppressive therapy; after 131I treatment, serum Tg dropped to 104 +/- 50 and 7.3 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, without and with suppressive therapy, respectively. Of 11 patients with lung metastases treated with 131I, respiratory function, as assessed by means of spirometry, was normal in three, mildly reduced in six, and severely impaired in two (including the one who died). In conclusion, our study indicates that thyroid cancer in young patients is rather advanced at initial examination and usually associated with node and, less frequently, lung metastases.

  11. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  12. Obesity and thyroid cancer: epidemiologic associations and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pazaitou-Panayiotou, K; Polyzos, S A; Mantzoros, C S

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been rising over the past few decades along with a parallel increase in obesity. Observational studies have provided evidence for a potential association between the two. By contrast, clinical data for a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus, a condition strongly associated with obesity, and thyroid cancer are limited and largely not supportive of such an association. Obesity leads to hypoadiponectinemia, a pro-inflammatory state, and insulin resistance, which, in turn, leads to high circulating insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, thereby possibly increasing the risk for thyroid cancer. Thus, insulin resistance possibly plays a pivotal role in underlying the observed association between obesity and thyroid cancer, potentially leading to the development and/or progression of thyroid cancer, through its interconnections with other factors including insulin-like growth factor-1, adipocytokines/cytokines and thyroid-stimulating hormone. In this review, epidemiological and clinical evidence and potential mechanisms underlying the proposed association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk are reviewed. If the association between obesity and thyroid cancer demonstrated in observational studies proves to be causal, targeting obesity (and/or downstream mediators of risk) could be of importance in the prevention and management of thyroid cancer.

  13. Extent of Surgery Affects Survival for Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Bentrem, David J.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Stewart, Andrew K.; Winchester, David P.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Sturgeon, Cord

    2007-01-01

    Background: The extent of surgery for papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) remains controversial. Consensus guidelines have recommended total thyroidectomy for PTC ≥1 cm; however, no study has supported this recommendation based on a survival advantage. The objective of this study was to examine whether the extent of surgery affects outcomes for PTC and to determine whether a size threshold could be identified above which total thyroidectomy is associated with improved outcomes. Methods: From the National Cancer Data Base (1985–1998), 52,173 patients underwent surgery for PTC. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests. Cox Proportional Hazards modeling stratified by tumor size was used to assess the impact of surgical extent on outcomes and to identify a tumor size threshold above which total thyroidectomy is associated with an improvement in recurrence and long-term survival rates. Results: Of the 52,173 patients, 43,227 (82.9%) underwent total thyroidectomy, and 8946 (17.1%) underwent lobectomy. For PTC <1 cm extent of surgery did not impact recurrence or survival (P = 0.24, P = 0.83). For tumors ≥1 cm, lobectomy resulted in higher risk of recurrence and death (P = 0.04, P = 0.009). To minimize the influence of larger tumors, 1 to 2 cm lesions were examined separately: lobectomy again resulted in a higher risk of recurrence and death (P = 0.04, P = 0.04). Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate that total thyroidectomy results in lower recurrence rates and improved survival for PTC ≥1.0 cm compared with lobectomy. This is the first study to demonstrate that total thyroidectomy for PTC ≥1.0 cm improves outcomes. PMID:17717441

  14. Medical exposure to radiation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, S J; Lee, C; Berrington de González, A

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, the worldwide estimated age-standardised incidence rates for thyroid cancer incidence were 4.7 and 1.5 per 100,000 women and men, respectively. Thyroid cancer's overall contribution to the worldwide cancer burden is relatively small, but incidence rates have increased over the last three decades throughout the world. This trend has been hypothesised to reflect a combination of technological advances enabling increased detection, but also changes in environmental factors, including population exposure to ionising radiation from fallout, diagnostic tests and treatment for benign and malignant conditions. Studies of the atomic bomb survivors and populations treated with radiotherapy have established radiation as a risk factor for thyroid cancer, particularly from early life exposure. About 0.62 mSv (20%) of the global annual per caput effective radiation dose comes from diagnostic medical and dental radiation for the period of 1997-2007, increased from 0.4 mSv for the years 1991-1996. This international trend of increasing population exposure to medical diagnostic sources of radiation, attributed in large part to the growing use of computed tomography scans, but also interventional radiology procedures, has raised concerns about exposure to radiosensitive organs such as the thyroid. Worldwide, medical and dental X-rays constitute the most common type of diagnostic medical exposures, but their contribution to the cumulative effective dose is relatively low, whereas computed tomography scans account for 7.9% of diagnostic radiology examinations but 47% of the collective effective dose from diagnostic radiation procedures in parts of the world. Although the radiation exposure from computed tomography scans is substantially lower than that from radiotherapy, multiple computed tomography scans could result in non-trivial cumulative doses to the thyroid. Studies are currently underway to assess the incidence of cancer in large cohorts of children who received

  15. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast ... took it for 5 years. (See the table.) Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death 5 to 14 Years after ...

  16. Robotic versus Open Thyroidectomy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shirley Yuk Wah; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2016-01-01

    While open thyroidectomy (OT) is advocated as the gold standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer, the contemporary use of robotic thyroidectomy (RT) is often controversial. Although RT combines the unique benefits of the surgical robot and remote access thyroidectomy, its applicability on cancer patients is challenged by the questionable oncological benefits and safety. This review aims to analyze the current literature evidence in comparing RT to OT on thyroid cancers for their perioperative and oncological outcomes. To date, no randomized controlled trial is available in comparing RT to OT. All published studies are nonrandomized or retrospective comparisons. Current data suggests that RT compares less favorably than OT for longer operative time, higher cost, and possibly inferior oncological control with lower number of central lymph nodes retrieved. In terms of morbidity, quality of life outcomes, and short-term recurrence rates, RT and OT are comparable. While conventional OT continues to be appropriate for most thyroid cancers, RT should better be continued by expert surgeons on selected patients who have low-risk thyroid cancers and have high expectations on cosmetic outcomes. Future research should embark on prospective randomized studies for unbiased comparisons. Long-term follow-up studies are also needed to evaluate outcomes on recurrence and survival. PMID:27069476

  17. [Method of detection of residual tissues in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Gostimskiĭ, A V; Romanchishen, A F; Zaĭtseva, I V; Kuznetsova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    A search of residual tissues is complicated in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland. The Saint-Petersburg Centre of Surgery of the Endocrine System and Oncology developed the method of detection of residual tissues of the thyroid gland with the aim of preoperative chromothyroidolymphography under control of ultrasound. The method consisted of US performance during 15-20 minutes before the operation and an introduction of 1% sterile water solution of methylene blue in revealed residual tissues of the thyroid gland. The volume of injected coloring agent was 0.5-2 ml in the residual tissue volume smaller than 9 cm3 and 2-3 ml injected in case of more than 9 cm3. The residual tissues of the thyroid gland accurately visualized during the following operation. Described method gives the possibility to detect all regions of residual tissues which should be removed and at the same time it shortens a revision and surgery trauma.

  18. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  19. A review on thyroid cancer during pregnancy: Multitasking is required.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Hussein; Al Lahloubi, Nasr; Rashad, Noha

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy after breast cancer. The goal of management is to control malignancy and prevent maternal and fetal complications as a result of maternal hypothyroidism. The role of female sex hormones as an etiologic factor was investigated, with no clear association. Pregnancy can cause an increase in size of a previously existed thyroid nodule through the structural similarity between TSH and BHCG, and the normally expressed estrogen receptors on thyroid gland cells. Effect of pregnancy on development and prognosis of differentiated thyroid malignancies (papillary and follicular) has also been studied. The prognosis of thyroid cancer is not worse in patients diagnosed during pregnancy or those who got pregnant after curative treatment. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated at all, surgery can be delayed till after delivery except in rapidly growing aggressive tumors. While radioactive iodine ablation is absolutely contra-indicated, the new systemic therapies are not well studied during pregnancy. However, almost all these new agents are classified as FDA category C or D and are better to be avoided. The effect of pregnancy on other types of thyroid cancer (medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors) is not well studied because of very low incidence with pregnancy. The endocrinological management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy is of utmost importance. The hypothyroidism after total thyroidectomy can cause fetal hypothyroidism. Therefore, the management of thyroid cancer related to pregnancy needs a multidisciplinary team.

  20. A review on thyroid cancer during pregnancy: Multitasking is required.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Hussein; Al Lahloubi, Nasr; Rashad, Noha

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy after breast cancer. The goal of management is to control malignancy and prevent maternal and fetal complications as a result of maternal hypothyroidism. The role of female sex hormones as an etiologic factor was investigated, with no clear association. Pregnancy can cause an increase in size of a previously existed thyroid nodule through the structural similarity between TSH and BHCG, and the normally expressed estrogen receptors on thyroid gland cells. Effect of pregnancy on development and prognosis of differentiated thyroid malignancies (papillary and follicular) has also been studied. The prognosis of thyroid cancer is not worse in patients diagnosed during pregnancy or those who got pregnant after curative treatment. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated at all, surgery can be delayed till after delivery except in rapidly growing aggressive tumors. While radioactive iodine ablation is absolutely contra-indicated, the new systemic therapies are not well studied during pregnancy. However, almost all these new agents are classified as FDA category C or D and are better to be avoided. The effect of pregnancy on other types of thyroid cancer (medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors) is not well studied because of very low incidence with pregnancy. The endocrinological management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy is of utmost importance. The hypothyroidism after total thyroidectomy can cause fetal hypothyroidism. Therefore, the management of thyroid cancer related to pregnancy needs a multidisciplinary team. PMID:27408758

  1. Quantitative assessment of preoperative serum thyrotropin level and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is the major growth factor for thyrocytes, but the pathogenic role of serum TSH in thyroid cancer (TC) is unknown. The association between TSH level and the development of thyroid cancer has been widely evaluated recently. However, the results remain conflicting. To develop an understanding of the relationship between TSH exposure and thyroid cancer, a meta-analysis of 56 studies involving 20227 thyroid cancer cases and 50003 controls with benign thyroid nodule was performed. Overall, significantly increased TSH level was observed in thyroid cancer patients compared with controls (RoM: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.32–1.56, P < 10−5). The pooled analyses also revealed that higher serum TSH level were significantly associated with the size of TC nodule and malignancy as well as lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, significantly increased THS levels were observed preferentially for papillary thyroid cancer when stratified by histological type of tumors. However, the diagnostic value of TSH level for TC might be limited. These results suggest that higher serum TSH concentration is associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer. PMID:27166998

  2. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  3. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    PubMed Central

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  4. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  5. Anesthetic Techniques and Cancer Recurrence after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    D'Arrigo, Maria G.; Triolo, Stefania; Mondello, Stefania; La Torre, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients. PMID:24683330

  6. Thyrotropin in the development and management of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Donald S A

    2014-06-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH) is the major regulator and growth factor of the thyroid. TSH may be important in the development of human thyroid cancer, with both suggestive animal models and clinical evidence, although definitive proof is still required. Applications for TSH in thyroid cancer management include TSH stimulation of radioiodine uptake, enhancement of biochemical monitoring through thyroglobulin measurement, and long-term suppression of TSH with supraphysiologic levothyroxine. This review synthesizes current knowledge of TSH in both the development and management of differentiated thyroid cancer.

  7. The BRAFV600E mutation: what is it really orchestrating in thyroid cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nucera, Carmelo; Lawler, Jack; Hodin, Richard; Parangi, Sareh

    2010-01-01

    BRAFV600E is a constitutively active onco-kinase and is the most common genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), and in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma as well, albeit at a lower frequency. The BRAFV600E mutation in some studies has been significantly associated with extra-thyroidal extension, metastases, recurrence, and mortality in patients with PTC. A recent genome-wide expression profiling approach (Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA)) and in vitro and in vivo functional studies revealed that BRAFV600E affects extracellular matrix composition (i.e. increased expression of some collagens and laminins) and promotes thyroid cancer migration and invasion. BRAFV600E through the phospho-MEK1/2 and phospho-ERK1/2 pathway may control a network of genes crucial in integrating and regulating the extracellular and intracellular signaling in thyroid cancer cells, which may be fundamental to trigger an abnormal cell differentiation/totipotency and shape/polarity, and contribute to tumor aggressiveness mechanisms (i.e. cell adhesion, migration, and invasion). Increasing our knowledge of BRAFV600E-modulated ECM genes and targeting the subset of genes essential for tumor aggressiveness will help establish a novel paradigm for treatment of thyroid cancers harboring BRAFV600E. Furthermore, identifying downstream events from the BRAFV600E/ERK1/2 pathway will eventually identify novel biomarkers that can be used to correlate with disease outcome and overall survival. PMID:21321384

  8. Relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disease: relevance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in breast malignancy.

    PubMed

    Giani, C; Fierabracci, P; Bonacci, R; Gigliotti, A; Campani, D; De Negri, F; Cecchetti, D; Martino, E; Pinchera, A

    1996-03-01

    The relationship between thyroid dysfunction and breast cancer (BC) is debated. To clarify this controversial issue, a prospective study on thyroid function in BC was performed. The prevalence of thyroid disease was examined in 102 consecutive BC patients with ductal infiltrating carcinoma after surgery and before starting any chemohormonal or x-ray therapy and in 100 age-matched control healthy women living in the same borderline iodine-sufficient geographic area. All subjects were submitted to clinical ultrasound thyroid evaluation and serum free T4, free T3, TSH, thyroperoxidase antibody, and thyroglobulin antibody determination. Fine needle aspiration was performed in all thyroid nodules. Estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR, respectively) were assayed in 92 and 55 BC specimens, respectively. The overall prevalence of thyroid disease was 47 in 102 (46%) in BC patients and 14 in 100 (14%) in controls (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of nontoxic goiter was 27.4% in BC patients and 11% in controls (P = 0.003). Hashimoto's thyroiditis was found in 13.7% of BC patients and in only 2% of the controls (P < 0.005). Other thyroid disorders found in the BC group included 2 cases of Graves' disease, 2 of thyroid carcinoma, and 1 of subacute thyroiditis, whereas in the control group only 1 case of Graves' disease and none of the other disorders were found. Mean free T3, free T4, and TSH concentrations showed no difference between BC patients and controls. The prevalence of thyroperoxidase antibody was higher in BC patients than in controls (23.5% vs. 8%; P < 0.005), whereas the prevalence of thyroglobulin antibody was not different. In BC patients the presence of thyroid antibodies was more frequently associated with clinically detectable autoimmune thyroiditis (14 of 26, 51.8%; P = 0.03) and was more common in the younger group. The positivity of ER was found in 51 of 92 (55.43%) and that of PR was found in 26 of 55 (47.27%) BC specimens. No relationship was found

  9. Diagnostic Utility of Galectin-3 in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Connie G.; Strugnell, Scott S.; Griffith, Obi L.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Gown, Allen M.; Walker, Blair; Nabi, Ivan R.; Wiseman, Sam M.

    2010-01-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), which has received significant recent attention for its utility as a diagnostic marker for thyroid cancer, represents the most well-studied molecular candidate for thyroid cancer diagnosis. Gal-3 is a protein that binds to β-galactosidase residues on cell surface glycoproteins and has also been identified in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartment. This marker has been implicated in regulation of normal cellular proliferation and apoptosis, as well as malignant transformation and the metastasis of cancer cells. We here present a mechanistic review of Gal-3 and its role in cancer development and progression. Gal-3 expression studies in thyroid tissue and cytologic tumor specimens and their methodological considerations are also discussed in this article. Despite great variance in their methodology, the majority of immunohistochemical studies found that Gal-3 was differentially expressed in thyroid carcinoma compared with benign and normal thyroid specimens, suggesting that Gal-3 is a good diagnostic marker for thyroid cancer. Recent studies have also demonstrated improved methodological reliability. On the other hand, Gal-3 genomic expression studies have shown inconsistent results for diagnostic utility and are not recommended. Overall, the development of Gal-3 as a diagnostic marker for thyroid cancer represents a promising avenue for future study, and its clinical application could significantly reduce the number of diagnostic thyroid operations performed for cases of indeterminant fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology, and thus positively impact the current management of thyroid nodular disease. PMID:20363921

  10. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Iodine I 131 and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  11. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  12. Trends of Thyroid Cancer in Israel: 1980–2012

    PubMed Central

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Silverman, Barbara G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing worldwide, while mortality from thyroid cancer is stable or decreasing. Consequently, survival rates are rising. We describe time trends in the incidence, mortality, and 5-year survival of thyroid cancer in Israel in 1980–2012, in light of the global trends. Methods: Israel National Cancer Registry database provided information regarding thyroid cancer incidence and vital status, which enabled computation of survival rates. The Central Bureau of Statistics database provided information on thyroid cancer mortality. Incidence and mortality rates were age-adjusted and presented by population group (Jews/Arabs) and gender. Relative 5-year survival rates which account for the general population survival in the corresponding time period were presented by population group and gender. Joinpoint analyses were used to assess incidence trends over time. Results: In 1980–2012 significant increases in the incidence of thyroid cancer were observed, with an annual percent change (APC) range of 3.98–6.93, driven almost entirely by papillary carcinoma (APCs 5.75–8.86), while rates of other types of thyroid cancer remained stable or decreased. Furthermore, higher rates of early detection were noted. In 1980–2012, a modest reduction in thyroid cancer mortality was observed in Jewish women (APC −1.07) with no substantial change in Jewish men. The 5-year relative survival after thyroid cancer diagnosis has increased to ≥90% in both population groups and both genders. Conclusions: The Israeli secular trends of thyroid cancer incidence (increasing), mortality (mostly stable), and survival (modestly increasing) closely follow reported global trends. PMID:26886958

  13. Recurrent Episodes of Thyrotoxicosis in a Man following Pregnancies of his Spouse with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Belokovskaya, Regina; Levine, Alice C.

    2015-01-01

    Over an 8-year period, a male patient presented three times to an endocrinologist with strikingly similar presentations, including palpitations, anxiety, and tremors. Each of his presentations occurred following either the birth of one of his two children or his wife's late termination of pregnancy. This patient's illness followed the typical time course of silent thyroiditis: hyperthyroidism, followed by euthyroidism, a late hypothyroid phase, and then a complete resolution of symptoms and normalization of thyroid function tests over a period of several months. We discuss the curious clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and a literature review of alternate explanations for this patient's condition, including a discussion of the impact of seasonal shift, spousal's autoimmune disease, stress, and evolutionary changes in males postpartum. Although the differential diagnosis is broad in this case and the thyrotoxicosis could have coincidentally followed pregnancies of the patient's wife, documented hormonal changes in men during postpartum period in conjunction with the timeline of the patient's condition are suggestive of recurrent “sympathetic” postpartum thyroiditis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent painless thyroiditis in a man following pregnancies of his wife with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. PMID:26421199

  14. Risk of Recurrence in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sørum Falk, Ragnhild; Folkvard Evensen, Jan; Boysen, Morten; Brøndbo, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    A cohort study was undertaken to analyze the risk of recurrence among 1616 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx from 1983 to 2010 at a single, tertiary academic center in Oslo, Norway. The cohort was followed from the date of diagnosis to September 2011. Competing risk regression analysis assessed the association between various risk factors and the risk of recurrence, where death was considered a competing event. Recurrence was observed in 368 patients (23%) during the study period. The majority (71%) of recurrences involved the location of the primary tumor. The overall risk of recurrence during the first three years after initiating treatment was 20.5%. Increased risk of recurrence was observed in patients with supraglottic cancer, younger patients, those with T2–T3 tumors and in patients treated in the earlier part of the study period. Significant factors for recurrence in glottic carcinomas were age, treatment in the earlier part of the study and T-status, whereas age was a significant factor in supraglottic cancer. N-status appeared less significant. In conclusion, follow-up of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma should place particular emphasis on the site of the primary tumor, younger patients, cases of supraglottic cancer and T2-T4 primary tumors, especially during the first three years after treatment. More studies are needed to assess the impact of surgical versus non-surgical treatment, and eventually the significance of recurrence, for disease-specific and overall survival in cases of advanced laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27716797

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands make hormones. The thyroid uses iodine , a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, ... Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid : The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The ...

  16. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has rapidly increased worldwide. Thyroid cancer incidence is relatively high in regions where the population's daily iodine intake is insufficient. While low dietary iodine has been considered as a risk factor for thyroid cancer development, previous studies found controversial results across different food types. Among different ethnic groups, dietary factors are influenced by various dietary patterns, eating habits, life-styles, nutrition, and other environmental factors. This review reports the association between dietary factors and thyroid cancer risk among ethnic groups living in different geologic regions. Iodine-rich food such as fish and shellfish may provide a protective role in populations with insufficient daily iodine intake. The consumption of goitrogenic food, such as cruciferous vegetables, showed a positive association with risk. While considered to be a risk factor for other cancers, alcohol intake showed a protective role against thyroid cancer. High consumption of meat such as chicken, pork, and poultry showed a positive association with the risk, but dairy products showed no significant association. Regular use of multivitamins and dietary nitrate and nitrite also showed a positive association with thyroid cancer risk. However, the study results are inconsistent and investigations into the mechanism for how dietary factors change thyroid hormone levels and influence thyroid function are required. PMID:25136535

  17. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references.

  18. [Reinnervation of larynx in surgical treatment of invasive thyroidal gland cancer].

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, V A

    2013-10-01

    The possibilities and efficacy of performance of simultant operations for invasive thyroid gland cancer in initial neuropathic laryngeal stenosis and dysphonic syndrome, aimed at minimization of the residual volume of thyroid gland tissue and surgical laryngeal reinnervation, were studied. The results of laryngeal surgical reinnervation, in accordance to data of videolaryngoscopy, aerodynamical and spectral analysis of the voice, self estimation of the vocal disorders impact on the patients quality of life were analyzed. Postoperatively in all the patients the improvement of phonation and quality of life was noted. Primary neurorhaphia of recurrent laryngeal nerve secures restoration of normal or nearly normal talkative voice due to restoration of the tone and volume of m. cricoarytenoideus lateralis and m. thyroarytenoideus on the side of affection and may be effectively applied for correction of consequences of laryngeal neuropathic paralysis in surgical treatment of the thyroid gland cancer.

  19. Thyroid cancer incidence in relation to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arnbjoernsson, E.A.; Arnbjoernsson, A.O.; Olafsson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Environmental or genetic factors are sought to explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. At present, it is impossible to cite any environmental factor, particularly one related to the volcanic activity in the country, which could explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. However, the thyroid gland in Icelanders is very small due to the high intake of iodine from seafood. It is, therefore, easier for physicians to find thyroid tumors. Furthermore, genetic factors are very likely to be of great importance in the small, isolated island of Iceland.

  20. Mutation Profile of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Shin; Lim, Jung Ah

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to significant insights into the genetic basis of thyroid tumorigenesis. Among the mutations commonly seen in thyroid cancers, the vast majority are associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) mutations are the most common mutations observed in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs), followed by RET/PTC rearrangements and RAS mutations, while follicular thyroid cancers are more likely to harbor RAS mutations or PAX8/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rearrangements. Beyond these more common mutations, alterations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter have recently been associated with clinicopathologic features, disease prognosis, and tumorigenesis in thyroid cancer. While the mutations underlying thyroid tumorigenesis are well known, the frequency of these mutations is strongly associated with geography, with clear differences reported between Asian and Western countries. Of particular interest is the prevalence of BRAF mutations, with Korean patients exhibiting the highest rate of BRAF-associated thyroid cancers in the world. Here, we review the prevalence of each of the most common mutations in Asian and Western countries, and identify the characteristics of well-differentiated thyroid cancer in Asians. PMID:26435130

  1. Standardized Thyroid Cancer Mortality in Korea between 1985 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Hyemi; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of thyroid cancer has increased very rapidly in Korea. However, there is no published report focusing on thyroid cancer mortality in Korea. In this study, we aimed to evaluate standardized thyroid cancer mortality using data from Statistics Korea (the Statistical Office of Korea). Methods Population and mortality data from 1985 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Age-standardized rates of thyroid cancer mortality were calculated according to the standard population of Korea, as well as World Health Organization (WHO) standard population and International Cancer Survival Standard (ICSS) population weights. Results The crude thyroid cancer mortality rate increased from 0.1 to 0.7 per 100,000 between 1985 and 2010. The pattern was the same for both sexes. The age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) for thyroid cancer for Korean resident registration population increased from 0.19 to 0.67 between 1985 and 2000. However, it decreased slightly, from 0.67 to 0.55, between 2000 and 2010. When mortality was adjusted using the WHO standard population and ICSS population weights, the ASMR similarly increased until 2000, and then decreased between 2000 and 2010. Conclusion Thyroid cancer mortality increased until 2000 in Korea. It started to decrease from 2000. PMID:25559576

  2. Post-thyroidectomy neck ultrasonography in patients with thyroid cancer and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Sumbul; Tan, Andrew; Ang, Ee Sin; Loke, Kelvin S H; Kao, Yung Hsiang; Goh, Anthony; Wong, Wai Yin

    2014-04-01

    The importance of routine neck ultrasonography for the detection of unsuspected local or nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer following thyroidectomy (with or without neck dissection) is well documented in many journal articles and international guidelines. Herein, we present a pictorial summary of the sonographic features of benign and malignant central neck compartment nodules and cervical lymph nodes via a series of high-quality ultrasonographic images, with a review of the literature.

  3. Indications for radioiodine administration in follicular-derived thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Buffet, C; Ghander, C; le Marois, E; Leenhardt, L

    2015-02-01

    Indications for radioiodine administration after thyroid cancer surgery have shifted in recent years toward personalized management, adapted to the individual risk of tumor progression. The most recent guidelines and studies favor de-escalation in indications for administration, dosage and means of preparation with exogenous recombinant TSH stimulation as treatment of choice. Radioiodine administration has 3 possible objectives: • ablation of normal thyroid tissue remnants in patients with low risk of progression, using low radioiodine activity levels, with the advantage of completing disease staging on whole-body scintigraphy performed after administration of the radioiodine capsule, and of facilitating follow-up by thyroglobulin assay; • adjuvant treatment for suspected microscopic metastases in patients with intermediate or high risk of progression, using higher activity levels, with the theoretic aim of limiting recurrence and mortality; • curative treatment in high-risk patients with proven metastases, using exclusively high activity levels, with a view to improving specific survival. In future, indications for ablation and/or activity prescription may be governed by an algorithm incorporating individual baseline progression risk (essentially founded of pTNM staging) and postoperative data such as thyroglobulin level and neck ultrasound results.

  4. Clinical presentation and clinical outcomes in Chernobyl-related paediatric thyroid cancers: what do we know now? What can we expect in the future?

    PubMed

    Tuttle, R M; Vaisman, F; Tronko, M D

    2011-05-01

    Over the last 20 years, nearly 5000 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer have been diagnosed and treated in the regions of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus in young people previously exposed to the Chernobyl radioactive fallout during childhood. At diagnosis, 60-70% of the Chernobyl-related paediatric thyroid cancers had clinically evident cervical lymph node metastases (N1) and 10-15% had distant metastases (M1). Despite early reports suggesting that the paediatric thyroid cancer cases that developed after exposure to Chernobyl fallout were particularly aggressive, it now seems that the initial presentation and early clinical course of most of these cases are very similar to both non-radiation-associated paediatric thyroid cancers and thyroid cancers that arise after exposure to external beam irradiation. Over an average clinical follow-up period of about 10 years, the disease-specific mortality rate in these paediatric thyroid cancer cases that developed after the Chernobyl accident is quite low (1% or less). As would be expected in paediatric thyroid cancer, short-term recurrence rates range from 7 to 28% in published reports (mean 17%). However, long-term studies of paediatric thyroid cancer suggest that although the 30 year disease-specific mortality rate should be about 1%, the risk of developing structural disease recurrence is nearly 30% (of which 80% are expected to be locoregional recurrences and 20% are probably new distant metastases). Projected over 30 years of follow-up, a 1% disease-specific mortality in this cohort of 5000 patients would equate to about 50 deaths directly attributable to thyroid cancer. However, a 30% recurrence rate would also mean that about 1500 patients may develop a clinically meaningful recurrence that would need to be diagnosed and treated. It is imperative that we continue to work with our colleagues in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia to ensure that this large volume of patients destined to develop clinically significant

  5. Tumour suppressive function of HUWE1 in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyuan; Zhao, Pengxin; Zang, Leilei; Zhang, Kaili; Liao, Haiying; Hu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    HUWE1 (the HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing protein 1) is an ubiquitin E3 ligase which plays an important role in coordinating diverse cellular processes. It has been found to be dysregulated in various cancer type and its functions in tumorigenesis remain controversial. The potential tumour suppressive role of HUWE1 in thyroid cancer development was investigated by knocking down HUWE1 in three authentic thyroid cancer cell lines, WRO, FTC133 and BCPAP, followed by various functional assays, including cell proliferation, scratch wound healing and invasion assays. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo tumour suppressive properties of HUWE1. Small-interfering RNA mediated knockdown of HUWE1 promoted cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion in thyroid cancer cells. Overexpression of HUWE1 conferred partial sensitivity to chemo drugs interfering with DNA replication in these cells. Moreover, HUWE1 was found to be down-regulated in human thyroid cancer tissues compared with matched normal thyroid tissues. In addition, overexpression of HUWE1 significantly inhibited tumour growth in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Mechanistic investigation revealed that HUWE1 can regulate p53 protein level through its stabilization. HUWE1 functions as a tumour suppressor in thyroid cancer progression, which may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of thyroid cancer. PMID:27581931

  6. Hemithyroidectomy increases the risk of disease recurrence in patients with ipsilateral multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAOLONG; ZHAO, CUI; HU, DANDAN; YU, YANG; GAO, JIN; ZHAO, WENCHUAN; GAO, MING

    2013-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is often clinically multifocal. In this study, the clinicopathological characteristics of a total of 347 PTC patients treated between 2006 and 2007 were investigated in order to assess the risk factors for tumor recurrence in patients with multifocal PTC. Of all the PTC cases reviewed, 35 (10%) were categorized as multifocal PTC. Patients with multifocal PTC were significantly more likely to have extrathyroidal extension, lymph node metastases and disease recurrence (P<0.05). Hemithyroidectomy resulted in a significantly higher incidence of tumor recurrence in patients with ipsilateral multifocal PTC compared with unifocal PTC patients (P<0.01). In conclusion, hemithyroidectomy was associated with tumor recurrence in patients with ipsilateral multifocal PTC but not those with unifocal PTC. Hemithyroidectomy should only be carried out after careful deliberation when involving patients with ipsilateral multifocal PTC. PMID:23599804

  7. Determinants of papillary cancer of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Wingren, G.; Hatschek, T.; Axelson, O. )

    1993-10-01

    Determinants of papillary thyroid cancer were evaluated in a questionnaire-based case-control study from southeastern Sweden. A total of 104 cases, diagnosed from 1977 to 1987, and 387 randomly selected controls were included in the analyses. Female subjects with papillary cancer reported a work history as dentists/dental assistants, telephone operators, teachers, and day nursery personnel, and an occupational contact with chemicals and video display terminals more often than did controls. The 11 male cases more often reported working as mechanics and metal workers and having occupational contact with solvents. Other factors associated with increased risk for female papillary cancer were having private well water at the birth address; leisure time exposure to combustion smoke; low intake of cruciferous vegetables and seafood; and a family history of goiter, heart disease, biliary disorder, or female genital cancer. Diagnostic radiographic examinations, especially to the head, neck, or upper back/chest area, or repeated dental examinations, were also found to be associated with this form of cancer. With regard to the possible influence from hormonal factors among women less than age 50 years at time of diagnosis, an increased risk was found for a pregnancy soon after puberty. Tendencies toward a decreasing risk with increasing age at first pregnancy as well as an increasing risk with increasing number of pregnancies were found as well. Multiparity seemed to potentiate the effect from prior radiographic examinations.

  8. Immune Response in Thyroid Cancer: Widening the Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-01-01

    The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the first line of defensive response. Unlike innate immune responses, adaptive responses are highly specific to the particular antigen that induced them. Both branches of the immune system may interact in antitumor immune response. Major effector cells of the immune system that directly target thyroid cancer cells include dendritic cells, macrophages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes. A mixture of immune cells may infiltrate thyroid cancer microenvironment and the balance of protumor and antitumor activity of these cells may be associated with prognosis. Herein, we describe some evidences that immune response may be important for thyroid cancer progression and may help us identify more aggressive tumors, sparing the vast majority of patients from costly unnecessary invasive procedures. The future trend in thyroid cancer is an individualized therapy. PMID:25328756

  9. Overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer: answers to five key questions.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Jenny K; Nguyen, Xuan V; Davies, Louise

    2015-08-01

    Thyroid cancer fulfills the criteria for overdiagnosis by having a reservoir of indolent cancers and practice patterns leading to the diagnosis of incidental cancers from the reservoir. The occurrence of overdiagnosis is also supported by population-based data showing an alarming rise in thyroid cancer incidence without change in mortality. Because one of the activities leading to overdiagnosis is the workup of incidental thyroid nodules detected on imaging, it is critical that radiologists understand the issue of overdiagnosis and their role in the problem and solution. This article addresses 1) essential thyroid cancer facts, 2) the evidence supporting overdiagnosis, 3) the role of radiology in overdiagnosis, 4) harms of overdiagnosis, and 5) steps radiologists can take to minimize the problem.

  10. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  11. Exhaled breath volatile biomarker analysis for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Changsong; Chi, Chunjie; Wang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Wei; Ke, Chaofu; Xu, Guowang; Li, Enyou

    2015-08-01

    Compared with other types of cancer, thyroid cancer incidence rates have increased rapidly worldwide in the past few decades. In recent years, potential thyroid cancer biomarkers have been studied, but these biomarkers have neither specificity nor good positive predictive value. Exhaled breath analysis is a recently developed convenient and noninvasive method for screening and diagnosing the disease. In this study, potential thyroid cancer biomarkers in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected. Exhaled breath was collected from 64 patients with histologically confirmed cases of thyroid disease (including 39 individuals with papillary thyroid carcinoma and 25 individuals with nodular goiters) and 32 healthy volunteers. Solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was used to assess the exhaled VOCs of the study participants. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and partial least-squares discriminant analysis were performed to process the final data. The VOCs exhibited significant differences between nodular goiter patients and normal controls, papillary thyroid carcinoma patients and normal controls, and papillary thyroid carcinoma patients and nodular goiter patients; 7, 7, and 3 characteristic metabolites played decisive roles in sample classification, respectively. Breath analysis may provide a new, noninvasive, and directly qualitative method for the clinical diagnosis of thyroid disease. PMID:25666355

  12. Thyroid Hormones, Autoantibodies, Ultrasonography, and Clinical Parameters for Predicting Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin-zheng; Zeng, Tian-shu; Pu, Lin; Pan, Shi-xiu; Xia, Wen-fang; Chen, Lu-lu

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate thyroid nodule malignancy prediction using thyroid function tests, autoantibodies, ultrasonographic imaging, and clinical data. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in 1400 patients with nodular thyroid disease (NTD). The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration was significantly higher in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) versus benign thyroid nodular disease (BTND) (p = 0.004). The receiver operating characteristic curve of TSH showed an AUC of 0.58 (95% CI 0.53–0.62, p = 0.001), sensitivity of 74%, and specificity of 57% at a cut-off of 1.59 mIU/L. There was an incremental increase in TSH concentration along with the increasing tumor size (p < 0.001). Thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) concentration was associated with an increased risk of malignancy (p = 0.029), but this association was lost when the effect of TSH was taken into account (p = 0.11). Thyroid ultrasonographic characteristics, including fewer than three nodules, hypoechoic appearance, solid component, poorly defined margin, intranodular or peripheral-intranodular flow, and punctate calcification, can be used to predict the risk of thyroid cancer. In conclusion, our study suggests that preoperative serum TSH concentration, age, and ultrasonographic features can be used to predict the risk of malignancy in patients with NTD. PMID:27313612

  13. Ultrasonography survey and thyroid cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Peter; Kaiser, Jan Christian; Ulanovsky, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the major health concerns after the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station (NPS). Currently, ultrasonography surveys are being performed for persons residing in the Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident with an age of up to 18 years. Here, the expected thyroid cancer prevalence in the Fukushima Prefecture is assessed based on an ultrasonography survey of Ukrainians, who were exposed at an age of up to 18 years to (131)I released during the Chernobyl NPS accident, and on differences in equipment and study protocol in the two surveys. Radiation risk of thyroid cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and preliminary estimates of thyroid dose due to the Fukushima accident were used for the prediction of baseline and radiation-related thyroid cancer risks. We estimate a prevalence of thyroid cancer of 0.027 % (95 % CI 0.010 %; 0.050 %) for the first screening campaign in the Fukushima Prefecture. Compared with the incidence rate in Japan in 2007, the ultrasonography survey is predicted to increase baseline thyroid cancer incidence by a factor of 7.4 (95 % CI 0.95; 17.3). Under the condition of continued screening, thyroid cancer during the first fifty years after the accident is predicted to be detected for about 2 % of the screened population. The prediction of radiation-related thyroid cancer in the most exposed fraction (a few ten thousand persons) of the screened population of the Fukushima Prefecture has a large uncertainty with the best estimates of the average risk of 0.1-0.3 %, depending on average dose.

  14. Sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Politti, Ugo; Spisni, Roberto; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has been evaluated in several Phase II and III studies in patients with locally advanced/metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs), reporting partial responses, stabilization of the disease and improvement of progression-free survival. Best responses were observed in lung metastases and minimal responses in bone lesions. On the basis of these studies, sorafenib was approved for the treatment of metastatic DTC in November 2013. Few studies suggested that reduction of thyroglobulin levels, or of average standardized uptake value at the fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, could be helpful for the identification of responding patients; but further studies are needed to confirm these results. Tumor genetic marker levels did not have any prognostic or predictive role in DTC patients.The most common adverse events observed included skin toxicity and gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. Encouraging results have also been observed in patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Many studies are ongoing to evaluate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in DTC patients.

