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Sample records for recurrent thyroid cancer

  1. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  3. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyung; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Kyu Sun; Baek, Seon Mi; Lee, Younghen; Chong, Semin; Sim, Jung Suk; Huh, Jung Yin; Bae, Jae-Ik; Kim, Kyung Tae; Han, Song Yee; Bae, Min Young; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-01-01

    Thermal ablation using radiofrequency is a new, minimally invasive modality employed as an alternative to surgery in patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the optimal use of radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies, and expert consensus. PMID:22438678

  5. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  6. Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer after optimized surgery.

    PubMed

    Grant, Clive S

    2015-02-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after optimized surgery requires a full understanding of the disease, especially as it has changed in the last 15 years, what comprises optimized surgery, and the different types and implications of disease relapse that can be encountered. PTC has evolved to tumors that are much smaller than previously seen, largely due to various high quality imaging studies obtained for different reasons, but serendipitously identifying thyroid nodules that prove to be papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC). With rare exception, these cancers are cured by conservative surgery without additional therapy, and seldom result in recurrent disease. PTC is highly curable in 85% of cases because of its rather innocent biologic behavior. Therefore, the shift in emphasis from disease survival to recurrence is appropriate. As a result of three technologic advances-high-resolution ultrasound (US), recombinant TSH, and highly sensitive thyroglobulin (Tg)-disease relapse can be discovered when it is subclinical. Endocrinologists who largely control administration of radioactive iodine have used it to ablate barely detectable or even biochemically apparent disease, hoping to reduce recurrence and perhaps improve survival. Surgeons, in response to this new intense postoperative surveillance that has uncovered very small volume disease, have responded by utilizing US preoperatively to image this disease, and incorporated varying degrees of lymphadenectomy into their initial treatment algorithm. Bilateral thyroid resection-either total or near-total thyroidectomy-remains the standard for PTC >1 cm, although recent data has re-emphasized the value of unilateral lobectomy in treating even some PTC measuring 1-4 cm. Therapeutic lymphadenectomy has universal approval, but when lymph nodes in the central neck are not worrisome to the surgeon's intraoperative assessment, although that judgment in incorrect up to 50%, whether they should be excised has

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  8. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  9. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  10. Castleman disease mimicking nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lee, Chun-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old woman who had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine treatment for papillary thyroid cancer presented with elevated stimulated thyroglobulin levels and negative I-131 scan. Ultrasonography revealed suspicious lateral neck lymph nodes, which were FDG-avid. Neck dissection led to a diagnosis of Castleman disease.

  11. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  12. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in treatment of recurrent nodular goiter and thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Demidov, A. K.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy was performed in 29 patients with recurrent nodular and multinodular goiter, and in 3 patients with recurrent inoperable thyroid cancer. There were used transcutaneous puncture under ultrasonic control, diode lasers with wavelength 805, 980, and 1060 nm, quartz monofibers, special computerized thermometer with microthermocouples. Disappearance or significant reduction of nodes in the most goiter cases, and regress of tumor in the cancer cases were marked during observation period (0.5 - 2.5 years).

  13. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  14. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  15. Clinicopathologic predictors of thyroid bed recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer using ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Laura J; Sciallis, Andrew P; Reynolds, Jordan; Jenkins, Sarah; Smith, Carin; Stan, Marius N; Nassar, Aziza

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring changes in the thyroid bed (TB) is one of the clinical mainstays for surveillance of recurrent thyroid carcinoma. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a diagnostic tool that is commonly used to aid in the identification of residual or recurrent disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided FNA of the TB in detecting recurrent thyroid cancer and to correlate the findings with clinicopathologic parameters to identify predictors of TB recurrence. We retrieved cases of soft tissue masses within the TB that were evaluated for recurrence between January 1, 2006, and February 1, 2011. All ultrasound-guided FNA biopsies clinically suspected to indicate a lymph node metastasis and specimens with lymphocytes were excluded from the data. Of the 291 patients identified for evaluation of recurrence, 250 had papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 10 had follicular carcinoma, 22 had medullary carcinoma, 7 had Hürthle cell carcinoma, and 2 had a previous thyroidectomy for an unknown type of thyroid carcinoma. For all FNAs that were clinically suspicious or intermediate for recurrence, the rate of positivity was 71.8% (209 patients). All cases diagnosed as "positive for PTC" or "suspicious for PTC" on TB FNA were found to have soft tissue metastasis on follow-up surgical resection. This resulted in a negative predictive value of 88.4% and a positive predictive value of 100%. The average time between thyroidectomy and TB FNA was 73.5 months. Of the patients with a previous diagnosis of PTC, those with suspicious/positive cytology were more likely to be women, to be older at thyroidectomy, to have documented metastasis to other sites as well as extrathyroidal extension and multifocal primary disease as compared with nondiagnostic/negative cytology cases. Patient age ≥45 years, primary tumor size at thyroidectomy, and surgical resection margin status had no statistical significance for predicting risk of TB recurrence. TB recurrence of PTC is

  16. Recurrence-associated genes in papillary thyroid cancer: An analysis of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ming-Nan; Yang, Po-Sheng; Lee, Jie-Jen; Wang, Tao-Yeuan; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2017-06-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer is not uncommon, but incorporating clinicopathologic parameters to predict recurrence is suboptimal. The aim of this study was to identify systemically recurrence-associated genes using The Cancer Genome Atlas RNA sequencing database. A total of 504 patients with transcriptome sequencing data of the primary neoplasm were included in this study. High and low levels of expression of each gene were defined by median splits. Differences in recurrence-free survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Recurrence-associated genes were subjected to functional enrichment analyses with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotation databases and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We found that 1,807 genes were associated with recurrence-free survival. There were 676 genes of which high expression was associated with a greater risk of recurrence. These genes were enriched in pathways involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. Among 1,131 genes of which low expression was associated with recurrence, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-annotated functions were metabolism, calcium signaling, glycan biosynthesis, and the Notch signaling pathway. Canonical pathways identified by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis included RXR function, nitric oxide signaling, interleukin-8 signaling, and nutrient sensing. In addition, low expression of the majority of thyroid differentiation genes was associated with a significantly less recurrence-free survival. Upregulation of cell cycle-regulating and DNA repair genes appears to have a negative impact on recurrence-free survival in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. Furthermore, recurrence is associated with thyroid dedifferentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation exposure does not significantly contribute to the risk of recurrence of Chernobyl thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Pavel O; Saenko, Vladimir A; Ilyin, Alexey A; Stepanenko, Valery F; Rumyantseva, Ulyana V; Abrosimov, Aleksandr Yu; Lushnikov, Evgeny F; Rogounovitch, Tatiana I; Shibata, Yoshisada; Mitsutake, Norisato; Tsyb, Anatoly F; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-02-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in patients exposed to environmental radioiodine after the Chernobyl accident is thought to have a relatively aggressive clinical course. Long-term results of treatment are not well known, especially in comparison with sporadic PTC. The determination of risk factors for PTC recurrence in a controlled for baseline factors group of patients with radiation-related and sporadic PTC. Retrospective cohort study involving patients treated for PTC and followed-up in 1991-2008. Risk factors were assessed by stratified analysis using the proportional hazard model. Referral center-based. A total of 497 patients were enrolled. Patients exposed to radioiodine were 172 individuals with reconstructed individual radiation thyroid doses ranging 51-3170 mGy. Patients with sporadic PTC included 325 individuals matched to exposed patients for sex, age ± 5 yr and time to treatment ± 2 yr. Cancer recurrence. Nodal disease increased the recurrence rate (HR = 5.21; 95% CI = 1.63-16.7) while the presence of tumor capsule (HR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.06-0.45) and, particularly, treatment according to the Revised American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer significantly reduced it (HR = 0.16; 95% CI = 0.06-0.42). None of the tested variables interacted with radiation factor. PTC developing after internal exposure to radioiodine does not display specific risk factors for recurrence different from those in sporadic PTC. Common treatment approaches for patients with PTC should be recommended regardless of a history of radiation exposure.

  18. Long-term outcomes of ethanol injection therapy for locally recurrent papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Seok-Mo; Chang, Hojin; Kim, Bup-Woo; Lim, Chi Young; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2017-06-29

    The standard treatment regimen for locally recurrent lesions is total thyroidectomy, or complete removal of the recurrent thyroid lesion within the thyroid bed. However, reoperation increases the risk of complications and patients have to undergo general anesthesia. Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy represents a far less invasive procedure without general anesthesia and with lower risk of complications. Thirty-four patients who received PEIT at Yonsei University Medical Center between October 2002 and August 2009 for recurrent cervical nodal metastases of differentiated papillary thyroid cancer were included in this retrospective study. During a minimum follow-up of 60 months, treatment outcomes were determined by measuring the lesion size prior to the first injection and 3 months after the last injection. A total of 46 recurrent lesions were detected in 34 patients. Five patients underwent surgery and PEIT was administered to the remaining 19 and 22 lesions in the central compartment and lateral neck lymph nodes, respectively. Size increases were observed in seven (17.1%) lesions, whereas no changes in size and decreases were detected in 10 (24.4%) and 24 (58.5%) lesions. Patients with increased lymph nodes were significantly older (65.3 ± 14.4 vs. 48.2 ± 16.3 years; p = 0.02) and had smaller sizes (9.3 ± 1.0 vs. 12.3 ± 6.4 mm; p = 0.012). Although reoperation remains the first-line treatment for recurrent thyroid cancer, PEIT may be considered as a treatment option in selected patients with lesions larger than 1 cm who are ineligible for surgery or have refused reoperation.

  19. Central compartment reoperation for recurrent/persistent differentiated thyroid cancer: patterns of recurrence, morbidity, and prediction of postoperative hypocalcemia.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Chan Il

    2011-05-01

    Incidence rates of hypoparathyroidism and vocal cord paralysis are high following central compartment reoperation, but few prospective studies have assessed morbidities and factors predictive of hypocalcemia after reoperation. We investigated recurrence patterns, morbidity, and factors predictive of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients undergoing central compartment reoperation for recurrent/persistent differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). We prospectively evaluated 45 consecutive patients with recurrent/persistent DTC. Thyroid remnants or recurrent cancers were removed in 16 patients, the unilateral or bilateral central compartment was cleared in all patients, and the lateral compartment on the diseased side was comprehensively removed from 24 patients. Recurrence patterns were assessed histopathologically, morbidities were monitored, and serum concentrations of calcium and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured in all patients. Eleven patients (24.4%) had tumor invasion into the recurrent laryngeal nerve and/or the tracheoesophagus. Central nodal involvement occurred frequently (86.7%), and the ipsilateral jugular nodes of the lateral compartment were frequently involved. Temporary and permanent vocal cord paralysis developed in 10 (22.2%) and 8 (17.8%) patients, respectively, due primarily to intentional nerve resection following tumor invasion. Of 41 patients without preoperative hypoparathyroidism, 21 (46.3%) had temporary and 2 (4.9%) had permanent hypocalcemia. Multivariate analysis showed that bilateral central compartment dissection and low iPTH levels (<12.0 pg/ml) were independent predictors of postoperative hypocalcemia. Most patients with recurrent/persistent DTC harbor lesions in the central compartment. Central compartment reoperation may lead to high rates of morbidity, including hypoparathyroidism, which can be predicted by surgical extent and low serum iPTH levels.

  20. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  1. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  2. TERT Promoter Mutations and Tumor Persistence/Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Myung, Jae Kyung; Kwak, Byung Kuk; Lim, Jung Ah; Lee, Myung-Chul; Kim, Min Joo

    2016-07-01

    A telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation was identified in thyroid cancer. This TERT promoter mutation is thought to be a prognostic molecular marker, because its association with tumor aggressiveness, persistence/recurrence, and disease-specific mortality in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has been reported. In this study, we attempted to determine whether the impact of the TERT promoter mutation on PTC persistence/recurrence is independent of clinicopathological parameters. Using propensity score matching, 39 patients with PTC persistence or recurrence were matched with 35 patients without persistence or recurrence, with a similar age, sex, tumor size, multifocality, bilaterality, extrathyroidal extension, and lymph node metastasis. The TERT promoter and the BRAF V600E mutations were identified from PTC samples. The TERT promoter mutation was detected in 18% of PTC patients (13/74). No significant difference in the frequency of the TERT promoter mutation was observed between the persistence/recurrence group and the non-recurrence group. These results suggest that the prognostic implications of the TERT promoter mutation are dependent on clinicopathological parameters.

  3. Preoperative localization of neck recurrences from thyroid cancer: charcoal tattooing under ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Chami, Linda; Hartl, Dana; Leboulleux, Sophie; Baudin, Eric; Lumbroso, Jean; Schlumberger, Martin; Travagli, Jean Paul

    2015-03-01

    Reoperation for thyroid cancer recurrence is a surgical challenge in previously dissected necks, and there is a need for a reliable procedure for surgeon guidance. In this study, the usefulness of preoperative charcoal tattooing for surgical guidance was evaluated. From July 2007 to May 2010, 53 patients (40 females; Mage=44 years, range 19-76 years) were prospectively included for preoperative localization of neck recurrences from differentiated (n=46) or medullary thyroid cancer (n=7). Preoperative cytological assessment was performed for at least one lesion in each patient. Ultrasound (US) imaging was performed with high-frequency probes (8-14 Mhz). Micronized peat charcoal (0.5-3 mL) was injected under US guidance using a 25 gauge needle, 0-15 days preoperatively. A total of 106 lesions were selected for charcoal tattooing. Of these, 101 had been tattooed, and 102 were removed (85 metastases, 17 benign on pathology). The tolerance of charcoal injection was good in all but three patients. A mean volume of 1 mL of charcoal was injected with a mean of two targets per patient. Charcoal labeling facilitated intraoperative detection in 56 "difficult" lesions (i.e., small size, dense fibrosis, anatomical pitfalls), and charcoal trace facilitated intraoperative guidance in 17 lesions. Feasibility and usefulness rates were 83% and 70.7% respectively. These findings suggest that charcoal tattooing under US guidance is an easy to implement, safe, and useful procedure for surgeon guidance in neck reoperation for thyroid cancer.

  4. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  5. Charcoal tattoo localization for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence in the central compartment of the neck.

    PubMed

    Soprani, F; Bondi, F; Puccetti, M; Armaroli, V

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer can often require further surgical options. Reoperations may carry significant risk of surgical complications; additionally, as the anatomy is subverted, there is the possibility of leaving residual neoplasm. In order to avoid such problems during reoperation for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence, we have introduced the technique of preoperative ultrasound-guided tattooing localization of the lymphatic structure to be removed with a 4% solution of active charcoal. Using ultrasound guidance, the lesion is identified and 0.5-2 ml of colloidal charcoal is injected near the lesion. The extraction of the needle is accompanied by injection at constant pressure of other charcoal as to leave a trace of colouring along the path of the needle up to the skin. The preoperative injection was well tolerated in all cases. In the last 5 years, we have used this technique in 13 patients with suspected recurrence in the central compartment (all from papillary carcinomas). Postoperative ultrasound and histological examination confirmed the removal of the lesion in all patients; in one case, the lesion was a parathyroid cyst. Complications were observed in two of 13 (15.4%) cases (one transitory hypoparathyroidism, and one transitory vocal cord paresis). Considering our experience, charcoal tattoo localization can be considered a safe, low-cost technique that is extremely useful for facilitating surgical procedures, and reduces the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  6. Outcomes of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer risk-stratified according to the American thyroid association and Latin American thyroid society risk of recurrence classification systems.

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Bueno, Fernanda; Urciuoli, Carolina; Abelleira, Erika; Cross, Graciela; Tuttle, R Michael

    2013-11-01

    The aims of this study were to validate the proposed Latin American Thyroid Society (LATS) risk of recurrence stratification system and to compare the findings with those of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) risk of recurrence stratification system. This study is a retrospective review of papillary thyroid cancer patients treated with total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine at a single experienced thyroid cancer center and followed according to the LATS management guidelines. Each patient was risk-stratified using both the LATS and ATA staging systems. The primary endpoints were (i) the best response to initial therapy defined as either remission (stimulated thyroglobulin [Tg] <1 ng/mL, negative ultrasonography) or persistent disease (biochemical and/or structural), and (ii) clinical status at final follow-up defined as no evidence of disease (suppressed Tg <1 ng/mL, negative ultrasonography), biochemical persistent disease (suppressed Tg >1 ng/mL in the absence of structural disease), structural persistent disease (locoregional or distant metastases), or recurrence (biochemical or structural disease identified after a period of no evidence of disease). One hundred seventy-one papillary thyroid cancer patients were included (mean age 45 ± 16 years, followed for a median of 4 years after initial treatment). Both the ATA and LATS risk stratification systems provided clinically meaningful graded estimates with regard to (i) the likelihood of achieving remission in response to initial therapy, (ii) the likelihood of having persistent structural disease in response to initial therapy and at final follow-up, (iii) the likely locations of the persistent structural disease (locoregional vs. distant metastases), (iv) the likelihood of recurrence, and (v) the likelihood of being no evidence of disease at final follow-up. The likelihood of having persistent biochemical evidence of disease was not significantly different across the staging categories. Both the

  7. MiR-9 and miR-21 as prognostic biomarkers for recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sondermann, Adriana; Andreghetto, Flavia Maziero; Moulatlet, Ana Carolina Bernardini; da Silva Victor, Elivane; de Castro, Marilia Germanos; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; Severino, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Despite low mortality rates, nodal recurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma occurs in up to 20 % of patients. Emerging evidences indicate that dysregulated microRNAs are implicated in the process of metastasis. In the present study, we investigated whether miR-9, miR-10b, miR-21 and miR-146b levels are predictive of papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence. Using macro-dissection followed by quantitative real-time PCR, we measured miR-9, miR-10b, miR-21 and miR-146b expression levels in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 66 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma categorized into two groups: the recurrent group (n = 19) and the non-recurrent group (n = 47). All patients underwent total thyroidectomy and were followed for at least 120 months after surgery to be considered recurrence-free. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model in order to identify associations between multiple clinical variables and microRNA expression levels and papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence. MiR-9 and miR-21 expression levels were found to be significant prognostic factors for recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (HR = 1.48; 95 % CI 1.24-1.77, p < 0.001; and HR = 1.52; 95 % CI 1.18-1.94, p = 0.001; respectively). Multivariate analysis involving the expression level of miR-9 and miR-21 and various clinical parameters identified the expression of these microRNAs as independent prognostic factors for papillary thyroid cancer patients. In conclusion, our results support the potential clinical value of miR-9 and miR-21 as prognostic biomarkers for recurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  8. Pattern of neck recurrence after lateral neck dissection for cervical metastases in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, William F.; Wang, Laura Y.; Palmer, Frank L.; Nixon, Iain J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the rate and pattern of nodal recurrence in patients who underwent a therapeutic, lateral neck dissection (LND) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with clinically evident cervical metastases and to determine if there was any correlation between the extent of initial dissection and the rate and pattern of neck recurrence. Methods A total of 3,664 patients with PTC treated between 1986 and 2010 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were identified from our institutional database. Tumor factors, patient demographics, extent of initial LND, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Patterns of recurrent lateral neck metastases by level involvement were recorded and outcomes calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A total of 484 patients had an LND for cervical metastases; 364 (75%) had a comprehensive LND (CLND) and 120 (25%) had a selective neck dissection (SND). The median duration of follow-up was 63.5 months. As expected, patients with CLND had a greater number of nodes removed as well as a greater number of positive nodes (P < .001). There was no difference in overall lateral neck recurrence-free status (CLND 94.4% vs SND 89.4%, P = .158), but in the dissected neck, the ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence-free status was superior in the CLND patients (97.7% vs 89.4%, P < .001). Conclusion Patients with clinically evident neck metastases from PTC managed by CLND have lesser rates of recurrence in the dissected neck compared with patients managed by SND. SND should only be done in highly selected cases with small volume disease. PMID:26994486

  9. Pattern of neck recurrence after lateral neck dissection for cervical metastases in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    McNamara, William F; Wang, Laura Y; Palmer, Frank L; Nixon, Iain J; Shah, Jatin P; Patel, Snehal G; Ganly, Ian

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the rate and pattern of nodal recurrence in patients who underwent a therapeutic, lateral neck dissection (LND) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with clinically evident cervical metastases and to determine if there was any correlation between the extent of initial dissection and the rate and pattern of neck recurrence. A total of 3,664 patients with PTC treated between 1986 and 2010 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were identified from our institutional database. Tumor factors, patient demographics, extent of initial LND, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Patterns of recurrent lateral neck metastases by level involvement were recorded and outcomes calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 484 patients had an LND for cervical metastases; 364 (75%) had a comprehensive LND (CLND) and 120 (25%) had a selective neck dissection (SND). The median duration of follow-up was 63.5 months. As expected, patients with CLND had a greater number of nodes removed as well as a greater number of positive nodes (P < .001). There was no difference in overall lateral neck recurrence-free status (CLND 94.4% vs SND 89.4%, P = .158), but in the dissected neck, the ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence-free status was superior in the CLND patients (97.7% vs 89.4%, P < .001). Patients with clinically evident neck metastases from PTC managed by CLND have lesser rates of recurrence in the dissected neck compared with patients managed by SND. SND should only be done in highly selected cases with small volume disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pembrolizumab and Lenvatinib in Treating Metastatic or Recurrent Differentiated Thyroid Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Columnar Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Follicular Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  11. Serial Thyroglobulin Variation Trend Shortly after Radioiodine Therapy in Poorly to Moderately Differentiated Recurrent Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To dynamically observe the early change of thyroglobulin(Tg) levels after (131)I therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer(DTC) patients. Methods The study enrolled 22 post-total-thyroidectomy DTC patients and they were stratified as low to intermediate recurrence according to the 2009 American Thyroid Association Guidelines. The clinical data including pre-ablation stimulated Tg (ps-Tg),corresponding thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH),anti-thyroglobulin (TgAb) values,and the afterwards parameters were dynamically measured each week in the first month after (131)I therapy. Values collected at the first time were defined as Tg 0 and TSH0,while Tg1 and TSH1 were collected at the first week after (131)I therapy respectively. Then the variation trend curves of Tg were drawn,and factors influencing the variation of Tg were analyzed. Two groups were divided according to Tg levels:G1 (Tg≤0.1 ng/ml,n=9) and G2(Tg>0.1 ng/ml,n=13). Results The rates of negative Tg were 4.5%,18.0%,27.0%,36.0%,and 41.0%,respectively,exactly before (131)I therapy and the 1(st),2(nd),3(rd),and 4(th) week after the therapy. One-way analysis of variance showed that the two groups statistically differed in age (F=3.182,P=0.04) and remnant thyroid (U=4.849,P=0.026). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that early negative Tg was related to remnant thyroid tissue (OR:2.132;95%Cl:1.418-6.532,P=0.009).Conclusions Negative Tg can be achieved in nearly half of DTC patients by the end of first month after (131)I therapy. The negative conversion is closely related with the volume of remnant thyroid tissue.

  12. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research.

  13. Association Between BRAF V600E Mutation and Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao; Alzahrani, Ali S.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Tae Yong; Viola, David; Elisei, Rossella; Bendlová, Bela; Yip, Linwah; Mian, Caterina; Vianello, Federica; Tuttle, R. Michael; Robenshtok, Eyal; Fagin, James A.; Puxeddu, Efisio; Fugazzola, Laura; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Jarzab, Barbara; O'Neill, Christine J.; Sywak, Mark S.; Lam, Alfred K.; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Santisteban, Pilar; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Tallini, Giovanni; Holt, Elizabeth H.; Sýkorová, Vlasta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of BRAF V600E mutation for the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Patients and Methods This was a retrospective multicenter study of the relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and recurrence of PTC in 2,099 patients (1,615 women and 484 men), with a median age of 45 years (interquartile range [IQR], 34 to 58 years) and a median follow-up time of 36 months (IQR, 14 to 75 months). Results The overall BRAF V600E mutation prevalence was 48.5% (1,017 of 2,099). PTC recurrence occurred in 20.9% (213 of 1,017) of BRAF V600E mutation–positive and 11.6% (125 of 1,082) of BRAF V600E mutation–negative patients. Recurrence rates were 47.71 (95% CI, 41.72 to 54.57) versus 26.03 (95% CI, 21.85 to 31.02) per 1,000 person-years in BRAF mutation–positive versus –negative patients (P < .001), with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.82 (95% CI, 1.46 to 2.28), which remained significant in a multivariable model adjusting for patient sex and age at diagnosis, medical center, and various conventional pathologic factors. Significant association between BRAF mutation and PTC recurrence was also found in patients with conventionally low-risk disease stage I or II and micro-PTC and within various subtypes of PTC. For example, in BRAF mutation–positive versus –negative follicular-variant PTC, recurrence occurred in 21.3% (19 of 89) and 7.0% (24 of 342) of patients, respectively, with recurrence rates of 53.84 (95% CI, 34.34 to 84.40) versus 19.47 (95% CI, 13.05 to 29.04) per 1,000 person-years (P < .001) and an HR of 3.20 (95% CI, 1.46 to 7.02) after adjustment for clinicopathologic factors. BRAF mutation was associated with poorer recurrence-free probability in Kaplan-Meier survival analyses in various clinicopathologic categories. Conclusion This large multicenter study demonstrates an independent prognostic value of BRAF V600E mutation for PTC recurrence in various clinicopathologic categories. PMID:25332244

  14. Update on thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S

    2008-05-01

    With over 2 000 articles published on thyroid cancer between January 1, 2006 and September 10, 2007 it is difficult to offer an updated and complete review on this malignancy. Thus, I elected to summarize papers published in 2007 on topics frequently overlooked in other reviews or books, and papers that are likely to be followed by interesting developments. Papers include: 1) the accuracy and currency of websites on thyroid cancer; 2) the detection of the V600E BRAF mutation in very small papillary thyroid cancers that are detected histologically; 3) the relationship between thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis or hepatitis C virus, an association that appears to be nonrandom; 4) the not negligible frequency of coexistence of thyroid cancer with primary hyperparathyroidism; 5) the value of ultrasound elastography of thyroid nodules in distinguishing malignant form benign lesions; 6) the value of percutaneous ethanol injection in the treatment of thyroid or nodal recurrences of thyroid cancer; 7) the relatively benign course of intrathyroid metastases from renal cell carcinoma; 8) the exceedingly rare thyroid paraganglioma, though the rate of reports has increased recently; and 9) the increase in serum calcitonin caused by chronic alcoholism, an increase that cannot be reversed by three weeks of alcohol weaning.

  15. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. F18-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer: a systematic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Haslerud, Torjan; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Reisæter, Lars; Küfner Lein, Regina; Heinecke, Achim; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Biermann, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluor-18-deoxy-glucose (FDG) is widely used for diagnosing recurrent or metastatic disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). To assess the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET for DTC in patients after ablative therapy. A systematic search was conducted in Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Open Grey looking for all English-language original articles on the performance of FDG-PET in series of at least 20 patients with DTC having undergone ablative therapy including total thyroidectomy. Diagnostic performance measures were pooled using Reitsma's bivariate model. Thirty-four publications between 1996 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 79.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73.9-84.1) and 79.4% (95% CI, 71.2-85.4), respectively, with an area under the curve of 0.858. F18-FDG-PET is a useful method for detecting recurrent DTC in patients having undergone ablative therapy. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  17. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  18. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  19. BRAF V600E mutation in prognostication of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Barczyński, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) offers excellent prognosis, however relapse risk or persistent disease is related to ~30%. Currently, attention is paid to the possibility of patient group selection of different risk of unfavorable outcome to match a particular therapeutic approach. Therefore, interest in new prognostic and predictive markers known preoperatively is observed. BRAF V600E mutation is such a marker. Many studies analyzing the prevalence of the mutation and its relationship with other clinico-pathological risk factors were reported but with controversial conclusions. The prognostic significance of BRAF mutation was confirmed by some single centre studies, a few meta-analyses and a large multicenter retrospective international study. They confirmed a correlation between the mutation and the risk of recurrence. The strongest argument against using BRAF mutation as an independent prognostic and predictive factor in PTC is its high prevalence (30–80%). At present it seems that BRAF mutation is one of the factors influencing the prognosis and it should be analyzed in correlation with other prognostic factors. The most recent ATA recommendations do not indicate a routine application of BRAF status for initial risk stratification in differentiated thyroid cancer due to a lack of evident confirmation of a direct influence of mutation on the increase in relapse risk. However, ATA demonstrates the continuous risk scale for the relapse risk assessment, considering BRAF and/or TERT status. At present, researchers are working on determining the role of BRAF mutation in patients from a low-risk group and its correlations with others molecular events. Currently, BRAF mutation cannot be used as a single, independent predictive factor. However, its usefulness in the context of other molecular and clinico-pathological risk factors cannot be excluded. They may be used to make modern prognostic scales of relapse risk and be applied to individualized diagnostic and

  20. Recurrence Incidence in Differentiated Thyroid Cancers and the Importance of Diagnostic Iodine-131 Scintigraphy in Clinical Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoğlu, Filiz; Karapolat, İnanç; Ömür, Özgür; Akgün, Ayşegül; Yanarateş, Ahmet; Kumanlıoğlu, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC) are tumors with good prognosis. However, local recurrence or distant metastasis can be observed. In our study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of recurrence and the importance of diagnostic iodine-131 whole body scan (WBS) in clinical follow-up in patients with DTC. Methods: The clinical data of 217 patients with DTC who were followed-up more than 3 years were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of recurrence was investigated in a group of patients who had radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment and showed no sign of residual thyroid tissue or metastasis with diagnostic WBS that was performed at 6-12 months after therapy and had a thyroglobulin (Tg) level lower than 2 ng/dl. Results: At the time of diagnosis, ten cases had thyroid capsule invasion, 25 cases had extra-thyroid soft tissue invasion, 11 patients showed lymph node metastasis and four patients had distant organ metastasis. One hundred forty-five patients had RAI treatment at ablation dose (75-100 mCi), whereas 35 patients had RAI treatment at metastasis dose (150-200 mCi). Thirty-seven patients with papillary microcarcinoma did not receive RAI treatment. In 12 (%7.5) of the 160 patients who were considered as “successful ablation”, a recurrence was identified. Recurrence was detected by diagnostic WBS in all cases and stimulated Tg level was <2 ng/dL with the exception of the two cases who had distant metastasis. Conclusion: Identification of pathological findings with WBS in patients who developed local recurrence in the absence of elevated Tg highlights the importance of diagnostic WBS in clinical follow-up. PMID:27277325

  1. Radioguided surgery of parathyroid adenomas and recurrent thyroid cancer using the "low sestamibi dose" protocol.

    PubMed

    Rubello, Domenico; Fig, Lorraine M; Casara, Dario; Piotto, Andrea; Boni, Giuseppe; Pelizzo, Maria R; Shapiro, Brahm; Sandrucci, Sergio; Gross, Milton D; Mariani, Giuliano

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the clinical efficacy of the "low sestamibi dose" (LSD) protocol to perform thyroid and parathyroid radioguided surgery in a large series of patients homogeneously studied and operated on by the same surgeon. The LSD protocol was initially developed in our center to cure primary hyperparathyroid (PHPT) patients with a high likelihood of a solitary parathyroid adenoma (PA) by minimally invasive radioguided surgery (MIRS). Since then, the same protocol has been applied to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with 131I-negative, but sestamibi-positive, locoregional recurrent disease in order to obtain radical radioguided extirpation of tumoral lesions at reoperation. We reviewed the clinical charts of 453 consecutive patients referred at the surgical department at Padova University (Padova, Italy) to investigate a PHPT or a DTC recurrence: 336 patients (74.2%) met the inclusion criteria for radioguided surgery, and these patients were analyzed for the aim of this study. There were 298 patients affected by PHPT with a high likelihood of a solitary sestamibipositive PA and 38 DTC patients affected by 131I-negative, but sestamibi-positive, locoregional recurrence. All patients underwent a preoperative imaging work-up, including sestamibi scintigraphy (doubletracer subtraction scan in PHPT patients and single-tracer, wash-out scan in DTC patients) and high-resolution neck ultrasonography (US). The LSD protocol we developed consists of the intravenous injection of a very low (1 mCi) sestamibi dose in the operating theater just 10 minutes before commencing intervention for the purpose of radioguided surgery only. At variance with the traditional "high (20-25 mCi) sestamibi dose (HSD)" protocol in which imaging and radioguided surgery are obtained in the same day, in the LSD protocol, imaging and radioguided surgery are performed in different days. The LSD protocol allows some advantages over the HSD protocol: (1) more time for

  2. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  3. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  4. Germline Polymorphisms of the VEGF Pathway Predict Recurrence in Nonadvanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Vincenzo; Sciammarella, Concetta; Capasso, Mario; Testori, Alessandro; Pivonello, Claudia; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Gambardella, Claudio; Grasso, Marica; Antonino, Antonio; Annunziata, Annamaria; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Pivonello, Rosario; Santini, Luigi; Botti, Gerardo; Losito, Simona; Pezzullo, Luciano; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2017-02-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is determined by host genetic background rather than environment. Germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway have demonstrated prognostic value in different tumors. Our main objective was to test the prognostic value of germline SNPs of the VEGF pathway in nonadvanced differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Secondarily, we sought to correlate analyzed SNPs with microvessel density (MVD). Multicenter, retrospective, observational study. Four referral centers. Blood samples were obtained from consecutive DTC patients. Genotyping was performed according to the TaqMan protocol, including 4 VEGF-A (-2578C>A, -460T>C, +405G>C, and +936C>T) and 2 VEGFR-2 (+1192 C>T and +1719 T>A) SNPs. MVD was estimated by means of CD34 staining. Rate of recurrent structural disease/disease-free survival (DFS). Difference in MVD between tumors from patients with different genotype. Two hundred four patients with stage I-II DTC (mean follow-up, 73 ± 64 months) and 240 patients with low- to intermediate-risk DTC (mean follow-up, 70 ± 60 months) were enrolled. Two "risk" genotypes were identified by combining VEGF-A SNPs -2578 C>A, -460 T>C, and +405 G>C. The ACG homozygous genotype was protective in both stage I-II (odds ratio [OR], 0.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01 to 1.43; P = 0.018) and low- to intermediate-risk (OR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.01 to 1.13; P = 0.035) patients. The CTG homozygous genotype was significantly associated with recurrence in stage I-II (OR, 5.47; 95% CI, 1.15 to 26.04; P = 0.018) and was slightly deleterious in low- to intermediate-risk (OR, 3.39; 95% CI, 0.8 to 14.33; P = 0.079) patients. MVD of primary tumors from patients harboring a protective genotype was significantly lower (median MVD, 76.5 ± 12.7 and 86.7 ± 27.9, respectively; P = 0.024). Analysis of germline VEGF-A SNPs could empower a prognostic approach to DTC.

  5. The ima approach for the quick identification of the right recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Akira; Masuoka, Hiroo; Yabuta, Tomonori; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Kihara, Minoru; Higashiyama, Takuya; Takamura, Yuuki; Ito, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Miya, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    The right recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is more difficult to identify than the left RLN. The superior, lateral and inferior approaches are currently used to identify the RLN. This report presents a new technique, called the ima approach (the most inferior approach) for the quick identification of the right RLN. The ima approach involves dissection along the right common carotid artery and division of the most lateral branch of the inferior thyroid veins. The right RLN is identified at the bottom of the RLN triangle. This technique and the conventional inferior approach were applied to 81 and 19 patients with thyroid cancer, respectively. The ima approach required a significantly shorter time in identifying the nerve than the inferior approach (9.6 ± 16.6 and 31.2 ± 24.4 s, respectively, p < 0.0001). The ima approach is an easy, quick and safe technique for identifying the right RLN.

  6. Dynamic risk stratification for predicting the recurrence in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Elgin; Soydal, Cigdem; Nak, Demet; Kucuk, Nuriye O; Kir, Kemal M

    2017-09-27

    To analyze the predictive value of the dynamic risk stratification (DRS) system for assessing the risk of recurrent/persistent disease in our large group of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients. We retrospectively included 2184 consecutive patients who received radioiodine ablation therapy following a total or near total thyroidectomy in our department between 1998 and 2014. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) classification was used for initial risk classification. At the second year of follow-up period after radioiodine ablation therapy, DRS was performed also. The ATA and DRS risk classification results were compared with clinical outcome. According to DRS, more than half of the ATA high-risk patients (73.2%) moved to the DRS low-risk category and the 6.4% of ATA low-risk patients comprised the DRS high-risk category. In comparison of variables within the ATA and the DRS risk groups with clinical outcome, combined use of the ATA and the DRS systems was statistically significant to predict the recurrent/persistent disease (P<0.005). The present study revealed that the DRS system is a necessary stratification system in addition to the initial risk evaluation. The DRS can discriminate those patients who does not require closer follow-up in the long-term period.

  7. Occult lymph node metastasis and risk of regional recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer after bilateral prophylactic central neck dissection: A multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Chan; Na, Se Young; Park, Gi Cheol; Han, Ju Hyun; Kim, Seung Woo; Eun, Young Gyu

    2017-02-01

    The impact of occult lymph node metastasis on regional recurrence after prophylactic central neck dissection for preoperative, nodal-negative papillary thyroid cancer is controversial. We investigated risk factors for regional lymph node recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and bilateral prophylactic central neck dissection. Analysis was according to clinicopathologic characteristics and occult lymph node metastasis patterns. This multicenter study enrolled 211 consecutive patients who underwent total thyroidectomy with bilateral prophylactic central neck dissection for papillary thyroid cancer without evidence of central lymph node metastasis on preoperative imaging. Clinicopathologic features and central lymph node metastasis patterns were analyzed for predicting regional recurrence. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to identify independent factors for recurrence. Median follow-up time was 43 months (24-95 months). Ten patients (4.7%) showed regional lymph node recurrence. The estimated 5-year, regional recurrence-free survival was 95.2%. Tumor size ≥1 cm, central lymph node metastasis, lymph node ratio, and prelaryngeal lymph node metastasis were associated with regional recurrence in univariate analysis (P < .05). In multivariate analysis, a lymph node ratio ≥ 0.26 was a significant risk factor for regional lymph node recurrence (odds ratio = 11.63, P = .003). Lymph node ratio ≥ 0.26 was an independent predictor of worse recurrence-free survival on Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio = 11.49, P = .002). Although no significant association was observed between the presence of occult lymph node metastasis and regional recurrence, lymph node ratio ≥ 0.26 was an independent predictor of regional lymph node recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and bilateral prophylactic central neck dissection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. The Delayed Risk Stratification System in the Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Walczyk, Agnieszka; Pałyga, Iwona; Gąsior-Perczak, Danuta; Gadawska-Juszczyk, Klaudia; Szymonek, Monika; Trybek, Tomasz; Lizis-Kolus, Katarzyna; Szyska-Skrobot, Dorota; Mikina, Estera; Hurej, Stefan; Słuszniak, Janusz; Mężyk, Ryszard; Góźdź, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Context There has been a marked increase in the detection of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) over the past few years, which has improved the prognosis. However, it is necessary to adjust treatment and monitoring strategies relative to the risk of an unfavourable disease course. Materials and Methods This retrospective study examined data from 916 patients with DTC who received treatment at a single centre between 2000 and 2013. The utility of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the European Thyroid Association (ETA) recommended systems for early assessment of the risk of recurrent/persistent disease was compared with that of the recently recommended delayed risk stratification (DRS) system. Results The PPV and NPV for the ATA (24.59% and 95.42%, respectively) and ETA (24.28% and 95.68%, respectively) were significantly lower than those for the DRS (56.76% and 98.5%, respectively) (p<0.0001). The proportion of variance for predicting the final outcome was 15.8% for ATA, 16.1% for ETA and 56.7% for the DRS. Recurrent disease was rare (1% of patients), and was nearly always identified in patients at intermediate/high risk according to the initial stratification (9/10 cases). Conclusions The DRS showed a better correlation with the risk of persistent disease than the early stratification systems and allows personalisation of follow-up. If clinicians plan to alter the intensity of surveillance, patients at intermediate/high risk according to the early stratification systems should remain within the specialized centers; however, low risk patients can be referred to endocrinologists or other appropriate practitioners for long-term follow-up, as these patients remained at low risk after risk re-stratification. PMID:27078258

  9. Predictors for papillary thyroid cancer persistence and recurrence: a retrospective analysis with a 10-year follow-up cohort study.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Taciana Padilha; Waissmann, William; Simões, Taynãna César; de Mello, Rossana Corbo R; Carvalho, Denise P

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to determine outcome predictors of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) persistence and recurrence, separately. The factors contributing to either persistence or recurrence of PTC are poorly defined, as both outcomes are usually evaluated together. In this 10-year follow-up cohort study, 190 PTC patients were evaluated (18-85 years old; registered from 1 January 1990 to31 December 1999 at a Brazilian Cancer Care referral Hospital). After initial surgery, we examined persistence (disease detected up to 1 year), recurrence (disease detected after 1 year) and PTC-free status (disease absence during follow-up). Outcome predictors were modelled using multinomial logit regression analysis. The univariate analysis showed that persistence and recurrence were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (OR = 12·33; OR = 2·84, respectively), local aggressiveness (OR = 5·22; OR = 3·35) and extrathyroidal extension (OR = 5·07; OR = 7·11). Persistence was associated with male sex (OR = 3·49), age above 45 years old at diagnosis (OR = 1·03), macroscopic lymph node metastasis (OR = 5·85), local aggressiveness (OR = 5·22), each 1-cm tumour size increase (OR = 1·34), a cancer care referral hospital as the place of initial surgery (OR = 2·3), thyroidectomy or near total thyroidectomy(OR = 3·03) and neck dissection (OR = 3·19). Recurrence was associated with the time of radioactive iodine ((131) I) therapy (OR = 3·71). After data modelling, persistence was associated with macroscopic lymph node metastasis (OR = 6·17), 1-cm increases in tumour size (OR = 1·30) and thyroidectomy or near total thyroidectomy (OR = 3·82), while recurrence was associated with surgery at referral hospital (OR = 3·79). The best predictors of persistence were tumour size and macroscopic lymph node metastasis; when the initial surgery is of quality, the recurrence depends more on tumour's biology aspects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cabozantinib (thyroid cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat a certain type of thyroid cancer that is getting worse and that has spread ... only gives information about cabozantinib capsules (Cometriq) for thyroid cancer. If you are using this medication for advanced ...

  11. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  12. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  13. Thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Tam, Abbas Ali; Kaya, Cafer; Kılıç, Fevzi Balkan Mehmet; Ersoy, Reyhan; Çakır, Bekir

    2014-12-01

    The frequency of thyroid nodules accompanying Graves' disease and the risk of thyroid cancer in presence of accompanying nodules are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of thyroid nodules and the risk of thyroid cancer in patients operated because of graves' disease. Five hundred and twenty-six patients in whom thyroidectomy was performed because of Graves' disease between 2006 and 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients who had received radioactive iodine treatment and external irradiation treatment in the neck region and who had had thyroid surgery previously were not included in the study. While accompanying thyroid nodule was present in 177 (33.6%) of 526 Graves' patients, thyroid nodule was absent in 349 (66.4%) patients. Forty-two (8%) patients had thyroid cancer. The rate of thyroid cancer was 5.4% (n = 19) in the Graves' patients who had no nodule, whereas it was 13% (n = 23) in the patients who had nodule. The risk of thyroid cancer increased significantly in presence of nodule (p = 0.003). Three patients had recurrence. No patient had distant metastasis. No patient died during the follow-up period. Especially Graves' patients who have been decided to be followed up should be evaluated carefully during the follow-up in terms of thyroid cancer which may accompany.

  14. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The coming of age of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected neck nodal metastases in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2011;96:2717. Caprelsa (prescribing information). Wilmington, Del.: ...

  15. Post-PET ultrasound improves specificity of 18F-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer while maintaining sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Martin; Kråkenes, Jostein; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Heinecke, Achim; Akslen, Lars A; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Brauckhoff, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluor-18-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) with or without computed tomography (CT) is generally accepted as the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in patients with negative whole body scintigraphy with iodine-131 (I-131). To assess the potential incremental value of ultrasound (US) over 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Fifty-one consecutive patients with suspected recurrent DTC were prospectively evaluated using the following multimodal imaging protocol: (i) US before PET (pre-US) with or without fine needle biopsy (FNB) of suspicious lesions; (ii) single photon emission computed tomography (≥3 GBq I-131) with co-registered CT (SPECT-CT); (iii) 18F-FDG-PET with co-registered contrast-enhanced CT of the neck; (iv) US in correlation with the other imaging modalities (post-US). Postoperative histology, FNB, and long-term follow-up (median, 2.8 years) were taken as composite gold standard. Fifty-eight malignant lesions were identified in 34 patients. Forty lesions were located in the neck or upper mediastinum. On receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, 18F-FDG-PET had a limited lesion-based specificity of 59% at a set sensitivity of 90%. Pre-US had poor sensitivity and specificity of 52% and 53%, respectively, increasing to 85% and 94% on post-US, with knowledge of the PET/CT findings (P < 0.05 vs. PET and pre-US). Multimodal imaging changed therapy in 15 out of 51 patients (30%). In patients with suspected recurrent DTC, supplemental targeted US in addition to 18F-FDG-PET-CT increases specificity while maintainin sensitivity, as non-malignant FDG uptake in cervical lesions can be confirmed. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  16. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  17. TERT Promoter Mutations in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 discovery of TERT promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for ETS transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0%, 11.3%, 17.1%, 43.2%, and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence, and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g., RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms, and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer. PMID:26733501

  18. TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 discovery of Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for E-twenty-six transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0, 11.3, 17.1, 43.2 and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g. RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Thyroid cancer in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlin, J.B.; Sallan, S.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The incidence, clinical presentation, and types of thyroid cancers presenting in childhood are reviewed. The role of antecedent radiation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and genetics of medullary thyroid carcinoma are discussed. Unique aspects of therapy and prognosis for the pediatric patient with thyroid carcinoma are addressed as well as a diagnostic approach to the child who presents with a neck mass.59 references.

  20. Association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, Salem I; Tufano, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    The association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer remains an active focus of research and controversy. Since it was first proposed in 1955, numerous studies have explored the epidemiology and etiology of these concurrent disease processes. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently encountered in thyroid glands resected for a neoplasm. The most frequent association is noted with papillary thyroid cancer. Several recent studies performed on patients undergoing thyroidectomy with coexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis report an increased prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer, with a favorable disease profile and an improved prognosis, particularly in women. Conversely, some population-based studies using fine-needle aspiration biopsy data report no linkage between serologic Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, yet they are limited by the lack of definitive pathology. On the other hand, the significantly increased incidence of primary thyroid lymphomas in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis strongly suggests a pathogenetic link between this autoimmune disorder and malignant thyroid lymphoma. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently associated with papillary thyroid cancer and may indeed be a risk factor for developing this type of cancer. Nonetheless, a pathogenesis linking these diseases remains unclear. The relationship between thyroid lymphoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis appears to be well established.

  1. Recurrent thyroid cancer diagnosis: ROC study of the effect of a high-resolution head and neck 18F-FDG PET/CT scan.

    PubMed

    Chatziioannou, Sofia N; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros T; Pianou, Nikoletta K; Kafiri, Georgia Th; Pavlou, Spyros N; Kallergi, Maria

    2014-01-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) has demonstrated significant value in the evaluation of patients with indication of recurrent thyroid cancer with negative conventional workup. The hypothesis of this study was that the addition of a dedicated, high-resolution head and neck scan (HNS) to the standard whole-body scan (WBS) improves the accuracy of the detection and diagnosis of recurrent thyroid cancer. Forty-three consecutive patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer, as indicated by increased tumor markers, prospectively underwent a WBS and a HNS with (18)F-FDG PET/CT. The patients were followed up to establish ground truth. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) study with two observers was conducted to evaluate the impact of the additional HNS on the detection and diagnosis of recurrent thyroid cancer. Indices of performance included the area under the ROC curve (AUC), the number of detected abnormal foci, and the size of the detected foci without and with the HNS images. ROC results showed that the addition of the HNS to the standard WBS increased the average AUC index of performance from 0.69 to 0.96, a statistically significant difference with a confidence interval (CI) of -0.33 to -0.19. Diagnosis was also improved with the average AUC increasing from 0.79 to 0.87 but differences were not statistically significant (CI, -0.19 to 0.04). Interreader agreement was "good" in the detection task and "excellent" in the diagnostic task. The addition of the HNS increased the number of detected foci in the positive patients by an average of 37%, whereas false-positive detections in the negative patients increased by an average of 10%. Reported average maximum lesion size also increased with the HNS addition by an average of 11%. The addition of a high-resolution HNS to the standard whole-body PET/CT imaging improves readers' performance in the detection and diagnosis of recurrent thyroid cancer and

  2. Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer can cause any of the ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  3. Role of prophylactic central neck dissection in clinically node-negative differentiated thyroid cancer: assessment of the risk of regional recurrence.

