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Sample records for red cell proteins

  1. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  2. Dysferlin and other non-red cell proteins accumulate in the red cell membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA.

  3. The novel role of peroxiredoxin-2 in red cell membrane protein homeostasis and senescence.

    PubMed

    Matté, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Ferru, Emanuela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Lupo, Francesca; Siciliano, Angela; Ho Zoon, Chae; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2014-11-01

    Peroxiredoxin-2 (Prx2), a typical two-cysteine peroxiredoxin, is the third most abundant protein in red cells. Although progress has been made in the functional characterization of Prx2, its role in red cell membrane protein homeostasis is still under investigation. Here, we studied Prx2(-/-) mouse red cells. The absence of Prx2 promotes (i) activation of the oxidative-induced Syk pathway; (ii) increased band 3 Tyr phosphorylation, with clustered band 3; and (iii) increased heat shock protein (HSP27 and HSP70) membrane translocation. This was associated with enhanced in vitro erythrophagocytosis of Prx2(-/-) red cells and reduced Prx2(-/-) red cell survival, indicating the possible role of Prx2 membrane recruitment in red cell aging and in the clearance of oxidized hemoglobin and damaged proteins through microparticles. Indeed, we observed an increased release of microparticles from Prx2(-/-) mouse red cells. The mass spectrometric analysis of erythroid microparticles found hemoglobin chains, membrane proteins, and HSPs. To test these findings, we treated Prx2(-/-) mice with antioxidants in vivo. We observed that N-acetylcysteine reduced (i) Syk activation, (ii) band 3 clusterization, (iii) HSP27 membrane association, and (iv) erythroid microparticle release, resulting in increased Prx2(-/-) mouse red cell survival. Thus, we propose that Prx2 may play a cytoprotective role in red cell membrane protein homeostasis and senescence.

  4. [Role of protein kinases of human red cell membrane in deformability and aggregation changes].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A V; Maĭmistova, A A; Tikhomirova, I A; Bulaeva, S V; Mikhaĭlov, P V; Murav'ev, A A

    2012-01-01

    The proteomic analysis has showed that red cell membrane contains several kinases and phosphatases. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the role of protein kinases of human red cell membrane in deformability and aggregation changes. Exposure of red blood cells (RBCs) to some chemical compounds led to change in the RBC microrheological properties. When forskolin (10 microM), an adenylyl cyclase (AC) and a protein kinase A (PKA) stimulator was added to RBC suspension, the RBC deformability (RBCD) was increased by 20% (p < 0.05). Somewhat more significant deformability rise appeared after RBC incubation with dB-AMP (by 26%; p < 0.01). Red cell aggregation (RBCA) was significantly decreased under these conditions (p < 0.01). Markedly less changes of deformability was found after RBC incubation with protein kinase stimulator C (PKC)--phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). This drug reduced red cell aggregation only slightly. It was inhibited red cell tyrosine phosphotase activity by N-vanadat and was obtained a significant RBCD rise and RBCA lowering. The similar effect was found when cells were incubated with cisplatin as a tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activator. It is important to note that a selective TPK inhibitor--lavendustin eliminated the above mention effects. On the whole the total data clearly show that the red cell aggregation and deformation changes were connected with an activation of the different intracellular signaling pathways.

  5. The application of KillerRed for acute protein inactivation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy S.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2017-01-01

    Generating loss of protein function is a powerful investigatory tool particularly if carried out at a physiologically relevant timescale in a live-cell fluorescent imaging experiment. KillerRed mediated chromophore assisted light inactivation (CALI) uses genetic encoding for specificity and light for acute inactivation that can also be spatially restricted. This unit provides protocols for setting up and carrying out properly controlled KillerRed experiments during live-cell imaging of cultured cells. PMID:24984963

  6. Detection of IgG sensitization of red cells with /sup 125/I staphylococcal protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Yam, P.; Petz, L.D.; Spath, P.

    1982-06-01

    Most cases of immune hemolytic anemia are associated with a positive direct antiglobulin test. However, in some cases, the antiglobulin test is not sensitive enough to detect low levels of red-cell bound antibodies. This report describes a method using radiolabelled purified staphylococcal protein A which is capable of detecting IgG sensitization of red cells beyond the threshold of serologic techniques. It is less cumbersome than previously described methods and does not require antibody purification procedures. Its effectiveness was demonstrated for the detection of red-cell alloantibodies and in evaluation of patients with acquired hemolytic anemias associated with a negative direct antiglobulin test.

  7. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M−1cm−1, mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths. PMID:26648024

  8. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Priezzhev, Alexander V; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  9. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  10. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lloyd M; Lubbeck, Jennifer L; Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E; Jimenez, Ralph

    2013-06-21

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries.

  11. p-Chloromercuribenzoate-induced dissociation of cytoskeletal proteins in red blood cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, M; Shibata, K; Miura, T

    1987-12-11

    Effects of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) on the cytoskeletal organization of rat red blood cells were studied. Upon incubation with 50 microM PCMB in 10 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C for 30 min, 80% of actin and 45% of spectrin were released from the ghosts, resulting in the fragmentation of ghost membranes. Addition of 2 mM Mg2+ or 0.1 M KCl, or lowering incubation temperature to 0 degree C substantially inhibited the solubilization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the fragmentation of ghost membranes, which enable to examine the effects of PCMB on the interaction between transmembrane proteins and the peripheral cytoskeletal network. Decreased recoveries of transmembrane proteins, such as band 3 and glycophorin, in Triton shell fraction were observed in the ghosts incubated with PCMB either in the presence of Mg2+ or at 0 degree C. PCMB also inhibited the in vitro association of purified spectrin with spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles through interaction with proteins in the vesicle, such as bands 2.1 and 3. In the PCMB-treated ghosts, intramembrane particles were highly aggregated, which further supports the PCMB-induced dissociation of the transmembrane proteins from the cytoskeletal network. The decreased recovery of glycophorin in the Triton shell fraction also observed in intact red blood cells upon incubation with PCMB. These results suggest that the main action of PCMB on red cell membranes under physiological condition, at higher ionic strength and in the presence of Mg2+, is to dissociate transmembrane proteins from the peripheral cytoskeletal network, which may modify functions of these proteins.

  12. Multiphoton photochemistry of red fluorescent proteins in solution and live cells.

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Stoltzfus, Caleb; Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Barnett, Lauren; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2014-08-07

    Genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs), and biosensors based on them, provide new insights into how living cells and tissues function. Ultimately, the goal of the bioimaging community is to use these probes deep in tissues and even in entire organisms, and this will require two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), with its greater tissue penetration, lower autofluorescence background, and minimum photodamage in the out-of-focus volume. However, the extremely high instantaneous light intensities of femtosecond pulses in the focal volume dramatically increase the probability of further stepwise resonant photon absorption, leading to highly excited, ionizable and reactive states, often resulting in fast bleaching of fluorescent proteins in TPLSM. Here, we show that the femtosecond multiphoton excitation of red FPs (DsRed2 and mFruits), both in solution and live cells, results in a chain of consecutive, partially reversible reactions, with individual rates driven by a high-order (3-5 photon) absorption. The first step of this process corresponds to a three- (DsRed2) or four-photon (mFruits) induced fast isomerization of the chromophore, yielding intermediate fluorescent forms, which then subsequently transform into nonfluorescent products. Our experimental data and model calculations are consistent with a mechanism in which ultrafast electron transfer from the chromophore to a neighboring positively charged amino acid residue triggers the first step of multiphoton chromophore transformations in DsRed2 and mFruits, consisting of decarboxylation of a nearby deprotonated glutamic acid residue.

  13. Dynamics of Pinned Membranes with Application to Protein Diffusion on the Surface of Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence C.-L.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment and simulation algorithm for the dynamics of Helfrich elastic membrane surfaces in the presence of general harmonic perturbations and hydrodynamic coupling to the surrounding solvent. In the limit of localized and strong interactions, this harmonic model can be used to pin the membrane to intracellular/intercellular structures. We consider the case of pinning to the cytoskeleton and use such a model to estimate the macroscopic diffusion constant for band 3 protein on the surface of human erythrocytes. Comparison to experimental results suggests that thermal undulations of the membrane surface should play a significant role in protein mobility on the red blood cell. PMID:14747313

  14. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  15. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; ...

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  16. Novel embryonic stem cells expressing tdKaede protein photoconvertible from green to red fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Yoko; Yoshida, Naoki; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Mizobuti, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yuko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Takahashi, Satoru; Kunita, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-Ichi

    2007-10-01

    Kaede protein is a photoconvertible tracer that emits green fluorescence after synthesis, which changes to stable red fluorescence upon irradiation with violet or UV illumination. This color-change characteristic is a very effective means of optically marking living cells of interest. We established novel embryonic stem (ES) cell lines, B6KED-1 and -2, from C57BL/6J transgenic mouse blastocysts ubiquitously expressing tandem dimeric Kaede (tdKaede) protein. Undifferentiated B6KED-1 and -2 cells showed bright green fluorescence and mRNAs of pluripotent marker genes. Photoconversion of tdKaede protein in undifferentiated and differentiated B6KED cells in vitro occurred upon short-term UV irradiation. B6KED cells completely generated ES cell-derived females on transfer into tetraploid blastomeres. All organs showed strong green emission in the females derived completely from B6KED cells. These novel ES cell lines ubiquitously expressing photoconvertible Kaede protein, B6KED-1 and -2, are useful for basic research in developmental biology and regenerative medicine.

  17. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  18. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    PubMed Central

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  19. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  20. Bioinformatic prediction of the exportome of Babesia bovis and identification of novel proteins in parasite-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Sejal; Kats, Lev M; Seemann, Torsten; Fernandez, Kate M; Siddiqui, Ghizal; Cooke, Brian M

    2013-04-01

    Babesia bovis is a pathogen of considerable economic significance to the livestock industry worldwide but the precise mechanisms by which this parasite causes disease in susceptible cattle remain poorly understood. It is clear, however, that alterations to the structure and function of red blood cells in which the parasites reside and replicate play an important role in pathogenesis and that these are secondary to the export of numerous, currently unknown and uncharacterised parasite-encoded proteins. Using a rational bioinformatic approach, we have identified a set of 362 proteins (117 of which are hypothetical) that we predict encompasses the B. bovis exportome. These exported proteins are likely to be trafficked to various cellular locations, with a subset destined for the red blood cell cytosol or the red blood cell cytoskeleton. These proteins are likely to play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of babesiosis. We have selected three novel proteins and confirmed their predicted export and localisation within the host red blood cell by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies raised against these proteins. Complete characterisation of these novel exported parasite proteins will help elucidate their function within the host red blood cell and assist in identification of new therapeutic targets for babesiosis.

  1. Cell-penetrating peptides meditated encapsulation of protein therapeutics into intact red blood cells and its application.

    PubMed

    He, Huining; Ye, Junxiao; Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Quan; Chung, Hee Sun; Kwon, Young Min; Shin, Meong Cheol; Lee, Kyuri; Yang, Victor C

    2014-02-28

    Red blood cells (RBCs) based drug carrier appears to be the most appealing for protein drugs due to their unmatched biocompatability, biodegradability, and long lifespan in the circulation. Numerous methods for encapsulating protein drugs into RBCs were developed, however, most of them induce partial disruption of the cell membrane, resulting in irreversible alterations in both physical and chemical properties of RBCs. Herein, we introduce a novel method for encapsulating proteins into intact RBCs, which was meditated by a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) developed in our lab-low molecular weight protamine (LMWP). l-asparaginase, one of the primary drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was chosen as a model protein to illustrate the encapsulation into erythrocytes mediated by CPPs. In addition current treatment of ALL using different l-asparaginase delivery and encapsulation methods as well as their associated problems were also reviewed.

  2. Extraction methods of red blood cell membrane proteins for Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) analysis.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Antonella; Roveri, Antonella; Zaccarin, Mattia; Benazzi, Louise; Daminelli, Simone; Pantano, Giorgia; Buttarello, Mauro; Ursini, Fulvio; Gion, Massimo; Mauri, Pier Luigi

    2010-08-13

    Since red blood cells (RBCs) lack nuclei and organelles, cell membrane is their main load-bearing component and, according to a dynamic interaction with the cytoskeleton compartment, plays a pivotal role in their functioning. Even if erythrocyte membranes are available in large quantities, the low abundance and the hydrophobic nature of cell membrane proteins complicate their purification and detection by conventional 2D gel-based proteomic approaches. So, in order to increase the efficiency of RBC membrane proteome identification, here we took advantage of a simple and reproducible membrane sub-fractionation method coupled to Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT). In addition, the adoption of a stringent RBC filtration strategy from the whole blood, permitted to remove exhaustively contaminants, such as platelets and white blood cells, and to identify a total of 275 proteins in the three RBC membrane fractions collected and analysed. Finally, by means of software for the elaboration of the great quantity of data obtained and programs for statistical analysis and protein classification, it was possible to determine the validity of the entire system workflow and to assign the proper sub-cellular localization and function for the greatest number of the identified proteins.

  3. Cytosolic protein concentration is the primary volume signal in dog red cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether the activation of Na/H exchange by shrinkage in dog red cells is due to the packing of cell contents or a change in cell configuration. To make this distinction we prepared resealed ghosts that resembled intact cells in hemoglobin concentration and surface area, but had one-third their volume. A shrinkage-induced, amiloride-sensitive Na flux in the ghosts was activated at a much smaller volume in the ghosts than in the intact cells, but at the same concentration (by weight) of dry solids in both preparations. Na/H exchange in ghosts containing a mixture of 40% albumin and 60% hemoglobin (weight/weight) was activated by osmotic shrinkage at a dry solid concentration similar to that of intact cells or of ghosts containing only hemoglobin. We conclude that the process of Na/H exchange activation by cell shrinkage originates with an increase in the concentration of intracellular protein and not with a change in membrane configuration or tension. The macromolecular crowding that accompanies the reduction in cell volume probably alters the activities of key enzymes that in turn modulate the Na/H exchanger. PMID:1662684

  4. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming a cell called a proerythroblast, it will develop into a new red blood cell. The formation of a red ...

  5. Ruthenium red-induced bundling of bacterial cell division protein, FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Beuria, Tushar K; Banerjee, Abhijit; Panda, Dulal

    2004-06-18

    The assembly of FtsZ plays a major role in bacterial cell division, and it is thought that the assembly dynamics of FtsZ is a finely regulated process. Here, we show that ruthenium red is able to modulate FtsZ assembly in vitro. In contrast to the inhibitory effects of ruthenium red on microtubule polymerization, we found that a substoichiometric concentration of ruthenium red strongly increased the light-scattering signal of FtsZ assembly. Further, sedimentable polymer mass was increased by 1.5- and 2-fold in the presence of 2 and 10 microm ruthenium red, respectively. In addition, ruthenium red strongly reduced the GTPase activity and prevented dilution-induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that 4-10 microm of ruthenium red produced thick bundles of FtsZ polymers. The significant increase in the light-scattering signal and pelletable polymer mass in the presence of ruthenium red seemed to be due to the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments into larger polymers rather than the actual increase in the level of polymeric FtsZ. Furthermore, ruthenium red was found to copolymerize with FtsZ, and the copolymerization of substoichiometric amounts of ruthenium red with FtsZ polymers promoted cooperative assembly of FtsZ that produced large bundles. Calcium inhibited the binding of ruthenium red to FtsZ. However, a concentration of calcium 1000-fold higher than that of ruthenium red was required to produce similar effects on FtsZ assembly. Ruthenium red strongly modulated FtsZ polymerization, suggesting the presence of an important regulatory site on FtsZ and suggesting that a natural ligand, which mimics the action of ruthenium red, may regulate the assembly of FtsZ in bacteria.

  6. Targeting recombinant thrombomodulin fusion protein to red blood cells provides multifaceted thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Sergei; Kowalska, M Anna; Neyman, Michael; Carnemolla, Ronald; Tliba, Samira; Ding, Bi-Sen; Stonestrom, Aaron; Spitzer, Dirk; Atkinson, John P; Poncz, Mortimer; Cines, Douglas B; Esmon, Charles T; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2012-05-17

    Thrombin generates fibrin and activates platelets and endothelium, causing thrombosis and inflammation. Endothelial thrombomodulin (TM) changes thrombin's substrate specificity toward cleavage of plasma protein C into activated protein C (APC), which opposes its thrombotic and inflammatory activities. Endogenous TM activity is suppressed in pathologic conditions, and antithrombotic interventions involving soluble TM are limited by rapid blood clearance. To overcome this problem, we fused TM with a single chain fragment (scFv) of an antibody targeted to red blood cells. scFv/TM catalyzes thrombin-mediated generation of activated protein C and binds to circulating RBCs without apparent damage, thereby prolonging its circulation time and bioavailability orders of magnitude compared with soluble TM. In animal models, a single dose of scFv/TM, but not soluble TM, prevents platelet activation and vascular occlusion by clots. Thus, scFv/TM serves as a prodrug and provides thromboprophylaxis at low doses (0.15 mg/kg) via multifaceted mechanisms inhibiting platelets and coagulation.

  7. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, James G.; Drew, Damien R.; Boyle, Michelle J.; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J.I.; Richards, Jack S.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  8. Modeling of band-3 protein diffusion in the normal and defective red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Zhang, Yihao; Ha, Vi; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-04-21

    We employ a two-component red blood cell (RBC) membrane model to simulate lateral diffusion of band-3 proteins in the normal RBC and in the RBC with defective membrane proteins. The defects reduce the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton (vertical connectivity), or the connectivity of the membrane skeleton itself (horizontal connectivity), and are associated with the blood disorders of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) respectively. Initially, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton limits band-3 lateral mobility by measuring the band-3 macroscopic diffusion coefficients in the normal RBC membrane and in a lipid bilayer without the cytoskeleton. Then, we study band-3 diffusion in the defective RBC membrane and quantify the relation between band-3 diffusion coefficients and percentage of protein defects in HE RBCs. In addition, we illustrate that at low spectrin network connectivity (horizontal connectivity) band-3 subdiffusion can be approximated as anomalous diffusion, while at high horizontal connectivity band-3 diffusion is characterized as confined diffusion. Our simulations show that the band-3 anomalous diffusion exponent depends on the percentage of protein defects in the membrane cytoskeleton. We also confirm that the introduction of attraction between the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network reduces band-3 diffusion, but we show that this reduction is lower than predicted by the percolation theory. Furthermore, we predict that the attractive force between the spectrin filament and the lipid bilayer is at least 20 times smaller than the binding forces at band-3 and glycophorin C, the two major membrane binding sites. Finally, we explore diffusion of band-3 particles in the RBC membrane with defects related to vertical connectivity. We demonstrate that in this case band-3 diffusion can be approximated as confined diffusion for all attraction levels between the spectrin network and the lipid bilayer

  9. Effects of chitooligosaccharides on human red blood cell morphology and membrane protein structure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, João C; Eaton, Peter; Nascimento, Henrique; Belo, Luís; Rocha, Susana; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Joana; Santos-Silva, Alice; Pintado, Manuela E; Malcata, F Xavier

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies of chitosan have increased the interest in its conversion to chitooligosaccharides (COSs) because these compounds are water-soluble and have potential use in several biomedical applications. Furthermore, such oligomers may be more advantageous than chitosans because of their much higher absorption profiles at the intestinal level, which permit their facilitated access to systemic circulation and potential distribution throughout the entire human body. In that perspective, it is important to clarify their effect on blood further, namely, on human red blood cells (RBCs). The aim of this work was thus to study the effect of two COS mixtures with different molecular weight (MW) ranges, <3 and <5 kDa, at various concentrations (5.0-0.005 mg/mL) on human RBCs. The interactions of these two mixtures with RBC membrane proteins and with hemoglobin were assessed, and the RBC morphology and surface structure were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the presence of either COS mixture, no significant hemolysis was observed; however, at COS concentrations >0.1 mg/mL, changes in membrane binding hemoglobin were observed. Membrane protein changes were also observed with increasing COS concentration, including a reduction in both alpha- and beta-spectrin and in band 3 protein, and the development of three new protein bands: peroxiredoxin 2, calmodulin, and hemoglobin chains. Morphologic evaluation by OM showed that at high concentrations COSs interact with RBCs, leading to RBC adhesion, aggregation, or both. An increase in the roughness of the RBC surface with increasing COS concentration was observed by AFM. Overall, these findings suggest that COS damage to RBCs was dependent on the COS MW and concentration, and significant damage resulted from either a higher MW or a greater concentration (>0.1 mg/mL).

  10. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  11. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  12. Protein Structure-Function Correlation in Living Human Red Blood Cells Probed by Isotope Exchange-based Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sreekala; Mitra, Gopa; Muralidharan, Monita; Mathew, Boby; Mandal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of various biological events, it is important to study the structure-function correlation of proteins within cells. Structural probes used in spectroscopic tools to investigate protein conformation are similar across all proteins. Therefore, structural studies are restricted to purified proteins in vitro and these findings are extrapolated in cells to correlate their functions in vivo. However, due to cellular complexity, in vivo and in vitro environments are radically different. Here, we show a novel way to monitor the structural transition of human hemoglobin upon oxygen binding in living red blood cells (RBCs), using hydrogen/deuterium exchange-based mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS). Exploiting permeability of D2O across cell membrane, the isotope exchange of polypeptide backbone amide hydrogens of hemoglobin was carried out inside RBCs and monitored using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). To explore the conformational transition associated with oxygenation of hemoglobin in vivo, the isotope exchange kinetics was simplified using the method of initial rates. RBC might be considered as an in vivo system of pure hemoglobin. Thus, as a proof-of-concept, the observed results were correlated with structural transition of hemoglobin associated with its function established in vitro. This is the first report on structural changes of a protein upon ligand binding in its endogenous environment. The proposed method might be applicable to proteins in their native state, irrespective of location, concentration, and size. The present in-cell approach opens a new avenue to unravel a plethora of biological processes like ligand binding, folding, and post-translational modification of proteins in living cells.

  13. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Lam, Amy J.; Kim, Bongjae B.; Jacobs, Conor L.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude. PMID:26879144

  14. Effect of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Reiniger, I W; de Oliveira, J F; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-08-01

    Peumus boldus is used in popular medicine in Brazil. The influence of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with 99mTc was studied. Stannous chloride and 99mTc pertechnetate were incubated with blood and a tincture of Peumus boldus. Aliquots of plasma and blood cells were isolated from the mixture and treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). After separation, analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions showed a rapid uptake of the radioactivity by blood cells in the presence of the drug, whereas there was a slight decrease in the amount of 99mTc radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble fraction of plasma.

  15. Cryopreservative effects of the recombinant ice-binding protein from the arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Gu; Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-06-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) have important functions in many freeze-tolerant organisms. The proteins non-colligatively lower the freezing point and functionally inhibit ice recrystallization in frozen solutions. In our previous studies, we found that the Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces an AFP (LeIBP), and that the protein could be successfully produced in Pichia expression system. The present study showed that recombinant LeIBP possesses the ability to reduce the damage induced to red blood cells (RBCs) by freeze thawing. In addition to 40 % glycerol, both 0.4 and 0.8 mg/ml LeIBPs significantly reduced freeze-thaw-induced hemolysis at either rapid- (45 °C) or slow-warming (22 °C) temperatures. Post-thaw cell counts of the cryopreserved RBCs were dramatically enhanced, in particular, in 0.8 mg/ml LeIBP. Interestingly, the cryopreserved cells in the presence of LeIBP showed preserved cell size distribution. These results indicate that the ability of LeIBP to inhibit ice recrystallization helps the RBCs avoid critically damaging electrolyte concentrations, which are known as solution effects. Considering all these data, LeIBP can be thought of as a key component in improving RBC cryopreservation efficiency.

  16. Evidence that red blood cell protein p55 may participate in the skeleton-membrane linkage that involves protein 4.1 and glycophorin C.

    PubMed

    Alloisio, N; Dalla Venezia, N; Rana, A; Andrabi, K; Texier, P; Gilsanz, F; Cartron, J P; Delaunay, J; Chishti, A H

    1993-08-15

    Human erythrocyte p55 is a peripheral membrane protein that contains three distinct domains in its primary structure: an N-terminal domain, an SH3 motif, and a C-terminal guanylate kinase domain. We used naturally mutated red blood cells (RBCs) with primary genetic defects resulting in the absence of protein 4.1 (4.1[-] hereditary elliptocytosis) or glycophorin C (Leach elliptocytosis). The absence of either protein was associated with the absence of p55. On a stoichiometric basis, the reduction in glycophorin C (about 80%) was concomitant to the lack of p55 in RBCs devoid of protein 4.1. Similarly, the reduction of protein 4.1 (about 20%) was equivalent to the absence of p55 in RBCs devoid of glycophorin C. These correlations suggest that p55 is associated, in precise proportions, with the protein 4.1-glycophorin-C complex, linking the skeleton and the membrane. The protein 4.1-glycophorin-C cross-bridge is known to be critically important for the stability and mechanical properties of human RBC plasma membrane. Because isoforms of protein 4.1, glycophorin C, and p55 exist in many tissues, these results provide evidence of a linkage between the skeleton and the membrane that may have implications in many nonerythroid cells.

  17. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  18. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  19. Malaria Parasite Proteins and Their Role in Alteration of the Structure and Function of Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Proellocks, Nicholas I; Coppel, Ross L; Mohandas, Narla; Cooke, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Malaria, caused by Plasmodium spp., continues to be a major threat to human health and a significant cause of socioeconomic hardship in many countries. Almost half of the world's population live in malaria-endemic regions and many of them suffer one or more, often life-threatening episodes of malaria every year, the symptoms of which are attributable to replication of the parasite within red blood cells (RBCs). In the case of Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for most malaria-related deaths, parasite replication within RBCs is accompanied by striking alterations to the morphological, biochemical and biophysical properties of the host cell that are essential for the parasites' survival. To achieve this, the parasite establishes a unique and extensive protein export network in the infected RBC, dedicating at least 6% of its genome to the process. Understanding the full gamut of proteins involved in this process and the mechanisms by which P. falciparum alters the structure and function of RBCs is important both for a more complete understanding of the pathogenesis of malaria and for development of new therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat this devastating disease. This review focuses on what is currently known about exported parasite proteins, their interactions with the RBC and their likely pathophysiological consequences.

  20. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kats, Lev M; Proellocks, Nicholas I; Buckingham, Donna W; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G; Coppel, Ross L; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined sub-domains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process.

  1. Red cell membrane protein deficiencies in Mexican patients with hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, J Yoaly; Camacho, Ana L; Magaña, Maria Teresa; Ibarra, Bertha; Perea, F Javier

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-seven families and four individual patients with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) from the northwestern region of Mexico were studied. An autosomal dominant inheritance pattern was identified in 59% of 22 families. Densitometric analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins revealed individual protein deficiencies in 39% of the patients studied, in whom the principal altered proteins were the alpha spectrins (13%), band 3 protein (10%), ankyrin (6%), 4.2 protein (6%), and the beta spectrins (3%). A predominant deficiency of spectrins has also been observed in other Latin American and Mediterranean countries. However, it is well known that deficiencies in these proteins are heterogeneous across different ethnic groups. A combined protein deficiency was observed in 52% of patients, most frequently involving the spectrins, band 3 protein, 4.2 protein, and 4.1 protein. In three subjects, no abnormalities were detected (10%). We conclude that, despite the observed heterogeneity, the principal affected proteins are essentially similar to those observed in other ethnic groups.

  2. Pf155/RESA protein influences the dynamic microcirculatory behavior of ring-stage Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Diez-Silva, Monica; Park, YongKeun; Huang, Sha; Bow, Hansen; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Deplaine, Guillaume; Lavazec, Catherine; Perrot, Sylvie; Bonnefoy, Serge; Feld, Michael S.; Han, Jongyoon; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra

    2012-01-01

    Proteins exported by Plasmodium falciparum to the red blood cell (RBC) membrane modify the structural properties of the parasitized RBC (Pf-RBC). Although quasi-static single cell assays show reduced ring-stage Pf-RBCs deformability, the parameters influencing their microcirculatory behavior remain unexplored. Here, we study the dynamic properties of ring-stage Pf-RBCs and the role of the parasite protein Pf155/Ring-Infected Erythrocyte Surface Antigen (RESA). Diffraction phase microscopy revealed RESA-driven decreased Pf-RBCs membrane fluctuations. Microfluidic experiments showed a RESA-dependent reduction in the Pf-RBCs transit velocity, which was potentiated at febrile temperature. In a microspheres filtration system, incubation at febrile temperature impaired traversal of RESA-expressing Pf-RBCs. These results show that RESA influences ring-stage Pf-RBCs microcirculation, an effect that is fever-enhanced. This is the first identification of a parasite factor influencing the dynamic circulation of young asexual Pf-RBCs in physiologically relevant conditions, offering novel possibilities for interventions to reduce parasite survival and pathogenesis in its human host. PMID:22937223

  3. Pf155/RESA protein influences the dynamic microcirculatory behavior of ring-stage Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Silva, Monica; Park, Yongkeun; Huang, Sha; Bow, Hansen; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Deplaine, Guillaume; Lavazec, Catherine; Perrot, Sylvie; Bonnefoy, Serge; Feld, Michael S.; Han, Jongyoon; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra

    2012-08-01

    Proteins exported by Plasmodium falciparum to the red blood cell (RBC) membrane modify the structural properties of the parasitized RBC (Pf-RBC). Although quasi-static single cell assays show reduced ring-stage Pf-RBCs deformability, the parameters influencing their microcirculatory behavior remain unexplored. Here, we study the dynamic properties of ring-stage Pf-RBCs and the role of the parasite protein Pf155/Ring-Infected Erythrocyte Surface Antigen (RESA). Diffraction phase microscopy revealed RESA-driven decreased Pf-RBCs membrane fluctuations. Microfluidic experiments showed a RESA-dependent reduction in the Pf-RBCs transit velocity, which was potentiated at febrile temperature. In a microspheres filtration system, incubation at febrile temperature impaired traversal of RESA-expressing Pf-RBCs. These results show that RESA influences ring-stage Pf-RBCs microcirculation, an effect that is fever-enhanced. This is the first identification of a parasite factor influencing the dynamic circulation of young asexual Pf-RBCs in physiologically relevant conditions, offering novel possibilities for interventions to reduce parasite survival and pathogenesis in its human host.