  15. Sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Politti, Ugo; Spisni, Roberto; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has been evaluated in several Phase II and III studies in patients with locally advanced/metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs), reporting partial responses, stabilization of the disease and improvement of progression-free survival. Best responses were observed in lung metastases and minimal responses in bone lesions. On the basis of these studies, sorafenib was approved for the treatment of metastatic DTC in November 2013. Few studies suggested that reduction of thyroglobulin levels, or of average standardized uptake value at the fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, could be helpful for the identification of responding patients; but further studies are needed to confirm these results. Tumor genetic marker levels did not have any prognostic or predictive role in DTC patients.The most common adverse events observed included skin toxicity and gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. Encouraging results have also been observed in patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Many studies are ongoing to evaluate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in DTC patients. PMID:26152651

  16. The cost of breast cancer recurrences.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, S. F.; Huggins, R. M.; Snyder, R. D.; Bishop, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    Information about the costs of recurrent breast cancer is potentially important for targeting cost containment strategies and analysing the cost-effectiveness of breast cancer control programmes. We estimated these costs by abstracting health service and consumable usage data from the medical histories of 128 patients, and valuing each of the resources used. Resource usage and costs were summarised by regarding the recurrence as a series of episodes which were categorised into five anatomical site-based groups according to the following hierarchy: visceral, central nervous system (CNS), bone, local and other. Hospital visits and investigations comprised 78% of total costs for all episodes combined, and there were significant differences between the site-based groups in the frequency of hospital visits and most investigations. Total costs were most accurately described by separate linear regression models for each group, with the natural logarithm of the cost of the episode as the dependent variable, and predictor variables including the duration of the episode, duration squared, duration cubed and a variable indicating whether the episode was fatal. Visceral and CNS episodes were associated with higher costs than the other groups and were more likely to be shorter and fatal. A fatal recurrence of duration 15.7 months (the median for our sample) was predicted to cost $10,575 (Aus + 1988; or 4,877 pounds). Reduction of the substantial costs of recurrent breast cancer is likely to be a sizable economic benefit of adjuvant systemic therapy and mammographic screening. We did not identify any major opportunities for cost containment during the management of recurrences. PMID:1558803

  17. Thyroid cancer after diagnostic administration of iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.; Mattsson, A.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    To provide quantitative data on the risk of thyroid cancer after exposure to {sup 131}I, 34,104 patients administered {sup 131}I for diagnostic purposes were followed for up to 40 years. The mean thyroid dose was estimated as 1.1 Gy, and 67 thyroid cancers occurred in contrast to 49.7 expected (standardized incidence ratio = 1.35; 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.71). Excess cancers were apparent only among patients referred because of a suspected thyroid tumor, and no increased risk was seen among those referred for other reasons. Further, risk was not related to radiation dose to the thyroid gland, time since exposure or age at exposure. The slight excess of thyroid cancer thus appeared to be due to the underlying thyroid condition and not radiation exposure. Among those under age 20 years when {sup 131}I was administered, a small excess risk (3 cancers compared to 1.8 expected) was about 2-10 times lower than that predicted from data for the A-bomb survivors. These data suggest that protraction of dose may result in a lower risk than an acute X-ray exposure of the same total dose. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  18. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Valerie H.; Camille, Nadia; Miles, Brett A.; Teng, Marita S.; Genden, Eric M.; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Invasion of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) into surrounding structures can lead to morbid procedures such as laryngectomy and tracheal resection. In these patients, there is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy. Methods. We identified three studies involving the treatment of DTC with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: two from Slovenia and one from Japan. Results. These studies demonstrate that in selected situations, neoadjuvant chemotherapy can have a good response and allow for a more complete surgical resection, the treatment of DTC. Additionally, the SELECT trial shows that the targeted therapy lenvatinib is effective in the treatment of DTC and could be useful as neoadjuvant therapy for this disease due to its short time to response. Pazopanib has also demonstrated promise in phase II data. Conclusions. Thus, chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting could possibly be useful for managing advanced DTC. Additionally, some of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) hold promise for use in the neoadjuvant setting in DTC. PMID:27747102

  20. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment. PMID:27100499

  1. TCGA study improves understanding of thyroid cancer genetics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development.

  2. Herpes and polyoma family viruses in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    STAMATIOU, DIMITRIS P.; DERDAS, STAVROS P.; ZORAS, ODYSSEAS L.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is considered the most common malignancy that affects the endocrine system. Generally, thyroid cancer derives from follicular epithelial cells, and thyroid cancer is divided into well-differentiated papillary (80% of cases) and follicular (15% of cases) carcinoma. Follicular thyroid cancer is further divided into the conventional and oncocytic (Hürthle cell) type, poorly differentiated carcinoma and anaplastic carcinoma. Both poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinoma can arise either de novo, or secondarily from papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. The incidence of thyroid cancer has significantly increased for both males and females of all ages, particularly for females between 55–64 years of age, from 1999 through 2008. The increased rates refer to tumors of all stages, though they were mostly noted in localized disease. Recently, viruses have been implicated in the direct regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the development of metastases. More specifically, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins may potentially lead to the development of metastasis through the regulation of the metastasis suppressor, Nm23, and the control of Twist expression. The significant enhancement of the metastatic potential, through the induction of angiogenesis and changes to the tumor microenvironment, subsequent to viral infection, has been documented, while EMT also contributes to cancer cell permissiveness to viruses. A number of viruses have been identified to be associated with carcinogenesis, and these include lymphotropic herpesviruses, namely EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV, also known as human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV8)]; two hepatitis viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); human papillomaviruses (HPVs); human T cell lymphoma virus (HTLV); and a new polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus identified in 2008. In this review, we examined the association between thyroid cancer and two oncogenic

  3. Fetal growth and subsequent maternal risk of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer has peak incidence among women of reproductive age, and growth factors, which have procarcinogenic properties, may play an important etiologic role. However, the association between fetal growth rate during a woman's pregnancy and her subsequent risk of thyroid cancer has not been previously examined. We conducted a national cohort study of 1,837,634 mothers who had a total of 3,588,497 live-births in Sweden in 1973-2008, followed up for thyroid cancer incidence through 2009. There were 2,202 mothers subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 36.8 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for maternal age, height, weight, smoking, and sociodemographic factors, high fetal growth (birth weight standardized for gestational age and sex) was associated with a subsequent increased risk of thyroid cancer in the mother (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per additional 1 standard deviation, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09; p = 0.02). Each 1,000 g increase in the infant's birth weight was associated with a 13% increase in the mother's subsequent risk of thyroid cancer (IRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22; p = 0.001). These findings appeared to involve both papillary and follicular subtypes, and did not vary significantly by the mother's height, weight or smoking status. In this large national cohort study, high fetal growth during a woman's pregnancy was independently associated with a subsequent increased risk of her developing thyroid cancer. If confirmed, these findings suggest an important role of maternal growth factors in the development of thyroid cancer, and potentially may help facilitate the identification of high-risk subgroups of women.

  4. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Steven G.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D.; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T.; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B.; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. Methods: A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Results: These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. Conclusions: In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the

  5. [Thyroid cancer: lessons of chernobyl and prognosis for Fukushima].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F

    2013-01-01

    Results of epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer incidence in Russia following the Chernobyl accident are presented in the article. Child population in territories contaminated with radionuclides who got thyroid dose from incorporated (131)I above 100-150 mGy, should be referred to a group at radiation risk. Prognostic estimates of increase in thyroid cancer incidence among the population living in close vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP were made with account for the Chernobyl data and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  6. [Detection of thyroid cancer : utopia or reality? Or the value of thallium 201 in thyroid pathology].

    PubMed

    Hermans, J; Beauduin, M; Gigot, J F; Schmitz, A

    1986-01-01

    Faced with a diagnosis of cold thyroid nodule as evidenced by routine scintigraphy, the clinician has to determine whether this nodule is malignant or not. This is a serious problem since, according to literature, 7-20% of cold thyroid nodules are malignant. In 1982 some Japanese authors demonstrated the possibility of using 201 T1 in diagnosing thyroid tumors. This study refers to 120 patients who underwent an operation for thyroid disorders characterized by the presence of one or several cold nodules (as evaluated with conventional scintigraphy) and enables a comparison between a thorough evaluation of the thyroidal status and the 201 T1 scintigrams. These were obtained with a gamma-camera using a pinhole collimator. If a cold nodule is positive with 201 T1, surgery is incontestably indicated, as such a finding correlates with the existence of a thyroid tumor (benign follicular adenoma or carcinoma) in 89.5% of the observed cases. In the cancer group the sensibility of the Thallium test is of 85% and its specificity 80%. We may assert that there is a very low risk of Thallium negative (old) nodules being malignant. The pre-operative 201 T1 scintigraphy is easy to perform in any Nuclear Medicine department. Nowadays, the combination of aspiration cytology and 201 T1 scintigraphy should make it possible to make and accurate diagnosis in the vast majority of differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid cancers.

  7. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  8. Thyroid cancer in Egypt: histopathological criteria, correlation with survival and oestrogen receptor protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rehab Allah; Aboelnaga, Engy M

    2015-07-01

    Thyroid cancer represents approximately 1% of new cancer and oestrogen may play a role in the pathogenesis of thyroid neoplasm. We aimed to study the clinicopathological criteria and ER expression of thyroid cancer in Mansoura University (Egypt), and to correlate the survival to these clinicopathological data and ER expression. This retrospective study reviewed 644 patients with histologically proven thyroid carcinoma during the period from 2003 to 2011. 152 cases during the period between 2008 and 2011 were retrieved from the archive and examined by immunohistochemistry for oestrogen receptor-α (ER) expression. ER-α expression is significantly associated with the female sex, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, extrathyroid extension, multifocality disease and recurrence and in the whole series (p < 0.5). The same was noticed in papillary carcinoma (PTC) except the gender of the patient. Tumour type, extrathyroid extension and ER expression were the independent prognostic factors of DFS, while in PTC, only ER expression was the independent one. The histological type was the only independent prognostic factor for OAS in the series were studied for ER expression, while extrathyroid extension was the only one that affected OAS of PTC. There was significant positive correlation with lymph node metastasis and ER expression in whole patient and PTC cases. No difference in survival between the low and high ranges of positive oestrogen expression. The prognosis of thyroid carcinoma in Egypt is similar to that occurs worldwide. ER-α expression was a significant prognostic marker for DFS in thyroid cancer and can be used as a predictive factor of lymph node metastasis.

  9. Serum thyroglobulin in the monitoring of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) usually have an excellent prognosis. Following surgical and radioiodine treatment to remove the cancer cells and suppressive doses of levothyroxine, long-term follow-up, including measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) using a sensitive assay is required to detect recurrence. To interpret Tg results clinicians need to know the corresponding serum TSH concentration, have an appreciation of the clearance of Tg from patient serum following various interventions and the limitations of its measurement. The limitations of Tg immunoassay are well described and include potential interference from TgAb. For the majority of patients with DTC who are TgAb-negative, Tg measurement remains the most useful method of follow-up. For the TgAb-positive minority, interference and the possibility of producing erroneous results is a concern. Some assays are less badly affected than others and laboratories are advised to choose their assays carefully. Laboratories have sought to identify interferences using measurement of TgAb, lack of concordance between RIAs and immunometric assays and recovery of added Tg. More recently LC-MSMS assays to quantify Tg have been developed. They are not currently as sensitive as Tg immunoassays and it is likely these assays will, like immunoassays, be limited by Tg heterogeneity and standardization issues, although initial evaluations indicate that they may have value in the clinical setting as a second line test in antibody-positive DTC patients in whom Tg is unmeasurable by immunoassay. PMID:27542000

  10. Increasing Incidence of Thyroid Cancer in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Darrin V.; Goyal, Neerav; Camacho, Fabian; Goldenberg, David

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The incidence of thyroid cancer in the United States has increased rapidly and Pennsylvania is the state with the highest rate of thyroid cancer in the country, although the factors driving this increase are unknown. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the increase in thyroid cancer represents a true increase in disease or is the result of overdiagnosis. OBJECTIVE To compare the increase in thyroid cancer incidence and tumor characteristics in Pennsylvania with the rest of the United States and gain insight into the factors influencing the increased incidence of thyroid cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a population-based study, data on thyroid cancer from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results 9 (SEER-9) registry and the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry (PCR) from 1985 through 2009 were collected and reviewed for information regarding sex, race, histologic type of thyroid cancer, staging, and tumor size at diagnosis. International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition code C739 (thyroid carcinoma) was used to identify 110 615 records in the SEER-9 registry and 29 030 records in the PCR. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Average annual percent change (AAPC) in thyroid cancer incidence across various demographic groups in Pennsylvania. RESULTS The AAPC for thyroid cancer in Pennsylvania was 7.1% per year (95% CI, 6.3%–7.9%) vs 4.2% (95% CI, 3.7%–4.7%) per year in the remainder of the United States, and trends in incidence were significantly different (P < .001). Females experienced a higher AAPC (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.9%–8.3%) compared with males (6.1% per year; 95% CI, 4.9%–7.2%) (P < .01), and trend analysis revealed that thyroid cancer may be increasing more rapidly among black females (8.6% per year; 95% CI, 5.4%–11.9%) than among white females (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.8%–8.4) (P = .60; but despite the similarity in AAPC between the 2 groups, the joinpoint models fit to the data were not parallel [P < .005

  11. Further Evidence on the Role of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Women with Recurrent Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarin, Natalia; Moretti, Costanzo; De Felice, Giovanna; Vaquero, Elena; Manfellotto, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It has been twenty years since the first paper reporting the association between thyroid antibodies (TAIs) and spontaneous miscarriage was published. Following this observation, several studies have clearly demonstrated an increased prevalence of TAI in patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM). However, the exact mechanism underlying this association remains a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the thyroid function, throughout a specific test, in patient with RM and TAI focusing on the hypothesis that TAI should be an indirect sign of a mild thyroid dysfunction. 46 patients with RM and TAI were included in the study. All patients underwent short TRH stimulation test showing an abnormal response in the vast majority of cases (65%). Normal FT4 and FT3 mean values were found whereas TSH values were in the upper normal range (2.64 ± 1.3 mUI/L). Our data support the hypothesis that in patients with RM the presence of TAI is an indirect sign of a subtle thyroid dysfunction detectable by a specific test. This test give the possibility to identify women with RM in which specific therapeutic approaches could effectively improve the possibility for a successful pregnancy. PMID:22319528

  12. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  13. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important.

  14. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  15. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  16. Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis due to Both Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in the Same Three Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Ashley; Puthenpura, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are the 2 most common autoimmune disease processes affecting the thyroid gland. The relationship between the two is complex and not clearly understood. It has been theorized that HT and GD are 2 separate disease processes due to unique genetic differences demonstrated by genome studies. On the other hand, based on occurrence of both HT and GD in monozygotic twins and within the same family, they have been regarded to represent 2 ends of the same spectrum. This case report describes 3 patients who presented with thyrotoxicosis due to both GD and HT. The initial presentation was thyrotoxicosis due to GD treated with antithyroid medication followed by temporary resolution. They all subsequently experienced recurrence of thyrotoxicosis in the form of Hashitoxicosis due to HT, and then eventually all developed thyrotoxicosis due to GD, requiring radioablation therapy. PMID:27340576

  17. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Indications and Extent of Central Neck Dissection—Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Pietro Giorgio; Boi, Francesco; Baghino, Germana; Nicolosi, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the rate of metastases in the central neck compartment and examine the morbidity and rate of recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with or without a central neck dissection. Two hundred and fifteen patients undergoing total thyroidectomy with preoperative diagnosis of differentiated thyroid cancer, in the absence of suspicious nodes, were divided in two groups: those who underwent a thyroidectomy only (group A; n = 169) and those who also received a central neck dissection (group B; n = 46). Five cases (2.32%) of nodal recurrence were observed: 3 in group A and 2 in group B. Tumor histology was associated with a risk of recurrence: Hürthle cell-variant and tall cell-variant carcinomas were associated with a high risk of recurrence. Multifocality and extrathyroidal invasion also presented a higher risk, while smaller tumors were at lower risk. The results of this study suggest that prophylactic central neck dissection should be reserved for high-risk patients only. A wider use of immunocytochemical and genetic markers to improve preoperative diagnosis and the development of methods for the intraoperative identification of metastatic lymph nodes will be useful in the future for the improved selection of patients for central neck dissections. PMID:24282633

  18. Thyroid-specific ablation of the Carney complex gene, PRKAR1A, results in hyperthyroidism and follicular thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Daphne R; Yin, Zhirong; Lee, Audrey A; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Yu, Lianbo; Parlow, Alfred F; Jarjoura, David; La Perle, Krista M D; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2012-06-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy in the population, and the incidence of this cancer is increasing at a rapid rate. Although genetic analysis of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has identified mutations in a large percentage of patients, the genetic basis of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) is less certain. Thyroid cancer, including both PTC and FTC, has been observed in patients with the inherited tumor predisposition Carney complex, caused by mutations in PRKAR1A. In order to investigate the role of loss of PRKAR1A in thyroid cancer, we generated a tissue-specific knockout of Prkar1a in the thyroid. We report that the resulting mice are hyperthyroid and developed follicular thyroid neoplasms by 1 year of age, including FTC in over 40% of animals. These thyroid tumors showed a signature of pathway activation different from that observed in other models of thyroid cancer. In vitro cultures of the tumor cells indicated that Prkar1a-null thyrocytes exhibited growth factor independence and suggested possible new therapeutic targets. Overall, this work represents the first report of a genetic mutation known to cause human FTC that exhibits a similar phenotype when modeled in the mouse. In addition to our knowledge of the mechanisms of human follicular thyroid tumorigenesis, this model is highly reproducible and may provide a viable mechanism for the further clinical development of therapies aimed at FTC. PMID:22514108

  19. Reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, B.; Bignardi, M.; Spector, G.J.; Devineni, V.R.; Hederman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients with recurrent cancers of the head and neck region were treated with surgery, radiation therapy, or combination therapy. The follow-up period ranged from 18 months to 18 years. An initial overall complete response rate of 67% and a partial response rate of 7% (overall response rate-74%) were achieved. The eventual tumor control rate was 15%. Although equal initial response rates were achieved in recurrences at the primary site and the cervical nodes, the eventual local control was better for the former (21% vs. 10%). Patients receiving less than 5,000 rad radiotherapy had a 44% complete response and an 11% eventual tumor control. Patients receiving over 5,000 rad had an 80% complete response and a 25% eventual tumor control.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation to Treat Loco-Regional Recurrence of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Bum Soo; Ahn, Kook Jin; Choi, Hyun Seok; Lim, Dong Jun; Kim, Min Hee; Bae, Ja Seong; Kim, Min Sik; Jung, Chan Kwon; Chong, Se Min

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of loco-regional, recurrent, and well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Materials and Methods Thirty-five recurrent well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas (RTC) in 32 patients were treated with RFA, between March 2008 and October 2011. RTCs were detected by regular follow-up ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy. All patients had fewer than 3 RTCs in the neck and were at high surgical risk or refused to undergo repeated surgery. Average number of RFA sessions were 1.3 (range 1-3). Post-RFA biopsy and ultrasound were performed. The mean follow-up period was 30 months. Pre- and post-RFA serum thyroglobulin values were evaluated. Results Thirty-one patients with 33 RTCs were treated with RFA only, whereas 1 patient with 2 RTCs was treated with RFA followed by surgery. At the last follow-up ultrasound, 31 (94%) of the 33 RTCs treated with RFA alone completely disappeared and the remaining 2 (6%) RTCs showed decreased volume. The largest diameter and volume of the 33 RTCs were markedly decreased by 93.2% (from 8.1 ± 3.4 mm to 0.6 ± 1.8 mm, p < 0.001) and 96.4% (from 173.9 ± 198.7 mm3 to 6.2 ± 27.9 mm3, p < 0.001), respectively. Twenty of the 21 RTCs evaluated with post-RFA biopsies (95%) were negative for malignancy. One (5%) showed remaining tumor that was removed surgically. The serum thyroglobulin was decreased in 19 of 26 patients (73%). Voice change developed immediately after RFA in 6 patients (19%) and was spontaneously recovered in 5 patients (83%). Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation can be effective in treating loco-regional, recurrent, and well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma in patients at high surgical risk. PMID:25469095

  1. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  2. Role of the Wnt Pathway in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sastre-Perona, Ana; Santisteban, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling is involved in the development of several epithelial tumors. Wnt signaling includes two major types of pathways: (i) the canonical or Wnt/β-catenin pathway; and (ii) the non-canonical pathways, which do not involve β-catenin stabilization. Among these pathways, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has received most attention during the past years for its critical role in cancer. A number of publications emphasize the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in thyroid cancer. This pathway plays a crucial role in development and epithelial renewal, and components such as β-catenin and Axin are often mutated in thyroid cancer. Although it is accepted that altered Wnt signaling is a late event in thyroid cell transformation that affects anaplastic thyroid tumors, recent data suggest that it is also altered in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with RET/PTC mutations. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize the main relevant data of Wnt signaling in thyroid cancer, with special emphasis on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:22645520

  3. Signaling Pathways in Thyroid Cancer and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Bao, Wuyuntu; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of endocrine system, and has now become the fastest increasing cancer among all the malignancies. The development, progression, invasion, and metastasis are closely associated with multiple signaling pathways and the functions of related molecules, such as Src, Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, NF-κB, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), Wnt-β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. Each of the signaling pathways could exert its function singly or through network with other pathways. These pathways could cooperate, promote, antagonize, or interact with each other to form a complex network for the regulation. Dysfunction of this network could increase the development, progression, invasion, and metastasis of thyroid cancer. Inoperable thyroid cancer still has a poor prognosis. However, signaling pathway-related targeted therapies offer the hope of longer quality of meaningful life for this small group of patients. Signaling pathway-related targets provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. In the present work, the advances in these signaling pathways and targeted treatments of thyroid cancer were reviewed. PMID:26985248

  4. What is currently the best radiopharmaceutical for the hybrid PET/CT detection of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Slavikova, K; Montravers, F; Treglia, G; Kunikowska, J; Kaliska, L; Vereb, M; Talbot, J N; Balogova, S

    2013-06-01

    Among thyroid malignancies, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has some very specific features. Production and secretion of large amounts of peptides occur in malignant transformed C cells with few exceptions, leading to high serum levels of calcitonin (Ctn) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that act after thyroidectomy as tumour markers warning for the presence of persistent or metastatic MTC. The availability of those serum biomarkers with an excellent sensitivity challenges medical imaging to localise the recurrent cancer tissue, since surgery is a major therapeutic option. The aims of this article are (i) to review literature evidence about the efficacy and tolerance of radiopharmaceuticals for 3 targets of PET/CT imaging (glucose metabolism, bioamines metabolism and somatostatin receptors) and also bone scintigraphy which is recommended in the Guidelines of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO; (ii) to compare the availability and the costs in relation with those radiopharmaceuticals, (iii) and to discuss a possible sequence of those examinations, in order to optimise spending and to minimise the overall radiation dose. In this context of recurrent MTC suspected on rising tumour markers levels after thyroidectomy, this survey of literature confirms that FDOPA is the best radiopharmaceutical for PET/CT with significant diagnostic performance if Ctn>150 pg/mL; an early image acquisition starting during the first 15 min is advised. In negative cases, FDG should be the next PET radiopharmaceutical, in particular if Ctn and CEA levels are rapidly rising, and PET with a somatostatin analogue labelled with gallium-68 when neither FDOPA nor FDG PET are conclusive. Bone scintigraphy could complement FDG-PET/CT if FDOPA is not available.

  5. Detecting and Treating Thyroid Nodules and Cancer Before, During, and After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer have their own risk factors. For instance, “medullary” thyroid cancer (an uncommon type) can run in ... most common to least common, are papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. (See the Hormone Health Network’s Thyroid ...

  6. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about thyroid cancer? As you deal with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, may ...

  7. Novel Approaches to Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Response Assessment.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ravinder K; Ho, Alan; Schöder, Heiko

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing. After total thyroidectomy of well-differentiated thyroid tumors with intermediate- or high-risk features on pathology, radioiodine remains one of the mainstays of therapy for both thyroid remnant ablation as well as for treatment of metastatic disease. SPECT/CT, a relatively new modality, has been shown to play a pivotal role predominantly in the post-therapy setting by changing the risk stratification of patients with thyroid cancer. In the case of radioiodine treatment failure, FDG-PET/CT may provide prognostic information based on extent and intensity of metabolically active metastatic sites as well as serve as an important imaging test for response assessment in patients treated with chemotherapy, targeted therapies, or radiotherapy, thereby affecting patient management in multiple ways. The role of newer redifferentiation drugs has been evaluated with the use of I-124 PET/CT. PMID:26897715

  8. Long-term eradication of locally recurrent invasive follicular thyroid carcinoma after taxane-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall; Skarulis, Monica C; Sherman, Steven I; Sarlis, Nicholas J; Santarpia, Libero

    2009-11-01

    A 46-year-old woman with history of radioiodine-refractory follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) presented with locally recurrent, high-risk, invasive disease. She was treated with paclitaxel/carboplatin concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), which was well tolerated, resulting in complete remission and freedom from residual or recurrent FTC for longer than 5 years until her last follow-up at age 52. This case highlights the possibility of combining taxane-based chemotherapy with definitive radiotherapy (as CRT) for the management of locally aggressive recurrences in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, thereby resulting in rapid and persistent disease eradication. Even in the light of recent data on the potential benefit of novel targeted therapy agents in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, this approach in similar clinical settings deserves future investigation. PMID:20032418

  9. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  10. Protocol of a Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS): a prospective, clinical and epidemiological study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Young Joo; Cho, Belong; Hwang, Yunji; Choi, June Young; Kim, Su-jin; Choi, Hoonsung; Choi, Ho-Chun; An, Ah Reum; Park, Do Joon; Park, Sue K; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroid cancer incidence in Korea is the highest in the world and has recently increased steeply. However, factors contributing to this sudden increase have not been fully elucidated, and few studies have explored the postoperative prognosis. The Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS) was initiated with three aims: (1) to identify factors predicting quality of life, recurrence, and incidence of other diseases after thyroid cancer treatments; (2) to investigate environmental exposure to radiation, toxicants and molecular factors in relation to tumour aggressiveness; and (3) to evaluate gene–environment interactions that increase thyroid cancer in comparison with healthy participants from a pool of nationwide population-based healthy examinees. Methods and analysis T-CALOS enrols patients with incident thyroid cancer from three general hospitals, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and National Medical Center, Korea. The study is an ongoing project expecting to investigate 5000 patients with thyroid cancer up until 2017. Healthy examinees with a normal thyroid confirmed by sonography have been enrolled at the Healthy Examination Center at Seoul National University Hospital. We are also performing individual matching using two nationwide databases that are open to the public. Follow-up information is obtained at patients’ clinical visits and by linkage to the national database. For statistical analysis, we will use conditional logistic regression models and a Cox proportional hazard regression model. A number of stratifications and sensitivity analyses will be performed to confirm the results. Ethics and dissemination Based on a large sample size, a prospective study design, comprehensive data collection and biobank, T-CALOS has been independently peer-reviewed and approved by the three hospitals and two funding sources (National Research Foundation of Korea and Korean Foundation for Cancer Research

  11. The relevance of preoperative ultrasound cervical mapping in patients with thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kocharyan, Davit; Schwenter, Frank; Bélair, Manon; Nassif, Edgard

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical lymph node involvement in thyroid cancer is associated with locoregional recurrence and decreased disease-free survival. Preoperative lymph node mapping helps in planning surgery for neck dissection and improves patient outcomes. We sought to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of ultrasound mapping for thyroid cancer and evaluate the clinical importance of this exam in terms of identifying the group of patients who would benefit most from subsequent surgical dissection. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 263 patients who underwent thyroid surgery between 2009 and 2013. We calculated the positive predictive values (PPVs) of ultrasound mapping of both the lateral and central compartments together and the lateral or central compartment individually. A quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the number of positive lymph nodes at ultrasound imaging with histopathologic evaluation. Results A total of 136 cases of thyroid cancer in 120 patients met the inclusion criteria for ultrasound mapping analysis. The PPVs (and 95% confidence intervals) were 83.82 (0.76–0.89) for the lateral and central compartments, 85.39% (0.76–0.91) for the lateral compartment, and 80.48% (0.7–0.87) for the central compartment. When comparing the positive lymph nodes at ultrasound imaging with histopathologic evaluation, the result was χ2 = 10.33 (p = 0.006). Conclusion This single-institution study indicated that preoperative ultrasound mapping is an accurate imaging procedure for predicting lymphatic spread in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer. Ultrasound mapping can be used as an efficient tool for surgical planning and prognosis determination, as well as for identifying the group of patients who would benefit most from subsequent surgical intervention. PMID:27007092

  12. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was < 0.35 ng/dL, indicating severe hypothyroidism. After ruling out other possible causes, the diagnosis of myxedema madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer. PMID:26331326

  13. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was < 0.35 ng/dL, indicating severe hypothyroidism. After ruling out other possible causes, the diagnosis of myxedema madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer.

  14. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice.

  15. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice. PMID:26456892

  16. Trends in Imaging after Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Muenz, Daniel G.; Worden, Francis P.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The largest growth in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) diagnosis is in low-risk cancers. Trends in imaging after DTC diagnosis are understudied. Hypothesizing a reduction in imaging utilization due to rising low-risk disease, we evaluated post-diagnosis imaging patterns over time and patient characteristics that are associated with likelihood of imaging. Methods Using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database, we identified patients diagnosed with localized, regional or distant DTC between 1991 and 2009. We reviewed Medicare claims for neck ultrasound, I-131 scan, or PET scan within 3 years post-diagnosis. Using regression analyses we evaluated trends of imaging utilization. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of imaging based on patient characteristics. Results 23,669 patients were included. Patients diagnosed during 2001-2009, compared to 1991-2000, were more likely to have localized disease (p<0.001) and tumors less than 1cm (p<0.001). Use of neck ultrasound and I-131 scan increased in patients with localized disease (p=<0.001 and p=0.003, respectively), regional disease (p<0.001 and p<0.001), and distant metastasis (p=0.001 and p=0.015). Patients diagnosed after 2000 were more likely to undergo neck ultrasound (OR 2.15, 95% CI 2.02-2.28) and I-131 scan (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35-1.54). PET scan use from 2005-2009, compared to 1996-2004, increased 32.4-fold (p=<0.001) in localized patients, 13.1-fold (p<0.001) in regional disease patients, and 33.4-fold (p<0.001) in patients with distant DTC. Conclusion Despite a rise in low-risk disease, the use of post-diagnosis imaging increased in all stages of disease. The largest growth was in use of PET scan after 2004. PMID:25565063

  17. Recurrent EZH1 mutations are a second hit in autonomous thyroid adenomas.

    PubMed

    Calebiro, Davide; Grassi, Elisa S; Eszlinger, Markus; Ronchi, Cristina L; Godbole, Amod; Bathon, Kerstin; Guizzardi, Fabiana; de Filippis, Tiziana; Krohn, Knut; Jaeschke, Holger; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Bircan, Rifat; Gozu, Hulya Iliksu; Sancak, Seda; Niedziela, Marek; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Persani, Luca; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous thyroid adenomas (ATAs) are a frequent cause of hyperthyroidism. Mutations in the genes encoding the TSH receptor (TSHR) or the Gs protein α subunit (GNAS) are found in approximately 70% of ATAs. The involvement of other genes and the pathogenesis of the remaining cases are presently unknown. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 19 ATAs that were paired with normal DNA samples and identified a recurrent hot-spot mutation (c.1712A>G; p.Gln571Arg) in the enhancer of zeste homolog 1 (EZH1) gene, which codes for a catalytic subunit of the polycomb complex. Targeted screening in an independent cohort confirmed that this mutation occurs with high frequency (27%) in ATAs. EZH1 mutations were strongly associated with known (TSHR, GNAS) or presumed (adenylate cyclase 9 [ADCY9]) alterations in cAMP pathway genes. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that the p.Gln571Arg EZH1 mutation caused increased histone H3 trimethylation and increased proliferation of thyroid cells. In summary, this study revealed that a hot-spot mutation in EZH1 is the second most frequent genetic alteration in ATAs. The association between EZH1 and TSHR mutations suggests a 2-hit model for the pathogenesis of these tumors, whereby constitutive activation of the cAMP pathway and EZH1 mutations cooperate to induce the hyperproliferation of thyroid cells. PMID:27500488

  18. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  19. Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: update on the Brazilian consensus.

    PubMed

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa Maria Z; Maia, Ana Luiza; Vaisman, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent findings, especially when sensitive imaging methods are used. Although thyroid cancer is relatively rare, its incidence is increasing, particularly in terms of small tumors, which have an uncertain clinical relevance. Most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer exhibit satisfactory clinical outcomes when treatment is appropriate, and their mortality rate is similar to that of the overall population. However, relapse occurs in a considerable fraction of these patients, and some patients stop responding to conventional treatment and eventually die from their disease. Therefore, the challenge is how to identify the individuals who require more aggressive disease management while sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary treatments and procedures. We have updated the Brazilian Consensus that was published in 2007, emphasizing the diagnostic and therapeutic advances that the participants, representing several Brazilian university centers, consider most relevant in clinical practice. The formulation of the present guidelines was based on the participants' experience and a review of the relevant literature.

  20. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  1. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  2. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  3. Propranolol sensitizes thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Jun; Shen, Chen-Tian; Song, Hong-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Treatment options for advanced metastatic or progressive thyroid cancers are limited. Although targeted therapy specifically inhibiting intracellular kinase signaling pathways has markedly changed the therapeutic landscape, side-effects and resistance of single agent targeted therapy often leads to termination of the treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the antitumor property of the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol for thyroid cancers. Human thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, K1, BCPAP and BHP27 were used in the present study. Broad β-blocker propranolol and β2-specific antagonist ICI118551, but not β1-specific antagonist atenolol, inhibited the growth of 8505C and K1 cells. Propranolol treatment inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of 8505C cells in vitro and in vivo, which are closely associated with decreased expressions of cyclin D1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Expression of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) also decreased following propranolol intervention. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of the 8505C xenografts validated shrinkage of the tumors in the propranolol-treated group when compared to the phosphate‑buffered saline treated group. Finally, we found that propranolol can amplify the cytotoxicity of vemurafenib and sensitize thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib. Our present results suggest that propranolol has potential activity against thyroid cancers and investigation of the combination with targeted molecular therapy for progressive thyroid cancers could be beneficial. PMID:27432558

  4. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  5. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  6. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  7. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  8. [The treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Alberda, Wijnand J; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J; Rothbarth, Joost; Burger, Jacobus W A

    2015-01-01

    Its incidence has decreased in recent decades due to advances in the treatment of patients with primary rectal cancer, but LRRC still occurs in 6-10% of these patients. LRRC is often accompanied by severe, progressive pain and has a major impact on quality of life. Curative treatment is possible based on surgical resection combined with chemoradiotherapy. Radical resection is the most important prognostic factor in curative treatment. Neo-adjuvant systemic therapy may further improve outcomes in LRRC patients. Many patients are not eligible for surgical treatment due to the presence of metastases or irresectability of the local recurrence. These patients should receive optimal palliative care for the disabling pain. Radiotherapy is effective against local pain in around 75% of patients but the duration of palliation is limited.

  9. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  10. Cancer metabolism, stemness and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Joseph M.; Tuluc, Madalina; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Ames, Julie A.; Anantharaman, Archana; Butera, Aileen; Leiby, Benjamin; Cognetti, David M.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we interrogated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) specimens (n = 12) to examine if different metabolic compartments (oxidative vs. glycolytic) co-exist in human tumors. A large panel of well-established biomarkers was employed to determine the metabolic state of proliferative cancer cells. Interestingly, cell proliferation in cancer cells, as marked by Ki-67 immunostaining, was strictly correlated with oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and the uptake of mitochondrial fuels, as detected via MCT1 expression (p < 0.001). More specifically, three metabolic tumor compartments were delineated: (1) proliferative and mitochondrial-rich cancer cells (Ki-67+/TOMM20+/COX+/MCT1+); (2) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor cancer cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−); and (3) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor stromal cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−). In addition, high oxidative stress (MCT4+) was very specific for cancer tissues. Thus, we next evaluated the prognostic value of MCT4 in a second independent patient cohort (n = 40). Most importantly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in non-proliferating epithelial cancer cells predicted poor clinical outcome (tumor recurrence; p < 0.0001; log-rank test), and was functionally associated with FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.04). Similarly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in tumor stromal cells was specifically associated with higher tumor stage (p < 0.03), and was a highly specific marker for cancer-associated fibroblasts (p < 0.001). We propose that oxidative stress is a key hallmark of tumor tissues that drives high-energy metabolism in adjacent proliferating mitochondrial-rich cancer cells, via the paracrine transfer of mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketone bodies). New antioxidants and MCT4 inhibitors should be developed to metabolically target “three-compartment tumor metabolism” in head and neck cancers. It is remarkable that two “non-proliferating” populations of cells (Ki-67−/MCT4+) within the

  11. A New Aurora in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Enke; D'Armiento, Massimino

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC) are among the most aggressive human neoplasms with a dire prognosis and a median survival time of few months from the diagnosis. The complete absence of effective therapies for ATC renders the identification of novel therapeutic approaches sorely needed. Chromosomal instability, a feature of all human cancers, is thought to represent a major driving force in thyroid cancer progression and a number of mitotic kinases showing a deregulated expression in malignant thyroid tissues are now held responsible for thyroid tumor aneuploidy. These include the three members of the Aurora family (Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C), serine/threonine kinases that regulate multiple aspects of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Over the last few years, several small molecule inhibitors targeting Aurora kinases were developed, which showed promising antitumor effects against a variety of human cancers, including ATC, in preclinical studies. Several of these molecules are now being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials against advanced solid and hematological malignancies. In the present review we will describe the structure, expression, and mitotic functions of the Aurora kinases, their implications in human cancer progression, with particular regard to ATC, and the effects of their functional inhibition on malignant cell proliferation. PMID:25097550

  12. Autophagy in Thyroid Cancer: Present Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Klück, Viola; Plantinga, Theo S.; Smit, Johannes W. A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Despite having a good prognosis in the majority of cases, when the tumor is dedifferentiated it does no longer respond to conventional treatment with radioactive iodine, the prognosis worsens significantly. Treatment options for advanced, dedifferentiated disease are limited and do not cure the disease. Autophagy, a process of self-digestion in which damaged molecules or organelles are degraded and recycled, has emerged as an important player in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including cancer. The role of autophagy in thyroid cancer pathogenesis is not yet elucidated. However, the available data indicate that autophagy is involved in several steps of thyroid tumor initiation and progression as well as in therapy resistance and therefore could be exploited for therapeutic applications. The present review summarizes the most recent data on the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer and we will provide a perspective on how this process can be targeted for potential therapeutic approaches and could be further explored in the context of multimodality treatment in cancer and personalized medicine. PMID:25741318

  13. External radiotherapy prior to thyroid cancer: A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, A.; Loefroth, P.O. ); Hardell, L. )

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study previous radiotherapy of malignant diseases as a risk factor for thyroid cancer. By using the Swedish Cancer Registry all cases of thyroid cancer with another malignant disease at least one year previously and living within the catchment area of the hospital were traced. During 1959-1989 a total of 1056 cases of thyroid cancer were identified. Of these, 37 had had another previous malignant disease and they constituted the cases in this study. As controls four persons with at least two malignant diseases, thyroid cancer excluded, were selected for each case from the same cancer registry. Ten (27.0%) of the 37 patients with thyroid cancer as a second tumor had earlier been irradiated with the treatment dose including the thyroid gland as compared with 34 (24.5%) of the 139 control patients. Eight of the ten cases with previous irradiation of the thyroid gland had papillary cancer. The median latency was 13 years. The estimated radiation dose in the thyroid varied between 3 and 40 Gy. External radiotherapy gave a crude odds ratio of 1.1 with 95% confidence interval = 0.5-2.8 for thyroid cancer. The weighted odds ratio was calculated to 2.3 with confidence interval = 0.5-8.9. This case-control study gave a nonsignificantly increased odds ratio for thyroid cancer in patients with external radiotherapy including the thyroid gland. 26 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Investigating Chernobyl-induced thyroid cancer: Politics vs science

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, D.