    PubMed

    Calò, Pietro Giorgio; Lombardi, Celestino Pio; Podda, Francesco; Sessa, Luca; Santini, Luigi; Conzo, Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Prophylactic central neck dissection in clinically node-negative patients remains controversial. The aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to determine the rate of metastases in the central neck in clinically node-negative differentiated thyroid cancer patients, to examine the morbidity, and to assess the risk of regional recurrence in patients treated with total thyroidectomy with concomitant bilateral or ipsilateral central neck dissection compared with those undergoing total thyroidectomy alone. 258 consecutive clinically node-negative patients were divided into three groups according to the procedures performed: total thyroidectomy only (group A), total thyroidectomy with concomitant ipsilateral central neck dissection (group B), and total thyroidectomy combined with bilateral central neck dissection (group C). Mean operative time and postoperative stay were shorter in Group A (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative transient hypoparathyroidism was lower in Group A (p = 0.03), whereas no differences in the incidence of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve palsy were present. Postoperative radioactive iodine administration was higher in group B and particularly C (p = 0.03) compared with group A. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of regional recurrence. Differentiated thyroid cancer has a high rate of central lymph node metastasis even in clinically node-negative patients; in the present study there was no statistically significant difference in the rates of locoregional recurrence between the three modalities of treatment. Total thyroidectomy appears to be an adequate treatment for clinically node-negative differentiated thyroid cancer. Prophylactic central neck dissection might be considered for differentiated thyroid cancer patients with large tumor size or extrathyroidal extension.

  4. Influence of thyroid gland status on the thyroglobulin cutoff level in washout fluid from cervical lymph nodes of patients with recurrent/metastatic papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Hyun Chul; Yi, Ha Woo; Kim, Bong Kyun; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo

    2016-04-01

    The influence of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroidectomy status on Tg in fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) washout fluid is unclear. A total of 282 lymph nodes were prospectively subjected to FNAC, fine-needle aspiration (FNA)-Tg measurement, and frozen and permanent biopsies. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of several predetermined FNA-Tg cutoff values for recurrence/metastasis in lymph nodes according to thyroidectomy status. The diagnostic performance of FNA-Tg varied according to thyroidectomy status. The optimized cutoff value of FNA-Tg was 2.2 ng/mL. However, among FNAC-negative lymph nodes, the FNA-Tg cutoff value of 0.9 ng/mL showed better diagnostic performance in patients with a thyroid gland. An FNA-Tg/serum-Tg cutoff ratio of 1 showed the best diagnostic performance in patients without a thyroid gland. Applying the optimal cutoff values of FNA-Tg according to thyroid gland status and serum Tg level facilitates the diagnostic evaluation of neck lymph node recurrences/metastases in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1705-E1712, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [The ultrasound diagnosis of regional recurrent cancer of the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Bochkareva, O V; Siniukova, G T; Matiakin, E G; Kostiakova, L A; Titova, I A; Tsiklauri, V T

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 220 patients was performed using ultrasound investigation (USI) in B-regimen, color and energy Doppler encoding, 3D-reconstruction of image and sonoelastography. There were 49 recurrences in the regional lymph nodes. Main semiotic signs of regional recurrences were identified. USI with the application of the methods described is highly informative: sensitivity--94.2%, specificity--92.5%, accuracy--91.7%.

  6. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  7. Predictive factors for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer in patients under 21 years of age and a meta-analysis of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Zhong-Wu; Ji, Qing-Hai; Yang, Shu-Wen; Wei, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The influence of predictors for recurrence in relation to recurrence-free survival was analyzed retrospectively in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients under 21 years of age who underwent primary surgical treatment and who had a pathological diagnosis of DTC between 1983 and 2012 at Fudan University Cancer Hospital. Recurrences were retrospectively analyzed using a Cox regression model for the hazard ratio (HR) according to the clinicopathological features. A meta-analysis was performed with respect to the potential predictors for recurrence from current related studies. In the present study, there were 146 young patients aged from 7 to 20 years, with a female/male ratio of 2.65/1. Female gender was the only factor significantly associated with recurrence according to univariate (HR = 2.812, P = 0.037) and multivariate (HR = 4.107, P = 0.024) Cox regression analyses. Meta-analyses revealed that multifocality (HR = 1.91, P < 0.05) and presentation at diagnosis (HR = 1.39, P < 0.05) were highly associated with recurrence in young DTC patients. However, female gender and other factors, such as age (≤10 vs. 11-20 years), PTC (PTC vs. FTC), extrathyroidal extension, lymph node metastasis, total thyroidectomy (total vs. less than total), radioiodine therapy, and radiation history, were not associated with recurrence in young DTC patients. In conclusion, multifocality and presentation at diagnosis are strong predictive factors of recurrence in relation to recurrence-free survival. We recommend studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up to verify the influence of predictors for disease recurrence in young patients.

  8. Image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy – a valuable salvage treatment approach for loco-regional recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Zhao, Hongfu; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhipeng; Ge, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the treatment effect of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for refractory recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Case report This 66-year-old female presented with recurrence 5 years after thyroidectomy for PTC. Despite external irradiation and radioactive 131I, the lesion expanded as 3.7 × 3.0 × 2.3 cm3 and 2.0 × 1.5 × 1.5 cm3. The locoregional recurrent tumor was treated with image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The total dose of 30 Gy in 6 fractions were delivered on the whole recurrent tumor. Results Removal of the recurrent tumor was securely achieved by HDR interstitial brachytherapy guided with ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. The refractory tumor in the patients healed uneventfully after HDR interstitial brachytherapy without recurrence during the 14 months of follow-up. Conclusions The image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment approach for refractory recurrence of PTC. PMID:27257420

  9. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  10. Thyroid Nodules and Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Orlo H.

    1980-01-01

    Patients with thyroid nodules must be treated selectively because these nodules develop far more frequently than does thyroid cancer. A thorough clinical history, family history and history of radiation, as well as an accurate physical examination, are very important in determining whether surgical treatment is indicated. Thyroid function tests, a radioactive isotope scan, a thyroid echogram and fine-needle biopsy are also useful. Although there is considerable debate concerning the amount of thyroid tissue that should be removed at operation, the minimal procedure for a “cold,” solid thyroid nodule is a total thyroid lobectomy and isthmectomy. This is the treatment of choice for patients with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma. Partial lobectomy is to be discouraged. Near total or total thyroidectomy should be considered for all other patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Many factors influence the prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer including age, sex, type of thyroid cancer, invasion, symptoms, lymph node metastasis, metastasis to distant sites, extent of the surgical procedure, and use of radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone. With adequate treatment, the prognosis for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is excellent. PMID:7222643

  11. Canadian survey of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W. John; McKinney, Steven E.

    1985-01-01

    We report the results of a multicentre retrospective chart review of 2214 patients with thyroid cancer registered at 13 radiotherapy centres between 1958 and 1978. The data analysed included sex, age at the time of diagnosis, pathological diagnosis, extent of disease before treatment, types of treatment and their complications, and the rates of recurrence and survival up to 24 years after diagnosis. Although papillary cancers were most common, anaplastic and miscellaneous tumours were more frequent than expected, which reflects the type of patients referred by endocrinologists and surgeons to radiotherapy centres. There were marked differences in patterns of referral to the centres. Some patients with papillary and follicular thyroid cancers died of these cancers up to 20 years after diagnosis. The clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome of the rarer types of thyroid malignant tumours were of particular interest. The influence of age at the time of diagnosis on survival rates for patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancer was highly significant, indicating much more aggressive behaviour of these cancers in older patients, particularly those beyond the age of 60 years. A more detailed analysis of tumour subtypes should provide new information on their natural history and lead to better management. PMID:3978516

  12. Multifactorial analysis of survival and recurrences in differentiated thyroid cancer. Comparative evaluation of usefulness of AGES, MACIS, and risk group scores in Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cuevas, S; Labastida-Almendaro, S; Cortés-Arroyo, H; López-Garza, J; Barroso-Bravo, S

    2002-03-01

    Many risk factors have been identified in differentiated thyroid cancer, with them, some prognostic scores have been designed to asign the risk of recurrence and survival. In Mexican population, this type of study is scarce. This is a retrospective review of 180 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer completely treated at the Hospital de Oncologia, IMSS, in Mexico City from 1980 to 1990. All prognostic factors were analyzed and a score obtained either by the method of AGES, MACIS, or SKMH. Correlation of recurrences and survival was carried out according to score or risk assignment. There was a predominance of females (4.8:1), 48% had metastatic cervical nodes, median tumor size was 4 cm, 16% had multiple macroscopic thyroid tumors, in 12% resection was incomplete, 96% were papillary, and 4% follicular cancers. According to AGES, 46% were high risk patients, 49.4% with MACIS and 45.5% with SKMH, respectively. Median follow-up was 8.3 years. There were 67 (37%) recurrences. Ten-year overall survival was 89.4% and disease-free survival was 79.2%. There was no statistical significant difference of survival of AGES until the score reached 6 or more or the MACIS score reached 8 or more. Cox multivariate model showed that above the age of 45, tumor size of 5 cm or more, follicular histology, multiple macroscopic thyroid tumors, and extracapsular node invasion affected ten-year survival. In conclusions our patients are diagnosed at more advanced stages than patients in the U.S. or European countries. Nearly one half of our patients belonged to the high-risk group. This study confirms that patients over the age of 45, tumor size > 5 cm, and follicular histology are adverse prognostic factors and report that extracapsular node invasion and multiple macroscopic thyroid tumors are also adverse prognostic factors. In Mexican population, with 50% of high-risk patients, AGES and MACIS scores reached statistical differences with higher qualifications than observed in the U.S.

  13. Usefulness of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using CyberKnife for Recurrent Lymph Node Metastasis of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higashiyama, Shigeaki; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Yoshida, Atsushi; Shiomi, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    A woman in her 60s presented with a recurrent lymph node metastasis from a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right parapharyngeal space. She had already undergone total thyroidectomy, five resections for cervical lymph node metastases, and right carotid rebuilding. Surgical resection of the current metastasis was impossible. 131I-radioiodine therapy (RIT) with 3.7 GBq 131I was not effective; therefore, stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) using a CyberKnife radiotherapy system was scheduled. The prescription dose was 21 Gy, and a dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions was administered. The PTV was 4,790 mm3. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging conducted 3 and 12 months after the SRT demonstrated a remarkable and gradual reduction of the recurrent lymph node metastasis in the right parapharyngeal space and no evidence of recurrence. For multidisciplinary therapy of unresectable and/or RIT unresponsive locoregional lymph node metastases and recurrences of DTC, SRT using the CyberKnife system should be considered.

  14. Parasitic thyroid nodules: cancer or not?

    PubMed

    Baker, Lauren J; Gill, Anthony J; Chan, Charles; Lin, Betty P C; Crawford, Bronwyn A

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, a 58-year-old woman presented with thyrotoxicosis. She had undergone left hemithyroidectomy 14 years before for a benign follicular adenoma. Ultrasound imaging demonstrated bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy with enhanced tracer uptake in the left lateral neck on a Technetium-99m uptake scan. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of a left lateral neck node was insufficient for a cytological diagnosis; however, thyroglobulin (Tg) washings were strongly positive. The clinical suspicion was of functionally active metastatic thyroid cancer in cervical lymph nodes. A completion thyroidectomy and bilateral cervical lymph node dissection were performed. Histology demonstrated benign multinodularity in the right hemithyroid, with bilateral reactive lymphadenopathy and 24 benign hyperplastic thyroid nodules in the left lateral neck that were classified as parasitic thyroid nodules. As there had been a clinical suspicion of thyroid cancer, and the hyperplastic/parasitic thyroid tissue in the neck was extensive, the patient was given ablative radioactive iodine (3.7 GBq). After 2 years, a diagnostic radioactive iodine scan was clear and the serum Tg was undetectable. The patient has now been followed for 7 years with no evidence of recurrence. Archived tissue from a left lateral neck thyroid nodule has recently been analysed for BRAF V600E mutation, which was negative. Thyrotoxicosis due to functional thyroid tissue in the lateral neck is very rare and may be due to metastatic thyroid cancer or benign parasitic thyroid tissue.Parasitic thyroid nodules should be considered as a differential diagnosis of lateral neck thyroid deposits, particularly where there is a history of prior thyroid surgery.Parasitic thyroid nodules may occur as a result of traumatic rupture or implantation from a follicular adenoma at the time of surgery.The use of ablative radioactive iodine may be appropriate, as resection of all parasitic thyroid tissue can prove difficult.BRAF mutational analysis

  15. Follow-up of patients with thyroglobulin-antibodies: Rising Tg-Ab trend is a risk factor for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    de Meer, Siegrid G A; Vorselaars, Wessel M C M; Kist, Jakob W; Stokkel, Marcel P M; de Keizer, Bart; Valk, Gerlof D; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Vriens, Menno R

    2017-05-16

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recurrences (5-20%) are the main reason for follow-up. Thyroglobulin (Tg) has proven to be an excellent disease marker, but thyroglobulin-antibodies (Tg-Ab) may interfere with Tg measurement, leading to over or underestimation. It is proposed that the Tg-Ab trend can be used as a marker for disease recurrence, yet few studies define trend and have a long-term follow-up. The objective of our study was to investigate the value of a well-defined Tg-Ab trend as a surrogate marker for disease recurrence during long-term follow-up. We retrospectively studied patients treated at the Nuclear Department of the University Medical Center Utrecht from 1998 to 2010 and the Netherlands Cancer Institute from 2000 to 2009. All patients with Tg-Ab 12 months after treatment were included. The definition of a rise was >50% increase of the Tg-Ab value in a 2 year time period. A decline as >50% decrease of the Tg-Ab value. Twenty-five patients were included. None of the patients with declining or stable Tg-Ab without a concomitant rise in Tg developed a recurrence. Four patients did suffer a recurrence. Three of these patients had a rising Tg-Ab trend, in two of these patients Tg was undetectable. Tg-Ab trend can be used as a crude surrogate marker for long-term follow-up of Tg-Ab patients. A rising trend in Tg-Ab warrants further investigation to detect recurrent disease. Stable or declining Tg-Ab levels do not seem to reflect a risk for recurrence.

  16. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  17. Occupation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H; Della Valle, Curt T; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text 'occupation' 'job' 'employment' or 'work' and 'thyroid cancer'. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarised the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender-stratified results are reported. The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and healthcare occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis.

  18. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... some noncancerous childhood conditions Radiation exposure from nuclear plant disasters Radiation given through a vein (through an IV) during medical tests and treatments does not increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer.

  19. Thyroid cancer: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Cheah, W K

    2007-02-01

    Thyroid cancer is the ninth most common cancer in women in Singapore. Despite an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in the last few decades, survival has improved due to a combination of early cytological diagnosis, low-morbidity total thyroidectomy, and postoperative radioactive iodine therapy. Thyroid cancer is one of the most curable forms of cancer. This article provides an overview of thyroid cancer and future directions in its diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  1. Recurrent well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Magarey, Matthew J R; Freeman, Jeremy L

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of Well-differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (WDTC) has been increasing over the past several decades. Consequently, so has the incidence of recurrence, which ranges from 15% to 30%. Factors leading to increased risk of recurrence are well described. However, the impact of local and regional recurrence is not well understood, but distant recurrence dramatically reduces 10-year survival to 50%. Recurrent WDTC has several established options for treatment; Observation, Radioactive Iodine (RAI), Surgery and External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT). Novel treatments such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and percutaneous ultrasound-guided ethanol injection (PUEI) are beginning to gain popularity and have promising early results. A review of the current literature, outcome measurements and a strategy for revision surgery within the central neck compartment are discussed within this manuscript.

  2. Impact of lymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-02-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND. Analyses of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001-2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (P<0.0001). CLN metastasis rate rose from 18.0 to 77.3% from limited CND to formal CND (P<0.0001). An increasing rate of BRAF mutation was also found from less to more extensive CND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan-Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC.

  3. Clinical outcomes of patients with hypercalcitoninemia after initial treatment for medullary thyroid cancer and postoperative serum calcitonin cutoffs for predicting structural recurrence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Young; Jang, Hye Won; Jang, Ju Young; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2016-10-01

    Persistent hypercalcitoninemia is reported in 40% to 60% of patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) after initial therapy, but their clinical outcomes have not been clearly studied. We evaluated the outcomes of MTC with hypercalcitoninemia and assessed the cutoffs of postoperative serum calcitonin for predicting structural recurrence. A dynamic risk assessment system was used to categorize clinical outcomes in this retrospective study. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to calculate the calcitonin cutoffs for predicting structural recurrence. Among 120 patients operated on, 30 (25%) had persistent hypercalcitoninemia. Of that group, 18 (60%) had biochemical persistent disease and 11 (37%) developed structural identified disease, including 1 death (3%). Postoperative calcitonin <29 pg/mL predicted structural disease with 100% sensitivity, 90.5% specificity, and 100% negative predictive value. One third of the patients with MTC with hypercalcitoninemia experienced structural recurrence, and postoperative basal serum calcitonin might be a simple tumor marker to predict structural recurrence. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: First-1508, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  6. Obesity and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Marjory Alana; Cunha, Lucas Leite; Batista, Fernando Assis; Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-10-01

    Many studies have provided observational data on the association of obesity and thyroid cancers, but only few of them propose mechanisms that would permit a better understanding of the causal molecular mechanisms of this association. Considering that there is an increasing incidence of both obesity and thyroid cancers, we need to summarize and link recent studies in order to characterize and understand the contribution of obesity-related factors that might affect thyroid cancer development and progression. Adipose tissue is involved in many vital processes, including insulin sensitivity, angiogenesis, regulation of energy balance, activation of the complement system, and responses such as inflammation. Although these processes have their own molecular pathways, they involve the same molecules through which obesity and adipose tissue might exert their roles in carcinogenesis, not only affecting MAPK and PI3K or even insulin pathways, but also recruiting local inflammatory responses that could result in disease formation and progression. This review describes five important issues that might explain the link between excessive weight and thyroid cancer: thyroid hormones, insulin resistance, adipokines, inflammation, and sexual hormones. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  8. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  9. Oncogenesis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Enas

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid neoplasms encompass a variety of lesions that range from benign adenomas to malignancies. These latter can be well-differentiated, poorly differentiated or undifferentiated (anaplastic) carcinomas. More than 95% of thyroid cancers are derived from thyroid follicular cells, while 2-3% (medullary thyroid cancers, MTC) originate from calcitonin producing C-cells. Over the last decade, investigators have developed a clearer understanding of genetic alterations underlying thyroid carcinogenesis. A number of point mutations and translocations are involved, not only in its tumorigenesis, but also as have potential use as diagnostic and prognostic indicators and therapeutic targets. Many occur in genes for several important signaling pathways, in particular the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Sporadic (isolated) lesions account for 75% of MTC cases, while inherited MTC, often in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and 2B syndromes, constitute the remainder. However, non-MEN familial MTC may also occur. Advances in genetic testing have revolutionized the management of MTC, with prospects of genetic screening, testing and early prophylactic thyroidectomy. Ethical concerns of these advances are addressed. PMID:28610401

  10. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Tubiana, M.; Haddad, E.; Schlumberger, M.; Hill, C.; Rougier, P.; Sarrazin, D.

    1985-05-01

    Surgery is the most effective treatment for thyroid cancer; however, in some subsets of patients, the role of radiotherapy (RT) is important. The main indication for external-beam RT is incomplete surgery. When neoplastic tissue is left behind at surgery, RT must be considered, but only if an experienced surgeon feels that everything that can be done has been done. Generally, in those patients, the neoplastic tissue involves the larynx, trachea, esophagus, blood vessels or mediastinum. Of 539 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated at Villejuif, France, until 1976, 97 were treated by external radiotherapy after an incomplete surgical excision. Fifteen years after irradiation, the survival rate is 57% and is approximately 40% at 25 years. The relapse-free survival is lower (39% at 15 years). In patients irradiated with an adequate dose (greater than or equal to 50 Gy) to residual neoplastic tissue after incomplete surgery, the incidence of local recurrence is low (actuarial probability of local recurrence 11% at 15 years versus 23% for patients treated by surgery alone, although the irradiated patients had larger and more extensive tumors). This demonstrates the efficacy of external-beam radiotherapy. The effects of radiotherapy on a residual tumor can be monitored by a serum thyroglobulin assay. With regard to local control of tumors, the effectiveness of radioiodine administration is clearly lower. However, since radioiodine facilitates early detection of distant metastases, a combination of external RT and radioiodine is indicated and is well-tolerated.

  11. Thyroid cancer: a lethal endocrine neoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, J.; Merino, M.J.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Ron, E.; Ain, K.B.; Alexander, H.R.; Norton, J.A.; Reynolds, J.

    1991-07-15

    This conference focuses on the controversies about managing thyroid cancer, emphasizing the possibility that the treatment of patients with potentially fatal thyroid cancer may be improved. Although the mortality rate from thyroid cancer is low, it is the highest among cancers affecting the endocrine glands (excluding the ovary). Exposure to radiation during childhood in the 1930s and 1940s increased the incidence of but not the mortality from thyroid cancer, because these tumors are mainly papillary cancers developing in young adults. These rates may change as the exposed cohort ages. Risk factors that increase mortality include older patient age and the growth characteristics of the tumor at diagnosis, the presence of distant metastases, and cell type (for example, the tall-cell variants of papillary cancer, follicular cancer (to be distinguished from the more benign follicular variant of papillary cancer), medullary cancer, and anaplastic cancer). Local metastases in lymph nodes do not seem to increase the risk for death from papillary cancer, but they do increase the risk for death from follicular and medullary cancer. In the latter, mortality is decreased by the early detection and treatment of patients with the familial multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2a. There are excellent tumor markers for differentiated cancer of the parafollicular and of the follicular cells. Measuring the calcitonin level allows early diagnosis of familial medullary cancer, whereas measuring the thyroglobulin level, although useful only after total thyroidectomy, allows early recognition of recurrence or metastases of papillary or follicular cancer. Initial surgery, protocols for follow-up, and the use of radioiodine for the ablation of any residual thyroid and the treatment of metastatic cancer are discussed.128 references.

  12. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  13. Stemness is Derived from Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Risheng; Bonnefond, Simon; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs). Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Furthermore, EMT is a critical process for epithelial tumor progression, local invasion, and metastasis formation. In addition, stemness provides cells with therapeutic resistance and is the likely cause of tumor recurrence. However, the relevance of EMT and stemness in thyroid cancer progression has not been extensively studied. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer, we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E)/TPO-Cre). This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells, which do not express TPO. Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid-specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers, such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15, and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6-week-old BRAFV600E mice indicating the dedifferentiated status of the cells and the fact that stemness was derived in this model from differentiated thyroid cells. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a cancer thyroid cell line (named Marca cells) derived from one of the murine tumors. In this cell line, we also found that overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of

  14. Incidental Detection of Thyroid Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to Assess Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Haberkorn, Uwe; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to assess prostate cancer. Avid Ga-PSMA uptake by thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been reported in few cases. A 75-year-old man who received a diagnosis of RCC in 2006 and prostate cancer in 2009 presented with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels (0.7 ng/mL) following prostatectomy. Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed avid Ga-PSMA uptake in 1 pelvic and 1 retroperitoneal lymph node and focal Ga-PSMA accumulation in the thyroid. Excised retroperitoneal lymph node and thyroid tissues showed metastases from RCC, whereas the pelvic lymph node exhibited metastasis from prostate cancer.

  15. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  16. Management of the neck in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of nodal metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancer ranges between 40% to 75%. Elective neck dissection is generally not advised in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer; however, if clinically apparent nodal disease is noted in the tracheoesophageal groove during surgery, central compartment clearance is advised. If clinically apparent nodal disease is present in the lateral compartment of the neck, modified neck dissection preserving the sternomastoid, accessory nerve, and jugular vein is advised. The "berry picking procedure" is generally not recommended because of the higher incidence of regional recurrence. Due consideration should be given for parathyroidal transplantation if the blood supply to the parathyroids is damaged during central compartment clearance. The incidence of lymph node metastasis is highest in young patients, however, lymph node metastasis has no bearing on long-term survival. There seems to be a higher incidence of regional recurrence in elderly individuals. If patients present with bulky nodal disease, consideration may be given for postoperative radioactive iodine dosimetry and ablation if necessary. Differentiated thyroid cancer represents a unique disease in the human body, where lymph node metastasis has no prognostic implication. Aggressive surgical clearance is advised in patients with medullary thyroid cancer in the central compartment and the jugular chain lymph nodes.

  17. LOWER RATES OF RESIDUAL/RECURRENT DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH INCIDENTALLY DISCOVERED THYROID CARCINOMA.

    PubMed

    Shakil, Jawairia; Ansari, Mohammed Z; Brady, Jett; Xu, Jiaqiong; Robbins, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Incidentally discovered thyroid cancers (IDTCs) have contributed to the rapid rise in thyroid cancer incidence over the past 20 years. Since death rates from thyroid cancer are not increasing, we hypothesized that IDTCs are less aggressive compared to clinically apparent thyroid cancer (CATC). A retrospective study of patients and tumor characteristics of IDTCs and their rates of residual/recurrent (R/R) disease were determined at a median follow-up of 27 months in the setting of a large academic medical center. Patient analysis groups (IDTC [n = 46] and CATC [n = 126]) were based upon how the cancer was initially discovered. Patients were followed clinically and by biochemical testing and ultrasonography. We also compared time to progression between these groups. Patients in the two groups had similar demographic and tumor characteristics. At the close of the study, R/R status in the IDTC group was 6.7%, compared to 20.8% in the CATC group (P = .04). Of the 28 individuals in our overall cohort who had R/R disease, 3 were from the IDTC group and 25 were from the CATC group (P = .04). All three of the IDTC recurrences occurred within the first 6 months of follow-up. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend for longer progression-free survival in the IDTC group (P = .08). Compared to CATC patients, IDTC patients have a significantly less aggressive course and a trend toward longer progression-free survival. If confirmed by further studies, it may be reasonable to subject them to less intense surveillance and more conservative therapeutic approaches. CATC = clinically apparent thyroid cancers CT = computed tomography HMH = Houston Methodist Hospital IDTC = incidentally discovered thyroid cancer MRI = magnetic resonance imaging PET = positron emission tomography PTMC = papillary thyroid microcarcinoma R/R = residual/recurrent RRA = radioiodine remnant ablation Tg = thyroglobulin TgAb = anti-thyroglobulin antibody TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone

  18. Recurrence pattern after conservative surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenya; Takenouchi, Shigeo; Mitani, Hiroki; Yoshida, Tuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Risk-based treatment represents the optimal management strategy for papillary thyroid carcinoma; however, the optimal extent of thyroidectomy and neck dissection remains controversial. This study aims to clarify the pattern of recurrence after conservative surgery in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma. We retrospectively reviewed 93 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma treated with conservative surgery. We analyzed recurrence rate, recurrence pattern, risk factors for recurrence, salvage treatment, and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients stratified according to risk. The recurrence rate was significantly lower in the low-risk group compared with the high-risk group (14% vs 34%; p<0.01). The recurrence pattern also differed between the two groups, with ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence being more common in the low-risk group (9%), while contralateral lateral neck recurrence was more common in the high-risk group (18%). Patients with contralateral thyroid lobe metastasis and/or direct contralateral thyroid lobe invasion showed a significantly higher rate of contralateral lateral neck metastasis than patients negative for both these features. The overall 5-year DFS was 81% in all patients. Advanced T and N classification, large primary tumor (≥4cm), extrathyroidal invasion, and high-risk group were significantly associated with poorer 5-year DFS in univariate analysis. Conservative surgery may represent a good treatment option for patients with low-risk papillary thyroid carcinoma. Tumor recurrence patterns differ between risk groups, with contralateral thyroid lobe lesions and direct contralateral lobe invasion being risk factors for contralateral lateral neck recurrence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Concurrent papillary thyroid cancer with pituitary ACTH-secreting tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chen, Jeng-Yeou; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Jung, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Chen; Lin, Jen-Der

    2007-04-01

    Concomitant thyroid cancer with pituitary tumor is uncommon. This study reports a case of advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma with pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting tumor. A 58-year-old male patient had thyroid cancer in 1991 and presented with headache caused by pituitary tumor with apoplexy in 1993. Due to hypopituitarism, the patient underwent radioactive iodide ((131)I) for detection and treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer after the use of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) in 2000. During follow-up for thyroid cancer, (201)thallium scan proved to be an effective tool for detecting metastatic thyroid cancer in the patient without pituitary TSH reserve. Pituitary ACTH-secreting tumor was confirmed in 2001 based on the high serum ACTH level and positive immunohistochemical stain for ACTH. The patient had no Cushingoid features. Moreover, serum ACTH levels were 337 and 232 pg/mL with normal serum cortisol and urine-free cortisol. Although the patient underwent three operations and a total of 370 mCi (131)I therapy for recurrent thyroid cancer, the cancer continued to progress. Finally, the patient died of pneumonia with septic shock 12 years after the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

  20. [Thyroid cancer. In search of individualized treatment].

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Cavallo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased exponentially around the world (mostly papillary thyroid carcinoma). This growth may reflect the combined effects of increased screening practices, together with changes in risk factors for thyroid cancer. In spite of this, disease specific mortality remained stable in the last three decades. Due to the fact that patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma often have a very good prognosis, with high survival in the long term follow-up compared with other types of carcinomas, there has been no need to change the standard treatment. The mainstays of thyroid cancer treatment are surgery (total or near-total thyroidectomy) with or without the additional administration of radioiodine (131I). These approaches are now in the center of discussion in all global forums. The current trend is to ensure the most effective and less harmful treatment and the most important issue at this point is to individualize patients according to tumor stage and risk of recurrence, to define which patients will benefit of more aggressive therapy and who could be handled with a more conservative approach.

  1. Comparison of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-TATE octreotide scintigraphy with FDG PET and 99mTc-MIBI in local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Kabasakal, Levent; Halac, Metin; Maecke, Helmut; Uslu, Lebriz; Önsel, Çetin; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-05-01

    There have been various studies for early diagnosis of local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical utility of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE, octreotide derivatives, to detect recurrences or distant metastases in 131I-negative thyroglobulin positive thyroid cancer patients and to compare the lesions with FDG PET and 99mTc-MIBI studies in the same patient group. Twenty differentiated thyroid cancer patients, 7 male and 13 female, mean age 54.6 ± 15.3 (range 13-78 years), were included in this study. Eighteen patients had papillary thyroid cancer and 2 had follicular thyroid cancer. Fifteen patients received HYNIC-TOC and 5 patients received HYNIC-TATE as a radiopharmaceutical. All patients underwent whole-body scan 1 and 4 hours after injection of octreotide derivatives and SPECT imagings were performed from the suspicious sites. The lesions that were seen in 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE studies were compared with 99mTc-MIBI and FDG-PET studies. Among 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE scintigraphies, 15 patient studies were evaluated as true positive (75%) and 5 were false negative (25%). The total number of lesions in octreotide scintigraphy was 48 in 20 patients. Of 20 patients, 19 had FDG-PET study, 15 of them were evaluated as true positive (78.9%), and 4 them were evaluated as false negative (21.1%). Total number of lesions in FDG PET was 74. 99mTc-MIBI study was positive in 11 patients (55%) and negative in 9 patients (45%). Total number of lesions in 99mTc-MIBI was 25. Technetium-labeled somatostatin receptor scintigraphy analogues HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-TATE are useful imaging alternatives in somatostatin receptor expressing thyroid cancer patients. Radiolabeling is easy and they are readily available for routine use.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casula, Sabina; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin fold-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4) to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i) they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii) could play a role in modulating cell proliferation – in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)-13 cells is threefold to fourfold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a fivefold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma, and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches. PMID:22675319

  3. Thyroid Cancer Statistics | Did You Know?

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid cancer represents the 8th most common cancer in the United States. Did you know that this cancer, located at the base of the throat in the thyroid gland, is highly treatable and usually curable?

  4. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What’s New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... RAI) therapy. Doctors and researchers are looking for new ways to treat thyroid cancer that are more ...

  5. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  6. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  7. Clinical Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Staunton, M. D.; Greening, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    In a survey of 293 patients with carcinoma of the thyroid, a goitre or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck were the commonest symptoms and a mass confined to one lobe the commonest sign. Hardness of the mass was an important diagnostic feature, and at least two-thirds of the tumour could be recognized before operation. It is suggested that the preoperative evaluation of thyroid swellings should be classified as benign, cancer suspected, and cancer probable. PMID:4800743

  8. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erik K.; Bible, Keith C.; Doherty, Gerard M.; Mandel, Susan J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W.; Sawka, Anna M.; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    , and thyrotropin suppression therapy using levothyroxine. Recommendations related to long-term management of differentiated thyroid cancer include those related to surveillance for recurrent disease using imaging and serum thyroglobulin, thyroid hormone therapy, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, consideration for clinical trials and targeted therapy, as well as directions for future research. Conclusions: We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision-making in the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. They represent, in our opinion, contemporary optimal care for patients with these disorders. PMID:26462967

  9. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most common form of endocrine cancer and that thyroid hormone is needed for the growth and metabolism of each cell in the body, understanding the molecular and the cellular aspects of thyroid stem cell biology will ultimately provide insights into mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:18310275

  10. Female Reproductive Factors and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moleti, Mariacarla; Sturniolo, Giacomo; Di Mauro, Maria; Russo, Marco; Vermiglio, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is markedly more common in women than men, the highest female-to-male ratio being recorded during the reproductive period. This evidence has led to the suggestion that female hormonal and reproductive factors may account for the observed DTC gender disparity. This review focuses on current evidence on the risk of DTC in conjunction with major female reproductive factors, including the impact of pregnancy on DTC occurrence and progression/recurrence. Overall, studies exploring the link between the risk of DTC and menstrual and menopausal factors, oral contraceptives and/or hormone replacement therapy, showed these associations, if any, to be generally weak. Nonetheless, there is some evidence that higher levels of exposure to estrogens during reproductive years may confer an increased risk of DTC. As far as pregnancy is concerned, it is unclear whether a potential association between parity and risk of DTC actually exists, and whether it is enhanced in the short-term following delivery. A possible role for pregnancy-related factors in DTC progression has been recently suggested by some reports, the results of which are consistent with a worse outcome in the short-term of women diagnosed with DTC during gestation compared to non-pregnant control patients. Also, some progression of disease has been described in women with structural evidence of disease prior to pregnancy. However, there seems to be no impact from pregnancy in DTC-related death or overall survival. Several in vitro and animal studies have evaluated the influence of estrogens (E) and estrogen receptors (ERs) on thyroid cell proliferation. Presently available data are indicative of a role of E and ERs in thyroid cancer growth, although considerable discrepancies in respect to ER expression patterns in thyroid cancer tissues actually exist. Further studies providing more direct evidence on the possible role of E and of placental hormones and growth factors on thyroid

  11. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na’ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  12. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... panel of genetic mutations linked to follicular or papillary thyroid cancer… Read More June 10, 2012 6 Cirugia De ... 2011 0 Gene Mutation Increases Risk of Recurrent Papillary Thyroid Cancer in Some Patients By admin | 2011 News Releases , ...

  13. Lenvatinib approved for certain thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    The FDA approved lenvatinib to treat progressive, differentiated thyroid cancer, potentially offering the most effective treatment to date for a subset of thyroid cancer patients who do not respond to standard therapy.

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  15. Opioids and cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Rohit

    2014-06-01

    With the majority of deaths from cancer because of their metastases, strategies to reduce this from occurring are at the forefront of treatment. It has been hypothesized that morphine may result in an increase in cancer metastases, following many in-vitro and animal studies, but the evidence from human retrospective data is inconclusive. This article will explore the possible mechanisms by which opioids can impact on the natural history of the cancer cell and whether they are likely to be harmful in individuals with cancer. Although there have been trials demonstrating benefits with regional anaesthesia techniques (opioid sparing) in the surgical population, it is not clear whether the source of the benefit arises directly from the avoidance of opioids or an added benefit afforded by regional anaesthesia. Research has shown that in particular cancer cell types, morphine may actually be beneficial and that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) plays a role in cancer disease. With the crystal structure of the MOR having recently been elucidated, this may offer new opportunities for treatments aimed at reducing cancer metastasis. The role opioids play in the development of cancer metastasis and recurrence is far from clear and appears to differ depending on the cancer cell type in question. Prospective randomized controlled trials are currently underway in humans to help clarify the situation further and there results are awaited with anticipation. The negative impact of pain on the immune system is well documented and it appears that appropriate analgesia is paramount in minimizing this. Opioids still constitute a central role in the management of moderate-to-severe cancer pain.

  16. Sonographic appearance of thyroid cancer in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Sara M; Benson, Carol B; Arthaud, Dylan M; Alexander, Erik K; Frates, Mary C

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether the sonographic appearance of thyroid cancer differs in patients with and without Hashimoto thyroiditis. Patients with histologically proven thyroid cancer who had thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies measured and sonography performed preoperatively were included. We evaluated each nodule for size, echogenicity, composition, margins, halo, and vascularity and evaluated the background heterogeneity of the gland. There were 162 thyroid cancers in 145 patients. Forty-two patients (29.0%) had Hashimoto thyroiditis with positive TPO antibodies, and 103 patients (71.0%) had negative TPO antibodies. The background echogenicity was more often heterogeneous in TPO antibody-positive patients compared to those who had negative TPO antibodies (57.1% versus 26.2%; P= .0005). Comparing cancers in TPO antibody-positive to TPO antibody-negative patients, there was no significant difference in the size, echogenicity, composition, margins, halo presence, calcification presence and type, or vascularity of the cancerous nodule (P > .05). Among TPO antibody-positive patients, comparing thyroid cancerous nodules in patients with heterogeneous glands to those with homogeneous glands, there was no significant difference in any sonographic characteristic except the margin of the nodule, which was more often irregular or poorly defined in heterogeneous glands and more often smooth in homogeneous glands (P< .05). Sonographic features of thyroid cancer are similar in patients with and without Hashimoto thyroiditis. Among patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, the sonographic appearance of the cancerous nodule is similar, except that cancerous nodule margins are more likely to be irregular or poorly defined when the gland is heterogeneous. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  18. New developments in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Robert I

    2013-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is common but rarely deadly. Unfortunately, when the disease becomes refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI), few effective treatment options remain. This situation is changing, however, with the availability of multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cabozantanib and vandetanib, both recently FDA-approved for advanced or metastatic disease, have more than doubled progression-free survival in medullary thyroid cancer. New agents in the pipeline may yield even better outcomes, as discussed by Dr. Robert I. Haddad at the NCCN 18th Annual Conference.

  19. Incidental thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer: considerations before determining management.

    PubMed

    Tufano, Ralph P; Noureldine, Salem I; Angelos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The worldwide incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing substantially, almost exclusively attributable to small papillary thyroid cancers. Increased use of diagnostic imaging is considered the most likely explanation for this reported rise, but other factors may also be contributing. The increase in health care expenditures related to managing these presumably low-risk cancers, without a clear patient benefit, has resulted in a backlash against the early detection of thyroid cancer. Currently, there is no way to confidently predict which incidentally detected thyroid nodule may be the precursor to a more aggressive process. Predictions such as these would require more accurate characterization of the biology of individual thyroid cancers than is currently possible. With time, we might prove our ability to confidently differentiate low-risk from high-risk thyroid cancers, but until that happens, routine screening for thyroid cancer by imaging billed as a "health checkup" should not be performed. However, incidentally detected thyroid nodules should be reported, and a clear medical team management plan should be developed. Our ethical responsibility is to provide patients with objective, evidence-based information about their disease status, not to assume that we know what is best for them by selectively withholding information. In addition, providing patients with psychosocial assistance will help them process the information necessary to make informed decisions that will provide them with the most value when a small thyroid nodule or cancer is incidentally identified. Herein, we summarize the epidemiological data for disease incidence, discuss some controversies in disease management, and outline the key elements and ethical considerations of informed decision making as they apply to managing incidentally detected thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer.

  20. Clinical value of technetium-99m-labeled octreotide scintigraphy in local recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid cancers: a comparison of lesions with 18F-FDG-PET and MIBI images.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Kabasakal, Levent; Ocak, Meltem; Maecke, Helmut; Uslu, Lebriz; Halaç, Metin; Asa, Sertac; Sager, Günes; Önsel, Çetin; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-12-01

    Various studies have been conducted for determining the most optimal method for the early diagnosis of local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labeled octreotide derivatives in the detection of recurrence or distant metastases in medullary thyroid cancer patients and to compare the lesions with those detected using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET and Tc-99m MIBI studies in the same patient group. Sixteen medullary thyroid cancer patients [two male and 14 female; mean age 52.0 ± 14.1 years (range 13-72 years)] were included in this study. All patients underwent a whole-body scan 1 and 4 h after injection with octreotide derivatives and single photon emission computed tomography images were taken of the sites suspicious for metastasis. The lesions seen in Tc-99m HYNIC octreotide studies were compared with those seen in 18F-FDG-PET and Tc-99m MIBI studies. Among the Tc-99m-labeled octreotide scintigraphy studies, nine were evaluated as true positive (56.2%) and one was evaluated as false positive (6.2%); six were false negative (37.5%). In 16 patients, the total number of lesions seen on octreotide scintigraphy was 21. Thirteen of the 16 patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET imaging. Of the 13 patients studied, 10 showed true-positive (76.9%) and three showed false-negative (23.1%) results. The total number of lesions seen on 18F-FDG-PET was 23. The Tc-99m MIBI study yielded positive results in seven of 16 patients (43.7%) and negative results in nine patients (56.3%). The total number of lesions on Tc-99m MIBI was 12. The Tc-99m-labeled somatostatin receptor scintigraphy analogs HYNIC-tyrosine octreotide and HYNIC-TATE are useful imaging alternatives in somatostatin receptor-expressing thyroid cancers. Radiolabeling using these analogs is easy and they are readily available for routine use.

  1. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems.

  2. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems. PMID:27213120

  3. Initial surgical management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Witt, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    The rapid increase in the rate of papillary thyroid cancer is likely caused by improved surveillance. A significant trend toward total thyroidectomy for low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer is present in the United States after a paradigm shift from treatment of macroscopic disease to the treatment of macroscopic and microscopic disease by increasingly sensitive tests. Compelling arguments for thyroid lobectomy and total thyroidectomy for low-risk thyroid cancer remain. The relatively small number of deaths from thyroid cancer, the small number of clinical thyroid cancers, and the huge number of incidental thyroid cancers are indicative of how little we understand the biology of this disease. Clinical medicine awaits biologic markers to refine treatment recommendations.

  4. [Difficulties in diagnosis and localization of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Biterman, Arie; Bloch, Boaz; Wolf, Tamir; Baron, Ela; Lephel, Oleg; Cohen, Oded

    2002-02-01

    Recurrent and residual medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) are common in patients following primary surgical resection. Difficulty arises in performing precise localization of the tumor because of anatomical distortion of the neck structures following surgery. To date, no modality has been shown superior to others in the diagnosis of recurrent or residual MTC, and the issue is currently under debate in the literature. We report a case in which secondary recurrence of MTC was detected and localized using a novel combination of preoperative and intraoperative radionuclide imaging, and a method of preventing intraoperative damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the anatomically disrupted neck. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of these three modalities in detection and localization of recurrent MTC, while minimizing the possibility for nerve injury during the operative procedure. Such a therapeutic strategy may prove useful in the management of patients who have previously undergone neck surgery and suffer from anatomical distortion of normal neck structures.

  5. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, E.; Curtis, R.; Hoffman, D. A.; Flannery, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features. PMID:6691901

  6. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ron, E; Curtis, R; Hoffman, D A; Flannery, J T

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features.

  7. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  8. Epigenetic modulators of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodero, Sandra; Delgado-Álvarez, Elías; Díaz-Naya, Lucía; Martín Nieto, Alicia; Menéndez Torre, Edelmiro

    2017-01-01

    There are some well known factors involved in the etiology of thyroid cancer, including iodine deficiency, radiation exposure at early ages, or some genetic changes. However, epigenetic modulators that may contribute to development of these tumors and be helpful to for both their diagnosis and treatment have recently been discovered. The currently known changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs in each type of thyroid carcinoma are reviewed here. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Hashimoto's thyroiditis predicts outcome in intrathyroidal papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Vincenzo; Sciammarella, Concetta; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Gambardella, Claudio; Bellevicine, Claudio; Grasso, Marica; Conzo, Giovanni; Docimo, Giovanni; Botti, Gerardo; Losito, Simona; Troncone, Giancarlo; De Palma, Maurizio; Giacomelli, Laura; Pezzullo, Luciano; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2017-09-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) seems to have favourable prognostic impact on papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), but data were obtained analysing all disease stages. Given that HT-related microenvironment involves solely the thyroid, we aimed to assess the relationship between HT, as detected through pathological assessment, and outcome in intrathyroidal PTC. This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including 301 PTC with no evidence of extrathyroidal disease. Primary study endpoint was the rate of clinical remission. Auxiliary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). HT was detected in 42.5% of the cohort and was associated to female gender, smaller tumour size, lower rate of aggressive PTC variants and less frequent post-surgery radio-iodine administration. HT showed relationship with significantly higher rate of clinical remission (P < 0.001, OR 4, 95% CI 1.78-8.94). PTCs with concomitant HT had significantly longer RFS, as compared with non-HT tumours (P = 0.004). After adjustment for other parameters affecting disease outcome at univariate analysis (age at diagnosis, histology, tumour size and multifocality), prognostic effect of HT remained significant (P = 0.006, OR 3.28, 95% CI 1.39-7.72). To verify whether HT could optimise the identification of PTCs with unfavourable outcome, we assessed the accuracy of 'non-HT status' as negative prognostic marker, demonstrating poor capability of identifying patients not maintaining clinical remission until final follow-up (probability of no clinical remission in PTCs without HT: 21.05%, 95% CI 15.20-27.93). In conclusion, our data show that HT represents an independent prognostic parameter in intrathyroidal PTC, but cannot improve prognostic specificity. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  11. Contemporary management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, D Russell; Chin, Edward; Terris, David J

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a relatively common and frequently curable malignant neoplasm, accounting for nearly 2% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The diagnostic and management options have evolved considerably in the past decade, and a current understanding of these trends in the standard of care have assumed an important consideration in the practices of head and neck surgeons and endocrinologists alike. We sought to review the epidemiology and pathology of the several types of thyroid cancer and to present our evidence-based management algorithm. Every effort was made to offer alternative treatment strategies and supporting data where available. In addition to reviewing well-established approaches to diagnosis and management, emphasis is placed on newer techniques, including minimally invasive thyroidectomy, molecular detection of disease propensity, and the use of recombinant thyrotropin prior to radioiodine ablation.

  12. Female Reproductive Factors and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moleti, Mariacarla; Sturniolo, Giacomo; Di Mauro, Maria; Russo, Marco; Vermiglio, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is markedly more common in women than men, the highest female-to-male ratio being recorded during the reproductive period. This evidence has led to the suggestion that female hormonal and reproductive factors may account for the observed DTC gender disparity. This review focuses on current evidence on the risk of DTC in conjunction with major female reproductive factors, including the impact of pregnancy on DTC occurrence and progression/recurrence. Overall, studies exploring the link between the risk of DTC and menstrual and menopausal factors, oral contraceptives and/or hormone replacement therapy, showed these associations, if any, to be generally weak. Nonetheless, there is some evidence that higher levels of exposure to estrogens during reproductive years may confer an increased risk of DTC. As far as pregnancy is concerned, it is unclear whether a potential association between parity and risk of DTC actually exists, and whether it is enhanced in the short-term following delivery. A possible role for pregnancy-related factors in DTC progression has been recently suggested by some reports, the results of which are consistent with a worse outcome in the short-term of women diagnosed with DTC during gestation compared to non-pregnant control patients. Also, some progression of disease has been described in women with structural evidence of disease prior to pregnancy. However, there seems to be no impact from pregnancy in DTC-related death or overall survival. Several in vitro and animal studies have evaluated the influence of estrogens (E) and estrogen receptors (ERs) on thyroid cell proliferation. Presently available data are indicative of a role of E and ERs in thyroid cancer growth, although considerable discrepancies in respect to ER expression patterns in thyroid cancer tissues actually exist. Further studies providing more direct evidence on the possible role of E and of placental hormones and growth factors on thyroid

  13. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L; Rogan, Eleanor G; Cavalieri, Ercole L

    2013-12-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer most frequently occurs in premenopausal women. Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates significantly differed between cases and controls (p < 0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in thyroid cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts might play a role in the initiation of thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  14. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer most frequently occurs in premenopausal women. Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates significantly differed between cases and controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in thyroid cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts might play a role in the initiation of thyroid cancer. PMID:23686454

  15. Natural history of thyroid cancer [Review].

    PubMed

    Takano, Toru

    2017-02-02

    Thyroid cancers have long been considered to arise in middle age and, after their repeated proliferation, resulting in further damage to the genome, they progress to more aggressive and lethal cancers. However, in 2014, some studies were reported that might lead to a marked change in our understanding of the natural history of thyroid cancer. A high prevalence of papillary carcinoma in the young suggested that the first initiation of thyroid cancer is likely to occur in the infantile period. Such a conclusion was also supported by a very slow growth rate of papillary microcarcinomas (PMCs) in an observation trial. The proliferation rate of PMCs was negatively correlated with the age, and surgery to remove PMCs did not contribute to reduce mortality from thyroid cancer. These findings strongly suggested the existence of self-limiting cancers, which are truly malignant but do not progress to lethal cancers, for the first time in human history. The early detection of self-limiting cancers results in overdiagnosis. Ultrasonographic screening of the thyroid in the young should be avoided. Lethal thyroid cancers, whose origin is still unknown, appear suddenly after middle age. In the elderly, thyroid cancers are a mixture of self-limiting and lethal cancers; thus, when thyroid cancer is detected, careful follow-up with examination of its growth rate is required.