  4. Malaria and human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2012-11-01

    Invasion by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, brings about extensive changes in the host red cells. These include loss of the normal discoid shape, increased rigidity of the membrane, elevated permeability to a wide variety of ionic and other species and increased adhesiveness, most notably to endothelial surfaces. These effects facilitate survival of the parasite within the host cell and tend to increase the virulence of disease that includes cerebral malaria and anemia. Numerous proteins secreted by the internalized parasite and interacting with red cell membrane proteins are responsible for the changes occurring to the host cell. Anemia, a serious clinical manifestation of malaria, is due to increased destruction of both infected and uninfected red cells due to membrane alterations, as well as ineffective erythropoiesis. There is very good evidence that various red cell disorders including hemoglobinopathies and hereditary ovalocytosis decrease the virulence of disease following parasite infection. A number of mechanism(s) are likely responsible for the protective effect of various red cell abnormalities including decreased invasion, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasites and altered interaction between exported parasite proteins and the red cell membrane skeleton.

  5. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Laia; Baron, Cristian; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glucose, an aldose, spontaneously reacts with protein amino acids yielding glycosylated proteins. The compounds may reorganize to produce advanced glycosylation products, which regulatory importance is increasingly being recognized. Protein glycosylation is produced without the direct intervention of enzymes and results in the loss of function. Glycosylated plasma albumin, and glycosylated haemoglobin are currently used as index of mean plasma glucose levels, since higher glucose availability results in higher glycosylation rates. In this study we intended to detect the early changes in blood protein glycosylation elicited by an obesogenic diet. Experimental Design. Since albumin is in constant direct contact with plasma glucose, as are the red blood cell (RBC) membranes, we analyzed their degree or glycosylation in female and male rats, either fed a standard diet or subjected to a hyper-energetic self-selected cafeteria diet for 30 days. This model produces a small increase in basal glycaemia and a significant increase in body fat, leaving the animals in the initial stages of development of metabolic syndrome. We also measured the degree of glycosylation of hemoglobin, and the concentration of glucose in contact with this protein, that within the RBC. Glycosylation was measured by colorimetric estimation of the hydroxymethylfurfural liberated from glycosyl residues by incubation with oxalate. Results. Plasma glucose was higher in cafeteria diet and in male rats, both independent effects. However, there were no significant differences induced by sex or diet in either hemoglobin or plasma proteins. Purified RBC membranes showed a marked effect of diet: higher glycosylation in cafeteria rats, which was more marked in females (not in controls). In any case, the number of glycosyl residues per molecule were higher in hemoglobin than in plasma proteins (after correction for molecular weight). The detected levels of glucose in RBC were lower

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity assays: comparison of LDH, neutral red, MTT and protein assay in hepatoma cell lines following exposure to cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fotakis, George; Timbrell, John A

    2006-01-05

    The aim of this study was to compare four in vitro cytotoxicity assays and determine their ability to detect early cytotoxic events. Two hepatoma cell lines, namely HTC and HepG2 cells, were exposed to cadmium chloride (0-300 microM) for 3, 5 and 8 h. Following exposure to the toxic metal cytotoxicity was determined with the lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay (LDH), a protein assay, the neutral red assay and the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. In HTC cells no toxicity was observed for any incubation period when the LDH leakage, the MTT and the protein assay were employed whereas the neutral red assay revealed early cytotoxicity starting after incubation of HTC cells with CdCl(2) for 3 h. In the case of HepG2 cells the MTT assay reveals cytotoxicity due to CdCl(2) exposure after 3 h whereas no such effect is seen with the other three assays. Following 5 h exposure of HepG2 cells to CdCl(2), toxicity is observed with the MTT assay at lower concentrations compared to the ones required for detection of toxicity with the LDH leakage and the neutral red assay. In conclusion different sensitivity was observed for each assay with the neutral red and the MTT assay being the most sensitive in detecting cytotoxic events compared to the LDH leakage and the protein assay.

  7. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types. PMID:18988878

  8. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2008-11-15

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types.

  9. ALTERATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF RED BLOOD CELLS MEMBRANES PROTEINS OF DIFFERENT AGE AND SEX VOLUNTEERS.

    PubMed

    Pruidze, N; Khetsuriani, R; Sujashvili, R; Ioramashvili, I; Arabuli, M; Sanikidze, T

    2015-01-01

    Considering the age and sex-dependent trend in the manifestation of various diseases, as well as an important pathogenic role of circulatory disorders, we decided to study the age-dependent changes in the physical properties of RBCs membrane proteins (their electric charge and molecular weight) in healthy people of different sex (males and females) and age. Blood of 56 healthy volunteers (Tbilisi, Georgia) of different sex and gender was studied (the patients were divided in 8 groups (7 patients in each groups): 1 - 18-25 years old male, 2 - 18-25 years old female, 3 - 25-44 years old male, 4 - 25-44 years old female, 5 - 44-60 years old male, 6 - 44-60 years old female; 7 - 60-80 years old male, 8 - 70-80 years old female). In groups 6 and 8 were women in menopause was determined according 12 months of amenorrhea. Individuals often consume alcohol addicts, pregnant women and patients with chronic diseases were excluded from the study. The study protocol was approved by Ethical Committee of the Tbilisi State Medical University. RBCs membrane proteins have been extracted from human heparinized blood and their mobility was studied by electrophoretic method. The electrophoretic mobility of RBCs membrane proteins decreases with age of healthy volunteers, that indicates decrease of total charge of proteins, depending on the electrically charged amino acids content. In female patients the electrophoretic mobility of the RBCs membrane proteins especially intensively decreases in period of menopause. Increase of molecular weight of proteins (100-200 kDa) from RBCs' membranes of alder age group was manifested. Intensively decrease electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes membrane proteins from female patients in period of menopause indicates on estrogen related mechanism of the regulation of membrane protein conformation and composition in females. Increased content of high molecular weight proteins in the RBCs membranes from patients of older age groups may be caused to

  10. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol ester increases red blood cell scramblase activity and external phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Barber, Latorya A; Palascak, Mary B; Qi, Xiaoyang; Joiner, Clinton H; Franco, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is thought to contribute to sickle cell disease (SCD) pathophysiology. The red blood cell (RBC) aminophospholipid translocase (APLT) mediates the transport of PS from the outer to the inner RBC membrane leaflet to maintain an asymmetric distribution of PL, while phospholipid scramblase (PLSCR) equilibrates PL across the RBC membrane, promoting PS externalization. We previously identified an association between PS externalization level and PLSCR activity in sickle RBC under basal conditions. Other studies showed that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) causes increased external PS on RBC. Therefore, we hypothesized that PMA-activated PKC stimulates PLSCR activity in RBC and thereby contributes to increased PS externalization. In the current studies, we show that PMA treatment causes immediate and variable PLSCR activation and subsequent PS externalization in control and sickle RBC. While TfR+ sickle reticulocytes display some endogenous PLSCR activity, we observed a robust activation of PLSCR in sickle reticulocytes treated with PMA. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (Chel), significantly inhibited PMA-dependent PLSCR activation and PS externalization. Chel also inhibited endogenous PLSCR activity in sickle reticulocytes. These data provide evidence that PKC mediates PS externalization in RBC through activation of PLSCR.

  11. [Band 3 protein as a metabolic sensor--CO2 regulates the amount of oxygen delivered to tissues from red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2006-03-01

    Oxygen is essential for most forms of life, but too much oxygen is harmful and can induce tissue damage. Living creatures therefore have a tightly regulated system to deliver the necessary amount of oxygen to specific tissues at the right time. CO2 is not simply waste matter from tissues, but regulates the amount of oxygen delivered to tissues from red blood cells, utilizing the synergistic effects of hemoglobin, carbonic anhydrase and the anion exchange activity of band 3 protein. Red blood cells play an important role in this system and provide an ideal vehicle for delivering oxygen to tissues, depending on their metabolic activity.

  12. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  13. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  14. Albumin modulates S1P delivery from red blood cells in perfused microvessels: mechanism of the protein effect.

    PubMed

    Adamson, R H; Clark, J F; Radeva, M; Kheirolomoom, A; Ferrara, K W; Curry, F E

    2014-04-01

    Removal of plasma proteins from perfusates increases vascular permeability. The common interpretation of the action of albumin is that it forms part of the permeability barrier by electrostatic binding to the endothelial glycocalyx. We tested the alternate hypothesis that removal of perfusate albumin in rat venular microvessels decreased the availability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is normally carried in plasma bound to albumin and lipoproteins and is required to maintain stable baseline endothelial barriers (Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 303: H825-H834, 2012). Red blood cells (RBCs) are a primary source of S1P in the normal circulation. We compared apparent albumin permeability coefficients [solute permeability (Ps)] measured using perfusates containing albumin (10 mg/ml, control) and conditioned by 20-min exposure to rat RBCs with Ps when test perfusates were in RBC-conditioned protein-free Ringer solution. The control perfusate S1P concentration (439 ± 46 nM) was near the normal plasma value at 37 °C and established a stable baseline Ps (0.9 ± 0.4 × 10(-6) cm/s). Ringer solution perfusate contained 52 ± 8 nM S1P and increased Ps more than 10-fold (16.1 ± 3.9 × 10(-6) cm/s). Consistent with albumin-dependent transport of S1P from RBCs, S1P concentrations in RBC-conditioned solutions decreased as albumin concentration, hematocrit, and temperature decreased. Protein-free Ringer solution perfusates that used liposomes instead of RBCs as flow markers failed to maintain normal permeability, reproducing the "albumin effect" in these mammalian microvessels. We conclude that the albumin effect depends on the action of albumin to facilitate the release and transport of S1P from RBCs that normally provide a significant amount of S1P to the endothelium.

  15. Oxygen delivery from red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A; Federspiel, W J; Clark, P A; Cokelet, G R

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical analysis of the unloading of oxygen from a red cell. A scale analysis of the governing transport equations shows that the solutions have a boundary layer structure near the red-cell membrane. The boundary layer is a region of chemical nonequilibrium, and it owes its existence to the fact that the kinetic time scales are shorter than the diffusion time scales in the red cell. The presence of the boundary layer allows an analytical solution to be obtained by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. A very useful result from the analysis is a simple, lumped-parameter description of the oxygen delivery from a red cell. The accuracy of the lumped-parameter description has been verified by comparing its predictions with results obtained by numerical integration of the full equations for a one-dimensional slab. As an application, we calculate minimum oxygen unloading times for red cells. PMID:3978198

  16. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, XuDong; Yang, DongShan; Ao, XuDong; Wu, Xia; Li, GuangPeng; Wang, LingLing; Bao, Ming-Tao; Xue, Lian; Bou, ShorGan

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasts cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h. Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO-Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% vs 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%, P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P>0.05). After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly expressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysts were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymerase chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neo ( r ) genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenic somatic cell lines and positive transgenic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  17. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  18. High-protein-PUFA supplementation, red blood cell membranes, and plasma antioxidant activity in volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Baldini, Marta; Angeloni, Cristina; Biagi, Pierluigi; Hrelia, Silvana

    2008-06-01

    The authors evaluated the role of a high-protein, low-calorie, polyunsaturated fatty-acid (PUFA) -supplemented diet on anthropometric parameters, erythrocyte-membrane fatty-acid composition, and plasma antioxidant defenses of nonprofessional volleyball athletes. The athletes were divided in two groups: One (n = 5) followed the Mediterranean diet, and the other (n = 6) followed a high-protein, low-calorie diet with a 3-g/day fish-oil supplementation. All the athletes had anthropometric measurements taken, both at the beginning and at the end of the study, which lasted for 2 months. Body-mass index and total body fat were significantly diminished in the second group, while they remained unchanged in the first. Plasma total antioxidant activity (TAA) was significantly increased in the plasma of both groups, with no differences between the groups, suggesting that physical activity, not the different diets, is the main contributor to the increase of plasma TAA. The second group showed a significant increase in erythrocyte-membrane PUFA content and in the unsaturation index value (UI) because of the fish-oil supplementation.A high-protein, low-carbohydrate, fish-oil-supplemented diet seems to be useful only when the aim of the diet is to obtain weight loss in a short-term period. The significant increase in the UI of erythrocyte membranes indicates the potential for harm, because a high intake of PUFA might increase susceptibility to lipid peroxidation not counterbalanced by a higher increase in TAA. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet seems to be the better choice.

  19. Merozoite surface protein 1 recognition of host glycophorin A mediates malaria parasite invasion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Michael R; Li, Xuerong; Hanada, Toshihiko; Liu, Shih-Chun; Chishti, Athar H

    2015-04-23

    Plasmodium falciparum invasion of human red blood cells (RBCs) is an intricate process requiring a number of distinct ligand-receptor interactions at the merozoite-erythrocyte interface. Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), a highly abundant ligand coating the merozoite surface in all species of malaria parasites, is essential for RBC invasion and considered a leading candidate for inclusion in a multiple-subunit vaccine against malaria. Our previous studies identified an interaction between the carboxyl-terminus of MSP1 and RBC band 3. Here, by employing phage display technology, we report a novel interaction between the amino-terminus of MSP1 and RBC glycophorin A (GPA). Mapping of the binding domains established a direct interaction between malaria MSP1 and human GPA within a region of MSP1 known to potently inhibit P falciparum invasion of human RBCs. Furthermore, a genetically modified mouse model lacking the GPA- band 3 complex in RBCs is completely resistant to malaria infection in vivo. These findings suggest an essential role of the MSP1-GPA-band 3 complex during the initial adhesion phase of malaria parasite invasion of RBCs.

  20. Mitochondria-targeted DsRed2 protein expression during the early stage of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Min, Sung-Hun; Choi, Hoonsung; Park, Junghyung; Kim, Sun-Uk; Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kong, Il-Keun; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2016-09-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been widely used as an efficient tool in biomedical research for the generation of transgenic animals from somatic cells with genetic modifications. Although remarkable advances in SCNT techniques have been reported in a variety of mammals, the cloning efficiency in domestic animals is still low due to the developmental defects of SCNT embryos. In particular, recent evidence has revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction is detected during the early development of SCNT embryos. However, there have been relatively few or no studies regarding the development of a system for evaluating mitochondrial behavior or dynamics. For the first time, in mitochondria of bovine SCNT embryos, we developed a method for the visualization of mitochondria and expression of fluorescence proteins. To express red fluorescence in mitochondria of cloned embryos, bovine ear skin fibroblasts, nuclear donor, were stably transfected with a vector carrying mitochondria-targeting DsRed2 gene tagged with V5 epitope (mito-DsRed2-V5 tag) using lentivirus-mediated gene transfer because of its ability to integrate in the cell genome and the potential for long-term transgene expression in the transduced cells and their dividing cells. From western blotting analysis of V5 tag protein using mitochondrial fraction and confocal microscopy of red fluorescence using SCNT embryos, we found that the mitochondrial expression of the mito-DsRed2 protein was detected until the blastocyst stage. In addition, according to image analysis, it may be suggested possible use of the system for visualization of mitochondrial localization and evaluation of mitochondrial behaviors or dynamics in early development of bovine SCNT embryos.

  1. Pediatric red cell disorders and pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Sherrie L

    2004-12-01

    Anemia in children may arise from a wide variety of pathogenetic mechanisms that include congenital and acquired disorders. Often the diagnostic considerations include disorders that are not seen commonly in adults and lifelong disorders that arise in children and persist throughout life. Consideration of diverse causes of anemia such as red cell membrane disorders, red cell enzymopathies, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias, and hereditary pure red cell aplasia (Diamond-Blackfan anemia), as well as infectious causes such as parvovirus B19 infection, often is required when diagnosing anemia in an infant or young child. Knowledge of these entities that are important causes of anemia in the pediatric population, including clinical manifestations and laboratory workup, will aid in recognition of the specific disease entities and effective workup of pediatric red cell disorders.

  2. Therapy with hydroxyurea is associated with reduced adhesion molecule gene and protein expression in sickle red cells with a concomitant reduction in adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Gambero, Sheley; Canalli, Andreia A; Traina, Fabiola; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Saad, Sara T O; Costa, Fernando F; Conran, Nicola

    2007-02-01

    Propagation of the vaso-occlusive process in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a complex process involving the adhesion of steady-state SCA patients red cells and reticulocytes to the vascular endothelium. The effect of hydroxyurea therapy (HUT) on the adhesive properties of sickle cells and the expression of adhesion molecule genes by erythroid cells of SCA individuals is not yet fully understood. The expressions of the CD36 gene and the VLA-4-integrin subunit genes, CD49d (alpha-subunit) and CD29 (beta-subunit), were compared in the reticulocytes of steady-state SCA patients and patients on HUT using real-time PCR. Basal adhesion of red cells from these subjects was also compared using static adhesion assays, as was surface protein expression, using flow cytometry. Basal sickle red cell adhesion to fibronectin was significantly greater than that of normal cells (P < 0.01); in contrast, HUT was associated with significantly lower levels (P < 0.01) of red cell adhesion that were similar to those of control cells; this decrease could not be justified solely by altered reticulocyte numbers in this population. Accordingly, flow cytometry demonstrated that reticulocytes from patients on HUT had significantly lower CD36 and CD49d surface expressions (P < 0.01) and, importantly, significantly lower expressions of the CD36, CD49d and CD29 genes (P < 0.05) than reticulocytes of SCA patients not on HUT. Taken together, data support the hypothesis that HUT reduces the adhesive properties of sickle cells and that this decrease appears to be mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in the gene and, consequently, surface protein expression of adhesion molecules such as VLA-4 and CD36.

  3. Localization, Dynamics, and Function of Survivin Revealed by Expression of Functional SurvivinDsRed Fusion Proteins in the Living Cell

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Achim; Rieger, Michael; Reber, Friedemann; Lindemann, Dirk; Weigle, Bernd; Diestelkoetter-Bachert, Petra; Ehninger, Gerhard; Tatsuka, Masaaki; Terada, Yasuhiko; Rieber, Ernst Peter

    2003-01-01

    Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, has attracted growing attention due to its expression in various tumors and its potential application in tumor therapy. However, its subcellular localization and function have remained controversial: Recent studies revealed that survivin is localized at the mitotic spindle, binds caspases, and could thus protect cells from apoptosis. The cell cycle-dependent expression of survivin and its antiapoptotic function led to the hypothesis that survivin connects the cell cycle with apoptosis, thus providing a death switch for the termination of defective mitosis. In other studies, survivin was detected at kinetochores, cleavage furrow, and midbody, localizations being characteristic for chromosomal passenger proteins. These proteins are involved in cytokinesis as inferred from the observation that RNA interference and expression of mutant proteins led to cytokinesis defects without an increase in apoptosis. To remedy these discrepancies, we analyzed the localizations of a survivinDsRed fusion protein in HeLa cells by using confocal laser scanning microscopy and time-lapse video imaging. SurvivinDsRed was excluded from the interphase nucleus and was detected in centrosomes and at kinetochores. It dissociated from chromosomes at the anaphase/telophase transition and accumulated at the ends of polar microtubuli where it was immediately condensed to the midbody. Overexpression of both survivinDsRed and of a phosphorylation-defective mutant conferred resistance against apoptosis-inducing reagents, but only the overexpressed mutant protein caused an aberrant cytokinesis. These data characterize in detail the dynamics of survivin in vertebrate cells and confirm that survivin represents a chromosomal passenger protein. PMID:12529428

  4. Plasma protein induced clustering of red blood cells in micro capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Aouane, Othmane; Flormann, Daniel; Thiebaud, Marine; Verdier, Claude; Coupier, Gwennou; Podgorski, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi; Selmi, Hassib

    2013-11-01

    The plasma molecule fibrinogen induces aggregation of RBCs to clusters, the so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates in bulk flow can break them up which results in the pronounced shear thinning of blood. This led to the assumption that rouleaux formation does not take place in the microcapillaries of the vascular network where high shear rates are present. However, the question is of high medical relevance. Cardio vascular disorders are still the main cause of death in the western world and cardiac patients have often higher fibrinogen level. We performed AFM based single cell force spectroscopy to determine the work of separation. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the adhesion strength and we found that cluster formation is strongly enhanced by fibrinogen at physiological concentrations, even at shear rate as high as 1000 1/s. Numerical simulations based on a boundary integral method confirm our findings and the clustering transition takes place both in the experiments and in the simulations at the same interaction energies. In vivo measurements with intravital fluorescence microscopy in a dorsal skin fold chamber in a mouse reveal that RBCs indeed form clusters in the micrcapillary flow. This work was supported by the German Science Foundation research imitative SFB1027.

  5. Endothelial progenitor and mesenchymal stem cell-derived cells persist in tissue-engineered patch in vivo: application of green and red fluorescent protein-expressing retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Sales, Virna L; Mettler, Bret A; Lopez-Ilasaca, Marco; Johnson, John A; Mayer, John E

    2007-03-01

    An unresolved question regarding tissue-engineered (TE) cardiac valves and vessels is the fate of the transplanted cells in vivo. We have developed a strategy to track the anatomic location of seeded cells within TE constructs and neighboring tissues using a retroviral vector system encoding green and red fluorescent proteins (GFPs and RFPs, respectively) in ovine circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). We demonstrate that stable transduction ex vivo with high-titer Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector yields transduction efficiency of greater than 97% GFP(+) EPC- and RFP(+) mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived cells. Cellular phenotype and transgene expression were also maintained through 25 subsequent passages. Using a retroviral vector system to distinguish our pre-seeded cells from tissue-resident progenitor cells and circulating endothelial and marrow-derived precursors, we simultaneously co-seeded 2 x 10(6) GFP(+) EPCs and 2 x 10(5) RFP(+) MSCs onto the TE patches. In a series of ovine pulmonary artery patch augmentation studies, transplanted GFP(+) EPC- and RFP(+) MSC-derived cells persisted within the TE patch 7 to 14 days after implantation, as identified using immunofluorescence. Analysis showed 81% luminal coverage of the TE patches before implantation with transduced cells, increasing to 96% at day 7 and decreasing to 67% at day 14 post-implantation. This suggests a temporal association between retroviral expression of progenitor cells and mediating effects of these cells on the physiological remodeling and maturation of the TE constructs. To our knowledge, this is the first cardiovascular tissue-engineering in vivo study using a double-labeling method to demonstrate a direct evidence of the source, persistence, and incorporation into a TE vascular patch of co-cultured and simultaneously pre-seeded adult progenitor cells.

  6. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  7. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC Antibody Screen ; Blood Typing ; Type ... a positive RBC antibody screen or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) . It is used to identify ...

  8. Reactive oxygen species in photochemistry of the red fluorescent protein "Killer Red".

    PubMed

    Vegh, Russell B; Solntsev, Kyril M; Kuimova, Marina K; Cho, Soohee; Liang, Yue; Loo, Bernard L W; Tolbert, Laren M; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2011-05-07

    The fluorescent protein aptly named "Killer Red" (KRed) is capable of killing transfected cells and inactivating fused proteins upon exposure to visible light in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated the source of the bioactive species through a variety of photophysical and photochemical techniques. Our results indicate a Type I (electron transfer mediated) photosensitizing mechanism.

  9. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  10. Evaluation of haemoglobin, haematocrit, haemolysis, residual protein content and leucocytes in 345 red blood cell concentrates used for the treatment of patients with β-thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Roberta; Marinelli, Leonardo; Mirante, Nadia; Gallo, Assunta; Matteocci, Antonella; Terlizzi, Filomena; Palange, Maria; Fioravanti, Daniela; Donnini, Lorella; Pierelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of red blood cell concentrates obtained from donated whole blood, selected for transfusion therapy of thalassaemic patients, by measuring the following parameters: haemoglobin, haematocrit, percentage haemolysis, residual leucocyte count and residual protein content. Materials and methods Overall 345 red cell concentrates were evaluated, of which 205 had been filtered in-line pre-storage and washed and 140 were buffy coat-depleted and used within 2 days of collection. Of the buffy coat-depleted concentrates, 62 were leucodepleted and 78 washed and leucodepleted post-storage all within 2 days of collection. The off-line filters used for the leucodepletion were gamma-irradiated polyester with a pore size of 200 μm. The washing procedure was automated (Haemonetics ACP 215, Braintree, MA, USA). The haematological parameters were evaluated by a blood cell counter (Coulter, Ramsey, IL, USA) and the white blood cell count by cytofluorimetry (FACScan). Results Ninety-five percent (194/205) of the red cell concentrates that had been filtered pre-storage and washed, 92% (57/62) of the red cell concentrates that had been leucodepleted post-storage and 94% (73/78) of the those subjected to both treatments had normal values of haemoglobin (>40 g/unit), haematocrit (between 50–70%), percentage haemolysis (<0.8/unit), white cell count (<1×106) and residual protein content (<0.5 g/L). Five percent (11/205) of the red cell concentrates that had been filtered pre-storage and washed, 8% (5/62) of those leucodepleted post-storage after 2 days and 6% (5/78) of those that underwent both procedures had a haemoglobin content <40 g/unit and a haematocrit <50%. Conclusions The preparation procedures had been carried out satisfactorily; nevertheless, transfusion therapy with some “low dose” normal units could be less effective and might, therefore, result in greater transfusion requirements in patients receiving such units

  11. Study of the influence of laser of low potency to label red blood cells and plasmatic protein with 99mTc in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolim, Ricardo Q.; Carvalho, Elaine F.; Nascimento, Edgar V.; Souza, Grace M.; Magnata, Simey S.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Catanho, Maria T.

    2004-09-01

    This work aims to verify the effect of laser of low potency to label red blood cells and plasmatic protein with 99mTc in vitro. The experiments were carried out by incubating of anticoagulant whole blood. Differents doses of gallium arsenide laser with energy density of 3j/cm2, 6j/cm2, 9 j/cm2, 18 j/cm2 and 804nm wavelength was applied. A stannous chloride solution of 1,2μg/mL was added the incubation for 60 minutes. After this the 99mTc was added and the incubation was continued for another 10 minutes. Those were centrifuged, precipitated with thrichoroacetic acid 5% and mensured in a counter. The results shows that there is a significant decrease in the fixation of 99mTc in red blood cells when the concentration of 3j/ cm2 and (from 93 to 32.2%) and in occurs an increase %ATI from 12 to 54,6% of plasma protein. The laser promote modification on some properties of the red blood cellular membrane, probably, due to the metabolization of cellular that could be capable to generation the active metabolites.

  12. Identification of a Role for the PfEMP1 Semi-Conserved Head Structure in Protein Trafficking to the Surface of Plasmodium falciparum Infected Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melcher, Martin; Muhle, Rebecca A.; Henrich, Philipp P.; Kraemer, Susan M.; Avril, Marion; Vigan-Womas, Ines; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Smith, Joseph D.; Fidock, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Transport of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) variants to the red blood cell (RBC) surface enables malarial parasite evasion of host immunity by modifying the antigenic and adhesive properties of infected RBCs. In this study, we applied the Bxb1 integrase system to integrate transgenes encoding truncated PfEMP1-GFP fusions into cytoadherent A4 parasites and characterize their surface transport requirements. Our studies revealed that the semi-conserved head structure of PfEMP1 proteins, in combination with the predicted transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail, encodes sufficient information for RBC surface display. In contrast, miniPfEMP1 proteins with truncated head structures were exported to the RBC cytoplasm but were not detected at the RBC surface by flow cytometry or immuno-electron microscopy. We demonstrated the absence of a mechanistic barrier to having native and miniPfEMP1 proteins displayed simultaneously at the RBC surface. However, surface exposed miniPfEMP1 proteins did not convey cytoadherence properties to their host cells, implicating potential steric considerations in host-receptor interactions or the need for multiple domains to mediate cell binding. This study establishes a new system to investigate PfEMP1 transport and demonstrates that the PfEMP1 semi-conserved head structure is under selection for protein transport, in addition to its known roles in adhesion. PMID:20438573

  13. Identification of a role for the PfEMP1 semi-conserved head structure in protein trafficking to the surface of Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Martin; Muhle, Rebecca A; Henrich, Philipp P; Kraemer, Susan M; Avril, Marion; Vigan-Womas, Ines; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Smith, Joseph D; Fidock, David A

    2010-10-01

    Transport of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) variants to the red blood cell (RBC) surface enables malarial parasite evasion of host immunity by modifying the antigenic and adhesive properties of infected RBCs. In this study, we applied the Bxb1 integrase system to integrate transgenes encoding truncated PfEMP1-GFP fusions into cytoadherent A4 parasites and characterize their surface transport requirements. Our studies revealed that the semi-conserved head structure of PfEMP1 proteins, in combination with the predicted transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail, encodes sufficient information for RBC surface display. In contrast, miniPfEMP1 proteins with truncated head structures were exported to the RBC cytoplasm but were not detected at the RBC surface by flow cytometry or immuno-electron microscopy. We demonstrated the absence of a mechanistic barrier to having native and miniPfEMP1 proteins displayed simultaneously at the RBC surface. However, surface-exposed miniPfEMP1 proteins did not convey cytoadherence properties to their host cells, implicating potential steric considerations in host-receptor interactions or the need for multiple domains to mediate cell binding. This study establishes a new system to investigate PfEMP1 transport and demonstrates that the PfEMP1 semi-conserved head structure is under selection for protein transport, in addition to its known roles in adhesion.