    1995-09-01

    Nearly ten years after the nuclear power plant disaster, scientists from around the world are trying to track the incidence of childhood thyroid cancer and treat the young victims. Their efforts seem promising, but a lack of coordination may stymie the research. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Navarra (Spain): Historic Cohort Results (1987–2003)

    PubMed Central

    Salvador Egea, María Pilar; Echegoyen Silanes, Ana Aranzazu; Layana Echezuri, Eduardo; Anda Apiñariz, Emma; Puras Gil, Ana; Menéndez Torre, Edelmiro; Forga Llenas, Lluis; Sainz de los Terreros, Amaya

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Navarra has the highest incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer in Spain. The aim of this study was to review its management carried out by the Navarra's multidisciplinary Thyroid Disease Unit, from 1987 to 2003. Material and Methods. 325 patients were studied to find the incidence, prevalence, and prognostic factors. Statistical analysis comprised univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models for survival and tumor recurrence. Results. The average annual incidence was 3.6 per 100,000 inhabitants, with a final prevalence of 82.4 per 100,000. Regarding survival and recurrence, statistical significance was observed for stage IV, follicular carcinoma, capsular and prethyroid muscles invasion, and T4 group. Only survival was related to tumour size larger than 40 mm. Only recurrence was related to lymph node metastases and radioiodine dose higher than 100 mCi. Conclusions. Attendance of patients in a functional unit setting has allowed us to classify them into three risk groups. PMID:22084734

  16. Evaluation of Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 as a Potential Biomarker in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengxin; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a glycoprotein that mediates tissue-selective lymphocyte adhesion. The prognostic value of VAP-1 has been determined in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes and the predictive value of serum VAP-1 in patients with thyroid cancer. A total of 126 patients with thyroid nodules and 53 healthy controls participated in this study. The patients were further divided into subgroup 1 (69 cases with benign thyroid nodules) and subgroup 2 (57 cases with thyroid cancer). Serum VAP-1 was measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Diagnostic value of presurgical VAP-1 for thyroid cancer was conducted by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Serum levels of VAP-1 were significantly lower in thyroid cancer group than in healthy control and benign thyroid nodule groups. VAP-1 concentrations negatively correlated with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels in thyroid cancer patients (r = −0.81; p < 0.001). The optimum cut-off value of VAP-1 was 456.6 ng/mL with a 77.4% specificity and 66.7% sensitivity for thyroid cancer diagnosis. Serum VAP-1 decreased in thyroid cancer patients and VAP-1 could be a potential useful adjunct biomarker in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. PMID:27446209

  17. Clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer misdiagnosed by fine needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hideki; Kutomi, Goro; Satomi, Fukino; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Mitsuru; Hirata, Koichi; Takemasa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is commonly used as a preoperative assessment to diagnose thyroid cancer. However, misdiagnosis of malignancy by FNA is not rare, even if image examination suggests the possibility of thyroid cancer. In the present study, the clinicopathological factors of patients whose preoperative FNA examination had not led to a diagnosis of thyroid cancer were examined. In total, 125 patients with thyroid cancer who underwent FNA and surgery (total thyroidectomy, subtotal thyroidectomy or hemithyroidectomy) at the Department of Surgery, Surgical Oncology and Science of the Sapporo Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A, malignancy determined by FNA, and group B, no malignancy. The groups were then compared by gender, age, tumor size, stage, tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, histology, surgical procedure methods, presence or absence of calcification and thyroglobulin levels. The mean age of the patients in group A (5 males and 59 females) was 53.0 years. The mean age in group B (11 males and 49 females) was 54.2 years. The mean tumor size in both groups was 1.6 cm. The mean thyroglobulin levels were 82.7 ng/ml in Group A and 525.5 ng/ml in group B. There were also significant differences between the groups for tumor stage (P=0.046), histological type (P=0.024) and thyroglobulin levels (P=0.035). The results of the present study suggested that it may be difficult to diagnose thyroid cancer by FNA in cases with non-papillary carcinoma and higher thyroglobulin levels.

  18. Clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer misdiagnosed by fine needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hideki; Kutomi, Goro; Satomi, Fukino; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Mitsuru; Hirata, Koichi; Takemasa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is commonly used as a preoperative assessment to diagnose thyroid cancer. However, misdiagnosis of malignancy by FNA is not rare, even if image examination suggests the possibility of thyroid cancer. In the present study, the clinicopathological factors of patients whose preoperative FNA examination had not led to a diagnosis of thyroid cancer were examined. In total, 125 patients with thyroid cancer who underwent FNA and surgery (total thyroidectomy, subtotal thyroidectomy or hemithyroidectomy) at the Department of Surgery, Surgical Oncology and Science of the Sapporo Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A, malignancy determined by FNA, and group B, no malignancy. The groups were then compared by gender, age, tumor size, stage, tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, histology, surgical procedure methods, presence or absence of calcification and thyroglobulin levels. The mean age of the patients in group A (5 males and 59 females) was 53.0 years. The mean age in group B (11 males and 49 females) was 54.2 years. The mean tumor size in both groups was 1.6 cm. The mean thyroglobulin levels were 82.7 ng/ml in Group A and 525.5 ng/ml in group B. There were also significant differences between the groups for tumor stage (P=0.046), histological type (P=0.024) and thyroglobulin levels (P=0.035). The results of the present study suggested that it may be difficult to diagnose thyroid cancer by FNA in cases with non-papillary carcinoma and higher thyroglobulin levels. PMID:27698782

  19. Thyroid metastasis from breast cancer presenting with diffuse microcalcifications on sonography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Pei; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chou, Yi-Hong; Hsu, Chih-Yi; King, Kuang-Liang; Lai, Yi-Chen; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2014-09-01

    Microcalcifications are frequently associated with papillary thyroid cancers. Metastatic nodules from extrathyroid malignancies may mimic primary thyroid neoplasm on sonography, but do not present with microcalcifications. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with a history of invasive ductal carcinomas of bilateral breasts, status post surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Four years after surgery, thyroid sonography revealed diffuse microcalcifications without nodular component. Core needle biopsy confirmed thyroid metastasis from primary breast cancer. PMID:24752943

  20. New Insights in Risk Stratification of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Papaleontiou, Maria; Haymart, Megan R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Numerous staging and scoring systems exist for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but all harbor limitations. This has prompted investigation for new factors with prognostic implications for DTC. Recent findings Several new factors that may be involved in DTC risk stratification have emerged, such as thyroid stimulating hormone and molecular markers. In addition, others are controversial and being challenged, such as age, gender and lymph node involvement. Summary The purpose of this review is to present recent updates in the literature on new potential risk stratification predictors for DTC. PMID:24285100

  1. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    McTiernan, A.M.; Weiss, N.S.; Daling, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer.

  2. Cervical distribution of iodine 131 following total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fratkin, M.J.; Newsome, H.H. Jr.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.; Tatum, J.L.

    1983-07-01

    The use of postoperative radioiodine thyroid scanning has questioned whether total thyroidectomy is surgically possible. Similar to earlier studies, we have found functioning iodine 131 (/sup 131/I)-avid thyroid tissue in our patients following total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer. Preoperative and postoperative thyroid scans were compared in 24 patients to study the cervical location of postthyroidectomy residual thyroid tissue. Thyroid scanning detected 44 distinct sites of uptake. Thirty-eight of these foci were located either at the extremes of the upper poles of the thyroid gland (24) or along the embryonic thyroid descent tract (14). We conclude that these foci of /sup 131/I uptake represent incomplete resection of normal thyroid tissue, and that surgical attention to these areas should result more frequently in extirpation of the entire thyroid gland.

  3. Stress History and Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Palesh, Oxana; Butler, Lisa D.; Koopman, Cheryl; Giese-Davis, Janine; Carlson, Robert; Spiegel, David

    2007-01-01

    Background There is mixed evidence regarding the possible association between a history of stressful or traumatic life events and more rapid breast cancer progression. Method Retrospective reports of past experiences of traumatic life events were assessed among ninety-four women with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer. A traumatic event assessment was conducted using the event-screening question from the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) module of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV-TR (SCID; 2002). Each reported event was judged by two independent raters to determine whether it met DSM-IV-TR PTSD A1 criteria for a traumatic event. Those events that did not meet such criteria were designated “stressful events.” Results Nearly forty two percent of the women in the sample were judged to have experienced one or more traumatic events; 28.7% reported only stressful events. A Kruskal-Wallis test found significant differences in disease-free interval among the three groups χ2 (2, N = 94) = 6.09, p <.05. Planned comparisons revealed a significantly longer disease-free interval among women who had reported no traumatic or stressful life events (Median = 62 months) compared to those who had experienced one or more stressful or traumatic life events (Combined Median = 31 months). Conclusions A history of stressful or traumatic life events may reduce host resistance to tumor growth. These findings are consistent with a possible long-lasting effect of previous life stress on stress response systems such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. PMID:17719359

  4. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N. )

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation.

  5. Recent Advances in Molecular Biology of Thyroid Cancer and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with a rapid rising incidence in recent years. Novel efficient management strategies are increasingly needed for this cancer. Remarkable advances have occurred in recent years in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. This is reflected in several major biological areas of thyroid cancer, including the molecular alterations for the loss of radioiodine avidity of thyroid cancer, the pathogenic role of the MAP kinase and PI3K/Akt pathways and their related genetic alterations, and the aberrant methylation of functionally important genes in thyroid tumorigenesis and pathogenesis. These exciting advances in molecular biology of thyroid cancer provide unprecedented opportunities for the development of molecular-based novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:19040974

  6. Recurrence prediction in oral cancers: a serum Raman spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Aditi; Nandakumar, Nikhila; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C Murali

    2015-04-01

    High mortality rates associated with oral cancers can be primarily attributed to the failure of current histological procedures in predicting recurrence. Identifying recurrence related factors can lead to improved prognosis, optimized treatment and enhanced overall outcomes. Serum Raman spectroscopy has previously shown potential in the diagnosis of cancers, such as head and neck, cervix, breast, oral cancers, and also in predicting treatment response. In the present study, serum was collected from 22 oral cancer subjects [with recurrence (n = 10) and no-recurrence (n = 12)] before and after surgery and spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe coupled with a 40× objective. Spectral acquisition parameters were as follows: λex = 785 nm, laser power = 30 mW, integration time: 12 s and averages: 3. Data was analyzed in a patient-wise approach using unsupervised PCA and supervised PC-LDA, followed by LOOCV. PCA and PC-LDA findings suggest that recurrent and non-recurrent cases cannot be classified in before surgery serum samples; an average classification efficiency of ∼78% was obtained in after-surgery samples. Mean and difference spectra and PCA loadings indicate that DNA and protein markers may be potential spectral markers for recurrence. RS of post surgery serum samples may have the potential to predict the probability of recurrence in clinics, after prospective large-scale validation.

  7. Deregulated Expression of Aurora Kinases Is Not a Prognostic Biomarker in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prinzi, Natalie; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Falvo, Laura; De Vito, Corrado; Catania, Antonio; Tartaglia, Francesco; Mocini, Renzo; Coccaro, Carmela; Alessandrini, Stefania; Barollo, Susi; Mian, Caterina; Antonelli, Alessandro; De Antoni, Enrico; D’Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    A number of reports indicated that Aurora-A or Aurora-B overexpression represented a negative prognostic factor in several human malignancies. In thyroid cancer tissues a deregulated expression of Aurora kinases has been also demonstrated, butno information regarding its possible prognostic role in differentiated thyroid cancer is available. Here, weevaluated Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNA expression and its prognostic relevance in a series of 87 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), with a median follow-up of 63 months. The analysis of Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNA levels in PTC tissues, compared to normal matched tissues, revealed that their expression was either up- or down-regulatedin the majority of cancer tissues. In particular, Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNA levels were altered, respectively, in 55 (63.2%) and 79 (90.8%) out of the 87 PTC analyzed.A significant positive correlation between Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNAswas observed (p=0.001). The expression of both Aurora genes was not affected by the BRAFV600E mutation. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Mayer analyses documented the lack of association between Aurora-A or Aurora-B expression and clinicopathological parameterssuch as gender, age, tumor size, histology, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis and BRAF status as well asdisease recurrences or disease-free interval. Only Aurora-B mRNA was significantly higher in T(3-4) tissues, with respect to T(1-2) PTC tissues. The data reported here demonstrate that the expression of Aurora kinases is deregulated in the majority of PTC tissues, likely contributing to PTC progression. However, differently from other human solid cancers, detection of Aurora-A or Aurora-B mRNAs is not a prognostic biomarker inPTC patients. PMID:25807528

  8. Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Tekkel, M.

    1997-02-01

    Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  9. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  10. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Taking adjuvant tamoxifen for 10 years after primary treatment leads to a greater reduction in breast cancer recurrences and deaths than taking the drug for only 5 years, according to the results of a large international clinical trial.

  11. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Resistance of papillary thyroid cancer stem cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    GIUFFRIDA, RAFFAELLA; ADAMO, LUANA; IANNOLO, GIOACCHIN; VICARI, LUISA; GIUFFRIDA, DARIO; ERAMO, ADRIANA; GULISANO, MASSIMO; MEMEO, LORENZO; CONTICELLO, CONCETTA

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common endocrine neoplasm, with the highest mortality rate of all the endocrine cancers. Among the endocrine malignancies, ~80% are papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). In the initiation and progression of this tumor, genetic alterations in the mitogen-associated protein kinase pathway, including RAS point mutations, RET/PTC oncogene rearrangements and BRAF point mutations, play an important role, particularly in deciding targeted therapy. In the present study, a small population of thyroid tumor cells, known as tumor spheres, were isolated and characterized from PTC surgical samples. These spheres can be expanded indefinitely in vitro and give rise to differentiated adherent cells when cultivated in differentiative conditions. The present study showed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometric analysis that the undifferentiated PTC cells exhibited a characteristic antigen expression profile of adult progenitor/stem cells. The cells were more resistant to chemotherapeutics, including bortezomib, taxol, cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin and vincristine, than differentiated PTC cells and the majority possessed a quiescent status, as revealed by the various cell cycle characteristics and anti-apoptotic protein expression. Such advances in cancer thyroid stem cell biology may provide relevant information for future targeted therapies. PMID:27347201

  13. Competing risks analyses for recurrence from primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J W; Fish, E B; Link, M A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of prognostic factors on local, regional or distant metastasis are standardly assessed separately. Competing risks analyses may be used to assess simultaneously the effects of factors on different types of first recurrence. Data for a cohort of 678 primary invasive breast cancer patients accrued between 1971 and 1990, updated to 1995, included type of first recurrence (local, regional, distant). We investigated the effects of the traditional factors of age, tumour size, nodal status, ER, PgR, adjuvant therapy (hormones, chemotherapy, radiotherapy) on type of recurrence and time to recurrence for all patients and for those aged ≥ 65. For all ages of patients, there were five factors with significant associations with type or time to first recurrence. Adjuvant radiation was the only factor which had an effect (P ≤ 0.05) on the type of first recurrence: being associated with a reduction in local recurrence. Age, nodal status, tumour size and adjuvant chemotherapy all had significant associations across all types of first recurrence, and in particular with time to recurrence for both local and distant metastasis. This indicates a potential lack of independence in these end-points. For patients ≥ 65 years of age, there were no factors which differentially affected type of recurrence, while only nodal status and tumour size had significant associations with time to recurrence. Analyses were used to assess simultaneously the effects of traditional prognostic factors and treatment options on type of first recurrence and time to first recurrence. The extension to evaluations with newer prognostic factors would expedite the determination and mode of biologic activity for such factors. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188898

  14. Thyroid cancer mortality and incidence: a global overview.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Malvezzi, Matteo; Bosetti, Cristina; Garavello, Werner; Bertuccio, Paola; Levi, Fabio; Negri, Eva

    2015-05-01

    In most areas of the world, thyroid cancer incidence has been appreciably increasing over the last few decades, whereas mortality has steadily declined. We updated global trends in thyroid cancer mortality and incidence using official mortality data from the World Health Organization (1970-2012) and incidence data from the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (1960-2007). Male mortality declined in all the major countries considered, with annual percent changes around -2/-3% over the last decades. Only in the United States mortality declined up to the mid 1980s and increased thereafter. Similarly, in women mortality declined in most countries considered, with APCs around -2/-5% over the last decades, with the exception of the UK, the United States and Australia, where mortality has been declining up to the late 1980s/late 1990s to level off (or increase) thereafter. In 2008-2012, most countries had mortality rates (age-standardized, world population) between 0.20 and 0.40/100,000 men and 0.20 and 0.60/100,000 women, the highest rates being in Latvia, Hungary, the Republic of Moldova and Israel (over 0.40/100,000) for men and in Ecuador, Colombia and Israel (over 0.60/100,000) for women. In most countries, a steady increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer (mainly papillary carcinomas) was observed in both sexes. The declines in thyroid cancer mortality reflect both variations in risk factor exposure and changes in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, while the increases in the incidence are likely due to the increase in the detection of this neoplasm over the last few decades.

  15. Burden of malignancy after a primary skin cancer: recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Hans; Williams, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The current paper summarizes relevant recent research on the high risk of recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers in the growing number of people with a history of skin cancer; the ultimate purpose is to better assess the burden of malignancy following skin cancer. A number of challenges exist in identifying and tracking both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) cases. Most jurisdictions do not routinely track NMSC cases and, even if they do, it is customary to only include the first diagnosis. There are variable rules for counting multiple melanoma cancers, and recurrences are not considered for either major type of skin cancer. Applying insights from recent studies of this issue to Canadian cancer statistics would increase reported diagnoses of NMSC by about 26% and melanoma by 10% in this country. This approach to a fuller assessment of the burden of skin cancers has been called a "diagnosis-based incidence approach" as compared with a "patient-based incidence approach". A further issue that is not usually taken into account when assessing the burden of skin cancers is the 20% to 30% elevated risk of noncutaneous second primary cancers following a primary skin tumour. In summary, individuals with skin cancer are subject to a high risk of recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers. This burden should be a special concern in the large and growing pool of individuals with a history of skin cancer, as well as among prevention planners.

  16. Current Concepts in the Molecular Genetics and Management of Thyroid Cancer: An Update for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Tatiana; Keraliya, Abhishek R; Howard, Stephanie A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Hornick, Jason L; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Substantial improvement in the understanding of the oncogenic pathways in thyroid cancer has led to identification of specific molecular alterations, including mutations of BRAF and RET in papillary thyroid cancer, mutation of RAS and rearrangement of PPARG in follicular thyroid cancer, mutation of RET in medullary thyroid cancer, and mutations of TP53 and in the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)/AKT1 pathway in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonography (US) and US-guided biopsy remain cornerstones in the initial workup of thyroid cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy reserved for differentiated subtypes. Posttreatment surveillance of thyroid cancer is done with US of the thyroid bed as well as monitoring of tumor markers such as serum thyroglobulin and serum calcitonin. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT are used in the follow-up of patients with negative iodine 131 imaging and elevated tumor markers. Certain mutations, such as mutations of BRAF in papillary thyroid carcinoma and mutations in RET codons 883, 918, and 928, are associated with an aggressive course in medullary thyroid carcinoma, and affected patients need close surveillance. Treatment options for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are limited. Currently, Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted therapies for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, including sorafenib, lenvatinib, vandetanib, and cabozantinib, target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and RET kinases. Imaging plays an important role in assessment of response to these therapies, which can be atypical owing to antiangiogenic effects. A wide spectrum of toxic effects is associated with the molecularly targeted therapies used in thyroid cancer and can be detected at restaging scans. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  17. Current Concepts in the Molecular Genetics and Management of Thyroid Cancer: An Update for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Tatiana; Keraliya, Abhishek R; Howard, Stephanie A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Hornick, Jason L; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Substantial improvement in the understanding of the oncogenic pathways in thyroid cancer has led to identification of specific molecular alterations, including mutations of BRAF and RET in papillary thyroid cancer, mutation of RAS and rearrangement of PPARG in follicular thyroid cancer, mutation of RET in medullary thyroid cancer, and mutations of TP53 and in the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)/AKT1 pathway in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonography (US) and US-guided biopsy remain cornerstones in the initial workup of thyroid cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy reserved for differentiated subtypes. Posttreatment surveillance of thyroid cancer is done with US of the thyroid bed as well as monitoring of tumor markers such as serum thyroglobulin and serum calcitonin. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT are used in the follow-up of patients with negative iodine 131 imaging and elevated tumor markers. Certain mutations, such as mutations of BRAF in papillary thyroid carcinoma and mutations in RET codons 883, 918, and 928, are associated with an aggressive course in medullary thyroid carcinoma, and affected patients need close surveillance. Treatment options for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are limited. Currently, Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted therapies for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, including sorafenib, lenvatinib, vandetanib, and cabozantinib, target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and RET kinases. Imaging plays an important role in assessment of response to these therapies, which can be atypical owing to antiangiogenic effects. A wide spectrum of toxic effects is associated with the molecularly targeted therapies used in thyroid cancer and can be detected at restaging scans. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618325

  18. Quadruple Cancers of Non-producing Multiple Myeloma, Cholangiocellular Carcinoma, and Two Different Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Junya; Sasaki, Nana; Kiyota, Miki; Tatekawa, Shotaro; Tsukamoto, Taku; Maegawa, Saori; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Horiike, Shigeo; Tando, So; Fushiki, Shinji; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with non-producing multiple myeloma (MM) with three additional concomitant solid tumors that were identified by postmortem autopsy. The disease was refractory to anti-MM therapy including bortezomib and lenalidomide, and he finally died of bacterial pneumonia with diffuse alveolar damage 8 months after the diagnosis. An autopsy revealed that he was also affected by three other solid cancers, cholangiocellular carcinoma, medullary thyroid cancer and papillary thyroid cancer that were clinically asymptomatic and remained undiagnosed before death. A review of the literature suggests that primary quadruple cancers including MM are extremely rare. PMID:27150876

  19. Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. A novel case and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Borges, Fátima; Costa, António; Alvelos, Maria Inês; Mazeto, Glaúcia; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) represents a syndrome in which patients present elevated circulating thyroid hormones in the presence of non-suppressed TSH. We report a novel case where a patient with RTH presented a differentiated thyroid cancer. A19 year-old female had been referred due to thyroid disease that disclosed features characteristic of a RTH. During the follow up it was detected a follicular tumor that led to the recommendation for thyroid surgical ablation, where an incidental papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (mPTC) was found. The increase of thyroglobulin (TG) levels following thyroid removal referred the patient for radioiodine treatment. Post-treatment, it was detected jugular adenopathies and the patient was subjected to cervical lymph node drainage where metastases of the mPTC were found. RTH syndrome was confirmed by the detection of a THRB germline mutation. A BRAF mutation was also found in the mPTC but not detected in the follicular adenoma or normal adjacent tissue. The young age of the patient, the rarity of BRAF mutations in childhood and the high dissemination of the malignancy, lead us to the speculation that increased TSH stimulation in a RTH background and oncogenic activation of BRAF could have served as (co) drivers and might have triggered an advanced stage of the neoplastic disease. These findings together with a review of published cases add novel information to the management of RTH patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:25988151

  20. Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. A novel case and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Borges, Fátima; Costa, António; Alvelos, Maria Inês; Mazeto, Glaúcia; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) represents a syndrome in which patients present elevated circulating thyroid hormones in the presence of non-suppressed TSH. We report a novel case where a patient with RTH presented a differentiated thyroid cancer. A19 year-old female had been referred due to thyroid disease that disclosed features characteristic of a RTH. During the follow up it was detected a follicular tumor that led to the recommendation for thyroid surgical ablation, where an incidental papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (mPTC) was found. The increase of thyroglobulin (TG) levels following thyroid removal referred the patient for radioiodine treatment. Post-treatment, it was detected jugular adenopathies and the patient was subjected to cervical lymph node drainage where metastases of the mPTC were found. RTH syndrome was confirmed by the detection of a THRB germline mutation. A BRAF mutation was also found in the mPTC but not detected in the follicular adenoma or normal adjacent tissue. The young age of the patient, the rarity of BRAF mutations in childhood and the high dissemination of the malignancy, lead us to the speculation that increased TSH stimulation in a RTH background and oncogenic activation of BRAF could have served as (co) drivers and might have triggered an advanced stage of the neoplastic disease. These findings together with a review of published cases add novel information to the management of RTH patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:25988151

  1. [The principles of differentiated thyroid cancer surgery and anesthesia in pregnancy: three case reports].

    PubMed

    Bayır, Ömer; Polat, Reyhan; Saylam, Güleser; Öcal, Bülent; Çakal, Erman; Delibaşı, Tuncay; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Development of thyroid nodule during pregnancy is rare, however the cancer rate of this nodule is high. Herein, we present medical outcomes of three pregnant women who were operated with the diagnosis of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in the light of literature. As sonographic findings of three cases showed malignant characteristics, fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was performed. Cytological examination result was reported as papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Surgery was performed in the second trimester in all cases. One case underwent total thyroidectomy with neck dissection at level III and VI and two cases underwent total thyroidectomy with neck dissection at level VI. Pathological examination result was also reported as PTC. Lymph node metastases in the dissected materials were detected. During the intraoperative and early postoperative period, no complications occurred and no findings of recurrence or residues were observed during one-year follow-up following surgery. In conclusion, as the first trimester has an increased risk of congenital malformations, elective surgery should be performed at the second trimester, if applicable. In pregnants with malignant sonographic features and PTC confirmed by FNAB, surgery can be applied safely by taking precautions during pre-/peri- and postoperative period. These patients should not be given premedication for anesthesia, should be properly positioned and teratogenic agents should be avoided. After surgery, mother and fetus should be monitored closely. PMID:26572180

  2. Breast cancer recurrence in relation to antidepressant use

    PubMed Central

    Chubak, Jessica; Bowles, Erin J.A.; Yu, Onchee; Buist, Diana S.M.; Fujii, Monica; Boudreau, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women with breast cancer frequently use antidepressants; however, questions about the effect of these medications on breast cancer recurrence remain. Methods We identified 4216 women ≥18 years with an incident stage I or II breast cancer diagnosed between 1990–2008 in a mixed model healthcare delivery system linked to a cancer registry. Recurrences were ascertained from chart review. Medication exposures were extracted from electronic pharmacy records. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between antidepressant use and breast cancer recurrence and mortality. We also conducted analyses restricted to tamoxifen users. Results Antidepressants overall, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were not associated with risk of breast cancer recurrence or mortality. Women taking paroxetine only (adjusted HR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.71) and trazadone only (adjusted HR: 1.76; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.92), but not fluoxetine only (adjusted HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.55, 1.53), had higher recurrence risks than antidepressant non-users. There was some suggestion of an increased recurrence risk with concurrent paroxetine and tamoxifen use compared to users of tamoxifen only (adjusted HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 0.79, 2.83). Conclusions In general, antidepressants did not appear increase risk of breast cancer recurrence; though there were some suggested increases in risk that warrant further investigation in other datasets. Our results combined systematically and quantitatively with results from other studies may be useful for patients and providers making decisions about antidepressant use after breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:26518198

  3. Primary and recurrent colorectal cancer masquerading as gynaecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Brand, A; Scurry, J; Planner, R; Leung, S

    1996-05-01

    To make clinicians more aware of the phenomenon of primary and recurrent colorectal and anal carcinoma masquerading as primary gynaecological malignancy, we reviewed the records of 8 women referred to our gynaecological oncology unit with primary colorectal cancer (1), recurrent colorectal cancer (6) and primary anal cancer (1). Seven of these patients presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge. All patients had Papanicolaou smears performed; 7 were abnormal and 1 unsuitable for cytological assessment. None of the 6 patients with recurrent carcinoma had been previously treated with more than standard anterior or abdominoperineal resection; no radiotherapy had been given, and only 1 patient had received chemotherapy. These patients were treated in our gynaecological oncology unit for their recurrence by surgery and/or chemotherapy and/or irradiation. All 6 had further recurrences in the pelvis despite this aggressive therapy. Follow-up of colorectal cancer in women should involve gynaecological history, pelvirectal examination and Pap smear at each visit. Correct diagnosis of the colorectal origin of a genital tract tumour is made on careful history, examination and biopsy. An abnormal Pap smear may be the first indication of recurrent colorectal cancer in the cervix and vagina, although most patients ultimately present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. The presence of a tumour invading both cervix and posterior vaginal wall is suggestive of spread from a colorectal tumour compared to the more common lateral spread of a cervical primary.

  4. The association of benign and malignant ovarian adenofibromas with breast cancer and thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elvio G; Tornos, Carmen; Malpica, Anais; Deavers, Michael T; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Gershenson, David M

    2002-01-01

    An unexpected association with breast cancer and thyroid disorders was found during a review of 91 cases of benign and malignant ovarian adenofibromas. Sixty-three tumors were benign, 11 had areas of borderline neoplasms, and 17 had a component of carcinoma. Such tumors were divided into glandular/cystic (61 cases) and papillary (30 cases) according to their gross and microscopic appearance. Among the 61 patients with glandular/cystic adenofibromas, 13 (21%) had breast cancer and 19 (31%) also had thyroid disorders. Among the 30 patients with papillary adenofibromas there were no cases of breast cancer and only 2 patients had thyroid disorders. The average age of the patients with ovarian adenofibroma and breast cancer or thyroid disorders was higher (66 years) than that of patients without breast cancer or thyroid disorders (55 years). More patients with breast cancer and thyroid disorders had bilateral adenofibromas than patients without breast cancer or thyroid disorders. We also reviewed the medical records of 100 patients with ovarian cancer without adenofibroma component, 100 patients with breast cancer, and 100 patients with ovarian and breast cancer. Six percent of patients with ovarian cancer had breast cancer and 16% of each one of these groups had thyroid disorders. This unexpected association found between glandular/cystic adenofibromas, breast cancer, and thyroid disorders might be explained by defects common to these organs. Disorders of some of these organs have been linked by common genetic changes and it is known that these organs are under the influence of similar hormones. Mutations of PTEN have been found in breast and thyroid cancer. The thyroid and ovaries are controlled by glycoprotein hormones of the pituitary gland, which have common alpha subunits.

  5. The Chernobyl thyroid cancer experience: pathology.

    PubMed

    LiVolsi, V A; Abrosimov, A A; Bogdanova, T; Fadda, G; Hunt, J L; Ito, M; Rosai, J; Thomas, G A; Williams, E D

    2011-05-01

    The Chernobyl accident was followed by a large increase in the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in the areas exposed to high levels of fallout. The Chernobyl Tumor Bank was set up in 1998 to make tumours available for study internationally, and a pathology panel reviewed all the tumours and established an agreed diagnosis. The thyroid tumours that were discovered after the Chernobyl nuclear accident were virtually all (95%) of the papillary carcinoma type. Rare examples of other tumour types were identified. Within the papillary group, several subtypes were noted, including classical or usual type, follicular variant, solid variant and mixed patterns Diffuse sclerosis variant, cribriform/morular type and Warthin-like variant were rare. No tall cell or columnar cell variants were identified. The tumours examined by the Pathology Panel of the Chernobyl Tumor Bank constitute a large representative sample (estimated at about 50%) of the tumours that developed in this population. This overview describes the method adopted by the panel and the different diagnostic categories adopted; illustrates the pathology of these neoplasms; compares the pathological characteristics of the early lesions with those identified after long latency periods and the institution of screening programmes and outlines the possible associated causes for the various morphological patterns seen.

  6. Lymphocytic Profiling in Thyroid Cancer Provides Clues for Failure of Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Paparodis, Rodis; Sharma, Deepak; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is usually surrounded by a significant number of immune reactive cells. Tumor associated lymphocytes as well as background lymphocytic thyroiditis is frequently mentioned in pathology reports of patients operated for thyroid cancer. The nature of this lymphocytic reaction in not well understood. Evidently, the fact that cancer can survive in this adverse microenvironment speaks for immune regulation. We characterized the lymphocytic infiltration that accompanies thyroid cancer and compared it to that present in thyroid autoimmunity. We found that double-negative (DN) T cells were significantly more abundant in thyroid cancer than in thyroid autoimmunity. Although FOXP3+ Tregs were also present, DN T cells were the dominant cell type associated with thyroid cancer. Furthermore, upon stimulation, the DN T cells associated with cancer remained unchanged while the few (<5%) DN T cells associated with thyroid autoimmunity increased in numbers (>20%). CD25 expression on DN T cells remained unchanged after stimulation which suggests that the increase in the absolute number of DN T cells in thyroid autoimmunity was at the expense of inactivation of single positive T cells. We concluded that in the setting of thyroid cancer, DN T cells appear to suppress tumor immunity. In contrast, in thyroid autoimmunity, DN T cells were barely present and only increased at the expense of inactivated, single positive T cells upon induction. Together, these findings suggest that thyroid cancer associated DN T cells might regulate proliferation and effector function of T cells and thereby contribute to tumor tolerance and active avoidance of tumor immunity. PMID:24623740

  7. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L.; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer. PMID:26942566

  8. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M; Walker, Blair A; Schein, Jacqueline E; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M

    2016-03-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  9. Thyroid cancer incidence due to technogenic exposure in childhood.

    PubMed

    Koshurnikova, Nina Alexandrovna; Kaigorodova, Larissa Y; Rabinovich, Evgenya I; Martinenko, Irina I; Okatenko, Pavel A; Khokhryakov, Victor V; Mosharova, Elena P; Mokrov, Juri; Fomin, Evgeny; Alekseyev, Valery S; Panteleyev, Nikolay T; Sannikova, Lubov A; Ryzhykh, Tatyana V

    2012-07-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence was studied in the cohort of residents of Ozyorsk and Kyshtym, the nearest upwind cities to the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Russia's first plutonium production facility, which has been in operation since 1948. Radioactive contamination of areas around the Mayak PA were from unmonitored releases of inert gases produced by industrial reactors and also from the release of uranium fission products from a radiochemical plant stack where irradiated uranium blocks were refined. Iodine-131 (131I) was the main contributor to the technogenic dose from atmospheric releases. Routine monitoring of gaseous releases began in the mid-1960s, when a gas purification system was perfected. Children were a critical group due to their higher radiosensitivity and specific diet (dairy products and vegetables). Both cities maintain Registries containing over 100,000 individuals born from 1934-2006. Among this group, more than 100 cases of thyroid cancer were registered during 1948-2009. The relative risk of thyroid cancer incidence is 1.5 times higher than in the Chelyabinsk.

  10. Validity of thyroid cancer incidence data following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2011-12-01

    The only clearly demonstrated cancer incidence increase that can be attributed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is thyroid carcinoma in patients exposed during childhood or adolescence. Significant increases in thyroid disease were observed as soon as 4 y after the accident. The solid/follicular subtype of papillary carcinoma predominated in the early period after the accident. Morphological diagnosis of cancer in such cases, if no infiltrative growth is clearly visible, depends mainly on the nuclear criteria. Outdated equipment and insufficient quality of histological specimens impeded reliable evaluation of the nuclear criteria. Access to foreign professional literature has always been limited in the former Soviet Union. The great number of advanced tumors observed shortly after the accident can be explained by the screening effect (detection of previously neglected cancers) and by the fact that many patients were brought from non-contaminated areas and registered as Chernobyl victims. It is also worth noting that exaggeration of the Chernobyl cancer statistics facilitated the writing of dissertations, financing of research, and assistance from outside the former Soviet Union. "Chernobyl hysteria" impeded nuclear energy production in some countries, thus contributing to higher prices for fossil fuel. The concluding point is that since post-Chernobyl cancers tend on average to be in a later stage of tumor progression, some published data on molecular or immunohistochemical characteristics of Chernobyl-related cancers require reevaluation.