  16. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: The third most common thyroid cancer reviewed

    PubMed Central

    STAMATAKOS, MICHAEL; PARASKEVA, PANORAIA; STEFANAKI, CHARIKLEIA; KATSARONIS, PARASKEVAS; LAZARIS, ANDREAS; SAFIOLEAS, KONSTANTINOS; KONTZOGLOU, KONSTANTINOS

    2011-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is a type of thyroid cancer of neuroendocrine origin. It occurs in hereditary and sporadic forms, and its aggressive behavior is associated with the clinical presentation and type of RET mutation. Total thyroidectomy remains the ideal choice of treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment are the fundamental for a 100% cure rate. In this study, we present our experience of 3 cases, along with a complete review of the literature derived from a Pubmed Database search. PMID:22870127

  17. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  18. Hysterectomy, Oophorectomy, and Risk of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hendryx, Michael; Manson, JoAnn E.; Liang, XiaoYun; Margolis, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Estrogen has been suggested as a risk factor for thyroid cancer. Objective: The aim of this study is to examine the associations between hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), and incidence of thyroid cancer. Design: This was a prospective cohort study. Setting: The study was conducted at 40 clinical centers in the United States. Participants: A total of 127 566 women aged 50–79 were enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative during 1993–1998. Main Outcome Measures: Hysterectomy and BSO were self-reported. Incident thyroid cancer cases were confirmed by medical record review. Results: Three hundred forty-four incident thyroid cancer cases were identified during an average of 14.4 years of follow-up. Compared with women without hysterectomy, women with hysterectomy, regardless of ovarian status, had a significantly higher risk of thyroid cancer (hazard ratio 1.46 [95% confidence interval 1.16–1.85]). Hysterectomy with BSO was not associated with a lower risk for thyroid cancer compared with hysterectomy alone. Among women with hysterectomy alone, hormone therapy use was associated with lower risk of thyroid cancer (hazard ratio 0.47 [95% confidence interval 0.28–0.78]). However, we did not observe significant associations between hormone therapy use and thyroid cancer in women without hysterectomy or women with hysterectomy plus BSO. Conclusion: Our large prospective study observed that hysterectomy, regardless of oophorectomy status, was associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer among postmenopausal women. In addition, our data did not support the hypotheses that exogenous estrogen is a risk factor or that estrogen deprivation is a protective factor for thyroid cancer. Further research is needed to clarify whether these apparent associations may be due to shared risk factors between indications for hysterectomy and thyroid cancer. PMID:27459531

  19. Hysterectomy, Oophorectomy, and Risk of Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Juhua; Hendryx, Michael; Manson, JoAnn E; Liang, XiaoYun; Margolis, Karen L

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen has been suggested as a risk factor for thyroid cancer. The aim of this study is to examine the associations between hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), and incidence of thyroid cancer. This was a prospective cohort study. The study was conducted at 40 clinical centers in the United States. A total of 127 566 women aged 50-79 were enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative during 1993-1998. Hysterectomy and BSO were self-reported. Incident thyroid cancer cases were confirmed by medical record review. Three hundred forty-four incident thyroid cancer cases were identified during an average of 14.4 years of follow-up. Compared with women without hysterectomy, women with hysterectomy, regardless of ovarian status, had a significantly higher risk of thyroid cancer (hazard ratio 1.46 [95% confidence interval 1.16-1.85]). Hysterectomy with BSO was not associated with a lower risk for thyroid cancer compared with hysterectomy alone. Among women with hysterectomy alone, hormone therapy use was associated with lower risk of thyroid cancer (hazard ratio 0.47 [95% confidence interval 0.28-0.78]). However, we did not observe significant associations between hormone therapy use and thyroid cancer in women without hysterectomy or women with hysterectomy plus BSO. Our large prospective study observed that hysterectomy, regardless of oophorectomy status, was associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer among postmenopausal women. In addition, our data did not support the hypotheses that exogenous estrogen is a risk factor or that estrogen deprivation is a protective factor for thyroid cancer. Further research is needed to clarify whether these apparent associations may be due to shared risk factors between indications for hysterectomy and thyroid cancer.

  20. Targeting the TSH receptor in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher W; Paul, Jonathan; Gedye, Craig; Tolosa, Jorge; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun; Smith, Roger

    2017-03-28

    Recent advances in the arena of theranostics have necessitated a re-examining of previously established fields. The existing paradigm of therapeutic thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) targeting in the post-surgical management of differentiated thyroid cancer using levothyroxine and recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is well understood. However, in an era of personalized medicine, and with an increasing awareness of the risk profile of longstanding pharmacological hyperthyroidism, it is imperative clinicians understand the molecular basis and magnitude of benefit for individual patients. Furthermore, TSHR has been recently re-conceived as a selective target for residual metastatic thyroid cancer, with pilot data demonstrating effective targeting of nanoparticles to thyroid cancers using this receptor as a target. This review examines the evidence for TSHR signaling as an oncogenic pathway, and assesses the evidence for ongoing TSHR expression in thyroid cancer metastases. Priorities for further research are highlighted.

  1. Biomarkers for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Kruttibas; Sarkar, Siddik; Das, Subhasis; Mohanty, Biswanarayan; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid tumor contributes 1% of the total tumor but 90% of the endocrine related tumors. Majority of the thyroid cancers are being diagnosed by Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and histology. Although histology is considered as gold standard, it has some limitations, like variants of papillary and follicular cancer creates confusion among pathologists, where the morphological features are indistinguishable. Conventional histology and FNAC fails to provide any prognostic and therapeutic information. To address this problem, several immunohistochemical markers are proposed and their efficiency in thyroid cancer diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are being evaluated. Among the discussed immunohistochemical markers, few have potential in accurate diagnosis and prognosis of thyroid carcinoma. Hector battifora mesothelial antigen-1 (HBME-1) and Galectin-3 (GAL-3) shows highest specificity and sensitivity in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer respectively. Overexpression of EGFR in thyroid cancer is in proportionate with the severity of the advanced thyroid carcinoma, which required further evaluation and validation. Surgery and radio-iodine therapy is the main treatment modality, however; combined targeted therapeutic approach against different thyroid cancer receptor and biomarkers can reduce the side effect, and improve therapeutic efficiency. This review is oriented towards the finding of the potent thyroid cancer receptor having enhanced sensitivity and specificity, with diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic efficiency.

  2. Management of well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Selena; Shindo, Maisie

    2012-10-01

    This review provides an overview of current guideline recommendations for the clinical evaluation and surgical management of well-differentiated thyroid cancer, and further examines the evidence for controversial topics such as the minimum degree of primary resection, the role of elective central neck dissection, and the extent of lateral neck dissection. Well-differentiated thyroid cancer comprises the majority of thyroid cancers, about 90%, and includes both papillary and follicular carcinomas. Despite convergence of the medical community in establishing treatment guidelines under the American Thyroid Association, there still remain many areas of disagreement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thyroglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2015-04-15

    Identification of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is becoming increasingly common. Patients usually have an excellent prognosis. Most undergo total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and treatment with suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Patients require long term follow-up which includes measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg). Interpretation of serum Tg requires knowledge of the concurrent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration, as secretion is TSH dependant, and an awareness of the limitations of the methods used to measure it. These limitations include the heterogeneity of Tg in serum, the ability of assays to recognise forms of Tg secreted by a tumour, assay biases and not least the potential for interference in immunoassays for Tg from endogenous thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in patient serum. This review considers what the clinician wants to know and how Tg results can be interpreted in light of an awareness of assay limitations.

  4. Imaging for Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias; Fanti, Stefano; Budäus, Lars; Panebianco, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    Correct identification of metastatic sites in recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is of crucial importance because it leads to further treatment decisions. To provide an overview on current imaging procedures and their performance in recurrent PCa. Medline search via PubMed was performed with the keywords imaging, recurrent, and prostate cancer as well as more detailed searches including the keywords bone scan, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, PET, choline, FDG, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and PSMA, with emphasis on recent literature from 2010 to the present. Non-English published literature was excluded. Abstracts and full-text articles were reviewed and assessed for relevant content. In diagnostic imaging and particularly with newer technologies like positron emission tomography (PET), a profound lack of prospectively designed studies in recurrent PCa has to be noted. In most studies histologic validation has only been performed in a subset of patient cohorts. Heterogeneity of included patient cohorts, lack of standardized assessment, as well as diverging end points, hamper systematic comparison of different image modalities. Thus evidence for currently used imaging in recurrent PCa is only presented descriptively. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as bone scintigraphy still represent the standard imaging for recurrent PCa; however, particularly for detection of local recurrence, multiparametric MRI is a valuable imaging modality. PET using choline and particularly tracers against prostate-specific membrane antigen might improve visualization of metastatic lesions. These findings need to be validated in prospective trials. Imaging of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is important to guide further treatment. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy represent the current standard. Positron emission tomography, especially with cancer

  5. Diagnostic value of selected biochemical markers in the detection of recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer - comparison of calcitonin, procalcitonin, chromogranin A, and carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Woliński, Kosma; Kaznowski, Jarosław; Klimowicz, Aleksandra; Maciejewski, Adam; Łapińska-Cwojdzińska, Dagny; Gurgul, Edyta; Car, Adrian D; Fichna, Marta; Gut, Paweł; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the thyroid gland, which derives from parafollicular C cells. Periodic measurement of biochemical markers of MTC remains a crucial part of patient follow-up and disease monitoring. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value of four selected markers - calcitonin (Ct), procalcitonin (PCT), chromogranin A (CgA), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Patients with histopathologically confirmed MTC hospitalised in a single department between January 2015 and December 2015 were included in the study. Patients were subdivided into two groups: a remission group and an active disease group, based upon serum markers of MTC and imaging. Levels of Ct, PCT, CgA, and CEA were compared between the groups. Forty-four patients were included; 20 patients presented active disease and 24 were in remission. All patients with active disease had Ct exceeding the upper limit of normal range (10 pg/mL) - for that threshold the sensitivity was 100.0% and the specificity was 73.9%; for the best-fit threshold of 121.0 pg/mL the specificity was 95.8% with sensitivity 100.0%. There was significant correlation between Ct and PCT - p < 0.000001, r = 0.93. All patients with active disease exceeded the upper limit of the normal range (0.5 ng/mL) - for that threshold the sensitivity was 100.0% and the specificity was 83.3%; for the best-fit threshold of 0.95 ng/mL the specificity was 95.8% with sensitivity 100.0%. In case of CEA for the best-fit threshold of 12.66 ng/mL the specificity was 100.0% with sensitivity 57.9%; for CgA the best-fit threshold was 75.66 ng/mL with specificity 83.3% and sensitivity 75.0%. Our study confirms that PCT can be considered as an equivalent alternative for measurement of calcitonin. On the other hand, it is also worth noting that MTC can be a rare cause of very high levels of PTC not resulting from infectious diseases. The diagnostic value of CEA and chromogranin A is much lower and can be within the

  6. Lymph Node Dissection for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have a wide spectrum of clinical significance. Several variables are taken under consideration when trying to decide on the optimal management of patients with DTC. Routine prophylactic central and/or lateral lymph node dissection is not advocated with exception of central neck dissection for locally advanced tumors. When regarding recurrent disease, foundations have been laid for clinicians to make accurate decisions as to when to perform surgery and when to continue maintaining the patient’s disease under observation. These complex decisions are determined based upon multiple factors, not only regarding the patient’s disease but also the patient’s comprehension of the procedure and apprehension levels. Nevertheless if the patient and/or clinician are emotionally keen to surgically remove the disease then the procedure should be considered. PMID:28117285

  7. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  8. Targeted therapies in advanced differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel M; Carneiro, Benedito A; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and its incidence has been rising rapidly over the past 10 years. Although most patients with this disease have an excellent prognosis, a subset develops a more aggressive disease phenotype refractory to conventional therapies. Until recently, there was no effective therapy for these patients. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer, novel targeted therapies are being developed for this group of patients. Sorafenib and lenvatinib, small-molecule multikinase inhibitors, were approved for the treatment of progressive, symptomatic, radioactive iodine refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. This represents a major innovation in the therapy of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. However, these therapies still have many limitations and further research needs to be pursued with the ultimate goal of providing safe and effective personalized therapy for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  9. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kirsten; Woods, Andrew; Gupta, Sandeep; Smith, Roger; Wynne, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy. Learning points: Pregnancy is associated with the growth of thyroid nodules due to stimulation from oestrogen receptors on thyrocytes and HCG cross-stimulation of the TSH receptor. Thyroid cancer diagnosed during pregnancy has not been shown to be associated with increased rates of persistent or recurrent disease in most studies. There is little evidence to guide the management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy, where both maternal and foetal wellbeing must be carefully balanced. PMID:27994875

  10. Modifiable risk factors and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Stansifer, Kyle J; Guynan, John F; Wachal, Brandon M; Smith, Russell B

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the association between modifiable patient risk factors including tobacco use, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid cancer. Retrospective study with chart review. Midwest university hospital. Retrospective study comparing Midwest patients with thyroid cancer from our Thyroid Tumor and Cancer Registry with Midwest controls without a personal history of cancer. Descriptive statistics were created from patient questionnaires and chart reviews. Odds ratios (ORs) were reported for significant associations. There were 467 patients with cancer and 255 controls. The thyroid cancer group included 404 papillary, 47 follicular, 13 medullary, and 3 anaplastic cancers. When comparing all patients with cancer with controls, smoking more than 100 lifetime cigarettes was associated with a reduced cancer risk (OR, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.94). Secondhand smoke exposure did not show a statistically significant relationship to thyroid cancer. Compared with never drinking, current drinking was associated with a reduced cancer risk (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.73) as was consuming 1 to 2 drinks daily compared to drinking <1 drink daily (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.89). There was no difference between median BMI at age 20 years, lifetime maximum BMI, or current BMI between patients with cancer and controls. Our data showed no positive correlation between tobacco use, alcohol consumption, or obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Our data suggest that tobacco use and mild alcohol consumption may be associated with a slightly reduced risk of thyroid cancer. There was no association between BMI and thyroid cancer in our study population. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Radiotherapy technique for thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Thambi, V.; Pedapatti, P.J.; Murthy, A.; Kartha, P.K.

    1980-02-01

    A treatment technique for treating patients with cancer of the thyroid is presented. This is a modification of the bar-arc technique that uses a centrally blocked moving field. We have introduced wedges and partial midline block to achieve uniform dose within the treatment volume. This enables the desired dose to be delivered to the primary, the lymph nodes and the cervical soft tissues at risk, yet keeping the dose to the spinal cord to a minimum in the cervical region and to acceptable levels in the superior mediastinum.

  12. Operative management of locally advanced, differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laura Y.; Nixon, Iain J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Palmer, Frank L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of differentiated thyroid cancer tends to present with limited locoregional disease, leading to excellent long-term survival after operative treatment. Even patients with advanced local disease may survive for long periods with appropriate treatment. The aim of this study is to present our institutional experience of the management of locally advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and to analyze factors predictive of outcome. Methods We reviewed our institutional database of 3,664 previously untreated patients with differentiated thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010. A total of 153 patients had tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule that invaded the subcutaneous soft tissues, recurrent laryngeal nerve, larynx, trachea, or esophagus. Details on extent of operation and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Disease-specific survival and locoregional recurrence-free probability were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were determined by multivariate analysis. Results The median age of the 153 patients with tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule was 55 years (range 11–91 years). Eighty-nine patients (58.2%) were female. Twenty-three patients (15.0%) were staged as M1 at presentation, and 122 (79.7%) had pathologically involved lymph nodes. The most common site of extrathyroidal extension was the recurrent laryngeal nerve (51.0%) followed by the trachea (46.4%) and esophagus (39.2%). Sixty-three patients (41%) required resection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve due to tumor involvement. After surgery, 20 patients (13.0%) had gross residual disease (R2), 63 (41.2%) had a positive margin of resection (R1), and 70 (45.8%) had complete resection with negative margins (R0). With a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 5-year, disease-specific survival, when stratified by R0/R1/R2 resection, was 94.4%, 87.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P = .030). The data do not demonstrate a statistical difference in survival

  13. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  14. [Thyroidectomy of completion and reoperations for thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Sterniuk, Iu M

    2013-06-01

    In 1990--2010 yrs there were operated 159 patients for differentiated thyroid gland cancer (THGC) and 89 - for medullary thyroid gland cancer (MTHGC). The recurrence rate in application of radical tactics of surgical treatment in the first operation for differentiated THGC, comparing with such after reoperation, is lesser - (2.7 +/- 1.5) and (7.3 +/- 4.0)%, accordingly (P < 0.05). The results of diagnostic lymphadenectomy constitute a secure criterion for indication to perform a dissection of a lateral basin of the lymph nodes. The indices of survival in patients, suffering MTHGC, in whom a radical tactics was used in the first operation, are by 29.4% (P = 0.024) better, than in patients, to whom it was applied while subsequent operations, the disease-free survival - by 45.6% (P= .0001). Reoperation is indicated in occurrence of any local and regional recurrences of the THGC. In anaplastic THGC reoperations are performed rarely.

  15. Novel Approaches in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kun-Tai; Yu, Xiao-Min; Audhya, Anjon W.; Jaume, Juan C.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Prolla, Tomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), accounting for less than 2% of all thyroid cancer, is responsible for the majority of death from all thyroid malignancies and has a median survival of 6 months. The resistance of ATC to conventional thyroid cancer therapies, including radioiodine and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression, contributes to the very poor prognosis of this malignancy. This review will cover several cellular signaling pathways and mechanisms, including RET/PTC, RAS, BRAF, Notch, p53, and histone deacetylase, which are identified to play roles in the transformation and dedifferentiation process, and therapies that target these pathways. Lastly, novel approaches and agents involving the Notch1 pathway, nuclear factor κB, Trk-fused gene, cancer stem-like cells, mitochondrial mutation, and tumor immune microenvironment are discussed. With a better understanding of the biological process and treatment modality, the hope is to improve ATC outcome in the future. PMID:25260367

  16. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field.

    PubMed

    Farhood, B; Bahreyni Toossi, M T; Vosoughi, H; Khademi, S; Knaup, C

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient's setup, the technologists' experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient's setup time. Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient's setup, etc. could be considered.

  17. American Thyroid Association Statement on Preoperative Imaging for Thyroid Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrew J.; Bernet, Victor A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Loevner, Laurie A.; Mandel, Susan J.; Orloff, Lisa A.; Randolph, Gregory W.; Steward, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The success of surgery for thyroid cancer hinges on thorough and accurate preoperative imaging, which enables complete clearance of the primary tumor and affected lymph node compartments. This working group was charged by the Surgical Affairs Committee of the American Thyroid Association to examine the available literature and to review the most appropriate imaging studies for the planning of initial and revision surgery for thyroid cancer. Summary: Ultrasound remains the most important imaging modality in the evaluation of thyroid cancer, and should be used routinely to assess both the primary tumor and all associated cervical lymph node basins preoperatively. Positive lymph nodes may be distinguished from normal nodes based upon size, shape, echogenicity, hypervascularity, loss of hilar architecture, and the presence of calcifications. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of suspicious lymph nodes may be useful in guiding the extent of surgery. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography with contrast or magnetic resonance imaging) may be considered in select circumstances to better characterize tumor invasion and bulky, inferiorly located, or posteriorly located lymph nodes, or when ultrasound expertise is not available. The above recommendations are applicable to both initial and revision surgery. Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) or PET-CT may be helpful in cases of recurrent cancer with positive tumor markers and negative anatomic imaging. PMID:25188202

  18. [Therapy of recurrent cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Sekiba, K; Hayase, R

    1990-09-01

    1,122 uterine cancer patients above FIGO stage I a were treated at our hospital in the decade from 1980 to 1989. Total 69 patients diagnosed as recurrent cervical cancer had 82 lesions in 11 sites. The most frequent recurrent sites were uterus, vaginal stump and vaginal wall; the second sites were parametrium and pelvic wall. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia were done to patients with these lesions. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were used to patients with distant metastatic lesions to left supraclavicular lymph nodes and lung. But there has been no good results.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Patients Following Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Weiss, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients following thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer, although a potentially straightforward clinical problem, can present the clinician and patient with a variety of challenges. Most often the problems are related to the dose and preparation of thyroid hormone (TH) to use. Some patients feel less well following thyroidectomy and/or radioiodine ablation than they did before their diagnosis. We present evidence that levothyroxine (L-T4) is the preparation of choice, and keeping the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between detectable and 0.1 mU/L should be the standard of care in most cases. In unusual circumstances, when the patient remains clinically hypothyroid despite a suppressed TSH, we acknowledge there may be as yet unidentified factors influencing the body’s response to TH, and individualized therapy may be necessary in such patients. PMID:26886951

  20. Altered Epigenetic Mechanisms in Thyroid Cancer Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Maryam; Zadeh-Vakili, Azita; Azizi, Fereidoun; Foroughi, Forough; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2017-10-06

    Thyroid carcinoma (TC) is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the endocrine system. Molecular methods for diagnosis of invasive thyroid disease can be effectively adopted. Epigenetic factors play an important role in the diversity patterns of gene expression and the phenotypic and biological characteristics of TC subtypes. We aimed to review epigenetic changes in the main subtypes of TC, along with a presentation of the methods that have examined these changes, and active clinical trials for the treatment of advanced TCs targeting epigenetic changes. A literature analysis was performed in MEDLINE using PubMed, Elsevier, and Google Scholar for studies published up to 2016, using the keywords: "Epigenetic alterations" OR "Epigenetic changes", "thyroid cancers", "papillary thyroid cancer", "medullary thyroid cancer", "follicular thyroid cancer", and "anaplastic thyroid cancer", which resulted in 310 articles in English. All related abstracts were reviewed and studies were included that were published in English, had available full text, and determined the details of the methods and materials associated with the epigenetic patterns of TC and its subtypes (100 articles). Analysis of epigenetic alterations in TC subtypes helps to identify pathogenesis and can play an important role in the classification and diagnosis of tumors. Epigenetic mechanisms, especially aberrant methylation of DNA and microRNAs (miRs), are likely to play an important role in thyroid tumorigenesis. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of histone modification mechanisms in TC development.

  1. Lenvatinib: Role in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in treatment of advanced thyroid cancers, prognoses remain poor. Treatment of advanced, progressive disease remains challenging, with limited treatment options. Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib, and lenvatinib, which are now FDA-approved for thyroid cancer, have shown clinical benefit in advanced thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib is approved for treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). It has been studied in phase II and III trials for treatment of advanced RAI-refractory DTC, and in a phase II trial for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Lenvatinib targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptors 1-4 (FGFR-1-4), RET, c-kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Its antitumor activity may be due to antiangiogenic properties and direct antitumor effects. Lenvatinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in a variety of solid tumors, including MTC, in phase I and II clinical trials. In a phase II study in advanced RAI-refractory DTC, lenvatinib-treated patients achieved a 50% response rate (RR), with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12.6 months. In a phase III trial in RAI-refractory DTC, median PFS in lenvatinib-treated patients was 18.3 months, with a 65% overall RR, versus 3.6 months in placebo-treated patients, with a 2% RR. Adverse events occurring in >50% of patients included hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue/asthenia, and decreased appetite. Lenvatinib is a promising new agent for treatment of patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  2. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  3. The Surgical Approach to Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing rapidly. A large percentage of new cases identified fall into a low-risk category. As the incidence has increased, clinical experience has confirmed that the majority of patients will have excellent outcomes and that those at risk of doing badly can be reliably identified. Treatment for thyroid cancer is predominantly surgical. The decision about how aggressively this disease should be managed has remained controversial due to the excellent outcomes irrespective of the nature of surgical procedure chosen. This article reviews the developments in our understanding of the biology of thyroid cancer and the evidence that supports the approach to management. PMID:26918146

  4. Estrogen and its role in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Derwahl, Michael; Nicula, Diana

    2014-10-01

    Proliferative thyroid diseases are more prevalent in females than in males. Upon the onset of puberty, the incidence of thyroid cancer increases in females only and declines again after menopause. Estrogen is a potent growth factor both for benign and malignant thyroid cells that may explain the sex difference in the prevalence of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer. It exerts its growth-promoting effect through a classical genomic and a non-genomic pathway, mediated via a membrane-bound estrogen receptor. This receptor is linked to the tyrosine kinase signaling pathways MAPK and PI3K. In papillary thyroid carcinomas, these pathways may be activated either by a chromosomal rearrangement of the tyrosine receptor kinase TRKA, by RET/PTC genes, or by a BRAF mutation and, in addition, in females they may be stimulated by high levels of estrogen. Furthermore, estrogen is involved in the regulation of angiogenesis and metastasis that are critical for the outcome of thyroid cancer. In contrast to other carcinomas, however, detailed knowledge on this regulation is still missing for thyroid cancer. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Routine exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery can prevent nerve injury★

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenling; Xiang, Mingliang; Wu, Hao; Ma, Yan; Chen, Li; Cheng, Lan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the value of dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery with respect to preventing recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 5 344 patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Among these cases, 548 underwent dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while 4 796 did not. There were 12 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection (injury rate of 2.2%) and 512 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in those not undergoing nerve dissection (injury rate of 10.7%). This difference remained statistically significant between the two groups in terms of type of thyroid disease, type of surgery, and number of surgeries. Among the 548 cases undergoing recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection, 128 developed anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (incidence rate of 23.4%), but no recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was found. In addition, the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was significantly lower in patients with the inferior parathyroid gland and middle thyroid veins used as landmarks for locating the recurrent laryngeal nerve compared with those with the entry of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx as a landmark. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve are common, and that dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery is an effective means of preventing nerve injury. PMID:25206452

  6. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Imaging with [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-Exendin-4 for the Diagnosis of Recurrence or Dissemination of Medullary Thyroid Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pach, D.; Sowa-Staszczak, A.; Jabrocka-Hybel, A.; Stefańska, A.; Tomaszuk, M.; Mikołajczak, R.; Janota, B.; Trofimiuk-Müldner, M.; Przybylik-Mazurek, E.; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Epidemiological studies on medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) have shown that neither a change in stage at diagnosis nor improvement in survival has occurred during the past 30 years. In patients with detectable serum calcitonin and no clinically apparent disease, a careful search for local recurrence, and nodal or distant metastases, should be performed. Conventional imaging modalities will not show any disease until basal serum calcitonin is at least 150 pg/mL. The objective of the study was to present the first experience with labelled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 in the visualisation of MTC in humans. Material and Method. Four patients aged 22–74 years (two with sporadic and two with MEN2 syndrome-related disseminated MTC) were enrolled in the study. In all patients, GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed. Results. High-quality images were obtained in all patients. All previously known MTC lesions have been confirmed in GLP-1 scintigraphy. Moreover, one additional liver lesion was detected in sporadic MTC male patient. Conclusions. GLP-1 receptor imaging with [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 is able to detect MTC lesions. GLP-1 scintigraphy can serve as a confirmatory test in MTC patients, in whom other imaging procedures are inconsistent. PMID:23606839

  7. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Syrigos, K N; Konstantoulakis, M M; Constantoulakis, M; Marafelia, P; Koutras, D; Golematis, B C

    1994-01-01

    Antibodies against thyroid antigens are commonly found in patients with chronic gastritis type B (20-30%) and pernicious anaemia (50%), two disorders that predispose to gastric cancer. In addition, thyroid disease in increased incidence has been reported in breast and in colon cancer. In order to determine a) the incidence of antithyroid antibodies (ATA) in gastric cancer, b) the thyroid function in patients with ATA and c) the correlation between ATA and the presence of chronic gastritis, we examined the sera of 32 patients with gastric cancer (GC) for the presence of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies. T3, T4 and TSH values were also measured. The sera of 36 patients with malignant tumours of the GI tract other than stomach (OMT) and of 40 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Three of the 32 GC patients had antithyroglobulin antibodies, 4 had antimicrosomal and one had both types. Of the eight patients with ATA (25%) only two had hypothyroidism and another two histologically diagnosed chronic gastritis. Three sera of the healthy controls and one of the OMT had also antithyroid antibodies. To conclude, a significant number of patients with GC had ATA as compared to controls (p < 0.01) but the presence of ATA did not necessarily indicate an abnormality of thyroid function. The presence of antibodies did not correlate with chronic gastritis type B.

  8. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır Mahmut; Yegen, Cumhur Şevket; Soran, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of breast cancer and thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested by many studies in the literature, but the causality still needed to be proven. With this study we aimed to search the correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and breast cancer prognostic factors. Materials and Methods To this prospective cohort study 200 consecutive breast cancer patients, who were operated in our clinic were included. Patients’ serum thyroid hormone, anti-thyroglobuline (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) levels and tumors’ prognostic parameters (tumor size, axillary involvement, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, receptor status, Ki-67 proliferation index) were collected. The correlation between serum thyroid autoantibody levels and tumor’s prognostic factors were studied. Results The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (high levels of serum anti-TPO and/or anti-TG) was 18.5% (n=37). Patients with thyroid autoimmunity had a significant lower rate of axillary involvement and a lower rate of Ki-67 proliferation index (22% vs. 46% [p=0,007] and 12.73% vs. 20.72% [p=0.025], respectively) and were more commonly included to the “low-risk” group (<14%) according to their Ki-67 scores (68% vs. 46%; p=0.015). Other parameters did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion We found a favorable correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and axillary involvement and also Ki-67 proliferation index score, which are two crucial and strongly predictive parameters of breast cancer prognoses. This supports the idea of thyroid autoimmunity being a favorable prognostic parameter. Further studies are necessary to investigate the reasons of protective or predictive effect of high thyroid peroxidase levels in breast cancer patients.

  9. Aurora kinase A induces papillary thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis by promoting cofilin-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Yusufu; Jie, Tan; Jing, Zhou; Changwen, Wang; Pan, Yu; Chen, Chen; Tao, Huang

    2016-04-22

    Aurora-A (Aur-A), a member of the serine/threonine Aurora kinase family, plays an important role in ensuring genetic stability during cell division. Previous studies indicated that Aur-A possesses oncogenic activity and may be a valuable therapeutic target in cancer therapy. However, the role of Aur-A in the most common thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), remains largely unknown. In patients with PTC, cancer cell migration and invasion account for most of the metastasis, recurrence, and cancer-related deaths. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is the most important effector of actin polymerization and depolymerization, determining the direction of cell migration. Here, we assessed the correlation between Aur-A and CFL-1 in PTC with lymph node metastasis. Tissue microarray data showed that simultaneous overexpression of Aur-A and CFL-1 correlated with lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer tissue. Inhibition of Aur-A suppressed thyroid cancer cell migration in vitro and decreased lymph node metastasis in nude mice. Importantly, Aur-A increased the non-phosphorylated, active form of CFL-1 in TPC-1 cells, thus promoting cancer cell migration and thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis. Our findings indicate that the combination of Aur-A and CFL-1 may be useful as a molecular prediction model for lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer and raise the possibility of targeting Aur-A and CFL-1 for more effective treatment of thyroid cancer.

  10. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-21

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  11. Radionuclides in the management of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear medicine imaging was born over 60 years ago with imaging of thyroid conditions. Most of our present imaging devices were developed for imaging of the thyroid and thyroid cancer. Millions of patients in over 100 countries have been diagnosed and treated for thyroid cancer using nuclear medicine techniques. It remains, however, one of the most dynamic areas of development in nuclear medicine with new roles for positron emission tomography and receptor based imaging. In addition to this is research into combinations of genetic therapy and radioisotopes and receptor based therapy using beta emitting analogues of somatostatin. Despite the use of ultrasound computed tomography and magnetic resonance, nuclear medicine techniques remain central to both imaging and therapy in thyroid disease and the field has recently become one of the most dynamic within the specialty. PMID:18083649

  12. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Thomas-Teinturier, Cecile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Helene; Jackson, Angela; Munzer, Martine; N'Guyen, Tan Dat; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne; Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Schlumberger, Martin; Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  13. Thyroid cancer cell lines: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Saiselet, Manuel; Floor, Sébastien; Tarabichi, Maxime; Dom, Geneviève; Hébrant, Aline; van Staveren, Wilma C. G.; Maenhaut, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Human thyroid cancer cell lines are the most used models for thyroid cancer studies. They must be used with detailed knowledge of their characteristics. These in vitro cell lines originate from differentiated and dedifferentiated in vivo human thyroid tumors. However, it has been shown that mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines were closer to dedifferentiated in vivo thyroid tumors (anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, ATC) than to differentiated ones. Here an overview of the knowledge of these models was made. The mutational status of six human thyroid cancer cell lines (WRO, FTC133, BCPAP, TPC1, K1, and 8505C) was in line with previously reported findings for 10 genes frequently mutated in thyroid cancer. However, the presence of a BRAF mutation (T1799A: V600E) in WRO questions the use of this cell line as a model for follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC). Next, to investigate the biological meaning of the modulated mRNAs in these cells, a pathway analysis on previously obtained mRNA profiles was performed on five cell lines. In five cell lines, the MHC class II pathway was down-regulated and in four of them, ribosome biosynthesis and translation pathways were up-regulated. mRNA expression profiles of the cell lines were also compared to those of the different types of thyroid cancers. Three datasets originating from different microarray platforms and derived from distinct laboratories were used. This meta-analysis showed a significant higher correlation between the profiles of the thyroid cancer cell lines and ATC, than to differentiated thyroid tumors (i.e., PTC or FTC) specifically for DNA replication. This already observed higher correlation was obtained here with an increased number of in vivo tumors and using different platforms. In summary, this would suggest that some papillary thyroid carcinoma or follicular thyroid carcinoma (PTC or FTC) cell lines (i.e., TPC-1) might have partially lost their original DNA synthesis/replication regulation mechanisms during

  14. IL-4, IL-10 and high sensitivity-CRP as potential serum biomarkers of persistent/recurrent disease in papillary thyroid carcinoma with/without Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Stanciu, Adina E; Serdarevic, Nafija; Hurduc, Anca E; Stanciu, Marcel M

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the potential role of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as serum biomarkers of persistent/recurrent disease in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with/without Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Eighty consecutive patients (64 F/16 M, 43.2 ± 12.7 years) with PTC and 40 (37 F/3 M, 40.6 ± 12.3 years) with papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (PTC + HT) were evaluated before radioiodine therapy. A control group of 20 patients with HT without thyroid cancer (18 F/2 M, 47.3 ± 2.8 years) was included in the study for the comparison of cytokine levels. No meaningful differences were found in clinical outcomes between PTC and PTC + HT groups (47.5% vs. 45% persistent/recurrent disease). Serum IL-4, IL-10 and hs-CRP levels were higher in patients with persistent/recurrent disease compared to those without recurrence (p < 0.001). IL-4, IL-10 and hs-CRP were also found in substantially higher concentrations in PTC + HT patients with persistent/recurrent disease than in patients with HT or PTC (with or without recurrence) (p < 0.01). Positive correlations were observed between IL-4, IL-10, hs-CRP and thyroglobulin (Tg) (r between 0.48 and 0.56, p < 0.005) or antithyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) (r between 0.63 and 0.80, p < 0.002) in PTC and PTC + HT patients with persistent/recurrent disease. Increased levels of serum IL-4, IL-10 and hs-CRP are associated with persistent/recurrent disease in PTC and PTC + HT patients. Our results suggest that these biomarkers might be used to improve patient stratification according to the risk of recurrence, especially in patients with PTC + HT, where Tg levels are not reliable due to presence of TgAb.

  15. Thyroid cancer following exposure to radioactive iodine.

    PubMed

    Robbins, J; Schneider, A B

    2000-04-01

    The thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs for radiation-induced oncogenesis and the magnitude of the risk from external radiation is well understood. This is not the case for internal radiation derived from the radioiodines, a matter of practical importance because of medical use and potential accidental exposure. This article reviews current knowledge derived from the follow-up of patients receiving diagnostic or therapeutic 131I and populations exposed to radioactive fallout. The latter includes the nuclear power station accident at Chernobyl and the results of atomic bomb development and testing at Hanford, the Nevada Test Site and the Marshall Islands. The most cogent information comes from Chernobyl where an epidemic of childhood thyroid cancer has followed exposure to radioiodine that was mainly 131I. Although much has been learned from this experience about the nature of radioiodine induced thyroid cancer in young children, the reconstruction of thyroid radiation doses is too preliminary to provide accurate knowledge of the risk in comparison to that from external radiation. In the Marshall Islands, much of the exposure was from short-lived radioiodines as well as external radiation, obviating the possibility to determine the risk from 131I. Exposure to 131I in the continental United States from atomic bomb testing is expected to have caused some thyroid cancers, but only in the immediate vicinity of the Nevada Test Site has any evidence of radiation-induced thyroid neoplasms been adduced. This evidence is minimally significant statistically, and not significant for thyroid cancer per se. Medical use of radioiodine has not been observed to cause thyroid cancer but very few of the patients studied were young children, the group most sensitive to thyroid radiation. Despite these limitations, this information is sufficient to make some suggestions concerning protective measures in the case of nuclear accidents and the follow up of individuals who

  16. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer: are they immunologically linked?

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Margret; Schott, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most common autoimmune disease in humans frequently leading to hypothyroidism. HT is characterized by a cellular immune response with lymphatic infiltration of the thyroid gland by T and B cells, as well as by a humoral immune response leading to specific antibody production. The synchronous appearance of HT and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) indicates an immunological link between the two entities. Three different pathomechanisms may be postulated, including preexisting autoimmunity leading to malignancy due to inflammation, immunity towards preexisiting tumor cells leading to specific autoimmunity, and immune tolerance leading to malignancy despite (auto)immunity. In this article we review data describing these potential mechanisms that might lead to the synchronous appearance of HT and PTC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong; Chen, Guang

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient's neck skin feeling.

  18. [Diagnostics and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer using nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Morsing, Anni; Bogsrud, Trond Velde

    2012-06-25

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a rare cancer with excellent prognosis for most patients. Primary treatment is surgery. Adjuvant radioiodine is used after surgery and in case of residual radioiodine positive disease. Measurements of serum thyroglobulin levels and neck ultrasound (US) are the primary follow-up procedures. For suspected recurrence, US, computed tomography (CT), radioiodine single photon emission computed tomography/CT, and FDG positron emission tomography/CT will be appropriate choices for restaging and further treatment planning. Multidisciplinary collaboration is crucial for optimal management of patients with DTC.

  19. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence. Because of its uncommon occurrence, randomized trials have not been applied to test best-care options in children. Even in adults that have a 10-fold or higher incidence of thyroid cancer than children, few prospective trials have been executed to compare treatment approaches. We recognize that treatment recommendations have changed over the past few decades and will continue to do so. Respecting the aggressiveness of pediatric thyroid cancer, high recurrence rates, and the problems associated with decades of long-term follow-up, a premium should be placed on treatments that minimize risk of recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments and facilitate follow-up. We recommend that total thyroidectomy and central compartment lymph node dissection is the surgical procedure of choice for children with DTC if it can be performed by a high-volume thyroid surgeon. We recommend radioactive iodine therapy for remnant ablation or residual disease for most children with DTC. We recommend long-term follow-up because disease can recur decades after initial diagnosis and therapy. Considering the complexity of DTC management and the potential complications associated with therapy, it is essential that pediatric DTC be managed by physicians with expertise in this area. PMID:21880704

  20. The immune network in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune system plays critical roles in tumor prevention, but also in its initiation and progression. Tumors are subjected to immunosurveillance, but cancer cells generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that favors their escape from immune-mediated elimination. During chronic inflammation, immune cells can contribute to the formation and progression of tumors by producing mitogenic, prosurvival, proangiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Thyroid cancer is the most frequent type of endocrine neoplasia and is the most rapidly increasing cancer in the US. In this review, we discuss recent findings on how different immune cells and mediators can contribute to thyroid cancer development and progression. PMID:27471646

  1. Cediranib Maleate With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-09

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  2. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  3. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Thyroid function in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ditsch, Nina; Liebhardt, Susanne; Von Koch, Franz; Lenhard, Miriam; Vogeser, Michael; Spitzweg, Christine; Gallwas, Julia; Toth, Bettina

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies indicate a possible relationship between hypothyroidism and breast cancer in vivo. In addition, oestrogen-like effects of thyroid hormones on breast cancer cell growth are seen in vitro. Therefore, this study evaluated thyroid function in breast cancer patients, women with benign breast tumour and healthy controls. Breast cancer patients (n=65), women with carcinoma in situ (n=13) or benign breast tumour (n=27), and healthy controls (n=38) were included in the study. Thyroid history was reported. Thyroid hormones (fT4, fT3, TSH) and thyroid antibodies (TPO, TRAK and TG) were determined. Statistical analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact test (p<0.005 significant). fT3 and fT4 levels were highest in breast cancer patients, and differed significantly from controls (fT3 and fT4: p<0.001) as well as from patients with benign breast tumour (fT3: p=0.021; fT4: p=0.017). TSH was highest in the control group without reaching significance. With regard to TRAK antibodies, breast cancer patients showed the highest levels differing significantly from women with benign breast tumours (p=0.048). Significant differences in fT3/fT4 as well as TRAK levels were observed among breast cancer patients, women with benign breast tumours and healthy controls. Further studies using larger patient groups are part of ongoing research.

  5. Prognosis and management of invasive well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Urken, Mark L

    2010-04-01

    Invasive thyroid cancer is often asymptomatic and can take the surgeon and the patient by surprise. Maintenance of a high level of suspicion in patients who present with symptoms, an abnormal examination, recurrent disease, or documented metastatic disease lead the clinician to obtain appropriate cross-sectional imaging that helps to define the full extent of the disease. Specific guidelines are provided for the management of the various structures in the neck that are at risk for involvement by disease extension outside the gland or extracapsular extension outside a lymph node with involvement by metastatic disease. This article reviews the prognosis, diagnosis, management, and implications of invasive thyroid cancer affecting the various structures of the central and lateral compartments of the neck. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reassessing risks and benefits of living kidney donors with a history of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Adler, Joel T; Yeh, Heidi; Barbesino, Giuseppe; Lubitz, Carrie C

    2017-09-29

    Many potential and willing living kidney donors are excluded from donating for a history of malignancy. There is appropriate caution toward patients with a history of malignancy because of concern for transmission of donor-derived malignancy. Thyroid cancer is common and increasing in incidence, and outcomes are very good in otherwise young, healthy potential donors. We review the evidence and guidelines regarding recurrence and transmission risk of thyroid cancer, and then we suggest a standardized guideline for otherwise healthy donors with a history of thyroid malignancy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  8. Clinical characteristics and molecular pathology of skull ectopic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Longxing; Wang, Zhongyong; Ma, Jiawei; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhu, Haojiang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Zhu, Qing; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is very common, but skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries. There are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. This paper aims to investigate the clinical characteristics and possible molecular mechanisms of this rare disease. Five keywords of "thyroid gland", "ectopic thyroid", "thyroid cancer", "ectopic thyroid cancer" and "metastatic thyroid cancer" were included and 50 years of literatures in the PubMed-MEDLINE and Wanfang database were reviewed. By combining the test data of 2 cases of surgical patient tissue microarray specimens-molecular immunology pathology, the possible molecular mechanisms were analyzed and molecular regulation network diagram was drawn. The skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries and there are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. The molecular expressions of skull ectopic thyroid cancer, orthotopic thyroid cancer, and metastatic thyroid cancer were not the same: (I) AKT (P=0.012, 0.002) and mTOR (P=0.002, 0.004) were highly expressed in the skull ectopic thyroid cancer; (II) BRAF (P=0.029, 0.014) and ERK (P=0.002, 0.001) were highly expressed in orthotopic thyroid cancer; (III) MMP-9 (P=0.023, 0.016) was highly expressed in metastatic thyroid cancer. According to the molecular information base, the PI3K is predicted to be a key crossing gene of the above three signaling pathways, which showed no significant differences in these three thyroid cancers (P=0.692, 0.388, 0.227), but PI3K has regulation roles in the three signaling pathways of Akt/mTOR, MAPK, and NF-κB. PI3K gene is an important starting gene of thyroid cancers. After the canceration starts, due to the fact that the local microenvironments of

  9. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of recurrent laryngeal nerve function during thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J; Smith, B; Dougherty, T; Ayshford, C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is disparity in the reported incidence of temporary and permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy following thyroidectomy. Much of the disparity is due to the method of assessing vocal cord function. We sought to identify the incidence and natural history of temporary and permanent vocal cord palsy following thyroid surgery. The authors wanted to establish whether intraoperative nerve monitoring and stimulation aids in prognosis when managing vocal cord palsy. Methods Prospective data on consecutive thyroid operations were collected. Intraoperative nerve monitoring and stimulation, using an endotracheal tube mounted device, was performed in all cases. Endoscopic examination of the larynx was performed on the first postoperative day and at three weeks. Results Data on 102 patients and 123 nerves were collated. Temporary and permanent RLN palsy rates were 6.1% and 1.7%. Most RLN palsies were identified on the first postoperative day with all recognised at the three-week review. No preoperative clinical risk factors were identified. Although dysphonia at the three-week follow-up visit was the only significant predictor of vocal cord palsy, only two-thirds of patients with cord palsies were dysphonic. Intraoperative nerve monitoring and stimulation did not predict outcome in terms of vocal cord function. Conclusions Temporary nerve palsy rates were consistent with other series where direct laryngoscopy is used to assess laryngeal function. Direct laryngoscopy is the only reliable measure of cord function, with intraoperative monitoring being neither a reliable predictor of cord function nor a predictor of eventual laryngeal function. The fact that all temporary palsies recovered within four months has implications for staged procedures. PMID:24780671

  11. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  12. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Gazic, Barbara; Dolzan, Vita; Besic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1) are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC). Methods A retrospective study was performed in 139 patients treated by thyroid surgery for a Hurthle cell neoplasm. HCTC, Hurthle cell thyroid adenoma (HCTA) or Hurthle cell thyroid nodule (HCTN) were diagnosed by pathomorphology. DNA was extracted from cores of histologically confirmed normal tissue obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens and genotyped for investigated polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to compare genotype distributions between patient groups. Results HCTC, HCTA and HCTN were diagnosed in 53, 47 and 21 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease and recurrence of HCTC were diagnosed in 20 and 16 HCTC patients, respectively. Genotypes and allele frequencies of investigated polymorphisms did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with HCTC, HCTA and HCTN. Under the dominant genetic model we observed no differences in the genotype frequency distribution of the investigated polymorphisms when the HCTA and HCTN group was compared to the HCTC group for diagnosis of HCTC or for the presence of metastatic disease. However, GPX1 polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of recurrent disease (p = 0.040). Conclusions GPX1 polymorphism may influence the risk for recurrent disease in HCTC. PMID:27679545

  13. Endosonographic examination of thyroid gland among patients with nonthyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, Amer A.; Mahayni, Abdulah A.; Chawki, Ghaleb R.; Yoder, Leon; Elkhatib, Fateh A.; Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is limited endosonographic literature regarding thyroid gland pathology, which is frequently visualized during upper endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Our objective was to assess the prevalence of benign and malignant thyroid lesions encountered during routine upper EUS within a cancer center setting. Materials and Methods: The data were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. All upper EUS procedures performed between October 2012 and July 2014 were reviewed at a large referral cancer center. Data collected included patient demographics, preexisting thyroid conditions, thyroid gland dimensions, the presence or absence of thyroid lesions, and EUS morphology of lesions if present, and interventions performed to characterize thyroid lesions and pathology results when applicable. Results: Two hundred and forty-five EUS procedures were reviewed. Of these, 100 cases reported a detailed endosonographic examination of the thyroid gland. Most of the thyroid glands were endosonographically visualized when the tip of the scope was at 18 cm from the incisors. Twelve cases showed thyroid lesions, out of which three previously undiagnosed thyroid cancers were visualized during EUS (two primary papillary thyroid cancers and one anaplastic thyroid cancer). Transesophageal EUS-guided fine needle aspiration of thyroid lesions was feasible when the lesion was in the inferior portion of the thyroid gland, and the tip of the scope was at 18 cm or more from the incisors. Conclusions: Routine EUS examination may detect unexpected thyroid lesions including malignant ones. We encourage endosonographers to screen the visualized portions of the thyroid gland during routine withdrawal of the echoendoscope. PMID:27803906

  14. Endosonographic examination of thyroid gland among patients with nonthyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Amer A; Mahayni, Abdulah A; Chawki, Ghaleb R; Yoder, Leon; Elkhatib, Fateh A; Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    There is limited endosonographic literature regarding thyroid gland pathology, which is frequently visualized during upper endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Our objective was to assess the prevalence of benign and malignant thyroid lesions encountered during routine upper EUS within a cancer center setting. The data were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. All upper EUS procedures performed between October 2012 and July 2014 were reviewed at a large referral cancer center. Data collected included patient demographics, preexisting thyroid conditions, thyroid gland dimensions, the presence or absence of thyroid lesions, and EUS morphology of lesions if present, and interventions performed to characterize thyroid lesions and pathology results when applicable. Two hundred and forty-five EUS procedures were reviewed. Of these, 100 cases reported a detailed endosonographic examination of the thyroid gland. Most of the thyroid glands were endosonographically visualized when the tip of the scope was at 18 cm from the incisors. Twelve cases showed thyroid lesions, out of which three previously undiagnosed thyroid cancers were visualized during EUS (two primary papillary thyroid cancers and one anaplastic thyroid cancer). Transesophageal EUS-guided fine needle aspiration of thyroid lesions was feasible when the lesion was in the inferior portion of the thyroid gland, and the tip of the scope was at 18 cm or more from the incisors. Routine EUS examination may detect unexpected thyroid lesions including malignant ones. We encourage endosonographers to screen the visualized portions of the thyroid gland during routine withdrawal of the echoendoscope.