  14. High-throughput living cell-based optical biosensor for detection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a red fluorescent protein reporter system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Shao, Jingdong; Sun, Xiulan; Wang, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high toxicity of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulting in sepsis and septic shock, two major causes of death worldwide, significant effort is directed toward the development of specific trace-level LPS detection systems. Here, we report sensitive, user-friendly, high-throughput LPS detection in a 96-well microplate using a transcriptional biosensor system, based on 293/hTLR4A-MD2-CD14 cells that are transformed by a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) gene under the transcriptional control of an NF-κB response element. The recognition of LPS activates the biosensor cell, TLR4, and the co-receptor-induced NF-κB signaling pathway, which results in the expression of mCherry fluorescent protein. The novel cell-based biosensor detects LPS with specificity at low concentration. The cell-based biosensor was evaluated by testing LPS isolated from 14 bacteria. Of the tested bacteria, 13 isolated Enterobacteraceous LPSs with hexa-acylated structures were found to increase red fluorescence and one penta-acylated LPS from Pseudomonadaceae appeared less potent. The proposed biosensor has potential for use in the LPS detection in foodstuff and biological products, as well as bacteria identification, assisting the control of foodborne diseases. PMID:27841364

  15. Red Blood Cell Magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Zborowski, Maciej; Ostera, Graciela R.; Moore, Lee R.; Milliron, Sarah; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of unpaired electrons in the four heme groups of deoxy and methemoglobin (metHb) gives these species paramagnetic properties as contrasted to the diamagnetic character of oxyhemoglobin. Based on the measured magnetic moments of hemoglobin and its compounds, and on the relatively high hemoglobin concentration of human erythrocytes, we hypothesized that differential migration of these cells was possible if exposed to a high magnetic field. With the development of a new technology, cell tracking velocimetry, we were able to measure the migration velocity of deoxygenated and metHb-containing erythrocytes, exposed to a mean magnetic field of 1.40 T and a mean gradient of 0.131 T/mm, in a process we call cell magnetophoresis. Our results show a similar magnetophoretic mobility of 3.86 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg for erythrocytes with 100% deoxygenated hemoglobin and 3.66 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg for erythrocytes containing 100% metHb. Oxygenated erythrocytes had a magnetophoretic mobility of from −0.2 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg to +0.30 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg, indicating a significant diamagnetic component relative to the suspension medium, in agreement with previous studies on the hemoglobin magnetic susceptibility. Magnetophoresis may open up an approach to characterize and separate cells for biochemical analysis based on intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of biological macromolecules. PMID:12668472

  16. Red blood cell magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Ostera, Graciela R; Moore, Lee R; Milliron, Sarah; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Schechter, Alan N

    2003-04-01

    The existence of unpaired electrons in the four heme groups of deoxy and methemoglobin (metHb) gives these species paramagnetic properties as contrasted to the diamagnetic character of oxyhemoglobin. Based on the measured magnetic moments of hemoglobin and its compounds, and on the relatively high hemoglobin concentration of human erythrocytes, we hypothesized that differential migration of these cells was possible if exposed to a high magnetic field. With the development of a new technology, cell tracking velocimetry, we were able to measure the migration velocity of deoxygenated and metHb-containing erythrocytes, exposed to a mean magnetic field of 1.40 T and a mean gradient of 0.131 T/mm, in a process we call cell magnetophoresis. Our results show a similar magnetophoretic mobility of 3.86 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg for erythrocytes with 100% deoxygenated hemoglobin and 3.66 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg for erythrocytes containing 100% metHb. Oxygenated erythrocytes had a magnetophoretic mobility of from -0.2 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg to +0.30 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg, indicating a significant diamagnetic component relative to the suspension medium, in agreement with previous studies on the hemoglobin magnetic susceptibility. Magnetophoresis may open up an approach to characterize and separate cells for biochemical analysis based on intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of biological macromolecules.

  17. A lysine-rich membrane-associated PHISTb protein involved in alteration of the cytoadhesive properties of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Proellocks, Nicholas I; Herrmann, Susann; Buckingham, Donna W; Hanssen, Eric; Hodges, Emma K; Elsworth, Brendan; Morahan, Belinda J; Coppel, Ross L; Cooke, Brian M

    2014-07-01

    The genomes of malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) contain a family of genes encoding proteins with a Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric (PHIST) domain, most of which are predicted to be exported into the parasite-infected human red blood cell (iRBC). Here, using transgenic parasites and a combination of cellular, biochemical, and biophysical assays, we have characterized and determined the function of a novel member of the PHIST protein family in Plasmodium falciparum, termed lysine-rich membrane-associated PHISTb (LyMP). LyMP was shown to associate directly with the cytoskeleton of iRBCs where it plays a role in their abnormal ability to adhere to a protein expressed on vascular endothelial cells, resulting in sequestration. Deletion of LyMP dramatically reduced adhesion of iRBCs to CD36 by 55%, which was completely restored to wild-type levels on complementation. Intriguingly, in the absence of LyMP, formation of RBC membrane knobs and the level of surface exposure of the parasites' major cytoadhesive ligand, PfEMP1, were identical to those for the parental parasite line, demonstrating for the first time an additional mechanism that enhances cytoadherence of iRBCs beyond those already recognized. Our findings identify LyMP as a previously unknown RBC cytoskeletal-binding protein that is likely to be of major significance in the complex pathophysiology of falciparum malaria.-Proellocks, N. I., Herrmann, S., Buckingham, D. W., Hanssen, E., Hodges, E. K., Elsworth, B., Morahan, B. J., Coppel, R. L., Cooke, B. M. A lysine-rich membrane-associated PHISTb protein involved in alteration of the cytoadhesive properties of Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells.

  18. Performance of a novel sieving matrix of poly(vinyl alcohol)/acrylamide copolymer in electrophoretic separations of high molecular weight proteins from red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Matte, Alessandro; Sola, Laura; Chiari, Marcella; Tomelleri, Carlo; Consonni, Roberto; Turrini, Franco; Franceschi, Lucia De

    2014-04-01

    The analysis of high molecular weight (HMW) proteins from complex mixtures is still a challenge in proteomics. This work introduces a novel hydrogel obtained by the copolymerization of an allyl-PVA derivative with acrylamide and bisacrylamide and applies this matrix to the electrophoretic separation of HMW proteins. By inducing gelation of polyacrylamide in the presence of variable amounts of allyl-PVA, it is possible to control and vary the average gel porosity. This gel is easy to produce and handle and offers the advantage of being highly mechanically resistant and macroporous. The new matrix was tested in mono-dimensional separations of complex protein mixtures extracted from red cell membranes with different detergents. The improved performance of this macroporous matrix allowed to identify new proteins by MS and immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies. In particular, the resolution of proteins ranging in size between 97 and 279 kDa was greatly improved here compared to standard polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that this matrix can be a useful tool in routine analysis of HMW proteins in cell biology.

  19. Extraction and Enrichment of Protein from Red and Green Macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Pádraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Macroalgae, in particular red and green species, are gaining interest as protein-rich foods for human consumption and sources of proteinaceous biofunctional peptide ingredients. During protein extraction the starting raw material, the cell disruption method utilized and the reagents employed have a major effect on the yield of protein recovered. A method is described herein for extraction and semi-purification of food-grade aqueous and alkaline soluble proteins from red and green macroalgae. Dried milled macroalgae are disrupted by osmotic shock with subsequent removal of aqueous soluble proteins by centrifugation. Alkaline soluble proteins are removed following consecutive treatment of the resultant pellet with an alkaline solution. Aqueous and alkaline soluble proteins are then enriched from the crude extracts by isoelectric precipitation.

  20. Metabolic dependence of red cell deformability

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Robert I.; LaCelle, Paul L.; Merrill, Edward W.

    1969-01-01

    The contribution of the metabolic state of human erythrocytes to maintenance of cellular deformability was studied during and after in vitro incubation in serum for periods up to 28 hr. An initial loss of membrane deformability became apparent between 4 and 6 hr when cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were approximately 70% of initial values. Membrane deformability then remained stable between 6 and 10 hr. After 10 hr, when cellular ATP had decreased to < 15% of initial values, progressive parallel changes occurred in red cell calcium which increased 400% by 24 hr and in the viscosity of red cell suspensions which had risen 500-750% at 24 hr. A further progressive decrease in membrane deformability also occurred and was reflected by a 1000% increase in negative pressure required to deform the membrane. Red cell filterability decreased to zero as the disc-sphere shape transformation ensued. These changes were accompanied by an increase in ghost residual hemoglobin and nonhemoglobin protein. Regeneration of ATP in depleted cells by incubation with adenosine produced significant reversal of these changes, even in the presence of ouabain. Introduction of calcium into reconstituted ghosts prepared from fresh red cells mimicked the depleted state, and introduction of ATP, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and magnesium into depleted cells mimicked the adenosine effects in intact depleted cells. ATP added externally to 24-hr depleted cells was without effect. Simultaneous introduction of EDTA, ATP, or magnesium along with calcium into reconstituted ghosts prevented the marked decrease in deformability produced by calcium alone. Incorporation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), NAD phosphate (NADP), NADP, reduced form (NADPH), glutatione, reduced form (GSH), inosine triphosphate (ITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP) was without effect. These data suggest that a major role of ATP in maintenance

  1. Non-Invasive In Vivo Imaging and Quantification of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Rats Using Cells Expressing Far-Red Fluorescence Protein.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jon; Vonwil, Daniel; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging is emerging as an important tool for basic and preclinical research. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence dyes and probes have been used for non-invasive optical imaging since in the NIR region absorption and auto fluorescence by body tissue is low, thus permitting for greater penetration depths and high signal to noise ratio. Currently, cell tracking systems rely on labeling cells prior to injection or administering probes targeting the cell population of choice right before imaging. These approaches do not enable imaging of tumor growth, as the cell label is diluted during cell division. In this study we have developed cell lines stably expressing the far-red fluorescence protein E2-Crimson, thus enabling continuous detection and quantification of tumor growth. In a xenograft rat model, we show that E2-Crimson expressing cells can be detected over a 5 week period using optical imaging. Fluorescence intensities correlated with tumor volume and weight and allowed for a reliable and robust quantification of the entire tumor compartment. Using a novel injection regime, the seeding of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in the lungs in a rat model was established and verified.

  2. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  3. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  4. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar "pearling instability."

  5. Perforin-like protein PPLP2 permeabilizes the red blood cell membrane during egress of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Christine C; Glushakova, Svetlana; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Repnik, Urska; Garg, Swati; Schaack, Dominik; Kachman, Marika M; Weißbach, Tim; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Dandekar, Thomas; Griffiths, Gareth; Chitnis, Chetan E; Singh, Shailja; Fischer, Rainer; Pradel, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Egress of malaria parasites from the host cell requires the concerted rupture of its enveloping membranes. Hence, we investigated the role of the plasmodial perforin-like protein PPLP2 in the egress of Plasmodium falciparum from erythrocytes. PPLP2 is expressed in blood stage schizonts and mature gametocytes. The protein localizes in vesicular structures, which in activated gametocytes discharge PPLP2 in a calcium-dependent manner. PPLP2 comprises a MACPF domain and recombinant PPLP2 has haemolytic activities towards erythrocytes. PPLP2-deficient [PPLP2(−)] merozoites show normal egress dynamics during the erythrocytic replication cycle, but activated PPLP2(−) gametocytes were unable to leave erythrocytes and stayed trapped within these cells. While the parasitophorous vacuole membrane ruptured normally, the activated PPLP2(−) gametocytes were unable to permeabilize the erythrocyte membrane and to release the erythrocyte cytoplasm. In consequence, transmission of PPLP2(−) parasites to the Anopheles vector was reduced. Pore-forming equinatoxin II rescued both PPLP2(−) gametocyte exflagellation and parasite transmission. The pore sealant Tetronic 90R4, on the other hand, caused trapping of activated wild-type gametocytes within the enveloping erythrocytes, thus mimicking the PPLP2(−) loss-of-function phenotype. We propose that the haemolytic activity of PPLP2 is essential for gametocyte egress due to permeabilization of the erythrocyte membrane and depletion of the erythrocyte cytoplasm. PMID:24602217

  6. Hypoalbuminemia causes high blood viscosity by increasing red cell lysophosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Joles, J A; Willekes-Koolschijn, N; Koomans, H A

    1997-09-01

    Albumin deficiency is accompanied by a reduction in red cell deformability and blood hyperviscosity. Albumin deficiency increases plasma fibrinogen and triglyceride levels and may alter red cell membrane lipid composition. These options, which could all contribute to reduced red cell deformability (RCD) and hyperviscosity, were studied in the Nagase analbuminemic rat (NAR), a mutant Sprague Dawley rat (CON), characterized by normal total protein levels, with an absolute deficiency of albumin, but elevated levels of non-albumin proteins and hyperlipidemia. Plasma protein-binding of the polar phopholipid lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was markedly decreased. LPC comprised only 26 +/- 1% of total plasma phospholipids as compared to 42 +/- 2% in CON. NAR red cells in CON plasma had a viscosity that was similar to CON red cells in CON plasma. Conversely, CON red cells in NAR plasma show an increased viscosity as compared to CON red cells in CON plasma. The maximum deformation index of both NAR and CON red cells was markedly decreased in NAR plasma as compared to either NAR or CON cells in CON plasma (0.04 +/- 0.03 and 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.22 +/- 0.06 and 0.15 +/- 0.04, respectively; P < 0.05). Thus, plasma composition causes hyperviscosity and reduced RCD in NAR. Fibrinogen is not responsible since red cells in serum and red cells in plasma had a similar viscosity and differences in viscosity and RCD between NAR and CON were maintained. Plasma triglycerides are also not responsible since the viscosity of red cells in serum with a 50% reduction in triglycerides was not reduced. LPC levels in red cells were increased in NAR (8.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.3% of total phospholipids; P < 0.01). Adding albumin to NAR blood dose-dependently decreased whole blood viscosity, despite marked increases in plasma viscosity, and increased RCD of NAR cells (from 0.04 +/- 0.03 to 0.21 +/- 0.01; P < 0.05). There was also some effect on CON RCD of similar albumin addition to CON blood (from 0

  7. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  8. Osmotic properties of human red cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A K; Toon, M R; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    When an osmotic pressure gradient is applied to human red cells, the volume changes anomalously, as if there were a significant fraction of "nonosmotic water" which could not serve as solvent for the cell solutes, a finding which has been discussed widely in the literature. In 1968, Gary-Bobo and Solomon (J. Gen. Physiol. 52:825) concluded that the anomalies could not be entirely explained by the colligative properties of hemoglobin (Hb) and proposed that there was an additional concentration dependence of the Hb charge (ZHb). A number of investigators, particularly Freedman and Hoffman (1979, J. Gen. Physiol. 74:157) have been unable to confirm Gary-Bobo and Solomon's experimental evidence for this concentration dependence of ZHb and we now report that we are also unable to repeat the earlier experiments. Nonetheless, there still remains a significant anomaly which amounts to 12.5 +/- 0.8% of the total isosmotic cell water (P much less than 0.0005, t test), even after taking account of the concentration dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient and all the other known physical chemical constraints, ideal and nonideal. It is suggested that the anomalies at high Hb concentration in shrunken cells may arise from the ionic strength dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient. In swollen red cells at low ionic strength, solute binding to membrane and intracellular proteins is increased and it is suggested that this factor may account, in part, for the anomalous behavior of these cells.

  9. Chemical toxicity of red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to toxic chemicals may result in alterations of red cell function. In certain cases, the toxic effect requires a genetic predisposition and thus affects only a restricted number of individuals; in other instances, the toxic effect is exerted on the hematopoietic system of every person. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is probably the most widespread genetic disorder. It is observed at highest frequency in populations from subtropical countries as a result of its selective advantage vis à vis falciparum malaria. The gene controlling this enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; thus, the defect is sex-linked. Individuals with a genetic defect of this enzyme are extremely susceptible to hemolysis, when exposed to oxidant drugs (such as certain antimalarials and sulfonamides) because of the inability of their red cells to regenerate NADPH. Lead poisoning result in profound effects on the process of heme synthesis. Among the steps most sensitive to lead toxicity are the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and the intramitochondrial step that leads to the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin. By these mechanisms, in severe lead intoxication there is an accumulation of large amounts of delta-aminolevulinic acid (a compound with inherent neurotoxicity), and there are abnormalities of mitochondrial function in all cells of the body. Individuals living in an industrialized society are unavoidably exposed to some environmental lead. Recent evidence indicates that, even at levels of exposure which do not increase the blood lead level above values presently considered normal, abnormalities of heme synthesis are clearly detectable. PMID:7016524

  10. Red cell transfusion "trigger": a review.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Marian

    2003-07-01

    Despite the publication of several consensus guidelines that set forth recommendations for the transfusion of red cells, actual clinical practice continues to vary widely. Animal data and studies in human volunteers and patients support a red cell transfusion threshold of 7 to 8 g/dl in most patients. However, conflicting data, particularly in cardiac patients and in the elderly, suggest that it may be impossible to define a single red cell "trigger" for all patients. A well-designed, randomized, controlled trial is still needed to establish a safe threshold for red cell transfusion in adults with coronary artery disease.

  11. Endothelial Lu/BCAM glycoproteins are novel ligands for red blood cell alpha4beta1 integrin: role in adhesion of sickle red blood cells to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    El Nemer, Wassim; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Rahuel, Cécile; Gane, Pierre; Hermand, Patricia; Galactéros, Frédéric; Wautier, Jean-Luc; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2007-04-15

    The Lutheran (Lu) blood group and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) antigens are both carried by 2 glycoprotein isoforms of the immunoglobulin superfamily representing receptors for the laminin alpha(5) chain. In addition to red blood cells, Lu/BCAM proteins are highly expressed in endothelial cells. Abnormal adhesion of red blood cells to the endothelium could potentially contribute to the vaso-occlusive episodes in sickle cell disease. Considering the presence of integrin consensus-binding sites in Lu/BCAM proteins, we investigated their potential interaction with integrin alpha(4)beta(1), the unique integrin expressed on immature circulating sickle red cells. Using cell adhesion assays under static and flow conditions, we demonstrated that integrin alpha(4)beta(1) expressed on transfected cells bound to chimeric Lu-Fc protein. We showed that epinephrine-stimulated sickle cells, but not control red cells, adhered to Lu-Fc via integrin alpha(4)beta(1) under flow conditions. Antibody-mediated activation of integrin alpha(4)beta(1) induced adhesion of sickle red cells to primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells; this adhesion was inhibited by soluble Lu-Fc and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-Fc proteins. This novel interaction between integrin alpha(4)beta(1) in sickle red cells and endothelial Lu/BCAM proteins could participate in sickle cell adhesion to endothelium and potentially play a role in vaso-occlusive episodes.

  12. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  13. Modelling the structure of the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Burton, Nicholas M; Bruce, Lesley J

    2011-04-01

    The red cell membrane has long been the focus of extensive study. The macromolecules embedded within the membrane carry the blood group antigens and perform many functions including the vital task of gas exchange. Links between the intramembrane macromolecules and the underlying cytoskeleton stabilize the biconcave morphology of the red cell and allow deformation during microvascular transit. Much is now known about the proteins of the red cell membrane and how they are organised. In many cases we have an understanding of which proteins are expressed, the number of each protein per cell, their oligomeric state(s), and how they are collected in large multi-protein complexes. However, our typical view of these structures is as cartoon shapes in schematic figures. In this study we have combined knowledge of the red cell membrane with a wealth of protein structure data from crystallography, NMR, and homology modelling to generate the first, tentative models of the complexes which link the membrane to the cytoskeleton. Measurement of the size of these complexes and comparison with known cytoskeletal distance parameters suggests the idea of interaction between the membrane complexes, which may have profound implications for understanding red cell function and deformation.

  14. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  15. Generation of cloned transgenic cats expressing red fluorescence protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi Jun; Lee, Hyo Sang; Yu, Xian Feng; Choi, Eugene; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun; Lee, Young S; Cho, Su Jin; Jin, Guang Zhen; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Kong, Il Keun

    2008-03-01

    A method for engineering and producing genetically modified cats is important for generating biomedical models of human diseases. Here we describe the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce cloned transgenic cats that systemically express red fluorescent protein. Immature oocytes were collected from superovulating cat ovaries. Donor fibroblasts were obtained from an ear skin biopsy of a white male Turkish Angora cat, cultured for one to two passages, and subjected to transduction with a retrovirus vector designed to transfer and express the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. A total of 176 RFP cloned embryos were transferred into 11 surrogate mothers (mean = 16 +/- 7.5 per recipient). Three surrogate mothers were successfully impregnated (27.3%) and delivered two liveborn and one stillborn kitten at 65 to 66 days of gestation. Analysis of nine feline-specific microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned cats were genetically identical to the donor cat. Presence of the RFP gene in the transgenic cat genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Whole-body red fluorescence was detected 60 days after birth in the liveborn transgenic (TG) cat but not in the surrogate mother cat. Red fluorescence was detected in tissue samples, including hair, muscle, brain, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, bronchus, lung, stomach, intestine, tongue, and even excrement of the stillborn TG cat. These results suggest that this nuclear transfer procedure using genetically modified somatic cells could be useful for the efficient production of transgenic cats.

  16. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  17. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  18. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  19. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  20. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  1. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  2. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  3. The accumulation of lipids and proteins during red blood cell storage: the roles of leucoreduction and experimental filtration

    PubMed Central

    Silliman, Christopher C.; Burke, Timothy; Kelher, Marguerite R.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-storage leucoreduction has been universally adopted in most developed countries in Asia, Europe and the Americas. It decreases febrile transfusion reactions, alloimmunisation to HLA antigens, cytomegalovirus exposure, the accumulation of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators in the supernatant, including the accumulation of platelet-and leucocyte-derived proteins and metabolites during routine storage. This review will highlight the lipids and proteins, biological response modifiers (BRMs) that accumulate, their clinical effects in transfused hosts, and methods of mitigation. PMID:28263170

  4. Human spleen and red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  5. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Red Fluorescent Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konold, Patrick Eugene

    Red-emitting homologues (RFPs) of the native Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with emission wavelengths beyond 650 nm are desirable probes for in vivo imaging experiments. They offer the potential for deeper tissue penetration and lower background scatter given a cleaner spectral window. However, bioimaging applications are hindered by poor photophysics ( e.g. low fluorescence quantum yield, high photobleaching), which limits experimental resolution and represents a significant obstacle towards utilization for low copy-number, long-duration imaging applications. In this thesis, a variety of femtosecond nonlinear electronic spectroscopies were employed jointly with site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the photophysical properties of RFPs. In one study, the molecular mechanism of red emission was pursued in two notable RFPs, mPlum and TagRFP675. Solvation dynamics observed with time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy were interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations to indicate that their red-emission is correlated with the ability of specific chromophore-sidechain hydrogen-bonding interactions to interconvert between direct and water-mediated states. In a second set of studies, two-dimensional double quantum coherence spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic transitions of mPlum. It was discovered that it displayed a response distinctly different from an organic dye in bulk solvent. Modeling indicate of these spectra indicate the spectral features may be attributed to the existence of multiple high-lying (n>1) excited states. The results provide new insight into the electronic structure of these widely used fluorescent probes.

  6. Associations of obesity with triglycerides and C-reactive protein are attenuated in adults with high red blood cell eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background:N-3 fatty acids are associated with favorable, and obesity with unfavorable, concentrations of chronic disease risk biomarkers.Objective:We examined whether high eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid intakes, measured as percentages of total red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid...

  7. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  8. Anatomy of the red cell membrane skeleton: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Lux, Samuel E

    2016-01-14

    The red cell membrane skeleton is a pseudohexagonal meshwork of spectrin, actin, protein 4.1R, ankyrin, and actin-associated proteins that laminates the inner membrane surface and attaches to the overlying lipid bilayer via band 3-containing multiprotein complexes at the ankyrin- and actin-binding ends of spectrin. The membrane skeleton strengthens the lipid bilayer and endows the membrane with the durability and flexibility to survive in the circulation. In the 36 years since the first primitive model of the red cell skeleton was proposed, many additional proteins have been discovered, and their structures and interactions have been defined. However, almost nothing is known of the skeleton's physiology, and myriad questions about its structure remain, including questions concerning the structure of spectrin in situ, the way spectrin and other proteins bind to actin, how the membrane is assembled, the dynamics of the skeleton when the membrane is deformed or perturbed by parasites, the role lipids play, and variations in membrane structure in unique regions like lipid rafts. This knowledge is important because the red cell membrane skeleton is the model for spectrin-based membrane skeletons in all cells, and because defects in the red cell membrane skeleton underlie multiple hemolytic anemias.

  9. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  10. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  11. Home improvements: malaria and the red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Foley, M; Tilley, L

    1995-11-01

    In real-estate agent's terms, the red blood cell is a renovator's dream. The mature human erythrocyte has no internal organelles, no protein synthesis machinery and no infrastructure for protein trafficking. The malaria parasite invades this empty shell and effectively converts the erythrocyte back into a fully functional eukaryotic cell. In this article, Michael Foley and Leann Tilley examine the Plasmodium falciparum proteins that interact with the membrane skeleton at different stages of the infection and speculate on the roles of these proteins in the remodelling process.

  12. Genomic Typing of Red Cell Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Antigen‐Matched  Red  Cells   for  Sickle   Cell   Anemia  Patients  Using  Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: Meghan Delaney, Prashant Gaur, Askale...H, Constans J, Quilici JC, Lefevre‐Witier P, Sevin J, Stevens M: Study of red blood  cell  and serum enzymes in  five  Pyrenean communities and in a...Antigen‐Matched Red  Cells  for  Sickle   Cell  Anemia Patients  Using Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: AABB (poster) 2009.  Background: Patients with  sickle

  13. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  14. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  15. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  16. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  17. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  18. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  19. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  20. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  1. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  4. Characterization of dsRed2-positive cells in the doublecortin-dsRed2 transgenic adult rat retina.

    PubMed

    Trost, A; Schroedl, F; Marschallinger, J; Rivera, F J; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Couillard-Despres, S; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2014-12-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is predominantly expressed in neuronal precursor cells and young immature neurons of the developing and adult brain, where it is involved in neuronal differentiation, migration and plasticity. Moreover, its expression pattern reflects neurogenesis, and transgenic DCX promoter-driven reporter models have been previously used to investigate adult neurogenesis. In this study, we characterize dsRed2 reporter protein-expressing cells in the adult retina of the transgenic DCX promoter-dsRed2 rat model, with the aim to identify cells with putative neurogenic activity. Additionally, we confirmed the expression of the dsRed2 protein in DCX-expressing cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult DCX-dsRed2 rat retinas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of DCX, NF200, Brn3a, Sox2, NeuN, calbindin, calretinin, PKC-a, Otx2, ChAT, PSA-NCAM and the glial markers GFAP and CRALBP, followed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. In addition, brain sections of transgenic rats were analyzed for dsRed2 expression and co-localization with DCX, NeuN, GFAP and Sox2 in the cortex and dentate gyrus. Endogenous DCX expression in the adult retina was confined to horizontal cells, and these cells co-expressed the DCX promoter-driven dsRed2 reporter protein. In addition, we encountered dsRed2 expression in various other cell types in the retina: retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a subpopulation of amacrine cells, a minority of bipolar cells and in perivascular cells. Since also RGCs expressed dsRed2, the DCX-dsRed2 rat model might offer a useful tool to study RGCs in vivo under various conditions. Müller glial cells, which have previously been identified as cells with stem cell features and with neurogenic potential, did express neither endogenous DCX nor the dsRed2 reporter. However, and surprisingly, we identified a perivascular glial cell type expressing the dsRed2 reporter, enmeshed with the glia/stem cell marker GFAP and colocalizing with the

  5. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  6. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; English, Brian P; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C; Singer, Robert H; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2014-10-23

    A subclass of fluorescent proteins (FPs), large Stokes shift (LSS) FP, are characterized by increased spread between excitation and emission maxima. We report a photoswitchable variant of a red FP with an LSS, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation and emission at 445 and 622 nm, but violet irradiation photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation and emission at 573 and 621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical, and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells and determine its crystal structure in the LSS form. Mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and spectroscopy of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the LSS, pH dependence, and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate the applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution photoactivated localization microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects.

  7. Interaction of ruthenium red with Ca2(+)-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Charuk, J.H.; Pirraglia, C.A.; Reithmeier, R.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The interaction of ruthenium red, ((NH3)5Ru-O-Ru(NH3)4-O-Ru(NH3)5)Cl6.4H2O, with various Ca2(+)-binding proteins was studied. Ruthenium red inhibited Ca2+ binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein, calsequestrin, immobilized on Sepharose 4B. Furthermore, ruthenium red bound to calsequestrin with high affinity (Kd = 0.7 microM; Bmax = 218 nmol/mg protein). The dye stained calsequestrin in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or on nitrocellulose paper and was displaced by Ca2+ (Ki = 1.4 mM). The specificity of ruthenium red staining of several Ca2(+)-binding proteins was investigated by comparison with two other detection methods, 45Ca2+ autoradiography and the Stains-all reaction. Ruthenium red bound to the same proteins detected by the 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Ruthenium red stained both the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter and the Ca2(+)-ATPase of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. Ruthenium red also stained the EF hand conformation Ca2(+)-binding proteins, calmodulin, troponin C, and S-100. This inorganic dye provides a simple, rapid method for detecting various types of Ca2(+)-binding proteins following electrophoresis.

  8. Theory of non-Newtonian viscosity of red blood cell suspension: effect of red cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Murata, T

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the deformation of red blood cells on non-Newtonian viscosity of a concentrated red cell suspension are investigated theoretically. To simplify the problem an elastic spherical shell filled with an incompressible Newtonian fluid is considered as a model of a normal red cell. The equation of the surface of the shell suspended in a steady simple shear flow is calculated on the assumption that the deformation from a spherical shape is very small. The relative viscosity of a concentrated suspension of such particles is obtained based on the "free surface cell" method proposed by Happel. It is shown that the relative viscosity decreases as the shear rate increases.

  9. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of these background data, metabolic studies were performed on humans involved in space flight. These studies included the Skylab experiences. The primary purpose of the investigations was to study red cells for: (1) evidences of lipid peroxidation, or (2) changes at various points in the glycolytic pathway. The Skylab missions were an opportunity to study blood samples before, during, and after flight and to compare results with simultaneous controls. No direct evidence that lipid peroxidation had occurred in the red blood cells was apparent in the studies.

  10. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-12

    starting cells are lost at rehydration). Hypotonic or hypertonic lysis of red cells can disrupt the normal asymmetric distribution of phospholipids between...remove the buffy coat and plasma. The packed RBC were washed in isotonic dextrose saline according to standard washing procedures (11] using an automated...cell washer ( Model 2991, COBE, Lakewood, CO). The washed and packed RBC (about 85% hematocrit) were resuspended to about 40% in hypertonic phosphate

  11. Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: effect of red cells.