  11. Current treatment options for recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Carlos; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2010-01-01

    Loco-regional control rate of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has improved significantly in the past decade. However, local recurrence still represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity in advanced stages, and management of local failure remains a challenging issue in NPC. The best salvage treatment for local recurrent NPC remains to be determined. The options include brachytherapy, external radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and nasopharyngectomy, either alone or in different combinations. In this article we will discuss the different options for salvage of locally recurrent NPC. Retreatment of locally recurrent NPC using radiotherapy, alone or in combination with other treatment modalities, as well as surgery, can result in long-term local control and survival in a substantial proportion of patients. For small-volume recurrent tumors (T1–T2) treated with external radiotherapy, brachytherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery, comparable results to those obtained with surgery have been reported. In contrast, treatment results of advanced-stage locally recurrent NPC are generally more satisfactory with surgery (with or without postoperative radiotherapy) than with reirradiation. PMID:20865269

  12. Prognosis of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Relation to Serum Thyrotropin and Thyroglobulin Antibody Status at Time of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, David S.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Brierley, James D.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Maxon, Harry R.; Sherman, Steven I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentration and thyroid autoimmunity may be of prognostic importance in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Preoperative serum TSH level has been associated with higher DTC stage in cross-sectional studies; data are contradictory on the significance of thyroid autoimmunity at the time of diagnosis. Objective: We sought to assess whether preoperative serum TSH and perioperative antithyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were associated with thyroid cancer stage and outcome in DTC patients followed by the National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study, a large multicenter thyroid cancer registry. Methods: Patients registered after 1996 with available preoperative serum TSH (n=617; the TSH cohort) or perioperative TgAb status (n=1770; the TgAb cohort) were analyzed for tumor stage, persistent disease, recurrence, and overall survival (OS; median follow-up, 5.5 years). Parametric tests assessed log-transformed TSH, and categorical variables were tested with chi square. Disease-free survival (DFS) and OS was assessed with Cox models. Results: Geometric mean serum TSH levels were higher in patients with higher-stage disease (Stage III/IV=1.48 vs. 1.02 mU/L for Stages I/II; p=0.006). The relationship persisted in those aged ≥45 years after adjusting for sex (p=0.01). Gross extrathyroidal extension (p=0.03) and presence of cervical lymph node metastases (p=0.003) were also significantly associated with higher serum TSH. Disease recurrence and all-cause mortality occurred in 37 and 38 TSH cohort patients respectively, which limited the power for survival analysis. Positive TgAb was associated with lower stage on univariate analysis (positive TgAb in 23.4% vs. 17.8% of Stage I/II vs. III/IV patients, respectively; p=0.01), although the relationship lost significance when adjusting for age and sex (p=0.34). Perioperative TgAb was not an independent predictor of DFS (hazard ratio=1.12 [95% confidence interval=0.74–1.69]) or OS (hazard

  13. Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Sáez, José M

    2011-01-01

    The MAPK/ERK (mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal- regulated kinase signaling pathway) and PI3K/Akt (lipid kinase phoshoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathway) play an important role in transmission of cell signals through transduction systems as ligands, transmembrane receptors and cytoplasmic secondary messengers to cell nucleus, where they influence the expression of genes that regulate important cellular processes: cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. The genes, coding the signaling cascade proteins (RET, RAS, BRAF, PI3K, PTEN, AKT), are mutated or aberrantly expressed in thyroid cancer derived from follicular thyroid cell. Genetic and epigenetic alternations, concerning MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, contribute to their activation and interaction in consequence of malignant follicular cell transformation. Moreover, it is additionally pointed out that genetic, as well as epigenetic DNA changing via aberrant methylation of several tumor suppressor and thyroid-specific genes is associated with tumor aggressiveness, being a jointly responsible mechanism for thyroid tumorigenesis. In the present manuscript the currently developed diagnostic and prognostic genetic/epigenetic markers are presented; the understanding of this molecular mechanism provides access to novel molecular therapeutic strategies. PMID:22654559

  14. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration as a marker of endometrial cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lie, Geoffrey; Morley, Thomas; Chowdhury, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman developed a cerebellar syndrome having undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometrial cancer 1 year previously. She was found to be anti-Yo antibody positive and was diagnosed with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). A subsequent positron emission tomography scan and lymph node biopsy identified recurrence of her endometrial cancer. This case illustrates how PCD can be an indicator of cancer recurrence, underlines the significance of PCD as a prompt to search for underlying malignancy, and highlights the difficulties PCD poses to the clinician in terms of diagnosis and management.

  15. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    PubMed

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries.

  16. ENDOCRINE TUMOURS: Advances in the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer: lessons from the cancer genome.

    PubMed

    Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Santisteban, Pilar

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy giving rise to one of the most indolent solid cancers, but also one of the most lethal. In recent years, systematic studies of the cancer genome, most importantly those derived from The Cancer Genome Altas (TCGA), have catalogued aberrations in the DNA, chromatin, and RNA of the genomes of thousands of tumors relative to matched normal cellular genomes and have analyzed their epigenetic and protein consequences. Cancer genomics is therefore providing new information on cancer development and behavior, as well as new insights into genetic alterations and molecular pathways. From this genomic perspective, we will review the main advances concerning some essential aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer such as mutational mechanisms, new cancer genes implicated in tumor initiation and progression, the role of non-coding RNA, and the advent of new susceptibility genes in thyroid cancer predisposition. This look across these genomic and cellular alterations results in the reshaping of the multistep development of thyroid tumors and offers new tools and opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies.

  17. ENDOCRINE TUMOURS: Advances in the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer: lessons from the cancer genome.

    PubMed

    Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Santisteban, Pilar

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy giving rise to one of the most indolent solid cancers, but also one of the most lethal. In recent years, systematic studies of the cancer genome, most importantly those derived from The Cancer Genome Altas (TCGA), have catalogued aberrations in the DNA, chromatin, and RNA of the genomes of thousands of tumors relative to matched normal cellular genomes and have analyzed their epigenetic and protein consequences. Cancer genomics is therefore providing new information on cancer development and behavior, as well as new insights into genetic alterations and molecular pathways. From this genomic perspective, we will review the main advances concerning some essential aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer such as mutational mechanisms, new cancer genes implicated in tumor initiation and progression, the role of non-coding RNA, and the advent of new susceptibility genes in thyroid cancer predisposition. This look across these genomic and cellular alterations results in the reshaping of the multistep development of thyroid tumors and offers new tools and opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27666535

  18. Activation of the RhoB Signaling Pathway by Thyroid Hormone Receptor β in Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Sayaka; Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Kazuya; Ohta, Kazuyasu; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) mediates the crucial effects of the thyroid hormone (T3) on cellular growth, development, and differentiation. Decreased expression or inactivating somatic mutations of TRs have been found in human cancers of the liver, breast, lung, and thyroid. The mechanisms of TR-associated carcinogenesis are still not clear. To establish the function of TRβ in thyroid cancer cell proliferation, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus vector, AdTRβ, which expresses human TRβ1 cDNA. Thyroid cancer cell lines in which TRβ protein levels were significantly decreased as compared to intact thyroid tissues were infected with AdTRβ and the function of TRβ on cell proliferation and migration was analyzed. Ligand-bound TRβ induced HDAC1 and HDAC3 dissociation from, and histone acetylation associated with the RhoB promoter and enhanced the expression of RhoB mRNA and protein. In AdTRβ-infected cells, T3 and farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI)-treatment induced the distribution of RhoB on the cell membrane and enhanced the abundance of active GTP-bound RhoB. This RhoB protein led to p21-associated cell-cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase, following inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion. Conversely, lowering cellular RhoB by small interfering RNA knockdown in AdTRβ-infected cells led to downregulation of p21 and inhibited cell-cycle arrest. The growth of BHP18-21v tumor xenografts in vivo was significantly inhibited by AdTRβ injection with FTIs-treatment, as compared to control virus-injected tumors. This novel signaling pathway triggered by ligand-bound TRβ provides insight into possible mechanisms of proliferation and invasion of thyroid cancer and may provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid cancers. PMID:25548921

  19. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  20. Coexistence of papillary thyroid cancer and Hashimoto thyroiditis in children: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Koibuchi, Harumi; Omoto, Kiyoka; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Toyotsuji, Tomonori; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Mikihiko

    2014-07-01

    This report documents 3 pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma cases with associated Hashimoto thyroiditis. In all 3 cases, hypoechoic nodules accompanied by multiple echogenic spots were noted on sonography of the thyroid. Hashimoto thyroiditis was suspected on the basis of positive thyroid autoantibody test results and pathologic examinations of thyroidectomy specimens, which revealed chronic thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration as the background of papillary thyroid carcinoma development. The potential for papillary carcinoma development warrants close follow-up, and meticulous sonographic examinations must be performed in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  1. Effects of thyroid hormones on human breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Linda C; Salazar, Eddie P; Kane, Staci R; Liu, Nan

    2008-03-01

    The involvement of estrogens in breast cancer development and growth has been well established. However, the effects of thyroid hormones and their combined effects with estrogens are not well studied. We investigated the response of human breast cancer cells to thyroid hormone, particularly the role of T3 in mediating cell proliferation and gene expression. We demonstrated that 17beta-estradiol (E2) or triiodothyronine (T3) promoted cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines. The E2- or T3-dependent cell proliferation was suppressed by co-administration of the ER antagonist ICI. We also demonstrated that T3 could enhance the effect of E2 on cell proliferation in T47-D cells. Using an estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated luciferase assay, we determined that T3 was able to induce the activation of ERE-mediated gene expression in MCF-7 cells, although the effects were much weaker than that induced by E2. These results suggest that T3 can promote breast cancer cell proliferation and increase the effect of E2 on cell proliferation in some breast cancer cell lines and thus that T3 may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. PMID:18328691

  2. The relationship of thyroid cancer with radiation exposure from nuclear weapon testing in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuya; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Trott, Klaus R; Simon, Steven L; Fujimori, Keisei; Nakashima, Noriaki; Fukao, Akira; Saito, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The US nuclear weapons testing program in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands. The potentially widespread radiation exposure from radio-iodines of fallout has raised concerns about the risk of thyroid cancer in the Marshallese population. The most serious exposures and its health hazards resulted from the hydrogen-thermonuclear bomb test, the Castle BRAVO, on March 1, 1954. Between 1993 and 1997, we screened 3,709 Marshallese for thyroid disease who were born before the BRAVO test. It was 60% of the entire population at risk and who were still alive at the time of our examinations. We diagnosed 30 thyroid cancers and found 27 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before our screening in this group. Fifty-seven Marshallese born before 1954 (1.5%) had thyroid cancer or had been operated for thyroid cancer. Nearly all (92%) of these cancers were papillary carcinoma. We derived estimates of individual thyroid dose proxy from the BRAVO test in 1954 on the basis of published age-specific doses estimated on Utirik atoll and 137Cs deposition levels on the atolls where the participants came from. There was suggestive evidence that the prevalence of thyroid cancer increased with category of estimated dose to the thyroid. PMID:12675119

  3. The relationship of thyroid cancer with radiation exposure from nuclear weapon testing in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuya; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Trott, Klaus R; Simon, Steven L; Fujimori, Keisei; Nakashima, Noriaki; Fukao, Akira; Saito, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The US nuclear weapons testing program in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands. The potentially widespread radiation exposure from radio-iodines of fallout has raised concerns about the risk of thyroid cancer in the Marshallese population. The most serious exposures and its health hazards resulted from the hydrogen-thermonuclear bomb test, the Castle BRAVO, on March 1, 1954. Between 1993 and 1997, we screened 3,709 Marshallese for thyroid disease who were born before the BRAVO test. It was 60% of the entire population at risk and who were still alive at the time of our examinations. We diagnosed 30 thyroid cancers and found 27 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before our screening in this group. Fifty-seven Marshallese born before 1954 (1.5%) had thyroid cancer or had been operated for thyroid cancer. Nearly all (92%) of these cancers were papillary carcinoma. We derived estimates of individual thyroid dose proxy from the BRAVO test in 1954 on the basis of published age-specific doses estimated on Utirik atoll and 137Cs deposition levels on the atolls where the participants came from. There was suggestive evidence that the prevalence of thyroid cancer increased with category of estimated dose to the thyroid.

  4. Thyroid cancer incidence attributable to overdiagnosis in the United States 1981-2011.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Thomas J; Gates, Margaret A; Boscoe, Francis P

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer incidence has increased in the United States from 1978 through 2011 for both men and women of all ages and races. Overdiagnosis is partially responsible for this trend, although its magnitude is uncertain. This study examines papillary thyroid cancer incidence according to stage at diagnosis and estimates the proportion of newly diagnosed tumors that are attributable to overdiagnosis. We analyzed stage specific trends in papillary thyroid cancer incidence, 1981-2011, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results national cancer registries. Yearly changes in early and late-stage thyroid cancer incidence were calculated. We estimate that the proportion of incident papillary thyroid cancers attributable to overdiagnosis in 2011 was 5.5 and 45.5% in men ages 20-49 and 50+ and 41.1 and 60.1% in women ages 20-49 and 50+, respectively. Overdiagnosis has resulted in an additional 82,000 incident papillary thyroid cancers that likely would never have caused any clinical symptoms. The detection of early-stage papillary thyroid cancer outpaced that of late-stage disease from 1981 through 2011, in part due to overdiagnosis. Further studies into the prevention, risk stratification and optimal treatment of papillary thyroid cancer are warranted in response to these trends.

  5. miR-126-3p Inhibits Thyroid Cancer Cell Growth and Metastasis, and Is Associated with Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yin; Kotian, Shweta; Zeiger, Martha A.; Zhang, Lisa; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that microRNAs are dysregulated in thyroid cancer and play important roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of target oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the function of miR-126-3p in thyroid cancer cells, and as a marker of disease aggressiveness. We found that miR-126-3p expression was significantly lower in larger tumors, in tumor samples with extrathyroidal invasion, and in higher risk group thyroid cancer in 496 papillary thyroid cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas study cohort. In an independent sample set, lower miR-126-3p expression was observed in follicular thyroid cancers (which have capsular and angioinvasion) as compared to follicular adenomas. Mechanistically, ectopic overexpression of miR-126-3p significantly inhibited thyroid cancer cell proliferation, in vitro (p<0.01) and in vivo (p<0.01), colony formation (p<0.01), tumor spheroid formation (p<0.05), cellular migration (p<0.05), VEGF secretion and endothelial tube formation, and lung metastasis in vivo. We found 14 predicted target genes, which were significantly altered upon miR-126-3p transfection in thyroid cancer cells, and which are involved in cancer biology. Of these 14 genes, SLC7A5 and ADAM9 were confirmed to be inhibited by miR-126-3p overexpression and to be direct targets of miR-136-3p. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that miR-126-3p has a tumor-suppressive function in thyroid cancer cells, and is associated with aggressive disease phenotype. PMID:26244545

  6. Association of the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Lei, Jianyong; Chen, Wenjie; Gong, Yanping; Luo, Han; Li, Zhihui; Gong, Rixiang; Zhu, Jingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are known to be prognostic factors in several cancers. However, no previous investigation has been performed to evaluate the significance of the NLR and PLR in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The aim of this study was to identify the ability of the preoperative NLR or PLR to predict lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. Data from all patients with MTC who had undergone surgery at our institution from May 2009 to May 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to identify optimal NLR and PLR cutoff points, and we assessed independent predictors of lymph node metastasis and recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The ideal cutoff points for predicting lymph node involvement were 2.7 for the NLR and 105.3 for the PLR. The optimal cutoff points of the NLR and PLR for predicting recurrence were 2.8 and 129.8, respectively. Using the cutoff values, we found that PLR>105.3 (odds ratio [OR] 4.782, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–16.7) was an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis and that PLR>129.8 (OR 3.838, 95% CI 1.1–13.5) was an independent predictor of recurrence. Our study suggests that the preoperative PLR, but not NLR, was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and recurrence in patients with MTC. PMID:27749581

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) offers a promising opportunity for cure and/or palliation to patients with recurrent head and neck cancer whose comorbidities, performance status, and history of prior treatment may preclude many other salvage options. Stereotactic body radiation therapy appears to have a favorable response and toxicity profile compared with other nonoperative salvage options for recurrent head and neck cancer. However, the risk of severe toxicity remains, with carotid blowout syndrome a unique concern, although the incidence of this complication may be minimized with alternating-day fractionation. The short overall treatment time and low rates of acute toxicity make SBRT an optimal vehicle to integrate with novel systemic therapies, and several phase II studies have used concurrent cetuximab as a radiosensitizer with SBRT with promising results. Ongoing studies aim to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of SBRT with immune checkpoint inhibitors in recurrent head and neck cancer. PMID:27441751

  8. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  9. The expression of translocator protein in human thyroid cancer and its role in the response of thyroid cancer cells to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Jensen, Kirk; Bauer, Andrew; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Hardwick, Matthew J; Vasko, Vasyl V

    2012-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), formerly known as a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, exerts pro-apoptotic function via regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential. We examined TSPO expression in human thyroid tumors (25 follicular adenomas (FA), 15 follicular cancers (FC), and 70 papillary cancers (PC)). The role of TSPO in the regulation of cell growth, migration, and apoptosis was examined in thyroid cancer cell lines after TSPO knockdown with siRNA and after treatment with TSPO antagonist (PK11195). Compared with normal thyroid, the level of TSPO expression was increased in FA, FC, and PC in 24, 26.6, and 55.7% of cases respectively. Thyroid cancer cell lines demonstrated variable levels of TSPO expression, without specific association with thyroid oncogene mutations. Treatment with inhibitors of PI3K/AKT or MEK/ERK signaling was not associated with changes in TSPO expression. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproic acid) increased TSPO expression in TSPO-deficient cell lines (FTC236 cells). TSPO gene silencing or treatment with PK11195 did not affect thyroid cancer cell growth and migration but prevented depolarization of mitochondrial membranes induced by oxidative stress. Induction of TSPO expression by valproic acid was associated with increased sensitivity of FTC236 to oxidative stress-inducible apoptosis. Overall, we showed that TSPO expression is frequently increased in PC. In vitro data suggested the role of epigenetic mechanism(s) in the regulation of TSPO in thyroid cells. Implication of TSPO in the thyroid cancer cell response to oxidative stress suggested its potential role in the regulation of thyroid cancer cell response to treatment with radioiodine and warrants further investigation.

  10. A Review of Joseph J. Mangano's Study on the Variation in Thyroid Cancer Incidence.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Paul A; Laurita, Matthew J; Shah, Shikhar K

    2015-09-01

    Researchers have attempted to link incidences of papillary thyroid cancer with radioiodine releases from nuclear power plants. Thyroid cancer detection rates are examined together with overall population exposure to ionizing radiation and actual radioiodine releases from the Indian Point Energy Center to determine if a causal relationship exists. A critical review of the statistical analyses used in previous papers is then presented. PMID:26222221

  11. Fear of cancer recurrence in prostate cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, Marieke; van Oort, Inge; Schouten, Joost; Thewes, Belinda; Gielissen, Marieke; Prins, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Background High fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is an understudied topic in prostate cancer (PCa) survivors. This study aimed to detect the prevalence, consequences and characteristics associated with high FCR in PCa survivors. Material and methods This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with localized PCa and treated with curative radical prostatectomy between 1992 and 2012. We administered the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) to assess FCR severity (primary outcome measure). Secondary outcomes included distress, quality of life (QOL), post-traumatic symptoms, and multidimensional aspects of FCR. χ(2)-tests, t-tests and Pearson's correlations examined the relationship between FCR and medical/demographic characteristics. MANOVA analyses and χ2-tests identified differences between PCa survivors with high and low FCR. Results Two hundred eighty-three PCa survivors (median age of 70.0 years) completed the questionnaires a median time of 7.1 years after surgery. About a third (36%) of all PCa survivors experienced high FCR. High FCR was associated with lower QOL, more physical problems, higher distress and more post-traumatic stress symptoms. PCa survivors with high FCR reported disease-related triggers (especially medical examinations), felt helpless and experienced problems in social relationships. High FCR was associated with a younger age and having received adjuvant radiotherapy. Conclusions Results illustrate that FCR is a significant problem in PCa survivors. Younger men and those treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are especially at risk. Those with high FCR experience worse QOL and higher symptom burden. Health care providers should pay specific attention to this problem and provide appropriate psychosocial care when needed. PMID:26935517

  12. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  13. Radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer in the era of risk stratification and alternative targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Pryma, Daniel A; Mandel, Susan J

    2014-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancers are typically iodine-avid and can be effectively treated with radioiodine. In most patients, radioiodine treatment is done for ablation of residual tissue, and in these cases the focus should be on using the minimum effective dose. Adjuvant therapy can be done to reduce the risk of recurrence, but optimal patient selection and dose are unclear. Patients with advanced disease benefit most from treatment with the maximum-tolerated dose. Recent research has focused on better patient selection and reduced radioiodine doses for remnant ablation. There are emerging targeted therapeutic approaches in patients who are appropriately shown to have iodine-refractory disease, with 1 drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Numerous trials are ongoing to assess targeted therapeutics alone or in combination with radioiodine.

  14. Identification of novel thyroid cancer-related genes and chemicals using shortest path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Peiwei; Li, Li-Peng; He, Yi-Chun; Gao, Ru-jian; Gao, Yu-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a typical endocrine malignancy. In the past three decades, the continued growth of its incidence has made it urgent to design effective treatments to treat this disease. To this end, it is necessary to uncover the mechanism underlying this disease. Identification of thyroid cancer-related genes and chemicals is helpful to understand the mechanism of thyroid cancer. In this study, we generalized some previous methods to discover both disease genes and chemicals. The method was based on shortest path algorithm and applied to discover novel thyroid cancer-related genes and chemicals. The analysis of the final obtained genes and chemicals suggests that some of them are crucial to the formation and development of thyroid cancer. It is indicated that the proposed method is effective for the discovery of novel disease genes and chemicals.

  15. False-Positive Radioactive Iodine Uptake Mimicking Miliary Lung Metastases in a Patient Affected by Papillary Thyroid Cancer and IgA Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Demidowich, Andrew Paul; Kundu, Amartya; Reynolds, James C; Celi, Francesco S

    2016-09-01

    A 42-year-old female with immunoglobulin A deficiency and recurrent sinopulmonary infections underwent thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Follow-up (123)I scintigraphy demonstrated diffuse pulmonary uptake, suggesting metastatic disease. However, subsequent pathologic, biochemical and radiographic testing proved that she was in fact disease free, and the initial (123)I pulmonary uptake was identified as a false positive. Inflammatory conditions may rarely cause iodine uptake in non-thyroidal tissues due to local retention, organification, and/or immunologic utilization. To avoid exposing patients to unnecessary treatments, it is critical for clinicians to recognize that comorbid pulmonary conditions may mimic metastatic PTC on radioiodine scintigraphy. PMID:27540434

  16. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-05-10

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  17. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-01-01

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  18. Do Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) Increase the Risk of Thyroid Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yawei; Guo, Grace L.; Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Cairong; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Zhu, Yong; Boyle, Peter; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2008-01-01

    An increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported in many parts of the world including the United States during the past several decades. Recently emerging evidence has demonstrated that polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs), particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alter thyroid hormone homeostasis and cause thyroid dysfunction. However, few studies have been conducted to test whether exposure to PBDEs and other PHAHs increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Here, we hypothesize that elevated exposure to PHAHs, particularly PBDEs, increases the risk of thyroid cancer and may explain part of the increase in incidence of thyroid cancer during the past several decades. In addition, genetic and epigenetic variations in metabolic pathway genes may alter the expression and function of metabolic enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of endogenous thyroid hormones and the detoxification of PBDEs and other PHAHs. Such variation may result in different individual susceptibilities to PBDEs and other PHAHs and the subsequent development of thyroid cancer. The investigation of this hypothesis will lead to an improved understanding of the role of PBDEs and other PHAHs in thyroid tumorigenesis and may provide a real means to prevent this deadly disease. PMID:19122824

  19. Can technical characteristics predict clinical performance in PET/CT imaging? A correlation study for thyroid cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Metaxas, Marinos; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether image characteristics could be used to predict the outcome of ROC studies in PET/CT imaging. Patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer underwent a standard whole body (WB) examination and an additional high-resolution head-and-neck (HN) F18-FDG PET/CT scan. The value of the latter was determined with an ROC study, the results of which showed that the WB+HN combination was better than WB alone for thyroid cancer detection and diagnosis. Following the ROC experiment, the WB and HN images of confirmed benign or malignant thyroid disease were analyzed and first and second order textural features were determined. Features included minimum, mean, and maximum intensity, as well as contrast in regions of interest encircling the thyroid lesions. Lesion size and standard uptake values (SUV) were also determined. Bivariate analysis was applied to determine relationships between WB and HN features and between observer ROC responses and the various feature values. The two sets showed significant associations in the values of SUV, contrast, and lesion size. They were completely different when the intensities were considered; no relationship was found between the WB minimum, maximum, and mean ROI values and their HN counterparts. SUV and contrast were the strongest predictors of ROC performance on PET/CT examinations of thyroid cancer. The high resolution HN images seem to enhance these relationships but without a single dramatic effect as was projected from the ROC results. A combination of features from both WB and HN datasets may possibly be a more robust predictor of ROC performance.

  20. Multiplatform Biomarker Discovery for Bladder Cancer Recurrence Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    De Paoli, Marine; Gogalic, Selma; Sauer, Ursula; Preininger, Claudia; Pandha, Hardev; Simpson, Guy; Horvath, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (BCa) has a high recurrence rate requiring lifelong surveillance. Urinary biomarkers are promising as simple alternatives to cystoscopy for the diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer. However, no single marker can achieve the required accuracy. The purpose of this study was to select a multiparameter panel, comprising urinary biomarkers and clinical parameters, for BCa recurrence diagnosis. Experimental Design. Candidate biomarkers were measured in urine samples of BCa patients with recurrence and BCa patients without recurrence. A multiplatform strategy was used for marker quantification comprising a multiplexed microarray and an automated platform for ELISA analysis. A multivariate statistical analysis combined the results from both platforms with the collected clinical data. Results. The best performing combination of biomarkers and clinical parameters achieved an AUC value of 0.91, showing better performance than individual parameters. This panel comprises six biomarkers (cadherin-1, IL-8, ErbB2, IL-6, EN2, and VEGF-A) and three clinical parameters (number of past recurrences, number of BCG therapies, and stage at time of diagnosis). Conclusions. The multiparameter panel could be a useful noninvasive tool for BCa surveillance and potentially impact the clinical management of this disease. Validation of results in an independent cohort is warranted. PMID:27660385

  1. Multiplatform Biomarker Discovery for Bladder Cancer Recurrence Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    De Paoli, Marine; Gogalic, Selma; Sauer, Ursula; Preininger, Claudia; Pandha, Hardev; Simpson, Guy; Horvath, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (BCa) has a high recurrence rate requiring lifelong surveillance. Urinary biomarkers are promising as simple alternatives to cystoscopy for the diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer. However, no single marker can achieve the required accuracy. The purpose of this study was to select a multiparameter panel, comprising urinary biomarkers and clinical parameters, for BCa recurrence diagnosis. Experimental Design. Candidate biomarkers were measured in urine samples of BCa patients with recurrence and BCa patients without recurrence. A multiplatform strategy was used for marker quantification comprising a multiplexed microarray and an automated platform for ELISA analysis. A multivariate statistical analysis combined the results from both platforms with the collected clinical data. Results. The best performing combination of biomarkers and clinical parameters achieved an AUC value of 0.91, showing better performance than individual parameters. This panel comprises six biomarkers (cadherin-1, IL-8, ErbB2, IL-6, EN2, and VEGF-A) and three clinical parameters (number of past recurrences, number of BCG therapies, and stage at time of diagnosis). Conclusions. The multiparameter panel could be a useful noninvasive tool for BCa surveillance and potentially impact the clinical management of this disease. Validation of results in an independent cohort is warranted.

  2. Epidemiology of thyroid cancer: a review with special reference to Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states.

    PubMed

    Al-Zahrani, A S; Ravichandran, K

    2007-07-01

    A wide variation in incidence of thyroid cancer according to age, sex, ethnicity and geographic region was observed. In general, it occurs more frequently in women than men and a substantially higher rate was observed particularly during fertile period of women compared with men of the same age. Papillary carcinoma is the most prevalent histological type, irrespective of gender and conditions like iodine level. Over the years the incidence of thyroid cancer, especially papillary type, increases around the world. Ionizing radiation, in particular radiotherapy to head and neck region was the most established risk factor for thyroid cancer. Goiter, miscarriage or abortion (particularly in the first pregnancy) may also predispose to thyroid cancer risk. Cigarette smoking and use of contraceptives may be modifier of thyroid cancer risk. In all the GCC states thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer except in Babrain and Kuwait (where it stands third). During the five year peribd (1998-2002) 549 male and 1898 female thyroid caneers were diagnosed in all the GCC states. Papillary carcinoma is the predominant histological type followed by follicular carcinoma in both genders. Among females, Qatar has the highest incidence with an age standardized incidence rate of 13.5 per 100,000 followed by Kuwait (7.7), Bahrain (7.6), Emirates (6.0), Oman (5.9), and Saudi Arabia (5.0). There were at least 2.6 female thyroid cancer cases (in Kuwait) for each male thyroid cancer case and this goes up to 6.6 in Babrain. Incidence of thyroid cancer in the GCC states is closer or higher than that of some of the developed countries.

  3. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  4. Interleukin-12 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Cancer That Has High Levels of HER2/Neu

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Bone Metastases; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Distal Urethral Cancer; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Liver Metastases; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Occult Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal

  5. ProNGF is a potential diagnostic biomarker for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Demont, Yohann; Pundavela, Jay; Choquet, Genevieve; Leissner, Philippe; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Attia, John; Walker, Marjorie M.; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    The precursor for nerve growth factor (proNGF) is expressed in some cancers but its clinicopathological significance is unclear. The present study aimed to define the clinicopathological significance of proNGF in thyroid cancer. ProNGF expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry in two cohorts of cancer versus benign tumors (adenoma) and normal thyroid tissues. In the first cohort (40 thyroid cancers, 40 thyroid adenomas and 80 normal thyroid tissues), proNGF was found overexpressed in cancers compared to adenomas and normal samples (p<0.0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.84 (95% CI 0.75-0.93, p<0.0001) for cancers versus adenomas, and 0.99 (95% CI 0.98-1.00, p<0.0001) for cancers versus normal tissues. ProNGF overexpression was confirmed in a second cohort (127 cancers of various histological types and 55 normal thyroid tissues) and using a different antibody (p<0.0001). ProNGF staining intensity was highest in papillary carcinomas compared to other histological types (p<0.0001) and there was no significant association with age, gender, tumor size, stage and lymph node status. In conclusion, proNGF is increased in thyroid cancer and should be considered as a new potential diagnostic biomarker. PMID:27074571

  6. Delineating Chromosomal Breakpoints in Radiation-Induced Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Ito, Yuko; Kwan, Johnson; Smida, Jan; Weier, Jingly F.; Hieber, Ludwig; Lu, Chun-Mei; Lehmann, Lars; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J.; Zeng, Hui; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent translocations are well known hallmarks of many human solid tumors and hematological disorders, where patient- and breakpoint-specific information may facilitate prognostication and individualized therapy. In thyroid carcinomas, the proto-oncogenes RET and NTRK1 are often found to be activated through chromosomal rearrangements. However, many sporadic tumors and papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) arising in patients with a history of exposure to elevated levels of ionizing irradiation do not carry these known abnormalities. We developed a rapid scheme to screen tumor cell metaphase spreads and identify candidate genes of tumorigenesis and neoplastic progression for subsequent functional studies. Using a series of overnight fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments with pools comprised of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, it now becomes possible to rapidly refine breakpoint maps and, within one week, progress from the low resolution Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) maps or Giemsa-banding (G-banding) karyotypes to fully integrated, high resolution physical maps including a list of candiate genes in the critical regions. PMID:22096618

  7. A Genomic Alternative to Identify Medullary Thyroid Cancer Preoperatively in Thyroid Nodules with Indeterminate Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Robert J.; Traweek, S. Thomas; Lanman, Richard B.; Kennedy, Giulia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of calcitonin screening for the rare medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is controversial due to questions of efficacy, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. This study reports the results of a large prospective validation using a machine-trained algorithm (MTC Classifier) to preoperatively identify MTC in fine-needle aspiration biopsies in lieu of calcitonin measurements. Methods: Cytology analysis on a prospective consecutive series of 50,430 thyroid nodule biopsies yielded a total of 7815 indeterminate (Bethesda categories III/IV) cases, which were tested with the MTC classifier. A prospective, consecutively submitted series of 2673 Bethesda III–VI cases with cytology determined locally was also evaluated. RNA was isolated and tested for the MTC Classifier using microarrays. Results: Forty-three cases were positive by the MTC Classifier among 10,488 tested nodules (0.4%), consistent with the low prevalence of MTC. Of these, all but one was histologically or biochemically confirmed as MTC, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%. Of the positive cases, only 19 (44%) had been specifically suspected of MTC by cytology, highlighting the limitations of light microscopy to detect this disease. Three surgically confirmed MTC cases that were detected by the MTC Classifier had low basal serum calcitonin values, indicating these would have been missed by traditional calcitonin screening methods. A pooled analysis of three independent validation sets demonstrates high test sensitivity (97.9%), specificity (99.8%), PPV (97.9%), and negative predictive value (99.8%). Conclusions: A clinical paradigm is proposed, whereby cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules being tested for common malignancies using gene expression can be simultaneously tested for MTC using the same genomic assay at no added cost. PMID:26992356

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and neoplasia in children receiving neck irradiation for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, I.D.; Black, T.L.; Thompson, E.I.; Pratt, C.; Rao, B.; Hustu, O.

    1985-03-15

    The reported relationship of radiation exposure and thyroid carcinoma stimulated this retrospective study of 298 patients treated at St. Jude Children's Hospital with radiation therapy to the neck for childhood cancer to identify patients who developed subsequent thyroid abnormalities. This series includes 153 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 95 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with lymphoepithelioma, and 22 with miscellaneous tumors. Inclusion in the study required 5 years of disease-free survival following therapy for their original tumor, which included thyroid irradiation. Follow-up has been 100%. Most patients also received chemotherapy. Seventeen patients were found to have decreased thyroid reserve with normal levels of free triiodothyroxine (T3) or free thyroxin, (T4) and an elevated level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In nine patients hypothyroidism developed, with decreased T3 or T4 levels and an elevated level of TSH. One hyperthyroid patient was identified. Two patients had thyroiditis, and seven had thyroid neoplasms: (carcinoma in two, adenoma in two, colloid nodule in one, and undiagnosed nodules in two). This survey has demonstrated an increased incidence of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid neoplasia when compared to the general population. The importance of long-term follow-up for thyroid disease is emphasized in patients who have received thyroid irradiation. The possible role of subclinical hypothyroidism with TSH elevation coupled with radiation damage to the thyroid gland as a model for the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  9. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases. PMID:25033684

  10. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases.

  11. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  12. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) is a novel tumor suppressor in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and many patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC), and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) fail to respond to conventional therapies, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Additional therapeutic targets and treatment options are needed for these patients. We recently reported that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is highly expressed in ATC and confers an aggressive phenotype when overexpressed in DTC cells. Methods Microarray analysis was used to identify downstream targets of PPARγ in ATC cells. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to assess thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) expression in thyroid cancer cell lines and primary tumor specimens. Retroviral transduction was used to generate ATC cell lines that overexpress TXNIP, and assays that assess glucose uptake, viable cell proliferation, and invasion were used to characterize the in vitro properties of these cells. An orthotopic thyroid cancer mouse model was used to assess the effect of TXNIP overexpression in ATC cell lines in vivo. Results Using microarray analysis, we show that TXNIP is highly upregulated when PPARγ is depleted from ATC cells. Using Western blot analysis and IHC, we show that DTC and ATC cells exhibit differential TXNIP expression patterns. DTC cell lines and patient tumors have high TXNIP expression in contrast to low or absent expression in ATC cell lines and tumors. Overexpression of TXNIP decreases the growth of HTh74 cells compared to vector controls and inhibits glucose uptake in the ATC cell lines HTh74 and T238. Importantly, TXNIP overexpression in T238 cells results in attenuated tumor growth and decreased metastasis in an orthotopic thyroid cancer mouse model. Conclusions Our findings indicate that TXNIP functions as a tumor suppressor in thyroid cells, and its downregulation is likely important in

  13. Recurrent Breast Cancer in a Patient with a Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Copeland-Halperin, Libby R.; Cohen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with recurrent infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. We also review the current literature regarding reports of breast malignancy around a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, as well as the potential relevance of such shunts to the preoperative evaluation and management of patients with breast cancer. PMID:25648450

  14. Cognitive Adaptation Theory and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are There Limits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomich, Patricia L.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2006-01-01

    Relations of the components of cognitive adaptation theory (self-esteem, optimism, control) to quality of life and benefit finding were examined for 70 women (91% Caucasian) diagnosed with Stage I, II, or III breast cancer over 5 years ago. Half of these women experienced a recurrence within the 5 years; the other half remained disease free. Women…

  15. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel Corey; Weinberg, Eric P; Hollenberg, Gary M; Meyers, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the prostate combines both morphological and functional MR techniques by utilizing small field of view T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and MR spectroscopy to accurately detect, localize, and stage primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Localizing the site of recurrence in patients with rising prostate-specific antigen following treatment affects decision making regarding treatment and can be accomplished with multiparametric prostate MR. Several different treatment options are available for prostate cancer including radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, brachytherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, or a number of focal therapy techniques. The findings of recurrent prostate cancer can be different depending on the treatment the patient has received, and the radiologist must be able to recognize the variety of imaging findings seen with this common disease. This review article will detail the findings of recurrent prostate cancer on multiparametric MR and describe common posttreatment changes which may create challenges to accurate interpretation. PMID:27195184

  16. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  17. Breast cancer recurrence after sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    AlSaif, Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To look into the pattern of breast cancer recurrence following mastectomy, breast conservative surgery and radiotherapy or chemotherapy after SLNB at our institution. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2014, all patients diagnosed with breast cancer with clinically negative axilla, underwent SLNB. We reviewed their medical records to identify pattern of cancer recurrence. Results: The median follow-up was 35.5 months. Eighty five patients (70.8%) had a negative sentinel lymph node (SLN) and subsequently had no further axillary treatment, one of them (1.2%) developed axillary recurrence 25 months postoperatively. Twenty five patients (20.8%) had a positive SLN (macrometastases) and subsequently had immediate axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Ten patients (8.3%) had a positive SLN (micrometastases). In the positive SLN patients (macrometastases and micrometastases), there were two ipsilateral breast recurrences (5.7%), seen three and four years postoperatively. Also in this group, there was one (2.9%) distant metastasis to bone three years postoperatively. Conclusion: In this series, the clinical axillary false negative rate for SLNB was 1.2% which is in accordance with the published literature. This supports the use of SLNB as the sole axillary staging procedure in breast cancer patients with negative SLNB. Axillary lymph node dissection can be safely omitted in patients with micrometastases in their sentinel lymph node(s). PMID:26870109

  18. Exemestane Following Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences and Prolongs Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Postmenopausal women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer had delayed disease recurrence and longer survival after taking 2-3 years of tamoxifen followed by exemestane for a total of 5 years compared to taking tamoxifen for 5 years.