  15. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    PubMed

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  16. Thyroid Cancer: Pathogenesis and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liebner, David A.; Shah, Manisha H.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic options for advanced, unresectable radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancers have historically been limited. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of the various subtypes of thyroid cancer has led to increased interest in the development of targeted therapies, with potential strategies including angiogenesis inhibition, inhibition of aberrant intracellular signaling in the MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways, radioimmunotherapy, and redifferentiation agents. On the basis of a recent positive phase III clinical trial, the RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor vandetanib has received FDA approval as of April 2011 for use in the treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer. Several other recent phase II clinical trials in advanced thyroid cancer have demonstrated significant activity, and multiple other promising therapeutic strategies are in earlier phases of clinical development. The recent progress in targeted therapy is already revolutionizing management paradigms for advanced thyroid cancer, and will likely continue to dramatically expand treatment options in the coming years. PMID:23148184

  17. Potential Utility and Limitations of Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines as Models for Studying Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pilli, Tania; Prasad, Kanteti V.; Jayarama, Shankar; Pacini, Furio

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor-derived cell lines are widely used to study the mechanisms involved in thyroid carcinogenesis but recent studies have reported redundancy among thyroid cancer cell lines and identification of some “thyroid cell lines” that are likely not of thyroid origin. Summary In this review, we have summarized the uses, the limitations, and the existing problems associated with the available follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer cell lines. There are some limitations to the use of cell lines as a model to “mimic” in vivo tumors. Based on the gene expression profiles of thyroid cell lines originating from tumors of different types it has become apparent that some of the cell lines are closely related to each other and to those of undifferentiated carcinomas. Further, many cell lines have lost the expression of thyroid-specific genes and have altered karyotypes, while they exhibit activation of several oncogenes (BRAF, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1; RAS, rat sarcoma; and RET/PTC, rearranged in transformation/papillary thyroid carcinoma) and inactivation of tumor suppressor gene (TP53) which is known to be important for thyroid tumorigenesis. Conclusions A careful selection of thyroid cancer cell lines that reflect the major characteristics of a particular type of thyroid cancer being investigated could be used as a good model system to analyze the signaling pathways that may be important in thyroid carcinogenesis. Further, the review of literature also suggests that some of the limitations can be overcome by using multiple cell lines derived from the same type of tumor. PMID:20001716

  18. [Recurrent urological cancer--diagnose and treatment].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, H; Akaza, H

    1998-02-01

    Clinical efforts to spare bladder function even in the case of muscle invasive recurrent bladder cancer is taking. Early detection of recurrence is essential for bladder sparing, and both urinary NMP22 and BTA are thought to have potency to detect recurrence of bladder cancer earlier than urinary cytology. Intravesical administration of BCG for superficial bladder cancer and intraarterial injection of chemoagents (Methotrexate and Cisplatin) with radiation for muscle invasive bladder cancer are thought to play important roles in sparing the bladder. Early detection of recurrent prostate cancer is becoming easier by ultrasensitive PSA assay. Though the value of early detection of recurrence is not proven since the benefits of early hormonal treatment have not yet been established, that should be a good indicator to evaluate new and coming treatments and play a important role to develop an effective treatment for recurrent prostate cancer.

  19. Thyroid cancer in black thyroid glands: the effect of age and race.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yasin; Crawford, Byron E; Murci, Mohammad; Masoodi, Hammad; Khan, Amna N; Hu, Tian; Kandil, Emad; Friedlander, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Black thyroid pigmentation is a rare entity. The risk of malignancy is higher in black thyroid compared to non-black thyroid glands. We aimed to examine the effect of age and race on the risk of malignancy in black thyroid glands. We identified a series of consecutive patients who underwent thyroidectomy at an academic institution between January 1998 and May 2013. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and histopathology data were reviewed. Among 925 patients who underwent thyroidectomy, 112 (12.1%) patients with black thyroid glands were identified. The incidence of thyroid cancer was 55.4% in black thyroid glands compared to 32.8% in non-black thyroid glands (p < 0.0001). The incidence of papillary thyroid cancer among the black and non-black thyroid glands was 34.8 and 20%, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean age (± SD) for patients with black thyroid glands and those with non-black thyroid was 54.3 ± 12.8 and 51.2 ± 15.7 years, respectively (p = 0.05). Black thyroid glands were also associated with a higher incidence of microcarcinomas (76 vs. 59%, p = 0.02). Among patients with black thyroid glands, Caucasians had a higher malignancy rate (63.4%) than African-Americans (37%; p = 0.03). The incidence of malignancy is higher in black thyroid compared to non-black thyroid glands, specifically in Caucasians. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Involvement of Aberrant Glycosylation in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Eiji; Ito, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification reactions and nearly half of all known proteins in eukaryotes are glycosylated. In fact, changes in oligosaccharides structures are associated with many physiological and pathological events, including cell growth, migration and differentiation, and tumor invasion. Therefore, functional glycomics, which is a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of glycans, is attracting the increasing attention of scientists in various fields of life science. In cases of thyroid cancer, the biological characters and prognosis are completely different in each type of histopathology, and their oligosaccharide structures as well as the expression of glycosyltransferases are also different. In this review, we summarized our previous papers on oligosaccharides and thyroid cancers and discussed a possible function of oligosaccharides in the carcinogenesis in thyroid cancer. PMID:20652009

  1. BRAFV600E status adds incremental value to current risk classification systems in predicting papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jason D.; Sadow, Peter M.; Hodin, Richard A.; Le, Long Phi; Gaz, Randall D.; Randolph, Gregory W.; Stephen, Antonia E.; Parangi, Sareh; Daniels, Gilbert H.; Lubitz, Carrie C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) recurrence risk is difficult to predict. No current risk classification system incorporates BRAF mutational status. Here, we assess the incremental value of BRAF mutational status in predicting PTC recurrence relative to existing recurrence risk algorithms. Methods Serial data were collected for a historical cohort having undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC over a five-year period. Corresponding BRAFV600E testing was performed and Cox proportional hazard regression modeling, with and without BRAF status, was used to evaluate existing recurrence risk algorithms. Results The five-year cumulative PTC recurrence incidence within our 356 patient cohort was 15%. 205 (81%) of associated archived specimens were successfully genotyped and 110 (54%) harbored the BRAFV600E mutation. The five-year cumulative recurrence incidence among BRAFV600E patients was 20%, versus 8% among BRAF wild type. BRAFV600E was significantly associated with time to recurrence when added to the following algorithms: AMES (HR 2.43 [1.08–5.49]), MACIS category (HR 2.46 [1.09–5.54]), AJCC-TNM (HR 2.51 [1.11, 5.66]), and ATA recurrence-risk category (HR 2.44 [1.08–5.50]), and model discrimination improved (incremental c-index range 0.046–0.109). Conclusions Addition of BRAF mutational status to established risk algorithms improves discrimination of recurrence risk in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for PTC. PMID:23158172

  2. Progress in molecular-based management of differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao; Haugen, Bryan R; Schlumberger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Substantial developments have occurred in the past 5–10 years in clinical translational research of thyroid cancer. Diagnostic molecular markers, such as RET-PTC, RAS, and BRAFV600E mutations; galectin 3; and a new gene expression classifier, are outstanding examples that have improved diagnosis of thyroid nodules. BRAF mutation is a prognostic genetic marker that has improved risk stratification and hence tailored management of patients with thyroid cancer, including those with conventionally low risks. Novel molecular-targeted treatments hold great promise for radioiodine-refractory and surgically inoperable thyroid cancers as shown in clinical trials; such treatments are likely to become a component of the standard treatment regimen for patients with thyroid cancer in the near future. These novel molecular-based management strategies for thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer are the most exciting developments in this unprecedented era of molecular thyroid-cancer medicine. PMID:23668556

  3. Papillary thyroid cancer with bilateral adrenal metastases.

    PubMed

    Batawil, Nadia

    2013-12-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer is the most common type of thyroid malignancy and has an excellent prognosis. Distant organ metastasis is rare. Bilateral adrenal metastases with iodine uptake has not been described before. A 47-year-old woman presented for evaluation because of severe right upper arm pain and weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed a compression fracture at the third thoracic vertebra associated with a soft tissue mass. Computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy of the mass showed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Ultrasonography of the neck showed an enlarged right thyroid lobe with cervical lymphadenopathy. A high-resolution CT scan of the chest showed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. Treatment included total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection, external beam radiation to the thoracic spine, and (131)I therapy. Initial whole body (131)I scintigraphy showed faint uptake in the right upper abdomen, interpreted as a sign of physiologic bowel activity; however, repeat whole body (131)I scintigraphy showed increased uptake in both adrenal glands, consistent with metastatic disease. Serial abdominal CT scans showed progressively enlarging bilateral adrenal masses. Despite additional treatment with (131)I, the patient's disease progressed at all metastatic sites. This patient had bilateral adrenal metastases from advanced papillary thyroid cancer with distant metastasis to lung and bone at initial presentation and poor response to repeated (131)I therapy. Unilateral adrenal metastasis from thyroid cancer has been described previously in six cases; this is the first case report of bilateral adrenal metastases. Bilateral adrenal metastasis is rare in papillary thyroid cancer. Elevated abdominal uptake of (131)I in a high-risk patient may be a sign of abdominal metastatic disease.

  4. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  5. Approach to the pregnant patient with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L

    2011-02-01

    Thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine malignancy, increased progressively from 1972 through 2002 largely as the result of an increasing incidence of small papillary thyroid cancers, the majority of which are less than 2 cm and which increased almost 3-fold during the 30-yr study. During this time, thyroid cancer was found to affect women more often than men by a ratio of almost 3 to 1. Moreover, papillary thyroid cancer was found to be the most common form of differentiated thyroid cancer among women of childbearing age, 10% of whom were either pregnant or in the early postpartum period when thyroid cancer was diagnosed. Although the prevalence of thyroid cancer in pregnant women remains high, most are first identified after delivery. Nonetheless, the management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy poses serious diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to both the patient and fetus. The thyroid gland may secrete more thyroid hormone than usual during early pregnancy, which may not only be the cause of this problem but also may be responsible for the higher rate of differentiated thyroid cancer during pregnancy. There is concern about therapy for thyroid cancer during this period, including the timing of surgery, the use of levothyroxine, and the assessment of follow-up during gestation.

  6. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. This leads to low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism) and causes the pituitary gland to release more ... is that it can cause the symptoms of hypothyroidism, including tiredness, depression, weight gain, sleepiness, constipation, muscle ...

  7. Germline HABP2 Mutation Causing Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Jia, Li; Merino, Maria J.; Agarwal, Sunita K.; Zhang, Lisa; Cam, Maggie; Patel, Dhaval; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer accounts for 3 to 9% of all cases of thyroid cancer, but the susceptibility genes are not known. Here, we report a germline variant of HABP2 in seven affected members of a kindred with familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer and in 4.7% of 423 patients with thyroid cancer. This variant was associated with increased HABP2 protein expression in tumor samples from affected family members, as compared with normal adjacent thyroid tissue and samples from sporadic cancers. Functional studies showed that HABP2 has a tumor-suppressive effect, whereas the G534E variant results in loss of function. PMID:26222560

  8. Treating medullary thyroid cancer in the age of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Hu, Mimi I; Jimenez, Camilo; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Cote, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor deriving from the thyroid parafollicular cell. Thyroidectomy continues to serve as the primary initial treatment for this cancer. Because standard cytotoxic chemotherapy has proven ineffective, reoperation and external beam radiation therapy had been the only tools to treat recurrences or distant disease. The discovery that aberrant activation of RET, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is a primary driver of MTC tumorigenesis led to clinical trials using RET-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The successes of those trials led to the approval of vandetanib and cabozantinib for treating patients with progressive or symptomatic MTC. The availability of these drugs, along with additional targeted therapies in development, requires a thoughtful reconsideration of the approach to treating patients with unresectable locally advanced and/or metastatic progressive MTC. PMID:25908961

  9. Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to the nose: report and review of cutaneous metastases of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma typically appears in local lymph nodes. Skin metastases are rare. Purpose: A man with progressive metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma who developed a cutaneous metastasis on his nose is described. The clinical manifestations of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to skin are reviewed. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: basal, cancer, carcinoma, cell, cutaneous, kinase, inhibitor, metastases, nose, papillary, rearranged during transfection, receptor, RET, thyroid, tyrosine, vandetanib. Results: Pathologic changes observed on the biopsy of the man’s nose lesion were similar to those of his original cancer. Genomic evaluation of the tumor revealed an aberration involving the rearranged during transfection (RET) receptor tyrosine kinase. The residual tumor was excised. Treatment with vandetanib, a RET inhibitor was initiated; his metastatic disease has been stable, without symptoms or recurrent cutaneous metastasis, for 2 years following the discovery of his metastatic nose tumor. Conclusions: Papillary thyroid carcinoma with skin metastases is rare. Nodules usually appear on the scalp or neck; the thyroidectomy scar is also a common site. Metastatic tumor, albeit infrequently, can present as a nose lesion. The prognosis for patients with cutaneous metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma is poor. However, with the ability to test the tumor for genomic aberrations, molecular targeted therapies—such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors—may provide extended survival in these individuals. PMID:26693082

  10. Four patients with cutaneous metastases from medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Libero; El-Naggar, Adel K; Sherman, Steven I; Hymes, Sharon R; Gagel, Robert F; Shaw, Stephanie; Sarlis, Nicholas J

    2008-08-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from thyroid cancer, especially medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is rare. We report four patients with cutaneous metastases from sporadic MTC, three women and one man, aged 50 to 69 years. They presented different cutaneous lesions phenotypes. The first patient had a remote history of MTC and initial presentation of the recurrence was a rapidly progressing cutaneous lesion; on subsequent disease staging, widely metastatic disease was discovered. The other three patients developed cutaneous metastases in the presence of known distant metastases, indicating systemic spread of thyroid cancer. Definitive diagnosis of cutaneous metastases of MTC was made on biopsy of the lesions with cells that stained positive for neuroendocrine markers. Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis from MTC is important because it is a negative prognostic factor indicative of multisystemic disease. Thus, MTC metastases should be included in the differential diagnosis of erythematous maculopapular eruptions and nodular lesions of the skin, especially when these metastases occur in the upper part of the body and if the patient has a history of MTC. The appearing of cutaneous metastasis is a negative prognostic factor since all the patients here described died within one year from the diagnosis of cutaneous metastases.

  11. Clinical and Pathological Implications of Concurrent Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders and Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, L. L.; Ferreira, R. C.; Marcello, M. A.; Vassallo, J.; Ward, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Cooccurrences of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer (DTC) have been repeatedly reported. Both CLT and DTC, mainly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), share some epidemiological and molecular features. In fact, thyroid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction has been observed in association with PTC at variable frequency, although the precise relationship between the two diseases is still debated. It also remains a matter of debate whether the association with a CLT or even an autoimmune disorder could influence the prognosis of PTC. A better understanding about clinical implications of autoimmunity in concurrent thyroid cancer could raise new insights of thyroid cancer immunotherapy. In addition, elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in autoimmune disease and concurrent cancer allowed us to identify new therapeutic strategies against thyroid cancer. The objective of this article was to review recent literature on the association of these disorders and its potential significance. PMID:21403889

  12. BRAF V600E status adds incremental value to current risk classification systems in predicting papillary thyroid carcinoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Jason D; Sadow, Peter M; Hodin, Richard A; Le, Long Phi; Gaz, Randall D; Randolph, Gregory W; Stephen, Antonia E; Parangi, Sareh; Daniels, Gilbert H; Lubitz, Carrie C

    2012-12-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) recurrence risk is difficult to predict. No current risk classification system incorporates BRAF mutational status. Here, we assess the incremental value of BRAF mutational status in predicting PTC recurrence relative to existing recurrence risk algorithms. Serial data were collected for a historical cohort having undergone total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) during a 5-year period. Corresponding BRAF(V600E) testing was performed and Cox proportional hazard regression modeling, with and without BRAF status, was used to evaluate existing recurrence risk algorithms. The 5-year cumulative PTC recurrence incidence within our 356 patient cohort was 15%. A total of 205 (81%) of associated archived specimens were successfully genotyped, and 110 (54%) harbored the BRAF(V600E) mutation. The 5-year cumulative recurrence incidence among BRAF(V600E) patients was 20% versus 8% among BRAF wild type. BRAF(V600E) was significantly associated with time to recurrence when added to the following algorithms: AMES (hazard ratio [HR] 2.43 [confidence interval 1.08-5.49]), MACIS category (HR 2.46 [1.09-5.54]), AJCC-TNM (HR 2.51 [1.11-5.66]), and ATA recurrence-risk category (HR 2.44 [1.08-5.50]), and model discrimination improved (incremental c-index range 0.046-0.109). The addition of BRAF mutational status to established risk algorithms improves the discrimination of risk recurrence in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for PTC. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  14. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Pathology and Risk for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paparodis, Rodis; Imam, Shahnawaz; Todorova-Koteva, Kristina; Staii, Anca

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been found to coexist with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in surgical specimens, but an association between the two conditions has been discounted by the medical literature. Therefore, we performed this study to determine any potential relationship between HT and the risk of developing DTC. Methods: We collected data for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T4), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) titers, surgical pathology, and weight-based levothyroxine (LT4) replacement dose for patients who were referred for thyroid surgery. Patients with HT at final pathology were studied further. To estimate thyroid function, patients with preoperative hypothyroid HT (Hypo-HT) were divided into three equal groups based on their LT4 replacement: LT4-Low (<0.90 μg/kg), LT4-Mid (0.90–1.43 μg/kg), and LT4-High (>1.43 μg/kg). A group of preoperatively euthyroid (Euth-HT) patients but with HT by pathology was also studied. All subjects were also grouped based on their TPO-Ab titer in TPO-high (titer >1:1000) or TPO-low/negative (titer <1:1000 or undetectable) groups. The relationship of HT and DTC was studied extensively. Results: Of 2811 subjects, 582 had HT on surgical pathology, 365 of whom were Euth-HT preoperatively. DTC was present in 47.9% of the Euth-HT, in 59.7% of LT4-Low, 29.8% of LT4-Mid, and 27.9% of LT4-High groups. The relative risk (RR) for DTC was significantly elevated for the Euth-HT and LT4-Low groups (p<0.001), but not for the LT4-Mid or LT4-High replacement dose groups. TPO-low/negative status conferred an increased RR in the Euth-HT and LT4-Low replacement dose groups (p<0.001 both), while TPO-high status decreased it in Euth-HT group (p<0.05) and made it nonsignificant in the LT4-Low group. Conclusions: HT pathology increases the risk for DTC only in euthyroid subjects and those with partially functional thyroid glands (LT4-Low) but not in fully hypothyroid HT (LT4-Mid and LT4-High). High TPO-Ab titers

  15. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, B.; Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Vosoughi, H.; Khademi, S.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered. PMID:27853722

  16. Trials show delayed recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bender, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Phase I trials of 2 treatments for recurrent ovarian cancer-a 2-step immunotherapy treatment and an antibody-drug conjugate-demonstrated promising early results in delaying recurrence, in work presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2013.

  17. Diagnostic imaging techniques in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Toriumi, D.M.; Mafee, M.F.

    1988-02-01

    With the refinement of fine-needle aspiration, the specific applications of thyroid imaging techniques need to be reevaluated for efficiency and cost containment. No thyroid imaging test should be routinely obtained. Radionuclide scanning is most beneficial in evaluating the functional status of thyroid nodules when fine-needle aspiration is inadequate, the findings are benign, or when there is no discrete nodule that is palpated in an enlarged gland. When fine-needle aspiration is unavailable or unreliable, radionuclide scanning becomes a first-line diagnostic tool. Ultrasonography should be used primarily for identifying a solid component of a cystic nodule, determining the size of nodules on thyroxine suppression that are not easily palpable, or for performing guided fine-needle aspiration. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging both have a definite role in the evaluation of thyroid tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to computerized tomography for the evaluation of metastatic, retrotracheal, or mediastinal involvement of large thyroid tumors or goiters. Careful selection of the diagnostic techniques will ensure more accurate diagnosis and reduce unnecessary patient costs in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  18. Recurrent High-Flow Arterio-Venous Malformation of the Thyroid Gland.

    PubMed

    Borchert, D H; Massmann, A; Kim, Y J; Bader, C A; Wolf, G; Eisele, R; Minko, P; Bücker, A; Glanemann, M

    2015-09-01

    Vascular malformations and hemangiomas of the thyroid gland are rare disorders. The first case of a patient with recurrent high-flow arterio-venous malformation of the right thyroid gland involving the right endolarynx is presented. In June 2013, a 42-year-old female patient presented to the surgical department with recurrent hoarseness and a soft, vibrating mass on the right side of her neck. In 1993, she underwent right subtotal hemithyroidectomy with embolization on the day before surgery for a high-flow arterio-venous malformation of the thyroid gland. Diagnostic work-up in 2013 demonstrated a complex recurrent high-flow arterio-venous malformation on the right side of her neck involving the endolarynx. Full function of the right vocal fold could not be ascertained. The lesion was embolized again and excised the following day. Intraoperative gross bleeding and scar tissue prevented visualization and monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Gross bleeding was also noted on hemithyroidectomy after embolization in 1993. No therapy was needed for the endolaryngeal part of the lesion. Histology showed large arterio-venous malformations with thyroid tissue. She remains well without signs of recurrence 18 month later but with a definitive voice handicap. This is the first report of a recurrent high-flow arterio-venous malformation originally developing from the right thyroid gland involving the right endolarynx. Counseling, diagnostic, and therapeutic work-up of the patient was possible only with an interdisciplinary team. The endolaryngeal part of the hemangioma dried out after embolization and completion hemithyroidectomy. Her hoarseness has greatly improved but a definitive voice handicap remains. High-flow arterio-venous malformations of the thyroid gland are a rare disease, and recurrent lesions have not been reported. Interdisciplinary management of these patients is mandatory due to the complex nature of the underlying pathology. Recurrence might develop

  19. Sorafenib makes headway on metastatic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    In a randomized phase III clinical trial, patients with metastatic differentiated cancer of the thyroid who were treated with sorafenib achieved median progression-free survival of 10.8 months, compared with 5.8 months among patients treated with placebo.

  20. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  1. Thyroid Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Thyroid Cancer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) French (français) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic (العربية) ...

  2. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Management of Patients with Radioiodine Nonresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Busaidy, Naifa Lamki; Cabanillas, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary and follicular) has a favorable prognosis with an 85% 10-year survival. The patients that recur often require surgery and further radioactive iodine to render them disease-free. Five percent of thyroid cancer patients, however, will eventually succumb to their disease. Metastatic thyroid cancer is treated with radioactive iodine if the metastases are radioiodine avid. Cytotoxic chemotherapies for advanced or metastatic noniodine avid thyroid cancers show no prolonged responses and in general have fallen out of favor. Novel targeted therapies have recently been discovered that have given rise to clinical trials for thyroid cancer. Newer aberrations in molecular pathways and oncogenic mutations in thyroid cancer together with the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth have been central to these discoveries. This paper will focus on the management and treatment of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers that do not take up radioactive iodine. PMID:22530159

  3. MicroRNAs in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Context: Traditionally, factors predisposing to diseases are either genetic (“nature”) or environmental, also known as lifestyle-related (“nurture”). Papillary thyroid cancer is an example of a disease where the respective roles of these factors are surprisingly unclear. Evidence Acquisition: Original articles and reviews summarizing our current understanding of the role of microRNA in thyroid tumorigenesis are reviewed and evaluated. Conclusion: The genetic predisposition to papillary thyroid cancer appears to consist of a variety of gene mutations that are mostly either of low penetrance and common or of high penetrance but rare. Moreover, they likely interact with each other and with environmental factors. The culpable genes may not be of the traditional, protein-coding type. A limited number of noncoding candidate genes have indeed been described, and we propose here that the failure to find mutations in traditional protein-coding genes is not coincidental. Instead, a more likely hypothesis is that changes in the expression of multiple regulatory RNA genes, e.g. microRNAs, may be a major mechanism. Our review of the literature strongly supports this notion in that a polymorphism in one microRNAs (miR-146a) predisposes to thyroid carcinoma, whereas numerous other microRNAs are involved in signaling (mainly PTEN/PI3K/AKT and T3/THRB) that is central to thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:21865360

  4. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B are rare genetic diseases, which lead to the development of medullary thyroid cancer, usually in childhood. Surgery is the only standard treatment.

  5. Disruption of mutated BRAF signaling modulates thyroid cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Elyse K; Rajoria, Shilpi; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong; Suriano, Robert; Tuli, Neha; George, Andrea L; Bednarczyk, Robert; Shin, Edward J; Geliebter, Jan; Tiwari, Raj K

    2014-03-28

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine-related cancer in the United States and its incidence is rising rapidly. Since among various genetic lesions identified in thyroid cancer, the BRAFV600E mutation is found in 50% of papillary thyroid cancers and 25% of anaplastic thyroid cancers, this mutation provides an opportunity for targeted drug therapy. Our laboratory evaluated cellular phenotypic effects in response to treatment with PLX4032, a BRAFV600E-specific inhibitor, in normal BRAF-wild-type thyroid cells and in BRAFV600E-positive papillary thyroid cancer cells. Normal BRAF-wild-type thyroid cells and BRAFV600E-mutated papillary thyroid cancer cells were subjected to proliferation assays and analyzed for cell death by immunofluorescence. Cell cycle status was determined using an EdU uptake assay followed by laser scanning cytometry. In addition, expression of proteins within the MAPK signal transduction pathway was analyzed by Western blot. PLX4032 has potent anti-proliferative effects selectively in BRAF-mutated thyroid cancer cells. These effects appear to be mediated by the drug's activity of inhibiting phosphorylation of signaling molecules downstream of BRAF within the pro-survival MAPK pathway. Interestingly, PLX4032 promotes the phosphorylation of these signaling molecules in BRAF-wild-type thyroid cells. These findings support further evaluation of combinational therapy that includes BRAFV600E inhibitors in thyroid cancer patients harboring the BRAFV600E mutation.

  6. Expression of YY1 in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Jéssica; Castellví, Josep; Marcos, Ricard; Zafón, Carles; Velázquez, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) has an important regulatory role in tumorigenesis, but its implication in thyroid cancer has not been yet investigated. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer and assessed the association of YY1 expression with clinical features. Expression of YY1 was evaluated in human thyroid cancer cell lines, a series of matched normal/tumor thyroid tissues and in a thyroid cancer tissue microarray, using real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. YY1 was overexpressed in thyroid cancer cells, at transcription and protein levels. A significant increase of YY1 mRNA was also observed in tumor thyroid tissues. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the thyroid cancer tissue microarray revealed that both papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) present increased YY1 protein levels (48 and 19%, respectively). After stratification by the level of YY1 protein, positive YY1 expression identifies 88% of patients with PTC. The association of YY1 expression with clinicopathological features in PTC and FTC showed that YY1 expression was related with age at diagnosis. Our data indicates for the first time overexpression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer, with YY1 being more frequently overexpressed in the PTC subtype.

  7. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  8. Lenvatinib: A Review in Refractory Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-02-01

    Lenvatinib (Lenvima®) is an oral, multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1, 2 and 3, fibroblast growth factor receptors 1, 2, 3 and 4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, and RET and KIT signalling networks, which are implicated in tumour growth and maintenance. In the EU and USA, lenvatinib is indicated for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). This approval was based on the results of the randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase 3 SELECT study, in which lenvatinib significantly improved median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate compared with placebo in patients with RR-DTC. The PFS benefit with lenvatinib was seen in all pre-specified subgroups, including patients who had received either one or no prior VEGF-targeted therapy. Moreover, the PFS benefit with lenvatinib was maintained regardless of BRAF or RAS mutation status. The safety and tolerability profile of lenvatinib in SELECT was consistent with that of other VEGF/VEGF receptor-targeted therapies and was mostly manageable. Hypertension was the most common treatment-related adverse event in lenvatinib-treated patients, but only infrequently led to discontinuation of the drug. Although not collected in SELECT, information on quality of life would be useful in assessing the overall impact of therapy on the patient. This notwithstanding, the data which are available indicate that lenvatinib is an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment option for patients with RR-DTC. Lenvatinib, therefore, offers an acceptable alternative to sorafenib--currently, the only other TKI approved for this indication.

  9. Endocrine Complications of Surgical Treatment of Thyroid Cancer: An Update.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Pedro; Díez, Juan José

    2017-09-01

    Postoperative hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) and hypothyroidism (HypoT) are the main endocrine complications after the surgical treatment for thyroid cancer. Postsurgical HypoPT can be transient, protracted or permanent. Its frequency varies according to the underlying cervical pathology, surgical technique, and mainly the experience of the surgeon. Risk factors for HypoPT include aggressiveness of the tumor, extent of surgery, the presence of parathyroid gland in the pathologic specimen, and surgeon experience. Clinical manifestations of postsurgical HypoPT can be acute or chronic. An adequate surgical technique that minimizes trauma and preserve the vascularization of the parathyroid glands is the better procedure to reduce the risk of postoperative HypoPT. Acute hypocalcemia may be managed with intravenous or oral calcium supplements, according to the level of serum calcium and the presence of signs and symptoms. Patients with permanent HypoPT require lifelong calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Calcitriol is the vitamin D metabolite of preference because of its high activity and short half-life. Both PTH (1-34) and intact PTH (1-84) have demonstrated to be attractive options in hypoparathyroid patients who cannot maintain stable serum and urinary calcium levels with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. However, the long-term safety of these preparations has not been established. Postsurgical HypoT is an unavoidable consequence of total or near-total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer. Replacement and suppressive therapy are necessary in these patients. Thyroid hormone suppression therapy has shown to be accompanied by a decreased risk of disease progression and recurrence; however, it may also be associated with increased risk of dysrhythmia and loss of bone mass. Therefore, the intensity of TSH suppression must be established in a personalized way after balancing risk and benefits, according to the severity of the thyroid cancer, the response to therapy, and

  10. US-guided biopsy of neck masses in postoperative management of patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R T; Reading, C C; Charboneau, J W; James, E M; Grant, C S; Hay, I D

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency (10-MHz) sonography demonstrated a cervical mass or lymphadenopathy, or both, during postoperative follow-up of 52 patients who had undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. Percutaneous biopsy with ultrasonographic (US) guidance was performed in all 52 masses, 44 of which were nonpalpable. Malignant cells were obtained in 29 biopsies, and the results of 20 biopsies were negative, yielding benign lymphocytes only. Results in three biopsies were nondiagnostic due to hypocellular specimens. Therefore, 94% of biopsy results (49) of 52) were confidently assigned as either positive (56%) or negative (38%) for malignancy. There were no complications. High-frequency sonography can demonstrate clinically occult thyroid bed tumor recurrence and lymph node metastases. US-guided biopsy is an accurate and safe technique to confirm or exclude malignancy in patients at high risk of recurrence of thyroid cancer.

  11. Induction of thyroid cancer by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report assesses the potential for cancer induction in the thyroid gland after exposure of the gland to external x radiation and gamma radiation and/or some internally deposited radionuclides. Data and assumptions from existing human and animal studies are used to develop average risk estimates for populations over various ranges of radiation dose to the thyroid. The carcinogenicity of various iodine isotopes is examined. A specific model for risk estimation is developed which involves numerous modifications of an absolute risk model for factors such as age at exposure, sex, ethnic background, radiation source, exposure range, and time since exposure. Risk estimates are presented which are considered to be application to the population of the US for mean thyroidal doses in the range from 6 to 1500 rads. 146 references, 1 figures, 18 tables.

  12. [Clinico-pathological features of papillary thyroid cancer coexistent with Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Molnár, Sarolta; Győry, Ferenc; Nagy, Endre; Méhes, Gábor; Molnár, Csaba

    2017-02-01

    Former studies suggest the frequent coexistence of Hashimoto's thyreoditis with papillary thyroid cancer, frequently featured by multifocal carcinogenesis but lower clinical stages compared to thyroid cancers lacking thyroiditis. We examined the clinico-pathological correlations between Hashimoto's thyroditis and papillary thyroid cancer in our region in the North-Eastern part of Hungary. We included a total of 230 patients with papillary thyroid cancer who underwent thyroid surgery at the Surgical Department of the University of Debrecen. Patients' sex, age, multifocality of thyroid cancer and clinical stage were evaluated. Cases included 40 patients (17.4%) with (4 male, 36 female) and 190 (82.6%) patients without HT (44 male, 146 female). Hashimoto's thyroiditis related thyroid cancer was almost exclusively associated with the papillary histological type. Multifocality of papillary cancer was significantly more frequent with coexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis (16/40; 40.0%) compared to cases uninvolved (45/190; 23.7%; p = 0.034). In contrast, lymph node metastasis was significantly less frequent among patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (4 pN1 [36.4%]; 7 pN0 [63.6%]) then without it (34 pN1 [82.9%]; 7 pN0 [17.1%]; p = 0.002). Higher frequency and multifocality of papillary thyroid cancer might be the consequence of preexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis to be considered as a preneoplastic stimulus supporting carcinogenesis, though the exact pathomechanism of this correlation is not clear yet. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(5), 178-182.

  13. Editorial: Thyroid cancer and the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.

    1996-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl power station nearly 10 years ago was unprecedented in the exposure of a very large population to high levels of fallout including high levels of isotopes of iodine, predominantly {sup 131}I. An increase in incidence of childhood thyroid cancer was first observed in 1990 in Belarus and in the Ukraine, and the first reports in the Western literature were published in 1992. At a symposium in Nagasaki in June 1994, the numbers of cases that had occurred between 1990 and 1993 in Belarus, a country with a population of just over 10 million, was reported to be 233, and in the heavily contaminated northern parts of the Ukraine, with a population of about 7 million, 36 cases occurred in the same period. To put these figures into perspective, the number of childhood thyroid cancers registered in England and Wales over a 30-year period was 154, an average of 5 cases per yr in a population of 50 million people, with about 10 million children under 15 yr of age. The initial reports of such a great increase in childhood thyroid cancers in the areas exposed to fallout from Chernobyl were at first greeted in the West with some skepticism. The latent period between exposure and development of thyroid cancer was surprisingly short, based on experience with thyroid carcinomas developing after external radiation to the neck. The reliability of the figures based on the pathological diagnosis was questioned because the cases had not been confirmed by Western pathologists, and because the known high frequency of papillary microcarcinoms in adults raised the possibility that the reported incidence was resulted form increased ascertainment and not a true increase in incidence. 14 refs.

  14. Incidental thyroid lesions identified by ultrasound in patients with non-thyroidal head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Cheol; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Namkung, Sook; Hong, Myung Sun; Baek, Sora; Lim, Kyoung Ja; Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Chung, Eun-Jae; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young-Soo

    2013-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the common head and neck malignancies and may be found incidentally with other head and neck cancers. To evaluate the prevalence and risk of malignancy in incidental thyroid lesions identified by ultrasound (US) in patients with head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all patients with head and neck cancer other than of thyroid origin between January 2004 and December 2011. A total of 690 patients (537 men and 153 women; mean age, 58.9 ± 12.9 years) underwent US of the neck for the evaluation of cervical lymph node status (including thyroid gland). We evaluated the prevalence of patients with incidental thyroid lesions identified by US and the risk of malignancy in these patients. Of the 690 patients with head and neck cancer, 234 (33.9%) had incidental thyroid lesions on US. Based on US findings, 61 patients underwent fine-needle aspiration, with 39 eventually undergoing thyroidectomy. Among these thyroid lesions, 24 incidental thyroid lesions of 22 patients were histologically proven to be malignant (23 papillary and 1 follicular carcinomas). The risk of malignancy was 9.4% on a patient-by-patient basis. Screening of the thyroid gland should be included in the preoperative US examination for cervical lymph node metastases in patients with non-thyroidal head and neck cancer.

  15. Pathogenesis of infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss in thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Twig, Gilad; Shina, Avi; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2012-05-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity is the most prevalent autoimmune state that affects up to 4% of women during the age of fertility. A growing body of clinical studies links thyroid autoimmunity as a cause of infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes that includes miscarriage or preterm deliveries. Importantly, these adverse effects are persistent in euthyroid women. In the current review we elaborate on the pathogenesis that underlies infertility and increased pregnancy loss among women with autoimmune thyroid disease. Such mechanisms include thyroid autoantibodies that exert their effect in a TSH-dependent but also in a TSH-independent manner. The later includes quantitative and qualitative changes in the profile of endometrial T cells with reduced secretion of IL-4 and IL-10 along with hypersecretion of interferon-γ. Polyclonal B cells activation is 2-3 time more frequent in thyroid autoimmunity and is associated with increased titers of non-organ specific autoantibodies. Hyperactivity and Increased migration of cytotoxic natural killer cells that alter the immune and hormonal response of the uterus is up to 40% more common in women with thyroid autoimmunity. Lack of vitamin D was suggested as a predisposing factor to autoimmune diseases, and was shown to be reduced in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. In turn, its deficiency is also linked to infertility and pregnancy loss, suggesting a potential interplay with thyroid autoimmunity in the context of infertility. In addition, thyroid autoantibodies were also suggested to alter fertility by targeting zona pellucida, human chorionic gonadotropin receptors and other placental antigens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Abdulwahid M.; Fatih, Salah M.; Kakamad, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic, idiopathic disease. It has a highly variable clinical course. It has been reported to present in association with malignancy. Coexistence of sarcoidosis and thyroid cancer is rarely reported in the literature. Presentatioin of the case We present a case with neck swelling for 3 months, and symmetrical painless thyroid enlargement without fixation to deep tissues of the neck. Multiple nodules on the both thyroid lobes, hard irregular, grade two goiter with lymphadenopathy all over anterior neck compartments. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done under ultrasound guide from right thyroid nodule and showed papillary thyroid carcinoma. Excisional biopsy of the neck lymphnode showed picture typical for sarcoidosis. Discussion Most researchers believe that patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis are predisposed to develop malignancies, less than a dozen of cases are reported in the literature to be associated with PTC with a very wide range of presentations and clincal coarses. An interesting finding of our case is that in contrast to what is reported, both diseases were not known by the physician until the time of presentation. Conclusion Cervical lymphadenopathy in association with goiter could be metastasis, sarcoidosis or mixed, therefore should be seperately biopsied. PMID:26432997

  17. Role of prophylactic central neck dissection in cN0 papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Costa, S; Giugliano, G; Santoro, L; Ywata De Carvalho, A; Massaro, MA; Gibelli, B; De Fiori, E; Grosso, E; Ansarin, M; Calabrese, L

    2009-01-01

    Summary Prophylactic central neck dissection in papillary thyroid cancer is controversial. In this retrospective cohort study, the aim was to assess possible advantages of prophylactic central neck dissection with total thyroidectomy in cN0 papillary thyroid cancer. A total of 244 consecutive patients with papillary thyroid cancer, without clinical and ultrasound nodal metastases (cN0), were evaluated out of 1373 patients operated for a thyroid disease at the Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan, Italy from 1994 to 2006. Of these 244 patients, 126 (Group A) underwent thyroidectomy with central neck dissection, while 118 (Group B) underwent thyroidectomy alone. Demographic, clinical and pathological features were analysed. Overall recurrence rate was 6.3% (8/126) in Group A and 7.7% (9/118) in Group B, with a mean follow-up of 47 (Group A) and 64 (Group B) months. In Group A patients, 47% were pN1a and all patients with recurrence had nodal involvement (p = 0.002). Survival rate did not differ in the two groups. Nine patients were lost to follow-up. Group A patients were older and their tumours were larger in size; according to the pT distribution, a higher extra-capsular invasion rate was observed. The two groups were equivalent as far as concerns histological high risk variants and multifocality. Nodal metastases correlated with stage: pT1-2 vs. pT3-T4a, p = 0.0036. A lower risk of nodal metastases was related to thyroiditis (p = 0.0034). In conclusion, central neck metastases were predictive of recurrence without influencing prognosis. From data obtained, possible greatest efficacy of central neck dissection in pT3-4 papillary thyroid cancer without thyroiditis is suggested. PMID:20111614

  18. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y.; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A.; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Outschoorn, Ubaldo Martinez; Curry, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Aims Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) and Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Member 20 (TOMM20). Methods Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and 8 non-cancerous thyroid) and 9 ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. Results MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (p<0.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (p<0.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (p<0.001). These xenograft tumors have high 13C- pyruvate uptake. Conclusions Anaplastic thyroid cancer has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target. PMID:26615136

  19. Does the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome Increase in Thyroid Cancer Survivors?

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hee; Huh, Jin-Young; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kang, Moo-Il

    2017-07-01

    The steep rise in thyroid cancer observed in recent decades has caused an increase in the population of long-term thyroid cancer survivors. Other than recurrences of cancer, the long-term health consequences of surviving thyroid cancer, particularly metabolic syndrome, have not yet been determined. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of metabolic syndrome in thyroid cancer survivors. Population-based data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) were used for the analysis. The data of KNHANES IV-VI from 2007-2014 were obtained. After excluding subjects who were under 19 years old, whose fasting interval was less than 8 hours, and whose data for predefined variables including metabolic syndrome components were incomplete, 34,347 subjects were analyzed. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components were evaluated in three groups: subjects with no history of thyroid cancer, subjects diagnosed with thyroid cancer within 3 years of the survey date, and subjects diagnosed more than 3 years before the survey date. Thyroid cancer diagnoses were made within 3 years of the survey date for 95 subjects (group 1, short-term survivors) and more than 3 years earlier than the survey date for 60 subjects (group 2, long-term survivors). Metabolic syndrome was frequently observed with clinical significance (odds ratio [OR] 1.986 [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.70], p = 0.030) in short-term survivors compared with subjects with no thyroid cancer history. Risks for having high blood pressure and high fasting glucose were estimated to be higher in the short-term survivor group (OR 2.115 [CI 1.23-3.64], p = 0.006 and OR 1.792 [CI 1.03-3.11], p = 0.038, respectively). No significant associations were noticed in the long-term survivor group when compared with the group with no thyroid cancer history. Risks for metabolic syndrome, especially high blood pressure and high fasting glucose, were increased in short

  20. Thyroid Cancer Epidemiology in Iran: a Time Trend Study.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Ali; Azizi, Fereidoun; Jafari, Rozita; Chaibakhsh, Samira; Safavi, Amir Ali

    2016-01-01

    Considering the rising incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide, the aim of our study was to investigate the temporal trends in the incidence of this cancer in a large population of Iranian patients. We used the Iran Cancer Data System (ICDS) Registry to assess the thyroid cancer trend from 2004 to 2010 with regard to different genders, age groups, and morphologies. To do this we analyzed the data of 10,913 new cases of thyroid cancer that occurred during these years. The incidence rate (per one year) of thyroid cancer was 2.20 per 100,000 persons between 2004 and 2010 in Iran. Papillary thyroid cancer was the most common histology type, with an annual rate of 0.29 in Iran. The highest rate of prevalence in thyroid cancer was observed at the age of 45 years at the time of diagnosis. We found a female-to-male ratio of 2 in Iran. A significant decrease was detected in the trend of thyroid cancer in children <19y, which was not correlated to the trend of older patients. As expected, the trend of thyroid cancer increased over the 7 years, primarily contributed by papillary thyroid cancer. A rising pattern of incidence was seen in all the age groups except patients aged under 19 years.

  1. The role of thyroid hormone signaling in the prevention of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Simmen, Frank A

    2013-08-06

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  2. Advanced medullary thyroid cancer: pathophysiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carla Vaz; Siqueira, Débora Rodrigues; Ceolin, Lucieli; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare malignant tumor originating from thyroid parafollicular C cells. This tumor accounts for 3%–4% of thyroid gland neoplasias. MTC may occur sporadically or be inherited. Hereditary MTC appears as part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2A or 2B, or familial medullary thyroid cancer. Germ-line mutations of the RET proto-oncogene cause hereditary forms of cancer, whereas somatic mutations can be present in sporadic forms of the disease. The RET gene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways leading to proliferation, growth, differentiation, migration, and survival. Nowadays, early diagnosis of MTC followed by total thyroidectomy offers the only possibility of cure. Based on the knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of MTC, new drugs have been developed in an attempt to control metastatic disease. Of these, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent one of the most promising agents for MTC treatment, and clinical trials have shown encouraging results. Hopefully, the cumulative knowledge about the targets of action of these drugs and about the tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated side effects will help in choosing the best therapeutic approach to enhance their benefits. PMID:23696715

  3. Increased Pleiotrophin Concentrations in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jee, Youn Hee; Sadowski, Samira M; Celi, Francesco S; Xi, Liqiang; Raffeld, Mark; Sacks, David B; Remaley, Alan T; Wellstein, Anton; Kebebew, Electron; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are common, and approximately 5% of these nodules are malignant. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor which is overexpressed in many cancers. The expression of PTN in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is unknown. 74 subjects (age 47 ± 12 y, 15 males) who had thyroidectomy with a histological diagnosis: 79 benign nodules and 23 PTCs (10 classic, 6 tall cell, 6 follicular variant and 1 undetermined). Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) samples were obtained ex vivo from surgically excised tissue and assayed for PTN and thyroglobulin (Tg). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on tissue sections. In FNA samples, PTN concentration normalized to Tg was significantly higher in PTC than in benign nodules (16 ± 6 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 ng/mg, p < 0.001). In follicular variant of PTC (n = 6), the PTN/Tg ratio was also higher than in benign nodules (1.3 ± 0.6 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 ng/mg, P < 0.001, respectively). IHC showed cytoplasmic localization of PTN in PTC cells. In ex vivo FNA samples, the PTN to thyroglobulin ratio was higher in PTCs, including follicular variant PTC, than in benign thyroid nodules. The findings raise the possibility that measurement of the PTN to Tg ratio may provide useful diagnostic and/or prognostic information in the evaluation of thyroid nodules.

  4. Increased Pleiotrophin Concentrations in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Youn Hee; Sadowski, Samira M.; Celi, Francesco S.; Xi, Liqiang; Raffeld, Mark; Sacks, David B.; Remaley, Alan T.; Wellstein, Anton; Kebebew, Electron; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid nodules are common, and approximately 5% of these nodules are malignant. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor which is overexpressed in many cancers. The expression of PTN in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is unknown. Method and Findings 74 subjects (age 47 ± 12 y, 15 males) who had thyroidectomy with a histological diagnosis: 79 benign nodules and 23 PTCs (10 classic, 6 tall cell, 6 follicular variant and 1 undetermined). Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) samples were obtained ex vivo from surgically excised tissue and assayed for PTN and thyroglobulin (Tg). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on tissue sections. In FNA samples, PTN concentration normalized to Tg was significantly higher in PTC than in benign nodules (16 ± 6 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 ng/mg, p < 0.001). In follicular variant of PTC (n = 6), the PTN/Tg ratio was also higher than in benign nodules (1.3 ± 0.6 vs 0.3 ± 0.1 ng/mg, P < 0.001, respectively). IHC showed cytoplasmic localization of PTN in PTC cells. Conclusion In ex vivo FNA samples, the PTN to thyroglobulin ratio was higher in PTCs, including follicular variant PTC, than in benign thyroid nodules. The findings raise the possibility that measurement of the PTN to Tg ratio may provide useful diagnostic and/or prognostic information in the evaluation of thyroid nodules. PMID:26914549

  5. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THYROID CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David F.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer exists in several forms. Differentiated thyroid cancers include papillary and follicular histologies. These tumors exist along a spectrum of differentiation, and their incidence continues to climb. A number of advances in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancers now exist. These include molecular diagnostics and more advanced strategies for risk stratification. Medullary cancer arises from the parafollicular cells and not the follicular cells. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment differs from differentiated thyroid tumors. Genetic testing and newer adjuvant therapies has changed the diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid cancer. This review will focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of both differentiated and medullary thyroid cancers, focusing specifically on newer developments in the field. PMID:23797834

  6. Perspectives of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 90% of non-medullary thyroid malignancies originate from the follicular cell and are classified as papillary or follicular (well-differentiated) thyroid carcinomas, showing an overall favourable prognosis. However, recurrence or persistence of the disease occurs in some cases associated with the presence of loco-regional or distant metastatic lesions that generally become resistant to radioiodine therapy, while glucose uptake and metabolism are increased. Recent advances in the field of tumor progression have shown that CTC (circulating tumour cells) are metabolic and genetically heterogeneous. There is now special interest in unravelling the mechanisms that allow the reminiscence of dormant tumour lesions that might be related to late disease progression and increased risk of recurrence. AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is activated by the depletion in cellular energy levels and allows adaptive changes in cell metabolism that are fundamental for cell survival in a stressful environment; nevertheless, the activation of this kinase also decreases cell proliferation rate and induces tumour cell apoptosis. In the thyroid field, AMPK emerged as a novel important intracellular pathway, since it regulates both iodide and glucose uptakes in normal thyroid cells. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the AMPK pathway is highly activated in papillary thyroid carcinomas, although the clinical significance of these findings remains elusive. Herein we review the current knowledge about the role of AMPK activation in thyroid physiology and pathophysiology, with special focus on thyroid cancer.