    PubMed

    Brash, J L; Brophy, J M; Feuerstein, I A

    1976-05-01

    Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

  12. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  13. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  14. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    freeze-dried and rehydrated blood cells will be made radioactive with " chromium and infused into my other arm through a hypodermic needle . No more than...directed at: (1) development of buffer formulations based on the glass transition and water replacement theory : (2) establishing standard...survival of transfused red blood cells. The labelled RBC were infused through a 20 gauge needle into the volunteer via a scalp vein in the right arm

  15. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Benjamin; Slijper, Monique

    2014-05-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. This makes RBCs highly sensitive to any aberration. If so, these RBCs are quickly removed from circulation, but if the RBC levels reduce extremely fast, this results in hemolytic anemia. Several causes of HA exist, and proteome analysis is the most straightforward way to obtain deeper insight into RBC functioning under the stress of disease. This should result in discovery of biomarkers, typical for each source of anemia. In this review, several challenges to generate in-depth RBC proteomes are described, like to obtain pure RBCs, to overcome the wide dynamic range in protein expression, and to establish which of the identified/quantified proteins are active in RBCs. The final challenge is to acquire and validate suited biomarkers unique for the changes that occur for each of the clinical questions; in red blood cell aging (also important for transfusion medicine), for thalassemias or sickle cell disease. Biomarkers for other hemolytic anemias that are caused by dysfunction of RBC membrane proteins (the RBC membrane defects) or RBC cytosolic proteins (the enzymopathies) are sometimes even harder to discover, in particular for the patients with RBC rare diseases with unknown cause. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  16. Interferometric phase microscopy of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Tang, Xian; Wang, Yin; Wang, Shouyu

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative phase imaging of cells with high accuracy in a completely noninvasive manner is a challenging task. To provide a proper solution to this important need, interferometric phase microscopy is described which relies on the off-axis interferometry, confocal microscopy and high-speed image capture technology. Phase retrieval from the single interferogram is done by algorithms based on the fast Fourier transform, traditional Hilbert transform and two-step Hilbert transform, respectively. Furthermore, a phase aberrations compensation approach is applied to correct the phase distribution of the red blood cells obtained via the three methods mentioned before without the pre-known knowledge for removing the wave front curvature introduced by the microscope objectives, off-axis imaging, etc., which otherwise hinders the phase reconstruction. The improved results reveal the better inner structures of the red blood cells. The development of quantitative phase imaging technique is shedding light on their future directions and applications for basic and clinical research.

  17. Quenching of red cell tryptophan fluorescence by mercurial compounds.

    PubMed

    Verkman, A S; Lukacovic, M F; Tinklepaugh, M S; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in red cell ghost membranes labeled with N-ethylmaleimide (N-EM) is quenched in a dose-dependent manner by the organic mercurial p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (p-CMBS). Fluorescence lifetime analysis shows that quenching occurs by a static mechanism. Binding of p-CMBS occurs by a rapid (less than 5 s) biomolecular association (dissociation constant K1 = 1.8 mM) followed by a slower unimolecular transition with forward rate constant k2 = 0.015 s-1 and reverse rate constant k-2 = 0.0054 s-1. Analysis of the temperature dependence of k2 gives delta H = 6.5 kcal/mol and delta S = -21 eu. The mercurial compounds p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, and mercuric chloride quench red cell tryptophan fluorescence by the same mechanism as p-CMBS does; the measured k2 value was the same for each compound, whereas K1 varied. p-CMBS also quenches the tryptophan fluorescence in vesicles reconstituted with purified band 3, the red cell anion exchange protein, in a manner similar to that in ghost membranes. These experiments define a mercurial binding site on band 3 in ghosts treated with N-EM and establish the binding mechanism to this site. The characteristics of this p-CMBS binding site on band 3 differ significantly from those of the p-CMBS binding site involved in red cell water and urea transport inhibition.

  18. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  19. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  20. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  3. Increased phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) receptor function associated with sickle red cell membrane ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, M.; Nair, C.N.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    The biological receptor for tumor-promoting phorbol esters has been identified as the CaS /phospholipid dependent enzyme, protein kinase C. In the red cell, this enzyme is mainly cytosolic but becomes translocated to the membrane if the cellular CaS is allowed to rise. Since cellular CaS in sickle red cells is high, it was reasoned that this enzyme may become more membrane-bound. In fact, the authors noticed a four-fold increase in the binding of TH-PDBu by membrane ghosts isolated from sickle red cells compared to normal red cells (pmoles PDBu bound/mg protein; normal = 0.3 vs sickle cell = 1.4). Attempts to assay the enzyme directly as phospholipid-activated TSP incorporation into the acid-precipitable membrane proteins also indicated a two-fold increase in the radiolabelling of sickle cell membrane ghosts. Autophosphorylation of membrane proteins and analysis of the phosphorylation profile by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography revealed phosphorylation predominantly of bands 3, 4.1 and 4.9 which are known protein kinase C substrates for the red cell enzyme. The increased membrane-associated protein kinase C in sickle red cells may have a bearing on the altered membrane properties reported in this condition.

  4. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  5. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  6. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  9. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  11. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  12. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  14. Red cell distribution width and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is an index which primarily reflects impaired erythropoiesis and abnormal red blood cell survival. In last years the interest in this marker has considerably grown and now a lot of data are available indicating that this simple and inexpensive parameter is a strong and independent risk factor for death in the general population. Moreover, several investigations have been performed to investigate the role of RDW in cardiovascular and thrombotic disorders. Contrarily, there are relatively few reports focusing on RDW in the area of oncology and to date none review have been performed in this specific field. As such, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize some interesting results obtained in studies performed in patients affected by solid and hematological tumors. Even if larger studies are needed before these preliminary findings can be generalized, it seems plausible to affirm that RDW can be useful by adding prognostic information in patients with oncologic disease. PMID:27867951

  15. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  16. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  17. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  18. From Red Cells to Soft Porous Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Gacka, Thomas; Nathan, Rungun; Crawford, Robert; Vucbmss Team

    2014-11-01

    Biological scientists have wondered, since the motion of red cells was first observed in capillaries, how the highly flexible red cell can move with so little friction in tightly fitting microvessels without being damaged or undergoing hemolysis. Theoretical studies (Feng and Weinbaum, 2000, JFM; Wu et al., 2004, PRL) attributed this frictionless motion to the dramatically enhanced hydrodynamic lifting force generated inside the soft, porous, endothelial surface layer (ESL) covering the inner surfaces of our capillaries, as a red blood cell glides over it. Herein we report the first experimental examination of this concept. The results conclusively demonstrate that significant fraction of the overall lifting force generated in a soft porous layer as a planing surface glides over it, is contributed by the pore fluid pressure, and thus frictional loss is reduced significantly. Moreover, the experimental predictions showed excellent agreement with the experimental data. This finding has the potential of dramatically changing existing lubrication approaches, and can result in substantial savings in energy consumption and thus reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  20. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1. PMID:7229611

  1. Two-plasmid vector system for independently controlled expression of green and red fluorescent fusion proteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brzoska, Anthony J; Firth, Neville

    2013-05-01

    We have constructed a system for the regulated coexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusions in Staphylococcus aureus. It was validated by simultaneous localization of cell division proteins FtsZ and Noc and used to detect filament formation by an actin-like ParM plasmid partitioning protein in its native coccoid host.

  2. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  3. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA.

  4. Protein concentration by precipitation with pyrogallol red prior to electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, T; Abbott, N J; Fox, P; Williams, K M

    1995-01-01

    The pyrogallol red protein assay (Clinical Chemistry 1986, 32, 1551-1554) is based upon formation of a blue protein-dye complex in the presence of molybdate under acidic conditions. However, centrifugation of the assay mixture results in loss of color yield and precipitation of the protein-dye complex which can be recovered and resolubilized to achieve protein concentration prior to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The method has been evaluated relative to trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation for recovery and electrophoresis of commercial protein and peptide molecular weight markers. Precipitation with pyrogallol red-molybdate (PRM) gives better and more uniform recovery of both proteins and peptides as compared to TCA. The lower limit of PRM precipitation is similar to TCA and corresponds to 1 microgram protein per mL assay mixture. This is equivalent to 100 microL of 10 micrograms/mL protein using the standard protein assay or 1 microgram/mL protein using a modified assay incorporating a fivefold concentrate of the dye reagent. Application of the method is demonstrated by concentration of urinary proteins. The method is simple and economic and useful for conserving trace amounts of precious sample as it allows recovery of protein for electrophoresis following protein assay.

  5. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  6. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  7. Spectroscopy detection of green and red fluorescent proteins in genetically modified plants using a fiber optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; Chew, Yiwen; Yu, Shangjuan; Yeo, Gare H.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, fiber optic spectroscopy is developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in vivo. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fiber optic spectroscopy. Fluorescence at the appropriate emission wavelengths could be detected up to 64X dilution for EGFP and 40X dilution for DsRED. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in vivo, transgenic potato hairy roots expressing EGFP and DsRED were regenerated. This was achieved by cloning the EGFP and DsRED genes into the plant binary vector, pTMV35S, to create the recombinant vectors pGLOWGreen and pGLOWRed. These latter binary vectors were introduced into Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4T. Infection of potato cells with transformed agrobacteria was used to insert the fluorescent protein genes into the potato genome. Genetically modified potato cells were then regenerated into hairy roots. A panel of transformed hairy roots expressing varying levels of fluorescent proteins was selected by fluorescence microscopy. We are now assessing the capability of spectroscopic detection system for in vivo quantification of green and red fluorescence levels in transformed roots.

  8. Role molecular signaling pathways in changes of red blood cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Muravyov, Alexei V; Tikhomirova, Irina A

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the dependency of the red blood cell deformability upon activation of extra- and intracellular signaling pathways. Exposures of red blood cells (RBCs) to catecholamines and to insulin led to positive change in the RBC deformability. When forskolin, a stimulator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), was added to RBC suspension, the RBC deformability was increased. Somewhat more significant deformability rise appeared after RBC incubation with dB-AMP. The inhibitors of phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity increased red cell deformability. These results revealed a considerable role of the AC-cAMP signaling system in the regulation of red blood cell deformability. The rise of the red blood cell Ca(2+) influx, stimulated by mechanical loading or A23187 was accompanied by a marked lowering of RBC deformability. At the same time blocking of Ca(2+) entry into RBC by verapamil or Ca(2+) chelating by EGTA led to significant deformability rise. The comparison of the effect of the different protein kinases on the red blood cell deformability showed that it was altered more considerable under PKA activation by forskolin or dB-cAMP than by other protein kinases. There was a lesser but quite statistically significant effect of tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) on RBC microrheology. Whereas the microrheological effect of PKC was not so considerable. The problem of the short-term regulation of red blood cell microrheology is examined. The latter includes: the modes of activation of extra- and intracellular molecular signaling pathways, ligand - receptor interaction, second messengers, membrane protein phosphorylation. On the whole the total data clearly show that the red cell deformability changes are connected with activation of different extra - and intracellular signaling pathways. It seems reasonable to suppose that red blood cell deformability changes were mainly associated with activation of the AC-cAMP-PKA pathway, and with decrease of Ca(2+) entry into

  9. Impact of glycocalyx structure on red cell-red cell affinity in polymer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rad, Samar; Meiselman, Herbert J; Neu, Björn

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical framework based on macromolecular depletion has been utilized in order to examine the energetics of red blood cell interactions. Three different glycocalyx structures are considered and cell-cell affinities are calculated by superposition of depletion, steric and electrostatic interactions. The theoretical model predicts a non-monotonic dependence of the interaction energies on polymer size. Further, our results indicate that the glycocalyx segment distribution has a large impact on adhesion energies between cells: a linear segment distribution induces the strongest adhesion between cells followed by pseudo-tail and uniform distributions. Our approach confirms the concept of a depletion mechanism for RBC aggregation, and also provides new insights that may eventually help to understand and quantify cellular factors that control red blood cell interactions in health and disease.

  10. Argon laser radiation of human clots: differential photoabsorption in red cell rich and red cell poor clots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Chan, M.C.; Seckinger, D.L.; Vazquez, A.; Rosenthal, P.K.; Lee, K.K.; Ikeda, R.M.; Reis, R.L.; Hanna, E.S.; Mason, D.T.

    1985-06-01

    Since argon laser radiation (454-514 nm) can vaporize human clots, the authors determined whether the absorption of laser energies can differ among different types of blood clots. Thus, they performed spectrophotometric studies and examined the ability of this laser to penetrate red cell rich and red cell poor clots. Fifty-four red cell rich and red cell poor clot samples, varying in depth from 1.8 to 5.0 mm, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 watts from an argon laser beam. At a given power intensity, the deeper the red cell rich clot, the longer was the time needed to penetrate the clot. The higher the power used, the shorter was the red clot penetration time. In contrast, all power levels used up to 5 minutes did not penetrate any of the varying depths of red cell poor clots. Spectrophotometrically, the red cell rich clot had an absorption curve typical of hemoglobin pigment while the red cell poor clot, in the absence of hemoglobin, had poor absorption between 350 and 600 nm and was unable to absorb argon laser energies. Thus, the argon laser provides a therapeutic modality for human red cell rich clot dissolution but the present approach does not appear to be effective against red cell poor clots.

  11. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  12. Inhibition of anion permeability by amphiphilic compounds in human red cell: evidence for an interaction of niflumic acid with the band 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Cousin, J L; Motais, R

    1979-04-20

    In human erythrocyte, permeability to the anion is instantaneously, reversibly, and noncompetitively inhibited by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, niflumic acid. The active form of this powerful inhibitor (I50 = 6 X 10(-7) M) is the ionic form. We demonstrated that: (i) The binding of niflumic acid to the membrane of unsealed ghosts show one saturable and one linear component over the concentration range studied. The saturable component vanishes when chloride transport is fully inhibited by covalently bound 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyano stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS). Our estimate of these SITS protectable niflumate binding sites (about 9 x 10(5) per cell) agrees with the number of protein molecules per cell in band 3. These sites are half-saturated with 10(-6) M niflumic acid, a concentration very close to I50. (ii) Niflumic acid inhibits the binding reaction of SITS with anion controlling transport sites. These results indicate that niflumic acid and SITS are mutually exclusive inhibitors, suggesting that niflumic acid interacts with the protein in band 3. Niflumic acid also decreases glucose and ouabain-insensitive sodium permeabilities. However, these effects are produced at a very high concentration of niflumic acid (in millimolar range), suggesting unspecific action, possibly through lipid phase.

  13. Image analysis of nucleated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Melnik, Y; Yeger, A

    1983-08-01

    Bone marrow smears stained with Giemsa were scanned with a video camera under computer control. Forty-two cells representing the six differentiation classes of the red bone marrow were sampled. Each cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing a square area of 0.4 micron2 in the original image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. After separation and smoothing the images were processed with a Sobel operator outlining the points of steepest gray level change in the cell. These points constitute a closed curve denominated as inner cell boundary, separating the cell into an inner and an outer region. Two types of features were extracted from each cell: form features, e.g., area and length, and gray level features. Twenty-two features were tested for their discriminative merit. After selecting 16, the discriminant analysis program classified correctly all 42 cells into the 6 classes.

  14. Interactions of mefloquine with ABC proteins, MRP1 (ABCC1) and MRP4 (ABCC4), that are present in human red cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Klokouzas, Antonios; Hladky, Stephen B.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Barrand, Margery A.

    2005-01-01

    Human erythrocyte membranes express the multidrug resistance-associated proteins, MRP1, MRP4 and MRP5, that collectively can efflux oxidised glutathione, glutathione conjugates and cyclic nucleotides. It is already known that the quinoline derivative, MK-571, is a potent inhibitor of MRP-mediated transport. We here examine whether the quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, amodiaquine, chloroquine, mefloquine, primaquine, quinidine and quinine, also interact with erythrocyte MRPs with consequences for their access to the intracellular parasites or for efflux of oxidised glutathione from infected cells. Using inside-out vesicles prepared from human erythrocytes we have shown that mefloquine and MK-571 inhibit transport of 3 μM [3H]DNP-SG known to be mediated by MRP1 (IC50 127 μM and 1.1 μM respectively) and of 3.3 μM [3H]cGMP thought but not proven to be mediated primarily by MRP4 (IC50 21 μM and 0.41 μM). They also inhibited transport in membrane vesicles prepared from tumour cells expressing MRP1 or MRP4 and blocked calcein efflux from MRP1 overexpressing cells and BCECF efflux from MRP4 overexpressing cells. Both stimulated ATPase activity in membranes prepared from MRP1 and MRP4 overexpressing cells and inhibited activity stimulated by quercetin or PGE1 respectively. Neither inhibited [α-32P]8-azidoATP binding confirming that the interactions are not at the ATP binding site. These results demonstrate that mefloquine and MK-571 both inhibit transport of other substrates and stimulate ATPase activity and thus may themselves be substrates for transport. But at concentrations achieved clinically mefloquine is unlikely to affect the MRP1-mediated transport of GSSG across the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:16004972

  15. Skeleton deformation of red blood cells during tank treading motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Peng, Zhangli

    2012-11-01

    By coupling a fluid-structure interaction algorithm with a three-level multiscale structural model, we simulate the tank treading responses of erythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBC) in shear flows. The fluid motion is depicted within the Stokes-flow framework, and is mathematically formulated with the boundary integral equations. The structural model takes into account the flexible connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton as well as the viscoelastic responses. The concentration of this study is on the transient process involving the development of the local area deformation of the protein skeleton. Under the assumption that the protein skeleton is stress-free in the natural biconcave configuration, our simulations indicate the following properties: (1) During tank treading motions it takes long time for significant area deformations to establish. For cells with diminished connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton (e.g. cells with mutations or defects), the relaxation time will be greatly reduced; (2) Deformations of the skeleton depend on the initial orientation of the cell with respect to the incoming flow; (3) The maximum area expansion occurs around the regions corresponding to the dimples in the original biconcave state; (4) Oscillations in cell geometry (breathing) and orientation (e.g. swinging) are observed. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute under award number R01HL092793.

  16. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  17. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  18. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  19. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking.

  20. Ektacytometry: Instrumentation and Applications in Red Blood Cell Preservation Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-10

    that it was necessary to maintain an isotonic environment, since the red blood cells respond differently to shear stress under hypertonic or...the red blood cells respond differently to shear stress under hypertonic or hypotonic conditions. The most unexpected observation was an absence of...required to compare samples analyzed the same day. 2. Treatment of Human Red Blood Cells With Hypotonic and Hypertonic Solutions and Glutaraldehyde

  1. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  2. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  3. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  4. A novel type of light-harvesting antenna protein of red algal origin in algae with secondary plastids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Light, the driving force of photosynthesis, can be harmful when present in excess; therefore, any light harvesting system requires photoprotection. Members of the extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily are involved in light harvesting as well as in photoprotection and are found in the red and green plant lineages, with a complex distribution pattern of subfamilies in the different algal lineages. Results Here, we demonstrate that the recently discovered “red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like proteins” (RedCAPs) form a monophyletic family within this protein superfamily. The occurrence of RedCAPs was found to be restricted to the red algal lineage, including red algae (with primary plastids) as well as cryptophytes, haptophytes and heterokontophytes (with secondary plastids of red algal origin). Expression of a full-length RedCAP:GFP fusion construct in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum confirmed the predicted plastid localisation of RedCAPs. Furthermore, we observed that similarly to the fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding light-harvesting antenna proteins also RedCAP transcripts in diatoms were regulated in a diurnal way at standard light conditions and strongly repressed at high light intensities. Conclusions The absence of RedCAPs from the green lineage implies that RedCAPs evolved in the red lineage after separation from the the green lineage. During the evolution of secondary plastids, RedCAP genes therefore must have been transferred from the nucleus of the endocytobiotic alga to the nucleus of the host cell, a process that involved complementation with pre-sequences allowing import of the gene product into the secondary plastid bound by four membranes. Based on light-dependent transcription and on localisation data, we propose that RedCAPs might participate in the light (intensity and quality)-dependent structural or functional reorganisation of the light-harvesting antennae of the photosystems upon dark to light

  5. Mechanisms of immune red cell destruction, and red cell compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Garratty, G.

    1983-03-01

    The immune destruction of red cells can occur as a complement-mediated intravascular process, or extravascularly, where the red cells are destroyed by macrophages following interaction with cell-bound IgG1, IgG3, and/or C3b. Many of the factors that affect this in vivo destruction are not taken into account during in vitro pretransfusion compatibility testing. At present, even by use of more elaborate tests, it is difficult to accurately predict the fate of a transfused unit of blood. By using some simple information, such as antibody specificity and thermal range, it is sometimes possible to predict the outcome of transfusing a unit of blood that is incompatible in vitro. At other times it may be necessary to utilize /sup 51/Cr-labeled red cells to determine the risk of transfusing such units. Because of the paucity of reported clinical correlations, macrophage/monocyte monolayer assays are of little practical value at present.

  6. Kinematics of red cell aspiration by fluorescence-imaged microdeformation.

    PubMed Central

    Discher, D E; Mohandas, N

    1996-01-01

    Maps of fluorescing red cell membrane components on a pipette-aspirated projection are quantitated in an effort to elucidate and unify the heterogeneous kinematics of deformation. Transient gradients of diffusing fluorescent lipid first demonstrate the fluidity of an otherwise uniform-density bilayer and corroborate a "universal" calibration scale for relative surface density. A steep but smooth and stable gradient in the densities of the skeleton components spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1 is used to estimate large elastic strains along the aspirated skeleton. The deformation fields are argued to be an unhindered response to loading in the surface normal direction. Density maps intermediate to those of the compressible skeleton and fluid bilayer are exhibited by particular transmembrane proteins (e.g., Band 3) and yield estimates for the skeleton-connected fractions. Such connected proteins appear to occupy a significant proportion of the undeformed membrane surface and can lead to steric exclusion of unconnected integral membrane proteins from regions of network condensation. Consistent with membrane repatterning kinematics in reversible deformation, final vesiculation of the projection tip produces a cell fragment concentrated in freely diffusing proteins but depleted of skeleton. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:8889146

  7. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  8. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  9. Red blood cell nitric oxide synthase modulates red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Mozar, Anaïs; Connes, Philippe; Collins, Bianca; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Lemonne, Nathalie; Bloch, Wilhelm; Grau, Marijke

    2016-11-04

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited red blood cells (RBC) disorder characterized by significantly decreased RBC deformability. The present study aimed to assess whether modulation of RBC Nitric Oxide Synthase (RBC-NOS) activation could affect RBC deformability in SCA.Blood of twenty-five SCA patients was treated for 1 hour at 37°C with Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) or PBS containing 1% of Dimethylsulfoxyde as control, L-arginine or N(5)-(1-Iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO) to directly stimulate or inhibit RBC-NOS, insulin or wortmannin to indirectly stimulate or inhibit RBC-NOS through their effects on the PI3 Kinase/Akt pathway, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) as NO donor and NO scavenger, respectively. RBC deformability was measured by ektacytometry at 3 Pa.RBC deformability significantly increased after insulin treatment and significantly decreased after L-NIO and wortmannin incubation. The other conditions did not affect deformability. Significantly increased nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of enhanced free radical generation, were detected by immunohistochemistry in SNP and insulin treated samples.These data suggest that RBC deformability of SCA can be modulated by RBC-NOS activity but also that oxidative stress may impair effectiveness of RBC-NOS produced NO.

  10. Vesicles, capsules and red blood cells under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-12-01

    Blood flow is dictated by the dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs), which constitute by far the major component. RBCs are made of a a two dimensional fluid bilayer of phospholipids, having underneath a network of proteins conferring to them shear elasticity, and they possess many membrane and transmembrane proteins (like ion channels). Simplified systems, like vesicles (made of a pure bilayer of phospholipid) and capsules (made of an extensible polymer shell) are used as models for RBCs. Both systems reproduce several features known for RBCs under flow. Their interest lies, besides some simplicity, in the fact that they can be fabricated in the laboratory, and their properties (size, stiffness, internal content....) can be varied in a wide range allowing thus to explore a quite significant parameter space that is essential to test predictions and discriminate between different models. We shall review the main recent achievement in this field, both for a single entity, collective effects and the impact on rheology.

  11. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  12. Efflux of red cell water into buffered hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    OLMSTEAD, E G

    1960-03-01

    Buffered NaCl solutions hypertonic to rabbit serum were prepared and freezing point depressions of each determined after dilution with measured amounts of water. Freezing point depression of these dilutions was a linear function of the amount of water added. One ml. of rabbit red cells was added to each 4 ml. of the hypertonic solutions and after incubation at 38 degrees C. for 30 minutes the mixture was centrifuged and a freezing point depression determined on the supernatant fluid. The amount of water added to the hypertonic solutions by the red cells was calcuated from this freezing point depression. For each decrease in the freezing point of -0.093 degrees C. of the surrounding solution red cells gave up approximately 5 ml. of water per 100 ml. of red cells in the range of -0.560 to -0.930 degrees C. Beyond -0.930 degrees C. the amount of water given up by 100 ml. of red cells fits best a parabolic equation. The maximum of this equation occurred at a freezing point of the hypertonic solution of -2.001 degrees C. at which time the maximum amount of water leaving the red cells would be 39.9 ml. per 100 ml. of red cells. The data suggest that only about 43 per cent of the red cell water is available for exchange into solutions of increasing tonicity.

  13. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called “sports anemia.” This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  14. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  15. Developmental Plasticity of Red Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Malka, Roy; Higgins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Most human physiologic set points like body temperature are tightly regulated and show little variation between healthy individuals. Red blood cell (RBC) characteristics such as hematocrit (HCT) and mean cell volume (MCV) are stable within individuals but can vary by 20% from one healthy person to the next. The mechanisms for the majority of this inter-individual variation are unknown and do not appear to involve common genetic variation. Here we show that environmental conditions present during development, namely in utero iron availability, can exert long-term influence on a set point related to the RBC life cycle. In a controlled study of rhesus monkeys and a retrospective study of humans, we use a mathematical model of in vivo RBC population dynamics to show that in utero iron deficiency is associated with a lowered threshold for RBC clearance and turnover. This in utero effect is plastic, persisting at least two years after birth and after the cessation of iron deficiency. Our study reports a rare instance of developmental plasticity in the human hematologic systems and also shows how mathematical modeling can be used to identify cellular mechanisms involved in the adaptive control of homeostatic set points. PMID:24415575

  16. Red blood cell transfusion in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G; Spahn, Donat R; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2007-08-04

    Every year, about 75 million units of blood are collected worldwide. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is one of the few treatments that adequately restore tissue oxygenation when oxygen demand exceeds supply. Although the respiratory function of blood has been studied intensively, the trigger for RBC transfusion remains controversial, and doctors rely primarily on clinical experience. Laboratory assays that indicate failing tissue oxygenation would be ideal to guide the need for transfusion, but none has proved easy, reproducible, and sensitive to regional tissue hypoxia. The clinical importance of the RBCs storage lesion (ie, the time-dependent metabolic, biochemical, and molecular changes that stored blood cells undergo) is poorly understood. RBCs can be filtered, washed, frozen, or irradiated for specific indications. Donor screening and testing have dramatically reduced infectious risks in the developed world, but infection remains a major hazard in developing countries, where 13 million units of blood are not tested for HIV or hepatitis viruses. Pathogen inactivation techniques are in clinical trials for RBCs, but none is available for use. Despite serious immunological and non-immunological complications, RBC transfusion holds a therapeutic index that exceeds that of many common medications.

  17. Hemodynamic effects of red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2007-01-01

    The influence of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on blood flow in vivo has been under debate since early 1900's, yet a full understanding has still has not been reached. Enhanced RBC aggregation is well known to increase blood viscosity measured in rotational viscometers. However, it has been demonstrated that RBC aggregation may decrease flow resistance in cylindrical tubes, due to the formation of a cell-poor zone near the tube wall which results from the enhanced central accumulation of RBC. There is also extensive discussion regarding the effects of RBC aggregation on in vivo blood flow resistance. Several groups have reported increased microcirculatory flow resistance with enhanced RBC aggregation in experiments that utilized intravital microscopy. Alternatively, whole organ studies revealed that flow resistance may be significantly decreased if RBC aggregation is enhanced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to achieve well-controlled, graded alterations in RBC aggregation without influencing suspending phase properties. Studies using this technique revealed that the effects of RBC aggregation are determined by the degree of aggregation changes, and that this relationship can be explained by different hemodynamic mechanisms.

  18. Understanding red blood cell alloimmunization triggers.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-12-02

    Blood group alloimmunization is "triggered" when a person lacking a particular antigen is exposed to this antigen during transfusion or pregnancy. Although exposure to an antigen is necessary for alloimmunization to occur, it is not alone sufficient. Blood group antigens are diverse in structure, function, and immunogenicity. In addition to red blood cells (RBCs), a recipient of an RBC transfusion is exposed to donor plasma, white blood cells, and platelets; the potential contribution of these elements to RBC alloimmunization remains unclear. Much attention in recent years has been placed on recipient factors that influence RBC alloantibody responses. Danger signals, identified in murine and human studies alike as being risk factors for alloimmunization, may be quite diverse in nature. In addition to exogenous or condition-associated inflammation, autoimmunity is also a risk factor for alloantibody formation. Triggers for alloimmunization in pregnancy are not well-understood beyond the presence of a fetal/maternal bleed. Studies using animal models of pregnancy-induced RBC alloimmunization may provide insight in this regard. A better understanding of alloimmunization triggers and signatures of "responders" and "nonresponders" is needed for prevention strategies to be optimized. A common goal of such strategies is increased transfusion safety and improved pregnancy outcomes.

  19. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  20. Post-mortem re-cloning of a transgenic red fluorescent protein dog.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Koo, Ok Jae; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Geon-A; Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the world's first transgenic dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, cellular senescence is a major limiting factor for producing more advanced transgenic dogs. To overcome this obstacle, we rejuvenated transgenic cells using a re-cloning technique. Fibroblasts from post-mortem red fluorescent protein (RFP) dog were reconstructed with in vivo matured oocytes and transferred into 10 surrogate dogs. One puppy was produced and confirmed as a re-cloned dog. Although the puppy was lost during birth, we successfully established a rejuvenated fibroblast cell line from this animal. The cell line was found to stably express RFP and is ready for additional genetic modification.

  1. A new material concept for the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Evans, E A

    1973-09-01

    The proposition is made that the red cell membrane is a two-dimensional, incompressible material and a general stress-strain law is developed for finite deformations. In the linear form, the character of such a material is analogous to a two-dimensional Mooney material (e.g., rubber), indicating that the molecular structure in the plane of the membrane would consist of long chains, randomly kinked and cross-linked in the natural state. The loose network could be provided by the protein component and the lipid phase could exist interstitially as a liquid bilayer, giving the membrane its two-dimensional incompressibility. The material provides the capability of large deformations exhibited by the discocyte and yet the rigidity associated with the osmotic spherocyte state. It is demonstrated that a membrane of this type can form a sphere at constant area. An illustrative example of the application to single cell discocyte-to-osmotic spherocyte transformations is presented.