  19. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  20. Small cell lung cancer with metastasis to the thyroid in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Ozgu, Eylem Sercan; Gen, Ramazan; Ilvan, Ahmet; Ozge, Cengiz; Polat, Ayşe; Vayisoglu, Yusuf

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid metastasis of lung cancer is rarely observed in clinical practice. The primary cancers which metastasize to the thyroid gland are mostly renal cell carcinoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. Transient destructive thyrotoxicosis is caused by massive metastasis of extrathyroid tumors. We herein present a case report of a patient with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. A 66-year-old man complained of swelling around the right side of the neck, dyspnea, progressive weight loss, and palpitation starting since 3 months before his admission. The patient was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. The case report presented here illustrates the challenge of making a definitive and adequate diagnosis, particularly if the patient presents with 2 potential causes of thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid scintigraphy is an important tool for differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. PMID:23172496

  1. Sulforaphane inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth and invasiveness through the reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Tian, Zhufang; Yang, Qi; Li, Heng; Guan, Haixia; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng; Ji, Meiju

    2015-09-22

    Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural compound derived from broccoli/broccoli sprouts, has been demonstrated to be used as an antitumor agent in different types of cancers. However, its antitumor effect in thyroid cancer remains largely unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of SFN for thyroid cancer and explore the mechanisms underlying antitumor effects of SFN by in vitro and in vivo studies. Our data demonstrated that SFN significantly inhibited thyroid cancer cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibited thyroid cancer cell migration and invasion by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and expression of Slug, Twist, MMP-2 and -9. Mechanically, SFN inhibited thyroid cancer cell growth and invasiveness through repressing phosphorylation of Akt, enhancing p21 expression by the activation of Erk and p38 signaling cascades, and promoting mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent pathway. Growth of xenograft tumors derived from thyroid cancer cell line FTC133 in nude mice was also significantly inhibited by SFN. Importantly, we did not find significant effect of SFN on body weight and liver function of mice. Collectively, we for the first time demonstrate that SFN is a potentially effective antitumor agent for thyroid cancer.

  2. International patterns and trends in thyroid cancer incidence, 1973–2002

    PubMed Central

    Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Han, Xuesong; Ward, Mary H.; Sjodin, Andreas; Zhang, Yaqun; Bai, Yana; Zhu, Cairong; Guo, Grace L.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Yawei

    2009-01-01

    During the past several decades, an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported in many parts of the world. To date, no study has compared trends in thyroid cancer incidence across continents. We examined incidence data from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5) over the 30-year period 1973–2002 from 19 populations in the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Thyroid cancer rates have increased from 1973–1977 to 1998–2002 for most of the populations except for Sweden, in which the incidence rates decreased about 18% for both males and females. The average increase was 48.0% among males and 66.7% among females. More recently, the age-adjusted international thyroid cancer incidence rates from 1998–2002 varied 5-fold by geographic region for males and nearly 10-fold for females by geographic region. Considerable variation in thyroid cancer incidence was present for every continent but Africa, in which the incidence rates were generally low. Our analysis of published CI5 data suggests that thyroid cancer rates increased between 1973 and 2002 in most populations worldwide and that the increase does not appear to be restricted to a particular region of the world or by the underlying rates of thyroid cancer. PMID:19016336

  3. Aberrantly methylated genes in human papillary thyroid cancer and their association with BRAF/RAS mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yasuko; Tsuji, Eiichi; Yagi, Koichi; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Tsuji, Shingo; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Ogawa, Toshihisa; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer arises through accumulation of epigenetic and genetic alteration. Aberrant promoter methylation is a common epigenetic mechanism of gene silencing in cancer cells. We here performed genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation of promoter regions by Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, using 14 clinical papillary thyroid cancer samples and 10 normal thyroid samples. Among the 14 papillary cancer cases, 11 showed frequent aberrant methylation, but the other three cases showed no aberrant methylation at all. Distribution of the hypermethylation among cancer samples was non-random, which implied existence of a subset of preferentially methylated papillary thyroid cancer. Among 25 frequently methylated genes, methylation status of six genes (HIST1H3J, POU4F2, SHOX2, PHKG2, TLX3, HOXA7) was validated quantitatively by pyrosequencing. Epigenetic silencing of these genes in methylated papillary thyroid cancer cell lines was confirmed by gene re-expression following treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, and detected by real-time RT-PCR. Methylation of these six genes was validated by analysis of additional 20 papillary thyroid cancer and 10 normal samples. Among the 34 cancer samples in total, 26 cancer samples with preferential methylation were significantly associated with mutation of BRAF/RAS oncogene (P = 0.04, Fisher's exact test). Thus, we identified new genes with frequent epigenetic hypermethylation in papillary thyroid cancer, two subsets of either preferentially methylated or hardly methylated papillary thyroid cancer, with a concomitant occurrence of oncogene mutation and gene methylation. These hypermethylated genes may constitute potential biomarkers for papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:24367375

  4. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Blair, Cindy K.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Rock, Cheryl L.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Wadden, Thomas; Philip, Errol J.; Wolfe, Bruce; Gapstur, Susan M.; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; McTiernan, Anne; Minasian, Lori; Nebeling, Linda; Goodwin, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and components of energy imbalance, i.e., excessive energy intake and suboptimal levels of physical activity, are established risk factors for cancer incidence. Accumulating evidence suggests that these factors also may be important after the diagnosis of cancer and influence the course of disease, as well as overall health, well-being, and survival. Lifestyle and medical interventions that effectively modify these factors could potentially be harnessed as a means of cancer control. However, for such interventions to be maximally effective and sustainable, broad sweeping scientific discoveries ranging from molecular and cellular advances, to developments in delivering interventions on both individual and societal levels are needed. This review summarizes key discussion topics that were addressed in a recent Institute of Medicine Workshop entitled, “The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence”; discussions included: 1) mechanisms associated with obesity and energy balance that influence cancer progression; 2) complexities of studying and interpreting energy balance in relation to cancer recurrence and survival; 3) associations between obesity and cancer risk, recurrence, and mortality; 4) interventions that promote weight loss, increased physical activity, and negative energy balance as a means of cancer control; and 5) future directions. PMID:22695735

  6. Risk of Thyroid Cancer in a Nationwide Cohort of Patients with Biopsy-Verified Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Kämpe, Olle; Murray, Joseph A.; Green, Peter H.; Ekbom, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background In earlier studies based on selected populations, the relative risk for thyroid cancer in celiac disease has varied between 0.6 and 22.5. We aimed to test this relationship in a population-based setting. Methods We collected small intestinal biopsy report data performed in 1969–2008 from all 28 Swedish pathology departments. 29,074 individuals with celiac disease (villous atrophy; Marsh histopathology stage III) were matched for sex, age, calendar year, and county to 144,440 reference individuals from the Swedish general population. Through Cox regression, we then estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for any thyroid cancer and papillary thyroid cancer (defined according to relevant pathology codes in the Swedish Cancer Register) in patients with celiac disease. Results During follow-up, any thyroid cancer developed in seven patients with celiac disease (expected=12) and papillary thyroid cancer developed in five patients (expected=7). Celiac disease was not associated with an increased risk of any thyroid cancer (HR 0.6 [CI 0.3–1.3]) or of papillary thyroid cancer (HR 0.7 [CI 0.3–1.8]). All cases of thyroid cancer in celiac disease occurred in female patients. Risk estimates were similar before and after the year 2000 and independent of age at celiac diagnosis (≤24 years vs. ≥25 years). Conclusions We conclude that, in the Swedish population, there is no increased risk of thyroid cancer in patients with celiac disease. This differs from what has been reported in smaller studies in Italy and the United States. PMID:23281890

  7. Effects of the chernobyl disaster on thyroid cancer incidence in Turkey after 22 years.

    PubMed

    Acar, Hasan; Cakabay, Bahri; Bayrak, Ferit; Evrenkaya, Tülay

    2011-01-01

    Background. Separate studies involving people who survived atomic bombs have shown that the risk for cancer remains high after 40 years, compared with the risk in the general population. An elevated risk may also remain in regions of Turkey near the Chernobyl disaster. Patients and Methods. A multidisciplinary study conducted in 2008, 22 years after the Chernobyl disaster, examined the thyroid cancer incidence in Rize, a province of Turkey located on the shore of the middle Black Sea. Approximately 100,000 people were screened, and a fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed in 89 patients. Results. Based on postoperative histopathological examinations, thyroid cancer was diagnosed in six of the 100,000 people screened. Conclusion. Given a thyroid cancer frequency of approximately 8 in 100,000 in the Turkish population, according to the Turkish Cancer Research Association, the rate in Rize reflects no increase in the thyroid cancer incidence 22 years after the Chernobyl disaster. PMID:22229102

  8. A new appraisal of iodine refractory thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Fernanda; Carvalho, Denise P; Vaisman, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing all over the world - mostly due to an increase in the detection of small tumors that were previously undetected. A small percentage of these tumors lose the ability to uptake and/or to respond to radioiodine (RAI) therapy, especially in metastatic patients. There are several new therapeutic options that have emerged in the last 5 years to treat RAI refractory thyroid cancer patients, however, it is very important to properly identify RAI refractory patients and to clarify those appropriate for these treatments. In this review, we discuss the RAI refractory definitions and the criteria that have been suggested based on RAI uptake in the post therapy scan, as well as the response after RAI therapy and the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We offer a review of the therapeutic options available at the moment and the therapeutic considerations based on a patient's individualized personal characteristics, primary tumor histology, tumor burden and location and velocity of lesion growth.

  9. Municipal mortality due to thyroid cancer in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lope, Virginia; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2006-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a tumor with a low but growing incidence in Spain. This study sought to depict its spatial municipal mortality pattern, using the classic model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Methods It was possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 municipal areas. Maps were plotted depicting standardized mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the posterior probability that RR > 1. Results From 1989 to 1998 a total of 2,538 thyroid cancer deaths were registered in 1,041 municipalities. The highest relative risks were mostly situated in the Canary Islands, the province of Lugo, the east of La Coruña (Corunna) and western areas of Asturias and Orense. Conclusion The observed mortality pattern coincides with areas in Spain where goiter has been declared endemic. The higher frequency in these same areas of undifferentiated, more aggressive carcinomas could be reflected in the mortality figures. Other unknown genetic or environmental factors could also play a role in the etiology of this tumor. PMID:17173668

  10. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-04-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer.

  11. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  12. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  13. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  14. A case report of hyperfunctioning metastatic thyroid cancer and rare I-131 avid liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kunawudhi, Anchisa; Promteangtrong, Chetsadaporn; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is usually, relatively hypofunctional; most patients with thyroid cancer are clinically euthyroid. The combination of thyroid cancer and thyrotoxicosis is not common. We herein, report a case of follicular thyroid cancer with hyperfunctioning metastasis in a 43-year-old woman who presented with thyrotoxicosis, a cold right thyroid nodule, and low I-131 uptake at the thyroid bed. An additional total body scan with I-131 revealed a large radioiodine avid osteolytic bone metastasis with soft tissue masses and liver metastasis. The patient received treatment with total thyroidectomy, methimazole, and I-131 at a cumulative dose of 600 mCi along with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone before the first I-131 treatment and palliative radiation. The patient had normal liver function test and experienced a mild degree of bone marrow suppression after I-131. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was still alive with the progression of bone metastases but was doing well with less severe thyrotoxicosis, good ambulation, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. Clinicians should be aware of the unusual concurrent presentation of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid cancer, a differential diagnosis in patients with thyrotoxicosis and low or normal radioiodine uptake over the neck and also potential pitfalls during radionuclide treatment. PMID:27385894

  15. A case report of hyperfunctioning metastatic thyroid cancer and rare I-131 avid liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kunawudhi, Anchisa; Promteangtrong, Chetsadaporn; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is usually, relatively hypofunctional; most patients with thyroid cancer are clinically euthyroid. The combination of thyroid cancer and thyrotoxicosis is not common. We herein, report a case of follicular thyroid cancer with hyperfunctioning metastasis in a 43-year-old woman who presented with thyrotoxicosis, a cold right thyroid nodule, and low I-131 uptake at the thyroid bed. An additional total body scan with I-131 revealed a large radioiodine avid osteolytic bone metastasis with soft tissue masses and liver metastasis. The patient received treatment with total thyroidectomy, methimazole, and I-131 at a cumulative dose of 600 mCi along with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone before the first I-131 treatment and palliative radiation. The patient had normal liver function test and experienced a mild degree of bone marrow suppression after I-131. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was still alive with the progression of bone metastases but was doing well with less severe thyrotoxicosis, good ambulation, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. Clinicians should be aware of the unusual concurrent presentation of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid cancer, a differential diagnosis in patients with thyrotoxicosis and low or normal radioiodine uptake over the neck and also potential pitfalls during radionuclide treatment. PMID:27385894

  16. Worldwide Increasing Incidence of Thyroid Cancer: Update on Epidemiology and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Francesco; Regalbuto, Concetto; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the last decades, thyroid cancer incidence has continuously and sharply increased all over the world. This review analyzes the possible reasons of this increase. Summary. Many experts believe that the increased incidence of thyroid cancer is apparent, because of the increased detection of small cancers in the preclinical stage. However, a true increase is also possible, as suggested by the observation that large tumors have also increased and gender differences and birth cohort effects are present. Moreover, thyroid cancer mortality, in spite of earlier diagnosis and better treatment, has not decreased but is rather increasing. Therefore, some environmental carcinogens in the industrialized lifestyle may have specifically affected the thyroid. Among potential carcinogens, the increased exposure to medical radiations is the most likely risk factor. Other factors specific for the thyroid like increased iodine intake and increased prevalence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis cannot be excluded, while other factors like the increasing prevalence of obesity are not specific for the thyroid. Conclusions. The increased incidence of thyroid cancer is most likely due to a combination of an apparent increase due to more sensitive diagnostic procedures and of a true increase, a possible consequence of increased population exposure to radiation and to other still unrecognized carcinogens. PMID:23737785

  17. Fluorescence-guided surgical resection of oral cancer reduces recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre; Poh, Catherine F.; Durham, J. Scott; Zhang, Lewei; Lam, Sylvia F.; Rosin, Miriam; MacAulay, Calum

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 36,000 people in the US will be newly diagnosed with oral cancer in 2010 and it will cause 8,000 new deaths. The death rate is unacceptably high because oral cancer is usually discovered late in its development and is often difficult to treat or remove completely. Data collected over the last 5 years at the BC Cancer Agency suggest that the surgical resection of oral lesions guided by the visualization of the alteration of endogenous tissue fluorescence can dramatically reduce the rate of cancer recurrence. Four years into a study which compares conventional versus fluorescence-guided surgical resection, we reported a recurrence rate of 25% (7 of 28 patients) for the control group compared to a recurrence rate of 0% (none of the 32 patients) for the fluorescence-guided group. Here we present resent results from this ongoing study in which patients undergo either conventional surgical resection of oral cancer under white light illumination or using tools that enable the visualization of naturally occurring tissue fluorescence.

  18. Prostate cancer recurrence after Focal Therapy: Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Hamid, S; Guillaumier, S; Shah, T; Arya, M; Ahmed, H U

    2016-07-01

    Focal therapy is a novel treatment option in localised prostate cancer with or without a visible lesion on MRI. Treatment for low to intermediate risk prostate cancer with focal therapy has demonstrated good short to medium term outcomes with fewer undesirable genitourinary side effects. This has made focal therapy more appealing to men who find the implications of radical treatment unacceptable or are unable to tolerate active surveillance. In this paper we review the literature for treatment options in prostate cancer recurrence post focal therapy. We also cover the different definitions of failure agreed upon in previous consensus meetings, as well as their implications on future management focal therapy patients. PMID:27416641

  19. Detecting recurrent bladder cancer: new methods and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ross, J S; Cohen, M B

    2001-05-01

    In this review, a series of biomarkers and molecular assays are compared with conventional urothelial cytology in their ability to detect recurrent bladder cancer. The tests considered in detail include the BTA test, NMP 22 test, DNA ploidy measurements, telomerase determinations and microsatellite instability assays. Although all of these measurements show some degree of improvement for cancer detection, the microsatellite instability assay shows the highest sensitivity and specificity. Additional biomarkers considered in the review include bladder cancer tumor antigens, growth factors, cell adhesion molecules and various molecular markers including cell cycle regulatory genes and p53 mutations.

  20. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Varley, Katherine E; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S; Davis, Nicholas S; Bowling, Kevin M; Kirby, Marie K; Nesmith, Amy S; Oliver, Patsy G; Grizzle, William E; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J; LoBuglio, Albert F; Myers, Richard M

    2014-07-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples. We analyzed the sequencing data to identify breast cancer associated read-through fusion transcripts. We discovered two recurrent read-through fusion transcripts that were identified in breast cancer cell lines, confirmed across breast cancer primary tumors, and were not detected in normal tissues (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10). Both fusion transcripts use canonical splice sites to join the last splice donor of the 5' gene to the first splice acceptor of the 3' gene, creating an in-frame fusion transcript. Western blots indicated that the fusion transcripts are translated into fusion proteins in breast cancer cells. Custom small interfering RNAs targeting the CTSD-IFITM10 fusion junction reduced expression of the fusion transcript and reduced breast cancer cell proliferation. Read-through fusion transcripts between adjacent genes with different biochemical functions represent a new type of recurrent molecular defect in breast cancer that warrant further investigation as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Both breast cancer associated fusion transcripts identified in this study involve membrane proteins (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10), which raises the possibility that they could be breast cancer-specific cell surface markers. PMID:24929677

  1. The identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve by injection of blue dye into the inferior thyroid artery in elusive locations.

    PubMed

    Hepgul, Gulcin; Kucukyilmaz, Meltem; Koc, Oguz; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Sari, Yavuz Selim; Erbil, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Thyroidectomy creates a potential risk for all parathyroid glands and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The identification and dissection of the RLN is the gold standard for preserving its function. In some cases, it may be quite difficult to identify the nerve localization. In such elusive locations, we aimed to identify RLNs using peroperative injection of a blue dye into the inferior thyroid artery. Materials and Methods. This study included 10 selected patients whose RLN identification had been difficult peroperatively during the period from April 2008 to June 2009. When the RLNs became elusive in location, the branches of the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) on the capsule of the thyroid lobe were isolated, and then 0.5 mL isosulphan blue dye was injected into the artery. Results. RLN was carefully dissected in the tracheoesophageal groove. RLN was clearly visualized, in all patients. All RLNs were identified along their course in the dyed surrounding tissue. No RLN palsy was encountered. Conclusion. The injection of blue dye into the ITA branches can be used as an alternate method in case of difficulty in identification of RLNs.

  2. The Identification of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve by Injection of Blue Dye into the Inferior Thyroid Artery in Elusive Locations

    PubMed Central

    Hepgul, Gulcin; Kucukyilmaz, Meltem; Koc, Oguz; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Sari, Yavuz Selim; Erbil, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Thyroidectomy creates a potential risk for all parathyroid glands and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The identification and dissection of the RLN is the gold standard for preserving its function. In some cases, it may be quite difficult to identify the nerve localization. In such elusive locations, we aimed to identify RLNs using peroperative injection of a blue dye into the inferior thyroid artery. Materials and Methods. This study included 10 selected patients whose RLN identification had been difficult peroperatively during the period from April 2008 to June 2009. When the RLNs became elusive in location, the branches of the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) on the capsule of the thyroid lobe were isolated, and then 0.5 mL isosulphan blue dye was injected into the artery. Results. RLN was carefully dissected in the tracheoesophageal groove. RLN was clearly visualized, in all patients. All RLNs were identified along their course in the dyed surrounding tissue. No RLN palsy was encountered. Conclusion. The injection of blue dye into the ITA branches can be used as an alternate method in case of difficulty in identification of RLNs. PMID:23401846

  3. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  4. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ansa, Benjamin; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary; Coughlin, Steven; Smith, Selina

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs). Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%), lack of physical activity (48.7%), and a high fat diet (63.2%) are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5%) agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9%) believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06); nearly all of the women (99.2%) answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05). These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity. PMID:26703650

  5. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Ansa, Benjamin; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary; Coughlin, Steven; Smith, Selina

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs). Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%), lack of physical activity (48.7%), and a high fat diet (63.2%) are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5%) agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9%) believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M² reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M² (p = 0.06); nearly all of the women (99.2%) answered "yes" to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05). These results provide information about AA BCSs' beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity. PMID:26703650

  6. Cancer risk estimation in Belarussian children due to thyroid irradiation as a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Buglova, E.; Kenigsberg, J.E.; Sergeeva, N.V.

    1996-07-01

    The thyroid doses received by the juvenile population of Belarus following the Chernobyl accident ranged up to about 10 Gy. The thyroid cancer risk estimate recommended in NCRP Report No. 80 was used to predict the number of thyroid cancer cases among children during 1990-1992 in selected Belarussian regions and cities. The results obtained using this risk estimate show an excess of thyroid cancer cases being registered vs. the predicted cases. Thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys under investigation is higher than among girls in the postaccident period. The excess of the observed over the expected incidence in the general juvenile population is caused by the high thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys. These results, which can be considered part of the first stage of a thorough thyroid cancer risk estimation after the Chernobyl accident, demonstrate the critical need to complete these studies in depth. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Implication from thyroid function decreasing during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: chemosensitization role of triiodothyronine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones have been shown to regulate breast cancer cells growth, the absence or reduction of thyroid hormones in cells could provoke a proliferation arrest in G0-G1 or weak mitochondrial activity, which makes cells insensitive to therapies for cancers through transforming into low metabolism status. This biological phenomenon may help explain why treatment efficacy and prognosis vary among breast cancer patients having hypothyroid, hyperthyroid and normal function. Nevertheless, the abnormal thyroid function in breast cancer patients has been considered being mainly caused by thyroid diseases, few studied influence of chemotherapy on thyroid function and whether its alteration during chemotherapy can influence the respose to chemotherapy is still unclear. So, we aimed to find the alterations of thyroid function and non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) prevalence druing chemotherapy in breast cancer patients, and investigate the influence of thyroid hormones on chemotherapeutic efficacy. Methods Thyroid hormones and NTIS prevalence at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy were analyzed in 685 breast diseases patients (369 breast cancer, 316 breast benign lesions). The influence of thyroid hormones on chemotherapeutic efficacy was evaluated by chemosensitization test, to compare chemotherapeutic efficacy between breast cancer cells with chemotherapeutics plus triiodothyronine (T3) and chemotherapeutics only. Results In breast cancer, NTIS prevalence at the initial diagnosis was higher and increased during chemotherapy, but declined before the next chemotherapeutic course. Thyroid hormones decreased signigicantly during chemotherapy. T3 can enhance the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 to 5-Fu and taxol, with progression from G0-G1 phase to S phase. The similar chemosensitization role of T3 were found in MDA-MB-231. We compared chemotherapeutic efficacy among groups with different usage modes of T3, finding pretreatment with lower dose of T3, using

  8. Charting a course through the CEAs: diagnosis and management of medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher W; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun

    2016-09-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an uncommon thyroid cancer that requires a high index of suspicion to facilitate diagnosis of early-stage disease amenable to surgical cure. The challenges of diagnosis, as well as management in the setting of persistent disease, are explored in the context of a case presenting with the incidental finding of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and an (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET)-positive thyroid incidentaloma detected following treatment of colorectal cancer. Strategies to individualize prognosis, and emerging PET-based imaging modalities, particularly the potential role of (18) F-DOPA-PET in staging, are reviewed. PMID:27230389

  9. Sentinel node biopsy for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence: a review.

    PubMed

    Palit, G; Jacquemyn, Y; Tjalma, W

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review published reports on the feasability, results, and reliability of sentinel node biopsy in cases of ipsilateral recurrent breast cancer. A Medline search on publications from January 1999 to December 2007 and cross-references in published articles were looked for. We identified 16 reports on sentinel node biopsy in recurrent breast cancer, including a total of 287 patients. In 210/287 (73.2%) a sentinel node was identified, 77/210 (37.7%) had had previous axillary lymph node dissection and 131 (62.3%) a previous sentinel node procedure. Aberrant lymphatic drainage, other than the ipsilateral axilla was noted in 68/210 (32.4%). Of these 16/68 (23.6%) were located in the contralateral axilla. Of the removed contralateral axillary sentinel nodes 8/17 (47.1%) were invaded by cancer. We conclude that sentinel node biopsy in cases of recurrent ipsilateral breast cancer is feasible. In about one out of three cases drainage to the contralateral axilla with invasion in almost half the cases takes place. The therapeutical consequences of these findings need further study. PMID:19115679

  10. Selective use of sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pitoia, Fabián; Jerkovich, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multiple kinase inhibitor (MKI) approved for the treatment of primary advanced renal cell carcinoma and advanced primary liver cancer. It was recently approved by several health agencies around the world as the first available MKI treatment for radioactive iodine-refractory advanced and progressive differentiated thyroid cancer. Sorafenib targets C-RAF, B-RAF, VEGF receptor-1, -2, -3, PDGF receptor-β, RET, c-kit, and Flt-3. As a multifunctional inhibitor, sorafenib has the potential of inhibiting tumor growth, progression, metastasis, and angiogenesis and downregulating mechanisms that protect tumors from apoptosis and has shown to increase the progression-free survival in several Phase II trials. This led to the Phase III trial (DECISION) which showed that there was an improvement in progression-free survival of 5 months for patients on sorafenib when compared to those on placebo. Adverse events with this drug are common but usually manageable. The development of resistance after 1 or 2 years is almost a rule in most patients who showed partial response or stabilization of the disease while on sorafenib, which makes it necessary to think of a plan for subsequent therapies. These may include the use of another MKI, such as lenvatinib, the second approved MKI for advanced differentiated thyroid cancer, or include patients in clinical trials or the off-label use of other MKIs. Given sorafenib’s earlier approval, most centers now have access to its prescription. The goal of this review was to improve the care of these patients by describing key aspects that all prescribers will need to master in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:27042004

  11. Cervical lymph node dissection in papillary thyroid cancer: current trends, persisting controversies, and unclarified uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Sampanis, Dimitrios; Safioleas, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Cervical lymph node metastases are very common in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Despite that PTC has an excellent prognosis, lymphatic spread is associated with increased risk of loco-regional recurrence, which significantly impairs quality-of-life and can alter prognosis of the patient. Therefore, the identification of lymph node metastases preoperatively is very important for the surgeon to plan the optimal surgical therapy for the individual patient. In most western countries, cervical lymph node dissection (CLND) is performed in the presence of cervical lymphadenopathy (therapeutic CLND). In contrast, in eastern countries (mainly in Japan, where the use of postoperative radioiodine adjuvant therapy is restricted by law), most surgeons perform prophylactic CLND (i.e., CLND in the absence of cervical lymphadenopathy). CLND is performed on a compartment-oriented basis. Currently, given the very high incidence of cervical lymph node metastases in PTC, there is a clear trend -even in western countries- in favor of central (level IV) node dissection, even in patients without clinically or ultrasonographically evident node disease. This surgical strategy will prevent disease recurrence, which may require an additional and more morbid surgery. Experience is therefore required from the part of the operating surgeon, who should be able to perform safely CLND at the time of initial surgery (thyroidectomy), to minimize surgical morbidity. PMID:19447608

  12. Chemosensitivity of Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Based on a Histoculture Drug Response Assay

    PubMed Central

    Uruno, Takashi; Masaki, Chie; Akaishi, Junko; Matsuzu, Kenichi; Suzuki, Akifumi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Sugino, Kiminori; Ito, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensitivity of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) to some cytotoxic agents was investigated by the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA). Thirty specimens from 22 patients with ATC were obtained from surgically resected subjects. The drugs tested were paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DOC), adriamycin (ADM), nedaplatin (254-S), cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin (CBDCA), etoposide (VP-16), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), mitomycin C (MMC), and cyclophosphamide (CPA). PTX was the most effective agent, and 25 of 29 cases (86.2%) had high inhibition rates (IRs; over 70%), while DOC, another taxane, had lower IRs (median, 32.6%). 254-S had the second highest IR (median 68.1%), higher than other platins, CDDP (median 47.3%) and CBDCA (median 27.4%). The IR of 50% dose PTX (20 μg/mL, median 30.6%) was markedly decreased, while that of 50% dose 254-S (10 μg/mL, median 63.3%) still retained its inhibition effect compared to 100% dose. Most recurrent samples had higher IRs than primary lesions, but the IRs of different drugs differed between primary and recurrent lesions, even with samples from the same patients. PTX has a higher IR to ATC tissues in the HDRA, which suggests that it may be a key drug for the treatment of patients with ATC. PMID:25866510

  13. Chemosensitivity of anaplastic thyroid cancer based on a histoculture drug response assay.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Takashi; Masaki, Chie; Akaishi, Junko; Matsuzu, Kenichi; Suzuki, Akifumi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Sugino, Kiminori; Ito, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensitivity of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) to some cytotoxic agents was investigated by the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA). Thirty specimens from 22 patients with ATC were obtained from surgically resected subjects. The drugs tested were paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DOC), adriamycin (ADM), nedaplatin (254-S), cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin (CBDCA), etoposide (VP-16), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), mitomycin C (MMC), and cyclophosphamide (CPA). PTX was the most effective agent, and 25 of 29 cases (86.2%) had high inhibition rates (IRs; over 70%), while DOC, another taxane, had lower IRs (median, 32.6%). 254-S had the second highest IR (median 68.1%), higher than other platins, CDDP (median 47.3%) and CBDCA (median 27.4%). The IR of 50% dose PTX (20 μg/mL, median 30.6%) was markedly decreased, while that of 50% dose 254-S (10 μg/mL, median 63.3%) still retained its inhibition effect compared to 100% dose. Most recurrent samples had higher IRs than primary lesions, but the IRs of different drugs differed between primary and recurrent lesions, even with samples from the same patients. PTX has a higher IR to ATC tissues in the HDRA, which suggests that it may be a key drug for the treatment of patients with ATC. PMID:25866510

  14. Approach to Follow-Up of the Patient With Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and Positive Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nabhan, Fadi

    2013-01-01

    Anti-thyroglobulin antibodies are commonly identified in patients with differentiated follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer. When present, they interfere with the measurement of thyroglobulin (Tg), which is the primary biochemical marker used for disease surveillance, creating challenges in monitoring patients for residual or recurrent disease. Moreover, there is variability in measuring anti-Tg antibodies according to the different assays, such that not all patients with anti-Tg antibodies are identifiable on a single assay system. The persistence of anti-Tg antibodies, especially if levels are rising, may indicate persistent, recurrent, or progressive thyroid cancer. In contrast, declining anti-Tg antibody levels may indicate reduced tumor burden or the absence of disease. In this review, we will explore in a case-based manner the data supporting monitoring and treatment paradigms for patients with anti-Tg antibodies and will stress areas where more evidence is needed to better inform clinicians regarding the management of patients with this challenging situation. PMID:23922347

  15. Metformin blocks progression of obesity-activated thyroid cancer in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongwon; Kim, Won Gu; Zhao, Li; Enomoto, Keisuke; Willingham, Mark; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiologic evidence indicates that obesity is associated with a high risk of human malignancies, including thyroid cancer. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet (HFD) effectively induces the obese phenotype in a mouse model of aggressive follicular thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice). We showed that HFD promotes cancer progression through aberrant activation of the leptin-JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway. HFD-promoted thyroid cancer progression allowed us to test other molecular targets for therapeutic opportunity for obesity-induced thyroid cancer. Metformin is a widely used drug to treat patients with type II diabetes. It has been shown to reduce incidences of neoplastic diseases and cancer mortality in type II diabetes patients. The present study aimed to test whether metformin could be a therapeutic for obesity-activated thyroid cancer. ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice were fed HFD together with metformin or vehicle-only, as controls, for 20 weeks. While HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice had shorter survival than LFD-treated mice, metformin had no effects on the survival of HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice. Remarkably, metformin markedly decreased occurrence of capsular invasion and completely blocked vascular invasion and anaplasia in HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice without affecting thyroid tumor growth. The impeded cancer progression was due to the inhibitory effect of metformin on STAT3-ERK-vimentin and fibronectin-integrin signaling to decrease tumor cell invasion and de-differentiation. The present studies provide additional molecular evidence to support the link between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Importantly, our findings suggest that metformin could be used as an adjuvant in combination with antiproliferative modalities to improve the outcome of patients with obesity-activated thyroid cancer. PMID:27145454

  16. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence: The Role of Dietary Polyphenolics

    PubMed Central

    Braakhuis, Andrea J.; Campion, Peta; Bishop, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from numerous observational and clinical studies suggest that polyphenolic phytochemicals such as phenolic acids in olive oil, flavonols in tea, chocolate and grapes, and isoflavones in soy products reduce the risk of breast cancer. A dietary food pattern naturally rich in polyphenols is the Mediterranean diet and evidence suggests those of Mediterranean descent have a lower breast cancer incidence. Whilst dietary polyphenols have been the subject of breast cancer risk-reduction, this review will focus on the clinical effects of polyphenols on reducing recurrence. Overall, we recommend breast cancer patients consume a diet naturally high in flavonol polyphenols including tea, vegetables (onion, broccoli), and fruit (apples, citrus). At least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily appear protective. Moderate soy protein consumption (5–10 g daily) and the Mediterranean dietary pattern show the most promise for breast cancer patients. In this review, we present an overview of clinical trials on supplementary polyphenols of dietary patterns rich in polyphenols on breast cancer recurrence, mechanistic data, and novel delivery systems currently being researched. PMID:27608040

  17. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence: The Role of Dietary Polyphenolics.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Andrea J; Campion, Peta; Bishop, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from numerous observational and clinical studies suggest that polyphenolic phytochemicals such as phenolic acids in olive oil, flavonols in tea, chocolate and grapes, and isoflavones in soy products reduce the risk of breast cancer. A dietary food pattern naturally rich in polyphenols is the Mediterranean diet and evidence suggests those of Mediterranean descent have a lower breast cancer incidence. Whilst dietary polyphenols have been the subject of breast cancer risk-reduction, this review will focus on the clinical effects of polyphenols on reducing recurrence. Overall, we recommend breast cancer patients consume a diet naturally high in flavonol polyphenols including tea, vegetables (onion, broccoli), and fruit (apples, citrus). At least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily appear protective. Moderate soy protein consumption (5-10 g daily) and the Mediterranean dietary pattern show the most promise for breast cancer patients. In this review, we present an overview of clinical trials on supplementary polyphenols of dietary patterns rich in polyphenols on breast cancer recurrence, mechanistic data, and novel delivery systems currently being researched. PMID:27608040

  18. Treatment patterns, health state, and health care resource utilization of patients with radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gianoukakis, Andrew G; Flores, Natalia M; Pelletier, Corey L; Forsythe, Anna; Wolfe, Gregory R; Taylor, Matthew H

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) often respond well to treatment but some become refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment, and treatment options are limited. Despite the humanistic and economic burden RAI refractory disease imposes on patients, published research concerning treatment patterns and health care resource utilization is sparse. Methods Data were collected from an online retrospective chart review study in the US and five European Union (EU) countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and UK) with physicians recruited from an online panel. Physicians (N=211) provided demographics, disease history, treatment information, and health care resource utilization for one to four of their patients with radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). Results The majority of the patients with RR-DTC (N=623) were female (56%), and their mean age was 58.2 years. In this sample, 63.2% had papillary thyroid cancer and 57.0% were in Stage IV when deemed RAI refractory. Patients with RR-DTC experienced regional recurrence in the thyroid bed/central neck area (25.3%) and had distant metastatic disease (53.6%). At the time data were collected, 50.7% were receiving systemic treatment. Of those, 78.5% were on first-line treatment and 62.7% were receiving multikinase inhibitors. Regional differences for prescribed treatments were observed; the US was more likely to have patients receiving multikinase inhibitors (79.2%) compared with UK (41.2%) and Italy (17.1%). Additional details regarding treatment patterns and resource utilization are discussed. Conclusion The current study aimed to obtain a greater understanding of RR-DTC treatment globally. These results can assist in the development and implementation of treatment guidelines and ultimately enhance the care of patients with RR-DTC. PMID:27313476

  19. DNA damage among thyroid cancer and multiple cancer cases, controls, and long-lived individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdson, A J; Hauptmann, M; Alexander, B J; Doody, M M; Thomas, C B; Struewing, J P; Jones, I M

    2004-08-24

    Variation in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA damage contributes to human cancer risk. To assess capacity to modulate endogenous DNA damage among radiologic technologists who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and another malignancy (breast-other; n=42), early-onset breast cancer (early-onset, age {<=} 35; n=38), thyroid cancer (n=68), long-lived cancer-free individuals (hyper-normals; n=20) and cancer-free controls (n=49) we quantified DNA damage (single strand breaks and abasic sites) in untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines using the alkaline comet assay. Komet{trademark} software provided comet tail length, % DNA in tail (tail DNA), comet distributed moment (CDM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) summarized as the geometric mean of 100 cells. Category cut-points (median and 75th percentile) were determined from the distribution among controls. Tail length (for {>=} 75% vs. below the median, age adjusted) was most consistently associated with the highest odds ratios in the breast-other, early-onset, and thyroid cancer groups (with risk increased 10-, 5- or 19-fold, respectively, with wide confidence intervals) and decreased risk among the hyper-normal group. For the other three Comet measures, risk of breast-other was elevated approximately three-fold. Risk of early-onset breast cancer was mixed and risk of thyroid cancer ranged from null to a two-fold increase. The hyper-normal group showed decreased odds ratios for tail DNA and OTM, but not CDM. DNA damage, as estimated by all Comet measures, was relatively unaffected by survival time, reproductive factors, and prior radiation treatment. We detected a continuum of endogenous DNA damage that was highest among cancer cases, less in controls, and suggestively lowest in hyper-normal individuals. Measuring this DNA damage phenotype may contribute to the identification of susceptible sub-groups. Our observations require replication in a prospective study with a large number of pre-diagnostic samples.