  7. Perspectives of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of non-medullary thyroid malignancies originate from the follicular cell and are classified as papillary or follicular (well-differentiated) thyroid carcinomas, showing an overall favourable prognosis. However, recurrence or persistence of the disease occurs in some cases associated with the presence of loco-regional or distant metastatic lesions that generally become resistant to radioiodine therapy, while glucose uptake and metabolism are increased. Recent advances in the field of tumor progression have shown that CTC (circulating tumour cells) are metabolic and genetically heterogeneous. There is now special interest in unravelling the mechanisms that allow the reminiscence of dormant tumour lesions that might be related to late disease progression and increased risk of recurrence. AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is activated by the depletion in cellular energy levels and allows adaptive changes in cell metabolism that are fundamental for cell survival in a stressful environment; nevertheless, the activation of this kinase also decreases cell proliferation rate and induces tumour cell apoptosis. In the thyroid field, AMPK emerged as a novel important intracellular pathway, since it regulates both iodide and glucose uptakes in normal thyroid cells. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the AMPK pathway is highly activated in papillary thyroid carcinomas, although the clinical significance of these findings remains elusive. Herein we review the current knowledge about the role of AMPK activation in thyroid physiology and pathophysiology, with special focus on thyroid cancer. PMID:27919039

  8. Responses to Overdiagnosis in Thyroid Cancer Screening among Korean Women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Yoon Young; Yoon, Hyo Joong; Choi, Eunji; Suh, Mina; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Kim, Yeol; Choi, Kui Son

    2016-07-01

    Communicating the harms and benefits of thyroid screening is necessary to help individuals decide on whether or not to undergo thyroid cancer screening. This study was conducted to assess changes in thyroid cancer screening intention in response to receiving information about overdiagnosis and to determine factors with the greatest influence thereon. Data were acquired from subjects included in the 2013 Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), a nationwide, population-based, cross-sectional survey. Of the 4,100 respondents in the 2013 KNCSS, women were randomly subsampled and an additional face-to-face interview was conducted. Finally, a total of 586 female subjects were included in this study. Intention to undergo thyroid cancer screening was assessed before and after receiving information on overdiagnosis. Prior awareness of overdiagnosis in thyroid cancer screening was 27.8%. The majority of subjects intended to undergo thyroid cancer screening before and after receiving information on overdiagnosis (87% and 74%, respectively). Only a small number of subjects changed their intention to undergo thyroid cancer screening from positive to negative after receiving information on overdiagnosis. Women of higher education level and Medical Aid Program recipients reported being significantly more likely to change their intention to undergo thyroid cancer screening afterreceiving information on overdiagnosis,whilewomen with stronger beliefs on the efficacy of cancer screening were less likely to change their intention. Women in Korea appeared to be less concerned about overdiagnosis when deciding whether or not to undergo thyroid cancer screening.

  9. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer: impact of treatment in 1578 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J.; Panzarella, T.; Carruthers, J.S.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    We report the experience from 13 Canadian radiotherapy centers concerning the treatment and outcome for 1074 papillary and 504 follicular thyroid cancer patients followed for 4-24 years. Surgical resection was carried out in almost all patients; there was no correlation between the type of operation and recurrence or survival. Treatment with external irradiation (201 patients) radioiodine (214 patients), or both (107 patients) was used more often in poor prognosis patients than in those with good prognostic factors, and was effective in reducing local recurrences and improving survival, especially in patients with microscopic residual disease postoperatively. Treatment complications were common but rarely fatal. Thyroid cancer was the cause of death in over half of the papillary cancer deaths and in two-thirds of the follicular cancer deaths.

  10. Detecting and Treating Thyroid Nodules and Cancer Before, During, and After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for thyroid nodules: age over 40 and low iodine intake. Some types of thyroid cancer have their ... family history of nodules • Those whose diet lacks iodine (which the thyroid uses to make thyroid hormones), ...

  11. Metastin receptor is overexpressed in papillary thyroid cancer and activates MAP kinase in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Matthew D; Hardy, Elena; Bernet, Victor J; Burch, Henry B; Schuppert, Frank; Burman, Kenneth D; Saji, Motoyasu

    2002-05-01

    The development of distant metastasis is the most important predictor of death from thyroid cancer. KiSS-1 is a recently cloned human metastasis suppressor gene whose product, metastin, was recently identified as the endogenous agonist for a novel Gq/11 coupled receptor (metastin receptor). The expression and functional consequences of metastin and the metastin receptor have not been evaluated in thyroid cancer. We measured metastin and metastin receptor mRNA levels in 10 FCs and 13 papillary carcinomas (PCs), 2 benign non-functioning follicular adenomas (FAs), and 11 normal thyroid samples, and evaluated the signaling pathways activated by metastin in ARO thyroid cancer cells that express the metastin receptor endogenously. Paired normal and tumor samples were available for 4 PC and 3 PFC samples. Metastin mRNA was detected in 6/11 normal samples, and 0/2 FA, 2/10 FC, and 9/13 PC samples (p < 0.05 for PC vs. FC). Metastin receptor was not expressed in any normal thyroid or benign FA samples, and was expressed in only a minority (2/10) of FC samples. However, the receptor was expressed in the majority (10/13) of PCs (p = 0.002 for PC vs. normal tissue). Increased levels of metastin receptor were detected in all four PCs compared to adjacent normal tissue. Incubation levels of metastin receptor were detected in all four PCs compared to adjacent normal tissue. Incubation of metastin receptor expressing ARO thyroid cancer cells with metastin resulted in activation of ERK, but not Akt. Taken together, these data suggest a potential role for metastin and/or metastin receptors in modulating the biological behavior of thyroid cancers.

  12. 2012 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlumberger, M.; Bastholt, L.; Dralle, H.; Jarzab, B.; Pacini, F.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Distant metastases are the main cause of death in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). These 21 recommendations focus on MTC patients with distant metastases and a detailed follow-up protocol of patients with biochemical or imaging evidence of disease, selection criteria for treatment, and treatment modalities, including local and systemic treatments based on the results of recent trials. Asymptomatic patients with low tumor burden and stable disease may benefit from local treatment modalities and can be followed up at regular intervals of time. Imaging is usually performed every 6–12 months, or at longer intervals of time depending on the doubling times of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Patients with symptoms, large tumor burden and progression on imaging should receive systemic treatment. Indeed, major progress has recently been achieved with novel targeted therapies using kinase inhibitors directed against RET and VEGFR, but further research is needed to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:24782992

  13. Central neck dissection in differentiated thyroid cancer: technical notes.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, G; Proh, M; Gibelli, B; Grosso, E; Tagliabue, M; De Fiori, E; Maffini, F; Chiesa, F; Ansarin, M

    2014-02-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancers may be associated with regional lymph node metastases in 20-50% of cases. The central compartment (VIupper VII levels) is considered to be the first echelon of nodal metastases in all differentiated thyroid carcinomas. The indication for central neck dissection is still debated especially in patients with cN0 disease. For some authors, central neck dissection is recommended for lymph nodes that are suspect preoperatively (either clinically or with ultrasound) and/or for lymph node metastases detected intra-operatively with a positive frozen section. In need of a better definition, we divided the dissection in four different areas to map localization of metastases. In this study, we present the rationale for central neck dissection in the management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, providing some anatomical reflections on surgical technique, oncological considerations and analysis of complications. Central neck dissection may be limited to the compartments that describe a predictable territory of regional recurrences in order to reduce associated morbidities.

  14. Pediatric papillary thyroid cancer: current management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verburg, Frederik A; Van Santen, Hanneke M; Luster, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Although with a standardized incidence of 0.54 cases per 100,000 persons, differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a rare disease in children and adolescents, it nonetheless concerns ~1.4% of all pediatric malignancies. Furthermore, its incidence is rising. Due to the rarity and long survival of pediatric DTC patients, in most areas of treatment little evidence exists. Treatment of pediatric DTC is therefore littered with controversies, many questions therefore remain open regarding the optimal management of pediatric papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and many challenges remain unsolved. In the present review, we aim to provide an overview of these challenging areas of patient and disease management in pediatric PTC patients. Data on diagnosis, surgery, radionuclide, and endocrine therapy are discussed, and the controversies therein are highlighted. PMID:28096684

  15. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  16. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; Pacini, F.; Lippi, F.; Elisei, R.; Arganini, M.; Miccoli, P.; Pinchera, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report on 49 patients younger than 18 years at diagnosis, of 776 patients with thyroid cancer, seen in our institution in the last 17 years. Female/male ratio was 2.2:1. Histologic type was papillary in 44, follicular in 4, and medullary in 1. Initial treatment was near-total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection. Surgical complications (vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, or both) were found in 25 patients and were usually associated with more advanced primary tumors. At surgery, node metastases were present in 73% of the patients and lung metastases, detected by chest x ray films, in 6%. Patients were treated with thyroid suppressive therapy and, except the one with medullary cancer, with radioiodine (131I) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 +/- 4.4 years (range, 1 to 17 years), one patient with lung metastases died of respiratory failure. Of 36 patients who have been followed up more than 4 years, 22 (61.1%) are now cured, and 14 have metastases (to lymph nodes, 2; to nodes and lung, 10; and to lung, 2). Since 1977 serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was used routinely as a tumor marker for differentiated thyroid cancer. After operation, Tg was elevated in all patients both not receiving (mean +/- SE, 902 +/- 380 ng/ml) and receiving (44 +/- 15 ng/ml) suppressive therapy; after 131I treatment, serum Tg dropped to 104 +/- 50 and 7.3 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, without and with suppressive therapy, respectively. Of 11 patients with lung metastases treated with 131I, respiratory function, as assessed by means of spirometry, was normal in three, mildly reduced in six, and severely impaired in two (including the one who died). In conclusion, our study indicates that thyroid cancer in young patients is rather advanced at initial examination and usually associated with node and, less frequently, lung metastases.

  17. [Advances in thyroglobulin assays and their impact on the management of differentiated thyroid cancers].

    PubMed

    d'Herbomez, Michèle; Lion, Georges; Béron, Amandine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; DoCao, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a high molecular weight glycoprotein located mainly in thyroid follicles, where thyroid hormones are synthesized and stored. In patients with differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular origin, serum Tg levels become undetectable following total thyroidectomy and iodine-131 remnant ablation. It is a key biomarker to follow-up patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, in combination with neck ultrasound monitoring. The measurement of Tg in the wash-out of the needle used for fine needle aspiration biopsy is a valuable aid to the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis. The presence of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affects reliability of Tg results measured in serum or plasma. Systematic investigation of such antibodies is required to validate any Tg assay. Elevated or rising levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies can in turn be used as a surrogate tumor marker of thyroid cancer. The development of second-generation Tg assay (automated, highly sensitive) has enabled significant advances in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer: early detection of persistent or recurrent disease and follow-up care simplified in low-risk patients. Testing of serum Tg can also be useful in evaluating other clinical situations such as congenital hypothyroidism, endemic goiter and thyrotoxicosis factitia.

  18. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Curry, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane member 20 (TOMM20). Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer [PTC], and eight non-cancerous thyroid) and nine ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (P<.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.001). These xenograft tumors have high (13)C- pyruvate uptake. ATC has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target.

  19. Effect of (131)I 'clear residual thyroid tissue' after surgery on the function of parathyroid gland in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Hua; Li, Feng-Qi; Han, Jian-Kui; Li, Xian-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignant tumor of the endocrine glands. Although surgery is the optimal treatment utilized, the disease is characterized by recurrence and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of iodine-131 ((131)I) 'clear residual thyroid tissue' following surgery on the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and its effect on the function of the parathyroid gland. A total of 160 patients diagnosed with DTC, who were consecutively admitted to our Hospital between June 2012 and June 2014 and underwent total thyroidectomy or subtotal resection, were included in the present study. After three months, the patients were administered (131)I 'clear residual thyroid tissue' treatment and underwent a whole body scan after 1 week to determine whether 'clear residual thyroid tissue' treatment was successful or not. The treatment was repeated within 3 months if not successful. Of the 160 patients, 24 patients had cancer metastasis (15.0%). The average dose of (131)I used for the first time was 6.4+1.2 GBq and the treatment was successful in 66 cases (41.3%). The average treatment time was 2.8±0.6 therapy sessions. The results showed that, prior to and following the first treatment and at the end of the follow up, levels of the parathyroid hormone, serum calcium and phosphorus were compared, and no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) was observed. There were 5 patients with persistent hypothyroidism and 8 patients with transient hypothyroidism. The levels of thyroglobulin were significantly decreased, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). A total of 48 patients (30%) with hypothyroidism were identified. In conclusion, the results have shown that DTC resection and (131)I 'clear residual thyroid tissue' treatment did not significantly impair the parathyroid function, thereby improving the treatment effect.

  20. The association between serum TSH concentration and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Boelaert, Kristien

    2009-12-01

    There is mounting evidence that the serum concentration of TSH is an independent predictor for the diagnosis of thyroid malignancy in patients with nodular thyroid disease. Furthermore, preoperative serum TSH concentrations are higher in patients with more aggressive tumours, suggesting a potential role for TSH in the progression of differentiated thyroid cancer. Based on these observations, patients with higher serum TSH concentrations and borderline cytological results may require more aggressive investigation and treatment when compared with those with lower baseline TSH levels. The mechanisms underlying the finding of higher serum TSH in patients with thyroid cancer remain unexplained. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Fiore et al. have analysed the relationship between serum TSH and diagnosis of papillary thyroid cancer in 10 178 patients with nodular thyroid disease who were investigated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy. They found significantly higher TSH concentrations in patients who were subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer compared with those with benign disease. In addition, they found that the development of autonomous thyroid function (TSH<0.4 muU/ml) was associated with a reduction in the risk of papillary thyroid carcinoma. In this commentary, the evidence regarding the association between serum TSH and thyroid cancer is discussed placing these new findings into context.

  1. Thyroid Radiofrequency Ablation: Updates on Innovative Devices and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Sun; Park, Auh Whan; Chung, Sae Rom; Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-known, effective, and safe method for treating benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. Thyroid-dedicated devices and basic techniques for thyroid RFA were introduced by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology (KSThR) in 2012. Thyroid RFA has now been adopted worldwide, with subsequent advances in devices and techniques. To optimize the treatment efficacy and patient safety, understanding the basic and advanced RFA techniques and selecting the optimal treatment strategy are critical. The goal of this review is to therefore provide updates and analysis of current devices and advanced techniques for RFA treatment of benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. PMID:28670156

  2. Survival of Patients with Thyroid Cancer in Yazd, Iran

    PubMed

    Vahedian Ardakani, Hassan Ali; Moghimi, Mansour; Shayestehpour, Mohammad; Doosti, Masoud; Beigi Sharifabadi, Shamsi

    2017-08-27

    Background: Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine related malignancy in the world. This cancer has increased during recent years in Iran and is the11th most common malignancy in Iranian population. Survival of patients with thyroid carcinoma in the different geographic areas within Iran is not clear. The present study aimed to estimate survival of patients suffering from thyroid cancer in Yazd, Iran. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, data were collected from 80 patients with thyroid cancer registered in Shohadaye Kargar and Shahid Sadoughy hospitals in Yazd between March 2001 and March 2012. The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for estimation of survival over time and Cox regression method was performed for calculating hazard ratios according to demographic and risk variables. Results: Survival rates at the end of 1, 3, and 5 years in thyroid cancer patients were 99%, 96%, and 91%, respectively. A statistically significant correlation was found between stage of disease, type of cancer and survival time of patients (p<0.05). The worst survival was in peoples with the anaplastic type and stage IV of thyroid carcinoma. Conclusion: The survival of patients with thyroid carcinoma was higher than some areas in Iran. Since type and stage of thyroid cancer were the important factors in survival time, screening of people for cancer diagnosis in early stages, it seems to improve survival of patients. Radioactive iodine therapy can increase the survival rate in patients suffering from thyroid malignancy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  3. Expression of Stanniocalcin 1 in Thyroid Side Population Cells and Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayase, Suguru; Sasaki, Yoshihito; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Seo, Daekwan; Miyakoshi, Masaaki; Murata, Tsubasa; Ozaki, Takashi; Kakudo, Kennichi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Ylaya, Kris; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mouse thyroid side population (SP) cells consist of a minor population of mouse thyroid cells that may have multipotent thyroid stem cell characteristics. However the nature of thyroid SP cells remains elusive, particularly in relation to thyroid cancer. Stanniocalcin (STC) 1 and 2 are secreted glycoproteins known to regulate serum calcium and phosphate homeostasis. In recent years, the relationship of STC1/2 expression to cancer has been described in various tissues. Method: Microarray analysis was carried out to determine genes up- and down-regulated in thyroid SP cells as compared with non-SP cells. Among genes up-regulated, stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) was chosen for study because of its expression in various thyroid cells by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results: Gene expression analysis revealed that genes known to be highly expressed in cancer cells and/or involved in cancer invasion/metastasis were markedly up-regulated in SP cells from both intact as well as partial thyroidectomized thyroids. Among these genes, expression of STC1 was found in five human thyroid carcinoma–derived cell lines as revealed by analysis of mRNA and protein, and its expression was inversely correlated with the differentiation status of the cells. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher expression of STC1 in the thyroid tumor cell line and thyroid tumor tissues from humans and mice. Conclusion: These results suggest that SP cells contain a population of cells that express genes also highly expressed in cancer cells including Stc1, which warrants further study on the role of SP cells and/or STC1 expression in thyroid cancer. PMID:25647164

  4. Redifferentiating Thyroid Cancer: Selumetinib-enhanced Radioiodine Uptake in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Steven M.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Grewal, Ravinder K.; Tuttle, R. Michael

    2017-01-01

    In a recent article, we reported a restorative therapeutic intervention that turned individual thyroid cancer lesions into more efficient tissues for taking up radioactive iodine (RAI), resulting in clinically significant and durable responses. A group of Iodine-131 refractory thyroid cancer patients were treated with the MEK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) selumetinib, and RAI uptake was restored in a subset of patients. We employed Iodine-124 positron emission tomography to measure radiation absorbed dose, on a lesion by lesion basis. The process can be thought of as a re-differentiation of the cancer toward a more nearly normal state most like the tissue from which the cancer arose. Remarkably, in its own way, a change was detected within a few weeks of treatment, restoring uptake with therapeutically effective levels of RAI and in some patients, previously completely refractory to radioiodine treatment. In this article, we summarize the basic work that led to this seminal study, and make the case for lesional dosimetry in thyroid cancer with Iodine-124 as a new optimal radiotracer for precision medicine in patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:28117292

  5. Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A L; Gandhi, A; Scott-Coombes, D; Perros, P

    2016-05-01

    spread (pT3 and pT4a), familial disease and those with clinically or radiologically involved nodes and/or distant metastases. (R) • Subtotal thyroidectomy should not be used in the management of thyroid cancer. (G) • Central compartment neck dissection is not routinely recommended for patients with papillary thyroid cancer without clinical or radiological evidence of lymph node involvement, provided they meet all of the following criteria: classical type papillary thyroid cancer, patient less than 45 years old, unifocal tumour, less than 4 cm, no extrathyroidal extension on ultrasound. (R) • Patients with metastases in the lateral compartment should undergo therapeutic lateral and central compartment neck dissection. (R) • Patients with follicular cancer with greater than 4 cm tumours should be treated with total thyroidectomy. (R) • I131 ablation should be carried out only in centres with appropriate facilities. (R) • Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) should be checked in all post-operative patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but not sooner than six weeks after surgery. (R) • Patients who have undergone total or near total thyroidectomy should be started on levothyroxine 2 µg per kg or liothyronine 20 mcg tds after surgery. (R) • The majority of patients with a tumour more than 1 cm in diameter, who have undergone total or near-total thyroidectomy, should have I131 ablation. (R) • A post-ablation scan should be performed 3-10 days after I131 ablation. (R) • Post-therapy dynamic risk stratification at 9-12 months is used to guide further management. (G) • Potentially resectable recurrent or persistent disease should be managed with surgery whenever possible. (R) • Distant metastases and sites not amenable to surgery which are iodine avid should be treated with I131 therapy. (R) • Long-term follow-up for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is recommended. (G) • Follow-up should be based on clinical examination, serum Tg and

  6. Medical exposure to radiation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, S J; Lee, C; Berrington de González, A

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, the worldwide estimated age-standardised incidence rates for thyroid cancer incidence were 4.7 and 1.5 per 100,000 women and men, respectively. Thyroid cancer's overall contribution to the worldwide cancer burden is relatively small, but incidence rates have increased over the last three decades throughout the world. This trend has been hypothesised to reflect a combination of technological advances enabling increased detection, but also changes in environmental factors, including population exposure to ionising radiation from fallout, diagnostic tests and treatment for benign and malignant conditions. Studies of the atomic bomb survivors and populations treated with radiotherapy have established radiation as a risk factor for thyroid cancer, particularly from early life exposure. About 0.62 mSv (20%) of the global annual per caput effective radiation dose comes from diagnostic medical and dental radiation for the period of 1997-2007, increased from 0.4 mSv for the years 1991-1996. This international trend of increasing population exposure to medical diagnostic sources of radiation, attributed in large part to the growing use of computed tomography scans, but also interventional radiology procedures, has raised concerns about exposure to radiosensitive organs such as the thyroid. Worldwide, medical and dental X-rays constitute the most common type of diagnostic medical exposures, but their contribution to the cumulative effective dose is relatively low, whereas computed tomography scans account for 7.9% of diagnostic radiology examinations but 47% of the collective effective dose from diagnostic radiation procedures in parts of the world. Although the radiation exposure from computed tomography scans is substantially lower than that from radiotherapy, multiple computed tomography scans could result in non-trivial cumulative doses to the thyroid. Studies are currently underway to assess the incidence of cancer in large cohorts of children who received

  7. Robotic versus Open Thyroidectomy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shirley Yuk Wah; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2016-01-01

    While open thyroidectomy (OT) is advocated as the gold standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer, the contemporary use of robotic thyroidectomy (RT) is often controversial. Although RT combines the unique benefits of the surgical robot and remote access thyroidectomy, its applicability on cancer patients is challenged by the questionable oncological benefits and safety. This review aims to analyze the current literature evidence in comparing RT to OT on thyroid cancers for their perioperative and oncological outcomes. To date, no randomized controlled trial is available in comparing RT to OT. All published studies are nonrandomized or retrospective comparisons. Current data suggests that RT compares less favorably than OT for longer operative time, higher cost, and possibly inferior oncological control with lower number of central lymph nodes retrieved. In terms of morbidity, quality of life outcomes, and short-term recurrence rates, RT and OT are comparable. While conventional OT continues to be appropriate for most thyroid cancers, RT should better be continued by expert surgeons on selected patients who have low-risk thyroid cancers and have high expectations on cosmetic outcomes. Future research should embark on prospective randomized studies for unbiased comparisons. Long-term follow-up studies are also needed to evaluate outcomes on recurrence and survival. PMID:27069476

  8. Complications of Bilateral Neck Dissection in Thyroid Cancer From a Single High-Volume Center.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Caitlin; Rocke, Daniel; Freeman, Jeremy

    2017-04-01

    The morbidity of bilateral lateral neck dissection (BLND) for thyroid cancers has not been described in detail. This study delineates the specific complications arising from BLND for thyroid cancers at a single high-volume center. To determine the morbidity associated with BLNDs for differentiated thyroid cancers at our institution. This was a retrospective review of medical records performed to identify patients having undergone BLNDs for thyroid cancers by a single surgeon at an academic, tertiary medical center in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, from 1988 to 2015. Patients who underwent BLND for papillary, follicular, or medullary thyroid cancers were identified through operative procedure codes and review of operative and pathology reports. The indication for this procedure was suspicious bilateral lateral compartment on imaging and clinical examination. Sixty-two patients who underwent BLND for thyroid cancers, with or without total thyroidectomy and central compartment dissection, were identified. The main outcome measures for this study were unanticipated medical or surgical complications during the operation or in the postoperative period. Secondary measures were oncologic outcomes, including regional structural or biochemical recurrence. Of the 62 patients, 24 were male (39%), and 38 (61%) were female. Their mean age was 46 years (range, 17-80 years). The overall risk of permanent hypoparathyroidism was 37%. There was 1 case of unanticipated permanent recurrent nerve paralysis and 1 case of temporary nerve paresis. Postoperative chyle fistula occurred in 6 cases (10%). There were 3 readmissions within 30 days of surgery, 1 pulmonary embolism, and 1 perioperative mortality. Fifty percent of patients had pN0 contralateral necks despite preoperative clinical suspicion. Four patients were found to have anaplastic thyroid cancers intraoperatively. Five patients (8%) developed nodal recurrence in the neck. Four patients died of their disease within available follow

  9. [Method of detection of residual tissues in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Gostimskiĭ, A V; Romanchishen, A F; Zaĭtseva, I V; Kuznetsova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    A search of residual tissues is complicated in recurrent operations on the thyroid gland. The Saint-Petersburg Centre of Surgery of the Endocrine System and Oncology developed the method of detection of residual tissues of the thyroid gland with the aim of preoperative chromothyroidolymphography under control of ultrasound. The method consisted of US performance during 15-20 minutes before the operation and an introduction of 1% sterile water solution of methylene blue in revealed residual tissues of the thyroid gland. The volume of injected coloring agent was 0.5-2 ml in the residual tissue volume smaller than 9 cm3 and 2-3 ml injected in case of more than 9 cm3. The residual tissues of the thyroid gland accurately visualized during the following operation. Described method gives the possibility to detect all regions of residual tissues which should be removed and at the same time it shortens a revision and surgery trauma.

  10. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  11. Thyroid cancer in Graves' disease: is surgery the best treatment for Graves' disease?

    PubMed

    Tamatea, Jade A U; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2014-04-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment options include anti-thyroid medications or definitive therapy: thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine (I(131) ). Traditionally, I(131) has been the preferred definitive treatment for Graves' disease in New Zealand. Reports of concomitant thyroid cancer occurring in up to 17% of Graves' patients suggest surgery, if performed with low morbidity, may be the preferred option. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of thyroid cancer and surgical outcomes in a New Zealand cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. This study is a retrospective review of Waikato region patients undergoing thyroid surgery for Graves' disease during the 10-year period prior to 1 December 2011. A total of 833 patients underwent thyroid surgery. Of these, 117 were for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 82, near-total in 33 and subtotal in 2 patients. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis developed in one subtotal patient requiring I(131) therapy. There were two cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism and one of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Eight patients (6.8%) had thyroid cancer detected, none of whom had overt nodal disease. Five were papillary microcarcinomas (one of which was multifocal), two were papillary carcinomas (11 mm and 15 mm) and one was a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. Thyroid cancer was identified in approximately 7% of patients undergoing surgery for Graves' disease. A low complication rate (<2%) of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve injury (<1%) supports surgery being a safe alternative to I(131) especially for patients with young children, ophthalmopathy or compressive symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. A review on thyroid cancer during pregnancy: Multitasking is required.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Hussein; Al Lahloubi, Nasr; Rashad, Noha

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy after breast cancer. The goal of management is to control malignancy and prevent maternal and fetal complications as a result of maternal hypothyroidism. The role of female sex hormones as an etiologic factor was investigated, with no clear association. Pregnancy can cause an increase in size of a previously existed thyroid nodule through the structural similarity between TSH and BHCG, and the normally expressed estrogen receptors on thyroid gland cells. Effect of pregnancy on development and prognosis of differentiated thyroid malignancies (papillary and follicular) has also been studied. The prognosis of thyroid cancer is not worse in patients diagnosed during pregnancy or those who got pregnant after curative treatment. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated at all, surgery can be delayed till after delivery except in rapidly growing aggressive tumors. While radioactive iodine ablation is absolutely contra-indicated, the new systemic therapies are not well studied during pregnancy. However, almost all these new agents are classified as FDA category C or D and are better to be avoided. The effect of pregnancy on other types of thyroid cancer (medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors) is not well studied because of very low incidence with pregnancy. The endocrinological management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy is of utmost importance. The hypothyroidism after total thyroidectomy can cause fetal hypothyroidism. Therefore, the management of thyroid cancer related to pregnancy needs a multidisciplinary team.

  13. Increasing detection and increasing incidence in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stephen F; Walker, Hugh; Siemens, Robert; Schneeberg, Amy

    2009-12-01

    It has been proposed that the increasing incidence of thyroid cancer is due to increasing detection. Using administrative data, we compare by year from 1993 to 2006, the rates of diagnostic imaging tests of the neck (computed axial tomography--CT, magnetic resonance imaging--MRI, and non-obstetrical ultrasound--US) to the incidence of thyroid cancer for the population of the Province of Ontario Canada. Women and men have different rates of tests, and those rates reflect the rates of new diagnoses of thyroid cancer. The rising incidence of thyroid disease in women is associated with increasing numbers of diagnostic imaging tests.

  14. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  15. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    PubMed Central

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  16. Mouse Models of Thyroid Cancer: A 2015 Update

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Lawrence S.; Qamri, Zahida; Kari, Suresh; Ashtekar, Amruta

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasm, and its rate is rising at an alarming pace. Thus, there is a compelling need to develop in vivo models which will not only enable the confirmation of the oncogenic potential of driver genes, but also point the way towards the development of new therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, techniques for the generation of mouse models of human diseases have progressed substantially, accompanied by parallel advances in the genetics and genomics of human tumors. This convergence has enabled the development of mouse lines carrying mutations in the genes that cause thyroid cancers of all subtypes, including differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancers, poorly differentiated/anaplastic cancers, and medullary thyroid cancers. In this review, we will discuss the state of the art of mouse modeling of thyroid cancer, with the eventual goal of providing insight into tumor biology and treatment. PMID:26123589

  17. Thyroid cancer characteristics in the population surrounding Three Mile Island.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neerav; Camacho, Fabian; Mangano, Joseph; Goldenberg, David

    2012-06-01

    To determine differences in disease characteristics between the thyroid cancer populations in the area around the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant and the rest of the state of Pennsylvania. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Data from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry from 1985 to 2008 were reviewed and information regarding age at diagnosis, sex, race, residential status, county of residence, thyroid pathology, thyroid surgery, and staging was recorded. Dauphin, Lancaster, and York counties were defined as the TMI area. Records of 26,357 thyroid cancer patients were reviewed, with 2,611 patients within the TMI area. A higher proportion of papillary thyroid cancer (P < .001) and lower proportion of follicular thyroid cancer (P < .001) were noted in the TMI area population. Thyroid cancer cases from the TMI area were found to be more likely to be diagnosed before the age of 65 years (P < .001), be Pennsylvania born (P < .001), be well differentiated (P < .001), be <10 mm in size (P < .001), and be localized without spread (P < .001). Although the TMI area shows a higher incidence of thyroid cancer as compared to the rest of the state, this was not statistically significant. The TMI population showed a higher proportion of papillary thyroid cancer and less aggressive pathology and earlier diagnosis compared to the rest of Pennsylvania. No statistically significant difference in thyroid cancer incidence was noted. Overall, the study does not show a clear link with more advanced thyroid cancer and proximity to the TMI nuclear reactors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Molecular Pathways Associated with Aggressiveness of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    The most common thyroid malignancy is papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Mortality rates from PTC mainly depend on its aggressiveness. Geno- and phenotyping of aggressive PTC has advanced our understanding of treatment failures and of potential future therapies. Unraveling molecular signaling pathways of PTC including its aggressive forms will hopefully pave the road to reduce mortality but also morbidity from this cancer. The mitogen-activated protein kinase and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway as well as the family of RAS oncogenes and BRAF as a member of the RAF protein family and the aberrant expression of microRNAs miR-221, miR-222, and miR-146b all play major roles in tumor initiation and progression of aggressive PTC. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF-mediated events, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, RET/PTC rearrangements, and other molecular targets, show promising results to improve treatment of radioiodine resistant, recurrent, and aggressive PTC. PMID:24955023

  19. Medullary thyroid cancer diagnosis: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Giovanella, Luca; Crescenzi, Anna; Romanelli, Francesco; Valabrega, Stefano; Spriano, Giuseppe; Cremonini, Nadia; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    Since its first description in 1951, a timely diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may represent a diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Several contributions have been addressed to the treatment and follow-up of MTC, but review articles focused on the diagnostic problems of this cancer in clinical practice are sparse. As a delayed diagnosis and an inadequate initial treatment may severely affect the prognosis of this thyroid malignancy, the appropriate use and the correct interpretation of the available diagnostic tools for MTC are of crucial importance. The purpose of the present article is to provide an easy-to-use guide reviewing the main issues of MTC diagnosis: (1) basal serum calcitonin; (2) stimulated serum calcitonin; (3) additional serum markers for MTC; (4) ultrasound and other imaging techniques; (5) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology; (6) calcitonin measurement on FNA washout; (7) rearranged during transfection (RET) mutations; and (8) scope of the problem. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dynamic prediction of the risk of recurrence in patients over 60 years of age with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morosán, Yanina Jimena; Parisi, Carina; Urrutia, María Agustina; Rosmarin, Melanie; Schnitman, Marta; Serrano, Leonardo; Luciani, Wilfrido; Faingold, Cristina; Pitoia, Fabián; Brenta, Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    The reclassification of the risk according to the response to the initial treatment makes the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) vary in each individual. As the influence of age on this diagnostic strategy is unknown, we have decided to assess it in adults who are over 60 years of age. Ninety patients with DTC above 60 years old were enrolled, with total thyroidectomy plus radioiodine ablation, negative anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, follow-up ≥ 2 years and with clinical and pathological information to classify the risk of recurrence according to ATA (American Thyroid Association) and reclassify based on the response to initial therapy according to MSKCC (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center). The structural persistence at the end of the follow-up was the gold standard of our analysis. The structural persistence in ATA low, intermediate and high risk categories was 0, 38, and 100%, respectively. In the intermediate group, none of those with an excellent response to the initial treatment showed structural persistence, whereas 39% of those with an incomplete/indeterminate response showed structural persistence (p < 0.01). The re-stratification according to the response to the initial treatment in patients over 60 years of age with an ATA intermediate risk of recurrence allowed for the distinction of disease-free patients at the end of the follow-up from those with structural persistence and a worse clinical progression.

  1. Mutant HABP2 Causes Non-Medullary Thyroid Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that lies at the base of the throat in front of the windpipe. A member of the endocrine system, the thyroid secretes hormones to regulate heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and metabolism. Cancer of the thyroid is the most common endocrine cancer and the eighth most common cancer in the U.S. An estimated 63,450 Americans will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer this year. The vast majority is of follicular cell origin, and the remaining cancer originates from parafollicular cells, so called medullary thyroid cancer.

  2. Thyroid cancer after external or internal ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Foteini; Efthimiou, Elias

    2009-01-01

    It has been known for 50 years that thyroid exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence induces an appreciable cancer risk. Epidemiological studies in children treated with external radiotherapy for benign or malignant lesions in the head and neck have also shown the induction of thyroid cancer. The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that the risk for developing thyroid cancer due to the Chernobyl accident is greatest in newborns and children below the age of 5, less in adolescents and negligible in adults. As reported, during the first 15 years after the accident, the increase in thyroid cancer cases in Belarus was 87.8 fold in children, 12.7 fold in adolescents and 4.5 fold in adults more than expected. Papillary thyroid cancer with a relative risk incidence of approximately 80% per se is typical in childhood and adolescence. We refer to the differences between adult and childhood papillary thyroid cancers. Gene mutations in thyroid tumors induced after Chernobyl accident have been studied extensively. The treatment comprises thyroid surgery, suppressive doses of thyroxine and radioiodine. It is noteworthy that the thyroid gland can be protected from the intake of radioactive iodine by oral administration of potassium iodide.

  3. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gribova, O. V. Choynzonov, E. L.; Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A. Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  4. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  5. Anesthetic techniques and cancer recurrence after surgery.

    PubMed

    Fodale, Vincenzo; D'Arrigo, Maria G; Triolo, Stefania; Mondello, Stefania; La Torre, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients.

  6. Regional variation in thyroid cancer incidence in Belgium is associated with variation in thyroid imaging and thyroid disease management.

    PubMed

    Van den Bruel, Annick; Francart, Julie; Dubois, Cecile; Adam, Marielle; Vlayen, Joan; De Schutter, Harlinde; Stordeur, Sabine; Decallonne, Brigitte

    2013-10-01

    Increased thyroid cancer incidence is at least partially attributed to increased detection and shows considerable regional variation. We investigated whether regional variation in cancer incidence was associated with variations in thyroid disease management. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study that involved linking data from the Belgian Health Insurance database and the Belgian Cancer Registry to compare thyroid-related procedures between regions with high and low cancer incidence. Primary outcome measures were rates of TSH testing, imaging, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), and thyroid surgery. Secondary study outcomes were proportions of subjects with thyrotoxicosis and nodular disease treated with surgery, of subjects treated with surgery preceded by FNAC or with synchronous lymph node dissection, and of thyroid cancer diagnosis after surgery. The rate of TSH testing was similar, but the rate of imaging was lower in the low incidence region. The rate of FNAC was similar, whereas the rate of surgery was lower in the low incidence region (34 [95% CI 33; 35 ] vs 80 [95% CI 79; 81 ] per 100,000 person years in the high incidence region; P < .05). In the low incidence region compared to the high incidence region, surgery represented a less chosen therapy for euthyroid nodular disease patients (47% [95% CI 46; 48] vs 69% [95% CI 68; 70]; P < .05), proportionally more surgery was preceded by FNAC, more cancer was diagnosed after total thyroidectomy, and thyroid cancer patients had more preoperative FNAC and synchronous lymph node dissection. Regional variation in thyroid cancer incidence, most marked for low-risk disease, is associated with different usage of thyroid imaging and surgery, supporting variable detection as a key determinant in geographic variation.

  7. Trends of Thyroid Cancer in Israel: 1980–2012

    PubMed Central

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Silverman, Barbara G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing worldwide, while mortality from thyroid cancer is stable or decreasing. Consequently, survival rates are rising. We describe time trends in the incidence, mortality, and 5-year survival of thyroid cancer in Israel in 1980–2012, in light of the global trends. Methods: Israel National Cancer Registry database provided information regarding thyroid cancer incidence and vital status, which enabled computation of survival rates. The Central Bureau of Statistics database provided information on thyroid cancer mortality. Incidence and mortality rates were age-adjusted and presented by population group (Jews/Arabs) and gender. Relative 5-year survival rates which account for the general population survival in the corresponding time period were presented by population group and gender. Joinpoint analyses were used to assess incidence trends over time. Results: In 1980–2012 significant increases in the incidence of thyroid cancer were observed, with an annual percent change (APC) range of 3.98–6.93, driven almost entirely by papillary carcinoma (APCs 5.75–8.86), while rates of other types of thyroid cancer remained stable or decreased. Furthermore, higher rates of early detection were noted. In 1980–2012, a modest reduction in thyroid cancer mortality was observed in Jewish women (APC −1.07) with no substantial change in Jewish men. The 5-year relative survival after thyroid cancer diagnosis has increased to ≥90% in both population groups and both genders. Conclusions: The Israeli secular trends of thyroid cancer incidence (increasing), mortality (mostly stable), and survival (modestly increasing) closely follow reported global trends. PMID:26886958

  8. Oxidative stress: a new risk factor for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a state of excessive free radicals and reactive metabolites among which the most important class is reactive oxygen species (ROS) - radicals derived from oxygen - as represented by the superoxide anion radical (O2(·-)) and its reactive metabolites, hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In essence, OS represents an imbalance between the production of oxidants - ROS - and their elimination by antioxidative systems in the body. Many studies have linked OS to thyroid cancer by showing its association with abnormally regulated oxidative or antioxidative molecules. The study by Wang et al. in the December 2011 issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer (18, 773-782) further supports this relationship by demonstrating a high total oxidant status and OS index in thyroid cancer patients. The origin of ROS in thyroid cancer patients has not been defined, but thyroid cancer itself can be one since inflammation, a major event in it, is a classical source of ROS. ROS may in turn enhance the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, forming a vicious cycle propelling thyroid tumorigenesis. Regardless of the mechanism, the clinical implication of the association of OS with thyroid cancer is severalfold: one, OS is a new risk factor for thyroid cancer; two, OS confers thyroid cancer patients an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, degenerative neurological disorders, and other cancers that are classically associated with OS; and three, interference with OS may reduce this risk and be therapeutically beneficial to thyroid cancer itself in thyroid cancer patients. These interesting possibilities deserve further studies.

  9. Electrophysiologic nerve stimulation for identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: review of 70 consecutive thyroid surgeries.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, A; Flexon, P B

    1998-04-01

    To describe a simple technique for identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) with a nerve stimulator to prevent damage to the nerve during thyroid surgery. A retrospective review of 70 thyroidectomies performed from October 1989 to January 1995 by one surgeon using electrophysiologic nerve stimulation to identify the RLN was conducted. The technique is described. Outpatient flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy was performed preoperatively and postoperatively in all patients. From 70 thyroidectomies, 80 RLNs were identified to be at risk for injury. Five patients had transient unilateral vocal cord paresis postoperatively. No RLN transection or permanent vocal cord paralysis occurred. This is the first large series of patients undergoing the use of electrophysiologic nerve stimulation for identifying the RLN during thyroid surgery. We found the technique to be useful and safe for identifying the RLN. We present this technique as a less costly and time-consuming alternative to intraoperative RLN monitoring.

  10. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has rapidly increased worldwide. Thyroid cancer incidence is relatively high in regions where the population's daily iodine intake is insufficient. While low dietary iodine has been considered as a risk factor for thyroid cancer development, previous studies found controversial results across different food types. Among different ethnic groups, dietary factors are influenced by various dietary patterns, eating habits, life-styles, nutrition, and other environmental factors. This review reports the association between dietary factors and thyroid cancer risk among ethnic groups living in different geologic regions. Iodine-rich food such as fish and shellfish may provide a protective role in populations with insufficient daily iodine intake. The consumption of goitrogenic food, such as cruciferous vegetables, showed a positive association with risk. While considered to be a risk factor for other cancers, alcohol intake showed a protective role against thyroid cancer. High consumption of meat such as chicken, pork, and poultry showed a positive association with the risk, but dairy products showed no significant association. Regular use of multivitamins and dietary nitrate and nitrite also showed a positive association with thyroid cancer risk. However, the study results are inconsistent and investigations into the mechanism for how dietary factors change thyroid hormone levels and influence thyroid function are required. PMID:25136535

  11. Inherited cancer syndromes and the thyroid: an update.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Rosemarie; Milas, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge related to hereditary thyroid cancer syndromes has expanded enormously. This review identifies contributions that have changed approaches to diagnosis and broadened treatment options for patients with hereditary medullary and nonmedullary thyroid cancers related to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), Cowden syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). A new risk-stratification scheme based on type of RET gene mutation informs the age at which prophylactic thyroidectomy and diagnostic screening for MEN-associated endocrine diseases should occur. Two new US Food and Drug Administration-approved targeted medical therapies are now available for medullary thyroid cancer. There is better understanding of more aggressive clinical features and increased lifetime cancer risks for patients with well differentiated thyroid cancers as part of families with and without Cowden syndrome or FAP. This has led to a clearer appreciation for the role and timing of thyroid ultrasound screening in these populations. It has also informed the appropriate extent of thyroid surgery and the circumstances in which prophylactic thyroidectomy is reasonable to consider as part of hereditary syndromes other than MEN2. Recognition and early diagnosis of these syndromes allows for comprehensive medical care and may improve thyroid cancer-related outcomes. Ultrasound-based screening programs to detect thyroid disease are advised for patients and family members with hereditary cancer syndromes.

  12. Changing face of paediatric and adolescent thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hameed, R; Zacharin, M R

    2005-11-01

    The aims of our study were to review the Royal Children's Hospital cohort of children having thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules over the last 8 years and to report the changing pattern of thyroid cancer seen in our institution over that time. We undertook a retrospective case-note review of all patients who underwent thyroid surgery between 1997 and 2004. Of 69 patients identified, the pathological diagnoses were 51 benign tumours, 14 thyroid cancers and four cases of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, who were treated with prophylactic thyroidectomy. Sixteen of the 69 patients had a history of childhood cancer and 10/16 had cancer treatment which included direct or scatter radiation. Of the 10 patients who received irradiation, four had follicular adenomas and six developed thyroid cancer. All six patients were euthyroid: one patient was presented with a palpable nodule and the other five were detected on surveillance ultrasound. Our results confirm a high detection of malignancy in thyroid nodules in childhood. Compared to an earlier study at this institution, the number of thyroid malignancies appears to be increasing. Surveillance at the Royal Children's Hospital has changed, with increased long-term cancer survival. Prospective 2-yearly evaluation of those with a past history of radiation exposure has resulted in earlier detection of benign and malignant thyroid lesions. Nodular changes are usually not clinically apparent for many years and lifelong surveillance is necessary for cancer detection in this group.

  13. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references.

  14. Circulating thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA and differentiated thyroid cancer: A diagnostic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chao-Yue; Li, Zhan-Ming; Wang, Li-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR-mRNA) is over-expressed in thyroid cancer patients, which indicates that TSHR-mRNA is a potential biomarker of thyroid cancer. However, system evaluation for TSHR-mRNA as a diagnostic biomarker of thyroid cancer is deficient. The performance of TSHR-mRNA for thyroid cancer diagnosis was evaluated in this study. Three common international databases as well as a Chinese database were applied for literature researching. Quality assessment of the included literatures was conducted by the QUADAS-2 tool. Totally, 1027 patients from nine studies eligible for the meta-analysis were included in this study. Global sensitivity and specificity for the positivity of TSHR-mRNA in the thyroid cancer diagnosis is 72% and 82%. The value of AUC for this test performance was 0.84. Our meta-analysis suggests that TSHR-mRNA might be a potential biomarker to complete present diagnostic methods for early and precision diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Notably, this findings need validation thorough large-scale clinical studies. PMID:28036261

  15. [Reinnervation of larynx in surgical treatment of invasive thyroidal gland cancer].

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, V A

    2013-10-01

    The possibilities and efficacy of performance of simultant operations for invasive thyroid gland cancer in initial neuropathic laryngeal stenosis and dysphonic syndrome, aimed at minimization of the residual volume of thyroid gland tissue and surgical laryngeal reinnervation, were studied. The results of laryngeal surgical reinnervation, in accordance to data of videolaryngoscopy, aerodynamical and spectral analysis of the voice, self estimation of the vocal disorders impact on the patients quality of life were analyzed. Postoperatively in all the patients the improvement of phonation and quality of life was noted. Primary neurorhaphia of recurrent laryngeal nerve secures restoration of normal or nearly normal talkative voice due to restoration of the tone and volume of m. cricoarytenoideus lateralis and m. thyroarytenoideus on the side of affection and may be effectively applied for correction of consequences of laryngeal neuropathic paralysis in surgical treatment of the thyroid gland cancer.

  16. Differentiated and Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Management of Cervical Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulos, P; Nixon, I J; Shaha, A R

    2017-05-01

    Thyroid cancer metastasises to the central and lateral compartments of the neck frequently and early. The impact of nodal metastases on outcome is affected by the histological subtype of the primary tumour and the patient's age, as well as the size, number and location of those metastases. The impact of extranodal extension has recently been highlighted as an important prognosticating factor. Although clinically evident nodal disease in the lateral neck compartments has a significant impact on both survival and recurrence, microscopic metastases to the central or the lateral neck in well-differentiated thyroid cancer do not significantly affect outcome. Here we discuss the surgical management of neck metastases in well-differentiated and medullary thyroid carcinoma. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Obesity and thyroid cancer: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Theodora; Alevizaki, Maria

    2014-02-01

    In the last decade, significant contributions have been made to our knowledge on the connection between the thyroid and adipose tissue. Modern society is faced with climbing rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome, and there is accumulating evidence of an association between obesity and increased cancer risk. The aim of this review is to summarize clinical data on the association between thyroid cancer (TC) and obesity and briefly to present plausible hypotheses explaining this interplay. We performed a search on the PubMed database for studies published in English from 1980 to March 2013 using the terms "thyroid cancer," "obesity," and "body mass index." Although there is inconsistency among the clinical studies, it seems that overweight and obesity are related to a modestly increased TC risk. Various factors, such as sex, ethnicity, and body changes during certain life periods, for example adolescence, may influence the association between obesity and TC risk. There are preliminary data linking obesity with a less favorable clinicopathologic profile of TC. However, validation with larger multicenter studies is needed. The precise underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated, but the insulin-IGF axis and adipokines, such as leptin and adiponectin, might be implicated in the link between excess weight and TC. Given the rising prevalence of TC and the development of obesity as an epidemic, it is important to clarify its connection with TC as well as the mediating pathways. However, unless this association is confirmed and causation proven, screening for TC in overweight and obese subjects-a rapidly increasing body of the general population-does not seem justified.

  18. Thyroid cancer incidence among Asian immigrants to Ontario, Canada: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Baiju R; Griffiths, Rebecca; Hall, Stephen F

    2017-09-01

    The highest rates of thyroid cancer are observed in Pacific Island nations as well as Australia and Asian countries bordering the Pacific. The objective of this study was to determine the risk for thyroid cancer among immigrants to Canada from Southeast and East Asia compared with immigrants from other regions and nonimmigrants. This was a population-based, longitudinal cohort study using health care administrative data to examine all residents of Ontario without pre-existing thyroid cancer. Individuals were followed from January 1997 or 5 years after they became eligible for health care coverage in Ontario, whichever came later. Patients were followed until March 2015 for incident-differentiated thyroid cancer, and then for recurrence. The study followed 14,659,733 individuals for a median of 17 years. Thyroid cancer incidence was 43.8 cases per 100,000 person-years among Southeast Asian immigrants, 28.6 cases per 100,000 person-years among East Asian immigrants, 21.5 cases per 100,000 person-years among other immigrants, and 14.5 cases per 100,000 person-years among nonimmigrants. Incidence was highest among immigrants from the Philippines (52.7 cases per 100,000 person-years), South Korea (33.5 cases per 100,000 person-years), and China (30.0 cases per 100,000 person-years). Adjusted hazard ratios for thyroid cancer compared with nonimmigrants were 2.66 (95% confidence interval, 2.48-2.84) for Southeast Asian immigrants, 1.87 (95% confidence interval, 1.75-2.00) for East Asian immigrants, and 1.51 (95% confidence interval, 1.45-1.57) for other immigrants. Immigrants were more likely to have papillary histology and stage I cancer. East Asian immigrants, but not Southeast Asian immigrants, had a lower risk of recurrence (hazard ratio, 0.73 [95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.94] and 1.01 [95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.26], respectively). Immigrants from Southeast and East Asia had markedly higher thyroid cancer incidence than nonimmigrants. At particularly elevated

  19. Thyroid cancer incidence in relation to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arnbjoernsson, E.A.; Arnbjoernsson, A.O.; Olafsson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Environmental or genetic factors are sought to explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. At present, it is impossible to cite any environmental factor, particularly one related to the volcanic activity in the country, which could explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. However, the thyroid gland in Icelanders is very small due to the high intake of iodine from seafood. It is, therefore, easier for physicians to find thyroid tumors. Furthermore, genetic factors are very likely to be of great importance in the small, isolated island of Iceland.