  2. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  3. Photochemical decontamination of red cell concentrates with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Zuk, Maria M.; Oetjen, Joyce; Chan, Wai-Shun; Lenny, Leslie; Horowitz, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    Virus inactivation in red blood cells concentrates (RBCC) is being studied in order to increase the safety of the blood supply. For this purpose we have been studying the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc 4), a photosensitizer activated with red light. Two approaches were used to achieve enhanced selectivity of Pc 4 for virus inactivation. One was formulation of Pc 4 in liposomes that reduce its binding to red cells. The other was the use of a light emitting diode (LED) array emitting at 700 nm. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infectivity served as an endpoint for virus kill in treated RBCC. Red cell hemolysis and circulatory survival in rabbits served as measures for red cell damage. Treatment of small aliquots of human RBCC with 2 (mu) M Pc 4 in liposomes and 10 J/cm2 of 700 nm LED light in the presence of the quenches of reactive oxygen species glutathione and trolox resulted in 6 log10 inactivation of VSV. Under these conditions hemolysis of treated red cells stored at 4 degree(s)C for 21 days was only slightly above that of control cells. Rabbit RBCC similarly treated circulated with a half life of 7.5 days compared with 10.5 days of control. It is concluded that Pc 4 used as described here may be useful for viral decontamination of RBCC, pending toxicological and clinical studies.

  4. Neutral red uptake assay for the estimation of cell viability/cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Guillermo; del Peso, Ana; Zurita, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of the number of viable cells in a culture. It is one of the most used cytotoxicity tests with many biomedical and environmental applications. It is based on the ability of viable cells to incorporate and bind the supravital dye neutral red in the lysosomes. Most primary cells and cell lines from diverse origin may be successfully used. Cells are seeded in 96-well tissue culture plates and are treated for the appropriate period. The plates are then incubated for 2 h with a medium containing neutral red. The cells are subsequently washed, the dye is extracted in each well and the absorbance is read using a spectrophotometer. The procedure is cheaper and more sensitive than other cytotoxicity tests (tetrazolium salts, enzyme leakage or protein content). Once the cells have been treated, the assay can be completed in <3 h.

  5. Dynamic insight into protein structure utilizing red edge excitation shift.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Haldar, Sourav

    2014-01-21

    Proteins are considered the workhorses in the cellular machinery. They are often organized in a highly ordered conformation in the crowded cellular environment. These conformations display characteristic dynamics over a range of time scales. An emerging consensus is that protein function is critically dependent on its dynamics. The subtle interplay between structure and dynamics is a hallmark of protein organization and is essential for its function. Depending on the environmental context, proteins can adopt a range of conformations such as native, molten globule, unfolded (denatured), and misfolded states. Although protein crystallography is a well established technique, it is not always possible to characterize various protein conformations by X-ray crystallography due to transient nature of these states. Even in cases where structural characterization is possible, the information obtained lacks dynamic component, which is needed to understand protein function. In this overall scenario, approaches that reveal information on protein dynamics are much appreciated. Dynamics of confined water has interesting implications in protein folding. Interfacial hydration combines the motion of water molecules with the slow moving protein molecules. The red edge excitation shift (REES) approach becomes relevant in this context. REES is defined as the shift in the wavelength of maximum fluorescence emission toward higher wavelengths, caused by a shift in the excitation wavelength toward the red edge of absorption spectrum. REES arises due to slow rates (relative to fluorescence lifetime) of solvent relaxation (reorientation) around an excited state fluorophore in organized assemblies such as proteins. Consequently, REES depends on the environment-induced motional restriction imposed on the solvent molecules in the immediate vicinity of the fluorophore. In the case of a protein, the confined water in the protein creates a dipolar field that acts as the solvent for a fluorophore

  6. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  7. Malaria parasites and red cell variants: when a house is not a home

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Steve M.; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Multiple red cell variants are known to confer protection from malaria. Here we review advances in identifying new variants that modulate malaria risk and in defining molecular mechanisms that mediate malaria protection. Recent findings New red cell variants, including an innate variant in the red cell’s major Ca2+ pump and the acquired state of iron deficiency, have been associated with protection from clinical falciparum malaria. The hemoglobin (Hb) mutants HbC and HbS – known to protect carriers from severe falciparum malaria – enhance parasite passage to mosquitoes and may promote malaria transmission. At the molecular level, substantial advances have been made in understanding the impact of HbS and HbC upon the interactions between host microRNAs and Plasmodium falciparum protein translation; remodeling of red cell cytoskeletal components and transport of parasite proteins to the red cell surface; and chronic activation of the human innate immune system which induces tolerance to blood-stage parasites. Several polymorphisms have now been associated with protection from clinical vivax malaria or reduced P. vivax density, including Southeast Asian ovalocytosis and two common forms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Summary Red cell variants that modulate malaria risk can serve as models to identify clinically relevant mechanisms of pathogenesis, and thus define parasite and host targets for next-generation therapies. PMID:24675047

  8. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  9. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  10. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  11. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pankaj; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2014-10-01

    DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pK a, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (C max) observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine.

  12. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  13. A label-free proteome analysis strategy for identifying quantitative changes in erythrocyte membranes induced by red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2012-12-05

    Red blood cells have been extensively studied but many questions regarding membrane properties and pathophysiology remain unanswered. Proteome analysis of red cell membranes is complicated by a very wide dynamic range of protein concentrations as well as the presence of proteins that are very large, very hydrophobic, or heterogeneously glycosylated. This study investigated the removal of other blood cell types, red cell membrane extraction, differing degrees of fractionation using 1-D SDS gels, and label-free quantitative methods to determine optimized conditions for proteomic comparisons of clinical blood samples. The results showed that fractionation of red cell membranes on 1-D SDS gels was more efficient than low-ionic-strength extractions followed by 1-D gel fractionation. When gel lanes were sliced into 30 uniform slices, a good depth of analysis that included the identification of most well-characterized, low-abundance red cell membrane proteins including those present at 500 to 10,000 copies per cell was obtained. Furthermore, the size separation enabled detection of changes due to proteolysis or in vivo protein crosslinking. A combination of Rosetta Elucidator quantitation and subsequent statistical analysis enabled the robust detection of protein differences that could be used to address unresolved questions in red cell disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  14. The curious genomic path from leaky red cell to nephrotic kidney.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G W; Fricke, B

    2003-01-01

    The human red cell has proved to be an invaluable model cell for the study of many aspects of membrane structure and function. It has a series of transport pathways which mediate the movements of the univalent cations Na and K, which are either identical or similar to systems in other human tissues, including the human kidney. The balance between the energy-consuming NaK pump and a 'passive leak' component maintains a net deficit of cations within the cell, which defends the cell volume against osmotic swelling. There exist a series of dominantly inherited human red cell conditions, gathered under the generic title 'hereditary stomatocytoses', in which the so-called 'passive leak' to Na and K is pathologically increased. In the more severe variants this compromises the integrity of the cell and the patients suffer haemolytic anaemia. Some less severe variants present with pseudohyperkalaemia caused by loss of K from red cells on storage of blood at room temperature. The most severe variants show a deficiency in a widely distributed 'raft' protein known as stomatin. The stomatin protein is homologous to the 'podocin' protein, the gene for which is mutated in a recessively inherited form of nephrotic syndrome. Among other possible functions, both proteins could be involved in the trafficking of membrane proteins to and from the plasma membrane.

  15. Increased red cell calcium, decreased calcium adenosine triphosphatase, and altered membrane proteins during fava bean hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient (Mediterranean variant) individuals.

    PubMed

    Turrini, F; Naitana, A; Mannuzzu, L; Pescarmona, G; Arese, P

    1985-08-01

    RBCs from four glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient (Mediterranean variant) subjects were studied during fava bean hemolysis. In the density-fractionated RBC calcium level, Ca2+-ATPase activity, reduced glutathione level, and ghost protein pattern were studied. In the bottom fraction, containing most heavily damaged RBCs, calcium level ranged from 143 to 244 mumol/L RBCs (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 17 +/- 5 mumol/L RBCs). The Ca2+-ATPase activity ranged from 0.87 to 1.84 mumol ATP consumed/g Hb/min (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 2.27 +/- 0.4). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of ghosts showed: (1) the presence of high mol wt aggregates (in three cases they were reduced by dithioerythritol; in one case, only partial reduction was possible); (2) the presence of multiple, scattered new bands; and (3) the reduction of band 3. Oxidant-mediated damage to active calcium extrusion, hypothetically associated with increased calcium permeability, may explain the large increase in calcium levels. They, in turn, could activate calcium-dependent protease activity, giving rise to the profound changes in the ghost protein pattern.

  16. Astringency reduction in red wine by whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, Paula; Olatujoye, Jumoke B; Cabezudo, Ignacio; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2016-05-15

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacturing and therefore investigating new applications of whey proteins will contribute towards the valorisation of whey and hence waste reduction. This study shows for the first time a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of gelatin and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) as fining agents. Gelatin was more reactive than whey proteins to tannic acid as shown by both the astringency method (with ovalbumin as a precipitant) and the tannins determination method (with methylcellulose as a precipitant). The two proteins showed similar selectivity for polyphenols but β-LG did not remove as much catechin. The fining agent was removed completely or to a trace level after centrifugation followed by filtration which minimises its potential allergenicity. In addition, improved understanding of protein-tannin interactions was obtained by fluorescence, size measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Overall this study demonstrates that whey proteins have the potential of reducing astringency in red wine and can find a place in enology.

  17. Targeted erythropoietin selectively stimulates red blood cell expansion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Devin R.; Vernet, Andyna; Collins, James J.; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    The design of cell-targeted protein therapeutics can be informed by natural protein–protein interactions that use cooperative physical contacts to achieve cell type specificity. Here we applied this approach in vivo to the anemia drug erythropoietin (EPO), to direct its activity to EPO receptors (EPO-Rs) on red blood cell (RBC) precursors and prevent interaction with EPO-Rs on nonerythroid cells, such as platelets. Our engineered EPO molecule was mutated to weaken its affinity for EPO-R, but its avidity for RBC precursors was rescued via tethering to an antibody fragment that specifically binds the human RBC marker glycophorin A (huGYPA). We systematically tested the impact of these engineering steps on in vivo markers of efficacy, side effects, and pharmacokinetics. huGYPA transgenic mice dosed with targeted EPO exhibited elevated RBC levels, with only minimal platelet effects. This in vivo selectivity depended on the weakening EPO mutation, fusion to the RBC-specific antibody, and expression of huGYPA. The terminal plasma half-life of targeted EPO was ∼28.3 h in transgenic mice vs. ∼15.5 h in nontransgenic mice, indicating that huGYPA on mature RBCs acted as a significant drug sink but did not inhibit efficacy. In a therapeutic context, our targeting approach may allow higher restorative doses of EPO without platelet-mediated side effects, and also may improve drug pharmacokinetics. These results demonstrate how rational drug design can improve in vivo specificity, with potential application to diverse protein therapeutics. PMID:27114509

  18. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Groshar, D.; Weininger, J.

    1984-07-01

    Red blood cells labeled with 99mTc constitute a suitable intravascular agent for imaging of vascular abnormalities. Hemangiomas are characterized by low perfusion and a high blood pool. This ''perfusion blood-pool mismatch,'' not encountered in other lesions, may help in the specific diagnosis of this tumor. This is particularly so in cavernous hemangiomas of the liver where three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy should precede liver biopsy. Red cell scintigraphy also is useful for establishing the vascular nature of hemangiomas of the head and neck and the skin and for diagnosis of venous occlusion. Heat-damaged red blood cells provide a specific spleen imaging agent. This should be used when patients with suspected splenic pathology have equivocal colloid scintigraphy.

  19. Contamination of ribosome inactivating proteins with ribonucleases, separated by affinity chromatography on red sepharose.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B; Cheng, C H K; Fong, W P

    2003-05-01

    Three preparations of type 1 ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), namely, agrostin, saporin, and luffin, were subjected to affinity chromatography on Red Sepharose and eluted with a linear concentration gradient of NaCl in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4). The eluate was assayed for ability to inhibit translation in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate system which measures RIP activity, and for ability to hydrolyze yeast transfer RNA which measures RNase activity. It was found that, in all three RIP preparations, the peak of RIP activity, which coincided with the peak of absorbance at 280 nm, was eluted earlier than the peak of RNase activity. It appears that RNase is a possible contaminant of ribosome inactivating protein preparations and that this contamination can be minimized by using Red Sepharose.

  20. Bright and stable near infra-red fluorescent protein for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Filonov, Grigory S.; Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Ting, Li-Min; Zhang, Jinghang; Kim, Kami; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of non-invasive monitoring of deep-tissue developmental, metabolic, and pathogenic processes will advance modern biotechnology. Imaging of live mammals using fluorescent probes is more feasible within a “near-infrared optical window” (NIRW)1. Here we report a phytochrome-based near infra-red fluorescent protein (iRFP) with the excitation/emission maxima at 690/713 nm. Bright fluorescence in a living mouse proved iRFP to be a superior probe for non-invasive imaging of internal mammalian tissues. Its high intracellular stability, low cytotoxicity, and lack of the requirement to add external biliverdin-chromophore makes iRFP as easy to use as conventional GFP-like proteins. Compared to earlier phytochrome-derived fluorescent probes, the iRFP protein has better in vitro characteristics and performs well in cells and in vivo, having greater effective brightness and photostability. Compared to the far-red GFP-like proteins, iRFP has substantially higher signal to background ratio in a mouse model owing to its infra-red shifted spectra. PMID:21765402

  1. Method for determining properties of red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for quantifying the concentration of hemoglobin in a cell, and indicia of anemia, comprises determining the wavelength of the longitudinal mode of a liquid in a laser microcavity; determining the wavelength of the fundamental transverse mode of a red blood cell in the liquid in the laser microcavity; and determining if the cell is anemic from the difference between the wavelength of the longitudinal mode and the fundamental transverse mode. In addition to measuring hemoglobin, the invention includes a method using intracavity laser spectroscopy to measure the change in spectra as a function of time for measuring the influx of water into a red blood cell and the cell's subsequent rupture.

  2. [Effects of infusion media on human red blood cell morphology].

    PubMed

    Burova, O O; Gusev, A A; Petrikov, S S; Gusev, S A; Basyreva, L Iu

    2006-01-01

    The effect of various infusion media on the structure of human red blood cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro experiments used 10% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, 10% glucose solution, 20% albumin solution, Rheopolyglucin, HyperHAES solution (18 g of NaCl in combination with 60 g of hydroxyethylstarch (HES), 200/0.5), Voluven (HES 130/0.4/9:1), and a combination of hypertensive NaCl solution and Rheopolyglucin. The morphofunctional response of red blood cells was studied in the clinical setting when 6% Voluven solution (HES 130/0.4/ 9:1) and hypertensive NaCl and glucose solutions were used. It was established that 10% NaCl solution caused considerable changes in the morphology of red blood cells both in the experiment and in patients with severe brain injury. The magnitude of structural changes increased as blood NaCl concentrations became higher. 10% glucose solution, Voluven, Rheopolyglucin, and albumin did not virtually affect the structure of red blood cells. Infusion of Voluven (500 ml of 6% solution for 40 minutes) induced no changes in the morphology of red blood cells in the clinical setting. Among the test solutions used to correct intracranial hypertension (HyperHAES, 10% NaCl, a combination of rheopolyglucin and 10% NaCl), HyperHAES exerted the least effect on the morphology of red blood cells.

  3. Diamond Blackfan anemia: a disorder of red blood cell development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R; Lipton, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited hypoplastic anemia that typically presents in the first year of life. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA encode ribosomal proteins, and in these cases ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. The developmental timing of DBA presentation suggests that the changes in red blood cell production that occur around the time of birth trigger a pathophysiological mechanism, likely linked to defective ribosome synthesis, which precipitates the hematopoietic phenotype. Variable presentation of other clinical phenotypes in DBA patients indicates that other developmental pathways may also be affected by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and that the involvement of these pathways is influenced by modifier genes. Understanding the molecular basis for the developmental timing of DBA presentation promises to shed light on a number of baffling features of this disease. This chapter also attempts to demonstrate how the marriage of laboratory and clinical science may enhance each and permit insights into human disease that neither alone can accomplish.

  4. Hemoglobin dynamics in red blood cells: correlation to body temperature.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Digel, I; Artmann, G M; Embs, J P; Zaccai, G; Büldt, G

    2008-12-01

    A transition in hemoglobin behavior at close to body temperature has been discovered recently by micropipette aspiration experiments on single red blood cells (RBCs) and circular dichroism spectroscopy on hemoglobin solutions. The transition temperature was directly correlated to the body temperatures of a variety of species. In an exploration of the molecular basis for the transition, we present neutron scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of hemoglobin dynamics in whole human RBCs in vivo. The data reveal a change in the geometry of internal protein motions at 36.9 degrees C, at human body temperature. Above that temperature, amino acid side-chain motions occupy larger volumes than expected from normal temperature dependence, indicating partial unfolding of the protein. Global protein diffusion in RBCs was also measured and the findings compared favorably with theoretical predictions for short-time self-diffusion of noncharged hard-sphere colloids. The results demonstrated that changes in molecular dynamics in the picosecond time range and angstrom length scale might well be connected to a macroscopic effect on whole RBCs that occurs at body temperature.

  5. Born approximation model for light scattering by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joonoh; Ding, Huafeng; Mir, Mustafa; Zhu, Ruoyu; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The primary role of a red blood cell (RBC) is delivering oxygen throughout our body. Abnormalities of this basic function lead to anemia and are caused by numerous diseases such as malaria and sickle cell anemia. As prompt and inexpensive tests for blood screening are in demand, we have developed a faster and reliable way to measure morphological parameters associated with the structure of red blood cells and the size distribution of the cells in a whole blood smear. Modeling the RBC shape under Born approximation, we are able to determine parameters of clinical relevance, such as the diameter, thickness and dimple size. From a measured quantitative phase image of a blood smear, we can determine the average and standard deviation of the red blood cell volume simultaneously, i.e., without analyzing each cell individually. This approach may open the door for a new generation of label-free, high-throughput blood testing.

  6. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-05-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells.

  7. Non-invasive intravital imaging of cellular differentiation with a bright red-excitable fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Haynes, Russell D; Corbel, Stéphane Y; Li, Pengpeng; González-González, Emilio; Burg, John S; Ataie, Niloufar J; Lam, Amy J; Cranfill, Paula J; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Ng, Ho-Leung; Garcia, K Christopher; Contag, Christopher H; Shen, Kang; Blau, Helen M; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    A method for non-invasive visualization of genetically labelled cells in animal disease models with micron-level resolution would greatly facilitate development of cell-based therapies. Imaging of fluorescent proteins (FPs) using red excitation light in the “optical window” above 600 nm is one potential method for visualizing implanted cells. However, previous efforts to engineer FPs with peak excitation beyond 600 nm have resulted in undesirable reductions in brightness. Here we report three new red-excitable monomeric FPs obtained by structure-guided mutagenesis of mNeptune, previously the brightest monomeric FP when excited beyond 600 nm. Two of these, mNeptune2 and mNeptune2.5, demonstrate improved maturation and brighter fluorescence, while the third, mCardinal, has a red-shifted excitation spectrum without reduction in brightness. We show that mCardinal can be used to non-invasively and longitudinally visualize the differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into myocytes in living mice with high anatomical detail. PMID:24633408

  8. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  9. Cutting Management Effects on Yield, Fiber, and Protein Degradability of Red Clover Conserved as Silage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With adequate soil moisture, forage yields of red clover can equal or exceed alfalfa in many temperate regions. Red clover also boasts superior fiber digestibility and greater rumen-undegradable protein than alfalfa, but milk yields from cattle fed red clover diets are often below expectations. Coup...

  10. From green to red--To more dead? Autofluorescent proteins as photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Braun, Klaus

    2010-01-21

    Inactive compounds like autofluorescent proteins can absorb visible daylight (around 500-700 nm) and can emit active electrons producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to an increase in photokilling processes in bacteria. The endogenously originated ROS create single strand breaks in the cells DNA. These various types of breaks can be partially repaired by different cellular repair systems but a high number of breaks leads to cell death. A dramatic increase in cell killing can be observed from green, via yellow to red color emission. This was tested by colony forming ability. The generation of ROS and the bacterial protection mechanisms are discussed. We outline some possibilities for use the protein's properties for treatment of antibiotic multi-resistant and difficult to treat bacteria like the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

  11. Prolonged red cell storage before transfusion increases extravascular hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rapido, Francesca; Brittenham, Gary M.; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; La Carpia, Francesca; L’Acqua, Camilla; McMahon, Donald J.; Rebbaa, Abdelhadi; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Netterwald, Jane; Wang, Hangli; Schwartz, Joseph; Eisenberger, Andrew; Soffing, Mark; Yeh, Randy; Divgi, Chaitanya; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.; Shaz, Beth H.; Sheth, Sujit; Francis, Richard O.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Hod, Eldad A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Some countries have limited the maximum allowable storage duration for red cells to 5 weeks before transfusion. In the US, red blood cells can be stored for up to 6 weeks, but randomized trials have not assessed the effects of this final week of storage on clinical outcomes. METHODS. Sixty healthy adult volunteers were randomized to a single standard, autologous, leukoreduced, packed red cell transfusion after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks of storage (n = 10 per group). 51-Chromium posttransfusion red cell recovery studies were performed and laboratory parameters measured before and at defined times after transfusion. RESULTS. Extravascular hemolysis after transfusion progressively increased with increasing storage time (P < 0.001 for linear trend in the AUC of serum indirect bilirubin and iron levels). Longer storage duration was associated with decreasing posttransfusion red cell recovery (P = 0.002), decreasing elevations in hematocrit (P = 0.02), and increasing serum ferritin (P < 0.0001). After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion was followed by increases in AUC for serum iron (P < 0.01), transferrin saturation (P < 0.001), and nontransferrin-bound iron (P < 0.001) as compared with transfusion after 1 to 5 weeks of storage. CONCLUSIONS. After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion of autologous red cells to healthy human volunteers increased extravascular hemolysis, saturated serum transferrin, and produced circulating nontransferrin-bound iron. These outcomes, associated with increased risks of harm, provide evidence that the maximal allowable red cell storage duration should be reduced to the minimum sustainable by the blood supply, with 35 days as an attainable goal. REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02087514. FUNDING. NIH grant HL115557 and UL1 TR000040. PMID:27941245

  12. [Relations between red cell structure, function and immune homeostasis in prostatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Shatokhin, M N; Teodorovich, O V; Konoplia, A I; Dolgareva, S A; Gavriliuk, V P; Krasnov, L V; Mavrin, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic prostatitis alone and in combination with prostatic adenoma have changes in the activity of the complement system, neutrophil function and content of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Abnormal representation of the proteins of the red cell membrane in patients with prostatic diseases affects structural and functional activity of erythrocytes in these patients. Dynamic changes in immune status of patients with chronic prostatitis and prostatic adenoma correlate with changes in functional red cell activity. This fact helps better understanding of pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis and prostatic adenoma.

  13. Photoactivation in green to red converting EosFP and other fluorescent proteins from the GFP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2006-02-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the hydromedusa Aequorea victoria and its derivatives have become indispensable imaging devices in cell biology. In previous years, a wide variety of GFP-like proteins were discovered in non-bioluminescent anthozoa. Some of them displayed exciting new properties, including photoactivated changes of the fluorescence emission intensity and wavelength. Photoactivatable proteins offer a high potential as tools for regional optical marking in live cells and tissues. This review aims to give an overview of photoactivatable marker proteins, focusing on the molecular basis of light-induced green to red photoconversion in EosFP.

  14. Red blood cell dynamics: from cell deformation to ATP release.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiandi; Forsyth, Alison M; Stone, Howard A

    2011-10-01

    The mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) deformation under both static and dynamic, i.e., flow, conditions have been studied extensively since the mid 1960s. Deformation-induced biochemical reactions and possible signaling in RBCs, however, were proposed only fifteen years ago. Therefore, the fundamental relationship between RBC deformation and cellular signaling dynamics i.e., mechanotransduction, remains incompletely understood. Quantitative understanding of the mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs requires integrative studies of physical models of RBC deformation and cellular biochemical reactions. In this article we review the physical models of RBC deformation, spanning from continuum membrane mechanics to cellular skeleton dynamics under both static and flow conditions, and elaborate the mechanistic links involved in deformation-induced ATP release.

  15. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk. PMID:25710019

  16. Mechanisms linking red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  17. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of the red cell volume disorders.

    PubMed

    Badens, Catherine; Guizouarn, Hélène

    2016-09-01

    Genetic defects of erythrocyte transport proteins cause disorders of red blood cell volume that are characterized by abnormal permeability to the cations Na(+) and K(+) and, consequently, by changes in red cell hydration. Clinically, these disorders are associated with chronic haemolytic anaemia of variable severity and significant co-morbidities, such as iron overload. This review provides an overview of recent insights into the molecular basis of this group of rare anaemias involving cation channels and transporters dysfunction. To date, a total of 5 different membrane proteins have been reported to be responsible for volume homeostasis alteration when mutated, 3 of them leading to overhydrated cells (AE1 [also termed SLC4A1], RHAG and GLUT1 [also termed SCL2A1) and 2 others to dehydrated cells (PIEZO1 and the Gardos Channel). These findings are not only of basic scientific interest, but also of direct clinical significance for improving diagnostic procedures and identify potential approaches for novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Computational Biomechanics of Human Red Blood Cells in Hematological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Li, He; Chang, Hung-Yu; Lykotrafitis, George; Em Karniadakis, George

    2017-02-01

    We review recent advances in multiscale modeling of the biomechanical characteristics of red blood cells (RBCs) in hematological diseases, and their relevance to the structure and dynamics of defective RBCs. We highlight examples of successful simulations of blood disorders including malaria and other hereditary disorders, such as sickle-cell anemia, spherocytosis, and elliptocytosis.

  19. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Rodrigo; Buytaert-Hoefen, Kimberley A.; Gonzalez-Romero, Dennisse; Castilla, Joaquin; Hansen, Eric T.; Hlavinka, Dennis; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Soto, Claudio

    2008-12-12

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrP{sup Sc}) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions ({>=}3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  20. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  1. Structure and deformation properties of red blood cells: concepts and quantitative methods.

    PubMed

    Evans, E A

    1989-01-01

    The lamellar configuration of the red cell membrane includes a (liquid) superficial bilayer of amphiphilic molecules supported by a (rigid) subsurface protein meshwork. Because of this composite structure, the red cell membrane exhibits very large resistance to changes in surface density or area with very low resistance to in-plane extension and bending deformations. The primary extrinsic factor in cell deformability is the surface area-to-volume ratio which establishes the minimum-caliber vessel into which a cell can deform (without rupture). Within the restriction provided by surface area and volume, the intrinsic properties of the membrane and cytoplasm determine the deformability characteristics of the red cell. Since the cytoplasm is liquid, the static rigidity of the cell is determined by membrane elastic constants. These include an elastic modulus for area compressibility in the range of 300-600 dyn/cm, an elastic modulus for in-plane extension or shear (at constant area) of 5-7 X 10(-3) dyn/cm, and a curvature or bending elastic modulus on the order of 10(-12) dyn.cm. Even though small, the surface rigidity of the cell membrane is sufficient to return the membrane capsule to a discoid shape after deformation by external forces. Viscous dissipation in the peripheral protein structure (cytoskeleton) dominates the dynamic response of the cell to extensional forces. Based on a time constant for recovery after extensional deformation on the order of 0.1 sec, the coefficient of surface viscosity is on the order of 10(-3) dyn.sec/cm. On the other hand, the dynamic resistance to folding of the cell appears to be limited by viscous dissipation in the cytoplasmic and external fluid phases. Dynamic rigidities for both extensional and folding deformations are important factors in the distribution of flow in the small microvessels. Although the red cell membrane normally behaves as a resilient viscoelastic shell, which recovers its conformation after deformation

  2. In vivo red cell destruction by anti-Lu6

    SciTech Connect

    Issitt, P.D.; Valinsky, J.E.; Marsh, W.L.; DiNapoli, J.; Gutgsell, N.S. )

    1990-03-01

    An example is presented of an IgG1, anti-Lu6, that reacted by indirect antiglobulin test and was capable of destroying antigen-positive red cells in vivo. Two methods for the measurement of red cell survival, {sup 51}Cr labeling and flow cytometry, gave the same result: 20 percent of the test dose of Lu:6 red cells was destroyed in the first hour after injection and 80 percent in the first 24 hours. The clinical relevance of the antibody was correctly predicted by an in vitro monocyte monolayer assay. The finding that this example of anti-Lu6 was clinically significant should not be taken to mean that all antibodies directed against high-incidence Lutheran and Lutheran system-related antigens will behave similarly. When such antibodies are encountered, in vivo and/or in vitro studies to assess their clinical significance are necessary before rare blood is used for transfusion.

  3. Caught red-handed: Rc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix protein conditioning red pericarp in rice.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Megan T; Thomson, Michael J; Pfeil, Bernard E; McCouch, Susan

    2006-02-01

    Rc is a domestication-related gene required for red pericarp in rice (Oryza sativa). The red grain color is ubiquitous among the wild ancestors of O. sativa, in which it is closely associated with seed shattering and dormancy. Rc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein that was fine-mapped to an 18.5-kb region on rice chromosome 7 using a cross between Oryza rufipogon (red pericarp) and O. sativa cv Jefferson (white pericarp). Sequencing of the alleles from both mapping parents as well as from two independent genetic stocks of Rc revealed that the dominant red allele differed from the recessive white allele by a 14-bp deletion within exon 6 that knocked out the bHLH domain of the protein. A premature stop codon was identified in the second mutant stock that had a light red pericarp. RT-PCR experiments confirmed that the Rc gene was expressed in both red- and white-grained rice but that a shortened transcript was present in white varieties. Phylogenetic analysis, supported by comparative mapping in rice and maize (Zea mays), showed that Rc, a positive regulator of proanthocyanidin, is orthologous with INTENSIFIER1, a negative regulator of anthocyanin production in maize, and is not in the same clade as rice bHLH anthocyanin regulators.