  20. Cancer risks after diagnostic doses of 131I with special reference to thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1969 a total of 35,074 patients less than 75 years of age (mean = 44 years) were examined with diagnostic doses of 131I. The mean administered activity of 131I was 52 microCi and the radiation dose to the thyroid gland was on the average of 0.5 Gy. The cohort was matched with the Swedish Cancer Register for the years 1958-1984. During this period, 3746 cancers occurred more than 5 years after the 131I examination, and the resulting standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98 to 1.04). SIR for thyroid cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.88 to 1.56). The risks for both cancer of all sites and for thyroid cancer were highest 5 to 9 years after examination (SIR = 1.07 and 2.06, respectively) and did not differ from unity thereafter. With greater than or equal to 10 years of follow-up, risk was not statistically associated with the dose of 131I.

  1. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term “theranostics” was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging. PMID:27239470

  2. Recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a focal neurologic deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.N.; Wu, S.Y.; Kim, D.D.; Kollin, J.; Prasasvinichai, S.

    1986-10-01

    Papillary-follicular thyroid carcinoma usually remains localized to the thyroid bed and, in cases of metastasis, almost always involves the lung, bone, or liver. The two patients described here presented with papillary carcinoma and neurologic dysfunction. Total body iodine 131 scans disclosed cerebral uptake, and cerebral masses were confirmed by computed tomographic scan. Both patients presented diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas, and ultimately underwent craniotomy. One patient's cerebral metastasis recurred and was treated by a second craniotomy. The other patient received postoperative external cerebral radiotherapy and a novel intraoperative treatment: implantation of 22 iodine 125 seeds in the tumor bed, estimated to yield 16,000 rad (160 Gy) in one year. To date, cerebral metastases have not recurred in the latter patient, although tumor has reappeared in other sites. There is little reported in the medical literature concerning cerebral metastases of thyroid carcinoma, and the present report reviews this experience and discusses treatment alternatives.

  3. Thyroid cancer incidence and mortality trends in Croatia 1988-2010.

    PubMed

    Vučemilo, Luka; Znaor, Tin; Kuliš, Tomislav; Šekerija, Mario; Znaor, Ariana

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to describe and interpret national trends in thyroid cancer in Croatian men and women during the 1988-2010 period, to better understand the incidence and mortality trends in comparison with other populations, and to determine the proportion of certain histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer and their impact on these trends. Using information from the Croatian National Cancer Registry and WHO Mortality Database, we estimated trends in the age-standardized incidence and mortality rates by joinpoint regression analysis. Thyroid cancer incidence increased in both women and men during the study period, with the estimated annual percent change (EAPC) of 6.4% and 5.5%, with no joinpoints identified. A significant decrease in mortality (EAPC-2.1%) was observed in women, while in men mortality rates decreased nonsignificantly (EAPC-1.3%). A statistically significant incidence increase was observed only for papillary carcinomas with annual incidence increase by 6.7% for women and 7.9% for men. During the study period, thyroid cancer showed an incidence increase in Croatia with persistent and steady decrease in mortality in women and statistically nonsignificant decrease in mortality in men. The increase in papillary carcinomas led to the thyroid cancer incidence increase and also affected the thyroid cancer mortality decrease in women. The trends observed are similar to those in other European countries and require additional analysis to determine all factors that have an effect on them.

  4. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Christopher; De Luca, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer). Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppressed TSH, elevated free T4, and normal TSI titer. In addition, an I(123) thyroid uptake was borderline-low. A month later, the free T4 had normalized. After remaining asymptomatic for 3 years, the patient presented again with increased appetite, and he was found with low TSH and high free T4. Within the following 3 months, his free T4 and TSH normalized. At his most recent evaluation, his TSH was normal and the free T4 was borderline-high; the TG antibody titer was still elevated and the TSI titer was negative. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. This case exemplifies the variability of the manifestations and natural history of Hashimoto thyroiditis and supports the need for a long-term evaluation of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  5. Significance of microvascular density (MVD) in cervical cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Cantu De León, D; Lopez-Graniel, C; Frias Mendivil, M; Chanona Vilchis, G; Gomez, C; De La Garza Salazar, J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study of 118 patients with squamous cell cervical cancer from January 1990 to December 1993 was to evaluate angiogenesis as predictive factor of recurrence in cervical cancer stages II-III treated with standard radiotherapy. Microvessel density (MVD) was evaluated and correlated with other prognostic factors. MVD was greater than 20 in 67.8% of patients with recurrence (P = 0.002) in comparison to 39% of patients without. Disease-free survival was shorter in stage IIA and MVD >20 (P = 0.0193) as well as for stage IIB (P < 0.05 ), but not for IIIB (P = 0.1613 ). Global survival was significantly shorter when MVD was >20 (P = 0.0316). For stage IIA and MVD >20 survival was shorter (P = 0.0008) for stage IIB (P < 0.05) but not for IIIB (P = 0.14). Patients younger than 40 years and MVD >20 had poorer disease-free interval and survival (P = 0.0029). MVD in patients with squamous cell cervical cancer stage II and age younger than 40 may play a role in predicting recurrence and survival. PMID:14675324

  6. The role of Cdk5 in neuroendocrine thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Castro-Rivera, Emely; Tan, Chunfeng; Plattner, Florian; Schwach, Gert; Siegl, Veronika; Meyer, Douglas; Guo, Ailan; Gundara, Justin; Mettlach, Gabriel; Richer, Edmond; Guevara, Jonathan A; Ning, Li; Gupta, Anjali; Hao, Guiyang; Tsai, Li-Huei; Sun, Xiankai; Antich, Pietro; Sidhu, Stanley; Robinson, Bruce G; Chen, Herbert; Nwariaku, Fiemu E; Pfragner, Roswitha; Richardson, James A; Bibb, James A

    2013-10-14

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer that originates from calcitonin-secreting parafollicular cells, or C cells. We found that Cdk5 and its cofactors p35 and p25 are highly expressed in human MTC and that Cdk5 activity promotes MTC proliferation. A conditional MTC mouse model was generated and corroborated the role of aberrant Cdk5 activation in MTC. C cell-specific overexpression of p25 caused rapid C cell hyperplasia leading to lethal MTC, which was arrested by repressing p25 overexpression. A comparative phosphoproteomic screen between proliferating and arrested MTC identified the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) as a crucial Cdk5 downstream target. Prevention of Rb phosphorylation at Ser807/Ser811 attenuated MTC proliferation. These findings implicate Cdk5 signaling via Rb as critical to MTC tumorigenesis and progression. PMID:24135281

  7. Evolving Approaches to Patients with Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Steven I.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), defined by clinical characteristics including gross extrathyroidal invasion, distant metastases, radioiodine (RAI) resistance, and avidity for 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (positron emission tomography-positive), is found in approximately 10–20% of patients with DTC. Standard therapy (surgery, RAI, TSH suppression with levothyroxine) is ineffective for many of these patients, as is standard chemotherapy. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to DTC and the transformation to advanced DTC has rapidly evolved over the past 15–20 years. Newer targeted therapy, specifically inhibitors of intracellular kinase signaling pathways, and cooperative multicenter clinical trials have dramatically changed the therapeutic landscape for patients with advanced DTC. In this review focusing on morbidities, molecules, and medicinals, we present a patient with advanced DTC, explore the genetics and molecular biology of advanced DTC, and review evolving therapies for these patients including multikinase inhibitors, selective kinase inhibitors, and combination therapies. PMID:23575762

  8. The role of Cdk5 in neuroendocrine thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Castro-Rivera, Emely; Tan, Chunfeng; Plattner, Florian; Schwach, Gert; Siegl, Veronika; Meyer, Douglas; Guo, Ailan; Gundara, Justin; Mettlach, Gabriel; Richer, Edmond; Guevara, Jonathan A; Ning, Li; Gupta, Anjali; Hao, Guiyang; Tsai, Li-Huei; Sun, Xiankai; Antich, Pietro; Sidhu, Stanley; Robinson, Bruce G; Chen, Herbert; Nwariaku, Fiemu E; Pfragner, Roswitha; Richardson, James A; Bibb, James A

    2013-10-14

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer that originates from calcitonin-secreting parafollicular cells, or C cells. We found that Cdk5 and its cofactors p35 and p25 are highly expressed in human MTC and that Cdk5 activity promotes MTC proliferation. A conditional MTC mouse model was generated and corroborated the role of aberrant Cdk5 activation in MTC. C cell-specific overexpression of p25 caused rapid C cell hyperplasia leading to lethal MTC, which was arrested by repressing p25 overexpression. A comparative phosphoproteomic screen between proliferating and arrested MTC identified the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) as a crucial Cdk5 downstream target. Prevention of Rb phosphorylation at Ser807/Ser811 attenuated MTC proliferation. These findings implicate Cdk5 signaling via Rb as critical to MTC tumorigenesis and progression.

  9. CHIP promotes thyroid cancer proliferation via activation of the MAPK and AKT pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Lianyong; He, Xiaohua; Shen, Yunling; Liu, Xuerong; Wei, Jing; Yu, Fang; Tian, Jianqing

    2016-08-26

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a U box-type ubiquitin ligase that plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression. To date, the functional mechanism of CHIP in thyroid cancer remains unknown. Here, we obtained evidence of upregulation of CHIP in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. CHIP overexpression markedly enhanced thyroid cancer cell viability and colony formation in vitro and accelerated tumor growth in vivo. Conversely, CHIP knockdown impaired cell proliferation and tumor growth. Notably, CHIP promoted cell growth through activation of MAPK and AKT pathways, subsequently decreasing p27 and increasing cyclin D1 and p-FOXO3a expression. Our findings collectively indicate that CHIP functions as an oncogene in thyroid cancer, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for this disease.

  10. Sorafenib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Some Patients with Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Endocrine & Neuroendocrine Neoplasias Research Sorafenib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Some Patients with Metastatic Thyroid Cancer ... starting treatment without their disease getting worse ( progression-free survival ), as assessed by independent review. Secondary endpoints ...

  11. Association of Family History with Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    Context A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. Objective To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective observational study of 1,087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, in tumor specimens. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 1,087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57/195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343/892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared to patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with ≥1 affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival (DFS), 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival (OS). This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared to participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1

  12. Thyroid cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease: a case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Moroff, S.V.; Fuks, J.Z.

    1986-01-01

    Improved survival resulting from advances in therapy in patients with Hodgkin's disease is associated with long-term morbidity, including the potential for the development of a second solid malignancy. We report a 44-year-old man with an unusually aggressive course of thyroid carcinoma 15 years after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. In a review of the English-language literature, we found 21 cases of thyroid cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease, with latency periods ranging from 6 to 48 years. The development of secondary thyroid cancer after high-dose neck irradiation may be related to hypothyroidism, itself a complication of radiotherapy. Thyroid function should be measured at least once a year in all patients given neck irradiation, with initiation of thyroid hormone replacement if there is evidence of sustained hypothyroidism.

  13. Associations between metabolic syndrome, breast cancer recurrence, and the 21-gene recurrence score assay.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Jeanette; Kidwell, Kelley M; Henry, N Lynn

    2016-06-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay is prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive (HR+), HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer (BC). The interaction between RS and host factors including metabolic syndrome (MS) is unclear. MS conditions such as obesity have been associated with worse BC prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify associations between presence of MS conditions and RS group or breast cancer recurrence. Demographic, pathologic, and treatment data, MS criteria, and menopausal status were abstracted from medical records of women with stage I-II, HR+, HER2-negative BC evaluated with the RS assay at a single institution since 2005. MS was defined as presence of ≥3 of the following within 2 years of diagnosis: body mass index ≥27.7 kg/m(2); hypertension; impaired fasting glucose; HDL <50 mg/dL; hypertriglyceridemia. Of 533 eligible women, 22 % had MS. MS was more common in post- vs premenopausal women (30 vs 9 %; P < 0.0001). There was no significant association between RS group and overall MS status or any individual criterion, controlling for stage, and no association after stratification by menopausal status. Postmenopausal status was associated with higher RS group (P = 0.039), independent of stage. With 4.2-year median follow-up, no association between disease recurrence and MS was identified. Although MS has been associated with worse BC outcomes, we were unable to identify associations between RS group and MS criteria. Identification of prognostic factors other than RS that underlie this higher risk will be important for optimizing breast cancer treatment decision-making in patients with MS. PMID:27271766

  14. Tumor-Associated Mast Cells in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Visciano, Carla; Prevete, Nella; Liotti, Federica; Marone, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that the tumor microenvironment plays a major role in mediating aggressive features of cancer cells, including invasive capacity and resistance to conventional and novel therapies. Among the different cell populations that infiltrate cancer stroma, mast cells (MCs) can influence several aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development and progression, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and tissue remodelling. Thyroid cancer (TC), the most frequent neoplasia of the endocrine system, is characterized by a MC infiltrate, whose density correlates with extrathyroidal extension and invasiveness. Recent evidence suggests the occurrence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness in human TC. The precise role of immune cells and their mediators responsible for these features in TC remains unknown. Here, we review the relevance of MC-derived mediators (e.g., the chemokines CXCL1/GRO-α, CXCL10/IP-10, and CXCL8/IL-8) in the context of TC. CXCL1/GRO-α and CXCL10/IP-10 appear to be involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation, while CXCL8/IL-8 participates in the acquisition of TC malignant traits through its ability to induce/enhance the EMT and stem-like features of TC cells. The inhibition of chemokine signaling may offer novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of refractory forms of TC. PMID:26379707

  15. Non-thyroid cancer in Northern Ukraine in the post-Chernobyl period: Short Report

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M; Ostroumova, E; Brenner, A; Federenko, Z; Gorokh, Y; Zvinchuk, O; Shpak, V; Tereschenko, V; Tronko, M; Mabuchi, K

    2015-01-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in Ukraine in 1986 led to widespread radioactive releases into the environment - primarily of radioiodines and cesium – heavily affecting the northern portions of the country, with settlement-averaged thyroid doses estimated to range from 10 mGy to more than 10 Gy. The increased risk of thyroid cancer among exposed children and adolescents is well-established but the impact of radioactive contamination on the risk of other types of cancer is much less certain. To provide data on a public health issue of major importance, we have analyzed the incidence of non-thyroid cancers during the post-Chernobyl period in a well-defined cohort of 13,203 individuals who were <18 years of age at the time of the accident. The report is based on Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) analysis of 43 non-thyroid cancers identified through linkage with the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine for the period 1998 through 2009. We compared the observed and expected number of cases in three cancer groupings: all solid cancers excluding thyroid; leukemia; and lymphoma. Our analyses found no evidence of a statistically significant elevation in cancer risks in this cohort exposed at radiosensitive ages, although the cancer trends, particularly for leukemia (SIR=1.92, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.69; 4.13), should continue to be monitored. PMID:25794878

  16. Non-thyroid cancer in Northern Ukraine in the post-Chernobyl period: Short report.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M; Ostroumova, E; Brenner, A; Federenko, Z; Gorokh, Y; Zvinchuk, O; Shpak, V; Tereschenko, V; Tronko, M; Mabuchi, K

    2015-06-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in Ukraine in 1986 led to widespread radioactive releases into the environment - primarily of radioiodines and cesium - heavily affecting the northern portions of the country, with settlement-averaged thyroid doses estimated to range from 10 mGy to more than 10 Gy. The increased risk of thyroid cancer among exposed children and adolescents is well established but the impact of radioactive contamination on the risk of other types of cancer is much less certain. To provide data on a public health issue of major importance, we have analyzed the incidence of non-thyroid cancers during the post-Chernobyl period in a well-defined cohort of 13,203 individuals who were <18 years of age at the time of the accident. The report is based on standardized incidence ratio (SIR) analysis of 43 non-thyroid cancers identified through linkage with the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine for the period 1998 through 2009. We compared the observed and expected number of cases in three cancer groupings: all solid cancers excluding thyroid, leukemia, and lymphoma. Our analyses found no evidence of a statistically significant elevation in cancer risks in this cohort exposed at radiosensitive ages, although the cancer trends, particularly for leukemia (SIR=1.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.69; 4.13), should continue to be monitored.

  17. To Treat or Not to Treat: The Role of Adjuvant Radioiodine Therapy in Thyroid Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, Marilee; Quiros, Roderick M.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) is used in treatment of patients with differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. It is typically used after thyroidectomy, both as a means of imaging to detect residual thyroid tissue or metastatic disease, as well as a means of treatment by ablation if such tissue is found. In this paper, we discuss the indications for and the mechanisms of RAI in the treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. We discuss the attendant risks and benefits that come with its use, as well as techniques used to optimize its effectiveness as an imaging tool and a therapeutic modality. PMID:23193402

  18. I-131 accumulation in a benign cystic mesothelioma in a patient with follicular thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    de Keizer, Bart; Arsos, Georgios; Smit, Jan W; Lam, Marnix G; Rinkes, Inne H Borel; Goldschmeding, Roel; van Isselt, Johannes W

    2008-03-01

    Focal I-131 accumulation is generally a reliable indicator of functioning normal thyroid tissue or a differentiated thyroid cancer metastasis. However, physiologic accumulation of activity may also be observed in organs such as the intestinal tract, liver, and salivary glands. Extrathyroidal I-131 accumulation has been reported in various sites, such as ectopic gastric mucosa, gastrointestinal and urinary tract abnormalities, cysts (mammary, liver, kidney, and ovaries), and inflammation and infection foci. We report a case of focal I-131 accumulation in a benign cystic mesothelioma in a patient with follicular thyroid cancer.

  19. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuemei; Wu, Xinchao; Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Gao, Zairong; Zhang, Yongxue

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine (131)I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from (131)I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced (131)I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. PMID:26707881

  20. Molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes using large-scale text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor with a steady increase in incidence. It is classified into multiple histopathological subtypes with potentially distinct molecular mechanisms. Identifying the most relevant genes and biological pathways reported in the thyroid cancer literature is vital for understanding of the disease and developing targeted therapeutics. Results We developed a large-scale text mining system to generate a molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes. The system first uses a subtype classification method for the thyroid cancer literature, which employs a scoring scheme to assign different subtypes to articles. We evaluated the classification method on a gold standard derived from the PubMed Supplementary Concept annotations, achieving a micro-average F1-score of 85.9% for primary subtypes. We then used the subtype classification results to extract genes and pathways associated with different thyroid cancer subtypes and successfully unveiled important genes and pathways, including some instances that are missing from current manually annotated databases or most recent review articles. Conclusions Identification of key genes and pathways plays a central role in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. An integration of subtype context can allow prioritized screening for diagnostic biomarkers and novel molecular targeted therapeutics. Source code used for this study is made freely available online at https://github.com/chengkun-wu/GenesThyCan. PMID:25521965

  1. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery: a national study of patients treated at Danish departments of ENT Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Schytte, Sten; Trolle, Waldemar; Helweg-Larsen, Jens; Barfoed, Lisa; Kristiansen, Larry; Sørensen, Vibeke Zederkof; Samuelsen, Grethe; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with thyroid surgery from 1 January 2001 to the 31 December 2008 at the Danish departments of ENT-HNS were analyzed. Unilateral RLN palsy was found in 2.1 % and bilateral in 0.1 %. In benign histology, RLN palsies were registered in 1.3 %. Malignant histology and accordingly neck dissection were the most predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous performed thyroid surgery are the strongest predictors for RLN palsy and patient information should be given accordingly. Incomplete resections should be reserved for isthmectomy only. Centralization of thyroid surgery in larger units might improve quality. PMID:24132654

  2. microRNA-141 inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth and metastasis by targeting insulin receptor substrate 2.

    PubMed

    Dong, Su; Meng, Xianying; Xue, Shuai; Yan, Zewen; Ren, Peiyou; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    microRNA-141 (miR-141), a member of the miR-200 family, and has been reported to involve in tumor initiation and development in many types of cancers. However, the function and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-141 in thyroid cancer remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify its expression, function, and molecular mechanism in thyroid cancer. In this study, we found that miR-141 expression levels were downregulated in human thyroid cancer specimens compared to the adjacent normal tissues, and its expression were strongly correlated with clinical stages and lymph node metastases. Function assays showed that overexpression of miR-141 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis, and decreased migration, invasion in thyroid cancer cells, as well as tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), a known oncogene, was confirmed as a direct target of miR-141, and IRS2 expression levels were upregulated in thyroid cancer, and its expression were inversely correlated with miR-141 expression levels in human thyroid cancer specimens. Forced expression of IRS2 reversed the inhibition effect induced by miR-141 overexpression in thyroid cancer cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that miR-141 suppressed thyroid cancer cell growth and metastasis through inhibition of IRS2. Thus, miR-141 might serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for thyroid cancer treatment.

  3. Zn(II)-curc targets p53 in thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GARUFI, ALESSIA; D'ORAZI, VALERIO; CRISPINI, ALESSANDRA; D'ORAZI, GABRIELLA

    2015-01-01

    TP53 mutation is a common event in many cancers, including thyroid carcinoma. Defective p53 activity promotes cancer resistance to therapies and a more malignant phenotype, acquiring oncogenic functions. Rescuing the function of mutant p53 (mutp53) protein is an attractive anticancer therapeutic strategy. Zn(II)-curc is a novel small molecule that has been shown to target mutp53 protein in several cancer cells, but its effect in thyroid cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether Zn(II)-curc could affect p53 in thyroid cancer cells with both p53 mutation (R273H) and wild-type p53. Zn(II)-curc induced mutp53H273 downregulation and reactivation of wild-type functions, such as binding to canonical target promoters and target gene transactivation. This latter effect was similar to that induced by PRIMA-1. In addition, Zn(II)-curc triggered p53 target gene expression in wild-type p53-carrying cells. In combination treatments, Zn(II)-curc enhanced the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutic drugs, in both mutant and wild-type-carrying cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Zn(II)-curc promotes the reactivation of p53 in thyroid cancer cells, providing in vitro evidence for a potential therapeutic approach in thyroid cancers. PMID:26314369

  4. Restoration of Brain Acid Soluble Protein 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Run-Sheng; Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yue-Yu; Shen, Na; Qiu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) is identified as a novel potential tumor suppressor in several cancers. However, its role in thyroid cancer has not been investigated yet. In the present study, the antitumor activities of BASP1 against the growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells were evaluated. Methods: BASP1 expression in thyroid cancer tissues and normal tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and the association between its expression and prognosis was analyzed. pcDNA-BASP1 carrying full length of BASP1 cDNA was constructed to restore the expression of BASP1 in thyroid cancer cell lines (BHT-101 and KMH-2). The cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by WST-1 assay and xenograft tumor models, respectively. Cell cycle distribution after transfection was analyzed using flow cytometry. Cell apoptosis after transfection was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay. The migration was examined using transwell assay. Results: BASP1 expression was abundant in normal tissues while it is significantly decreased in cancer tissues (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 restored the expression of BASP1 and significantly inhibited the growth of BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells as well as xenograft tumors in nude mice (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells. In addition, pcDNA-BASP1 significantly inhibited the cell migration. Conclusions: Downregulation of BASP1 expression may play a role in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer. Restoration of BASP1 expression exerted extensive antitumor activities against growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells, which suggested that BASP1 gene might act as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:27270539

  5. Rising thyroid cancer incidence in the United States by demographic and tumor characteristics, 1980–2005

    PubMed Central

    Enewold, Lindsey; Zhu, Kangmin; Ron, Elaine; Marrogi, Aizen J.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peoples, George E.; Devesa, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence has been rising in the United States, and this trend has often been attributed to heightened medical surveillance and use of improved diagnostics. Thyroid cancer incidence varies by sex and race/ethnicity, and these factors also influence access to and utilization of healthcare. We therefore examined thyroid cancer incidence rates by demographic and tumor characteristics, based on 48,403 thyroid cancer patients diagnosed during 1980–2005 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute. Rates varied by histologic type, sex, and race/ethnicity. Papillary carcinoma was the only histologic type for which incidence rates rose consistently among all racial/ethnic groups. Subsequent analyses focused on the 39,706 papillary thyroid cancers diagnosed during this period. Papillary carcinoma rates increased most rapidly among females. Between 1992–1995 and 2003–2005, they rose nearly 100% among White Non-Hispanics and Black females, but only 20–50% among White Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Black males. Increases were most rapid for localized stage and small tumors; however, rates also rose for large tumors and tumors of regional and distant stage. Since 1992–1995, half the overall increase in papillary carcinoma rates was due to rising rates of very small (≤1.0 cm) cancers, 30% to cancers 1.1–2 cm, and 20% to cancers >2 cm. Among White females, the rate of increase for cancers >5 cm almost equaled that for the smallest cancers. Medical surveillance and more sensitive diagnostic procedures cannot completely explain the observed rises in papillary thyroid cancer rates. Thus, other possible explanations should be explored. PMID:19240234

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 enhances thyroid cancer cell motile response to Hepatocyte Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Frasca, F; Vigneri, P; Vella, V; Vigneri, R; Wang, J Y

    2001-06-28

    The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and its receptor Met are physiological regulators of cell migration. HGF and Met have also been implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. We show here that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 has a stimulatory effect on HGF-induced migration and branching morphogenesis in thyroid cancer but not in primary or immortalized thyroid epithelial cells. These stimulatory effects of STI571 are observed at a concentration that is clinically relevant. The STI571-enhanced motile response can be correlated with an increase in the Met receptor tyrosine phosphorylation as well as ERK and Akt activation by HGF. Interestingly, one of the targets of STI571, namely the c-Abl tyrosine kinase, is activated by HGF and is recruited at the migrating edge of thyroid cancer cells. These data suggests that c-Abl and/or STI571-inhibited tyrosine kinases can negatively regulate the Met receptor to restrain the motile response in thyroid cancer cells.

  7. Metabolomic analysis of percutaneous fine-needle aspiration specimens of thyroid nodules: Potential application for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Inseon; Kwon, Hyuknam; Kim, Soo Chin; Jung, Seung Chai; Yeom, Jeong A; Shin, Hwa Seon; Cho, Hye Rim; Yun, Tae Jin; Choi, Seung Hong; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sunghyouk; Kim, Ji-hoon

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are a very common problem. Since malignant thyroid nodules should be treated surgically, preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer is very crucial. Cytopathologic analysis of percutaneous fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens is the current gold standard for diagnosing thyroid nodules. However, this method has led to high rates of inconclusive results. Metabolomics has emerged as a useful tool in medical fields and shown great potential in diagnosing various cancers. Here, we evaluated the potential of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of percutaneous FNA specimens for preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer. We analyzed metabolome of FNA samples of papillary thyroid carcinoma (n = 35) and benign follicular nodule (n = 69) using a proton NMR spectrometer. The metabolomic profiles showed a considerable discrimination between benign and malignant nodules. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that seven metabolites could serve as discriminators (area under ROC curve value, 0.64–0.85). These findings demonstrated that NMR analysis of percutaneous FNA specimens of thyroid nodules can be potentially useful in the accurate and rapid preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer. PMID:27440433

  8. Trends in Thyroid Cancer Incidence in Korean Children (1999-2012) Based on Palpation and Nonpalpation Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Young; Jang, Hye Won; Joung, Ji Young; Park, Sun-Mi; Jeong, Dae Joon; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of childhood thyroid cancer is increasing in several populations; however, contributing factors have not been adequately discussed. Objectives Our aim was to identify trends of childhood thyroid cancer based on the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR) database and to elucidate changes in detection methods of cancers using a single-center database. Methods Data from the KCCR and Statistics Korea between 1999 and 2012 were used to calculate the crude incidence of thyroid cancer in children. To analyze detection methods for cancers, pediatric patients (aged 0-19 years, n = 126) who underwent thyroid surgery for thyroid cancers at our institution were identified. Subjects were divided into two groups by detection method: (1) palpation group and (2) screening group. Results The crude incidence of childhood thyroid cancer increased from 0.5 per 100,000 in 1999 to 1.7 in 2012. The proportion of thyroid cancer among total cancers also increased from 4.4% in 1999 to 10.6% in 2012. Among 126 children from our institution, 91 cases (72%) were identified as palpable neck masses, and the remainder were discovered during imaging studies. The numbers in both groups gradually increased during the study period. Conclusions The incidence of childhood thyroid cancer has steadily increased in Korea. Regarding the detection methods of cancers, most tumors are detected by palpation rather than screening, although the rate of masses identified during screening has increased. PMID:26835429

  9. Photodynamic therapy for chest wall recurrence from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Allison, R R; Sibata, C; Mang, T S; Bagnato, V S; Downie, G H; Hu, X H; Cuenca, R

    2004-09-01

    Breast cancer is common with over 230,000 new cases diagnosed each year in North America alone. While great strides have been made to achieve excellent cancer control and survival, a significant minority of patients fail locally. While initial salvage to regain disease control is of the utmost importance, it is not universally successful. This leads to a therapeutic quagmire. Additional surgery, radiation and chemo-hormonal therapy are possible, but they are usually highly morbid with low success rates. Photodynamic therapy appears to be an underutilized salvage modality for this unfortunate patient population. This report analyzes and reviews the role of photodynamic therapy for patients with chest wall re-recurrence from breast cancer.

  10. The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

  11. [Molecular targeting agents for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Nozomu

    2012-10-01

    The combination of fluoropyrimidine and platinum with or without epirubicin or docetaxel has been regarded as standard chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Recently, trastuzumab with conventional chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive gastric cancer patients was proved to be effective in terms of survival benefit and has become one of standard treatment options. Other molecular target agents, such as HER1, HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met, fibroblast growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors were and are being evaluated in clinical trials. However, no agents other than trastuzumab have shown clear survival benefit. The predictive biomarker seems to be necessary for developing new molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer with heterogeneity.

  12. A Comprehensive Characterization of Mitochondrial Genome in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xingyun; Wang, Weibin; Ruan, Guodong; Liang, Min; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ye; Wu, Huiling; Fahey, Thomas J.; Guan, Minxin; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genetic alterations have been widely investigated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), however, the characteristics of the mitochondrial genome remain uncertain. We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of 66 PTCs, 16 normal thyroid tissues and 376 blood samples of healthy individuals. There were 2508 variations (543 sites) detected in PTCs, among which 33 variations were novel. Nearly half of the PTCs (31/66) had heteroplasmic variations. Among the 31 PTCs, 28 specimens harbored a total of 52 somatic mutations distributed in 44 sites. Thirty-three variations including seven nonsense, 11 frameshift and 15 non-synonymous variations selected by bioinformatic software were regarded as pathogenic. These 33 pathogenic mutations were associated with older age (p = 0.0176) and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0218). In addition, they tended to be novel (p = 0.0003), heteroplasmic (p = 0.0343) and somatic (p = 0.0018). The mtDNA copy number increased in more than two-third (46/66) of PTCs, and the average content in tumors was nearly four times higher than that in adjacent normal tissues (p < 0.0001). Three sub-haplogroups of N (A4, B4a and B4g) and eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) (A16164G, C16266T, G5460A, T6680C, G9123A, A14587G, T16362C, and G709A) were associated with the occurrence of PTC. Here we report a comprehensive characterization of the mitochondrial genome and demonstrate its significance in pathogenesis and progression of PTC. This can help to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying PTC and offer potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for future clinical practice. PMID:27735863

  13. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives. PMID:27185870

  14. FOXE1 Association with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and Its Progression

    PubMed Central

    Penna-Martinez, Marissa; Epp, Friederike; Kahles, Heinrich; Ramos-Lopez, Elizabeth; Hinsch, Nora; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Selkinski, Ivan; Grünwald, Frank; Holzer, Katharina; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Zeuzem, Stefan; Vorländer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near thyroid transcription factor genes (FOXE1 rs965513/NKX2-1 rs944289) have been shown to be associated with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in Caucasoid populations. We investigated the role of those SNPs in German patients with DTC and also extended our analysis to tumor stages and lymphocytic infiltration of the tumors (ITL). Methods: Patients with DTC (n=243; papillary, PTC; follicular, FTC) and healthy controls (HC; n=270) were analyzed for the rs965513 and rs944289 SNPs. Results: The case-control analysis for rs965513 SNP showed that the genotypes “AA,” “AG,” and minor allele “A” were more frequent in patients with DTC than in HC (pronounced in PTC pgenotype=0.000084, pallele=0.006 than FTC pgenotype=0.29 and pallele=0.06). Furthermore, subgroup analysis of the DTC patients stratified for primary tumor stage (T1–T2, T3–T4), the absence or presence of regional lymph node metastases (N0, N1), for distant metastases (M0, M1), as well as for ITL, showed an association of rs965513 with stages T1–T2, T1–T3, N1, and absence of ITL. The NKX2-1 SNP rs944289, however, was not associated with DTC. Conclusion: Our results confirm that the FOXE1 rs965513 SNP confers an increased risk for DTC in the German population, particularly allele “A” and the genotypes “AA” and “AG” for PTC. This increased risk was also observed in advanced tumor stages and absence of ITL, which may reflect the course of a more aggressive disease. The NKX2-1 rs944289 SNP, however, appears to play a secondary role in the development of DTC in the German population. PMID:24325646

  15. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies: are they a better marker to detect early thyroid damage in patients with hematologic cancers receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor or immunoregulatory drug treatments?

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, P.; Mian, M.; Pitini, V.; Cuzzocrea, S.; Sindoni, A.; Galletti, M.; Mandolfino, M.; Santoro, D.; Mondello, S.; Aloisi, C.; Altavilla, G.; Benvenga, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unlike cytotoxic agents, novel antineoplastic drugs can variably affect thyroid function and so impair patient outcomes. However, the widely used standard thyroid tests have demonstrated low sensitivity for detecting early thyroid damage that leads to dysfunction of the gland. To find a more reliable thyroid marker, we assessed the presence of antibodies binding thyroid hormones (thAbs) in a cancer population undergoing potentially thyrotoxic treatment. Methods From April 2010 to September 2013, 82 patients with hematologic malignancies treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or immunoregulatory drugs were recruited. Healthy volunteers (n = 104) served as control subjects. Thyroid function, autoimmunity tests, thAbs, and thyroid sonography were assessed once during treatment. Results Overall, thAb positivity was recorded in 13% of the entire cohort. In most cases, the thAbs were of a single type, with a predominance of T3 immunoglobulin G. More specifically, thAbs were detected in 11 cancer patients; and abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin antibody, and thyroperoxidase antibody were detected in 6 (p = 0.05), 0 (p = 0.0006), and 2 cancer patients (p = 0.001) respectively. Ultrasonographic alterations of the thyroid were observed in 12 cancer patients. In contrast, of the 104 healthy control subjects, only 1 was positive for thAbs (1%). Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time that thAbs are a reliable marker of early thyroid dysfunction when compared with the widely used standard thyroid tests. A confirmatory prospective trial aiming at evaluating thAbs at various time points during treatment could clarify the incidence and timing of antibody appearance. PMID:27330353

  16. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26977418

  17. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer.

  18. Circulating Thyroxine, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, and Hypothyroid Status and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mondul, Alison M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Bosworth, Tracey; Remaley, Alan T.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2012-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones may influence risk of cancer through their role in cell differentiation, growth, and metabolism. One study of circulating thyroid hormones supports this hypothesis with respect to prostate cancer. We undertook a prospective analysis of thyroid hormones and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. Methods Within the ATBC Study, a randomized controlled trial of α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplements and cancer incidence in male smokers, 402 prostate cancer cases were sampled. Controls were matched 2∶1 to cases on age and date of blood collection. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of prostate cancer were estimated for quintiles of serum total and free thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid-binding globulin (TBG), and by categories of thyroid status. Results Men with serum higher TSH had a decreased risk of prostate cancer compared to men with lower TSH (Q5 vs. Q1–4: OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.51–0.97, p = 0.03). When the T4 and TSH measurements were combined to define men as hypothyroid, euthyroid or hyperthyroid, hypothyroid men had a lower risk of prostate cancer compared to euthyroid men (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.28–0.81, p = 0.006). We observed no association between hyperthyroid status and risk, although the number of hyperthyroid men with prostate cancer was small (n = 9). Conclusions In this prospective study of smokers, men with elevated TSH and those classified as being in a hypothyroid state were at decreased risk of prostate cancer. Future studies should examine the association in other populations, particularly non-smokers and other racial/ethnic groups. PMID:23118893

  19. Helicase-like transcription factor: a new marker of well-differentiated thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The preoperative characterization of thyroid nodules is a challenge for the clinicians. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is the commonly used pre-operative technique for diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumor. However, many benign lesions, with indeterminate diagnosis following FNA, are referred to surgery. There is an urgent need to identify biomarkers that could be used with the FNA to distinguish benign thyroid nodules from malignant tumors. The purpose of the study is to examine the level of expression of the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF) in relation to neoplastic progression of thyroid carcinomas. Methods The presence of HLTF was investigated using quantitative and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry in a series of 149 thyroid lesion specimens. Our first clinical series was composed of 80 patients, including 20 patients presenting thyroid adenoma, 40 patients presenting thyroid papillary carcinoma, 12 patients presenting thyroid follicular carcinoma and 8 patients presenting anaplastic carcinoma. These specimens were assessed quantitatively using computer assisted microscopy. Our initial results were validated on a second clinical series composed of 40 benign thyroid lesions and 29 malignant thyroid lesions using a semi-quantitative approach. Finally, the HLTF protein expression was investigated by Western blotting in four thyroid cancer cell lines. Results The decrease of HLTF staining was statistically significant during thyroid tumor progression in terms of both the percentage of mean optical density (MOD), which corresponds to the mean staining intensity (Kruskall-Wallis: p < 0.0005), and the labelling index (LI), which corresponds to the percentage of immunopositive cells (Kruskall-Wallis: p < 10−6). Adenomas presented very pronounced nuclear HLTF immunostaining, whereas papillary carcinomas exhibited HLTF only in the cytoplasm. The number of HLTF positive nuclei was clearly higher in the adenomas group (30%) than in the

  20. Novel leptin OB3 peptide-induced signaling and progression in thyroid cancers: Comparison with leptin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Ke, Chien-Chih; Crawford, Dana R.; Lee, Oscar K.; Fu, Earl; Mousa, Shaker A.; Grasso, Patricia; Liu, Leroy F.; Chang, Heng-Yu; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity results in increased secretion of cytokines from adipose tissue and is a risk factor for various cancers. Leptin is largely produced by adipose tissue and cancer cells. It induces cell proliferation and may serve to induce various cancers. OB3-leptin peptide (OB3) is a new class of functional leptin peptide. However, its mitogenic effect has not been determined. In the present study, because of a close link between leptin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, OB3 was compared with leptin in different thyroid cancer cells for gene expression, proliferation and invasion. Neither agent stimulated cell proliferation. Leptin stimulated cell invasion, but reduced adhesion in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Activated ERK1/2 and STAT3 contributed to leptin-induced invasion. In contrast, OB3 did not affect expression of genes involved in proliferation and invasion. In vivo studies in the mouse showed that leptin, but not OB3, significantly increased circulating levels of thyrotropin (TSH), a growth factor for thyroid cancer. In summary, OB3 is a derivative of leptin that importantly lacks the mitogenic effects of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27050378

  1. Key genes and pathways in thyroid cancer based on gene set enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Wenwu; Qi, Bin; Zhou, Qiuxi; Lu, Chuansen; Huang, Qi; Xian, Lei; Chen, Mingwu

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer and its associated morbidity has shown the most rapid increase among all cancers since 1982, but the mechanisms involved in thyroid cancer, particularly significant key genes induced in thyroid cancer, remain undefined. In many studies, gene probes have been used to search for key genes involved in causing and facilitating thyroid cancer. As a result, many possible virulence genes and pathways have been identified. However, these studies lack a case contrast for selecting the most possible virulence genes and pathways, as well as conclusive results with which to clarify the mechanisms of cancer development. In the present study, we used gene set enrichment and meta-analysis to select key genes and pathways. Based on gene set enrichment, we identified 5 downregulated and 4 upregulated mixed pathways in 6 tissue datasets. Based on the meta-analysis, there were 17 common pathways in the tissue datasets. One pathway, the p53 signaling pathway, which includes 13 genes, was identified by both the gene set enrichment analysis and meta-analysis. Genes are important elements that form key pathways. These pathways can induce the development of thyroid cancer later in life. The key pathways and genes identified in the present study can be used in the next stage of research, which will involve gene elimination and other methods of experimentation.