  20. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-07-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with /sup 131/I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after /sup 131/I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women.

  1. Risk factors influencing the recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Zhuoying

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors influencing the recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma. This meta-analysis used MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE and CNKI including all cohort studies reporting the risk factors influencing the recurrence after the initial operation on PTC up to February 23, 2014. Software RevMan 5.2 was used for meta-analysis. Thirteen studies with a total of 7048 patients were included in our meta-analysis. Of all variables, gender, extrathyroid extension, LNM, tumor size, distance metastasis, thyroid surgery types and 131-I given or not were significantly correlated with recurrence, While overall recurrence was similar between the group of ≤ 45 years and > 45 years, multifolicality and solitary. However, when stratified the participants by study location (ie, Asian including China, Korea, Japan, Western country including America, France, Italy, Australia), a statistically significant summary odds ratio for age were found in Western country but none in Asian. The risk factors influencing recurrence includes male, extrathyroid extension, LNM, tumor size more than 2 cm, distance metastasis and subtotal thyroidectomy. However, selection of operation mode should be based on not only the recurrence but the comprehensive consideration of the clinical features.

  2. Risk of Recurrence in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sørum Falk, Ragnhild; Folkvard Evensen, Jan; Boysen, Morten; Brøndbo, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    A cohort study was undertaken to analyze the risk of recurrence among 1616 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx from 1983 to 2010 at a single, tertiary academic center in Oslo, Norway. The cohort was followed from the date of diagnosis to September 2011. Competing risk regression analysis assessed the association between various risk factors and the risk of recurrence, where death was considered a competing event. Recurrence was observed in 368 patients (23%) during the study period. The majority (71%) of recurrences involved the location of the primary tumor. The overall risk of recurrence during the first three years after initiating treatment was 20.5%. Increased risk of recurrence was observed in patients with supraglottic cancer, younger patients, those with T2–T3 tumors and in patients treated in the earlier part of the study period. Significant factors for recurrence in glottic carcinomas were age, treatment in the earlier part of the study and T-status, whereas age was a significant factor in supraglottic cancer. N-status appeared less significant. In conclusion, follow-up of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma should place particular emphasis on the site of the primary tumor, younger patients, cases of supraglottic cancer and T2-T4 primary tumors, especially during the first three years after treatment. More studies are needed to assess the impact of surgical versus non-surgical treatment, and eventually the significance of recurrence, for disease-specific and overall survival in cases of advanced laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27716797

  3. Highly prevalent TERT promoter mutations in aggressive thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Justin; Shan, Yuan; Pai, Sara; Liu, Dingxie; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sun, Hui; El-Naggar, Adel K; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-08-01

    Mutations 1 295 228 C>T and 1 295 250 C>T (termed C228T and C250T respectively), corresponding to -124 C>T and -146 C>T from the translation start site in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, have recently been reported in human cancers, but not in thyroid cancers yet. We explored these mutations in thyroid cancers by genomic sequencing of a large number of primary tumor samples. We found the C228T mutation in 0 of 85 (0.0%) benign thyroid tumors, 30 of 257 (11.7%) papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 9 of 79 (11.4%) follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 3 of 8 (37.5%) poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTC), 23 of 54 (42.6%) anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC), and 8 of 12 (66.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. The C250T mutation was uncommon, but mutually exclusive with the C228T mutation, and the two mutations were collectively found in 11 of 79 (13.9%) FTC, 25 of 54 (46.3%) ATC, and 11 of 12 (91.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. Among PTC variants, the C228T mutation was found in 4 of 13 (30.8%) tall-cell PTC (TCPTC), 23 of 187 (12.3%) conventional PTC, and 2 of 56 (3.6%) follicular variant PTC samples. No TERT mutation was found in 16 medullary thyroid cancer samples. The C228T mutation was associated with the BRAF V600E mutation in PTC, being present in 19 of 104 (18.3%) BRAF mutation-positive PTC vs 11 of 153 (7.2%) the BRAF mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). Conversely, BRAF mutation was found in 19 of 30 (63.3%) C228T mutation-positive PTC vs 85 of 227 (37.4%) C228T mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). We thus for the first time, to our knowledge, demonstrate TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancers, that are particularly prevalent in the aggressive thyroid cancers TCPTC, PDTC, ATC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, revealing a novel genetic background for thyroid cancers.

  4. Three cases of dermatomyositis associated with papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Meera; Shah, Neel B; Moder, Kevin G; Dean, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is considered a paraneoplastic phenomenon and cancer may precede or follow the development of clinical features by several years. Despite the prevalence of thyroid cancer, reports of an association are rare. We report 3 cases of dermatomyositis and thyroid cancer, focusing on the clinical course of the rheumatologic condition following thyroidectomy. We also performed a comprehensive review of the current literature. We performed a chart review between 1960 and 2012 to identify patients with DM and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) seen in Mayo Clinic, Rochester, in Minnesota, a tertiary referral center. Only 3 patients were identified using the above criteria. There was a significant improvement in the course of the dermatological condition after definitive treatment for thyroid cancer (i.e. thyroidectomy) in one of our patients. The risk of a first malignancy is highest at the time the diagnosis of dermatomyositis is made and remains significantly higher in the first two years following diagnosis. A comprehensive literature review identified only two patients with PTC and dermatomyositis (both in Taiwan) across 4 international population cohorts. In addition, several cases have been reported from patients in the Far East, a geographical predilection that is unexplained. Our case series highlights the uncommon association between thyroid cancer and dermatomyositis while illustrating prevailing knowledge about the temporal relationship between dermatomyositis and thyroid cancer. Increased vigilance for and treatment of thyroid cancer in patients with dermatomyositis may assist in the successful management of this difficult rheumatologic condition.

  5. Standardized Thyroid Cancer Mortality in Korea between 1985 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Hyemi; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of thyroid cancer has increased very rapidly in Korea. However, there is no published report focusing on thyroid cancer mortality in Korea. In this study, we aimed to evaluate standardized thyroid cancer mortality using data from Statistics Korea (the Statistical Office of Korea). Methods Population and mortality data from 1985 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Age-standardized rates of thyroid cancer mortality were calculated according to the standard population of Korea, as well as World Health Organization (WHO) standard population and International Cancer Survival Standard (ICSS) population weights. Results The crude thyroid cancer mortality rate increased from 0.1 to 0.7 per 100,000 between 1985 and 2010. The pattern was the same for both sexes. The age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) for thyroid cancer for Korean resident registration population increased from 0.19 to 0.67 between 1985 and 2000. However, it decreased slightly, from 0.67 to 0.55, between 2000 and 2010. When mortality was adjusted using the WHO standard population and ICSS population weights, the ASMR similarly increased until 2000, and then decreased between 2000 and 2010. Conclusion Thyroid cancer mortality increased until 2000 in Korea. It started to decrease from 2000. PMID:25559576

  6. Increased rates of advanced thyroid cancer in California.

    PubMed

    Harari, Avital; Singh, Rasnik K

    2016-03-01

    We have noted an unusually high rate of advanced thyroid cancers presenting from across California. We examined the rates of thyroid cancer presentation throughout California for potential geographic clustering. A total of 26,983 patients with a new diagnosis of thyroid cancer (1999-2008) were abstracted from the California Cancer Registry and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development registry. Percentages of advanced thyroid cancer rates were calculated within each county (defined as those with distant metastatic stage; regional and/or distant metastatic stage [RM]) as well as those with well-differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed before age 30. National averages were taken from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. There was no obvious clustering of advanced cases within certain regions in California; however, on average, the entire state of California had significantly higher rates of distant metastatic thyroid cancer (6.73%) and RM (34.92%) than the national SEER averages (4%, 29%, respectively, P < 0.001). Of the 47 California counties, 20 had significantly higher percentages of distant metastatic thyroid cancer than the national SEER average (range, 6%-13% versus 4%, P < 0.05), and 20 had a higher percentage of RM than the national SEER average (range, 35%-48% versus 29%, P < 0.05). Two California counties had higher rates of young patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer (range, 14.29%-17.9%) than the national SEER average (12%). California exhibits more advanced thyroid cancers than the national SEER population average. Further studies are warranted to better understand etiologies for these disparities, which may include environmental impacts and/or delays in diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic studies of thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.

    1981-01-01

    Patient with goiter usually has benign disease. While investigation is important, clinical factors weight heavily in the diagnosis of cancer. Aside from serum calcitonin and CEA, biochemical findings are of little help. Radioisotope scanning is of fundamental importance and has an implication in history. Ultrasonography has a diminishing role although its use has led to the widespread acceptance of needle aspiration. Needle aspiration cytology is now the most important maneuver in preoperative assessment and management of the goiter patient. Its results permit refined operative selection, the institution of safe conservative management, and greater organization in surgical treatment. Persistent cooperation between clinician and pathologist can yield a high rate of the reliable preoperative cytological diagnosis obtained by needle aspiration.

  8. Clinical presentation and clinical outcomes in Chernobyl-related paediatric thyroid cancers: what do we know now? What can we expect in the future?

    PubMed

    Tuttle, R M; Vaisman, F; Tronko, M D

    2011-05-01

    Over the last 20 years, nearly 5000 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer have been diagnosed and treated in the regions of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus in young people previously exposed to the Chernobyl radioactive fallout during childhood. At diagnosis, 60-70% of the Chernobyl-related paediatric thyroid cancers had clinically evident cervical lymph node metastases (N1) and 10-15% had distant metastases (M1). Despite early reports suggesting that the paediatric thyroid cancer cases that developed after exposure to Chernobyl fallout were particularly aggressive, it now seems that the initial presentation and early clinical course of most of these cases are very similar to both non-radiation-associated paediatric thyroid cancers and thyroid cancers that arise after exposure to external beam irradiation. Over an average clinical follow-up period of about 10 years, the disease-specific mortality rate in these paediatric thyroid cancer cases that developed after the Chernobyl accident is quite low (1% or less). As would be expected in paediatric thyroid cancer, short-term recurrence rates range from 7 to 28% in published reports (mean 17%). However, long-term studies of paediatric thyroid cancer suggest that although the 30 year disease-specific mortality rate should be about 1%, the risk of developing structural disease recurrence is nearly 30% (of which 80% are expected to be locoregional recurrences and 20% are probably new distant metastases). Projected over 30 years of follow-up, a 1% disease-specific mortality in this cohort of 5000 patients would equate to about 50 deaths directly attributable to thyroid cancer. However, a 30% recurrence rate would also mean that about 1500 patients may develop a clinically meaningful recurrence that would need to be diagnosed and treated. It is imperative that we continue to work with our colleagues in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia to ensure that this large volume of patients destined to develop clinically significant

  9. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  10. Prognostic Factors in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Revisited.

    PubMed

    Glikson, Eran; Alon, Eran; Bedrin, Lev; Talmi, Yoav P

    2017-02-01

    More than 90% of all thyroid cancers are differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTC) with a 10 year survival rate greater than 90%. The commonly used risk stratification systems for DTC include: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), AGES (Age, histologic Grade, Extent of tumor, Size), AMES (Metastasis) and MACIS (Completeness of resection, local Invasion). Other systems are also utilized. Several new factors that may be involved in DTC risk stratification have emerged in recent studies, with other "traditional" factors being challenged. To present recent updates in the literature on new potential prognostic factors for DTC. We conducted a literature review and analysis of publications regarding DTC prognostic factors or risk stratification published in the last 10 years. Several new factors with potential prognostic implications for DTC were noted, including family history, lymph node involvement parameters, positive PET-CT findings, multifocal disease, thyroglobulin level and several molecular markers including BRAF. Increasing age is associated with poorer outcome in DTC; however, recent studies suggest that the cutoff point of 45 years may be contested. Furthermore, several studies have shown contradictory results regarding male gender as a negative prognostic factor, thus questioning its prognostic significance. A number of new factors with potential prognostic implications for DTC have emerged and should be addressed. However, their role and possible inclusion in new staging systems has yet to be determined.

  11. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Steven P; Cabanillas, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for thyroid cancer – cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid cancer and sorafenib and lenvatinib for differentiated thyroid cancer. This change in the treatment landscape has raised challenges for practitioners who may not be familiar with the use of MKIs or with the treatment and natural history of advanced thyroid cancer in general. This article reviews the epidemiology, molecular drivers, and initial treatment of patients with thyroid cancer and offers practical guidance to assist with the determination of when to appropriately start an MKI. As an example, cabozantinib and its efficacy are discussed in detail. Close monitoring is required for all patients on targeted agents to assess for adverse effects and response to therapy. An approach to managing drug-related adverse events is detailed. Since these drugs are not curative and have not yet proven to prolong overall survival, it is critical to weigh the risks and benefits of treatment at every visit. The potential value of changing to a different agent following failure of an MKI is also addressed. PMID:26316818

  12. Efficacy of preoperative neck ultrasound in the detection of cervical lymph node metastasis from thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Harry S; Orloff, Lisa A

    2011-03-01

    This study was performed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of surgeon-performed preoperative neck ultrasound (US) in the detection of both central and lateral cervical lymph node metastases from thyroid cancer. Prospective cohort study. Data for all patients with thyroid cancers and follicular thyroid lesions who were evaluated by means of preoperative neck US were reviewed. The cervical lymph nodes were assessed for suspicion of metastasis based on US characteristics. The diagnostic accuracy of US was determined according to whether histologically confirmed cancer was present in surgical cervical lymph node specimens. The sensitivity and specificity of US in predicting papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) metastasis in the central neck were 30.0% and 86.8%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of US in predicting metastasis in the lateral neck were 93.8% and 80.0%, respectively. A subset of patients underwent US followed by revision neck dissection for PTC, and the sensitivity and specificity of US in predicting metastasis in the lateral neck were 100% and 100%, respectively. Preoperative neck US is a valuable tool in assessing patients with thyroid cancers. The highly sensitive and specific nature of US in predicting cervical lymph node metastasis in the lateral neck, especially in the setting of recurrent disease, can provide reliable information to assist in surgical management. Although US for central compartment lymphadenopathy in the presence of the thyroid gland is less sensitive and specific than US for the lateral neck, it still provides useful information that can be obtained at the same time the primary thyroid pathology is assessed. Copyright © 2010 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Risk Stratification of Neck Lesions Detected Sonographically During the Follow-Up of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamartina, Livia; Grani, Giorgio; Biffoni, Marco; Giacomelli, Laura; Costante, Giuseppe; Lupo, Stefania; Maranghi, Marianna; Plasmati, Katia; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Trulli, Fabiana; Verrienti, Antonella; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo

    2016-08-01

    The European Thyroid Association (ETA) has classified posttreatment cervical ultrasound findings in thyroid cancer patients based on their association with disease persistence/recurrence. The objective of the study was to assess this classification's ability to predict the growth and persistence of such lesions during active posttreatment surveillance of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This was a retrospective, observational study. The study was conducted at a thyroid cancer center in a large Italian teaching hospital. Center referrals (2005-2014) were reviewed and patients selected with pathologically-confirmed DTC; total thyroidectomy, with or without neck dissection and/or radioiodine remnant ablation; abnormal findings on two or more consecutive posttreatment neck sonograms; and subsequent follow-up consisting of active surveillance. Baseline ultrasound abnormalities (thyroid bed masses, lymph nodes) were classified according to the ETA system. Patients were divided into group S (those with one or more lesions classified as suspicious) and group I (indeterminate lesions only). We recorded baseline and follow-up clinical data through June 30, 2015. The main outcomes were patients with growth (>3 mm, largest diameter) of one or more lesions during follow-up and patients with one or more persistent lesions at the final visit. The cohort included 58 of the 637 DTC cases screened (9%). A total of 113 lesions were followed up (18 thyroid bed masses, 95 lymph nodes). During surveillance (median 3.7 y), group I had significantly lower rates than group S of lesion growth (8% vs 36%, P = .01) and persistence (64% vs 97%, P = .014). The median time to scan normalization was 2.9 years. The ETA's evidence-based classification of sonographically detected neck abnormalities can help identify papillary thyroid cancer patients eligible for more relaxed follow-up.

  14. Association between Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Thyroid Cancer in 64,628 Patients.

    PubMed

    Resende de Paiva, Christina; Grønhøj, Christian; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; von Buchwald, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer (TC) is increasing although explanatory causes are lacking. A link between cancer and inflammation is well documented but unclear for autoimmune thyroid diseases and TC. We aimed to systematically review the association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and papillary, follicular, medullary, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, and thyroid lymphoma (TL). PubMed, OVID Medline, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library were searched from 1955 to 2016. The inclusion criteria were age >18 years, ≥20 cases of HT or TC. We collectively examined the incidence of HT in TC and of TC in HT. We identified 36 studies (64,628 subjects) published between 1955 and 2016 from 13 countries. We found a relative risk (RR) of HT among papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) of 2.36 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) 1.55-3.29, p < 0.001], an RR of PTC among HT of 1.40 (95% CI 1.07-1.85, p = 0.016), and an RR of TL among HT of 9.74 (95% CI 3.93-24.13, p < 0.001). We report an association between HT and PTC and between HT and TL. No association was found between HT and follicular, medullary, or anaplastic thyroid cancer.

  15. Radiation Exposure and the Risk of Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Megumi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It has been more than three years since the unprecedentedly massive earthquake and tsunami struck eastern Japan on March 11, 2011, and the large accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. To investigate the influence of radiation exposure, thyroid ultrasonography has been provided preliminarily for 360,000 children who lived in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident. As of September 2013, 59 children had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer by fine-needle aspiration cytology, and 34 children had been treated surgically and ultimately diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer. Here, I would like to describe the characteristics of pediatric thyroid cancer and typical thyroid images obtained by ultrasonography. PMID:25110391

  16. Determinants of papillary cancer of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Wingren, G.; Hatschek, T.; Axelson, O. )

    1993-10-01

    Determinants of papillary thyroid cancer were evaluated in a questionnaire-based case-control study from southeastern Sweden. A total of 104 cases, diagnosed from 1977 to 1987, and 387 randomly selected controls were included in the analyses. Female subjects with papillary cancer reported a work history as dentists/dental assistants, telephone operators, teachers, and day nursery personnel, and an occupational contact with chemicals and video display terminals more often than did controls. The 11 male cases more often reported working as mechanics and metal workers and having occupational contact with solvents. Other factors associated with increased risk for female papillary cancer were having private well water at the birth address; leisure time exposure to combustion smoke; low intake of cruciferous vegetables and seafood; and a family history of goiter, heart disease, biliary disorder, or female genital cancer. Diagnostic radiographic examinations, especially to the head, neck, or upper back/chest area, or repeated dental examinations, were also found to be associated with this form of cancer. With regard to the possible influence from hormonal factors among women less than age 50 years at time of diagnosis, an increased risk was found for a pregnancy soon after puberty. Tendencies toward a decreasing risk with increasing age at first pregnancy as well as an increasing risk with increasing number of pregnancies were found as well. Multiparity seemed to potentiate the effect from prior radiographic examinations.

  17. Mouse Models of Follicular and Papillary Thyroid Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Marika A.; Arciuch, Valeria G. Antico; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of well-differentiated thyroid cancers progress or recur, becoming resistant to current therapeutic options. Mouse models recapitulating the genetic and histological features of advanced thyroid cancer have been an invaluable tool to dissect the mechanisms involved in the progression from indolent, well differentiated tumors to aggressive, poorly differentiated carcinomas, and to identify novel therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on the lessons learned from models of epithelial cell-derived thyroid cancer showing progression from hyperplastic lesions to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. PMID:22654848

  18. Immune Response in Thyroid Cancer: Widening the Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-01-01

    The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the first line of defensive response. Unlike innate immune responses, adaptive responses are highly specific to the particular antigen that induced them. Both branches of the immune system may interact in antitumor immune response. Major effector cells of the immune system that directly target thyroid cancer cells include dendritic cells, macrophages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes. A mixture of immune cells may infiltrate thyroid cancer microenvironment and the balance of protumor and antitumor activity of these cells may be associated with prognosis. Herein, we describe some evidences that immune response may be important for thyroid cancer progression and may help us identify more aggressive tumors, sparing the vast majority of patients from costly unnecessary invasive procedures. The future trend in thyroid cancer is an individualized therapy. PMID:25328756

  19. Consensus on the management of advanced radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer on behalf of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology Thyroid Cancer Working Group (GTSEEN) and Spanish Rare Cancer Working Group (GETHI).

    PubMed

    Capdevila, J; Galofré, J C; Grande, E; Zafón Llopis, C; Ramón Y Cajal Asensio, T; Navarro González, E; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; Santamaría Sandi, J; Gómez Sáez, J M; Riesco Eizaguirre, G

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the single most prevalent endocrine malignancy; differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) accounts for more than 90 % of all malignancies and its incidence has been rising steadily. For more patients, surgical treatment, radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy achieve an overall survival (OS) rate of 97.7 % at 5 years. Nevertheless, locoregional recurrence occurs in up to 20 % and distant metastases in approximately 10 % at 10 years. Two-thirds of these patients will never be cured with radioactive iodine therapy and will become RAI-refractory, with a 3-year OS rate of less than 50 %. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made in the management of RAI-refractory DTC. Given the controversy in some areas, the Spanish Task Force for Thyroid Cancer on behalf of Spanish Society of Endocrinology Thyroid Cancer Working Group (GTSEEN) and the Spanish Rare Cancer Working Group (GETHI) have created a national joint task force to reach a consensus addressing the most challenging aspects of management in these patients. In this way, multidisciplinary management should be mandatory and nuclear medicine targeted therapy, novel molecular targeted agents, and combinations are currently changing the natural history of RAI-refractory DTC.

  20. Ultrasonography survey and thyroid cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Peter; Kaiser, Jan Christian; Ulanovsky, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the major health concerns after the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station (NPS). Currently, ultrasonography surveys are being performed for persons residing in the Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident with an age of up to 18 years. Here, the expected thyroid cancer prevalence in the Fukushima Prefecture is assessed based on an ultrasonography survey of Ukrainians, who were exposed at an age of up to 18 years to (131)I released during the Chernobyl NPS accident, and on differences in equipment and study protocol in the two surveys. Radiation risk of thyroid cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and preliminary estimates of thyroid dose due to the Fukushima accident were used for the prediction of baseline and radiation-related thyroid cancer risks. We estimate a prevalence of thyroid cancer of 0.027 % (95 % CI 0.010 %; 0.050 %) for the first screening campaign in the Fukushima Prefecture. Compared with the incidence rate in Japan in 2007, the ultrasonography survey is predicted to increase baseline thyroid cancer incidence by a factor of 7.4 (95 % CI 0.95; 17.3). Under the condition of continued screening, thyroid cancer during the first fifty years after the accident is predicted to be detected for about 2 % of the screened population. The prediction of radiation-related thyroid cancer in the most exposed fraction (a few ten thousand persons) of the screened population of the Fukushima Prefecture has a large uncertainty with the best estimates of the average risk of 0.1-0.3 %, depending on average dose.

  1. A phase II study tests a new drug for patients with advanced thyroid cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    A phase II trial of CUDC-907, a new drug that may be able to shrink thyroid tumors that have spread or gotten worse, is being tested in metastatic or advanced thyroid cancer.  Currently, there is no standard or effective treatment for the most aggressive types of thyroid cancer such as anaplastic and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.  Learn more...

  2. Radioactive Iodine Therapy Decreases Recurrence in Thyroid Papillary Microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Creach, Kimberly M.; Siegel, Barry A.; Nussenbaum, Brian; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The most appropriate therapy for papillary microcarcinoma (PMC) is controversial. Methods. We reviewed the therapy and outcome of 407 patients with PMC. Results. Three hundred-eighty patients underwent total thyroidectomy, and 349 patients received I-131 therapy. The median followup was 5.3 years. Forty patients developed recurrent disease. On univariate analysis, development of disease recurrence was correlated with histological tumor size > 0.8 cm (P = 0.0104), age < 45 years (P = 0.043), and no I-131 therapy (P < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, histological tumor size > 0.8 cm, positive lymph nodes, and no I-131 therapy were significant. The 5-year RFS for patients treated with I-131 was 95.0% versus 78.6% (P < 0.0001) for patients not treated with I-131. Patients with lymph node metastasis who did not receive I-131 had a 5-year RFS of 42.9% versus 93.2% (P < 0.0001) for patients who received I-131. Conclusions. Recommend I-131 remnant ablation for patients with PMC, particularly patients with lymph node metastasis. PMID:22462017

  3. Does microscopically involved margin increase disease recurrence after curative surgery in papillary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Lang, Brian Hung-Hin; Shek, Tony W H; Wan, Koon Yat

    2016-05-01

    The prognostic significance of microscopically involved margin in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) following curative surgery remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the impact of an involved margin and its location (anterior vs. posterior) on disease recurrence. Of the 638 eligible patients, 538 (85.9%) did not have an involved margin (group I) while 100 (14.1%) did (group II). The latter group was further classified according to its location relative to the surface of the thyroid gland (anterior or posterior). A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify independent factors for recurrence risk. After a mean of 130.1 ± 93.5 months, 22 patients had disease recurrence. The 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) was significantly worse in group II (95.0% vs. 97.0%, P = 0.011). After adjusting other significant factors, involved margin was not an independent risk factor for disease recurrence (P = 0.358). Compared to a negative margin, an anterior involved margin did not pose increased recurrence risk (HR = 1.21, 95%CI = 0.93-500.00, P = 0.368), whereas a posterior involved margin had almost 23 times higher recurrence risk (HR = 22.95; 95%CI = 4.33-121.70, P < 0.001). Overall, a microscopically involved margin was not an independent factor for DFS. However, although an anterior involved margin itself did not increase disease recurrence, a posterior involved margin did. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:635-639. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genetic basis and gene therapy trials for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Humadi, Hussam; Zarros, Apostolos; Al-Saigh, Rafal; Liapi, Charis

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy is regarded as one of the most promising novel therapeutic approaches for hopeless cases of thyroid cancer and those not responding to traditional treatment. In the last two decades, many studies have focused on the genetic factors behind the origin and the development of thyroid cancer, in order to investigate and shed more light on the molecular pathways implicated in different differentiated or undifferentiated types of thyroid tumors. We, herein, review the current data on the main genes that have been proven to (or thought to) be implicated in thyroid cancer etiology, and which are involved in several well-known signaling pathways (such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathways). Moreover, we review the results of the efforts made through multiple gene therapy trials, via several gene therapy approaches/strategies, on different thyroid carcinomas. Our review leads to the conclusion that future research efforts should seriously consider gene therapy for the treatment of thyroid cancer, and, thus, should: (a) shed more light on the molecular basis of thyroid cancer tumorigenesis, (b) focus on the development of novel gene therapy approaches that can achieve the required antitumoral efficacy with minimum normal tissue toxicity, as well as (c) perform more gene therapy clinical trials, in order to acquire more data on the efficacy of the examined approaches and to record the provoked adverse effects.

  5. Thyroid cancer after diagnostic administration of iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.; Mattsson, A.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    To provide quantitative data on the risk of thyroid cancer after exposure to {sup 131}I, 34,104 patients administered {sup 131}I for diagnostic purposes were followed for up to 40 years. The mean thyroid dose was estimated as 1.1 Gy, and 67 thyroid cancers occurred in contrast to 49.7 expected (standardized incidence ratio = 1.35; 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.71). Excess cancers were apparent only among patients referred because of a suspected thyroid tumor, and no increased risk was seen among those referred for other reasons. Further, risk was not related to radiation dose to the thyroid gland, time since exposure or age at exposure. The slight excess of thyroid cancer thus appeared to be due to the underlying thyroid condition and not radiation exposure. Among those under age 20 years when {sup 131}I was administered, a small excess risk (3 cancers compared to 1.8 expected) was about 2-10 times lower than that predicted from data for the A-bomb survivors. These data suggest that protraction of dose may result in a lower risk than an acute X-ray exposure of the same total dose. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. The effects of race and ethnicity on thyroid cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Magreni, Angelina; Bann, Darrin V; Schubart, Jane R; Goldenberg, David

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased over the past 30 years. Thyroid cancer is less common in blacks than in persons of white descent, and it has been most common in Asians/Pacific Islanders until recently. To determine whether the incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing at disproportionate rates for different races and ethnicities. Retrospective review. Study participants were individuals with thyroid cancer in the US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 13 database from 1992 through 2010. The SEER 13 registry consists of records from Atlanta (Georgia), Connecticut, Detroit (Michigan), Hawaii, Iowa, New Mexico, San Francisco-Oakland (California), Seattle-Puget Sound (Washington), Utah, Los Angeles (California), San Jose-Monterey (California), rural Georgia, and the Alaska Native Tumor Registry. The SEER*Stat Joinpoint Regression Program was used to determine the average annual percentage change in thyroid cancer incidence for different races and ethnicities from 1992 through 2010. Trends in thyroid cancer incidence were compared between groups using comparability testing. During the study period, the average annual percentage change for thyroid cancer was 5.3% (95% CI, 4.8%-5.7%) per year. Stratification of the study population by race revealed that whites experienced the largest increase in age-adjusted thyroid cancer incidence (5.6% per year), followed by blacks (4.8% per year), American Indian/Alaskan natives (3.2% per year), and Asians/Pacific Islanders (2.3% per year). Joinpoint regression comparability testing showed that the increase in disease incidence was not significantly different between whites and blacks (P = .25). However, the increase in incidence for Asians/Pacific Islanders was significantly lower than that for whites and blacks (P < .05). Stratification of the study population by ethnicity revealed that non-Hispanics experienced a larger increase in incidence (5.5% per year) than

  7. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Iodine I 131 and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  8. Leukaemias and cancers following iodine-131 administration for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    de Vathaire, F; Schlumberger, M; Delisle, M J; Francese, C; Challeton, C; de la Genardiére, E; Meunier, F; Parmentier, C; Hill, C; Sancho-Garnier, H

    1997-01-01

    We studied 1771 patients treated for a thyroid cancer in two institutions. None of these patients had been treated with external radiotherapy and 1497 had received (131)I. The average (131)I cumulative activity administered was 7.2 GBq, and the estimated average dose was 0.34 Sv to the bone marrow and 0.80 Sv to the whole body. After a mean follow-up of 10 years, no case of leukaemia was observed, compared with 2.5 expected according to the coefficients derived from Japanese atomic bomb survivors (P = 0.1). A total of 80 patients developed a solid second malignant neoplasm (SMN), among whom 13 developed a colorectal cancer. The risk of colorectal cancer was found to be related to the total activity of (131)I administered 5 years or more before its diagnosis (excess relative risk = 0.5 per GBq, P = 0.02). These findings were probably caused by the accumulation of (131)I in the colon lumen. Hence, in the absence of laxative treatment, the dose to the colon as a result of (131)I administered for the treatment of thyroid cancer could be higher than expected from calculation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). When digestive tract cancers were excluded, the overall excess relative risk of second cancer per estimated effective sievert received to the whole body was -0.2 (P = 0.6).

  9. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  10. High incidence of thyroid cancer among patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Kaldrymidis, Dimitrios; Papadakis, Georgios; Tsakonas, Georgios; Kaldrymidis, Philippos; Flaskas, Theofanis; Seretis, Andreas; Pantazi, Eleni; Kostoglou-Athanassiou, Ifigenia; Peppa, Melpomeni; Roussou, Paraskevi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of thyroid, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers. In this study we determined the prevalence of malignant neoplasms in patients with acromegaly. Cancer risk was evaluated in a cohort of 110 patients (M/F 48/62, age 58.63±13.8 years, range 30-86) with acromegaly. Mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 46.37±13.11 years. Mean period of time since diagnosis of acromegaly was 12.26+9.6 years. From 110 patients, cancer was diagnosed in 26 (23.6%) patients. Thyroid cancer was the most common cancer and was diagnosed in 13 patients (11.8%); other cancers encountered were gastric cancer (N=2), endometrial cancer (N-2), and breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer (N-2), myelodysplastic syndrome, renal cell carcinoma, lung cancer and pancreatic carcinoma, one case each. Age, gender, age at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly, tumor size of pituitary adenoma and duration of disease were not associated with cancer development. This study suggests that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of thyroid cancer and therefore they should undergo regular screening with hormonal and ultrasound evaluation of the thyroid and FNAB when required.

  11. Thyroid gland metastasis arising from breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chenfang

    2013-06-01

    The thyroid gland is an uncommon site for metastasis to develop and thus metastases arising from breast cancer are rarely observed. In the present study, we describe a case of a 45-year-old female with a three-year history of breast cancer who presented with a thyroid mass that was diagnosed as metastatic breast carcinoma by histopathological analysis of the subtotal thyroidectomy specimen. To ascertain the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, we evaluated two types of markers; those that possessed a similar expression status in the original and metastatic lesions [ER, PR and CerbB-2 (HER2/neu)], and those that are capable of differentiating between metastatic lesions and the surrounding thyroid components (TG and TTF-1). The results showed that ER, PR and CerbB-2 demonstrated a similar expression pattern in primary breast carcinoma and thyroid lesions. Meanwhile, in the thyroid lesions, the malignant cells showed negative staining for TG and TTF-1, which confirmed that lesions were not thyroid in origin. This case may prompt clinicians that although thyroid gland are uncommon metastatic site, a diagnosis of metastatic disease should be considered when new aggregates are identified in the thyroid glands and histopathological analysis may aid the diagnosis.

  12. Interlinking of hypoxia and estrogen in thyroid cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rajoria, S; Hanly, E; Nicolini, A; George, A L; Geliebter, J; Shin, E J; Suriano, R; Carpi, A; Tiwari, R K

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen aids in neo-vascularization of various tumors during hypoxic conditions, however the role of estrogen within the hypoxic environment of thyroid cancer is not known. In a series of experimentations, using human thyroid cancer cells, we observed that estrogen and hypoxia modulate the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling which is abrogated by the anti-estrogen fulvestrant and the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 (3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole). Furthermore, we found that the conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells lead to enhanced migration and tubulogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which is abrogated by HIF-1 inhibitor. These findings, in addition to our previous and other scientific literature data, lead us to conclude that estrogen and hypoxia are interlinked in thyroid cancer and can equally modulate epithelial-endothelial cell interactions by mediating key cellular, metabolic and molecular processes of thyroid cancer progression. We believe that the hormonal component and cellular adaptation to oxygen tension of cancer cells are functionally equivalent with a cellular transition that can be exploited clinically for a combinational approach for thyroid cancer treatment involving antiestrogens as well as anti-hypoxic agents.

  13. Completion thyroidectomy in differentiated thyroid cancer: When to perform?

    PubMed Central

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Akçay, Müfide Nuran; Öztürk, Gürkan; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Aydınlı, Bülent; Kara, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Completion thyroidectomy is recommended in patients who have been diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer on histopathological evaluation, if their first operation was a conservative approach. The critical issue is when to do the second operation. Material and Methods: The medical records of 66 patients who underwent completion thyroidectomy for the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer in our clinic between 2006–2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All data were compared after patients were divided into two groups according to the interval between the first surgery and completion thyroidectomy. Results: Fifty-two patients (78.8%) were women and 14 patients (21.2%) were male. Completion thyroidectomy was performed 10–90 days after the initial surgery (group 1) in 26 patients, whereas it was performed later than 90 days in 40 patients (group 2). Temporary hypoparathyroidism occurred in two patients (7.7%) in group 1, and in 3 patients (7.5%) in group 2. Transient recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy was observed in 1 patient (3.9%) in group 1, and in 1 patient (2.5%) in group 2. There were no permanent morbidities in both groups. Residual tumor rate after completion thyroidectomy was 45.5%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of complications after completion thyroidectomy. Conclusion: Although in some studies it is recommended that completion thyroidectomy should be performed either before scar tissue development or after clinical remission of scar tissue, edema and inflammation, we believe that timing of surgery has no effect on morbidity. PMID:25931885

  14. TCGA study improves understanding of thyroid cancer genetics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development.

  15. [Malignant tumors associated with thyroid cancer in an autopsy material].

    PubMed

    Tiszlavicz, L; Varga, Z

    1991-03-17

    In the Department of Pathology of Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University at Szeged in Hungary 37,504 autopsies were performed in the last 30 years and double multiple primary malignant tumours were found in 385 cases (4.2%). In thyroid cancer cases the tumours of other organs were more frequent (22.7%), and these tumour-associations were observed mainly simultaneously, there were no important sex differences. In the most of cases the thyroid cancer was only a side diagnosis beside other malignancies, in the more rare metachronous cases the thyroid cancer was secondary following postoperative irradiation of the first tumour (4 cases of 5). We have seen thyroid cancers most frequently together with lung, breast and digestive system tumours.

  16. U.S. Thyroid Cancer Cases Continue to Rise

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening, the death rate for a particularly aggressive form of the disease -- advanced papillary thyroid cancer -- ... there needs to be a "renewed focus" on aggressive management of this disease, including surgery, radiation and/ ...

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of amylase isoenzymes in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Higashiyama, M; Doi, S; Tomita, N; Monden, T; Murotani, M; Kawasaki, Y; Kobayashi, T; Shimano, T; Ogawa, M; Takai, S

    1991-01-01

    The expression of amylase in various histological types of thyroid cancer was studied by an immunohistochemical technique, using a polyclonal antiamylase antiserum and two monoclonal antibodies specific for salivary and pancreatic-type amylases, respectively. Amylase was expressed in 21 of 24 (88%) thyroid cancers by polyclonal antiserum analysis. Analysis by monoclonal antibodies, however, showed that only 13 (54%) cases and three (13%) cases contained salivary-type and pancreatic-type amylases, respectively. Moreover, immunoreactivity for pancreatic-type amylase was detected only in medullary carcinoma; other histological types were positive for salivary-type amylase. These results show that thyroid cancer frequently expresses amylase, and suggest that the differences between amylase isoenzymes in thyroid cancer may correlate with those found between cellular origin of tumour. Images PMID:1713922

  18. Thyroid cancer mortality is higher in Filipinos in the United States: An analysis using National Mortality Records from 2003 through 2012.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michelle-Linh T; Hu, Jiaqi; Hastings, Katherine G; Daza, Eric J; Cullen, Mark R; Orloff, Lisa A; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2017-09-07

    Well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma has a favorable prognosis, but patients with multiple recurrences have drastically lower survival. Filipinos in the United States are known to have high rates of thyroid cancer incidence and disease recurrence. To the authors' knowledge, it is unknown whether Filipinos also have higher thyroid cancer mortality rates. The authors studied thyroid cancer mortality in Filipino, non-Filipino Asian (NFA), and non-Hispanic white (NHW) adults using US death records (2003-2012) and US Census data. Age-adjusted mortality rates and proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) were calculated. Sex, nativity status, age at death, and educational attainment also were examined. The authors examined 19,940,952 deaths. The age-adjusted mortality rates due to thyroid cancer were highest in Filipinos (1.72 deaths per 100,000 population; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.51-1.95) compared with NFAs (1.03 per 100,000 population; 95% CI, 0.95-1.12) and NHWs (1.17 per 100,000 population; 95% CI, 1.16-1.18). Compared with NHWs, higher proportionate mortality was observed in Filipino women (3-5 times higher) across all age groups, and among Filipino men, the PMR was 2 to 3 times higher in the subgroup aged >55 years. Filipinos who completed a higher educational level had a notably higher PMR (5.0) compared with their counterparts who had not (3.5). Negative prognostic factors for thyroid cancer traditionally include age >45 years and male sex. The results of the current study demonstrate that Filipinos die of thyroid cancer at higher rates than NFA and NHW individuals of similar ages. Highly educated Filipinos and Filipino women may be especially at risk of poor thyroid cancer outcomes. Filipino ethnicity should be factored into clinical decision making in the management of patients with thyroid cancer. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Short-term effectiveness of low-dose radioiodune ablative treatment of thyroid remnants after thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Vermiglio, F; Violi, M A; Finocchiaro, M D; Baldari, S; Castagna, M G; Moleti, M; Mattina, F; Pio Lo Presti, V; Bonanno, N; Trimarchi, F

    1999-04-01

    Twenty-five patients from a marginally iodine-deficient area with differentiated thyroid cancer who were referred to our unit between 1991 and 1997 had a residual thyroid uptake (RTU) at 24 hours of 5% or more after surgery. None of them underwent reoperation: 8 of 25 had RTU between 5% and 10% and were considered at low risk for both local recurrences and/or distant metastases; 17 of 25 had RTU greater than 10% and up to 30% and refused re-intervention. After detection of their cervical uptake by using a 131I tracer dose of 3.7 MBq (100 microCi), all 25 were treated with 1110 MBq (30 mCi) of 131I. A whole-body scan (WBS) performed 5 days later revealed 131I uptake corresponding to metastatic lymph nodes in the anterior part of the neck in 1 patient and the persistence of only RTU in 24 of 25 patients. RTU and thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were reevaluated 6 months later in all patients and compared to preradioiodine treatment values. RTU, ranging at presentation between 5% and 30%, decreased to below 1% in all but one patient. Serum Tg values, ranging between 1.6 and 108 ng/mL before radioiodine treatment, decreased to below 1.6 ng/mL in all but 4 of them (whose serum Tg was between 2 and 3.4 ng/mL). Our data indicate that 1,110 MBq of 131I can permit complete ablation of 80% of thyroid remnants concentrating up to 30% of radioiodine activity. A relation between this high success rate and iodine deficiency can be hypothesized because an increasing uptake of radioiodine by thyroid remnants could result in overestimation of their size. Therefore, our observations suggest that in iodine deficient areas, a hasty decision to carry out complete thyroidectomy should be avoided, even in the case of thyroid remnants with RTU up to 30%.

  20. Thyroid nodules and cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Josefson, Jami; Zimmerman, Donald

    2008-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid nodules in children is estimated to be 1 to 1.5% based on clinical examination. Children with thyroid nodules, compared to adults with thyroid nodules, have a fourfold greater risk of developing malignant thyroid disease. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common pediatric endocrine tumor, constituting 0.5-3% of all childhood malignancies. The thyroid is one of the most frequent sites of secondary neoplasm in children who receive radiation therapy for other malignancies. Thyroid carcinoma has been studied extensively in adults. However, the pediatric literature on this subject is much less complete, owing to the rarity of its diagnosis. This article reviews the predisposing factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis , clinical presentation, detailed treatment and follow-up management of children with thyroid carcinoma. Additionally, a discussion regarding the controversial aspects of radioiodine therapy in children is included.

  1. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment.

  2. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Valerie H.; Camille, Nadia; Miles, Brett A.; Teng, Marita S.; Genden, Eric M.; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Invasion of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) into surrounding structures can lead to morbid procedures such as laryngectomy and tracheal resection. In these patients, there is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy. Methods. We identified three studies involving the treatment of DTC with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: two from Slovenia and one from Japan. Results. These studies demonstrate that in selected situations, neoadjuvant chemotherapy can have a good response and allow for a more complete surgical resection, the treatment of DTC. Additionally, the SELECT trial shows that the targeted therapy lenvatinib is effective in the treatment of DTC and could be useful as neoadjuvant therapy for this disease due to its short time to response. Pazopanib has also demonstrated promise in phase II data. Conclusions. Thus, chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting could possibly be useful for managing advanced DTC. Additionally, some of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) hold promise for use in the neoadjuvant setting in DTC. PMID:27747102

  3. Risk factors for nodal metastasis and recurrence among patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma: differences in clinical relevance between nonincidental and incidental tumors.

    PubMed

    Pisanu, Adolfo; Reccia, Isabella; Nardello, Oreste; Uccheddu, Alessandro

    2009-03-01

    Papillary microcarcinoma (PMC) is a subgroup of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) measuring 1.0 cm or less in diameter. Herein we focused on the search for risk factors predicting nodal metastasis and recurrence in PMCs, analyzing differences in presentation, treatment, and prognosis between nonincidental and incidental tumors. From January 1998 to May 2007, 149 patients had a diagnosis of PMC in our department. A cross-sectional study of 76 patients with nonincidental and 73 patients with incidental PMC was carried out. Demographic data, diagnostic results, tumor characteristics, risk assessment, surgical treatment, and postoperative and follow up results were evaluated. Cytology detected thyroid cancer and nodal involvement in nonincidental PMC. Mean tumor size was significantly larger in nonincidental PMC (7.5 vs. 4.2 mm), which was commonly found within a normal thyroid gland or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, while incidental PMC was associated with a multinodular goiter. TNM staging system showed a higher cancer stage (IVA) in nonincidental. At multivariate analysis, capsular invasion and a nonincidental diagnosis were the two independent factors significantly affecting nodal metastasis. All patients with nonincidental PMC underwent iodine-131 ablation therapy after surgery compared with 49 patients with incidental. Nodal metastasis at diagnosis was the only factor influencing recurrence which was found in three nonincidental cases: two in the lateral and one in the central neck compartments. Several PMCs presented with risk-free clinical courses. Some nonincidental tumors had a more aggressive behavior and a tendency to recurrence. In these cases, early detection and aggressive treatment are mandatory as for conventional PTC according to risk stratification and cancer stage.

  4. Resection of recurrent neck cancer with carotid artery replacement.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Schneider, Fabrice; Minni, Antonio; Calio, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival rate, primary patency of vascular reconstructions, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) after en bloc resection of the carotid artery and tumor with in-line polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) carotid grafting, followed by radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2014, 31 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent en bloc resection and simultaneous carotid artery reconstruction with a PTFE graft, which was associated in 18 cases with a myocutaneous flap. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx in 17 patients and of the hypopharynx in 7, an undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin in 4, and an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid in 3. All of the patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (50-70 Gy), and 10 of them also underwent chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cisplatin). None of the patients died or sustained a stroke during the first 30 days after the index procedure. Postoperative morbidity consisted of 6 transitory dysphagias, 3 vocal cord palsies, 2 wound dehiscences, 1 transitory mandibular claudication, and 1 partial myocutaneous flap necrosis. No graft infection occurred during follow-up. Fifteen patients (48%) died from metastatic cancer during a mean follow-up of 45.4 months (range, 8-175 months). None of the patients showed evidence of local recurrence, stroke, or thrombosis of the carotid reconstruction. The 5-year survival rate was 49 ± 10%. The overall number of QALYs was 3.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.37) with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of redo surgery (n = 26; QALYs, 3.74) and those with metastasis (n = 5; QALYs, 0.56; P = .005). QALYs were also significantly improved in patients with cancer of the larynx (n = 17; QALYs, 4.69) compared to patients presenting with other types of

  5. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Steven G.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D.; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T.; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B.; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. Methods: A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Results: These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. Conclusions: In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the

  6. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gary L; Waguespack, Steven G; Bauer, Andrew J; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M; Dinauer, Catherine A; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-07-01

    Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the management of thyroid nodules and DTC in

  7. Herpes and polyoma family viruses in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    STAMATIOU, DIMITRIS P.; DERDAS, STAVROS P.; ZORAS, ODYSSEAS L.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is considered the most common malignancy that affects the endocrine system. Generally, thyroid cancer derives from follicular epithelial cells, and thyroid cancer is divided into well-differentiated papillary (80% of cases) and follicular (15% of cases) carcinoma. Follicular thyroid cancer is further divided into the conventional and oncocytic (Hürthle cell) type, poorly differentiated carcinoma and anaplastic carcinoma. Both poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinoma can arise either de novo, or secondarily from papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. The incidence of thyroid cancer has significantly increased for both males and females of all ages, particularly for females between 55–64 years of age, from 1999 through 2008. The increased rates refer to tumors of all stages, though they were mostly noted in localized disease. Recently, viruses have been implicated in the direct regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the development of metastases. More specifically, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins may potentially lead to the development of metastasis through the regulation of the metastasis suppressor, Nm23, and the control of Twist expression. The significant enhancement of the metastatic potential, through the induction of angiogenesis and changes to the tumor microenvironment, subsequent to viral infection, has been documented, while EMT also contributes to cancer cell permissiveness to viruses. A number of viruses have been identified to be associated with carcinogenesis, and these include lymphotropic herpesviruses, namely EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV, also known as human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV8)]; two hepatitis viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); human papillomaviruses (HPVs); human T cell lymphoma virus (HTLV); and a new polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus identified in 2008. In this review, we examined the association between thyroid cancer and two oncogenic

  8. Vitamin and mineral supplements and thyroid cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Rita; Sawka, Anna M; Adams, Laura; Hatfield, Nicole; Hung, Rayjean J

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to consolidate epidemiological evidence for the association between dietary supplements of vitamins and minerals and thyroid cancer development, as well as to contribute to evidence-based dietary recommendations for thyroid cancer primary prevention. We carried out a systematic literature review specifically for dietary supplement and thyroid cancer risk. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Dissertations and Theses were systematically searched to identify original epidemiological studies with a comparison group that investigated vitamin or mineral supplementation as an etiological factor for thyroid cancer. In total, 11 independent studies were identified and reviewed. Our qualitative summary showed conflicting results for common antioxidants including vitamins A, C, and E and β-carotene in relation to thyroid cancer. Similarly, results for dietary supplement combinations as well as other individual vitamins and minerals (vitamin B complex, vitamin D, iodine, calcium, zinc, magnesium, and iron) are largely inconsistent across studies. Overall, our review suggested that the current evidence to support any protective or hazardous effect of vitamin or mineral supplements on thyroid cancer development is inconclusive and additional studies addressing previous limitations are necessary to elucidate this possible association. In particular, reverse causality is of major concern and should be addressed by prospective studies with large and representative samples.