  4. A far-red fluorescent protein evolved from a cyanobacterial phycobiliprotein

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Erik A.; Tran, Geraldine N.; Gross, Larry A.; Crisp, Jessica L.; Shu, Xiaokun; Lin, John Y.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2016-01-01

    Far-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are desirable for in vivo imaging because less light is scattered, absorbed, or reemitted by endogenous biomolecules. A new class of FP was developed from an allophycocyanin α-subunit (APCα). Native APC requires a lyase to incorporate phycocyanobilin. The evolved FP, named small Ultra-Red FP (smURFP), covalently attaches biliverdin (BV) without a lyase, and has 642/670 nm excitation/emission peaks, a large extinction coefficient (180,000 M−1cm−1) and quantum yield (18%), and comparable photostability to eGFP. SmURFP has significantly increased BV incorporation rate and protein stability compared to the bacteriophytochrome (BPH) FPs. BV supply is limited by membrane permeability, so expression of heme oxygenase-1 with heme precursors increases fluorescence of BPH/APCα FPs. SmURFP (but not BPH FPs) can incorporate a more membrane-permeant BV analog, making smURFP fluorescence in situ comparable to FPs from jellyfish/coral. A far-red/near-infrared fluorescent cell cycle indicator was created with smURFP and a BPH FP. PMID:27479328

  5. Metabolic imaging of the tumor treated by KillerRed fluorescent protein-based photodynamic therapy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Qin, Lingsong; Wang, Anle; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Fei; Jin, Honglin; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-02-01

    KillerRed is a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties. It has the ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), for killing tumor cells in vitro upon laser irradiation and has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor therapy. Here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of pyridine nucleotide (PN) and flavoprotein (Fp), two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed that the tumor was scabbed in response to 561 nm laser irradiation at 80 mV for 3 min, and the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. More importantly, a home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The flavoprotein was remarkable elevated and the PN was seldom increased with concomitant photobleaching of KillerRed fluorescence after irradiation, suggesting that flavoprotein and PN were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT.

  6. Generation of monomeric reversibly switchable red fluorescent proteins for far-field fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiel, Andre C; Andresen, Martin; Bock, Hannes; Hilbert, Michael; Schilde, Jessica; Schönle, Andreas; Eggeling, Christian; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2008-09-15

    Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) are GFP-like proteins that may be repeatedly switched by irradiation with light from a fluorescent to a nonfluorescent state, and vice versa. They can be utilized as genetically encodable probes and bear large potential for a wide array of applications, in particular for new protein tracking schemes and subdiffraction resolution microscopy. However, the currently described monomeric RSFPs emit only blue-green or green fluorescence; the spectral window for their use is thus rather limited. Using a semirational engineering approach based on the crystal structure of the monomeric nonswitchable red fluorescent protein mCherry, we generated rsCherry and rsCherryRev. These two novel red fluorescent RSFPs exhibit fluorescence emission maxima at approximately 610 nm. They display antagonistic switching modes, i.e., in rsCherry irradiation with yellow light induces the off-to-on transition and blue light the on-to-off transition, whereas in rsCherryRev the effects of the switching wavelengths are reversed. We demonstrate time-lapse live-cell subdiffraction microscopy by imaging rsCherryRev targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum utilizing the switching and localization of single molecules.

  7. Fibrinogen, red blood cells, and factor XIII in venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Walton, B L; Byrnes, J R; Wolberg, A S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Among cardiovascular causes of death, venous thrombosis (VT) is ranked third most common in the world. Venous thrombi have high red blood cell and fibrin content; however, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to venous thrombus composition and stability are still poorly understood. This article reviews biological, biochemical, and biophysical contributions of fibrinogen, factor XIII, and red blood cells to VT, and new evidence suggesting interactions between these components mediate venous thrombus composition and size.

  8. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  9. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  10. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Squeezing red blood cells on an optical waveguide to monitor cell deformability during blood storage.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; McCourt, Peter; Oteiza, Ana; Wilkinson, James S; Huser, Thomas R; Hellesø, Olav Gaute

    2015-01-07

    Red blood cells squeeze through micro-capillaries as part of blood circulation in the body. The deformability of red blood cells is thus critical for blood circulation. In this work, we report a method to optically squeeze red blood cells using the evanescent field present on top of a planar waveguide chip. The optical forces from a narrow waveguide are used to squeeze red blood cells to a size comparable to the waveguide width. Optical forces and pressure distributions on the cells are numerically computed to explain the squeezing process. The proposed technique is used to quantify the loss of blood deformability that occurs during blood storage lesion. Squeezing red blood cells using waveguides is a sensitive technique and works simultaneously on several cells, making the method suitable for monitoring stored blood.

  12. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  13. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE.

  14. Artificial Red Cells with Polyhemoglobin Membranes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    preparing emulsions and ejecting cells from the oil phase. IX. REFERENCES 1. Wallace, H. W., Asher, W. J., and Li, N. N. Liquid - liquid oxygenation: a...1S. KEY WORDS (Continue, an reverse side if naceoay mnd identify by block number) Artificial Blood, Hemoglobin, Polyhemoglobin, Biotonometry Liquid ...cell-size microdroplets containing 30% of hemoglobin were held in liquid membrane capsules and treated with glutaralddhyde that cross linked the

  15. Chronic red blood cell exchange to prevent clinical complications in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Cabibbo, Sergio; Fidone, Carmelo; Garozzo, Giovanni; Antolino, Agostino; Manenti, Giovanna Oriella; Bennardello, Francesco; Licitra, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Salvatore; Costantino, Francesco; Travali, Simone; Distefano, Roberto; Bonomo, Pietro

    2005-06-01

    We tracked the results of 394 manual or automatic red blood cell exchanges done with a cell separator in 20 sickle cell patients at high risk for recurrent complications. Over an average of 6 years, none of the patients developed complications related to the procedure or to the increased blood use. It was safe and effective in preventing complications of sickle cell disease, and if done automatically, reduced iron overload. Ferritin levels also decreased in patients treated with automatic red blood cell exchange. Furthermore, using Single Donor Red Blood Cell units (SDRC) we reduced the potential exposure to transfusion transmitted infectious diseases (TTI).

  16. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  17. Protein digestion in red aak borer larvae, Enaphalodes rufulus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, a recent outbreak of red oak borer, Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman), contributed to the death of tens of thousands of red oaks. To better understand nutrient digestion in E. rufulus larvae, biochemical analyses were used to characterize dige...

  18. Red photon treatment inhibits apoptosis via regulation of bcl-2 proteins and ROS levels, alleviating hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Chen, L; Zhang, X J; Chen, J; Li, X C; Hou, W S; Xiao, N

    2014-05-30

    Therapeutic options for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) are scarce and inefficient. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that red photon plays an important role in anti-inflammatory processes as well as apoptosis, the main trait of HIBD. In this study, we investigated whether red photon can protect from HIBD in SD rats and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in PC12 cells. Apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) rates were assessed in PC12 cells. We found that 6-h irradiation resulted in decreased MMP, ROS and apoptosis rates, although these changes were reversible with prolonged irradiation. Importantly, these effects were sustained for 2-8h upon quenching of the red photon. Similar trends were observed for protein and mRNA expression of bax and bcl-2, with short-term irradiation (6h) inhibiting apoptosis in PC12 Cells. However, long-term (>6h) irradiation caused cell damage. In vivo experiments, bax mRNA and protein levels were reduced after 7days in HIBD model rats treated with red photon, in contrast to bcl-2. Furthermore, we found that bax and bcl-2 were mainly expressed in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus CA1 and CA3. Importantly, Morris Water Maze test results revealed an improvement in learning ability and spatial memory in rats after irradiation. Overall, our data showed that short-term irradiation with red photon in the acute phase inhibits the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via regulation of bcl-2-related proteins and reduction of ROS levels, thereby decreasing apoptosis in nerve cells and improving the neurological prognosis of HIBD.

  19. Proteins and Carbohydrates from Red Seaweeds: Evidence for Beneficial Effects on Gut Function and Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cian, Raúl E; Drago, Silvina R; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-08-20

    Based on their composition, marine algae, and namely red seaweeds, are good potential functional foods. Intestinal mucosal barrier function refers to the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules. Here, we will first outline the component of seaweeds and will summarize the effects of these on the regulation of mucosal barrier function. Special attention will be paid to unique components of red seaweeds: proteins and derived peptides (e.g., phycobiliproteins, glycoproteins that contain "cellulose binding domains", phycolectins and the related mycosporine-like amino acids) together with polysaccharides (e.g., floridean starch and sulfated galactans, such as carrageenans, agarans and "dl-hybrid") and minerals. These compounds have been shown to exert prebiotic effects, to regulate intestinal epithelial cell, macrophage and lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation and to modulate the immune response. Molecular mechanisms of action of peptides and polysaccharides are starting to be elucidated, and evidence indicating the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and signal transduction pathways mediated by protein kinase B (PKB or AKT), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) will also be summarized. The need for further research is clear, but in vivo experiments point to an overall antiinflammatory effect of these algae, indicating that they can reinforce membrane barrier function.

  20. Proteins and Carbohydrates from Red Seaweeds: Evidence for Beneficial Effects on Gut Function and Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cian, Raúl E.; Drago, Silvina R.; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Based on their composition, marine algae, and namely red seaweeds, are good potential functional foods. Intestinal mucosal barrier function refers to the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules. Here, we will first outline the component of seaweeds and will summarize the effects of these on the regulation of mucosal barrier function. Special attention will be paid to unique components of red seaweeds: proteins and derived peptides (e.g., phycobiliproteins, glycoproteins that contain “cellulose binding domains”, phycolectins and the related mycosporine-like amino acids) together with polysaccharides (e.g., floridean starch and sulfated galactans, such as carrageenans, agarans and “dl-hybrid”) and minerals. These compounds have been shown to exert prebiotic effects, to regulate intestinal epithelial cell, macrophage and lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation and to modulate the immune response. Molecular mechanisms of action of peptides and polysaccharides are starting to be elucidated, and evidence indicating the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and signal transduction pathways mediated by protein kinase B (PKB or AKT), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) will also be summarized. The need for further research is clear, but in vivo experiments point to an overall antiinflammatory effect of these algae, indicating that they can reinforce membrane barrier function. PMID:26308006

  1. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  2. Regulation of red blood cell deformability is independent of red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Lauten, Alexander; Hoeppener, Steffen; Goebel, Bjoern; Brenig, Julian; Jung, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2016-09-12

    The aim was to study impacts of mild to severe hypoxia on human red blood cell (RBC)-nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production, protein S-nitrosylation and deformability.Ambient air oxygen concentration of 12 healthy subjects was step-wisely reduced from 20.95% to 16.21%, 12.35%, 10% and back to 20.95%. Additional in vitro experiments involved purging of blood (±sodium nitrite) with gas mixtures corresponding to in vivo intervention.Vital and hypoxia-associated parameters showed physiological adaptation to changing demands. Activation of RBC-NOS decreased with increasing hypoxia. RBC deformability, which is influenced by RBC-NOS activation, decreased under mild hypoxia, but surprisingly increased at severe hypoxia in vivo and in vitro. This was causatively induced by nitrite reduction to NO which increased S-nitrosylation of RBC α- and β-spectrins -a critical step to improve RBC deformability. The addition of sodium nitrite prevented decreases of RBC deformability under hypoxia by sustaining S-nitrosylation of spectrins suggesting compensatory mechanisms of non-RBC-NOS-produced NO.The results first time indicate a direct link between maintenance of RBC deformability under severe hypoxia by non-enzymatic NO production because RBC-NOS activation is reduced. These data improve our understanding of physiological mechanisms supporting adequate blood and, thus, oxygen supply to different tissues under severe hypoxia.

  3. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  4. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  5. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the “storage lesion(s)”. Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients. PMID:28263166

  6. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G

    2017-03-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the "storage lesion(s)". Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients.

  7. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  8. Familial distal renal tubular acidosis is associated with mutations in the red cell anion exchanger (Band 3, AE1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, L J; Cope, D L; Jones, G K; Schofield, A E; Burley, M; Povey, S; Unwin, R J; Wrong, O; Tanner, M J

    1997-01-01

    All affected patients in four families with autosomal dominant familial renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) were heterozygous for mutations in their red cell HCO3-/Cl- exchanger, band 3 (AE1, SLC4A1) genes, and these mutations were not found in any of the nine normal family members studied. The mutation Arg589--> His was present in two families, while Arg589--> Cys and Ser613--> Phe changes were found in the other families. Linkage studies confirmed the co-segregation of the disease with a genetic marker close to AE1. The affected individuals with the Arg589 mutations had reduced red cell sulfate transport and altered glycosylation of the red cell band 3 N-glycan chain. The red cells of individuals with the Ser613--> Phe mutation had markedly increased red cell sulfate transport but almost normal red cell iodide transport. The erythroid and kidney isoforms of the mutant band 3 proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and all showed significant chloride transport activity. We conclude that dominantly inherited dRTA is associated with mutations in band 3; but both the disease and its autosomal dominant inheritance are not related simply to the anion transport activity of the mutant proteins. PMID:9312167

  9. Rapid, Specific, No-wash, Far-red Fluorogen Activation in Subcellular Compartments by Targeted Fluorogen Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live cell imaging requires bright photostable dyes that can target intracellular organelles and proteins with high specificity in a no-wash protocol. Organic dyes possess the desired photochemical properties and can be covalently linked to various protein tags. The currently available fluorogenic dyes are in the green/yellow range where there is high cellular autofluorescence and the near-infrared (NIR) dyes need to be washed out. Protein-mediated activation of far-red fluorogenic dyes has the potential to address these challenges because the cell-permeant dye is small and nonfluorescent until bound to its activating protein, and this binding is rapid. In this study, three single chain variable fragment (scFv)-derived fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), which activate far-red emitting fluorogens, were evaluated for targeting, brightness, and photostability in the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum with a cell-permeant malachite green analog in cultured mammalian cells. Efficient labeling was achieved within 20–30 min for each protein upon the addition of nM concentrations of dye, producing a signal that colocalized significantly with a linked mCerulean3 (mCer3) fluorescent protein and organelle specific dyes but showed divergent photostability and brightness properties dependent on the FAP. These FAPs and the ester of malachite green dye (MGe) can be used as specific, rapid, and wash-free labels for intracellular sites in live cells with far-red excitation and emission properties, useful in a variety of multicolor experiments. PMID:25650487

  10. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  11. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    PubMed Central

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance. PMID:28303921

  12. Alterations of Red Cell Membrane Properties in Nneuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M.; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington’s disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an “acanthocytic state” of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  13. Omics markers of the red cell storage lesion and metabolic linkage

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Reisz, Julie; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J.; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of omics technologies in the field of Transfusion Medicine has significantly advanced our understanding of the red cell storage lesion. While the clinical relevance of such a lesion is still a matter of debate, quantitative and redox proteomics approaches, as well quantitative metabolic flux analysis and metabolic tracing experiments promise to revolutionise our understanding of the role of blood processing strategies, inform the design and testing of novel additives or technologies (such as pathogen reduction), and evaluate the clinical relevance of donor and recipient biological variability with respect to red cell storability and transfusion outcomes. By reviewing existing literature in this rapidly expanding research endeavour, we highlight for the first time a correlation between metabolic markers of the red cell storage age and protein markers of haemolysis. Finally, we introduce the concept of metabolic linkage, i.e. the appreciation of a network of highly correlated small molecule metabolites which results from biochemical constraints of erythrocyte metabolic enzyme activities. For the foreseeable future, red cell studies will advance Transfusion Medicine and haematology by addressing the alteration of metabolic linkage phenotypes in response to stimuli, including, but not limited to, storage additives, enzymopathies (e.g. glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency), hypoxia, sepsis or haemorrhage. PMID:28263171

  14. Forage Management Effects on Protein and Fiber Fractions, Protein Degradability, and Dry Matter Yield of Red Clover Conserved as Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the action of o-quinones formed via polyphenol oxidase, conserved red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) contains abundant rumen undegradable protein (RUP), but inadequate rumen degradable protein (RDP) for dairy cattle. This study examined how forage management influences RDP, RUP, crude protein...

  15. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  16. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  17. Red blood cells and thrombin generation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Whelihan, Matthew F; Lim, Ming Y; Key, Nigel S

    2014-05-01

    The prothrombotic nature of sickle cell disease (SCD) is evidenced by the chronically elevated levels of almost all coagulation activation biomarkers, and an increased incidence of certain thrombotic events, including venous thromboembolism. Numerous studies have attempted to define the extent and elucidate the mechanism of the observed increase in thrombin generation in SCD patients in vivo. In general, these studies were performed using thrombin generation assays in platelet poor or platelet rich plasma and showed little difference in endogenous thrombin potential between the SCD cohort and healthy matched controls. In SCD, erythrocytes and monocytes have been demonstrated to exhibit procoagulant characteristics. Thus, the absence of these cellular components in standard thrombin generation assays may fail to reflect global hypercoagulability in the whole blood of patients with SCD. We were therefore surprised to see no difference in net thrombin generation in tissue factor-initiated initiated clotting of whole blood from patients with SCD. However, we are continuing to reconcile these seemingly disparate observations by slight modifications of the whole blood model that include alternative coagulation triggers and a re-examination of the net thrombin generation when the protein/protein S system is simultaneously interrogated.

  18. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  19. Quantitative measurement of red blood cell central pallor and hypochromasia.

    PubMed

    Bacus, J W

    1980-06-01

    A quantitataive definition and techniques of measurement for central pallor of red blood cells are proposed. These are based on high-resolution measurements of absorbance across the center of the cell. Thus, the measurements reflect both variations in cell thickness and hemoglobin concentration. Although contributions of thickness and concentration may differ in individual cells, to a first approximation, a specific cell may be considered as having a similar concentration of hemoglobin throughout, and thus the major contribution to the central pallor is that due to the difference in thickness between the edges of the cell and the center. The definition proposed expresses central pallor as the percentage volume of indentation, comparing the red cell to a disc of uniform absorbance equal to the maximum found at the cell edges. Population distributions of central pallor then provide a basis for quantitation of hypochromasia. The mean and standard deviation of such distributions are proposed as quantitative descriptors. Sample distributions from 27 normal persons, 8 patients with spherocytic anemia and 26 patients with iron deficiency anemia were studied.

  20. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Red Blood Cells Squeezing through Submicron Slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Lu, Huijie

    2016-11-01

    A multiscale model is applied to study the dynamics of healthy red blood cells (RBCs), RBCs in hereditary spherocytosis, and sickle cell disease squeezing through submicron slits. This study is motivated by the mechanical filtration of RBCs by inter-endothelial slits in the spleen. First, the model is validated by comparing the simulation results with experiments. Secondly, the deformation of the cytoskeleton in healthy RBCs is investigated. Thirdly, the mechanisms of damage in hereditary spherocytosis are investigated. Finally, the effects of cytoplasm and membrane viscosities, especially in sickle cell disease, are examined. The simulations results provided guidance for future experiments to explore the dynamics of RBCs under extreme deformation.

  2. Photoacoustic tomography of unlabelled red blood cell at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Pratik; Chen, Jian; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we present the principle behind nanoscale photoacoustic tomography (nPAT), in addition to simulation results demonstrating the thermal safety and the diagnostic potential of such a modality. Nanoscale photoacoustic tomography is a novel biomedical imaging modality that can allow for the 3D imaging of cells at nanometer resolutions. This modality also allows for the imaging of single red blood cells (RBCs) such that the hemoglobin concentration quantities can be visualized within the cell. As a result, we believe that nPAT can allow for diagnostic information at unprecedented resolutions and enable the visualization of previously unseen phenomenon in RBCs.

  3. Is pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) a clonal disorder?

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, M; Bhavnani, M; Stewart, A; Roberts, B E; Geary, G C

    1993-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon disorder, many cases lacking a well defined aetiology. This report describes three cases of PRCA (two idiopathic and one associated with B-CLL) who were investigated to assess the possibility of their PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-lymphocytes. The results show that one patient had evidence of T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma chain rearrangement, and the other had a TCR delta chain rearrangement. These two cases raise the possibility of PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-cells and further studies are warranted.

  4. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  5. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  6. Photodynamic treatment of red blood cell concentrates for virus inactivation enhances red blood cell aggregation: protection with antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hur, E; Barshtein, G; Chen, S; Yedgar, S

    1997-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using phthalocyanines and red light appears to be a promising procedure for decontamination of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates for transfusion. A possible complication of this treatment may be induced aggregation of RBC. The production of RBC aggregates was measured with a novel computerized cell flow properties analyzer (CFA). The PDT of RBC concentrates with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AIPcS4) and the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 under virucidal conditions markedly enhanced RBC aggregation and higher shear stress was required to disperse these aggregates. The clusters of cells were huge and abnormally shaped, unlike the rouleaux formed by untreated RBC. This aggregation was prevented when a mixture of antioxidants was included during PDT. Addition of the antioxidants after PDT reduced aggregation only partially. It is concluded that inclusion of antioxidants during PDT of RBC concentrates prior to transfusion may reduce or eliminate the hemodynamic risk that the virucidal treatment may present to the recipient.

  7. Vesiculation of healthy and defective red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2015-07-01

    Vesiculation of mature red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to removal of defective patches of the erythrocyte membrane. In blood disorders, which are related to defects in proteins of the RBC membrane, vesiculation of the plasma membrane is intensified. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain RBC vesiculation but the exact underlying mechanisms and what determines the sizes of the vesicles are still not completely understood. In this work, we apply a two-component coarse-grained molecular dynamics RBC membrane model to study how RBC vesiculation is controlled by the membrane spontaneous curvature and by lateral compression of the membrane. Our simulation results show that the formation of small homogeneous vesicles with a diameter less than 40 nm can be attributed to a large spontaneous curvature of membrane domains. On the other hand, compression on the membrane can cause the formation of vesicles with heterogeneous composition and with sizes comparable with the size of the cytoskeleton corral. When spontaneous curvature and lateral compression are simultaneously considered, the compression on the membrane tends to facilitate formation of vesicles originating from curved membrane domains. We also simulate vesiculation of RBCs with membrane defects connected to hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and to hereditary spherocytosis (HS). When the vertical connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is elevated, as in normal RBCs, multiple vesicles are shed from the compressed membrane with diameters similar to the cytoskeleton corral size. In HS RBCs, where the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton is reduced, larger-size vesicles are released under the same compression ratio as in normal RBCs. Lastly, we find that vesicles released from HE RBCs can contain cytoskeletal filaments due to fragmentation of the membrane skeleton while vesicles released from the HS RBCs are depleted of cytoskeletal filaments.

  8. What is antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA)?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole

    2005-05-01

    Antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an immunological pathology associated with the production of neutralizing Abs that inhibit the erythropoietic activity of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) and recombinant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Although this disorder occurs very rarely, the number of reported cases has increased dramatically in recent years, predominantly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anaemia receiving subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of one particular formulation of recombinant epoetin-alpha. This disorder is differentiated from classic forms of PRCA that are caused by chemical toxaemia (i.e. erythroblastopenia induced by chemical compounds), lymphoproliferative neoplasms, thymoma, human parvovirus B19 and certain autoimmune disorders. Patients with Ab-mediated PRCA develop resistance to EPO and severe anaemia that follows a period of successful erythropoietic response, and exhibit characteristic decreases in blood haemoglobin (Hb) level and in the number of circulating reticulocytes. However, it is not yet possible to predict which patients will develop PRCA or when in the course of their treatments PRCA may develop. Laboratory confirmation of Ab-mediated PRCA requires bone marrow examination demonstrating few or no erythroid precursors and the presence of serum anti-EPO Abs using a validated assay. These neutralizing anti-EPO Abs recognize the protein core of the EPO molecule; carbohydrate groups on EPO can affect the binding of Abs but are themselves not immunological determinants. Animal models are being developed to increase further our understanding of the immunological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of Ab-mediated PRCA.

  9. The Proteome of the Red Blood Cell: An Auspicious Source of New Insights into Membrane-Centered Regulation of Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Giel J. C. G. M.

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the hand-in-hand development of biotechnology and bioinformatics has enabled a view of the function of the red blood cell that surpasses the supply of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide. Comparative proteomic inventories have yielded new clues to the processes that regulate membrane–cytoskeleton interactions in health and disease, and to the ways by which red blood cells communicate with their environment. In addition, proteomic data have revealed the possibility that many, hitherto unsuspected, metabolic processes are active in the red blood cell cytoplasm. Recent metabolomic studies have confirmed and expanded this notion. Taken together, the presently available data point towards the red blood cell membrane as the hub at which all regulatory processes come together. Thus, alterations in the association of regulatory proteins with the cell membrane may be a sine qua non for the functional relevance of any postulated molecular mechanism. From this perspective, comparative proteomics centered on the red blood cell membrane constitute a powerful tool for the identification and elucidation of the physiologically and pathologically relevant pathways that regulate red blood cell homeostasis. Additionally, this perspective provides a focus for the interpretation of metabolomic studies, especially in the development of biomarkers in the blood. PMID:28248245

  10. The Proteome of the Red Blood Cell: An Auspicious Source of New Insights into Membrane-Centered Regulation of Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2016-11-25

    During the past decade, the hand-in-hand development of biotechnology and bioinformatics has enabled a view of the function of the red blood cell that surpasses the supply of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide. Comparative proteomic inventories have yielded new clues to the processes that regulate membrane-cytoskeleton interactions in health and disease, and to the ways by which red blood cells communicate with their environment. In addition, proteomic data have revealed the possibility that many, hitherto unsuspected, metabolic processes are active in the red blood cell cytoplasm. Recent metabolomic studies have confirmed and expanded this notion. Taken together, the presently available data point towards the red blood cell membrane as the hub at which all regulatory processes come together. Thus, alterations in the association of regulatory proteins with the cell membrane may be a sine qua non for the functional relevance of any postulated molecular mechanism. From this perspective, comparative proteomics centered on the red blood cell membrane constitute a powerful tool for the identification and elucidation of the physiologically and pathologically relevant pathways that regulate red blood cell homeostasis. Additionally, this perspective provides a focus for the interpretation of metabolomic studies, especially in the development of biomarkers in the blood.

  11. Online Biomedical Resources for Malaria-Related Red Cell Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-01-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed. PMID:23568771

  12. THE BIREFRINGENCE OF THE HUMAN RED CELL GHOSTS

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Eric; Barreto, Delia

    1956-01-01

    The type of birefringence described by Mitchison, which extends some 0.5 µ in from the surface of the human red cell ghost in glycerol and which shows a maximum retardation of about 7 A, is only found in ghosts which are sufficiently well hemoglobinised to be seen with the ordinary microscope. Ghosts from which all hemoglobin has been lost are not visible with the ordinary microscope and are not birefringent, although they are clearly visible with phase contrast. About 90 per cent of the ghosts in glycerol preparations are of the latter type, the exact percentage being a function of time. Mitchison's measurements of birefringence, although reproducible, accordingly apply only to ghosts in which some hemoglobin still remains complexed with the lipoprotein layers of the red cell ultrastructure, and do not enable one to draw conclusions as to the thickness and orientation of the lipoprotein surface layers. PMID:13286451

  13. Patterns of Nonelectrolyte Permeability in Human Red Blood Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, P.; Sha'afi, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    The permeability of human red cell membrane to 90 different molecules has been measured. These solutes cover a wide spectrum of nonelectrolytes with varying chemical structure, chain length, lipid solubility, chemical reactive group, ability to form hydrogen bonds, and other properties. In general, the present study suggests that the permeability of red cell membrane to a large solute is determined by lipid solubility, its molecular size, and its hydrogen-bonding ability. The permeability coefficient increases with increasing lipid solubility and decreasing ability to form hydrogen bonds, whereas it decreases with increasing molecular size. In the case of small solutes, the predominant diffusion factor is steric hindrance augmented by lipid solubility. It is also found that replacement of a hydroxyl group by a carbonyl group or an ether linkage tends to increase permeability. On the other hand, replacement of a hydroxyl group by an amide group tends to decrease the permeability coefficient. PMID:4804758

  14. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed.

  15. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  16. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  17. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Associated with Good Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okui, Masayuki; Yamamichi, Takashi; Asakawa, Ayaka; Harada, Masahiko; Horio, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hypogammaglobulinemia are paraneoplastic syndromes that are rarer than myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma. Good syndrome coexisting with PRCA is an extremely rare pathology. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with thymoma and PRCA associated with Good syndrome who achieved complete PRCA remission after thymectomy and postoperative immunosuppressive therapy, and provide a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:28382272

  18. My passion and passages with red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    This article mainly presents, in sequential panels of time, an overview of my professional involvements and laboratory experiences. I became smitten with red blood cells early on, and this passion remains with me to this day. I highlight certain studies, together with those who performed the work, recognizing that it was necessary to limit the details and the topics chosen for discussion. I am uncertain of the interest a personal account has for others, but at least it's here for the record.

  19. Role of Complement in Red Cell Dysfunction in Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    3 Introduction Trauma-induced changes in the red blood cells ( RBC ) contribute to the reduction of blood flow to distant...The expression of C4d on the surface of RBCs was measured by flow cytometry and expressed as mean fluorescence intensity. (A) Representative data. (B...measured by flow cytometry. Fluorescence levels of RBCs were acquired for 30 seconds using FACScan flow cytometer to establish a baseline for intra- 8

  20. Research on red cell membrane permeability in arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gatina, R; Balta, N; Moisin, C; Burtea, C; Botea, S; Ioan, M; Teleianu, C

    1998-01-01

    Arterial hypertension, including the elucidation of hypertension pathogenic mechanisms involving elements in the composition of the blood, continues to represent a topical research area. Recent work, such as nuclear magnetic resonance studies looking into red cell permeability, illustrates the presence of modifications of red cell permeability to water (RCPW) related to the stage of arterial hypertension. The identification of a significant increase of RCPW compared to that present in the population with normal arterial pressure values can be useful both in early diagnosis and in warning about a possible predisposition for this condition. At the same time, the dynamic investigation of protonic relaxation time of both intra- and extra-erythrocytic water, the assessment of proton exchange time across the red cell and the calculation of permeability to water enable one not only to diagnose arterial hypertension but also to ascertain the evolution of the disease, its complications and the effectiveness of anti-hypertensive medication. Our studies have also proven the existence of a correlation between the values of systolic arterial pressure and red cell permeability to water. The curve describing the interdependence of the two values has the shape of a bell, in the case of males. The peak of the curve is reached for a systolic pressure of 160 mmHg and gets below the values of the control group in the case of systolic pressures above 200 mmHg. The RCPW test can also be considered a valuable indicator in evaluating the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients. In the chronic therapy of arterial hypertension with various types of anti-hypertensive drugs, one can note differences in the RCPW values related to the effectiveness of the respective medication, to the clinical form and stage of the disease, the sex of the patient as well as to the existence of cerebro-vascular complications.