  2. Cardiac Effects of Thyrotropin Oversuppression with Levothyroxine in Young Women with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung-Soon; Son, Jung-Woo; Ryu, Ohk Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background. We investigated the cardiac effects of TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) oversuppression in women with thyroidectomized differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) during levothyroxine suppression therapy. Methods. Fourteen young female patients with DTC were enrolled. The duration of TSH-suppressive therapy was 5 to 9 years. They satisfied the following criteria: (1) a serum level of TSH < 0.1 mU/L in the intermediate-risk or TSH < 0.3 mU/L in the low-recurrence-risk group and (2) having been receiving a fixed dose of LT4 before the study. Controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were compared in terms of the levels of serum free T4, free T3, TSH, plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), and cardiac functions and structures. Results. DTC patients and control subjects were well matched in heart rate and blood pressure. There were marked differences in serum TSH (P = 0.001) and free T4 (P = 0.002). However, there were no differences between the groups in serum free T3 and plasma NT-pro-BNP. Furthermore, there were nonsignificant differences in cardiac functions and structures between the groups. Conclusions. This study shows that TSH suppression therapy in women with DTC may be safe with respect to cardiac functions and structures despite intermittent oversuppression of TSH during long-term suppressive therapy. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02645786. PMID:27418929

  3. A Novel Surgical Technique for Thyroid Cancer with Intra-Cricotracheal Invasion: Windmill Resection and Tetris Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Keisuke; Uchino, Shinya; Noguchi, Hitoshi; Enomoto, Yukie; Noguchi, Shiro

    2015-12-01

    The most effective treatment for thyroid cancer (TC) invading into the larynx and trachea is a complete surgical resection of the tumor, but currently employed techniques are less than ideal. We report a novel surgical technique, which we named Windmill resection and Tetris reconstruction, for patients with TC invading into the laryngeal lumen. We treated eight cases of TC with invasion into the laryngeal lumen by Windmill resection and Tetris reconstruction. We analyzed complications, clinical data, and pathological findings for all patients. Patients included one man and seven women (mean age 69 ± 10 years). Histopathology of TC indicated papillary cancer in five patients, poorly differentiated cancer in one patient, anaplastic cancer in one patient, and squamous cell carcinoma in one patient. Unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy was confirmed preoperatively by laryngoscope in four patients, and none had bilateral RLN palsy. All patients underwent Windmill resection and Tetris reconstruction along with total thyroidectomy (three patients), subtotal thyroidectomy (three patients), and lobectomy (two patients). Neck dissection was performed in all patients. The average resected length of the larynx and trachea was 29 ± 6 mm. Air leakage at the suture line occurred in three patients; two required further surgery, while the third was closed by insertion of a Penrose drain. Postoperative RLN palsy occurred in five patients. Aspiration was observed in two patients and resolved within 4 weeks. Pneumonia, atelectasis, and pleural effusion occurred in some patients. No other complications, including hemorrhage, wound infection, or airway stenosis, occurred. There was no postoperative mortality and no recurrence at the anastomotic site. Two patients underwent permanent tracheostomy due to permanent bilateral RLN palsy. Two patients, one with anaplastic cancer and the other with poorly differentiated cancer, recurred 13 and 21 months after surgery

  4. SERIAL NECK ULTRASOUND IS MORE LIKELY TO IDENTIFY FALSE-POSITIVE ABNORMALITIES THAN CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT DISEASE IN LOW-RISK PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samantha Peiling; Bach, Ariadne M.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Fish, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective American Thyroid Association (ATA) low-risk papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients without structural evidence of disease on initial posttreatment evaluation have a low risk of recurrence. Despite this, most patients undergo frequent surveillance neck ultrasound (US). The objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of routine neck US in ATA low-risk PTC patients with no structural evidence of disease after their initial thyroid surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 171 ATA low-risk PTC patients after total thyroidectomy, with or without radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, who had a neck US without suspicious findings after therapy. The main outcome measure was a comparison of the frequency of finding false-positive US abnormalities and the frequency of identifying structural disease recurrence. Results Over a median follow-up of 8 years, 171 patients underwent a median of 5 neck US (range 2–17). Structural recurrence with low-volume disease (≤1 cm) was identified in 1.2% (2/171) of patients at a median of 2.8 years (range 1.6–4.1 years) after their initial diagnosis. Recurrence was associated with rising serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level in 1 of the 2 patients and was detected without signs of biochemical recurrence in the other patient. Conversely, false-positive US abnormalities were identified in 67% (114/171) of patients after therapy, leading to additional testing without identifying clinically significant disease. Conclusion In ATA low-risk patients without structural evidence of disease on initial surveillance evaluation, routine screening US is substantially more likely to identify false-positive results than clinically significant structural disease recurrence. PMID:26372300

  5. Predicting Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Self-Efficacy in Survivors by Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D.; Champion, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. Sample 1,128 long-term survivors. Methods Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18–45 years (younger group) or 55–70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables’ prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Main Research Variables Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Findings Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. Conclusions The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of

  6. Temsirolimus With or Without Megestrol Acetate and Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Patients With Advanced, Persistent, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  7. Recurrent R-spondin fusions in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Somasekar; Stawiski, Eric W; Durinck, Steffen; Modrusan, Zora; Storm, Elaine E; Conboy, Caitlin B; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Guan, Yinghui; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Guillory, Joseph; Ha, Connie; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J P; Stinson, Jeremy; Gnad, Florian; Huntley, Melanie A; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Haverty, Peter M; Bourgon, Richard; Wang, Weiru; Koeppen, Hartmut; Gentleman, Robert; Starr, Timothy K; Zhang, Zemin; Largaespada, David A; Wu, Thomas D; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2012-08-30

    Identifying and understanding changes in cancer genomes is essential for the development of targeted therapeutics. Here we analyse systematically more than 70 pairs of primary human colon tumours by applying next-generation sequencing to characterize their exomes, transcriptomes and copy-number alterations. We have identified 36,303 protein-altering somatic changes that include several new recurrent mutations in the Wnt pathway gene TCF7L2, chromatin-remodelling genes such as TET2 and TET3 and receptor tyrosine kinases including ERBB3. Our analysis for significantly mutated cancer genes identified 23 candidates, including the cell cycle checkpoint kinase ATM. Copy-number and RNA-seq data analysis identified amplifications and corresponding overexpression of IGF2 in a subset of colon tumours. Furthermore, using RNA-seq data we identified multiple fusion transcripts including recurrent gene fusions involving R-spondin family members RSPO2 and RSPO3 that together occur in 10% of colon tumours. The RSPO fusions were mutually exclusive with APC mutations, indicating that they probably have a role in the activation of Wnt signalling and tumorigenesis. Consistent with this we show that the RSPO fusion proteins were capable of potentiating Wnt signalling. The R-spondin gene fusions and several other gene mutations identified in this study provide new potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer.

  8. Cancer recurrence worry, risk perception, and informational-coping styles among Appalachian cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Shedlosky-Shoemaker, Randi; Porter, Kyle; Desimone, Philip; Andrykowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the psychosocial impact of the threat of cancer recurrence, underserved populations, such as those from the Appalachian region, have been understudied. To examine worry and perceived risk in cancer survivors, Appalachian and non-Appalachian cancer patients at an ambulatory oncology clinic in a university hospital were surveyed. Appalachians had significantly higher worry than non-Appalachians. Cancer type and lower need for cognition were associated with greater worry. Those with missing perceived risk data were generally older, less educated, and lower in monitoring, blunting, and health literacy. Additional resources are needed to assist Appalachians and those with cancers with poor prognoses (e.g., liver cancer, pancreatic cancer) to cope with worry associated with developing cancer again. More attention for cancer prevention is critical to improve quality of life in underserved populations where risk of cancer is greater.

  9. Quantification of the increase in thyroid cancer prevalence in Fukushima after the nuclear disaster in 2011--a potential overdiagnosis?

    PubMed

    Katanoda, Kota; Kamo, Ken-Ichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-03-01

    A thyroid ultrasound examination programme has been conducted in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, after the nuclear disaster in 2011. Although remarkably high prevalence of thyroid cancer was observed, no relevant quantitative evaluation was conducted. We calculated the observed/expected (O/E) ratio of thyroid cancer prevalence for the residents aged ≤20 years. Observed prevalence was the number of thyroid cancer cases detected by the programme through the end of April 2015. Expected prevalence was calculated as cumulative incidence by a life-table method using the national estimates of thyroid cancer incidence rate in 2001-10 (prior to the disaster) and the population of Fukushima Prefecture. The underlying assumption was that there was neither nuclear accident nor screening intervention. The observed and estimated prevalence of thyroid cancer among residents aged ≤20 years was 160.1 and 5.2, respectively, giving an O/E ratio of 30.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 26.2, 35.9]. When the recent increasing trend in thyroid cancer was considered, the overall O/E ratio was 22.2 (95% CI: 18.9, 25.9). The cumulative number of thyroid cancer deaths in Fukushima Prefecture, estimated with the same method (annual average in 2009-13), was 0.6 under age 40. Combined with the existing knowledge about radiation effect on thyroid cancer, our descriptive analysis suggests the possibility of overdiagnosis. Evaluation including individual-level analysis is required to further clarify the contribution of underlying factors.

  10. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  11. Prospective study of seaweed consumption and thyroid cancer incidence in women: the Japan collaborative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaochen; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Li, Yuanying; Ota, Atsuhiko; Tamakoshi, Koji; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Mikami, Haruo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-05-01

    Excess intake of iodine is a suspected risk factor for thyroid cancer. Previous epidemiological research from Japan reported that daily intake of seaweed was associated with a four-fold higher risk in postmenopausal women, whereas others reported a null association. A major source of iodine intake in Japan is from edible seaweeds, and it is reported to be among the highest in the world. We examined the association between seaweed intake frequency and the risk of thyroid cancer in women in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study followed from 1988 to 2009. Seaweed intake, together with other lifestyle-related information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire at baseline. Seaweed intake frequency was categorized as follows: 1-2 times/week or less, 3-4 times/week, and almost daily. Hazard ratios and the 95% confidence intervals of thyroid cancer incidence according to seaweed intake frequency were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. During 447 876 person-years of follow-up (n=35 687), 94 new cases of thyroid cancer were identified. The crude incidence rate was 20.9 per 100 000 person-years. The hazard ratio of thyroid cancer in women who consumed seaweed daily compared with women who ate it 1-2 times/week or less was 1.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.69-1.90, P for trend=0.59). Further analyses did not indicate any association between seaweed intake and the risk of thyroid cancer on statistically adjusting for potential confounding variables as well as on stratification by menopausal status. The present study did not find an association between seaweed intake and thyroid cancer incidence in premenopausal or in postmenopausal women.

  12. Spotlight on lenvatinib in the treatment of thyroid cancer: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chandra, Sunandana; Pai, Sachin G; Chae, Young Kwang; Kaplan, Jason B; Garrett, Hannah B; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, with over 60,000 cases reported per year in the US alone. The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased in the last several years. Patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) generally have a good prognosis. Metastatic DTC can often be treated in a targeted manner with radioactive iodine, but the ability to accumulate iodine is lost with decreasing differentiation. Until recently, chemotherapy was the only treatment in patients with advanced thyroid cancer, which is no longer amenable to therapy with radioactive iodine. The modest efficacy and significant toxicity of chemotherapy necessitated the need for urgent advances in the medical field. New insights in thyroid cancer biology propelled the development of targeted therapies for this disease, including the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib as salvage treatment for DTC. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a second tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lenvatinib, for the treatment of radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer. Although associated with a significant progression-free survival improvement as compared to placebo in a large Phase III study (median progression-free survival 18.2 vs 3.6 months; hazard ratio 0.21; 99% confidence interval 0.14-0.31; P<0.001), the benefit of lenvatinib needs to be proved in the context of associated moderate to severe toxicities that require frequent dose reduction and delays. This article reviews the evidence supporting the use of lenvatinib as salvage therapy for radioactive iodine-refractory thyroid cancer, with a focus on the toxicity profile of this new therapy.

  13. Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Thyroid Cancer Incidence in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang-Mo; Jung, Kyu-Won; Won, Young-Joo; Shin, Aesun; Kong, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose South Korea has the highest incidence rate of thyroid cancer in the world, and the incidence rate continues to increase. The aim of this study was to determine the age-period-cohort effects on the incidence of thyroid cancer in Korea. Materials and Methods Using the Korean National Cancer registry database, age-standardized incidence rates and annual percent changes (APCs) in thyroid cancer according to sex and histologic type were analyzed between 1997 and 2011. Age-period-cohort models were applied using an intrinsic estimator method according to sex. Results In both men and women, the incidence of thyroid cancer showed a sharp increase from 1997 through 2011. Among the histologic types, papillary carcinoma showed the greatest increase, with APCs of 25.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.7% to 27.5%) in men and 23.7% (95% CI, 21.9% to 25.5%) in women, whereas anaplastic carcinoma did not show a significant increase in either sex. An increase in overall thyroid cancer incidence over time was observed in all birth cohorts. An age-period-cohort model indicated a steeply increasing period effect, which increased prominently from 1997 to 2011 in both men and women. The age effect showed an inverted U-shaped trend. The cohort effect tended to show a slight increase or remain constant from 1952 to 1977, followed by a decrease. Conclusion The period effect can explain the sharp increase in thyroid cancer incidence, strongly suggesting the role of thyroid screening. PMID:25672579

  14. The prognostic value of regional lymph node metastases in patients of Guangdong Province, China with differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin-yun; Wang, Wei-wei; Ibrahima, Balde Alpha; Han, Shuai; Li, Zhou; Cai, Zhai; Chen, Miao-liang; Chen, Bao-zhu; Tan, Hui-shi; Zeng, Hai-shan; Dai, Xiao-li; Zhou, Min-wei; Zhang, Gang-qing; Li, Guo-xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the prognostic value of nodal metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer remains controversial, it is of interest to evaluate and understand the different characteristics of predictive outcomes. A multicenter retrospective study was conducted in 215 untreated patients with differentiated thyroid cancer from July 1997 to July 2015 in 4 medical centers of Guangdong Province. A total of 107 patients with nodal metastases (group A) were compared to 108 patients without metastases (group B). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and postoperative complications in both groups were calculated. Variables predictive of DFS and OS were evaluated in group A. The group A had lower 5-year DFS (69.16%, 11 months) and shorter median time of recurrence than those in group B (87.96%, 8.5 months, respectively, P < 0.001). The incidence of temporary hypoparathyroidism in group A is lower; whereas higher incidence of temporary unilateral vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, permanent unilateral vocal cord palsy, and bilateral vocal cord palsy in group A were observed. Both univariate and multivariate analyses in group A revealed that age, pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM) stage, and histology were related to DFS (P < 0.05); while pTNM stage and histology were related to OS only in univariate analyses. Positive nodal metastases have significant prognostic value in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer in Guangdong, China and primarily reduce DFS. Moreover, patients with positive nodal metastases who are >45 years and have higher pTNM stage or follicular histology tend to have poor prognosis. Selective lymph node dissection with appropriate postoperative treatment and frequent follow-up should be accorded to these vulnerable groups of patients. PMID:27741112

  15. Aberrant Expression of Posterior HOX Genes in Well Differentiated Histotypes of Thyroid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cantile, Monica; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; La Sala, Lucia; La Mantia, Elvira; Scaramuzza, Veronica; Valentino, Elena; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Simona; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Fulciniti, Franco; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Molecular etiology of thyroid cancers has been widely studied, and several molecular alterations have been identified mainly associated with follicular and papillary histotypes. However, the molecular bases of the complex pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas remain poorly understood. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in neoplastic transformation of several human tissues. In particular, the genes belonging to HOX paralogous group 13 seem to hold a relevant role in both tumor development and progression. We have identified a significant prognostic role of HOX D13 in pancreatic cancer and we have recently showed the strong and progressive over-expression of HOX C13 in melanoma metastases and deregulation of HOX B13 expression in bladder cancers. In this study we have investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX paralogous group 13 genes/proteins expression in thyroid cancer evolution and progression, also evaluating its ability to discriminate between main histotypes. Our results showed an aberrant expression, both at gene and protein level, of all members belonging to paralogous group 13 (HOX A13, HOX B13, HOX C13 and HOX D13) in adenoma, papillary and follicular thyroid cancers samples. The data suggest a potential role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers. PMID:24189220

  16. Contralateral axillary node metastasis from recurrence after conservative breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Satoko; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Junko; Koyama, Masamichi

    2014-02-01

    Sentinel lymph node detection (SLND) with radiocolloid has become widely used for evaluation of nodal metastasis in primary breast cancer. However, the procedure for recurrent breast cancer is not well established. Contralateral axillary node metastasis is uncommon. We report 2 cases of contralateral axillary node metastasis with recurrent breast cancer. In the first case, contralateral node metastasis was found by SLND. In the other case without SLND, contralateral node metastasis developed after resection of local recurrence. FDG-avid contralateral node was pathologically diagnosed as metastasis. The SLND might be useful in patients with local recurrence after conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:24368539

  17. Safety of topotecan in the treatment of recurrent small-cell lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Garst, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor, topotecan, is approved for the treatment of recurrent small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and ovarian cancer (OC). Patients with recurrent SCLC and OC typically experience multiple relapses and receive multiple rounds of chemotherapy. In these settings, disease stabilisation is considered a treatment benefit, and quality-of-life effects and cumulative toxicities of treatments should be considered. Many patients with recurrent cancer may be predisposed to treatment-related adverse events because of advanced age, renal impairment or extensive prior therapy. The standard regimen of topotecan, 1.5 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 of a 21-day cycle, has generally mild nonhaematological toxicity and a well-defined haematological toxicity profile characterised by reversible and noncumulative neutropenia. Alternative regimens may lower the incidence of haematological toxicities and maintain antitumour efficacy. Topotecan may provide physicians with a versatile therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with relapsed SCLC or OC. PMID:17181452

  18. False positive diagnosis on (131)iodine whole-body scintigraphy of differentiated thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Vincenzo; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Iovino, Michele; De Pergola, Giovanni; Licchelli, Brunella; Varraso, Antonio; Dicembrino, Franca; Valle, Guido; Guastamacchia, Edoardo

    2016-09-01

    (131)Iodine is used both to ablate any residual thyroid tissue or metastatic disease and to obtain whole-body diagnostic images after total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Even though whole-body scan is highly accurate in showing thyroid residues as well as metastases of DTC, false positive results can be found, possibly leading to diagnostic errors and unnecessary treatments. This paper reviews the physiological and pathological processes involved as well as the strategy to recognize and rule out false positive radioiodine images.

  19. Does thyroid-stimulating hormone influence the prognosis of patients with endometrial cancer? A multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, V; Hofstetter, G; Polterauer, S; Reinthaller, A; Grimm, C; Schwameis, R; Taucher, S; Wagener, A; Marth, C; Concin, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thyroid function has been suggested to interfere with tumour biology and prognosis in different cancers. The present study was performed to investigate the impact of pre-therapeutic serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels on the prognosis of patients with endometrial cancer. Methods: Pre-therapeutic serum TSH was investigated in 199 patients with endometrial cancer. After stratification in TSH risk groups, univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed. Results: Elevated TSH was independently associated with poor disease-specific survival in univariate/multivariable survival analyses (P=0.01 and P=0.03, respectively). Conclusion: Thyroid-stimulating hormone may serve as a novel and independent prognostic parameter for disease-specific survival in patients with endometrial cancer. PMID:23764750

  20. Contactin 1 as a potential biomarker promotes cell proliferation and invasion in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kaiyuan; Xu, Dong; Yang, Chen; Wang, Liping; Pan, Weiyun; Zheng, Chuanming; Fan, Linyin

    2015-01-01

    Contactin 1 (CNTN1) as a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays important role in the development of nervous system. Recent studies find that elevated CNTN1 can promote the metastasis of cancer. However, the expression and function of CNTN1 in thyroid cancer are still unknown. Here, we firstly find CNTN1 is a new gene which can be regulated by RET/PTC3 (Ret proto-oncogene and Ret-activating protein ELE1) rearrangement gene and the protein level of CNTN1 is increasing in thyroid cancer. Besides this change is positively associated with the TNM stage and tumor size. Moreover, we confirm that knockdown of CNTN1 significantly inhibits the tumor proliferation, invasiveness and represses the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). In conclusion, CNTN1 will be a poteintial diagnosis biomarker and therapy target for thyroid cancer. PMID:26722434

  1. The Impact of Thyroid Cancer and Post-Surgical Radioactive Iodine Treatment on the Lives of Thyroid Cancer Survivors: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawka, Anna M.; Goldstein, David P.; Brierley, James D.; Tsang, Richard W.; Rotstein, Lorne; Ezzat, Shereen; Straus, Sharon; George, Susan R.; Abbey, Susan; Rodin, Gary; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Gafni, Amiram; Thabane, Lehana; Goguen, Jeannette; Naeem, Asima; Magalhaes, Lilian

    2009-01-01

    Background Adjuvant treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI) is often considered in the treatment of well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma (WDTC). We explored the recollections of thyroid cancer survivors on the diagnosis of WDTC, adjuvant radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment, and decision-making related to RAI treatment. Participants provided recommendations for healthcare providers on counseling future patients on adjuvant RAI treatment. Methods We conducted three focus group sessions, including WDTC survivors recruited from two Canadian academic hospitals. Participants had a prior history of WDTC that was completely resected at primary surgery and had been offered adjuvant RAI treatment. Open-ended questions were used to generate discussion in the groups. Saturation of major themes was achieved among the groups. Findings There were 16 participants in the study, twelve of whom were women (75%). All but one participant had received RAI treatment (94%). Participants reported that a thyroid cancer diagnosis was life-changing, resulting in feelings of fear and uncertainty. Some participants felt dismissed as not having a serious disease. Some participants reported receiving conflicting messages from healthcare providers on the appropriateness of adjuvant RAI treatment or insufficient information. If RAI-related side effects occurred, their presence was not legitimized by some healthcare providers. Conclusions The diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer significantly impacts the lives of survivors. Fear and uncertainty related to a cancer diagnosis, feelings of the diagnosis being dismissed as not serious, conflicting messages about adjuvant RAI treatment, and treatment-related side effects, have been raised as important concerns by thyroid cancer survivors. PMID:19142227

  2. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid....

  3. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid....

  4. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid....

  5. The discovery and development of sorafenib for the treatment of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter T; Cohen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While the prognosis for most differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC) remains excellent, recurrence and in-sensitivity to radioactive iodine (RAI) lead to therapeutic challenges and poorer outcomes. In defining the pathogenesis of DTC, multiple genetic alterations have been identified in key pathways focused around receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and the MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade. Sorafenib was specifically developed to target RAF kinase in the MAPK pathway. It has been shown however to have potent inhibition of several key RTKs, RAF kinase, and the V600E BRAF mutation, gaining FDA approval in November 2013 for advanced RAI-refractory DTC. Areas covered The authors provide a review of the targeted RAF kinase discovery strategy as well as the preclinical and clinical development of sorafenib, leading to FDA approval for DTC. The authors also provide some insight into the clinical use of sorafenib and look at important considerations for treatment. Expert opinion Sorafenib significantly improves progression free survival in metastatic DTC patients who are RAI-refractory. However, the overall survival benefit is still unproven and requires additional follow-up. Despite its cost and significant side effect profile, which results in dose reductions in the majority of DTC patients, sorafenib should be considered for the treatment of RAI-refractory advanced DTC patients following evaluation of their individual risk/benefit stratification. PMID:25662396

  6. Individualized optimal surgical extent of the lateral neck in papillary thyroid cancer with lateral cervical metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Yong; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-06-01

    Despite an excellent prognosis, cervical lymph node (LN) metastases are common in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The presence of metastasis is associated with an increased risk of locoregional recurrence, which significantly impairs quality of life and may decrease survival. Therefore, it has been an important determinant of the extent of lateral LN dissection in the initial treatment of PTC patients with lateral cervical metastasis. However, the optimal extent of therapeutic lateral neck dissection (ND) remains controversial. Optimizing the surgical extent of LN dissection is fundamental for balancing the surgical morbidity and oncological benefits of ND in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. We reviewed the currently available literature regarding the optimal extent of lateral LN dissection in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. Even in cases with suspicion of metastatic LN at the single lateral level or isolated metastatic lateral LN, the application of ND including all sublevels from IIa and IIb to Va and Vb may be overtreatment, due to the surgical morbidity. When there is no suspicion of LN metastasis at levels II and V, or when multilevel aggressive neck metastasis is not found, sublevel IIb and Va dissection may not be necessary in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. Thus consideration of the individualized optimal surgical extent of lateral ND is important when treating PTC patients with lateral cervical metastasis.

  7. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC. PMID:26934320

  8. Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org; Chan, Kelvin; Bekelman, Justin E.; Zhung, Joanne; Mechalakos, James; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted.

  9. Down-regulation of SOSTDC1 promotes thyroid cancer cell proliferation via regulating cyclin A2 and cyclin E2

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoying; Ke, Weijian; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Liehua; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Sclerostin domain containing protein 1 (SOSTDC1) is down-regulated and acts as a tumor suppressor in some kinds of cancers. However, the expression pattern and biological significance of SOSTDC1 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. We demonstrated that SOSTDC1 was significantly down-regulated in thyroid cancer. Ectopic over-expression of SOSTDC1 inhibited proliferation and induced G1/S arrest in thyroid cancer cells. Moreover, SOSTDC1 over-expression suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice. We also found that elevated SOSTDC1 led to inhibition of cyclin A2 and cyclin E2. Together, our results demonstrate that SOSTDC1 is down-regulated in thyroid cancer and might be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26378658

  10. The diagnosis of cancer in thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy. Surgery, repeat biopsy or specimen consultation?

    PubMed

    Stanek-Widera, A; Biskup-Frużyńska, M; Zembala-Nożyńska, E; Śnietura, M; Lange, D

    2016-03-01

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) is the only diagnostic method that allows a preoperative diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma. An unequivocal diagnosis of a malignant change is achievable only in cases in which all cytological criteria of carcinoma are met. The aim of the study was to evaluate the necessity of repeat thyroid FNA in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma verified on consultative examination (CE). We analyzed cytology reports of thyroid FNA and CE that resulted in the diagnosis of papillary carcinoma. Evaluation of the correlation of the cytological diagnosis with the histopathology report was based on data obtained after the surgery. Between 2010 and 2015 in the Institute of Oncology (IO) there were 184 cancers diagnosed on CE or in thyroid FNA performed primarily in IO. Additionally, 74 patients were subjected to repeat biopsy after confirmation of cancer in CE. Histopathological diagnosis of cancer was obtained in 62 (100%) cases that were doubly confirmed with cytological examination. The remaining 12 patients were operated on outside the institute. From 110 FNA primarily performed in the IO, histopathological verification was achievable in 92 cases, from which 92 (100%) provided a confirmation of cancer, and the remaining 18 patients were operated on outside the institute. High (100%) specificity of cancer diagnosis in FNA established primarily and verified on CE (second independent assessment) indicates that repeat FNA in order to confirm the diagnosis is unnecessary. PMID:27179270

  11. Dasatinib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  12. Influence of iodine deficiency and iodine prophylaxis on thyroid cancer histotypes and incidence in endemic goiter area.

    PubMed

    Huszno, B; Szybiński, Z; Przybylik-Mazurek, E; Stachura, J; Trofimiuk, M; Buziak-Bereza, M; Gołkowski, F; Pantoflinski, J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between thyroid cancer histotype and incidence rate (IR) and iodine nutrition level in two endemic goiter areas: the districts of Krakow and Nowy Sacz. The suspension of iodine prophylaxis in Poland in 1980 resulted in increased goiter prevalence in schoolchildren and adults and elevated TSH levels in newborns in the early 1990s. Since 1992 a rise in thyroid cancer IR was observed. Thyroid cancer IR in the Krakow population was 2.22 in 1986; 3.62 in 1995 and 6.02 in 2001; in Nowy Sacz: 1.52; 2.59 and 3.88 respectively. In 1986 papillary/follicular cancer ratio in both areas was about 1.0--the value typical of iodine deficient areas. After restoring the obligatory iodine prophylaxis in 1997, a significant decrease in elevated TSH concentration in newborns and urinary iodine concentration increase in schoolchildren were observed. A relative rise in the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer and decrease in follicular cancer, resulting in rise in papillary/follicular thyroid cancer ratio up to 5.9 in 2001 was also observed. Since 1999 no further thyroid cancer IR increase was noted. In conclusion, a significant increase in differentiated thyroid cancer IR was observed in association with the iodine prophylaxis suspension. Changes in thyroid cancer histotypes in 1986-2001 and a significant decrease in incremental rate of differentiated thyroid cancer probably reflect the influence of effective iodine prophylaxis. The significant difference between IR of thyroid cancer incidence in the districts of Krakow and Nowy Sacz may be related to differences in the exposure to radiation after the Chernobyl accident. PMID:12762644

  13. Evaluating Positron Emission Tomography Use in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Nazanene H.; Papaleontiou, Maria; Worden, Francis P.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results—Medicare database, a substantial increase was found in the use of positron emission tomography (PET) scans after 2004 in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. The reason for the increased utilization of the PET scan was not clear based on available the data. Therefore, the indications for and outcomes of PET scans performed at an academic institution were evaluated. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed of DTC patients who underwent surgery at the University of Michigan Health System from 2006 to 2011. After identifying patients who underwent a PET scan, indications, rate of positive PET scans, and impact on management were evaluated. For positive scans, the location of disease was characterized, and presence of disease on other imaging was determined. Results: Of the 585 patients in the cohort, 111 (19%) patients had 200 PET scans performed for evaluation of DTC. Indications for PET scan included: elevated thyroglobulin and negative radioiodine scan in 52 scans (26.0%), thyroglobulin antibodies in 13 scans (6.5%), rising thyroglobulin in 18 scans (9.0%), evaluation of abnormality on other imaging in 22 scans (11.0%), evaluation of extent of disease in 33 scans (16.5%), follow-up of previous scan in 57 scans (28.5%), other indications in two scans (1.0%), and unclear indications in three scans (1.5%). The PET scan was positive in 124 studies (62.0%); positivity was identified in the thyroid bed on 25 scans, cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes on 105 scans, lung on 28 scans, bone on four scans, and other areas on 14 scans. Therapy following PET scan was surgery in 66 cases (33.0%), chemotherapy or radiation in 23 cases (11.5%), observation in 110 cases (55.0%), and palliative care in one case (0.5%). Disease was identifiable on other imaging in 66% of cases. PET scan results changed management in 59 cases (29.5%). Conclusions: In this academic medical center, the PET scan was

  14. Risk of Thyroid Nodular Disease and Thyroid Cancer in Patients with Acromegaly – Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wolinski, Kosma; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Ruchala, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acromegaly is a quite rare chronic disease caused by the increased secretion of growth hormone (GH) and subsequently insulin - like growth factor 1. Although cardiovascular diseases remains the most common cause of mortality among acromegalic patients, increased prevalence of malignant and benign neoplasms remains a matter of debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk of thyroid nodular disease (TND) and thyroid cancer in patients with acromegaly. Materials and Methods PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cinahl, Academic Search Complete, Web of Knowledge, PubMed Central, PubMed Central Canada and Clinical Key databases were searched to identify studies containing. Random–effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratios and risk ratios of TND in acromegaly. Studies which not included control groups were systematically reviewed. Results TND was more frequent in acromegaly than in control groups (OR = 6.9, RR = 2.1). The pooled prevalence of TND was 59.2%. Also thyroid cancer (TC) proved to be more common in acromegalic patients (OR = 7.5, RR = 7.2), prevalence was 4.3%. The pooled rate of malignancy (calculated per patient) was equal to 8.7%. Conclusions This study confirms that both TND and TC occur significantly more often in acromegalic patients than in general population. These results indicate that periodic thyroid ultrasound examination and careful evaluation of eventual lesions should be an important part of follow-up of patients with acromegaly. PMID:24551163

  15. Differential Expression of Aquaporins and Its Diagnostic Utility in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dongfeng; Kondo, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Tadao; Kawasaki, Tomonori; Yamane, Tetsu; Mochizuki, Kunio; Kato, Yohichiro; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Takata, Kuniaki; Katoh, Ryohei

    2012-01-01

    Background Aquaporin3 (AQP3) and Aquaporin4 (AQP4) play a major role in transcellular and transepithelial water movement as water channel membrane proteins. Little is known of their expression and significance in human thyroid tissues. Thus, we examined the expression of AQP3 and AQP4 in normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic thyroid tissues in conjunction with human thyroid cancer cell lines. Methods and Results Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated AQP3 in the cytoplasmic membrane of normal C cells, but not in follicular cells. In contrast, AQP4 was not found in C cells but was identified in normal follicular cells. AQP4 was positive in 92% of Graves’ disease thyroids and 97% of multinodular goiters, and we failed to demonstrate AQP3 in these hyperplastic tissues. In neoplastic thyroid lesions, we observed AQP3 in 91% of medullary thyroid carcinomas but in no other follicular cell tumors. AQP4 was demonstrated in 100% of follicular adenomas, 90% of follicular carcinomas, and 85% of papillary carcinomas, while it was negative in all medullary carcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed AQP3 mRNA expression only in medullary carcinomas and AQP4 mRNA expression in follicular cell-derived tumors except for undifferentiated carcinomas. In thyroid cancer cell lines, using RT-PCR and western blotting, AQP3 mRNA and protein were only identified in the TT cell line (human medullary carcinoma cell line) and AQP4 in the other cell lines. In addition, AQP3 mRNA expression was up-regulated by FBS and calcium administration in both a dose and time dependent manner in TT cells. Conclusion The differential expressions of AQP3 and AQP4 may reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and additionally may have value in determining differential diagnoses of thyroid tumors. PMID:22808259

  16. Radioiodine remnant ablation in low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer patients who had R0 dissection is an over treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandrasekhar; Ballal, Sanjana; Soundararajan, Ramya; Chopra, Saurav; Garg, Aayushi

    2015-01-01

    Low-risk (LR) differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients should be ablated or not, albeit, with small dose of radioiodine is highly controversial. We hypothesized that those LR DTC patients who were surgically ablated need no radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA). This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome in these two groups of patients. Retrospective cohort study conducted from January 1991 to December 2012. Based on extent of surgical resection and histopathology, LR DTC patients were classified as Gr-1: 169 patients, who were surgically ablated; Gr-2: 153 patients, who had significant remnant in thyroid bed. Basal parameters were comparable between two groups except pretherapy 24 h radioiodine uptake (0.16 ± 0.01% vs. 5.64 ± 0.46%; P < 0.001). No patient received RRA in Gr-1; Gr-2 patients were administered 30 mCi 131I. Total number of events (recurrence, persistent, and progression of disease), with median follow up of 10.3 years, was observed in 10/322 (3.1%) of LR DTC patients. Only one patient had disease recurrence from Gr-1, who became disease-free after radioiodine therapy. Similarly, one patient from 126, who was ablated with single dose of RRA, had recurrence from Gr-2. However, 8/27 (29.7%) patients from Gr-2 had persistent disease; even two of them subsequently developed disease progression, who failed first-dose of RRA. The event-free survival rates were 99.4% and 94.1% (P = 0.006) in Gr-1 and Gr-2, respectively. RRA is an overtreatment in surgically ablated LR DTC patients. Successfully ablated RRA patients also had similar long-term outcome, however, those who failed, should be re-stratified as intermediate-risk category, and managed aggressively. PMID:25755077

  17. A new computational model for human thyroid cancer enhances the preoperative diagnostic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tuo; Sheng, Jianguo; Li, Weiqin; Zhang, Xin; Yu, Hongyu; Chen, Xueyun; Zhang, Jianquan; Cai, Quancai; Shi, Yongquan; Liu, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Considering the high rate of missed diagnosis and delayed treatments for thyroid cancer, an effective systematic model for the differential diagnosis is highly needed. Thus we analyzed the data on the clinicopathological characteristics, routine laboratory tests and imaging examinations in a cohort of 13,980 patients with thyroid cancer to establish a new diagnostic model for differentiating thyroid cancer in clinical practice. Here, we randomly selected two-thirds of the population to develop the thyroid malignancy risk scoring system (TMRS) for preoperative differentiation between thyroid cancer and benignant thyroid diseases, and then validated its differential diagnostic power in the rest one-third population. The 18 predictors finally enrolled in the TMRS included male gender, clinical manifestations (fever, neck sore, neck lump, palpitations or sweating), laboratory findings (TSH>1.56mIU/L, FT3>5.85pmol/L, TPOAb>14.97IU/ml, TgAb>48.00IU/ml, Tg>34.59μg/L, Ct>64.00ng/L, and CEA>0.41μg/L), and ultrasound features (tumor number≤ 23mm, site, size, echo texture, margins, and shape of neck lymphnodes). The TMRS is validated to be well-calibrated (P = 0.437) and excellently discriminated (AUC = 0.93, 95% CI [0.92, 0.94]), with an accuracy of 83.2%, a sensitivity of 89.3%, a specificity of 81.5%, positive and negative predictive values of 56.8% and 96.6%, positive and negative likelihood ratios of 4.83 and 0.13 in the development cohort, respectively. The TMRS highlights that this differential diagnostic system could help provide accurate preoperative risk stratification for thyroid cancer, and avoid unnecessary over- and under-treatment for such patients. PMID:26325368

  18. The relationship between local recurrence and death in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sopik, Victoria; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    To examine the relationship between local recurrence and breast cancer mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. We studied 1675 women with stage 0 (DCIS), stage I or stage II breast cancer who were treated with breast-conserving surgery at Women's College Hospital between 1987 and 2009. For each patient, we obtained information on age at diagnosis, tumour size, lymph node status, tumour grade, lymphovascular invasion, oestrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, HER2 status and treatments received (radiotherapy, chemotherapy and tamoxifen). Patients were followed from the date of diagnosis until local recurrence, death from breast cancer or the date of last follow-up. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate 15-year local recurrence-free and breast cancer-specific survival rates for each stage at diagnosis. For each stage, the two rates were compared. After a mean follow-up of 13.1 years, 243 women (14.5 %) experienced a local recurrence and 281 women (16.8 %) died of breast cancer. The 15-year actuarial rate of local recurrence was 16 % for women with DCIS, 15 % for women with stage I cancer and 16 % for women with stage II cancer. The 15-year breast cancer-specific mortality rate was 3 % for women with DCIS, 10 % for women with stage I breast cancer and 30 % for women with stage II breast cancer. After experiencing a local recurrence, the 15-year breast cancer mortality rate was 16 % for women with DCIS, 32 % for women with stage I breast cancer and 59 % for women with stage II breast cancer. Across the spectrum of the early stages of breast cancer, the risk of local recurrence does not correlate with the risk of death from breast cancer. After local recurrence, the risk of death from breast cancer depends on the initial stage at diagnosis.