  9. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  10. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chiacchio, S; Lorenzoni, A; Boni, G; Rubello, D; Elisei, R; Mariani, G

    2008-12-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare aggressive tumor arising from the follicular cells of the thyroid gland (as does well differentiated thyroid cancer, WDTC), but ATC cells do not retain any of the biological features of the original follicular cells, such as uptake of iodine and synthesis of thyroglobulin. Prognosis is almost invariably fatal. In this article the Authors review the pathology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of ATC. ATC incidence typically peaks at the 6-7th decade of life (mean age at diagnosis 55-65 years), women representing 55-77% of all patients. ATC represents 2-5% of all thyroid tumors, with a decreasing trend with respect to the incidence of WDTC. The histologic patterns of ATC include giant-cell, spindle-cell and squamoid-cell tumors; these subtypes frequently coexist and are not predictive of patients' outcome. Immuno-cyto-chemistry for thyroglobulin is usually negative or weakly positive and some cases are also negative for keratin, particularly in the spindle-cell areas. ATC may arise de novo, but in most cases it develops from a pre-existing WDTC, especially the follicular subtype. Most ATC patients complain of local compressive symptoms, such as dysphagia, dysphonia, stridor and dyspnea in addition to neck pain and tenderness; in over 70% of the patients the tumor infiltrates surrounding tissues, such as fat, trachea, muscle, esophagus, and larynx. The clinical course of a rapidly enlarging mass that is firm and fixed to surrounding structures in an elderly patient is quite suggestive for ATC. Diagnosis can be confirmed by fine needle aspiration cytology or, in doubtful cases, by histology on core biopsy. Computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful for defining the local extent of disease and for identifying distant metastases, as is also positron-emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]FDG. Tracheoscopy and esophagoscopy should be performed every two months

  11. Molecular target based combinational therapeutic approaches in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer, as with other types of cancer, is dependent on angiogenesis for its continued growth and development. Interestingly, estrogen has been shown to contribute to thyroid cancer aggressiveness in vitro, which is in full support of the observed increased incidence of thyroid cancer in women over men. Provided that estrogen has been observed to contribute to increased angiogenesis of estrogen responsive breast cancer, it is conceivable to speculate that estrogen also contributes to angiogenesis of estrogen responsive thyroid cancer. Methods In this study, three human thyroid cancer cells (B-CPAP, CGTH-W-1, ML-1) were treated with estrogen alone or estrogen and anti-estrogens (fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, a natural dietary compound) for 24 hours. The cell culture media was then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) and assayed for angiogenesis associated events. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were also quantified in the conditioned media so as to evaluate if it is a key player involved in these observations. Results Conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells enhanced phenotypical changes (proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis) of endothelial cells typically observed during angiogenesis. These phenotypic changes observed in HUVECs were determined to be modulated by estrogen induced secretion of VEGF by the cancer cells. Lastly, we show that VEGF secretion was inhibited by the anti-estrogens, fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, which resulted in diminished angiogenesis associated events in HUVECs. Conclusion Our data establishes estrogen as being a key regulator of VEGF secretion/expression in thyroid cells which enhances the process of angiogenesis in thyroid cancer. These findings also suggest the clinical utility of anti-estrogens as anti-angiogenic compounds to be used as a therapeutic means to treat thyroid cancer. We also observed that 3,3′-diindolylmethane is a

  12. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-10

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. Surgical complications and recurrence after central neck dissection in cN0 papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dongbin; Sohn, Jin Ho; Park, Ji Young

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate surgical complications and recurrence patterns after central neck dissection (CND) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A retrospective analysis was performed on 361 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy with or without CND for PTC from 2000 to 2007. Clinicopathological results and recurrence were stratified according to treatment modality. Incidence of occult central metastasis of PTC was 64.3%. With respect to surgical morbidities, the total thyroidectomy (TT) with CND group exhibited a significantly higher incidence of transient vocal fold paralysis (10.0% vs 3.4%, p=0.029) and permanent hypocalcaemia (11.4% vs 4.5%, p=0.041), and significantly prolonged mean operating time (195.8min vs 153.0min, p<0.001) than the TT alone group. Analysis of the recurrence patterns revealed that level IV was most commonly involved in both groups. When the location of recurrence was categorised into central and lateral neck, the recurrence rate in the lateral neck was significantly higher than that in the central neck, regardless of initial CND. CND was associated with permanent hypocalcaemia and transient vocal fold paralysis. The lateral neck was mainly involved in recurrence regardless of initial CND, suggesting the clinical benefit of CND may be small. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging characteristics and findings in thyroglossal duct cyst cancer and concurrent thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shemen, Larry; Sherman, Craig Harvey; Yurovitsky, Alyssa

    2016-04-20

    Thyroglossal duct cyst cancer is rare, while synchronous thyroglossal duct cyst cancer with thyroid cancer is still rarer. The radiographic features of this case are instructive and crucial when evaluating a thyroglossal duct cyst.

  15. SBRT for recurrent head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, M.; Kabarriti, R.; Baliga, S.; Guha, C.; Tome, W.; Kalnicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers is complex. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab.

  16. Reirradiation for locally recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marta, Gustavo Nader; Hijal, Tarek; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current status of reirradiation therapy (Re-RT) for locally recurrent breast cancer. The overall outcome of breast/chest wall Re-RT is difficult to assess because of the wide range of different treatments that a patient may have undergone and the patient's individual features. The local control and complete response rates were reported to be 43-96% and 41-71%, respectively. The combination of Re-RT and hyperthermia seems to be related to improved outcomes. Toxicity rates vary between studies, and Re-RT is generally well tolerated. Re-RT may be considered an option for patients with breast cancer relapse after prior irradiation. Further studies are needed to determine the best irradiation volume and treatment modality for patients with locally recurrent disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum thyroglobulin in the monitoring of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) usually have an excellent prognosis. Following surgical and radioiodine treatment to remove the cancer cells and suppressive doses of levothyroxine, long-term follow-up, including measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) using a sensitive assay is required to detect recurrence. To interpret Tg results clinicians need to know the corresponding serum TSH concentration, have an appreciation of the clearance of Tg from patient serum following various interventions and the limitations of its measurement. The limitations of Tg immunoassay are well described and include potential interference from TgAb. For the majority of patients with DTC who are TgAb-negative, Tg measurement remains the most useful method of follow-up. For the TgAb-positive minority, interference and the possibility of producing erroneous results is a concern. Some assays are less badly affected than others and laboratories are advised to choose their assays carefully. Laboratories have sought to identify interferences using measurement of TgAb, lack of concordance between RIAs and immunometric assays and recovery of added Tg. More recently LC-MSMS assays to quantify Tg have been developed. They are not currently as sensitive as Tg immunoassays and it is likely these assays will, like immunoassays, be limited by Tg heterogeneity and standardization issues, although initial evaluations indicate that they may have value in the clinical setting as a second line test in antibody-positive DTC patients in whom Tg is unmeasurable by immunoassay.

  18. Increasing Incidence of Thyroid Cancer in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Darrin V.; Goyal, Neerav; Camacho, Fabian; Goldenberg, David

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The incidence of thyroid cancer in the United States has increased rapidly and Pennsylvania is the state with the highest rate of thyroid cancer in the country, although the factors driving this increase are unknown. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the increase in thyroid cancer represents a true increase in disease or is the result of overdiagnosis. OBJECTIVE To compare the increase in thyroid cancer incidence and tumor characteristics in Pennsylvania with the rest of the United States and gain insight into the factors influencing the increased incidence of thyroid cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a population-based study, data on thyroid cancer from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results 9 (SEER-9) registry and the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry (PCR) from 1985 through 2009 were collected and reviewed for information regarding sex, race, histologic type of thyroid cancer, staging, and tumor size at diagnosis. International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition code C739 (thyroid carcinoma) was used to identify 110 615 records in the SEER-9 registry and 29 030 records in the PCR. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Average annual percent change (AAPC) in thyroid cancer incidence across various demographic groups in Pennsylvania. RESULTS The AAPC for thyroid cancer in Pennsylvania was 7.1% per year (95% CI, 6.3%–7.9%) vs 4.2% (95% CI, 3.7%–4.7%) per year in the remainder of the United States, and trends in incidence were significantly different (P < .001). Females experienced a higher AAPC (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.9%–8.3%) compared with males (6.1% per year; 95% CI, 4.9%–7.2%) (P < .01), and trend analysis revealed that thyroid cancer may be increasing more rapidly among black females (8.6% per year; 95% CI, 5.4%–11.9%) than among white females (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.8%–8.4) (P = .60; but despite the similarity in AAPC between the 2 groups, the joinpoint models fit to the data were not parallel [P < .005

  19. Clinical Experiences with Radiation Induced Thyroid Cancer after Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Reiners, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The risk of developing thyroid cancer increases considerably after exposure to external or internal radiation, especially in children below the age of 10. After the Chernobyl reactor accident, the yearly incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus increased to approximately 40 per 1.000.000 in girls and to roughly 20 per 1.000.000 in boys compared to approximately 0.5 cases per 1.000.000 prior to the accident. Typically, young children with thyroid cancer after radiation exposure present in ≈95% of the cases as papillary cancers, in ≈50% as invasive tumors growing outside the thyroid capsule, in ≈65% with lymph node metastases and in ≈15% with distant metastases. A joint Belarusian-German project starting in April 1993 that combined treatment with surgery and radioiodine was organized in 237 selected children from Belarus who were exposed to the Chernobyl fallout and had advanced stages of thyroid cancer. The study group included 141 girls and 96 boys. Their median age at the time of the accident was 1.7 years; whereas the median age at the time of diagnosis was 12.4 years. With the exception of two cases with follicular histology, the majority of the patients had been diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancers. In 63%, the tumor had grown outside the thyroid capsule and invaded the tissue of the neck (pT4). Nearly all of the selected cases (96%) showed-up with lymph node metastases (pN1) and 43% of the patients with distant metastases mainly to the lungs (pM1). In 58% of the children, complete remissions of thyroid cancer could be achieved until December 31st 2010 and in 34% of the children, stable partial remissions; in the remaining 8% of the patients, partial remissions were observed. The risk of radiation-induced thyroid cancer increased considerably in children and adolescents who were affected by the Chernobyl reactor accident. In spite of the fact, that thyroid cancers in young children seem to behave more aggressively than in older patients, the

  20. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  1. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important.

  2. Well-differentiated thyroid cancer - are you overtreating your patients?

    PubMed

    Nixon, Iain J

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 50 years there has been a move towards more aggressive therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer. In recent times, however, international guidelines have shown some trend back towards a more conservative approach to treating low-risk patients. This review explores how the state of the art in well-differentiated thyroid cancer research has evolved in tandem with improvements in risk-stratification. A focus on the surgical approach to the primary thyroid tumour and the regional lymphatics in addition to the interplay between surgical decision making and the use of radioactive iodine are presented to allow the reader to determine whether they are now overtreating patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

  3. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  4. Management of recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adan; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women. It is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancers in women. The overall survival rate at five years is 50% and its treatment is still poor. We need new treatments for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who are incurable with current management. We review the effectiveness of new biological agents and morbidity and mortality of cytoreductive surgery. Since the hyperthermic increases the effectiveness of chemotherapy and the chance of survival, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has been proven to be a promising option, however it still requires further study to be the standard treatment. PMID:25207212

  5. Dietary Factors Affecting Thyroid Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Ae; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-01-01

    Some dietary factors are proposed to affect thyroid carcinogenesis, but previous studies have reported inconsistent findings. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis, including 18 eligible studies, to clarify the role of dietary factors in the risk of thyroid cancer. The relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated to assess the association and heterogeneity tests and subgroup and sensitivity analyses, and bias assessments were performed. When the results from all studies were combined, dietary iodine, fish, and cruciferous vegetable intake were not associated with thyroid cancer. However, when the data were divided by geographic location based on iodine availability, a slight increase in the risk of thyroid cancer was observed among those consuming a high total amount of fish in iodine nondeficient areas (RR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.03-1.35; P for heterogeneity = 0.282). When excluding the studies examining a single food item and hospital-based controls, a high intake of cruciferous vegetables was associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer in iodine-deficient areas (RR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.18-1.74; P for heterogeneity = 0.426). This meta-analysis implies that the role of dietary factors, such as fish and cruciferous vegetables, in thyroid cancer risk can differ based on iodine availability.

  6. Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis due to Both Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in the Same Three Patients.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Ashley; Puthenpura, Vidya; Marshall, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are the 2 most common autoimmune disease processes affecting the thyroid gland. The relationship between the two is complex and not clearly understood. It has been theorized that HT and GD are 2 separate disease processes due to unique genetic differences demonstrated by genome studies. On the other hand, based on occurrence of both HT and GD in monozygotic twins and within the same family, they have been regarded to represent 2 ends of the same spectrum. This case report describes 3 patients who presented with thyrotoxicosis due to both GD and HT. The initial presentation was thyrotoxicosis due to GD treated with antithyroid medication followed by temporary resolution. They all subsequently experienced recurrence of thyrotoxicosis in the form of Hashitoxicosis due to HT, and then eventually all developed thyrotoxicosis due to GD, requiring radioablation therapy.

  7. Thyroid cancer following nuclear tests in French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    de Vathaire, F; Drozdovitch, V; Brindel, P; Rachedi, F; Boissin, J-L; Sebbag, J; Shan, L; Bost-Bezeaud, F; Petitdidier, P; Paoaafaite, J; Teuri, J; Iltis, J; Bouville, A; Cardis, E; Hill, C; Doyon, F

    2010-01-01

    Background: Between 1966 and 1974, France conducted 41 atmospheric nuclear tests in Polynesia, but their potential health effects have not previously been investigated. Methods: In a case–control study, we compared the radiation exposure of almost all the French Polynesians diagnosed with differentiated thyroid carcinoma between 1981 and 2003 (n=229) to the exposure of 373 French Polynesian control individuals without cancer from the general population. Radiation exposures were estimated using measurements after the nuclear tests, age at time of each test, residential and dietary information. Results: The average thyroid dose before 15 years of age was about 1.8 mGy, and 5% of the cases and 3% of the controls received a dose above 10 mGy. Despite this low level of dose, and after adjusting for ethnic group, level of education, body surface area, family history of thyroid cancer and number of pregnancies for women, we observed an increasing risk (P=0.04) of thyroid cancer with increasing thyroid dose received before age of 15 years, which remained after excluding non-aggressive differentiated thyroid micro-carcinomas. This increase of risk per unit of thyroid radiation dose was higher (P=0.03) in women who later experienced four or more pregnancies than among other women. Conclusion: The risk estimate is low, but is based on limited exposure data. The release of information on exposure, currently classified, would greatly improve the reliability of the risk estimation. PMID:20808313

  8. Dynamic monitoring of circulating microRNAs as a predictive biomarker for the diagnosis and recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanqing; Xu, Desheng; Pan, Jiaqi; Yang, Zhengkai; Chen, Meijun; Han, Jun; Zhang, Sijia; Sun, Lulu; Qiao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) are considered to be potential biomarkers for numerous types of cancer. However, previous investigations into the expression of miRNAs in the serum of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) to predict diagnosis, prognosis and recurrence have reported conflicting results, and the role of miRNAs remains unclear. The present study dynamically assessed the circulating miRNA profile in patients with PTC and determined whether miRNAs in the serum could be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis and recurrence of PTC. The expression levels of 3 reportedly upregulated miRNAs (miR-222, miR-221 and miR-146b) were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 106 patients with PTC, 35 patients with benign thyroid nodules (BTN) and 40 paired controls. Patients with either newly diagnosed PTC or BTN who were undergoing thyroidectomies were recruited for a dynamic analysis of preoperative and postoperative serum miRNA levels. The results indicated that the expression levels of serum miR-222, miR-221 and miR-146b were significantly increased in patients with newly diagnosed PTC compared with controls and patients with BTN. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that these miRNAs had a high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for PTC prior to surgery. The expression of these three miRNAs in serum was significantly associated with poorer prognostic variables, including extrathyroidal invasion, metastatic lymph nodes and high-risk or advanced tumor node metastasis stage. More notably, the present study identified 2.36-, 2.69- and 5.39-fold reductions in the serum levels of miR-222, miR-221 and miR-146b, respectively, subsequent to patients undergoing a thyroidectomy. In addition, miR-222, miR-221 and miR-146b were overexpressed in the PTC with recurrence group compared with the PTC without recurrence group. Collectively, dynamic monitoring of circulating miRNAs may serve as a

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation and Percutaneous Ethanol Injection Treatment for Recurrent Local and Distant Well-Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Monchik, Jack M.; Donatini, Gianluca; Iannuccilli, Jason; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the long-term efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and percutaneous ethanol (EtOH) injection treatment of local recurrence or focal distant metastases of well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WTC). Background: RFA and EtOH injection techniques are new minimally invasive surgical alternatives for treatment of recurrent WTC. We report our experience and long-term follow-up results using RFA or EtOH ablation in treating local recurrence and distant focal metastases from WTC. Methods: Twenty patients underwent treatment of biopsy-proven recurrent WTC in the neck. Sixteen of these patients had lesions treated by ultrasound-guided RFA (mean size, 17.0 mm; range, 8–40 mm), while 6 had ultrasound-guided EtOH injection treatment (mean size, 11.4 mm; range, 6–15 mm). Four patients underwent RFA treatment of focal distant metastases from WTC. Three of these patients had CT-guided RFA of bone metastases (mean size, 40.0 mm; range, 30–60 mm), and 1 patient underwent RFA for a solitary lung metastasis (size, 27 mm). Patients were then followed with routine ultrasound, 131I whole body scan, and/or serum thyroglobulin levels for recurrence at the treatment site. Results: No recurrent disease was detected at the treatment site in 14 of the 16 patients treated with RFA and in all 6 patients treated with EtOH injection at a mean follow-up of 40.7 and 18.7 months, respectively. Two of the 3 patients treated for bone metastases are free of disease at the treatment site at 44 and 53 months of follow-up, respectively. The patient who underwent RFA for a solitary lung metastasis is free of disease at the treatment site at 10 months of follow-up. No complications were experienced in the group treated by EtOH injection, while 1 minor skin burn and 1 permanent vocal cord paralysis occurred in the RFA treatment group. Conclusions: RFA and EtOH ablation show promise as alternatives to surgical treatment of recurrent WTC in patients with difficult reoperations

  10. Innovative strategies for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, C; Koehrle, J

    2000-07-01

    Normally, thyroid cancer is a disease with a good prognosis, but about 30% of the tumours dedifferentiate and may finally develop into highly malignant anaplastic thyroid carcinomas with a mean survival time of less than 8 months. Due to the loss of thyroid-specific functions associated with dedifferentiation, these tumours are inaccessible to standard therapeutic procedures such as radioiodide therapy and thyroxine-mediated thyrotrophin suppression. Medullary thyroid carcinomas are also highly aggressive. Here, therapy is limited to surgery, and no alternative is left if patients do not respond to this standard procedure. Obviously, new approaches would be desirable. Several novel approaches are currently being tested for the treatment of thyroid cancer. Many of them utilise methods of gene therapy, but follow different strategies: (1) reintroduction of the tumour suppressor p53 into a background lacking functional p53; (2) suicide gene therapy with ganciclovir and a transduced gene for herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase controlled by the thyroglobulin promoter; (3) strengthening of the antitumour immune response by expression of an adenovirus-delivered interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene; (4) induction of an immune response by DNA vaccination against the tumour marker calcitonin; (5) transduction of the thyroid sodium/iodide transporter gene to make tissues that do not accumulate iodide treatable by radioiodide therapy; (6) blocking of the expression of the oncogene c-myc by antisense oligonucleotides. While these approaches are still tested in vitro or in animal models, first results from pilot studies concerning other novel treatment modalities are available: (7) radioimmunotherapy exploits the carcinoembryonic antigen expressed on medullary thyroid carcinomas to target a radiolabelled antibody to the tumour; and (8) retinoic acid is used for a redifferentiation therapy in the case of thyroid cancer. Hopefully, one or the other of these novel strategies may probably

  11. Medullary thyroid cancer with undetectable serum calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Brutsaert, Erika F; Gersten, Adam J; Tassler, Andrew B; Surks, Martin I

    2015-02-01

    Calcitonin is a sensitive biomarker that is used for diagnosis and follow-up in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). In patients with tumors > 1 cm, it is uncommon for preoperative serum calcitonin to be in the normal laboratory reference range in patients with MTC, and even more unusual for serum calcitonin to be undetectable. A 39-year-old woman was found to have a left thyroid nodule on magnetic resonance imaging done for neck pain. Ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy were performed, and cytopathology was positive for malignant cells. The cells also had features suggestive of a neuroendocrine tumor, and the specimen was immune-stained with calcitonin. There was positive immunoreactivity for calcitonin in isolated cells of the cytospin, highly favoring a diagnosis of MTC. Serum calcitonin was < 2 pg/mL (<6 pg/mL), and serum carcinoembryonic antigen was 3.1 ng/mL (<5.2 ng/mL). Given the low calcitonin levels, procalcitonin was also tested and was elevated at 0.21 ng/mL (< 0.1 ng/mL). The patient subsequently underwent a total thyroidectomy and central and ipsilateral lateral lymph node dissection. Histopathology confirmed a 2.6 × 2.0 × 1.2-cm MTC, with strong, diffuse immunostaining for calcitonin. Postoperatively, serum calcitonin has remained undetectable, carcinoembryonic antigen has remained within the reference range, and procalcitonin has become undetectable. We present a rare case of a patient with MTC with undetectable preoperative serum calcitonin, whose tumor demonstrated strong, diffuse immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin. We discuss the possible pathogenesis of calcitonin-negative MTC and the challenges in following patients with this condition.

  12. Survival Analysis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Relation to Stage and Recurrence Risk: A 20-Year Experience in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Aamna; Razi, Mairah; Riaz, Saima; Khalid, Madeeha; Nawaz, M Khalid; Syed, Aamir Ali; Bashir, Humayun

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall and progression-free survival of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), comparing the American Thyroid Association (ATA) guideline for risk of recurrence with the TNM staging system with dynamic assessment at 2 years. This study is a retrospective analysis of 689 PTC patients over a 20-year period at a single center. Disease-free survival based on the TNM staging and ATA recurrence risk was calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Dynamic response assessment during the first 2 years was compared for both systems. Survival was calculated based on age, baseline resectability, and postthyroidectomy serum tumor marker levels. Six hundred eighty-nine (72.2%) of the total thyroid cancer patients had PTC. Four hundred sixty-nine patients were females, and 220 patients were males. The age range was 6 to 87 years. Five hundred thirty-five patients were resectable, and 56 patients were unresectable. One hundred fifty-one patients were excluded due to insufficient information on recurrence risk. By ATA categorization, 39% had low risk, no disease-related mortality; 44% had intermediate risk, 3 died; and 17% had high risk, 32 died. The 5-year disease-free survival was 54%, 26%, and 5% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. The log-rank test showed a significant difference in the percent survival (P < 0.01). TNM stage wise, in terms of survival, 1.3% in stage I, 2.2% in stage II, 0% in stage III, and 37.5% in stage IV died. The 20-year disease-free survival showed the following: stage I, 43%; stage II, 28%; stage III, 18%; and stage IV, 2%. There is significant difference in survival rate (P < 0.01). Both ATA risk classification and TNM staging were significant predictors of disease-free survival. On bivariate analysis, ATA classification (hazards ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.67; P = 0.001) was better predictive of overall survival versus TNM classification (hazards ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence

  13. Thyroid cancers. II. Medullary, anaplastic, lymphoma, sarcoma, squamous cell.

    PubMed

    Austin, J R; el-Naggar, A K; Goepfert, H

    1996-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma in both sporadic and familial forms is a curable disease if detected early and treated by the proper surgery. The advent of genetic screening for the RET protooncogene portends great promise in the earlier diagnosis and treatment of familial forms of MTC. New chemotherapy protocols have produced some tumor regression in patients with metastatic MTC. Improved use of Adriamycin and hyper-fractionated radiotherapy combined with debulking procedures has prolonged survival in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Thyroid gland lymphoma, if diagnosed early and treated by combined chemoradiotherapy, carries a good prognosis for survival. The best treatment for thyroid sarcomas and SCC of the thyroid is early diagnosis and aggressive surgery combined with radiotherapy.

  14. Cross-talk between NO and HMGB1 in lymphocytic thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mardente, Stefania; Zicari, Alessandra; Consorti, Fabrizio; Mari, Emanuela; Di Vito, Maura; Leopizzi, Martina; Della Rocca, Carlo; Antonaci, Alfredo

    2010-12-01

    The controversy on whether or not inflammatory infiltrates in chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis predispose to cancer, has now merged into a debate over the role of the inflammatory infiltrates. The question is how and why some cells become transformed and what factors allow them to spread and in some cases become invasive. Here, we show that the amount of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and high mobility group Box 1 protein (HMGB1) produced in thyroiditis microenvironment increases in tumors and could be involved in the cellular transformation process. NO and HMGB1 are known to attract macrophages that would promote angiogenesis, matrix remodelling and suppression of an efficient immune response. Inflammatory infiltrates could increase the risk of papillary cancer in patients with autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis. Cytokines and soluble inflammatory mediators involved in cancer-related inflammation are not only a target for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies but they also represent a future challenge for oncologists.

  15. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  16. Validation of dynamic risk stratification in pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Seo Young; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Hye In; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2017-08-18

    There has been increasing interest in a risk-adopted management strategy known as dynamic risk stratification following the revised American Thyroid Association guidelines for differentiated thyroid cancer. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic risk stratification for predicting structural disease in pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 130 pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer patients (≤19 years) who were treated between 1996 and 2015 at Samsung Medical Center. Patients were stratified according to three American Thyroid Association initial risk group (low, intermediate, or high risk) and four dynamic risk stratification group (excellent, indeterminate, biochemical incomplete, or structural incomplete). Based on dynamic risk stratification strategy, structural disease was identified 3.9% in the excellent group, 9.7% in the indeterminate group, 76.9% in the biochemical incomplete group, and 100% in the structural incomplete group. The hazard ratios of the structural disease were 18.10 (P < 0.001) in the biochemical incomplete group, and 19.583 (P < 0.001) in the structural incomplete group compared to the excellent group. The prevalence of structural disease also increased as American Thyroid Association initial risk classification increased (5.9% in the low-risk group, 13.6% in the intermediate-risk group, and 45% in the high-risk group). The hazard ratios of structural disease in the high-risk group was 10.296 (P < 0.001) in compared to the low-risk group. Dynamic risk stratification based on patient responses to initial therapy was able to effectively predict the risk of structural disease in a pediatric population, and as a follow-up strategy, may work as well in pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer patients as it does in adult differentiated thyroid cancer patients.

  17. Upper neck papillary thyroid cancer (UPTC): A new proposed term for the composite of thyroglossal duct cyst-associated papillary thyroid cancer, pyramidal lobe papillary thyroid cancer, and Delphian node papillary thyroid cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zizic, Marica; Faquin, William; Stephen, Antonia E; Kamani, Dipti; Nehme, Romy; Slough, Cristian M; Randolph, Gregory W

    2016-07-01

    Thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC) is a common congenital anomaly, but TGDC carcinoma is rare. Thyroglossal duct cyst carcinoma management is controversial, especially that of the orthotopic thyroid gland. We aim to provide an insight into the pathologic basis of this management controversy through the review of 28 TGDC cancer cases, thus far the largest such series to our knowledge. Retrospective. Twenty-eight cases recorded as TGDC cancer in the hospital database were reviewed; their initial clinical diagnosis from medical chart review (DX1) and final pathological review diagnosis (DX2) through pathology slides review by our pathologist (blinded to DX1) were compared. The thyroid gland management and pathology were evaluated. In the 28 TGDC carcinoma (hospital-recorded diagnosis) patients, DX1 and DX2 were respectively reported as 53% and 14% TGDC carcinoma, 11% and 29% as pyramidal lobe primary, and 4% and 25% as metastatic Delphian node. Thirty-two percent of cases were in the indeterminate category, in both DX1 and DX2, but included different patients. Thyroidectomy was performed in 54% of the cases, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) was reported in 37% of these thyroid glands. Concurrent thyroid gland malignancy was reported in all Delphian node and pyramidal lobe PTC patients. The diagnosis of TGDC cancer comprises a heterogeneous group that includes true TGDC cancer, pyramidal lobe primary, Delphian node metastasis, and indeterminate cases. We propose a new terminology of upper neck papillary thyroid carcinoma (UPTC) to denote this heterogeneous group and recommend a rational algorithm for management. Correct pathologic subcategory and thyroid ultrasonography are essential for optimal management of thyroid gland in UPTC cases. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1709-1714, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Screening for Thyroid Cancer: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jennifer S; Bowles, Erin J Aiello; Williams, Selvi B; Morrison, Caitlin C

    2017-05-09

    designed to determine if earlier or immediate treatment vs delayed or no surgical treatment improves patient outcomes. Based on 36 studies (n = 43 295), the 95% CI for the rate of surgical harm was 2.12 to 5.93 cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism per 100 thyroidectomies and 0.99 to 2.13 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy per 100 operations. Based on 16 studies (n = 291 796), treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer with radioactive iodine is associated with a small increase in risk of second primary malignancies and with increased risk of permanent adverse effects on the salivary gland, such as dry mouth. Although ultrasonography of the neck using high-risk sonographic characteristics plus follow-up cytology from fine-needle aspiration can identify thyroid cancers, it is unclear if population-based or targeted screening can decrease mortality rates or improve important patient health outcomes. Screening that results in the identification of indolent thyroid cancers, and treatment of these overdiagnosed cancers, may increase the risk of patient harms.

  19. Estrogens and Stem Cells in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zane, Mariangela; Catalano, Veronica; Scavo, Emanuela; Bonanno, Marco; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries highlight the emerging role of estrogens in the initiation and progression of different malignancies through their interaction with stem cell (SC) compartment. Estrogens play a relevant role especially for those tumors bearing a gender disparity in incidence and aggressiveness, as occurs for most thyroid diseases. Although several experimental lines suggest that estrogens promote thyroid cell proliferation and invasion, their precise contribution in SC compartment still remains unclear. This review underlines the interplay between hormones and thyroid function, which could help to complete the puzzle of gender discrepancy in thyroid malignancies. Defining the association between estrogen receptors’ status and signaling pathways by which estrogens exert their effects on thyroid cells is a potential tool that provides important insights in pathogenetic mechanisms of thyroid tumors. PMID:25120531

  20. Role of the Wnt Pathway in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sastre-Perona, Ana; Santisteban, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling is involved in the development of several epithelial tumors. Wnt signaling includes two major types of pathways: (i) the canonical or Wnt/β-catenin pathway; and (ii) the non-canonical pathways, which do not involve β-catenin stabilization. Among these pathways, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has received most attention during the past years for its critical role in cancer. A number of publications emphasize the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in thyroid cancer. This pathway plays a crucial role in development and epithelial renewal, and components such as β-catenin and Axin are often mutated in thyroid cancer. Although it is accepted that altered Wnt signaling is a late event in thyroid cell transformation that affects anaplastic thyroid tumors, recent data suggest that it is also altered in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with RET/PTC mutations. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize the main relevant data of Wnt signaling in thyroid cancer, with special emphasis on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:22645520

  1. [What's new in follicular thyroid cancer management in 2014?].

    PubMed

    Abeillon-du Payrat, J; Caron, P; Borson-Chazot, F

    2014-10-01

    The American Thyroid Association has presented new guidelines for the management of thyroid cancer. These guidelines tend to appreciate more accurately the individual risk of patients, to adapt accordingly the treatment and the follow up. The initial risk stratification has been completed, especially precising the risk of N1 patients, follicular thyroid cancers, and the prognostic impact of molecular markers. Indications, doses and modalities of radioiodine (RAI) have been reevaluated, restricting its utilization in order to avoid overtreatment of low risk patients. Moreover the response to initial treatment allows to restratify the risk of the patients, and to adapt the monitoring and the thyroid hormone therapy management. The risk of suppressive thyroid hormone therapy has also to be considered. Concerning advanced thyroid cancer, prognosis is mainly depending on its RAI sensitivity. The systemic treatment of progressive, threatening refractory cancers is nowadays based on targeted therapy. However none of these treatments has demonstrated an improvement in overall survival, and side effects are frequent. Fagin et al presented promising results concerning short term treatment with selective inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, able to partially restore RAI sensitivity of refractory lesions in murine models, and recently in human patients.

  2. Sorafenib in Metastatic Thyroid Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ligy; Lai, Stephen Y.; Dong, Wenli; Feng, Lei; Dadu, Ramona; Regone, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sorafenib was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for radioiodine-resistant metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). In addition, two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Several published phase II trials have investigated the efficacy of sorafenib in thyroid cancers, but to date, results from those studies have not been compared. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was performed to assess response rate, median progression-free survival, and adverse events associated with sorafenib therapy for metastatic thyroid cancers. Results. This review included seven trials involving 219 patients: 159 with DTC (papillary, follicular, and poorly differentiated), 52 with MTC, and 8 with anaplastic thyroid cancer. No study reported complete responses to treatment. Overall partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease rates were 21%, 60%, and 20%, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 18 months for patients with all subtypes of thyroid cancer. Drug was discontinued in 16% of patients because of toxicities or intolerance, and the dose was reduced in a further 56%. Side effects with an incidence ≥50% were hand-foot syndrome (74%), diarrhea (70%), skin rash (67%), fatigue (61%), and weight loss (57%). Deaths not related to progressive disease occurred in nearly 4% of patients. Conclusion. Treatment with sorafenib in patients with progressive DTC and MTC is a promising strategy, but the adverse event rate is high, leading to a high rate of dose reduction or discontinuation. Consequently, sorafenib use in patients with metastatic thyroid cancer requires careful selection of patients and careful management of side effects. PMID:24563075

  3. Electrochemotherapy of chest wall breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sersa, Gregor; Cufer, Tanja; Paulin, Snezna Marija; Cemazar, Maja; Snoj, Marko

    2012-08-01

    Chest wall breast cancer recurrence after mastectomy is a disease difficult to treat. Its incidence varies between 5% and 30% in different subset of patients. When possible, radical surgical therapy represents the main treatment approach, however when the disease progresses and/or treatments are not successful, ulceration, bleeding, lymphedema and psychological distress of progressive disease significantly decrease the quality of the remaining life of a patient. When surgical excision of chest wall recurrence is not possible, other local treatments such as radiotherapy, radiotherapy with hyperthermia, topical chemotherapy and electrochemotherapy might be taken into account. Electrochemotherapy provides safe, efficient and non-invasive locoregional treatment approach for chest wall breast cancer recurrence. Several clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy and a good safety profile of electrochemotherapy applied in single or multiple consecutive sessions, till clinical response was reached. Electrochemotherapy can be performed either with cisplatin injected intratumorally or with bleomycin given intratumorally or intravenously. Furthermore, it can be effectively used in heavily pre-treated areas, after surgery, radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. These are the advantages that might demand its use especially in patients with pre-treated extensive disease and in frail elderly patients. With development of the technology electrochemotherapy could even be suggested as a primary local therapy in patients not suitable for surgical removal of the primary tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  5. Signaling Pathways in Thyroid Cancer and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Bao, Wuyuntu; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of endocrine system, and has now become the fastest increasing cancer among all the malignancies. The development, progression, invasion, and metastasis are closely associated with multiple signaling pathways and the functions of related molecules, such as Src, Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, NF-κB, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), Wnt-β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. Each of the signaling pathways could exert its function singly or through network with other pathways. These pathways could cooperate, promote, antagonize, or interact with each other to form a complex network for the regulation. Dysfunction of this network could increase the development, progression, invasion, and metastasis of thyroid cancer. Inoperable thyroid cancer still has a poor prognosis. However, signaling pathway-related targeted therapies offer the hope of longer quality of meaningful life for this small group of patients. Signaling pathway-related targets provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. In the present work, the advances in these signaling pathways and targeted treatments of thyroid cancer were reviewed. PMID:26985248

  6. What is currently the best radiopharmaceutical for the hybrid PET/CT detection of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Slavikova, K; Montravers, F; Treglia, G; Kunikowska, J; Kaliska, L; Vereb, M; Talbot, J N; Balogova, S

    2013-06-06

    Among thyroid malignancies, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has some very specific features. Production and secretion of large amounts of peptides occur in malignant transformed C cells with few exceptions, leading to high serum levels of calcitonin (Ctn) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that act after thyroidectomy as tumour markers warning for the presence of persistent or metastatic MTC. The availability of those serum biomarkers with an excellent sensitivity challenges medical imaging to localise the recurrent cancer tissue, since surgery is a major therapeutic option. The aims of this article are (i) to review literature evidence about the efficacy and tolerance of radiopharmaceuticals for 3 targets of PET/CT imaging (glucose metabolism, bioamines metabolism and somatostatin receptors) and also bone scintigraphy which is recommended in the Guidelines of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO; (ii) to compare the availability and the costs in relation with those radiopharmaceuticals, (iii) and to discuss a possible sequence of those examinations, in order to optimise spending and to minimise the overall radiation dose. In this context of recurrent MTC suspected on rising tumour markers levels after thyroidectomy, this survey of literature confirms that FDOPA is the best radiopharmaceutical for PET/CT with significant diagnostic performance if Ctn>150 pg/mL; an early image acquisition starting during the first 15 min is advised. In negative cases, FDG should be the next PET radiopharmaceutical, in particular if Ctn and CEA levels are rapidly rising, and PET with a somatostatin analogue labelled with gallium-68 when neither FDOPA nor FDG PET are conclusive. Bone scintigraphy could complement FDG-PET/CT if FDOPA is not available.

  7. Anaplastic carcinoma following well-differentiated thyroid cancer: etiological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, D. S.; LiVolsi, V. A.; Sanders, M. M.

    1982-01-01

    Most cases of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can be pathologically and often historically associated with the presence of low-grade (differentiated) cancer in the thyroid. That radiation therapy to the differentiated tumor plays an etiologic role in the transformation of a differentiated to an undifferentiated tumor has been suggested. If such therapy can be implicated, is there a difference in risk between external radiotherapy or radioactive iodine? Review of the literature discloses that more anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid develop in patients without a history of prior radiation than in individuals who have received radiation. We report our recent experience with two patients who demonstrated the sequence of well-differentiated followed by anaplastic thyroid cancer subsequent to radiation and review the question. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7183024

  8. Novel Approaches to Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Response Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Ravinder K.; Ho, Alan; Schöder, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been on the rise. After total thyroidectomy of well differentiated thyroid tumors with intermediate or high-risk features on pathology, radioiodine remains one of the mainstays as the standard therapy for thyroid remnant ablation as well as treatment of metastatic disease. SPECT/CT, a relatively newer modality, has shown to play a pivotal role predominantly in the post-therapy setting by changing the risk stratification of patients with thyroid cancer. In the case of radioiodine failure, other modalities such as FDG PET/CT have been shown to provide prognostic information in terms of metabolic activity and external beam radiation therapy, thereby playing a role in disease management. The role of newer redifferentiation drugs has been evaluated with the use of I-124 PET/CT. PMID:26897715

  9. Genetic instability in fibroblasts of patients with thyroid cancers (TC).

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B; Pathak, S; Samaan, N A; Hickey, R C

    1987-02-15

    In cultured fibroblasts initiated from fresh tumor biopsies of 11 patients with thyroid tumors, 5 medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MCT) and 6 papillary follicular, the chromosomes are relatively unstable when compared with those from control fibroblast cultures. Tumor-derived fibroblast samples showed a mean number of cells in metaphase with chromosome abnormalities at a frequency of 9.1% and a range of 6-13%, whereas 5 controls exhibited a mean frequency of 4% and a range of 3-5%. Our results indicate that genetic instability in thyroid cancer patients is present not only in peripheral blood cultures, as reported earlier, but in their fibroblast cultures as well.

  10. Central compartment neck dissection for thyroid cancer. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sara I; Tufano, Ralph P

    2008-01-01

    The central compartment of the neck is a common site of local metastasis for thyroid carcinoma. Therefore, knowledge of the surgical techniques employed during a central compartment neck dissection is important to master for any surgeon who manages thyroid cancer patients. We review the anatomical boundaries of the central compartment of the neck as well as discuss the lymphatic drainage patterns of the thyroid gland. We advocate standardization of the surgical approach to the central compartment in order to minimize morbidity and ensure comprehensive removal of all lymph nodes when indicated, which can reduce the need for reoperative dissections. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is a sensitive and diagnostically useful immunohistochemical marker of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and of PTC-like nuclear alterations in Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, KE; GE, SHU-JIAN; LIN, XIAO-YAN; LV, BEI-BEI; CAO, ZHI-XIN; LI, JIA-MEI; XU, JIA-WEN; WANG, QIANG-XIU

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is important in the progression of inflammatory responses. Recently, increased levels of ICAM-1 have been reported in a number of types of malignancy. The present study aimed to investigate ICAM-1 expression in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) with PTC-like nuclear alterations, and to assess the predictive value of ICAM-1 in thyroid lesions. ICAM-1 expression was retrospectively investigated in 132 consecutive cases of PTC, 72 cases of HT, 10 of follicular cancer, 15 of follicular adenoma, 16 of nodular goiter and 8 samples of normal thyroid tissue using immunohistochemical analyses, and in 42 PTC patients using western blotting. ICAM-1 expression was not detected in normal follicular cells, follicular lesions (adenoma and cancer) and benign nodular hyperplasia, but was frequently overexpressed in PTC cells. ICAM-1 overexpression was associated with extra-thyroidal invasion and lymph node metastasis; no association was found with age, gender, tumor size, multifocality, pathological stage, recurrence or distant metastasis. ICAM-1 expression in HT patients with PTC-like nuclear alterations was significantly higher than that in HT cases with non-PTC-like features. Compared with antibodies against cytokeratin 19, galectin-3 and Hector Battifora mesothelial-1, ICAM-1 was the most sensitive marker for the detection of PTC-like features in HT. These findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression is upregulated in PTC and in HT with PTC-like nuclear alterations. This feature may be an important factor in the progression of cancer of the thyroid gland. PMID:26998068

  12. Nitrate intake and the risk of thyroid cancer and thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Mary H; Kilfoy, Briseis A; Weyer, Peter J; Anderson, Kristin E; Folsom, Aaron R; Cerhan, James R

    2010-05-01

    Nitrate is a contaminant of drinking water in agricultural areas and is found at high levels in some vegetables. Nitrate competes with uptake of iodide by the thyroid, thus potentially affecting thyroid function. We investigated the association of nitrate intake from public water supplies and diet with the risk of thyroid cancer and self-reported hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a cohort of 21,977 older women in Iowa who were enrolled in 1986 and who had used the same water supply for >10 years. We estimated nitrate ingestion from drinking water using a public database of nitrate measurements (1955-1988). Dietary nitrate intake was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire and levels from the published literature. Cancer incidence was determined through 2004. We found an increased risk of thyroid cancer with higher average nitrate levels in public water supplies and with longer consumption of water exceeding 5 mg/L nitrate-N (for >or=5 years at >5 mg/L, relative risk [RR] = 2.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2]). We observed no association with prevalence of hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Increasing intake of dietary nitrate was associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer (highest vs. lowest quartile, RR = 2.9 [1.0-8.1]; P for trend = 0.046) and with the prevalence of hypothyroidism (odds ratio = 1.2 [95% CI = 1.1-1.4]), but not hyperthyroidism. Nitrate may play a role in the etiology of thyroid cancer and warrants further study.

  13. Protocol of a Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS): a prospective, clinical and epidemiological study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Young Joo; Cho, Belong; Hwang, Yunji; Choi, June Young; Kim, Su-jin; Choi, Hoonsung; Choi, Ho-Chun; An, Ah Reum; Park, Do Joon; Park, Sue K; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroid cancer incidence in Korea is the highest in the world and has recently increased steeply. However, factors contributing to this sudden increase have not been fully elucidated, and few studies have explored the postoperative prognosis. The Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS) was initiated with three aims: (1) to identify factors predicting quality of life, recurrence, and incidence of other diseases after thyroid cancer treatments; (2) to investigate environmental exposure to radiation, toxicants and molecular factors in relation to tumour aggressiveness; and (3) to evaluate gene–environment interactions that increase thyroid cancer in comparison with healthy participants from a pool of nationwide population-based healthy examinees. Methods and analysis T-CALOS enrols patients with incident thyroid cancer from three general hospitals, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and National Medical Center, Korea. The study is an ongoing project expecting to investigate 5000 patients with thyroid cancer up until 2017. Healthy examinees with a normal thyroid confirmed by sonography have been enrolled at the Healthy Examination Center at Seoul National University Hospital. We are also performing individual matching using two nationwide databases that are open to the public. Follow-up information is obtained at patients’ clinical visits and by linkage to the national database. For statistical analysis, we will use conditional logistic regression models and a Cox proportional hazard regression model. A number of stratifications and sensitivity analyses will be performed to confirm the results. Ethics and dissemination Based on a large sample size, a prospective study design, comprehensive data collection and biobank, T-CALOS has been independently peer-reviewed and approved by the three hospitals and two funding sources (National Research Foundation of Korea and Korean Foundation for Cancer Research

  14. Review of Factors Related to the Thyroid Cancer Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer, of which the incidence has dramatically increased worldwide in the past few decades. The reasons for the observed rapid increase still are not fully understood, but evidence suggests that overdiagnosis, with the advancement in detection methods and screening policies, is not the sole driver of the substantial increase of the incidence. However, the effect of environmental/lifestyle factors remains speculative other than that of radiation exposure at a young age. This review tries to give a balanced view of debated factors leading to the thyroid cancer epidemic, to offer some alternatives in understanding the controversies, and to suggest potential directions in the search of modifiable risk factors to help reduce thyroid cancer. PMID:28555155

  15. Ethical issues in non-intervention trials for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Angelos, P; Hartl, D M; Shah, J P; Nixon, I J; Owen, R P; Rinaldo, A; Rodrigo, J P; Shaha, A R; Silver, C E; Suárez, C; Ferlito, A

    2017-03-16

    In recent years, the increasing numbers of small, apparently indolent thyroid cancers diagnosed in the world have encouraged investigators to consider non-intervention as an alternative to surgical management. In the following pages, the prospect of a non-intervention trial for thyroid cancer is considered with attention to the ethical issues that such a trial might raise. Such a non-intervention trial is analyzed relative to 7 ethical considerations: the social or scientific value of the research, the scientific validity of the trial, the necessity of fair selection of participants, a favorable risk-benefit ratio for trial participants, independent review of the trial, informed consent, and allowing the study participants to withdraw from the trial. A non-intervention trial for thyroid cancer is also considered relative to the central concept of equipoise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeted treatments of radio-iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Fouchardière, C

    2015-02-01

    Radio-iodine refractory metastatic thyroid cancers are rare and their management was until recently relatively complex. New therapeutic agents, kinase inhibitors, joined since the early 2000s the fight against these cancers with very promising results. These targeted agents showed for two of them (sorafenib; lenvatinib), in randomized phase III trials, a significant improvement in response rate and progressionfree survival when compared to placebo, leading to the first approval for radio-iodine refractory metastatic thyroid cancers. In parallel, patients also benefited from the development of interventional radiology techniques and organization of cares in oncology, with multidisciplinary management strengthened by the creation of a national network (TUTHYREF).

  17. The relevance of preoperative ultrasound cervical mapping in patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kocharyan, Davit; Schwenter, Frank; Bélair, Manon; Nassif, Edgard

    2016-04-01

    Cervical lymph node involvement in thyroid cancer is associated with locoregional recurrence and decreased disease-free survival. Preoperative lymph node mapping helps in planning surgery for neck dissection and improves patient outcomes. We sought to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of ultrasound mapping for thyroid cancer and evaluate the clinical importance of this exam in terms of identifying the group of patients who would benefit most from subsequent surgical dissection. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 263 patients who underwent thyroid surgery between 2009 and 2013. We calculated the positive predictive values (PPVs) of ultrasound mapping of both the lateral and central compartments together and the lateral or central compartment individually. A quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the number of positive lymph nodes at ultrasound imaging with histopathologic evaluation. A total of 136 cases of thyroid cancer in 120 patients met the inclusion criteria for ultrasound mapping analysis. The PPVs (and 95% confidence intervals) were 83.82 (0.76-0.89) for the lateral and central compartments, 85.39% (0.76-0.91) for the lateral compartment, and 80.48% (0.7-0.87) for the central compartment. When comparing the positive lymph nodes at ultrasound imaging with histopathologic evaluation, the result was χ(2) = 10.33 (p = 0.006). This single-institution study indicated that preoperative ultrasound mapping is an accurate imaging procedure for predicting lymphatic spread in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer. Ultrasound mapping can be used as an efficient tool for surgical planning and prognosis determination, as well as for identifying the group of patients who would benefit most from subsequent surgical intervention.