  1. Progress in improving the pathogen safety of red cell concentrates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J

    2000-01-01

    Current methods of preparing red cell concentrates do not include a process step to decontaminate pathogens potentially present in the transfusion product. Although substantial progress has been made in the reduction of the frequency of transmission of HIV, HCV, HBV and HTLV-I as a result of the implementation of diagnostic screening processes, the need for further reduction in transmission rate of these viruses remains. In addition, there are viruses which are known to be be present in blood but for which no screening test has been implemented to remove contaminated units from the blood supply. These viruses include but are not limited to TTV, HGV and Parvo B19. Finally, the lack of a pathogen inactivation process for red cells maintains the blood supply in a state of vulnerability to new viruses or virus variants as they enter the donor population. Recently, substantial progress has been made in the research and development of a class of chemical compounds designated as INACTINE. These compounds are being investigated for their potential to inactivate viruses in red cells without adversely affecting their physiologic function. One of the INACTINE compounds, designated as PEN110, is now in the clinical trial phase of development.

  2. Thymoma associated with hypogammaglobulinaemia and pure red cell aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Juan; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu; Galindo, Héctor; Ortega, Claudia; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Valbuena, José; Acevedo, Francisco; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Sánchez, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Thymomas are neoplasias that begin in the thymus and develop in the anterior mediastinum. They are commonly associated with a variety of systemic and autoimmune disorders, such as pure red cell aplasia, hypogammaglobulinaemia, pancytopaenia, collagen diseases, and, most commonly, myasthenia gravis. The presence of inter-current infections, especially diarrhoea and pneumonia, in the presence of lymphocyte B depletion and hypogammaglobulinaemia is known as Good’s syndrome and may affect up to 5% of patients with thymoma. While anaemia is present in 50%–86% of patients with Good’s syndrome, only 41.9% of cases present pure red cell aplasia. Concomitance of these two conditions has only been rarely studied. We report on the case of a 55-year-old man diagnosed with advanced thymoma, who, during the progression of his disease, developed signs and symptoms suggesting Good’s syndrome and pure red cell aplasia. We also performed a brief review of the literature concerning this association, its clinical characteristics, and treatment. PMID:24171048

  3. Comparison of human red cell lysis by hypochlorous and hypobromous acids: insights into the mechanism of lysis.

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, M C; Carr, A C; Chapman, A L

    1998-01-01

    Human red blood cells are lysed by the neutrophil-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), although the mechanism of lysis is unknown. Hypobromous acid (HOBr), a similarly reactive oxidant, lysed red cells approx. 10-fold faster than HOCl. Therefore we compared the effects of these oxidants on thiols, membrane lipids and proteins to determine which reactions are associated with lysis. There was no difference in the loss of reduced glutathione or membrane thiols with either oxidant, but HOBr reacted more readily with membrane lipids and proteins. Bromohydrin derivatives of phospholipids and cholesterol were seen at approx. one-tenth the level of oxidant than chlorohydrins were. However, these products were detected only with high concentrations of HOCl or HOBr, which caused instant haemolysis. Membrane protein modification occurred at much lower doses of oxidant and was more closely correlated with lysis. SDS/PAGE analysis showed that band 3, the anion transport protein, was lost at the lowest dose of HOBr and at the higher concentrations of HOCl. Labelling the red cells with eosin 5-maleimide, a fluorescent label for band 3, suggested possible clustering of this protein in oxidant-exposed cells. There was also irreversible cross-linking of all the major membrane proteins; this reaction occurred more readily with HOBr. The results indicate that membrane protein modification is the reaction responsible for HOCl-mediated lysis. These effects, and particularly cross-link formation, might result in clustering of band 3 and other membrane and cytoskeletal proteins to form haemolytic pores. PMID:9461501

  4. Trout red blood cell arrestin (TRCarr), a novel member of the arrestin family: cloning, immunoprecipitation and expression of recombinant TRCarr.

    PubMed

    Jahns, R; Borgese, F; Lindenthal, S; Straub, A; Motais, R; Fiévet, B

    1996-06-01

    Arrestins are cytosolic proteins involved in the desensitization of G-protein-coupled receptors. We report the cloning of trout red blood cell arrestin which shows 76, 82 and 52% identity with bovine beta-arrestin1, beta-arrestin2 and retinal arrestin respectively. Antibodies were generated against the C-terminus of trout red blood cell arrestin. These antibodies detected arrestin in erythrocyte cytosol and were able to precipitate the native protein. The Na+/H+ antiporter of trout red blood cell is activated by beta-adrenergic stimulation and is then desensitized whereas the transmembrane signalling pathway is not. To investigate the subcellular distribution of arrestin on beta-adrenergic activation and desensitization of the antiporter, precipitation experiments were carried out on trout erythrocytes. A desensitization-dependent shift in cytosolic arrestin to the membranes could not be detected using the immunoprecipitation technique but we cannot exclude the possibility that a small number of cytosolic arrestins might be involved in the regulation of membrane proteins in trout erythrocyte. Recombinant trout arrestin was produced in a protease-deficient Escherichia coli strain and its functionality was tested in a reconstituted rhodopsin assay. The recombinant protein provides a suitable tool for investigating the target for arrestin in trout red blood cell, which still remains to be identified.

  5. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  6. Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Meghan N.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2016-05-01

    We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

  7. Single-cell force spectroscopy as a technique to quantify human red blood cell adhesion to subendothelial laminin.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Jamie L; Partola, Kostyantyn; Zhang, Jing; Andemariam, Biree; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-12-18

    Single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assay, enables quantitative study of cell adhesion while maintaining the native state of surface receptors in physiological conditions. Human healthy and pathological red blood cells (RBCs) express a large number of surface proteins which mediate cell-cell interactions, or cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In particular, RBCs adhere with high affinity to subendothelial matrix laminin via the basal cell adhesion molecule and Lutheran protein (BCAM/Lu). Here, we established SCFS as an in vitro technique to study human RBC adhesion at baseline and following biochemical treatment. Using blood obtained from healthy human subjects, we recorded adhesion forces from single RBCs attached to AFM cantilevers as the cell was pulled-off of substrates coated with laminin protein. We found that an increase in the overall cell adhesion measured via SCFS is correlated with an increase in the resultant total force measured on 1 µm(2) areas of the RBC membrane. Further, we showed that SCFS can detect significant changes in the adhesive response of RBCs to modulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Lastly, we identified variability in the RBC adhesion force to laminin amongst the human subjects, suggesting that RBCs maintain diverse levels of active BCAM/Lu adhesion receptors. By using single-cell measurements, we established a powerful new method for the quantitative measurement of single RBC adhesion with specific receptor-mediated binding.

  8. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  9. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  10. Dual-color fluorescence imaging of tumor/host interaction with green and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Baranov, Eugene; Wang, Jin Wei; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2004-06-01

    Dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing transgenic mice has been shown to be a powerful technology to study tumor-host interaction. Host animals include mice which express the GFP transgene in essentially all cells as well as animals in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP. The general GFP-transgenic mouse is available in both the normal and athymic nude (nu/nu) background. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma interaction especially tumor induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. GFP-expressing tumor vasculature could be visualized interacting with the RFP-expressing tumor cells transplanted to the nestin-driven GFP transgenic mice which expressed nestin-GFP in nascent blood vessels was shown as a marker of nascent tumor angiogenesis. Dual-color fluorescence imaging, which visualizes the tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh tissues, dramatically expanding previous studies in fixed and stained preparations (1).

  11. Zinc as a Signal to Stimulate Red Blood Cell Formation in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Shiu, Jhe-Ruei; Ho, Chia-Ling; Jeng, Sen-Shyong

    2017-01-01

    The common carp can tolerate extremely low oxygen levels. These fish store zinc in a specific zinc-binding protein presented in digestive tract tissues, and under low oxygen, the stored zinc is released and used as a signal to stimulate erythropoiesis (red blood cell formation). To determine whether the environmental supply of zinc to other fish species can serve as a signal to induce erythropoiesis as in the common carp, head kidney cells of four different fish species were cultured with supplemental ZnCl2. Zinc stimulated approximately a three-fold increase in immature red blood cells (RBCs) in one day. The stimulation of erythropoiesis by zinc was dose-dependent. ZnSO4 solution was injected into an experimental blood loss tilapia model. Blood analysis and microscopic observation of the blood cells indicated that, in vivo, the presence of additional zinc induced erythropoiesis in the bled tilapia. In the fish species studied, zinc could be used as a signal to stimulate erythropoiesis both in vitro and in vivo. The present report suggests a possible approach for the induction of red blood cell formation in animals through the supply of a certain level of zinc through either diet or injection. PMID:28085070

  12. Inhibitory effect of red ginseng acidic polysaccharide from Korean red ginseng on phagocytic activity and intracellular replication of Brucella abortus in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Korean red ginseng (KRG) has long been used in traditional Korean and Oriental medicine. However, the anti-bacterial mechanism and therapeutic efficiency of KGR for intracellular Brucella infection are still unclear. In this study, the bactericidal activity of Korean red ginseng acidic polysaccharide (RGAP) on Brucella (B.) abortus and its cytotoxic effects on RAW 264.7 cells were evaluated. In addition, B. abortus internalization and intracellular replication in macrophages were investigated after RGAP treatment. RGAP-incubated cells displayed a marked reduction in the adherence, internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in macrophages. Furthermore, decreased F-actin fluorescence was observed relative to untreated B. abortus-infected cells. Western blot analysis of intracellular signaling proteins revealed reduced ERK, JNK and p38α phosphorylation levels in B. abortus-infected RGAP-treated cells compared to the control. Moreover, elevated co-localization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) were observed in RGAP-treated cells compared with the control. Overall, the results of this study suggest that RGAP can disrupt phagocytic activity of B. abortus via suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling proteins ERK, JNK and p38 levels and inhibit intracellular replication of B. abortus by enhancing phagolysosome fusion, which may provide an alternative control of brucellosis. PMID:26726017

  13. Comparison of rosetting, phagocytosis, and IgG binding assays for detection of IgG on old red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bassel, P.; Bosman, G.; Kay, M.

    1986-03-01

    Various methods have been used for detecting or inferring the presence of IgG on senescent red cells. In the authors studies, they have used a method for directly measuring IgG on senescent red cells. In our studies, the authors have used a method for directly measuring IgG on cells (e.g. scanning immunoelectron microscopy) along with determining phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis is used as a biological assay for determining the biological significance of the IgG on cells. However, the phagocytosis assay as performed in the authors laboratory is tedious, time-consuming, and requires meticulous technique. In contrast, rosetting is a quick, simple assay that does not require special techniques or supplies. Therefore, the authors compared the phagocytosis assay employed by us to rosetting, and correlated each of these with the amount of IgG present on red cells as determined with an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. Although senescent red cells were phagocytized, they did not form rosettes with K562 cells even at 25 RBC:K562. Further experiments indicated that the rosette assay depended on the RBC:K561 cell ratio and not on the amount of IgG/red cell. Rosette formation (%) at varying RBC:K562 ratios was as follows: 100:1, 81 +/- 12; 50:1, 65 +/- 18; 25:1, 34 +/- 30, 10:1, 20 +/- 33; 5:1, 15 +/- 29; 1: 1, 3 +/- 7 (n = 14). In contrast, phagocytosis of old RBC correlated well with the amount of IgG present on red cells (r = 0.96, 0.94, 0.92 and 0.94 in each of 4 different experiments with n = 16, 19, 14, and 19 respectively). Thus, the phagocytosis assay the authors have used correlates with IgG on red cells; whereas rosette formation does not.

  14. Dealcoholated red wine induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, I; Russo, M; Bilotto, S; Spagnuolo, C; Scognamiglio, A; Palumbo, R; Nappo, A; Iacomino, G; Moio, L; Russo, G L

    2013-10-01

    Until recently, the supposed preventive effects of red wine against cardiovascular diseases, the so-called "French Paradox", has been associated to its antioxidant properties. The interest in the anticancer capacity of polyphenols present in red wine strongly increased consequently to the enormous number of studies on resveratrol. In this study, using lyophilized red wine, we present evidence that its anticancer effect in a cellular model is mediated by apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Using a human osteosarcoma cell line, U2Os, we found that the lyophilized red wine was cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum effect in the range of 100-200 μg/ml equivalents of gallic acid. A mixed phenotype of types I/II cell death was evidenced by means of specific assays following treatment of U2Os with lyophilized red wine, e.g., autophagy and apoptosis. We found that cell death induced by lyophilized red wine proceeded through a mechanism independent from its anti-oxidant activity and involving the inhibition of PI3K/Akt kinase signaling. Considering the relative low concentration of each single bioactive compound in lyophilized red wine, our study suggests the activation of synergistic mechanism able to inhibit growth in malignant cells.

  15. Protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Mary-Jane; Sambrook, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    In the cell, as in vitro, the final conformation of a protein is determined by its amino-acid sequence. But whereas some isolated proteins can be denatured and refolded in vitro in the absence of other macromolecular cellular components, folding and assembly of polypeptides in vivo involves other proteins, many of which belong to families that have been highly conserved during evolution.

  16. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  17. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  18. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J.; Roback, John D.; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L.; Zimring, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation. PMID:26921359

  19. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation.

  20. Visualization of phosphoinositides via the development of the transient expression system of a cyan fluorescent protein in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Koji; Uji, Toshiki; Li, Lin; Takahashi, Megumu; Yasui, Hajime; Saga, Naotsune

    2009-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) play important roles in signal transduction pathways and the regulation of cytoskeleton and membrane functions in eukaryotes. Subcellular localization of individual PI derivative is successfully visualized in yeast, animal, and green plant cells using PI derivative-specific pleckstrin homology (PH) domains fused with a variety of fluorescent proteins; however, expression of fluorescent proteins has not yet been reported in any red algal cells. In the present study, we developed the system to visualize these PIs using human PH domains fused with a humanized cyan fluorescent protein (AmCFP) in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis. Plasma membrane localization of AmCFP fused with the PH domain from phospholipase Cdelta1 and Akt1, but not Bruton's tyrosine kinase, was observed in cell wall-free monospores, demonstrating the presence of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate in P. yezoensis cells. This is the first report of the successful expression of fluorescent protein and the monitoring of PI derivatives in red algal cells. Our system, based on transient expression of AmCFP, could be applicable for the analysis of subcellular localization of other proteins in P. yezoensis and other red algal cells.

  1. Comparison of red blood cells from gastric cancer patients and healthy persons using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Su, Qinglong; Sheng, Daping; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, FTIR spectroscopy was used to compare gastric cancer patients' red blood cells (RBCs) with healthy persons' RBCs. IR spectra were acquired with high resolution. The A1653/A1543 (the protein secondary structures), A1543/A2958 (the relative content of proteins and lipids), A1106/A1166 (the structure and content changes of sugars) and A1543/A1106 (the relative content of proteins and sugars) ratios of gastric cancer patients' RBCs were significantly different from those of healthy persons' RBCs. Curve fitting results showed that the protein secondary structures and sugars' structures had differences between gastric cancer patients' and healthy persons' RBCs. Additionally, FTIR spectroscopy could obtain 95% sensitivity, 70% specificity, 84.2% accuracy and 80.9% positive predictive value in combination with canconical discriminant analysis. The above results indicate FTIR spectroscopy may be useful for diagnosing gastric cancer.

  2. Red wine polyphenolics increase LDL receptor expression and activity and suppress the secretion of ApoB100 from human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ho, Nerissa; Santos, Carlos; Dubois, Paul; Mamo, John; Croft, Kevin; Allister, Emma

    2003-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that the consumption of red wine may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. The cardioprotective effect of red wine has been attributed to the polyphenols present in red wine, particularly resveratrol (a stilbene, with estrogen-like activity), and the flavonoids, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin and phenolic acids such as gallic acid. At present, very little is known about the mechanisms by which red wine phenolic compounds benefit the cardiovascular system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate whether red wine polyphenolics reduce lipoprotein production and clearance by the liver. Cultured HepG2 cells were incubated in the presence of dealcoholized red wine, alcohol-containing red wine and atorvastatin for 24 h. The apolipoprotien B100 (apoB100) protein (marker of hepatic lipoproteins) was quantified on Western blots with an anti-apoB100 antibody and the enhanced chemiluminescence detection system. Apolipoprotein B100 levels in the cells and that secreted into the media were significantly reduced by 50% in liver cells incubated with alcohol-stripped red wine compared with control cells. This effect of dealcoholized red wine on apoB100 production in HepG2 cells was similar to the effect of atorvastatin. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 30% in cells incubated with alcoholized red wine, suggesting that the alcohol was masking the effect of red wine polyphenolics. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 45% with the polyphenolic compounds resveratrol and quercertin. In addition, dealcoholized and alcoholized red wine and atorvastatin significantly increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA and LDL receptor binding activity relative to controls. Dealcoholized red wine also increased LDL receptor gene expression. Collectively, this study suggests that red wine polyphenolics regulate major pathways involved in lipoprotein metabolism.

  3. mBeRFP, an improved large stokes shift red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Liang; Yang, Fei; Luo, Haiming; Xu, Lingling; Lu, Jinling; Zeng, Shaoqun; Zhang, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe the generation of a monomeric large Stokes shift (LSS) red fluorescent protein, mBeRFP, with excitation and emission peaks at 446 and 615 nm, respectively. Compared with two previously reported LSS-RFPs (mKeima and LSS-mKate2), mBeRFP is approximately three times brighter. In addition, mBeRFP is characterized by improved photostability, rapid maturation, an extended lifetime, and a monomeric nature. Additionally, mBeRFP can be paired with the Alexa 647 dye as a FRET donor to detect caspase 3 activity. This FRET pair has an extremely dynamic range and a large Förster radius (approximately 6.5 nm). To demonstrate the applicability of mBeRFP for imaging in living cells, we performed dual-color imaging of mBeRFP and CFP simultaneously excited by a single excitation source, and we demonstrated that these fluorescent proteins allow the clear visualization of the dynamics of Bax during cancer cell apoptosis. Thus, mBeRFP appears to be particularly useful for cellular imaging applications.

  4. Measurement of red blood cell mechanics during morphological changes.

    PubMed

    Park, YongKeun; Best, Catherine A; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L; Levine, Alex J; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-04-13

    The human red blood cell (RBC) membrane, a fluid lipid bilayer tethered to an elastic 2D spectrin network, provides the principal control of the cell's morphology and mechanics. These properties, in turn, influence the ability of RBCs to transport oxygen in circulation. Current mechanical measurements of RBCs rely on external loads. Here we apply a noncontact optical interferometric technique to quantify the thermal fluctuations of RBC membranes with 3 nm accuracy over a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Combining this technique with a new mathematical model describing RBC membrane undulations, we measure the mechanical changes of RBCs as they undergo a transition from the normal discoid shape to the abnormal echinocyte and spherical shapes. These measurements indicate that, coincident with this morphological transition, there is a significant increase in the membrane's shear, area, and bending moduli. This mechanical transition can alter cell circulation and impede oxygen delivery.

  5. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  6. Structural analysis of red blood cell aggregates under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2010-03-01

    A set of measures of red blood cell (RBC) aggregates are developed and applied to examine the aggregate structure under plane shear and channel flows. Some of these measures are based on averages over the set of red blood cells which are in contact with each other at a given time. Other measures are developed by first fitting an ellipse to the planar projection of the aggregate, and then examining the area and aspect ratio of the fit ellipse as well as the orientations of constituent RBCs with respect to the fit ellipse axes. The aggregate structural measures are illustrated using a new mesoscale computational model for blood cell transport, collision and adhesion. The sensitivity of this model to change in adhesive surface energy density and shear rate on the aggregate structure is examined. It is found that the mesoscale model predictions exhibit reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical data for blood flow in plane shear and channel flows. The new structural measures are used to examine the differences between predictions of two- and three-dimensional computations of the aggregate formation, showing that two-dimensional computations retain some of the important aspects of three-dimensional computations.

  7. Transport of diseased red blood cells in the spleen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    A major function of the spleen is to remove old and diseased red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties. We investigated this mechanical filtering mechanism by combining experiments and computational modeling, especially for red blood cells in malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD). First, utilizing a transgenic line for 3D confocal live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element modeling, we extracted the mechanical properties of both the RBC membrane and malaria parasites for different asexual malaria stages. Secondly, using a non-invasive laser interferometric technique, we optically measured the dynamic membrane fluctuations of SCD RBCs. By simulating the membrane fluctuation experiment using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model, we retrieved mechanical properties of SCD RBCs with different shapes. Finally, based on the mechanical properties obtained from these experiments, we simulated the full fluid-structure interaction problem of diseased RBCs passing through endothelial slits in the spleen under different fluid pressure gradients using the DPD model. The effects of the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the cytoskeleton and the parasite on the critical pressure of splenic passage of RBCs were investigated separately. This work is supported by NIH and Singapore-MIT Alliance for Science and Technology (SMART).

  8. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  9. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  10. Red blood cell adhesion on a solid/liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Lavalle, Ph.; Stoltz, J.-F.; Senger, B.; Voegel, J.-C.; Schaaf, P.

    1996-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs), previously fixed with glutaraldehyde, adhere to glass slides coated with fibrinogen. The RBC deposition process on the horizontal glass surface is investigated by analyzing the relative surface covered by the RBCs, as well as the variance of this surface coverage, as a function of the concentration of particles. This study is performed by optical microscopy and image analysis. A model, derived from the classical random sequential adsorption model, has been developed to account for the experimental results. This model highlights the strong influence of the hydrodynamic interactions during the deposition process. PMID:8986776

  11. Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

  12. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta

    PubMed Central

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  13. Cytoskeleton confinement and tension of red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Gov, N; Zilman, A G; Safran, S

    2003-06-06

    We analyze theoretically both the static and dynamic fluctuation spectra of the red blood cell in a unified manner, using a simple model of the composite membrane. In this model, the two-dimensional spectrin network that forms the cytoskeleton is treated as a rigid shell, located at a fixed, average distance from the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton thereby confines both the static and dynamic fluctuations of the lipid bilayer. The sparse connections of the cytoskeleton and bilayer induce a surface tension, for wavelengths larger than the bilayer persistence length. The predictions of the model give a consistent account for both the wave vector and frequency dependence of the experimental data.

  14. Effect of asbestos on lipid peroxidation in the red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, S; Anca, Z

    1975-01-01

    In vitro exposure of red cells to vie International Union against Cancer (UICC) standard reference asbestos samples resulted in an increase of thiobarbituric acid substances. Chrysotiles developed the largest amounts of lipid peroxides, followed by anthophyllite, amosite, and crocidolite in decreasing order. Compared with the control samples erythrocytes free of dusts, all types of the asbestos examined disclosed significant differences. The results obtained provide support for the cytotoxic potential of amosite and crocidolite and, on the other hand, suggest that a lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids may be involved in the mechanisms(s) of membrane-damaging effects of asbestos dusts. PMID:1125126

  15. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sidae; Lim, Wendell A; Thorn, Kurt S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  16. [Red Blood Cells Raman Spectroscopy Comparison of Type Two Diabetes Patients and Rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Gui-dong; Mu, Xin; Xiao, Hong-bin; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Si-qi; Niu Wen-ying; Jiang, Guang-kun; Feng, Yue-nan; Bian, Jing-qi

    2015-10-01

    By using confocal Raman spectroscopy, Raman spectra were measured in normal rat red blood cells, normal human red blood cells, STZ induced diabetetic rats red blood cells, Alloxan induced diabetetic rats red blood cells and human type 2 diabetes red blood cells. Then principal component analysis (PCA) with support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for data analysis, and then the distance between classes was used to judge the degree of close to two kinds of rat model with type 2 diabetes. The results found significant differences in the Raman spectra of red blood cell in diabetic and normal red blood cells. To diabetic red blood cells, the peak in the amide VI C=O deformation vibration band is obvious, and amide V N-H deformation vibration band spectral lines appear deviation. Belong to phospholipid fatty acyl C-C skeleton, the 1 130 cm(-1) spectral line is enhanced and the 1 088 cm(-1) spectral line is abated, which show diabetes red cell membrane permeability increased. Raman spectra of PCA combined with SVM can well separate 5 types of red blood cells. Classifier test results show that the classification accuracy is up to 100%. Through the class distance between the two induced method and human type 2 diabetes, it is found that STZ induced model is more close to human type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy can be used for diagnosis of diabetes and rats STZ induced diabetes method is closer to human type 2 diabetes.

  17. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Henkelman, S; Noorman, F; Badloe, J F; Lagerberg, J W M

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular deterioration at subzero temperatures, its usage have been hampered due to the more complex and labour intensive procedure and the limited shelf life of thawed products. Since the FDA approval of a closed (de) glycerolization procedure in 2002, allowing a prolonged postthaw storage of red blood cells up to 21 days at 2-6°C, cryopreserved red blood cells have become a more utilized blood product. Currently, cryopreserved red blood cells are mainly used in military operations and to stock red blood cells with rare phenotypes. Yet, cryopreserved red blood cells could also be useful to replenish temporary blood shortages, to prolong storage time before autologous transfusion and for IgA-deficient patients. This review describes the main methods to cryopreserve red blood cells, explores the quality of this blood product and highlights clinical settings in which cryopreserved red blood cells are or could be utilized.

  18. Effects of red grape juice polyphenols in NADPH oxidase subunit expression in human neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; de la Peña, Gema; Sánchez-Martín, Carolina C; Teresa Guerra, M; Bartolomé, Begoña; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2009-10-01

    The NADPH oxidase enzyme system is the main source of superoxide anions in phagocytic and vascular cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide generation has been found to be abnormally enhanced in several chronic diseases. Evidence is accumulating that polyphenols may have the potential to improve cardiovascular health, although the mechanism is not fully established. Consumption of concentrated red grape juice, rich in polyphenols, has been recently shown to reduce NADPH oxidase activity in circulating neutrophils from human subjects. In the present work we studied whether red grape juice polyphenols affected NADPH oxidase subunit expression at the transcription level. For this, we used human neutrophils and mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, HL-60-derived neutrophils and the endothelial cell line EA.hy926.Superoxide production was measured with 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate or lucigenin, mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Each experiment was performed at least three times. In all cell types tested, red grape juice, dealcoholised red wine and pure polyphenols decreased superoxide anion production. Red grape juice and dealcoholised red wine selectively reduced p47phox, p22phox and gp91phox expression at both mRNA and protein levels, without affecting the expression of p67phox. Pure polyphenols, particularly quercetin, also reduced NADPH oxidase subunit expression, especially p47phox, in all cell types tested. The present results showing that red grape juice polyphenols reduce superoxide anion production provide an alternative mechanism by which consumption of grape derivatives may account for a reduction of oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular and/or inflammatory diseases related to NADPH oxidase superoxide overproduction.

  19. Bio-inspired cryo-ink preserves red blood cell phenotype and function during nanoliter vitrification.

    PubMed

    El Assal, Rami; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyler, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M W; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-09-03

    Current red-blood-cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red-blood-cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bioprinting approach.

  20. Bio-inspired Cryo-ink Preserves Red Blood Cell Phenotype and Function during Nanoliter Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Rami El; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyber, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M.W.; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Current red blood cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red blood cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bio-printing approach. PMID:25047246

  1. Red blood cell aquaporin-1 expression is decreased in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Renée L; Maltaneri, Romina E; Vittori, Daniela C; Solari, Liliana; Gammella, Daniel; Schvartzman, Gabriel; García, Eliana; Rapetti, María C; Donato, Hugo; Nesse, Alcira

    2016-10-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the membrane water channel responsible for changes in erythrocyte volume in response to the tonicity of the medium. As the aberrant distribution of proteins in hereditary spherocytosis (HS) generates deficiencies of proteins other than those codified by the mutated gene, we postulated that AQP1 expression might be impaired in spherocytes. AQP1 expression was evaluated through flow cytometry in 5 normal controls, 1 autoimmune hemolytic anemia, 10 HS (2 mild, 3 moderate, 2 severe, and 3 splenectomized), and 3 silent carriers. The effect of AQP1 inhibitors was evaluated through water flow-based tests: osmotic fragility and hypertonic cryohemolysis. Serum osmolality was measured in 20 normal controls and 13 HS. The effect of erythropoietin (Epo) on AQP1 expression was determined in cultures of erythroleukemia UT-7 cells, dependent on Epo to survive. Independent of erythrocyte size, HS patients showed a lower content of AQP1 in erythrocyte membranes which correlated with the severity of the disease. Accordingly, red blood cells from HS subjects were less sensitive to cryohemolysis than normal erythrocytes after inhibition of the AQP1 water channel. A lower serum osmolality in HS with respect to normal controls suggests alterations during reticulocyte remodeling. The decreased AQP1 expression could contribute to explain variable degrees of anemia in hereditary spherocytosis. The finding of AQP1 expression induced by Epo in a model of erythroid cells may be interpreted as a mechanism to restore the balance of red cell water fluxes.

  2. Developments in red cell rheology at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Mohandas, N

    1986-01-01

    The present day rheological approximation, which has been used successfully to quantitate the deformability properties of red cells, is based on the view that the cell has a liquid interior encapsulated by a viscoelastic solid membrane shell. A review of historical developments in this field shows that determination of intrinsic red cell membrane properties has not come from simple mathematical analysis of experiments. On the contrary, considerable insight has been required to bring together physical and biological methods to rationalize the unique deformability characteristics of the red blood cell. Key developments at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire (IPC) in the early 1970s played a role in our improved understanding of red cell rheology. In this article, we describe the material concepts of the red cell membrane held before 1970, discuss the seminal developments at Bicetre, and, finally, outline the contemporary view of red cell deformability.