  19. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer. PMID:26516037

  20. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarcinoma with a diameter <10 mm) were identified as a first primary among the eligible subjects. Using a linear dose-response model, the excess relative risk of thyroid cancer at 1 Gy of radiation exposure was estimated as 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.59-2.70) at age 60 after acute exposure at age 10. The risk decreased sharply with increasing age-at-exposure and there was little evidence of increased thyroid cancer rates for those exposed after age 20. About 36% of the thyroid cancer cases among those exposed before age 20 were estimated to be attributable to radiation exposure. While the magnitude of the excess risk has decreased with increasing attained age or time since exposure, the excess thyroid cancer risk associated with childhood exposure has persisted for >50 years after exposure.

  1. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarcinoma with a diameter <10 mm) were identified as a first primary among the eligible subjects. Using a linear dose–response model, the excess relative risk of thyroid cancer at 1 Gy of radiation exposure was estimated as 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.59–2.70) at age 60 after acute exposure at age 10. The risk decreased sharply with increasing age-at-exposure and there was little evidence of increased thyroid cancer rates for those exposed after age 20. About 36% of the thyroid cancer cases among those exposed before age 20 were estimated to be attributable to radiation exposure. While the magnitude of the excess risk has decreased with increasing attained age or time since exposure, the excess thyroid cancer risk associated with childhood exposure has persisted for >50 years after exposure PMID:22847218

  2. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarcinoma with a diameter <10 mm) were identified as a first primary among the eligible subjects. Using a linear dose-response model, the excess relative risk of thyroid cancer at 1 Gy of radiation exposure was estimated as 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.59-2.70) at age 60 after acute exposure at age 10. The risk decreased sharply with increasing age-at-exposure and there was little evidence of increased thyroid cancer rates for those exposed after age 20. About 36% of the thyroid cancer cases among those exposed before age 20 were estimated to be attributable to radiation exposure. While the magnitude of the excess risk has decreased with increasing attained age or time since exposure, the excess thyroid cancer risk associated with childhood exposure has persisted for >50 years after exposure. PMID:22847218

  3. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  4. Cetuximab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  5. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. Establishment of a highly differentiated thyroid cancer cell line of Hürthle cell origin.

    PubMed

    Zielke, A; Tezelman, S; Jossart, G H; Wong, M; Siperstein, A E; Duh, Q Y; Clark, O H

    1998-06-01

    Hürthle cell carcinomas (HCC) of the thyroid are a variant of follicular thyroid tumors. In contrast to follicular thyroid carcinoma, HCC rarely take up radioiodine and frequently metastasize to the lymph nodes. Histologically they are indistinguishable from Hürthle cell adenomas except for evidence of invasion and metastasis. How these carcinomas develop and why they behave differently than other follicular tumors is not known. Although some differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines exist, none are from Hürthle cell tumors. We have established a well-differentiated thyroid cancer cell line from a metastasis of a HCC, designated XTC.UC1. In vitro, XTC cells display epitheloid morphology, grow with a population doubling time of 4.3 +/- 0.3 days, migrate, and invade through reconstituted basement membranes. The cells are immunoreactive for and release thyroglobulin, respond to thyrotropin (TSH) with increase of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), proliferation, and invasion of reconstituted basement membrane, thus exhibiting characteristics of well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. In vivo, xenografted XTC cells grow with a doubling time of 9.8 +/- 0.8 days. Tumors spontaneously metastasize to the lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs and the liver. The cells retained their differentiated function in vivo as assessed by human thyroglobulin (hTG) secretion and immunohistochemistry. This is a first report of the establishment of a unique, highly differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell line derived from an HCC. Based on the ability to invade through reconstituted basement membrane in vitro and the potential to metastasize in vivo, this cell line may provide a unique model to study invasion and metastazation of well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

  7. Metformin for the Prevention of Bladder Cancer Recurrence: Is it Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Abbas Zade, Shahin; Mir Hosseini, Seyed Hassan; Ghadian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Many methods have been used for preventing and reducing recurrences of bladder cancers. In recent years, some investigators have examined the use of metformin for this purpose. First lines of evidence have shown that metformin inhibits cancer cell growth and prevents cancer occurrence in patients with type 2 diabetes. Objectives This study is designed to assess metformin usage in the prevention of bladder cancer recurrence after the trans-urethral resection of a bladder tumor (TUR-T). Patients and Methods In the present study, metformin was administered in the treatment of 32 patients with a history of bladder cancer, and their results were compared with those of 33 patients with bladder cancer recurrence (placebo group). Patients in the metformin group received 1000 mg metformin (2 tablets 500 mg) for 1 year. Frequency of tumor recurrence was calculated and compared with the placebo group. Results There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups with respect to the recurrence rate (P > 0.05). Although the recurrence interval was longer for the metformin group, this increase was not statistical significant (P > 0.05). Furthermore, tumor recurrence had no correlation with sex or the grade of the tumors. Conclusions According to our findings, it seems that metformin has no considerable inhibitory effect on the recurrence rate of bladder cancer, but that it can delay tumor recurrence. PMID:27570750

  8. The truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor5 (sst5TMD4) is associated with poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manel; Luque, Raúl M; Reverter, Jordi L; López-Sánchez, Laura M; Gahete, Manuel D; Culler, Michael D; Díaz-Soto, Gonzalo; Lomeña, Francisco; Squarcia, Mattia; Mate, José Luis; Mora, Mireia; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Vidal, Oscar; Alastrué, Antonio; Balibrea, Jose; Halperin, Irene; Mauricio, Dídac; Castaño, Justo P

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (ssts) are expressed in thyroid cancer cells, but their biological significance is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess ssts in well differentiated (WDTC) and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) by means of imaging and molecular tools and its relationship with the efficacy of somatostatin analog treatment. Thirty-nine cases of thyroid carcinoma were evaluated (20 PDTC and 19 WDTC). Depreotide scintigraphy and mRNA levels of sst-subtypes, including the truncated variant sst5TMD4, were carried out. Depreotide scans were positive in the recurrent tumor in the neck in 6 of 11 (54%) PDTC, and in those with lung metastases in 5/11 cases (45.4%); sst5TMD4 was present in 18/20 (90%) of PDTC, being the most densely expressed sst-subtype, with a 20-fold increase in relation to sst2. In WDTC, sst2 was the most represented, while sst5TMD4 was not found; sst2 was significantly increased in PDTC in comparison to WDTC. Five depreotide positive PDTC received octreotide for 3-6 months in a pilot study with no changes in the size of the lesions in 3 of them, and a significant increase in the pulmonary and cervical lesions in the other 2. All PDTC patients treated with octreotide showed high expression of sst5TMD4. ROC curve analysis demonstrated that only sst5TMD4 discriminates between PDTC and WDTC. We conclude that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in PDTC and may be involved in the lack of response to somatostatin analogue treatment.

  9. Comparative clinicopathological and outcome analysis of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged below 60 years and above 60 years

    PubMed Central

    AL-Qahtani, Khalid Hussain; Tunio, Mutahir A; Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Bayoumi, Yasser; Balbaid, Ali; Aljohani, Naji J; Fatani, Hanadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged above 60 years. Materials and methods Comparative analysis was performed in 252 patients aged 46–60 years (Group A) and 118 patients aged above 60 years (Group B), who had thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine-131, and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression therapy between July 2000 and December 2012. Different clinicopathological features, treatment, complications, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were compared. Results Mean age of patients in Group A was 51.9 years (range: 46–60), and mean age of those in Group B was 68.6 years (range: 62–97). Group B patients had higher positive lymph nodes (43.2%), P=0.011. The frequency of extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, and lymphovascular space invasion was seen more in Group B than in Group A. Postsurgical complications (permanent hypoparathyroidism, bleeding, and wound infections) were also seen more in Group B (P=0.043, P=0.011, and P=0.021, respectively). Group B patients experienced more locoregional recurrences (11.0%, P=0.025); similarly, more distant metastases were observed in Group B (15.3%, P=0.003). The 10-year disease-free survival rates were 87.6% in Group A and 70.8% in Group B (P<0.0001). Conclusion Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients aged above 60 years are more aggressive biologically and associated with a worse prognosis, and the morbidity is significantly high as compared to patients aged below 60 years. PMID:27621604

  10. Comparative clinicopathological and outcome analysis of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged below 60 years and above 60 years

    PubMed Central

    AL-Qahtani, Khalid Hussain; Tunio, Mutahir A; Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Bayoumi, Yasser; Balbaid, Ali; Aljohani, Naji J; Fatani, Hanadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged above 60 years. Materials and methods Comparative analysis was performed in 252 patients aged 46–60 years (Group A) and 118 patients aged above 60 years (Group B), who had thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine-131, and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression therapy between July 2000 and December 2012. Different clinicopathological features, treatment, complications, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were compared. Results Mean age of patients in Group A was 51.9 years (range: 46–60), and mean age of those in Group B was 68.6 years (range: 62–97). Group B patients had higher positive lymph nodes (43.2%), P=0.011. The frequency of extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, and lymphovascular space invasion was seen more in Group B than in Group A. Postsurgical complications (permanent hypoparathyroidism, bleeding, and wound infections) were also seen more in Group B (P=0.043, P=0.011, and P=0.021, respectively). Group B patients experienced more locoregional recurrences (11.0%, P=0.025); similarly, more distant metastases were observed in Group B (15.3%, P=0.003). The 10-year disease-free survival rates were 87.6% in Group A and 70.8% in Group B (P<0.0001). Conclusion Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients aged above 60 years are more aggressive biologically and associated with a worse prognosis, and the morbidity is significantly high as compared to patients aged below 60 years.

  11. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    With the advent of genomics-based treatment in recent years, the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of various malignancies has increased exponentially. Though much data is available regarding the efficacy of targeted therapies for common malignancies, genetic cancer syndromes remain a somewhat unexplored topic with comparatively less published literature. This review seeks to characterize targeted therapy options for the following genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, inherited medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies. By understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as available molecularly targeted therapies, oncologists, in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counsellors, can begin to develop effective clinical management options and therapy regimens for the patients with these genetic syndromes that they may encounter in their practice. PMID:25725224

  12. A robust biomarker of differential correlations improves the diagnosis of cytologically indeterminate thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rueda, Hugo; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Gutiérrez-Hermosillo, Hugo; Trevino, Victor

    2016-05-01

    The fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules and subsequent cytological analysis is unable to determine the diagnosis in 15 to 30% of thyroid cancer cases; patients with indeterminate cytological results undergo diagnostic surgery which is potentially unnecessary. Current gene expression biomarkers based on well-determined cytology are complex and their accuracy is inconsistent across public datasets. In the present study, we identified a robust biomarker using the differences in gene expression values specifically from cytologically indeterminate thyroid tumors and a powerful multivariate search tool coupled with a nearest centroid classifier. The biomarker is based on differences in the expression of the following genes: CCND1, CLDN16, CPE, LRP1B, MAGI3, MAPK6, MATN2, MPPED2, PFKFB2, PTPRE, PYGL, SEMA3D, SERGEF, SLC4A4 and TIMP1. This 15-gene biomarker exhibited superior accuracy independently of the cytology in six datasets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) thyroid dataset. In addition, this biomarker exhibited differences in the correlation coefficients between benign and malignant samples that indicate its discriminatory power, and these 15 genes have been previously related to cancer in the literature. Thus, this 15-gene biomarker provides advantages in clinical practice for the effective diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

  13. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  14. Papillary Thyroid Cancer in a Child with Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Suresh; DeNardo, Bradley; Stachurski, Dariusz; Greene Welch, Jennifer; Groblewski, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the presentation and management of a child with Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers (PTGC), an uncommon condition characterized by significant persistent lymphadenopathy, who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma and to explore and review potential links between PTGC and neoplastic processes in the head and neck. Methods. Case presentation and literature review are used. Results. A 10-year-old female presented with a right parotid mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Multiple biopsies revealed PTGC without malignancy. Two years later, she developed fatigue and weight gain, and a thyroid nodule was found. Fine needle aspiration was strongly suggestive of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and central neck dissection without surgical management of the longstanding right lateral neck lymphadenopathy. Final pathology confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was treated with radioactive iodine therapy postoperatively and remains free of disease at three years of follow-up. Conclusions. PTGC is considered a benign condition but has previously been associated with Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma (NLPHL). This is the first reported case of papillary thyroid cancer in a child with preexisting cervical PTGC and no defined risk factors for thyroid malignancy. No link has been established with thyroid carcinoma, but patients with PTGC may have a defect in immune surveillance that predisposes them to malignancy. PMID:27069706

  15. Evolutionary features of thyroid cancer in patients with thyroidectomies from 2008 to 2013 in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Lijun; Wang, Zhixiao; Cui, Dai; Chen, Huanhuan; Duan, Yu; Shen, Meiping; Lu, Hui; Zhang, Zhihong; Chen, Jiawei; Alexander, Erik K.; Yang, Tao; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of thyroid carcinoma over time, we carried out a retrospective study to illustrate the evolutionary features of thyroid carcinoma. All records of thyroidectomies from the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from 2008 to 2013 were obtained focusing on pathological diagnosis, size, local lymph node metastasis (LNM) of the tumors. The thyroid cancer detection rate increased from 24.6% to 41.5% significantly (P < 0.05). Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remained to be the most common type counting 86.4% of all thyroid carcinomas. In all 1,704 PTCs, microPTC (mPTC) with maximum diameter less than or equal to 10 mm has become the dominant form taking up 56.5% of all PTCs in 2013 while only 43.1% in 2008. The mean maximum tumor size has decreased from 17.8 mm to 12.2 mm significantly (P < 0.05). However, the average age, female dominance, and local LNM remained similarly in the past six years. Logistic regression test showed that the determinants for local LNM were age, gender and tumor size. mPTC has become the most common form of thyroid carcinoma detected during thyroidectomies in China while other features of thyroid carcinoma remained similarly in the recent years. PMID:27328631

  16. Thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  17. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Living near nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Bang, Yejin; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-02-01

    There has been public concern regarding the safety of residing near nuclear power plants, and the extent of risk for thyroid cancer among adults living near nuclear power plants has not been fully explored. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was conducted to investigate the association between living near nuclear power plants and the risk of thyroid cancer. A comprehensive literature search was performed on studies published up to March 2015 on the association between nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk. The summary standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect model of meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were performed by study quality. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis, covering 36 nuclear power stations in 10 countries. Overall, summary estimates showed no significant increased thyroid cancer incidence or mortality among residents living near nuclear power plants (summary SIR=0.98; 95% CI 0.87-1.11, summary SMR=0.80; 95% CI 0.62-1.04). The pooled estimates did not reveal different patterns of risk by gender, exposure definition, or reference population. However, sensitivity analysis by exposure definition showed that living less than 20 km from nuclear power plants was associated with a significant increase in the risk of thyroid cancer in well-designed studies (summary OR=1.75; 95% CI 1.17-2.64). Our study does not support an association between living near nuclear power plants and risk of thyroid cancer but does support a need for well-designed future studies. PMID:26638017

  19. Living near nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Bang, Yejin; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-02-01

    There has been public concern regarding the safety of residing near nuclear power plants, and the extent of risk for thyroid cancer among adults living near nuclear power plants has not been fully explored. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was conducted to investigate the association between living near nuclear power plants and the risk of thyroid cancer. A comprehensive literature search was performed on studies published up to March 2015 on the association between nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk. The summary standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect model of meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were performed by study quality. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis, covering 36 nuclear power stations in 10 countries. Overall, summary estimates showed no significant increased thyroid cancer incidence or mortality among residents living near nuclear power plants (summary SIR=0.98; 95% CI 0.87-1.11, summary SMR=0.80; 95% CI 0.62-1.04). The pooled estimates did not reveal different patterns of risk by gender, exposure definition, or reference population. However, sensitivity analysis by exposure definition showed that living less than 20 km from nuclear power plants was associated with a significant increase in the risk of thyroid cancer in well-designed studies (summary OR=1.75; 95% CI 1.17-2.64). Our study does not support an association between living near nuclear power plants and risk of thyroid cancer but does support a need for well-designed future studies.

  20. [Causes of local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Hôhn, József; Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Simonka, Zsolt; Géczi, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Maráz, Anikó; Kahán, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Adám

    2003-01-01

    The rate of local recurrence (LR) has been 20-40% after resective surgery for rectal cancer by the traditional - Miles or Dixon - operative technics. The authors performed curative resection in 358 patients with rectal cancer in a 10 year period (01.01.1990 - 31.12.2000) in the Surgical Department of Szeged University. Since 01.01.1996 the authors changed this type of surgery for the Heald technics (total mesorectal excision - TME - with sharp dissection, using the UltraCision device) for the surgical treatment of middle or lower third rectal cancer. To compare the results of the two procedures, the authors analysed their material in two periods: Period I: 01.01.1991 - 31.12.1992: 62 patients operated on with the traditional operative technics; LR 15% within 2 years after surgery. Period II: 01.01.1997 - 31.12.1998: 78 patients operated on with the Heald technics (TME with sharp dissection); LR 6.4% within 2 years after surgery. Based on their results, the authors found that the modern operative technics by Heald, used in the second period of the study, was a relevant factor decreasing LR from 15% to 6.4%, while the gender, age of the patients, ratio of the abdominoperineal extirpation versus anterior resection (APRE/AR) and the free margin of more than 3 cm proved to be irrelevant.

  1. Advanced radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer: the sodium iodide symporter and other emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, Christine; Bible, Keith C; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Morris, John C

    2014-10-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with advanced, metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer have radioiodine-refractory disease, based on decreased expression of the sodium iodide symporter SLC5A5 (NIS), diminished membrane targeting of NIS, or both. Patients with radioiodine-refractory disease, therefore, are not amenable to (131)I therapy, which is the initial systemic treatment of choice for non-refractory metastatic thyroid cancer. Patients with radioiodine-refractory cancer have historically had poor outcomes, partly because these cancers often respond poorly to cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in delineating the molecular pathogenesis of radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer. As a result of the identification of key genetic and epigenetic alterations and dysregulated signalling pathways, multiple biologically targeted drugs, in particular tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, have been evaluated in clinical trials with promising results and have begun to meaningfully impact clinical practice. In this Review, we summarise the current knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and discuss findings from clinical trials of targeted drugs in patients with radioiodine-refractory disease. Additionally, we focus on the molecular basis of loss of NIS expression, function, or both in refractory disease, and discuss preclinical and clinical data on restoration of radioiodine uptake. PMID:24898835

  2. The Diffuse Sclerosing Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer Presenting as Innumerable Diffuse Microcalcifications in Underlying Adolescent Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Kwak, Jeong Ja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common diffuse thyroid disease and is characterized by diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. However, the ultrasonographic findings of papillary thyroid carcinomas that arise from Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the pediatric and adolescent population are not well known. We report a rare ultrasonographic finding in a 22-year-old woman diagnosed with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma that arose from underlying Hashimoto's thyroiditis: innumerable diffuse microcalcifications instead of a typical malignant-appearing nodule. PMID:27015194

  3. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. [Experimental analysis of postoperative early recurrence of liver cancer].

    PubMed

    Namieno, T

    1989-09-01

    The author suspected that the high incidence of early recurrence after macroscopically curative operation in human liver cancers correlated with the production of liver regeneration factor which was induced following partial hepatectomy (PH). The author therefore analyzed whether PH enhanced the growth of liver cancers or not, and the relevant mechanism involved, using rats subcutaneously injected with hepatocellular carcinoma (KDH-8, AH-66) cells. Primarily, it proved that PH significantly enhanced the growth of liver cancers injected in rats. The effect of this enhancement of liver cancer growth appeared as an abrupt increase in tumor volume within 24 hours following PH, which fact was supported by the mitotic indices of the hepatocellular carcinoma (KDH-8) cells. However PH did not affect rats injected with mammary carcinoma (SST-2) cells without estrogen receptor (E2R) or fibrosarcoma (KMT-75) cells. Secondly, based on this result, the author tried to analyze the mechanism of enhanced growth of liver cancers following PH, from the standpoints of; changes in postoperative immunity, expression of cytosol E2R in liver cancer cells or liver regeneration factor, using KDH-8 cells. The changes in postoperative immunity (NK-activity and Blastogenesis) did not correlate with the changes in liver cancer growth. Although serum estradiol (E2) increased significantly after PH, E2R was not detected in the KDH-8 cells used in this experiment. Serum was obtained from healthy rats 24 hours after PH, and 20 mg of serum, as calculated from total protein, was eluted into 50 fractions by high liquid chromatography (column; TSK G3000 SW). When the author examined which fractions stimulated both the growth of primarily cultivated hepatocytes and KDH-8 cells, only the fraction Fr. 30, the molecular weight of which was about 100 Kd, enhanced both. Furthermore, the author performed an in vivo assay to determine the number of days needed for tumor appearance: PHs were carried out 2

  5. Geospatial and Temporal Analysis of Thyroid Cancer Incidence in a Rural Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, John P.; Jackson, Erin; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Sprague, Brian L.; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has resulted in the rate tripling over the past 30 years. Reasons for this increase have not been established. Geostatistics and geographic information system (GIS) tools have emerged as powerful geospatial technologies to identify disease clusters, map patterns and trends, and assess the impact of ecological and socioeconomic factors (SES) on the spatial distribution of diseases. In this study, these tools were used to analyze thyroid cancer incidence in a rural population. Methods: Thyroid cancer incidence and socio-demographic factors in Vermont (VT), United States, between 1994 and 2007 were analyzed by logistic regression and geospatial and temporal analyses. Results: The thyroid cancer age-adjusted incidence in Vermont (8.0 per 100,000) was comparable to the national level (8.4 per 100,000), as were the ratio of the incidence of females to males (3.1:1) and the mortality rate (0.5 per 100,000). However, the estimated annual percentage change was higher (8.3 VT; 5.7 U.S.). Incidence among females peaked at 30–59 years of age, reflecting a significant rise from 1994 to 2007, while incidence trends for males did not vary significantly by age. For both females and males, the distribution of tumors by size did not vary over time; ≤1.0 cm, 1.1–2.0 cm, and >2.0 cm represented 38%, 22%, and 40%, respectively. In females, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) accounted for 89% of cases, follicular (FTC) 8%, medullary (MTC) 2%, and anaplastic (ATC) 0.6%, while in males PTC accounted for 77% of cases, FTC 15%, MTC 1%, and ATC 3%. Geospatial analysis revealed locations and spatial patterns that, when combined with multivariate incidence analyses, indicated that factors other than increased surveillance and access to healthcare (physician density or insurance) contributed to the increased thyroid cancer incidence. Nine thyroid cancer incidence hot spots, areas with very high normalized incidence, were identified

  6. Pharmacotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koji; Onda, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-05-01

    Several 'lines of therapy' that utilize cytotoxic agents and are driven by platinum-free intervals are the current standard of care for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. For patients with platinum-resistant disease, single agent chemotherapy (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, topotecan, gemcitabine or weekly paclitaxel) is the standard of care. For patients with platinum-sensitive disease, combination chemotherapy (carboplatin plus paclitaxel, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or gemcitabine) is the standard of care. In addition, antiangiogenic therapy using bevacizumab is an established option. Future directions could include 'lines of therapy' with biologic agents driven by specific biologic targets. Data from antiangiogenic agents (trebananib, pazopanib and cediranib), antifolate drugs (farletuzumab and vintafolide), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (olaparib and veliparib), mTOR inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and immune editing agents (nivolumab) have been summarized in this review.

  7. Alpha lipoic acid inhibits proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition of thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Lim, Seonhee; Choi, Hyun-Jeung; Sim, Soyoung; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring short-chain fatty acid, α-lipoic acid (ALA) is a powerful antioxidant which is clinically used for treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recent studies suggested the possibility of ALA as a potential anti-cancer agent, because it could activate adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we evaluate the effects of ALA on thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We performed in vitro cell proliferation analysis using BCPAP, HTH-83, CAL-62 and FTC-133 cells. ALA suppressed thyroid cancer cell proliferation through activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-S6 signaling pathway. Low-dose ALA, which had minimal effects on cell proliferation, also decreased cell migration and invasion of BCPAP, CAL-62 and HTH-83 cells. ALA inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) evidently by increase of E-cadherin and decreases of activated β-catenin, vimentin, snail, and twist in these cells. ALA suppressed TGFβ production and inhibited induction of p-Smad2 and twist by TGFβ1 or TGFβ2. These findings indicate that ALA reduces cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of TGFβ production and inhibition of TGFβ signaling pathways in thyroid cancer cells. ALA also significantly suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft model using BCPAP and FTC-133 cells. This is the first study to show anti-cancer effect of ALA on thyroid cancer cells. ALA could be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of advanced thyroid cancer, possibly as an adjuvant therapy with other systemic therapeutic agents.

  8. On the cells of origin of radiogenic thyroid cancer: New studies based on an old idea

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.; Domann, F.E.; Groch, K.M.

    1990-12-31

    We have presented evidence that the functional thyroid follicles (follicular units, FU) which are formed in grafts of monodispersed rat thyroid cells, and hence the thyroid tumors which later develop in such grafts, are clonal in origin. Recent studies have been designed to investigate: whether cell number-dependent inhibition of promotion-progression is mediated by remote hormonal feed-back, local cell-cell interactions, or both; the cell population kinetics of the clonogen subpopulation during goitrogenesis and goiter involution; and the effect of prolonged exposure to high levels of TSH (thyrotropin) on the capacity of the clonogens to give rise to functional FU. The results indicate that local cell-cell interactions play an important role in the cell number-dependent suppression of neoplastic promotion-progression. They also show that if sufficient thyroid cells are grafted, the thyroid-pituitary axis can be reestablished in thyroidectomized rats fed normal diets. In such animals given iodine deficient diets, the FU that develop in the thyroid grafts shift their secretory pattern to increase the ratio of T3 (triiodothyronine) to T4 (thyroxine), and thus conserve the available iodine. Finally, the clonogenic subpopulation is conserved during both goitrogenesis and goiter involution. When they are transplanted to thyroidectomized recipients, clonogens from two types of goiters form FU that are morphologically indistinguishable from those that develop in grafts of normal thyroid clonogens. Furthermore, the secretion of T3 and T4 by such grafts is dependent on the grafted clonogen number, and hence FU formation, and not on the total number of thyroid cells transplanted. We conclude that the thyroid clonogens, the presumptive cancer progenitor cells, have many of the characteristics of stem cells.

  9. On the cells of origin of radiogenic thyroid cancer: New studies based on an old idea

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.; Domann, F.E.; Groch, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    We have presented evidence that the functional thyroid follicles (follicular units, FU) which are formed in grafts of monodispersed rat thyroid cells, and hence the thyroid tumors which later develop in such grafts, are clonal in origin. Recent studies have been designed to investigate: whether cell number-dependent inhibition of promotion-progression is mediated by remote hormonal feed-back, local cell-cell interactions, or both; the cell population kinetics of the clonogen subpopulation during goitrogenesis and goiter involution; and the effect of prolonged exposure to high levels of TSH (thyrotropin) on the capacity of the clonogens to give rise to functional FU. The results indicate that local cell-cell interactions play an important role in the cell number-dependent suppression of neoplastic promotion-progression. They also show that if sufficient thyroid cells are grafted, the thyroid-pituitary axis can be reestablished in thyroidectomized rats fed normal diets. In such animals given iodine deficient diets, the FU that develop in the thyroid grafts shift their secretory pattern to increase the ratio of T3 (triiodothyronine) to T4 (thyroxine), and thus conserve the available iodine. Finally, the clonogenic subpopulation is conserved during both goitrogenesis and goiter involution. When they are transplanted to thyroidectomized recipients, clonogens from two types of goiters form FU that are morphologically indistinguishable from those that develop in grafts of normal thyroid clonogens. Furthermore, the secretion of T3 and T4 by such grafts is dependent on the grafted clonogen number, and hence FU formation, and not on the total number of thyroid cells transplanted. We conclude that the thyroid clonogens, the presumptive cancer progenitor cells, have many of the characteristics of stem cells.

  10. Mitochondrial Dynamics Protein Drp1 Is Overexpressed in Oncocytic Thyroid Tumors and Regulates Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1 - a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line—and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells’ migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype. PMID:25822260

  11. Mitochondrial dynamics protein Drp1 is overexpressed in oncocytic thyroid tumors and regulates cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1--a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line--and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells' migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype.

  12. Autotaxin is an inflammatory mediator and therapeutic target in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Ko, Yi M; Tang, Xiaoyun; Dewald, Jay; Lopez-Campistrous, Ana; Zhao, Yuan Y; Lai, Raymond; Curtis, Jonathan M; Brindley, David N; McMullen, Todd P W

    2015-08-01

    Autotaxin is a secreted enzyme that converts extracellular lysophosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidate (LPA). In cancers, LPA increases tumour growth, metastasis and chemoresistance by activating six G-protein coupled receptors. We examined >200 human thyroid biopsies. Autotaxin expression in metastatic deposits and primary carcinomas was four- to tenfold higher than in benign neoplasms or normal thyroid tissue. Autotaxin immunohistochemical staining was also increased in benign neoplasms with leukocytic infiltrations. Malignant tumours were distinguished from benign tumours by high tumour autotaxin, LPA levels and inflammatory mediators including IL1β, IL6, IL8, GMCSF, TNFα, CCL2, CXCL10 and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA. We determined the mechanistic explanation for these results and revealed a vicious regulatory cycle in which LPA increased the secretion of 16 inflammatory modulators in papillary thyroid cancer cultures. Conversely, treating cancer cells with ten inflammatory cytokines and chemokines or PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB increased autotaxin secretion. We confirmed that this autotaxin/inflammatory cycle occurs in two SCID mouse models of papillary thyroid cancer by blocking LPA signalling using the autotaxin inhibitor ONO-8430506. This decreased the levels of 16 inflammatory mediators in the tumours and was accompanied by a 50-60% decrease in tumour volume. This resulted from a decreased mitotic index for the cancer cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis in the tumours. Our results demonstrate that the autotaxin/inflammatory cycle is a focal point for driving malignant thyroid tumour progression and possibly treatment resistance. Inhibiting autotaxin activity provides an effective and novel strategy for decreasing the inflammatory phenotype in thyroid carcinomas, which should complement other treatment modalities. PMID:26037280

  13. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Thyroid Cancer Risk in the Prostate, Colorectal, Lung, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; DellaValle, Curt T.; Purdue, Mark; Kim, Christopher; Zhang, Yawei; Sjodin, Andreas; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) alter thyroid hormone homeostasis, but their relationship with thyroid cancer is unknown. To investigate whether serum concentrations of PBDE were associated with thyroid cancer, we conducted a nested, case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter clinical trial in the United States. Cases with thyroid cancer (n = 104) were recruited from 1992 to 2001 and diagnosed through 2009, and controls (n = 208) were individually matched (2:1) to cases by race, sex, birth date (within 1 year), center, and blood collection date (within 15 days). We used gas chromatography isotope dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry to measure 10 tri- to heptabrominated diphenyl eithers in serum samples. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression for lipid-adjusted PBDE levels detected in more than 50% of controls and for the sum of these BDEs (∑PBDEs). We observed no significant differences between cases and controls in lipid-adjusted concentrations of ∑PBDEs (for cases, median = 12.8 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 6.2–42.1); for controls, median = 19.4 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 7.6–50.2)) or for individual congeners. Increasing quartiles of ∑PBDEs and 4 BDE congeners were not associated with risk of thyroid cancer (for the fourth vs. first quartile of ∑PBDEs, adjusted odd ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 1.30; P for trend = 0.56). Our study does not support an association between exposure to PBDEs and thyroid cancer. PMID:25939348

  14. Solitary thyroid metastasis from colon cancer: fine-needle aspiration cytology and molecular biology approach.

    PubMed

    Onorati, M; Uboldi, P; Bianchi, C L; Nicola, M; Corradini, G M; Veronese, S; Fascì, A I; Di Nuovo, F

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid gland is one of the most vascularized organs of the body, nevertheless clinical and surgical series report an incidence of secondary malignancies in this gland of only 3%. Colorectal carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland is not as uncommon as previously believed, infact the number of cases seems to be increased in recent years due to the more frequent use of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) guided by ultrasonography. Although kidney, breast and lung metastases to the thyroid are frequent, metastasis from colon cancer is clinically rare with 52 cases reported in the literature in the last 5 decades and three cases described as solitary thyroid metastasis from the colon cancer without any other visceral metastases. To the best of our knowledge, we report the fourth case of solitary, asymptomatic thyroid metastasis from colon cancer without involvement of other organs. We discuss the importance of FNAC to detect metastatazing process as a compulsory step of the diagnostic and therapeutic management algorithm, combined with a molecular biology approach. A review of the last 5 decades literature, to update the number of cases described to date, is also included. PMID:26946875

  15. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  16. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-21

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  17. An Occupational Study in Nurses: Prevalence of Thyroid Nodules and Cancer in Comparison to Health Check-up Female

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. It is known that a great extent of radiation is emitted from the medical instruments used in hospitals and that radiation exposure can cause thyroid cancer. However, the correlation between occupational radiation exposure in hospitals and thyroid disease is not extensively recognized. Methods. The subjects of the study were female nurses, who worked at a single hospital and female, who had undergone a health examination at the same hospital during the same period. The 1,024 nurses and 2,631 healthy women were enrolled for the present study. All the participants were screened using thyroid ultrasonography, and fine-needle aspiration & cytology was performed on potentially malignant nodules. Results. Thyroid nodules were present in 315 nurses (30.8%) and 1,023 health check-up female (38.9%). Typically, 107 nurses (10.4%) and 201 health check-up female (7.6%) had suspicious nodule and were further tested with ultrasonography guided fine-needle aspiration & cytology. The 16 nurses (1.6%) and 38 health check-up female (1.4%) were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. The prevalence of thyroid nodules was enhanced in both the groups and a significant increase was noted in health check-up female group (P<0.05); however, no difference was seen in the incidence of thyroid cancer in both the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion. In our study, working in a hospital does not increase the prevalence of thyroid nodules or thyroid cancer. PMID:27334518

  18. Anthropometric Risk Factors for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Young Men and Women From Eastern France: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Xhaard, Constance; de Vathaire, Florent; Cléro, Enora; Maillard, Stéphane; Ren, Yan; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Sassolas, Geneviève; Schvartz, Claire; Colonna, Marc; Lacour, Brigitte; Danzon, Arlette; Velten, Michel; Marrer, Emilie; Bailly, Laurent; Barjoan, Eugènia Mariné; Schlumberger, Martin; Orgiazzi, Jacques; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Rubino, Carole

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has risen over the past decade, along with a rise in obesity. We studied the role of anthropometric risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancer at the time of diagnosis and at age 20 years in a case-control study conducted in eastern France between 2005 and 2010. The study included 761 adults diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer before 35 years of age between 2002 and 2006. They were matched with 825 controls from the general population. Odds ratios were calculated using conditional logistic regression models and were reported for all participants, those with papillary cancer only, and women only. The risk of thyroid cancer was higher for participants with a high body surface area (BSA), great height, or excess weight and for women with a high body fat percentage. Conversely, no significant association was found between body mass index and the risk of thyroid cancer. In the present study, we provide further evidence of the role of BSA and excess weight in the risk of thyroid cancer. These epidemiologic observations should be confirmed by further exploration of the biological mechanisms responsible for the associations of obesity and BSA with thyroid cancer. PMID:26133374

  19. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nancy L.; Lin, Chi-Iou; Du, Jinyan; Whang, Edward E.; Ito, Hiromichi; Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation

  1. Contribution of problem-solving skills to fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Akechi, Tatuo; Momino, Kanae; Yamashita, Toshinari; Fujita, Takashi; Hayashi, Hironori; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Hiroji

    2014-05-01

    Although fear of recurrence is a major concern among breast cancer survivors after surgery, no standard strategies exist that alleviate their distress. This study examined the association of patients' problem