  18. Modulation of angiogenesis by thyroid hormone and hormone analogues: implications for cancer management.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shaker A; Lin, Hung-Yun; Tang, Heng Yuan; Hercbergs, Aleck; Luidens, Mary K; Davis, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Acting via a cell surface receptor on integrin αvβ3, thyroid hormone is pro-angiogenic. Nongenomic mechanisms of actions of the hormone and hormone analogues at αvβ3 include modulation of activities of multiple vascular growth factor receptors and their ligands (vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor), as well as of angiogenic chemokines (CX3 family). Thyroid hormone also may increase activity of small molecules that support neovascularization (bradykinin, angiotensin II) and stimulate endothelial cell motility. Therapeutic angio-inhibition in the setting of cancer may be opposed by endogenous thyroid hormone, particularly when a single vascular growth factor is the treatment target. This may be a particular issue in management of aggressive or recurrent tumors. It is desirable to have access to chemotherapies that affect multiple steps in angiogenesis and to examine as alternatives in aggressive cancers the induction of subclinical hypothyroidism or use of antagonists of the αvβ3 thyroid hormone receptor that are under development.

  19. Systemic treatment and management approaches for medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ernani, Vinicius; Kumar, Mukesh; Chen, Amy Y; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2016-11-01

    Although rare, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) exemplifies the value that ever-expanding knowledge of molecular pathways and mechanisms brings to managing challenging cancers. Although surgery can be curative for MTC in many patients, a substantial proportion of patients present with locoregional or distant metastatic disease. Once distant disease occurs, treatment options are limited, and conventional cancer treatments such as cytotoxic chemotherapy are of minimal benefit. Biomarkers such as calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen are important correlates of disease burden as well as predictors of disease progress, including recurrence and survival. MTC is either sporadic (∼75%) or inherited (∼25%) as an autosomal dominant disease. Regardless, germline and somatic mutations, particularly in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene, are key factors in the neoplastic process. Gain-of-function RET mutations result in overactive proteins that lead to abnormal activation of downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in ligand-independent growth and resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Specific RET mutation variants have been found to correlate with phenotype and natural history of MTC with some defects portending a more aggressive clinical course. Greater understanding of the consequence of the aberrant signaling pathway has fostered the development of targeted therapies. Two small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are currently available as approved agents for the treatment of advanced or progressive MTC and provide significant increases in progression-free survival. Since there have been no head-to-head comparisons, clinicians often select between these agents on the basis of familiarity, patient characteristics, comorbidities, and toxicity profile.

  20. DNA methylation signatures identify biologically distinct thyroid cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodero, Sandra; Fernández, Agustín F; Fernández-Morera, Juan Luís; Castro-Santos, Patricia; Bayon, Gustavo F; Ferrero, Cecilia; Urdinguio, Rocio G; Gonzalez-Marquez, Rocío; Suarez, Carlos; Fernández-Vega, Iván; Fresno Forcelledo, Manuel Florentino; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Mancikova, Veronika; Castelblanco, Esmeralda; Perez, Marco; Marrón, Pablo Isidro; Mendiola, Marta; Hardisson, David; Santisteban, Pilar; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Matías-Guiu, Xavier; Carnero, Amancio; Robledo, Mercedes; Delgado-Álvarez, Elías; Menéndez-Torre, Edelmiro; Fraga, Mario F

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the global patterns of aberrant DNA methylation in thyroid cancer. We have used DNA methylation arrays to determine, for the first time, the genome-wide promoter methylation status of papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic thyroid tumors. We identified 262 and 352 hypermethylated and 13 and 21 hypomethylated genes in differentiated papillary and follicular tumors, respectively. Interestingly, the other tumor types analyzed displayed more hypomethylated genes (280 in anaplastic and 393 in medullary tumors) than aberrantly hypermethylated genes (86 in anaplastic and 131 in medullary tumors). Among the genes indentified, we show that 4 potential tumor suppressor genes (ADAMTS8, HOXB4, ZIC1, and KISS1R) and 4 potential oncogenes (INSL4, DPPA2, TCL1B, and NOTCH4) are frequently regulated by aberrant methylation in primary thyroid tumors. In addition, we show that aberrant promoter hypomethylation-associated overexpression of MAP17 might promote tumor growth in thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer subtypes present differential promoter methylation signatures, and nondifferentiated subtypes are characterized by aberrant promoter hypomethylation rather than hypermethylation. Additional studies are needed to determine the potential clinical interest of the tumor subtype-specific DNA methylation signatures described herein and the role of aberrant promoter hypomethylation in nondifferentiated thyroid tumors.

  1. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was < 0.35 ng/dL, indicating severe hypothyroidism. After ruling out other possible causes, the diagnosis of myxedema madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer.

  2. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  3. Association of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations with clinicopathological features and prognosis of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xingyun; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Haiyong; Xu, Xin; Lin, Aihui; Teng, Xiaodong; Wu, Huiling; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations have been widely investigated in thyroid cancer; however, the results are still discrepant. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Ovid, and the Cochran Library databases for relevant articles prior to April 2016. Mutation rates were synthesized by R statistical software. The odds ratio or standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval was pooled by Stata. A total of 22 studies with 4,907 cases were included in this meta-analysis. TERT promoter mutations tended to present in aggressive histological types including poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (33.37%), anaplastic thyroid cancer (38.69%), and tall-cell variant papillary thyroid cancer (30.23%). These promoter mutations were likely to exist in older patients and males and were well associated with larger tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced tumor stage, disease recurrence/persistence, and mortality. In addition, TERT promoter mutations (especially C228T) tended to coexist with BRAFV600E mutation, which indicated more aggressive tumor behavior. Therefore, TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers for early diagnosis, risk stratification, prognostic prediction, and management of thyroid cancer. PMID:27956840

  4. Recurrent EZH1 mutations are a second hit in autonomous thyroid adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Elisa S.; Eszlinger, Markus; Ronchi, Cristina L.; Godbole, Amod; Bathon, Kerstin; Guizzardi, Fabiana; de Filippis, Tiziana; Krohn, Knut; Jaeschke, Holger; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Gozu, Hulya Iliksu; Sancak, Seda; Niedziela, Marek; Strom, Tim M.; Fassnacht, Martin; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous thyroid adenomas (ATAs) are a frequent cause of hyperthyroidism. Mutations in the genes encoding the TSH receptor (TSHR) or the Gs protein α subunit (GNAS) are found in approximately 70% of ATAs. The involvement of other genes and the pathogenesis of the remaining cases are presently unknown. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 19 ATAs that were paired with normal DNA samples and identified a recurrent hot-spot mutation (c.1712A>G; p.Gln571Arg) in the enhancer of zeste homolog 1 (EZH1) gene, which codes for a catalytic subunit of the polycomb complex. Targeted screening in an independent cohort confirmed that this mutation occurs with high frequency (27%) in ATAs. EZH1 mutations were strongly associated with known (TSHR, GNAS) or presumed (adenylate cyclase 9 [ADCY9]) alterations in cAMP pathway genes. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that the p.Gln571Arg EZH1 mutation caused increased histone H3 trimethylation and increased proliferation of thyroid cells. In summary, this study revealed that a hot-spot mutation in EZH1 is the second most frequent genetic alteration in ATAs. The association between EZH1 and TSHR mutations suggests a 2-hit model for the pathogenesis of these tumors, whereby constitutive activation of the cAMP pathway and EZH1 mutations cooperate to induce the hyperproliferation of thyroid cells. PMID:27500488

  5. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Access, excess, and overdiagnosis: the case for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Stephen F; Irish, Jonathan; Groome, Patti; Griffiths, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer in women is increasing at an epidemic rate. Numerous studies have proposed that the cause is increasing detection due to availability and use of medical diagnostic ultrasound. Our objective was to compare rates of diagnosis across different health-care regions to rates of diagnostic tests and to features of both health and access of the regional populations. This is a population-based retrospective ecological observational study of 12,959 patients with thyroid cancer between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2008 in Ontario Canada based on the health-care utilization regions (Local Health Integration Networks) of the province of Ontario Canada. We found that some regions of Ontario had four times the rates of diagnosis of thyroid cancer compared to other regions. The regions with the highest use of discretionary medical tests (pelvic ultrasound, abdominal ultrasound, neck ultrasound, echocardiogram, resting electrocardiogram, cardiac nuclear perfusion tests, and bone scan), highest population density, and better education had the highest rates of thyroid cancer diagnoses. Differences in the rates of the ordering of discretionary diagnostic medical tests, such as diagnostic ultrasound, in different geographic regions of Ontario lead to differences in the rates of diagnosis of thyroid cancer. PMID:24408145

  7. Glycemic index, glycemic load and thyroid cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Randi, G; Ferraroni, M; Talamini, R; Garavello, W; Deandrea, S; Decarli, A; Franceschi, S; La Vecchia, C

    2008-02-01

    Risk of thyroid cancer has already been related to refined cereals and starch food, but the association has not been studied in terms of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). We analyzed data from a case-control study conducted in Italy from 1986 to 1992 and including 399 histologically confirmed and incident cases of thyroid cancer and 616 control subjects. Information on dietary habits was derived through a food-frequency questionnaire and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) for GI and GL levels were estimated with adjustment for age, education, sex, area of residence, history of diabetes, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of fruit and vegetables, and noncarbohydrate energy intake. Compared with the lowest tertile, the ORs in subsequent tertiles were 1.68 and 1.73 for GI, and 1.76 and 2.17 for GL. The OR for highest tertile of GI compared with lowest one was 1.70 for papillary and 1.57 for follicular thyroid cancer. The ORs for GL were 2.17 for papillary and 3.33 for follicular thyroid cancer. Our study shows that high dietary levels of GI and GL are associated with thyroid cancer risk.

  8. Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: update on the Brazilian consensus.

    PubMed

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa Maria Z; Maia, Ana Luiza; Vaisman, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent findings, especially when sensitive imaging methods are used. Although thyroid cancer is relatively rare, its incidence is increasing, particularly in terms of small tumors, which have an uncertain clinical relevance. Most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer exhibit satisfactory clinical outcomes when treatment is appropriate, and their mortality rate is similar to that of the overall population. However, relapse occurs in a considerable fraction of these patients, and some patients stop responding to conventional treatment and eventually die from their disease. Therefore, the challenge is how to identify the individuals who require more aggressive disease management while sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary treatments and procedures. We have updated the Brazilian Consensus that was published in 2007, emphasizing the diagnostic and therapeutic advances that the participants, representing several Brazilian university centers, consider most relevant in clinical practice. The formulation of the present guidelines was based on the participants' experience and a review of the relevant literature.

  9. Trends in Imaging after Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Muenz, Daniel G.; Worden, Francis P.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The largest growth in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) diagnosis is in low-risk cancers. Trends in imaging after DTC diagnosis are understudied. Hypothesizing a reduction in imaging utilization due to rising low-risk disease, we evaluated post-diagnosis imaging patterns over time and patient characteristics that are associated with likelihood of imaging. Methods Using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database, we identified patients diagnosed with localized, regional or distant DTC between 1991 and 2009. We reviewed Medicare claims for neck ultrasound, I-131 scan, or PET scan within 3 years post-diagnosis. Using regression analyses we evaluated trends of imaging utilization. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of imaging based on patient characteristics. Results 23,669 patients were included. Patients diagnosed during 2001-2009, compared to 1991-2000, were more likely to have localized disease (p<0.001) and tumors less than 1cm (p<0.001). Use of neck ultrasound and I-131 scan increased in patients with localized disease (p=<0.001 and p=0.003, respectively), regional disease (p<0.001 and p<0.001), and distant metastasis (p=0.001 and p=0.015). Patients diagnosed after 2000 were more likely to undergo neck ultrasound (OR 2.15, 95% CI 2.02-2.28) and I-131 scan (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35-1.54). PET scan use from 2005-2009, compared to 1996-2004, increased 32.4-fold (p=<0.001) in localized patients, 13.1-fold (p<0.001) in regional disease patients, and 33.4-fold (p<0.001) in patients with distant DTC. Conclusion Despite a rise in low-risk disease, the use of post-diagnosis imaging increased in all stages of disease. The largest growth was in use of PET scan after 2004. PMID:25565063

  10. The IGF system in thyroid cancer: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Vella, V; Sciacca, L; Pandini, G; Mineo, R; Squatrito, S; Vigneri, R; Belfiore, A

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, the activation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in cancer has emerged as a key factor for tumour progression and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, a variety of strategies have been developed to block the type I IGF receptor (IGF-I-R), which is thought to mediate the biological effects of both IGF-I and IGF-II. However, recent data suggest that the IGF signalling system is complex and that other receptors are involved. To unravel the complexity of the IGF system in thyroid cancer, IGF-I and IGF-II production, and the expression and function of their cognate receptors were studied. Both IGFs were found to be locally produced in thyroid cancer: IGF-I by stromal cells and IGF-II by malignant thyrocytes. Values were significantly higher in malignant tissue than in normal tissue. IGF-I-Rs were overexpressed in differentiated papillary carcinomas but not in poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumours, whereas insulin receptors (IRs) were greatly overexpressed in all tumour hystotypes, with a trend for higher values in dedifferentiated tumours. As a consequence of IR overexpression, high amounts of IR/IGF-I-R hybrids (which bind IGF-I with high affinity) were present in all thyroid cancer histotypes. Because of recent evidence that isoform A of IR (IR-A) is a physiological receptor for IGF-II in fetal life, the relative abundance of IR-A in thyroid cancer was measured. Preliminary data indicate that overexpressed IRs mainly occur as IR-A in thyroid cancer. These data indicate that both IR/IGF-I-R hybrids and IR-A play an important role in the overactivation of the IGF system in thyroid cancer and in IGF-I mitogenic signalling in these tumours. J Clin PATHOL: Mol Pathol

  11. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  12. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-11-26

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  13. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  14. Total oxidant/antioxidant status in sera of patients with thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Feng, Jia-Fu; Zeng, Ping; Yang, Yun-Hong; Luo, Jun; Yang, Yu-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be involved in the pathophysiology of all cancers. In order to evaluate the total oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with thyroid cancer and to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress parameters and serum thyroid profiles among thyroid cancer patients and various controls, we determined oxidative status including total antioxidant status (TAS) and total oxidant status (TOS) and calculation of oxidative stress index (OSI) in sera in 82 thyroid cancer patients, 56 benign thyroid disease patients, and 50 healthy controls. It was found that serum TAS levels were significantly lower in patients with thyroid cancer than in controls (P<0.001), while serum TOS levels and OSI values were significantly higher (both P<0.001) in the cancer patients. No significant correlations were observed between various oxidative stress markers and thyroid profiles in either the thyroid cancer patients or the controls. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that OSI was the best indicator for distinguishing cancer patients from benign thyroid diseased or healthy controls, followed by TOS and TAS. Risk estimate statistics also indicated that TOS and/or OSI were good risk factors to discriminate patients with thyroid cancer from two controls. These findings suggested that oxidants are increased and antioxidants are decreased in patients with thyroid cancer. OSI may be a more useful oxidative stress biomarker than TAS and TOS for monitoring the clinical status of thyroid cancer patients. PMID:22002574

  15. The use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of thyroid cancer and hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    James, C; Starks, M; MacGillivray, D C; White, J

    1999-01-01

    With the variety of radiopharmaceutical agents and refined imaging techniques, thyroid and parathyroid imaging provides much valuable clinical information. The use of imaging is most important in the follow-up of differentiated (DTC) and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Patients with DTC are followed with serum thyroidglobulin and 131I whole body scintigraphy when the serum thyroglobulin level is elevated. When the 131I scintigram is negative, 201Tl scintigraphy may best identify the site of recurrent DTC. Alternative radioisotopes, ultrasound, CT, and FDG PET are also useful in localizing the site of DTC metastases. MTC recurrences and metastases are more difficult to image. Selective venous catheterization is the most sensitive and specific method for detecting areas of recurrent MTC. High-resolution ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and scintigraphy are all capable of, and useful in, detecting macroscopic foci of metastatic tumor. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and 99mTc DMSA have been the most frequently used nuclear imaging agents in patients with recurrent MTC. Imaging for hyperparathyroidism remains controversial. Sestambi has become the preferred isotope for parathyroid scintigraphy; whereas high-resolution ultrasound is also frequently used. Preoperative imaging is being used as a method to allow a unilateral neck exploration, more recently, in conjunction with intraoperative 1-84 PTH assay and with intraoperative use of the gamma probe. Most often, parathyroid imaging is performed before reoperation for persistent hyperparathyroidism.

  16. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  17. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  18. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  19. Focal Lymphocytic Thyroiditis Nodules Share the Features of Papillary Thyroid Cancer on Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sena; Shin, Dong Yeob; Kim, Eun Kyung; Yang, Woo Ick; Byun, Jung Woo; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Gyuri; Im, Soo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is often difficult to discriminate focal lymphocytic thyroiditis (FLT) or adenomatous hyperplasia (AH) from thyroid cancer if they both have suspicious ultrasound (US) findings. We aimed to make a predictive model of FLT from papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in suspicious nodules with benign cytologic results. Materials and Methods We evaluated 214 patients who had undergone fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and had shown thyroid nodules with suspicious US features. PTC was confirmed by surgical pathology. FLT and AH were confirmed through more than two separate FNABs. Clinical and biochemical findings, as well as US features, were evaluated. Results Of 214 patients, 100 patients were diagnosed with PTC, 55 patients with FLT, and 59 patients with AH. The proportion of elevated thyrotropin (TSH) levels (p=0.014) and thyroglobulin antibody (Tg-Ab) or thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) positivity (p<0.001) in the FLT group was significantly higher than that in the PTC group. Regarding US features, absence of calcification (p=0.006) and "diffuse thyroid disease" (DTD) pattern on US (p<0.001) were frequently seen in the FLT group. On multivariate analysis, Tg-Ab positivity, presence of a DTD pattern on US, and absence of calcification in nodules were associated with FLT with the best specificity of 99% and positive predictive value of 96%. In contrast, a taller than wide shape of nodules was the only variable significant for differentiating AH from PTC. Conclusion Suspicious thyroid nodules with cytologic benign results could be followed up with US rather than repeat FNAB, if patients exhibit Tg-Ab positivity, no calcifications in nodules, and a DTD pattern on US. PMID:26256977

  20. FAP Associated Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Peculiar Subtype of Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cetta, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Carcinoma (FNMTC) makes up to 5–10% of all thyroid cancers, also including those FNMTC occurring as a minor component of familial cancer syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). We give evidence that this extracolonic manifestation of FAP is determined by the same germline mutation of the APC gene responsible for colonic polyps and cancer but also shows some unusual features (F : M ratio = 80 : 1, absence of LOH for APC in the thyroid tumoral tissue, and indolent biological behaviour, despite frequent multicentricity and lymph nodal involvement), suggesting that the APC gene confers only a generic susceptibility to thyroid cancer, but perhaps other factors, namely, modifier genes, sex-related factors, or environmental factors, are also required for its phenotypic expression. This great variability is against the possibility of classifying all FNMTC as a single entity, not only with a unique or prevalent causative genetic factor, but also with a unique or common biological behavior and a commonly dismal prognosis. A new paradigm is also suggested that could be useful (1) for a proper classification of FAP associated PTC within the larger group of FNMTC and (2) for making inferences to sporadic carcinogenesis, based on the lesson from FAP. PMID:26697262

  1. Fibronectin 1 promotes migration and invasion of papillary thyroid cancer and predicts papillary thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shujun; Wang, Chuandong; Postma, Emily Louise; Yang, Yanhua; Ni, Xiaofeng; Zhan, Weiwei

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is common in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and is an indicator of recurrence. The detailed molecular mechanism of LNM in PTC has not been well described. This study aimed to investigate the role of fibronectin 1 in PTC LNM and its clinical relevance. The expression of fibronectin 1 was confirmed in PTC tissues and cell lines. A correlation analysis was conducted and a receiver-operating characteristic curve obtained. The effect of fibronectin 1 on the proliferation of PTC cell lines was performed using a colony-formation assay and Cell Counting Kit 8. Cell-cycle analysis was performed with a flow-cytometry assay. Migration and invasion ability were evaluated by transwell and wound-healing assays. Fibronectin 1 was overexpressed in metastasized PTC. Overexpressed fibronectin 1 was positively correlated with PTC LNM. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that the diagnostic accuracy of fibronectin 1 was 81.1%, with sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 82%. Overexpression of fibronectin 1 promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion in PTC. Fibronectin 1 plays a critical role in PTC metastasis by modulating the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of PTC cells, and it is a valuable diagnostic biomarker for predicting PTC LNM. PMID:28367057

  2. The Influence of Patient Age on Thyroid Nodule Formation, Multinodularity, and Thyroid Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Norra; Medici, Marco; Angell, Trevor E.; Liu, Xiaoyun; Marqusee, Ellen; Cibas, Edmund S.; Krane, Jeffrey F.; Barletta, Justine A.; Kim, Matthew I.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although advancing age is known to influence the formation of thyroid nodules, the precise relationship remains unclear. Furthermore, it is uncertain whether age influences the risk that any thyroid nodule may prove cancerous. Aim: The aim was to determine the impact of patient age on nodule formation, multinodularity, and risk of thyroid malignancy. Method: We conducted a prospective cohort analysis of consecutive adults (ages 20–95 y) who presented for evaluation of nodular disease from 1995 to 2011. A total of 6391 patients underwent ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration of 12 115 nodules ≥1 cm. Patients were divided into six age groups and compared using sonographic, cytological, and histological endpoints. Result: The prevalence of thyroid nodular disease increases with advancing age. The mean number of nodules at presentation increased from 1.5 in the youngest cohort (age, 20–30 y) to 2.2 in the oldest cohort (age, >70 y; P < .001), demonstrating a 1.6% annual increased risk for multinodularity (odds ratio, 1.02; P < .001). In contrast, the risk of malignancy in a newly identified nodule declined with advancing age. Thyroid cancer incidence per patient was 22.9% in the youngest cohort, but 12.6% in the oldest cohort (odds ratio, 0.972; P < .001), demonstrating a 2.2% decrease per year in the relative risk of malignancy between ages 20 and 60 years, which stabilized thereafter. Despite a lower likelihood of malignancy, identified cancers in older patients demonstrated higher risk histological phenotypes. Although nearly all malignancies in younger patients were well-differentiated, older patients were more likely to have higher risk papillary thyroid carcinoma variants, poorly differentiated cancer, or anaplastic carcinoma (P < .001). Conclusion: With advancing age, the prevalence of clinically relevant thyroid nodules increases, whereas the risk that such nodules are malignant decreases. Nonetheless, when thyroid cancer is detected in

  3. Photoacoustic analysis of thyroid cancer in vivo: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Kwanhoon; Ha, Jeonghoon; Kim, Yongmin; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers. About 3-8% of the people in the United States have thyroid nodules, and 5-15% of these nodules are malignant. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a standard procedure to diagnose malignity of nodules. However, about 10-20% of FNABs produce indeterminable results, which leads to repeat biopsies and unnecessary surgical operations. We have explored photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a new method to identify cancerous nodules. In a pilot study to test its feasibility, we recruited patients with thyroid nodules (currently 36 cases with 21 malignant and 15 benign nodules), acquired in vivo PA and ultrasound (US) images of the nodules in real time using a recently-developed clinical PA/US imaging system, and analyzed the acquired data offline. The preliminary results show that malignant and benign nodules could be differentiated by utilizing their PA amplitudes at different excitation wavelengths. This is the first in vivo PA analysis of thyroid nodules. Although a larger-scale study is needed for statistical significance, the preliminary results show the good potential of PA imaging as a non-invasive tool for triaging thyroid cancer.

  4. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  5. Identification of novel long non-coding RNA biomarkers for prognosis prediction of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuying; Li, Haihong; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Chunming; Yan, Wentao; Wang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most frequent type of malignant thyroid tumor. Several lncRNA signatures have been established for prognosis prediction in some cancers. However, the prognostic value of lncRNAs has not been investigated in PTC yet. In this study, we performed genome-wide analysis of lncRNA expression profiles in a large cohort of PTC patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas and identified 111 differentially expressed lncRNAs between tumor and non-tumor samples and between recurrent and recurrence-free samples. From the 111 differentially expressed lncRNAs, four independent lncRNA biomarkers associated with prognosis were identified and were integrated into a four-lncRNA signature which classified the patients of training dataset into the high-risk group and low-risk group with significantly different overall survival (p=0.016, log-rank test). The prognostic value of the four-lncRNA signature was validated in the independent testing dataset. Multivariate analysis indicated that the four-lncRNA signature was an independent prognostic predictor. Moreover, identified four lncRNA biomarkers demonstrates good performance in predicting disease recurrence with AUC of 0.833 using leave one out cross-validation. Our study not only highlighted the potential role for lncRNAs to improve clinical prognosis prediction in patients with PTC and but also provided alternative biomarkers and therapeutic targets for PTC patients. PMID:28545026

  6. Local thyroid renin-angiotensin system in experimental breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carrera-González, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Mayas, M D; García, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2013-12-18

    An association between breast cancer and thyroid dysfunction exists although the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Numerous studies have characterized the role of thyroid hormones in controlling the synthesis and secretion of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, but little information is available on the putative role of the local RAS on thyroid function. Here we analyze several soluble and membrane-bound RAS-regulating aminopeptidase activities in thyroid gland from rats with mammary tumors and the relationship with the circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxin (fT4). We analyze soluble and membrane-bound RAS-regulating aminopeptidase activities fluorometrically using their corresponding aminoacyl-β-naphthylamide as the substrate. We have found in rats with mammary tumors a concomitant change of thyroid RAS-regulating enzymes and thyroid hormone production. We suggest that existence of alterations in the regulatory mechanisms mediated by the angiotensins of the local tissue RAS as a consequence of the carcinogenic process which could act alone or in combination with alterations at a higher level of regulation such as the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. © 2013.

  7. Bilaterality weighs more than unilateral multifocality in predicting prognosis in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Wei-Li; Ji, Qing-Hai; Lu, Zhong-Wu; Zhu, Yong-Xue; Lin, Dao-Zhe

    2016-07-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) often presents as multifocal tumor;, however, whether multifocality is associated with poor prognosis remains controversial. The aims of this retrospective study were to identify the characteristics of PTC with multifocal tumors and evaluate the association between the location and prognosis. We reviewed the medical records of 496 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for PTC. Patients were classified as three groups: N1 (solitary tumor), N2 (2 or more foci within unilateral lobe of thyroid), and N3 (bilateral tumors, at least one tumor focus for each lobe of thyroid). We analyzed the differences of clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes among the three groups. Cox regression model was used to assess the relation between the different locations of multifocal tumors and prognosis. Although the differences of clinicopathologic features such as the size of tumor, extrathyroidal extension, and cervical lymph node metastasis were not significant among the three groups, the bilateral-multifocality was proved to be an independent risk factor for neck recurrence (hazard ratio (HR) = 4.052, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.070-7.933), distant metastasis (HR = 3.860, 95 % CI 1.507-9.884), and cancer death (HR = 7.252, 95 % 2.189-24.025). In addition, extrathyroidal extension (HR = 2.291, 95 % CI 1.185-4.427) and older age >45 years (HR = 6.721, 95 % CI 2.300-19.637) were also significant predictors for neck recurrence and cancer death, respectively. Therefore, bilateral-multifocality as an indicator for more extensive tumor location could be used to assess the risk of recurrence and mortality in PTC. Given the poor prognosis associated with bilateral-multifocality and other risk factors, aggressive therapy and intensive follow-up were recommended for PTC patients with them.

  8. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  9. Sonographic Detection of Extracapsular Extension in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Tahvildari, Ali M; Patel, Bhavik N; Willmann, Juergen K; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Desser, Terry S

    2015-12-01

    To identify and evaluate sonographic features suggestive of extracapsular extension in papillary thyroid cancer. Three board-certified radiologists blinded to the final pathologic tumor stage reviewed sonograms of pathologically proven cases of papillary thyroid cancer for the presence of extracapsular extension. The radiologists evaluated the following features: capsular abutment, bulging of the normal thyroid contour, loss of the echogenic capsule, and vascularity extending beyond the capsule. A total of 129 cases of pathologically proven thyroid cancer were identified. Of these, 51 were excluded because of lack of preoperative sonography, and 16 were excluded because of pathologic findings showing anaplastic carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, or microcarcinoma (<10 mm). The final analysis group consisted of 62 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma, 16 of whom had pathologically proven extracapsular extension. The presence of capsular abutment had 100% sensitivity for detection of extracapsular extension. Conversely, lack of capsular abutment had a 100% negative predictive value (NPV) for excluding extracapsular extension. Contour bulging had 88% sensitivity for detection of extracapsular extension and when absent had an 87% NPV. Loss of the echogenic capsule was the best predictor of the presence of extracapsular extension, with an odds ratio of 10.23 (P = .034). This sonographic finding had 75% sensitivity, 65% specificity, and an 88% NPV. Vascularity beyond the capsule had 89% specificity but sensitivity of only 25%. Sonographic features of capsular abutment, contour bulging, and loss of the echogenic thyroid capsule have excellent predictive value for excluding or detecting extracapsular extension and may help in biopsy selection, surgical planning, and treatment of patients with papillary thyroid cancer. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  10. Group I p21-activated kinases regulate thyroid cancer cell migration and are overexpressed and activated in thyroid cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Samantha K; Saji, Motoyasu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Fusco, Alfredo; Vasko, Vasyl V; Ringel, Matthew D

    2010-12-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell motility. PAKs are subdivided into group I (PAKs 1-3) and group II (PAKs 4-6) on the basis of structural and functional characteristics. Based on prior gene expression data that predicted enhanced PAK signaling in the invasive fronts of aggressive papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs), we hypothesized that PAKs functionally regulate thyroid cancer cell motility and are activated in PTC invasive fronts. We examined PAK isoform expression in six human thyroid cancer cell lines (BCPAP, KTC1, TPC1, FTC133, C643, and SW1746) by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and western blot. All cell lines expressed PAKs 1-4 and PAK6 mRNA and PAKs 1-4 protein; PAK6 protein was variably expressed. Samples from normal and malignant thyroid tissues also expressed PAKs 1-4 and PAK6 mRNA; transfection with the group I (PAKs 1-3) PAK-specific p21 inhibitory domain molecular inhibitor reduced transwell filter migration by ∼50% without altering viability in all cell lines (P<0.05). BCPAP and FTC133 cells were transfected with PAK1, PAK2, or PAK3-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA); only PAK1 siRNA reduced migration significantly for both cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of seven invasive PTCs demonstrated an increase in PAK1 and pPAK immunoactivity in the invasive fronts versus the tumor center. In conclusion, PAK isoforms are expressed in human thyroid tissues and cell lines. PAK1 regulates thyroid cancer cell motility, and PAK1 and pPAK levels are increased in PTC invasive fronts. These data implicate PAKs as regulators of thyroid cancer invasion.

  11. Propranolol sensitizes thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Jun; Shen, Chen-Tian; Song, Hong-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Treatment options for advanced metastatic or progressive thyroid cancers are limited. Although targeted therapy specifically inhibiting intracellular kinase signaling pathways has markedly changed the therapeutic landscape, side-effects and resistance of single agent targeted therapy often leads to termination of the treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the antitumor property of the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol for thyroid cancers. Human thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, K1, BCPAP and BHP27 were used in the present study. Broad β-blocker propranolol and β2-specific antagonist ICI118551, but not β1-specific antagonist atenolol, inhibited the growth of 8505C and K1 cells. Propranolol treatment inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of 8505C cells in vitro and in vivo, which are closely associated with decreased expressions of cyclin D1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Expression of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) also decreased following propranolol intervention. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of the 8505C xenografts validated shrinkage of the tumors in the propranolol-treated group when compared to the phosphate‑buffered saline treated group. Finally, we found that propranolol can amplify the cytotoxicity of vemurafenib and sensitize thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib. Our present results suggest that propranolol has potential activity against thyroid cancers and investigation of the combination with targeted molecular therapy for progressive thyroid cancers could be beneficial.

  12. Pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Christian; Richter, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Poor prognosis of anaplastic thyroid cancer and advanced disease in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer, together with absence of effective therapeutic measures, has induced recent intensified basic and clinical research in this area. The aim of this article is to assess the effects of new drug treatment for advanced thyroid cancer. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE until the end of September 2011 for relevant data. Further sources were reference lists of original publications and review articles. We included prospective studies that investigated drug interventions for advanced thyroid cancer published in any language. We did not include trials solely communicated as abstracts. For inclusion, studies had to report overall survival, progression-free survival or similar, or response outcomes. Data were extracted by one author and checked by the other. All tables are part of this publication. Because only non-comparative studies were included, we had to focus on descriptive analysis. Twenty-four studies with 715 patients were included; 18 studies investigated kinase inhibitors, the remainder various drugs. All studies reported response (only one complete response was observed; proportions of partial response were up to 49%). Median progression-free survival was about 12 months, ranging from 3.7 to 27.9 months. Adverse events (at least grade 3) of kinase inhibitors included hypertension, hand foot syndrome and diarrhoea (10%, 16% and 9%, respectively). Due to bias-prone data, any interpretation of newer pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer is limited because only non-comparative studies could be included. Therefore, we strongly argue the need for adequate randomized controlled trials that should provide a better basis for therapeutic decision making in thyroid cancer.

  13. Common genetic variants in pituitary–thyroid axis genes and the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Susana; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; González, Eddy R; Castell, Juan; Biarnés, Josefina; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors, THRA and THRB, together with the TSH receptor, TSHR, are key regulators of thyroid function. Alterations in the genes of these receptors (THRA, THRB and TSHR) have been related to thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that predisposition to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is related to common genetic variants with low penetrance that interact with each other and with environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the THRA (one SNP), THRB (three SNPs) and TSHR (two SNPs) genes with DTC risk. A case–control association study was conducted with 398 patients with sporadic DTC and 479 healthy controls from a Spanish population. Among the polymorphisms studied, only THRA-rs939348 was found to be associated with an increased risk of DTC (recessive model, odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.03–3.14, P=0.037). Gene–gene interaction analysis using the genotype data of this study together with our previous genotype data on TG and TRHR indicated a combined effect of the pairwises: THRB-TG (P interaction=0.014, THRB-rs3752874 with TG-rs2076740; P interaction=0.099, THRB-rs844107 with TG-rs2076740) and THRB-TRHR (P interaction=0.0024, THRB-rs3752874 with TRHR-rs4129682) for DTC risk in a Spanish population. Our results confirm that THRA is a risk factor for DTC, and we show for the first time the combined effect of THRB and TG or TRHR on DTC susceptibility, supporting the importance of gene–gene interaction in thyroid cancer risk. PMID:23781307

  14. Common genetic variants in pituitary-thyroid axis genes and the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Susana; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; González, Eddy R; Castell, Juan; Biarnés, Josefina; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors, THRA and THRB, together with the TSH receptor, TSHR, are key regulators of thyroid function. Alterations in the genes of these receptors (THRA, THRB and TSHR) have been related to thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that predisposition to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is related to common genetic variants with low penetrance that interact with each other and with environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the THRA (one SNP), THRB (three SNPs) and TSHR (two SNPs) genes with DTC risk. A case-control association study was conducted with 398 patients with sporadic DTC and 479 healthy controls from a Spanish population. Among the polymorphisms studied, only THRA-rs939348 was found to be associated with an increased risk of DTC (recessive model, odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.03-3.14, P=0.037). Gene-gene interaction analysis using the genotype data of this study together with our previous genotype data on TG and TRHR indicated a combined effect of the pairwises: THRB-TG (P interaction=0.014, THRB-rs3752874 with TG-rs2076740; P interaction=0.099, THRB-rs844107 with TG-rs2076740) and THRB-TRHR (P interaction=0.0024, THRB-rs3752874 with TRHR-rs4129682) for DTC risk in a Spanish population. Our results confirm that THRA is a risk factor for DTC, and we show for the first time the combined effect of THRB and TG or TRHR on DTC susceptibility, supporting the importance of gene-gene interaction in thyroid cancer risk.

  15. Recurrent breast cancer in the subpectoral space after implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Austin A; Chao, Jerry W; Varma, Sonal; Swistel, Alexander J; Otterburn, David M

    2014-04-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is most commonly performed with a prosthetic implant placed beneath the pectoralis major. Recurrence may rarely be identified in the subpectoral space where the implant was placed. We report a case of recurrent breast cancer after implant-based reconstruction with isolated subpectoral recurrence discovered 5 years later during secondary revision of her reconstructed breast.

  16. [Enviromental factors in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Gubetta, L; Costa, A

    1978-07-14

    Local factors with a possible influence on the frequency and histological type of thyroid cancer are examined in the light of cases observed at the Mauriziano Hospital in the last 10 years. The overall number of cases has been increasing and papilliferous forms have been more common than follicular forms. Iodine deficiency and thyrotropin hyper-stimulation encourage onset and account for the higher frequency of thyroid cancer in endemic areas, where, however, follicular forms are more common. Ironising radiation is a direct cause, particularly of papilliferous forms arising after exposure during youth.

  17. New Insight into the Treatment of Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Arash; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Guerrero, Marlon A.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are treated successfully with surgery and radioactive iodine ablation, yet the treatment of advanced cases is frustrating and largely ineffective. Systemic treatment with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is basically ineffective in most patients with advanced DTC. However, a better understanding of the genetics and biologic basis of thyroid cancers has generated opportunities for innovative therapeutic modalities, resulting in several clinical trials. We aim to delineate the latest knowledge regarding the biologic characteristics of DTC and to describe the available data related to novel targeted therapies that have demonstrated clinical effectiveness. PMID:23326755

  18. Nodal metastases in thyroid cancer: prognostic implications and management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Laura Y; Ganly, Ian

    2016-04-01

    The significance of cervical lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer has been controversial and continues to evolve. Current staging systems consider nodal metastases to confer a poorer prognosis, particularly in older patients. Increasingly, the literature suggests that characteristics of the metastatic lymph nodes such as size and number are also prognostic. There is a growing trend toward less aggressive treatment of low-volume nodal disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature and discuss prognostic and management implications of lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer.

  19. Nodal metastases in thyroid cancer: prognostic implications and management

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laura Y; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The significance of cervical lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer has been controversial and continues to evolve. Current staging systems consider nodal metastases to confer a poorer prognosis, particularly in older patients. Increasingly, the literature suggests that characteristics of the metastatic lymph nodes such as size and number are also prognostic. There is a growing trend toward less aggressive treatment of low-volume nodal disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature and discuss prognostic and management implications of lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:26948758

  20. Radioiodine remnant ablation in low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer: the "con" point of view.

    PubMed

    Lamartina, Livia; Cooper, David S

    2015-09-01

    A growing body of evidence is challenging the indiscriminate use of postoperative radioiodine for remnant ablation (RRA) in low-risk (LR) differentiated thyroid cancer patients. We critically reviewed the current evidence on which the rationale for RRA is based for LR patients and analyzed the new evidence-based recommendations for LR patients from the draft of the 2015 American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines. Cost-effective tools for staging and follow-up, such as neck ultrasonography and serial thyroglobulin testing, are useful for monitoring non-RRA-treated patients. Recurrence rates are very low in non-RRA-treated LR patient cohorts. Most RRA side effects are mild and transient, but can impair a patient's quality of life. RRA is appropriately not routinely recommended in LR patients according to the draft 2015 ATA guidelines and should be reserved for higher-risk patients.

  1. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  2. Usefulness of PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent or metastasized differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LU, CUN-ZHI; CAO, SU-SHENG; WANG, WEI; LIU, JUN; FU, NING; LU, FENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the usefulness of the positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrence or metastasization of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative findings on the 131I-diagnostic whole-body scanning (dWBS). Fifteen patients with DTC, abnormal thyroglobulin levels, and negative 131I-dWBS findings were scanned using the 18F-FDG PET/CT. Positive diagnosis was based on postoperative histologic findings, and clinical and imaging follow-up results obtained in the subsequent 6 months. In addition, preoperative and postoperative thyroglobulin levels were compared. Using the findings of 18F-FDG PET/CT and data on confirmed positive diagnosis, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated. Sensitivity and PPV of PET/CT in detecting recurrence or metastasisization of DTC were 93.30 and 91.40%, respectively. Furthermore, postoperative thyroglobulin levels were markedly lower compared to the preoperative levels (respectively, 4.67±1.71 vs. 58.53±18.34 ng/ml; p<0.05). PET/CT scan with 18F-FDG is an informative technique for the detection of recurrent or metastasized DTC in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative 131I-dWBS findings. PMID:27073490

  3. Clinical significance of prophylactic central compartment neck dissection in the treatment of clinically node-negative papillary thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, Claudio; Tartaglia, Ernesto; Nunziata, Anna; Izzo, Graziella; Siciliano, Giuseppe; Cavallo, Fabio; Mauriello, Claudio; Napolitano, Salvatore; Thomas, Guglielmo; Testa, Domenico; Rossetti, Gianluca; Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Avenia, Nicola; Conzo, Giovanni

    2016-09-19

    Lymph nodal involvement is very common in differentiated thyroid cancer, and in addition, cervical lymph node micrometastases are observed in up to 80 % of papillary thyroid cancers. During the last decades, the role of routine central lymph node dissection (RCLD) in the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has been an object of research, and it is now still controversial. Nevertheless, many scientific societies and referral authors have definitely stated that even if in expert hands, RCLD is not associated to higher morbidity; it should be indicated only in selected cases. In order to better analyze the current role of prophylactic neck dissection in the surgical treatment of papillary thyroid cancers, an analysis of the most recent literature data was performed. Prophylactic or therapeutic lymph node dissection, selective, lateral or central lymph node dissection, modified radical neck dissection, and papillary thyroid cancer were used by the authors as keywords performing a PubMed database research. Literature reviews, PTCs large clinical series and the most recent guidelines of different referral endocrine societies, inhering neck dissection for papillary thyroid cancers, were also specifically evaluated. A higher PTC incidence was nowadays reported in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) clinical series. In addition, ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration citology allowed a more precocious diagnosis in the early phases of disease. The role of prophylactic neck dissection in papillary thyroid cancer management remains controversial especially regarding indications, approach, and surgical extension. Even if morbidity rates seem to be similar to those reported after total thyroidectomy alone, RCLD impact on local recurrence and long-term survival is still a matter of research. Nevertheless, only a selective use in high-risk cases is supported by more and more scientific data. In the last years, higher papillary thyroid cancer incidence and more

  4. Successful treatment of thyroid storm presenting as recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiorgan failure by continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Han Soo; Kwon, Su Kyoung; Kim, Ye Na

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF). A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves' disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED). She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient's dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment. The presenting manifestations of thyroid storm vary and can include cardiac arrest with multiorgan failure in rare cases.In some patients with thyroid storm, especially those with severe complications, conventional medical treatment may be ineffective or inappropriate.During thyroid storm, the initiation of CRRT can immediately lower body temperature and subsequently stabilize vital signs

  5. Autophagy in Thyroid Cancer: Present Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Klück, Viola; Plantinga, Theo S.; Smit, Johannes W. A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Despite having a good prognosis in the majority of cases, when the tumor is dedifferentiated it does no longer respond to conventional treatment with radioactive iodine, the prognosis worsens significantly. Treatment options for advanced, dedifferentiated disease are limited and do not cure the disease. Autophagy, a process of self-digestion in which damaged molecules or organelles are degraded and recycled, has emerged as an important player in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including cancer. The role of autophagy in thyroid cancer pathogenesis is not yet elucidated. However, the available data indicate that autophagy is involved in several steps of thyroid tumor initiation and progression as well as in therapy resistance and therefore could be exploited for therapeutic applications. The present review summarizes the most recent data on the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer and we will provide a perspective on how this process can be targeted for potential therapeutic approaches and could be further explored in the context of multimodality treatment in cancer and personalized medicine. PMID:25741318

  6. MicroRNA Deregulation in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Fuziwara, Cesar Seigi; Kimura, Edna Teruko

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most lethal types of cancers, characterized as a fast-growing and highly invasive thyroid tumor that is unresponsive to surgery and radioiodine, blunting therapeutic efficacy. Classically, genetic alterations in tumor suppressor TP53 are frequent, and cumulative alterations in different signaling pathways, such as MAPK and PI3K, are detected in ATC. Recently, deregulation in microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small endogenous RNAs that regulate protein expression, has been implicated in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Deregulation of miRNA expression is detected in thyroid cancer. Upregulation of miRNAs, such as miR-146b, miR-221, and miR-222, is observed in ATC and also in differentiated thyroid cancer (papillary and follicular), indicating that these miRNAs' overexpression is essential in maintaining tumorigenesis. However, specific miRNAs are downregulated in ATC, such as those of the miR-200 and miR-30 families, which are important negative regulators of cell migration, invasion, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), processes that are overactivated in ATC. Therefore, molecular interference to restore the expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs, or to blunt overexpressed oncogenic miRNAs, is a promising therapeutic approach to ameliorate the treatment of ATC. In this review, we will explore the importance of miRNA deregulation for ATC cell biology. PMID:25202329

  7. A New Aurora in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Enke; D'Armiento, Massimino

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC) are among the most aggressive human neoplasms with a dire prognosis and a median survival time of few months from the diagnosis. The complete absence of effective therapies for ATC renders the identification of novel therapeutic approaches sorely needed. Chromosomal instability, a feature of all human cancers, is thought to represent a major driving force in thyroid cancer progression and a number of mitotic kinases showing a deregulated expression in malignant thyroid tissues are now held responsible for thyroid tumor aneuploidy. These include the three members of the Aurora family (Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C), serine/threonine kinases that regulate multiple aspects of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Over the last few years, several small molecule inhibitors targeting Aurora kinases were developed, which showed promising antitumor effects against a variety of human cancers, including ATC, in preclinical studies. Several of these molecules are now being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials against advanced solid and hematological malignancies. In the present review we will describe the structure, expression, and mitotic functions of the Aurora kinases, their implications in human cancer progression, with particular regard to ATC, and the effects of their functional inhibition on malignant cell proliferation. PMID:25097550

  8. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alba; Céspedes, Walkiria; Xamena, Noel; Surrallés, Jordi; Creus, Amadeu; Galofré, Pere; Marcos, Ricardo

    2003-02-10

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are enzymes involved in the metabolism of many carcinogens and mutagens, also acting as important free-radical scavengers. The existence of different genetic polymorphisms in human populations has proven to be a susceptibility factor for different tumours. Nevertheless, as far as we know, for thyroid cancer no study has been conducted until now linking its incidence to genetic susceptibility biomarkers. The present investigation has been conducted to detect the possible association between polymorphism at the GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes and thyroid cancer incidence. Thus, 134 thyroid cancer patients and 116 controls, all from the urban district of Barcelona (Spain), have been included in this study. The results indicate that, according to the calculated odds ratio, the frequencies of the different genotypes found in the group of cancer patients do not significantly differ from those values obtained in the controls. This is true for the overall data as well as for the tumour characterization as follicular and papillar types. In addition, none of the possible combinations of mutant genotypes were shown to be risk factors. Finally, when the sex of the patients, the age of tumour onset, and life-style habits were also taken into account, no influence was observed related to the different genotypes. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study clearly suggest that those susceptibility factors related to the different GST polymorphic enzymes are not a predisposing factor in thyroid cancer disease.

  9. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-03

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  10. Estrogen Induced Metastatic Modulators MMP-2 and MMP-9 Are Targets of 3,3′-Diindolylmethane in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajoria, Shilpi; Suriano, Robert; George, Andrea; Shanmugam, Arulkumaran; Schantz, Stimson P.; Geliebter, Jan; Tiwari, Raj K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine related cancer with increasing incidences during the past five years. Current treatments for thyroid cancer, such as surgery or radioactive iodine therapy, often require patients to be on lifelong thyroid hormone replacement therapy and given the significant recurrence rates of thyroid cancer, new preventive modalities are needed. The present study investigates the property of a natural dietary compound found in cruciferous vegetables, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), to target the metastatic phenotype of thyroid cancer cells through a functional estrogen receptor. Methodology/Principal Findings Thyroid cancer cell lines were treated with estrogen and/or DIM and subjected to in vitro adhesion, migration and invasion assays to investigate the anti-metastatic and anti-estrogenic effects of DIM. We observed that DIM inhibits estrogen mediated increase in thyroid cell migration, adhesion and invasion, which is also supported by ER-α downregulation (siRNA) studies. Western blot and zymography analyses provided direct evidence for this DIM mediated inhibition of E2 enhanced metastasis associated events by virtue of targeting essential proteolytic enzymes, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Conclusion/Significance Our data reports for the first time that DIM displays anti-estrogenic like activity by inhibiting estradiol enhanced thyroid cancer cell proliferation and in vitro metastasis associated events, namely adhesion, migration and invasion. Most significantly, MMP-2 and MMP-9, which are known to promote and enhance metastasis, were determined to be targets of DIM. This anti-estrogen like property of DIM may lead to the development of a novel preventive and/or therapeutic dietary supplement for thyroid cancer patients by targeting progression of the disease. PMID:21267453

  11. Obesity and risk of thyroid cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis of 21 observational studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei; Tong, Yan; Wang, Hanmin

    2015-01-22