  3. Associations of red meat, fat, and protein intake with distal colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina Dawn; Satia, Jessie A; Adair, Linda S; Stevens, June; Galanko, Joseph; Keku, Temitope O; Sandler, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Studies have suggested that red and processed meat consumption elevate the risk of colon cancer; however, the relationship between red meat, as well as fat and protein, and distal colorectal cancer (CRC) specifically is not clear. We determined the risk of distal CRC associated with red and processed meat, fat, and protein intakes in Whites and African Americans. There were 945 cases (720 White, 225 African American) of distal CRC and 959 controls (800 White, 159 African American). We assessed dietary intake in the previous 12 mo. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to obtain odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). There was no association between total, saturated, or monounsaturated fat and distal CRC risk. In African Americans, the OR of distal CRC for the highest category of polyunsaturated fat intake was 0.28 (95% CI = 0.08-0.96). The percent of energy from protein was associated with a 47% risk reduction in Whites (Q4 OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.37-0.77). Red meat consumption in Whites was associated with a marginally significant risk reduction (Q4 OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.43-1.00). Our results do not support the hypotheses that fat, protein, and red meat increase the risk of distal CRC.

  4. Interactions of hemoglobin in live red blood cells measured by the electrophoresis release test.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Gao, Lijun; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Lishe; Qin, Liangyi; Han, Lihong; Qin, Wenbin

    2010-09-01

    To elucidate the protein-protein interactions of hemoglobin (Hb) variants A and A(2), HbA was first shown to bind with HbA(2) in live red blood cells (RBCs) by diagonal electrophoresis and then the interaction between HbA and HbA(2) outside the RBC was shown by cross electrophoresis. The starch-agarose gel electrophoresis of hemolysate, RBCs, freeze-thawed RBCs and the supernatant of freeze-thawed RBCs showed that the interaction between HbA and HbA(2) was affected by membrane integrity. To identify the proteins involved in the interaction, protein components located between HbA and HbA(2) in RBCs (RBC HbA-HbA(2)) and hemolysate (hemolysate HbA-HbA(2)) were isolated from the starch-agarose gel and separated by 5-12% SDS-PAGE. The results showed that there was a ≈22 kDa protein band located in the RBC HbA-HbA(2) but not in hemolysate HbA-HbA(2). Sequencing by LC/MS/MS showed that this band was a protein complex that included mainly thioredoxin peroxidase B, α-globin, δ-globin and β-globin. Thus, using our unique in vivo whole blood cell electrophoresis release test, Hbs were proven for the first time to interact with other proteins in the live RBC.

  5. Cell polarity proteins and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Mruk, Dolores; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-11-01

    When the cross-section of a seminiferous tubule from an adult rat testes is examined microscopically, Sertoli cells and germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium are notably polarized cells. For instance, Sertoli cell nuclei are found near the basement membrane. On the other hand, tight junction (TJ), basal ectoplasmic specialization (basal ES, a testis-specific actin-rich anchoring junction), gap junction (GJ) and desmosome that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) are also located near the basement membrane. The BTB, in turn, divides the epithelium into the basal and the adluminal (apical) compartments. Within the epithelium, undifferentiated spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes restrictively reside in the basal compartment whereas spermatocytes and post-meiotic spermatids reside in the adluminal compartment. Furthermore, the heads of elongating/elongated spermatids point toward the basement membrane with their elongating tails toward the tubule lumen. However, the involvement of polarity proteins in this unique cellular organization, in particular the underlying molecular mechanism(s) by which polarity proteins confer cellular polarity in the seminiferous epithelium is virtually unknown until recent years. Herein, we discuss latest findings regarding the role of different polarity protein complexes or modules and how these protein complexes are working in concert to modulate Sertoli cell and spermatid polarity. These findings also illustrate polarity proteins exert their effects through the actin-based cytoskeleton mediated by actin binding and regulatory proteins, which in turn modulate adhesion protein complexes at the cell-cell interface since TJ, basal ES and GJ utilize F-actin for attachment. We also propose a hypothetical model which illustrates the antagonistic effects of these polarity proteins. This in turn provides a unique mechanism to modulate junction remodeling in the testis to support germ cell transport across the epithelium in

  6. Biochemical and Cellular Changes in Leukocyte-Depleted Red Blood Cells Stored for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Diana; Rocha, Susana; Abreu, Estela; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate biochemical and cellular changes associated with the storage of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells (RBCs). Methods We investigated 10 leukocyte-depleted RBC units, randomly chosen from volunteer donors. Every week an aliquot was collected for laboratorial evaluation, which included complete cell blood count, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, extracellular sodium, potassium and pH, membrane-bound hemoglobin (MBH), band 3 profile, and quantification of RBC membrane proteins composition. Results We observed an increase in mean cell volume (from 91.86 ± 4.65 fl to 98.10 ± 5.80 fl, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05), red cell distribution width, percentage of macrocytic RBCs, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and a decreased percentage of microcytic RBCs, mean cell volume concentration and G6PD activity. The extracellular concentration of sodium decreased, and that of potassium increased significantly over time. RBC membrane composition revealed an increase in spectrin/ankyrin ratio after 21 days (from 4.84 ± 0.99 to 5.27 ± 0.94, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05). At day 35, a decrease in ankyrin (from 6.44 ± 1.70% to 5.49 ± 1.96%, day 0 vs. day 35; p < 0.05), in protein 4.1/band 3, protein 4.2/band 3, and ankyrin/band 3 ratios and in band 5 was observed. Conclusions Our data show that leukocyte-depleted RBCs present changes in the RBC morphology, membrane protein composition, enzymatic activity, and extracellular electrolyte concentration and pH. PMID:25960715

  7. Reactivity of polymeric proanthocyanidins toward salivary proteins and their contribution to young red wine astringency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baoshan; de Sá, Marta; Leandro, Conceição; Caldeira, Ilda; Duarte, Filomena L; Spranger, Isabel

    2013-01-30

    Recent studies have indicated the presence of significant amount of highly polymerized and soluble proanthocyanidins in red wine and such compounds interacted readily with proteins, suggesting that they might be particularly astringent. Thus, the objective of this work was to verify the astringency of polymeric proanthocyanidins and their contribution to red wine astringency. The precipitation reactions of the purified oligomeric procyanidins (degree of polymerization ranging from 2 to 12-15) and polymeric procyanidins (degree of polymerization ranging from 12-15 to 32-34) with human salivary proteins were studied; salivary proteins composition changes before and after the reaction was verified by SDS-PAGE and procyanidins composition changes by spectrometric, direct HPLC and thiolysis-HPLC methods. The astringency intensity of these two procyanidin fractions was evaluated by a sensory analysis panel. For verifying the correlation between polymeric proanthocyanidins and young red wine astringency, the levels of total oligomeric and total polymeric proanthocyanidins and other phenolic composition in various young red wines were quantified and the astringency intensities of these wines were evaluated by a sensory panel. The results showed that polymeric proanthocyanidins had much higher reactivity toward human salivary proteins and higher astringency intensity than the oligomeric ones. Furthermore, young red wine astringency intensities were highly correlated to levels of polymeric proanthocyanidins, particularly at low concentration range (correlation coefficient r = 0.9840) but not significant correlated to total polyphenols (r = 0.2343) or other individual phenolic compounds (generally r < 0.3). These results indicate the important contribution of polymeric proanthocyanidins to red wine astringency and the levels of polymeric polyphenols in red wines may be used as an indicator for its astringency.

  8. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes.

  9. Geometric localization of thermal fluctuations in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Arthur A; Bhaduri, Basanta; Popescu, Gabriel; Levine, Alex J

    2017-02-27

    The thermal fluctuations of membranes and nanoscale shells affect their mechanical characteristics. Whereas these fluctuations are well understood for flat membranes, curved shells show anomalous behavior due to the geometric coupling between in-plane elasticity and out-of-plane bending. Using conventional shallow shell theory in combination with equilibrium statistical physics we theoretically demonstrate that thermalized shells containing regions of negative Gaussian curvature naturally develop anomalously large fluctuations. Moreover, the existence of special curves, "singular lines," leads to a breakdown of linear membrane theory. As a result, these geometric curves effectively partition the cell into regions whose fluctuations are only weakly coupled. We validate these predictions using high-resolution microscopy of human red blood cells (RBCs) as a case study. Our observations show geometry-dependent localization of thermal fluctuations consistent with our theoretical modeling, demonstrating the efficacy in combining shell theory with equilibrium statistical physics for describing the thermalized morphology of cellular membranes.

  10. Geometric localization of thermal fluctuations in red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Arthur A.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Popescu, Gabriel; Levine, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal fluctuations of membranes and nanoscale shells affect their mechanical characteristics. Whereas these fluctuations are well understood for flat membranes, curved shells show anomalous behavior due to the geometric coupling between in-plane elasticity and out-of-plane bending. Using conventional shallow shell theory in combination with equilibrium statistical physics we theoretically demonstrate that thermalized shells containing regions of negative Gaussian curvature naturally develop anomalously large fluctuations. Moreover, the existence of special curves, “singular lines,” leads to a breakdown of linear membrane theory. As a result, these geometric curves effectively partition the cell into regions whose fluctuations are only weakly coupled. We validate these predictions using high-resolution microscopy of human red blood cells (RBCs) as a case study. Our observations show geometry-dependent localization of thermal fluctuations consistent with our theoretical modeling, demonstrating the efficacy in combining shell theory with equilibrium statistical physics for describing the thermalized morphology of cellular membranes. PMID:28242681

  11. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  12. Raman Tweezers Spectroscopy of Live, Single Red and White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Zachariah, Elsa; Chidangil, Santhosh; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm) is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW). Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip. PMID:20454686

  13. From stem cell to erythroblast: regulation of red cell production at multiple levels by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey; Flygare, Johan; Chou, Song

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of production of red blood cells at several levels: (1) the ability of erythropoietin and adhesion to a fibronectin matrix to stimulate the rapid production of red cells by inducing terminal proliferation and differentiation of committed erythroid CFU-E progenitors; (2) the regulated expansion of the pool of earlier BFU-E erythroid progenitors by glucocorticoids and other factors that occurs during chronic anemia or inflammation; and (3) the expansion of thehematopoietic cell pool to produce more progenitors of all hematopoietic lineages.

  14. [Hereditary red cell membrane disorders in Japan: comparison with other countries].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Wada, Hideho; Suemori, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Red cell membrane disorders are the most common type of inherited hemolytic disorders in the Japanese population. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS), the primary presentation is a loss of membrane surface area, leading to reduced deformability because of defects in the membrane proteins ankyrin, band 3, β-spectrin, α spectrin, or protein 4.2 (P4.2). Complete P4.2 deficiencies, which are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, comprise a unique HS subgroup and are common in Japanese, but rare in other populations. In contrast, the principle presentation in hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) is mechanical weakness of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton due to defects in α-spectrin, β-spectrin, or protein 4.1. Although α-spectrin mutations are the most frequent cause of HE in Caucasian, African, and Mediterranean populations, these mutations are rare in the Japanese population, in which P4.1 deficiencies are instead most common. Furthermore, hereditary stomatocytoses (HSt) are disorders of monovalent cation permeability in the red cell membrane.

  15. Development of complement therapeutics for inhibition of immune-mediated red cell destruction

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-01-01

    A major objective of my National Blood Foundation (NBF)-funded proposal was to produce recombinant soluble forms of a complement regulatory protein called complement receptor 1 (CR1) that carries the Knops blood group system antigens to perform antibody neutralization studies. By generating these recombinant proteins, we were able to inhibit several Knops antibodies in patient serum samples, thereby demonstrating their usefulness for clinical use. Interestingly, the recombinant CR1 proteins generated through NBF funding were also found to strongly reduce complement-mediated red cell destruction in a mouse hemolytic transfusion model. In this review, I will outline our NBF-funded studies, give an overview of recent advances from our group and others in the development of complement therapeutics, and highlight their potential use in the transfusion medicine setting. PMID:16086799

  16. Hematologic variables and venous thrombosis: red cell distribution width and blood monocyte count are associated with an increased risk.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Suely Meireles; Lijfering, Willem M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that leukocytes and erythrocytes play a role in coagulation. However, whether leukocytes, erythrocytes and other hematologic variables are associated with risk of venous thrombosis is not well known. To study this, we used data from 2473 patients with venous thrombosis and 2935 controls. The variables assessed were: total leukocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, hematocrit, hemoglobin, erythrocytes and red cell indices (mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and red cell distribution width). We found a strong dose-response relation for higher red cell distribution width and monocyte count with risk of venous thrombosis, with odds ratios of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.0-4.8) and 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.8), respectively, after adjustment for age, sex, C-reactive protein level, malignancy and co-morbidities. Monocyte count and red cell distribution width were associated with venous thrombosis even within reference ranges. A low monocyte count (<0.12 × 10(9)/L) was associated with a lower risk of venous thrombosis after full adjustment (odds ratios 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-0.8). In summary, high red cell distribution width and blood monocyte count, two parameters that are inexpensive and easily obtainable, were clearly associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Future studies should evaluate the underlying mechanism and the use of these variables in prediction models for first and recurrent thrombosis.

  17. Influence of cell-specific factors on red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rampling, M W; Meiselman, H J; Neu, B; Baskurt, O K

    2004-01-01

    The reversible aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) into linear and three-dimensional structures continues to be of basic science and clinical interest: RBC aggregation affects low shear blood viscosity and microvascular flow dynamics, and can be markedly enhanced in several clinical states. Until fairly recently, most research efforts were focused on relations between suspending medium composition (i.e., protein levels, polymer type and concentration) and aggregate formation. However, there is now an increasing amount of experimental evidence indicating that RBC cellular properties can markedly affect aggregation, with the term "RBC aggregability" coined to describe the cell's intrinsic tendency to aggregate. Variations of aggregability can be large, with some changes of aggregation substantially greater than those resulting from pathologic states. The present review provides a brief overview of this topic, and includes such areas as donor-to-donor variations, polymer-plasma correlations, effects of RBC age, effects of enzymatic treatment, and current developments related to the mechanisms involved in RBC aggregation.

  18. Characterization of red blood cell deformability change during blood storage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Jun; Cui, Tony; Shehata, Nadine; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-02-07

    Stored red blood cells (RBCs) show progressive deformability changes during blood banking/storage. Their deformability changes over an 8 weeks' storage period were measured using a microfluidic device. Hydrodynamic focusing controls the orientation and position of individual RBCs within the microchannel. High-speed imaging (5000 frames s(-1)) captures the dynamic deformation behavior of the cells, and together with automated image analysis, enables the characterization of over 1000 RBCs within 3 minutes. Multiple parameters including deformation index (DI), time constant (shape recovery rate), and RBC circularity were quantified. Compared to previous studies on stored RBC deformability, our results include a significantly higher number of cells (>1000 cells per sample vs. a few to tens of cells per sample) and, for the first time, reveal deformation changes of stored RBCs when traveling through human-capillary-like microchannels. Contrary to existing knowledge, our results demonstrate that the deformation index of RBCs under folding does not change significantly over blood storage. However, significant differences exist in time constants and circularity distribution widths, which can be used to quantify stored RBC quality or age.

  19. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Y; Matsuyama, Y; Little, J A; Gurkan, U A

    2016-06-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell's aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events.

  20. Imaging red blood cell dynamics by quantitative phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease.

  1. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E; Ustinov, V D

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  3. Research opportunities in loss of red blood cell mass in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, J. M.; Fisher, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Decreases of red blood cell mass and plasma volume have been observed consistently following manned space flights. Losses of red cell mass by United States astronauts have averaged 10 to 15% (range: 2 to 21%). Based on postflight estimates of total hemoglobin, Soviet cosmonauts engaged in space missions lasting from 1 to 7 months have exhibited somewhat greater losses. Restoration of red cell mass requires from 4 to 6 weeks following return to Earth, regardless of the duration of space flight.

  4. New Developments in Red Blood Cell Preservation Using Liquid and Freezing Procedures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-02

    phosphate ion exchange resin.30 ൪ Solutions of bicarbonate, adenine, glucose and mannitol (BAGM), saline, adenine and RED BLOOD CELL PRESERVATION 10...glucose (SAO), and adenine, glucose, sodium chloride and mannitol (ADSOL), have been used to maintain or increase the red cell organic phosphate...compounds, ATP which influences posttransfusion survival, and 2,3 DPG which influences red cell oxygen transport function. Studies have shown that mannitol

  5. Rheology of red blood cell aggregation by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Liu, Wing Kam

    2006-12-01

    The aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) induced by the interactions between RBCs is a dominant factor of the in vitro rheological properties of blood, and existing models of blood do not contain full cellular information. In this work, we introduce a new three-dimensional model that couples Navier-Stokes equations with cell interactions to investigate RBC aggregation and its effect on blood rheology. It consists of a depletion mediated aggregation model to describe the interactions of RBCs and an immersed continuum model to track the deformation/motion of RBCs in blood plasma. To overcome the large deformation of RBCs, the meshfree method is used to model the RBCs. Three important phenomena in blood rheology are successfully captured and studied via this approach: the shear rate dependence of blood viscosity, the influence of cell rigidity on blood viscosity, and the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect. As a microscopic illustration of the shear-rate dependence of the blood's viscoelasticity, the disaggregation of an RBC rouleau at shear rates varying between 0.125 and 24 s -1 is modeled. Lower RBC deformability and higher shear rates above 0.5 s -1 are found to facilitate disaggregation. The effective viscosities at different shear rates and for cells with different deformabilities are simulated. The numerical results are shown to agree with the reported experimental measurements. The Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is, for the first time, studied through three-dimensional numerical simulations of blood flow through tubes with different diameters and is shown to be directly linked to axial-migration of deformable cells. This study shows that cell-cell interaction and cell deformability have significant effects on blood rheology in capillaries.

  6. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  7. Storage time of red blood cells and mortality of transfusion recipients.

    PubMed

    Middelburg, Rutger A; van de Watering, Leo M G; Briët, Ernest; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Storage of red cells and the associated storage lesion have been suggested to contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increasing storage time of red cells is associated with mortality of recipients. From all patients who received red cell transfusions between January 2005 and May 2009, in the Leiden University Medical Center, we selected those who received only-young or only-old red cells, defined as below or above the median storage time. Mortality was compared in a Cox regression model. Subsequently, similar comparisons were made between subgroups with increasing contrast between old and young red cells. Among adult patients, after correction for potential confounders, the hazard ratio of death within 1 year after receiving red cells stored for more than 17 days compared with 17 days or less was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.2). With increasing contrast, the hazard ratio decreased to 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.97) for red cells stored for more than 24 days compared with less than 10 days. In contrast to what has previously been suggested, we find an almost 2-fold increase in mortality rate after the transfusion of fresh red cells compared with old red cells. Results dependent on analyses chosen and previous studies may not have used optimal analyses. The tendency to demand ever-fresher blood could actually be detrimental for at least some patient groups.

  8. The deformation behavior of multiple red blood cells in a capillary vessel.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaobo; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2009-07-01

    The deformation of multiple red blood cells in a capillary flow was studied numerically. The immersed boundary method was used for the fluid red blood cells interaction. The membrane of the red blood cell was modeled as a hyperelastic thin shell. The numerical results show that the apparent viscosity in the capillary flow is more sensitive to the change of shear coefficient of the membrane than the bending coefficient and surface dilation coefficient, and the increase in the shear coefficient results in an increase in the pressure drop in the blood flow in capillary vessels in order to sustain the same flux rate of red blood cells.

  9. Red cell or serum folate: what to do in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Kirsch, Susanne H; Herrmann, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been linked to diverse clinical manifestations and despite the importance of accurate assessment of folate status, the best test for routine use is uncertain. Both serum and red cell folate assays are widely available in clinical laboratories; however, red cell folate is the more time-consuming and costly test. This review sought to evaluate whether the red cell assay demonstrated superior performance characteristics to justify these disadvantages. Red cell folate, but not serum folate, measurements demonstrated analytical variation due to sample pre-treatment parameters, oxygen saturation of haemoglobin and haematocrit. Neither marker was clearly superior in characterising deficiency but serum folate more frequently showed the higher correlation with homocysteine, a sensitive marker of deficiency. Similarly, both serum and red cell folate were shown to increase in response to folic acid supplementation. However, serum folate generally gave the greater response and was able to distinguish different supplementation doses. The C677T polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase alters the distribution of folate forms in red cells and may thereby cause further analytical variability in routine red cell folate assays. Overall, serum folate is cheaper and faster to perform than red cell folate, is influenced by fewer analytical variables and provides an assessment of folate status that may be superior to red cell folate.

  10. Beta2-microglobulin causes abnormal phosphatidylserine exposure in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Barbara; Bucci, Sonia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Del Boccio, Piero; Di Rienzo, Marianna; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Sacchetta, Paolo; Di Ilio, Carmine; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea; Bonomini, Mario

    2011-03-01

    The exposure of the aminophospholipid phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of red blood cell plasma membrane can have several pathophysiological consequences with particular regard to the processes of cell phagocytosis, haemostasis and cell-cell interaction. A significant increase in phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes has been reported in chronic haemodialysis patients and found to be strongly influenced by the uraemic milieu. To identify uraemic compound(s) enhancing phosphatidylserine externalization in erythrocytes, we fractionated by chromatographic methods the ultrafiltrate obtained during dialysis, and examined by flow cytometry the effect of the resulting fractions on phosphatidylserine exposure in human red cells. Chromatographic procedures disclosed a homogeneous fraction able to increase erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure. The inducer of such externalization was identified by monodimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry investigations as beta2-microglobulin. To confirm the beta2-microglobulin effect and to examine the influence of protein glycation (as it occurs in uraemia) on phosphatidylserine erythrocyte exposure, erythrocytes from normal subjects were incubated with recombinant beta2-microglobulin (showing no glycation sites at mass analysis), commercial beta2-microglobulin (8 glycation sites), or with in vitro glycated recombinant beta2-microglobulin (showing multiple glycation sites). Elevated concentrations of beta2-microglobulin (corresponding to plasma levels reached in dialysis patients) increased slightly but significantly the protein's ability to externalize phosphatidylserine on human erythrocytes. Such an effect was markedly enhanced by glycated forms of the protein. Beta2-microglobulin is recognized as a surrogate marker of middle-molecule uraemic toxins and represents a key component of dialysis-associated amyloidosis. Our study adds further evidence to the potential pathophysiologic consequences of beta2

  11. Dynamics of Red Cells in Spleen: How Does Vesiculation Happen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Salehyar, Sara; Cabrales, Pedro; Asaro, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Vesiculation of red blood cells as a result of local separation between lipid bilayer and cytoskeleton is known to happen in vivo, most likely inside spleen where they sustain large mechanical loads during the passage through venus slits. There is, however, little knowledge about the detailed scenario and condition. We address this question via a fluid-cell interaction model by coupling a multiscale model of the cell membrane (including molecular details) with a fluid dynamics model based on boundary-integral equations. A numerical flow channel is created where the cell is driven through a narrow slit by pressure (imitating the transit through venus slits in spleen). The concentration is the occurrence of large dissociation (negative) pressure between the skeleton/membrane connection that promotes separation, a precursor of vesicle formation. Critical levels for the negative pressure are estimated using published data. By following the maximum range of pressure, we conclude that for vesiculation to happen there must be biochemical influences (e.g. binding of degraded haemoglobin) that significantly reduce effective attachment density. This is consistent with reported trends in vesiculation that are believed to occur in cases of various hereditary anemias and during blood storage. Our findings also suggest the criticality of understanding the biochemical phenomena involved with cytoskeleton/membrane attachment.

  12. Axial dispersion in flowing red blood cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Losserand, Sylvain; Coupier, Gwennou

    2016-11-01

    A key parameter in blood microcirculation is the transit time of red blood cells (RBCs) through an organ, which can influence the efficiency of gas exchange and oxygen availability. A large dispersion of this transit time is observed in vivo and is partly due to the axial dispersion in the flowing suspension. In the classic Taylor-Aris example of a solute flowing in a tube, the combination of molecular diffusion and parabolic velocity profile leads to enhanced axial dispersion. In suspensions of non-Brownian deformable bodies such as RBCs, axial dispersion is governed by a combination of shear induced migration and shear-induced diffusion arising from hydrodynamic interactions. We revisit this problem in the case of RBC pulses flowing in a microchannel and show that the axial dispersion of the pulse eventually saturates with a final extension that depends directly on RBC mechanical properties. The result is especially interesting in the dilute limit since the final pulse length depends only on the channel width, exponent of the migration law and dimensionless migration velocity. In continuous flow, the dispersion of transit times is the result of complex cell-cell and cell-wall interactions and is strongy influenced by the polydispersity of the blood sample. The authors acknowledge support from LabEx TEC21 and CNES.

  13. Modeling of Red Blood Cells and Related Spleen Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A key function of the spleen is to clear red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties from the circulation. These abnormal mechanical properties may be due to RBC aging or RBC diseases, e.g., malaria and sickle cell anemia. Specifically, 10% of RBCs passing through the spleen are forced to squeeze into the narrow slits between the endothelial cells, and stiffer cells which get stuck are killed and digested by macrophages. To investigate this important physiological process, we employ three different approaches to study RBCs passage through these small slits, including analytical theory, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation and Multiscale Finite Element Method (MS-FEM). By applying the analytical theory, we estimate the critical limiting geometries RBCs can pass. By using the DPD method, we study the full fluid-structure interaction problem, and compute RBC deformation under different pressure gradients. By employing the MS-FEM approach, we model the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct layers, and focus on the cytoskeleton deformation and the bilayer-skeleton interaction force at the molecular level. Finally the results of these three approaches are compared to each other and correlated to the experimental observations.

  14. Minimal RED cell pairs markedly improve electrode kinetics and power production in microbial reverse electrodialysis cells.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Roland D; Hatzell, Marta; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-17

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m(2)-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m(2)), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m(2); WW: 1.9 W/m(2)). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m(2)) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m(2)) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m(2)-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment.

  15. A red/far-red light-responsive bi-stable toggle switch to control gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Metzger, Stéphanie; Schulz, Simon; Kämpf, Michael M.; Busacker, Moritz; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Ehrbar, Martin; Nagy, Ferenc; Timmer, Jens; Zubriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of multicellular systems is orchestrated by spatially restricted gene expression programs in specialized subpopulations. The targeted manipulation of such processes by synthetic tools with high-spatiotemporal resolution could, therefore, enable a deepened understanding of developmental processes and open new opportunities in tissue engineering. Here, we describe the first red/far-red light-triggered gene switch for mammalian cells for achieving gene expression control in time and space. We show that the system can reversibly be toggled between stable on- and off-states using short light pulses at 660 or 740 nm. Red light-induced gene expression was shown to correlate with the applied photon number and was compatible with different mammalian cell lines, including human primary cells. The light-induced expression kinetics were quantitatively analyzed by a mathematical model. We apply the system for the spatially controlled engineering of angiogenesis in chicken embryos. The system’s performance combined with cell- and tissue-compatible regulating red light will enable unprecedented spatiotemporally controlled molecular interventions in mammalian cells, tissues and organisms. PMID:23355611

  16. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  17. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  18. SEM analysis of red blood cells in aged human bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hortolà, P

    1992-08-01

    Mammal red blood cells (RBC) in bloodstains have been previously detected by light microscopy on stone tools from as early as 100,000 +/- 25,000 years ago. In order to evaluate the degree of morphological preservation of erythrocytes in bloodstains, an accidental human blood smear on white chert and several experimental bloodstains on hard substrates (the same stone-white chert; another type of stone-graywacke; a non-stone support-stainless steel), were stored in a room, in non-sterile and fluctuating conditions, for lengths of time ranging from 3 to 18 months. Afterwards, the specimens were coated with gold and examined by a Cambridge Stereoscan 120 scanning electron microscope. Results revealed a high preservation of RBC integrity, with the maintenance of several discocytary shapes, a low tendency to echinocytosis and a frequent appearance of a moon-like erythrocytary shape in the thinner areas of the bloodstains.

  19. Simulation of red blood cell aggregation in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lim, B; Bascom, P A; Cobbold, R S

    1997-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear flow. It is based on a description of the collision rates of RBC, the probability of particles sticking together, and the breakage of aggregates by shear forces. The influence of shear rate, hematocrit, aggregate fractal dimension, and binding strength on aggregation kinetics were investigated and compared to other theoretical and experimental results. The model was used to simulate blood flow in a long large diameter tube under steady flow conditions at low Reynolds numbers. The time and spatial distribution of the state of aggregation are shown to be in qualitative agreement with previous B-mode ultrasound studies in which a central region of low echogenicity was noted. It is suggested that the model can provide a basis for interpreting prior measurements of ultrasound echogenicity and may help relate them to the local state of aggregation.

  20. Duration of red blood cell storage and inflammatory marker generation

    PubMed Central

    Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Chou, Ming Li; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving treatment for several pathologies. RBCs for transfusion are stored refrigerated in a preservative solution, which extends their shelf-life for up to 42 days. During storage, the RBCs endure abundant physicochemical changes, named RBC storage lesions, which affect the overall quality standard, the functional integrity and in vivo survival of the transfused RBCs. Some of the changes occurring in the early stages of the storage period (for approximately two weeks) are reversible but become irreversible later on as the storage is extended. In this review, we aim to decipher the duration of RBC storage and inflammatory marker generation. This phenomenon is included as one of the causes of transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), an emerging concept developed to potentially elucidate numerous clinical observations that suggest that RBC transfusion is associated with increased inflammatory events or effects with clinical consequence. PMID:28263172

  1. Pressure and temperature effects on human red cell cation transport.

    PubMed

    Hall, A C; Ellory, J C; Klein, R A

    1982-01-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the three components of K+ uptake in human red cells have been investigated, using ouabain and bumetanide to distinguish between the pump, passive diffusion and cotransport. The pressure sensitivity for passive diffusion has been shown to depend on the counter-ion present. The order of this effect, Cl- greater than Br- greater than NO3- greater than I-, is the same as for the ionic partial molal volumes and the Hofmeister series. We have analyzed our experimental results thermodynamically, and propose a model for the activated transition-state complex of the potassium ion which involves the loss of water molecules from the secondary hydration shell, cosphere II.

  2. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  3. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  4. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology.

  5. HYPERSENSITIVE TO RED AND BLUE 1, a ZZ-type zinc finger protein, regulates phytochrome B-mediated red and cryptochrome-mediated blue light responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojun; Chong, Jason; Ni, Min

    2005-03-01

    Plant photoreceptors that regulate photomorphogenic development include red/far-red-light-absorbing phytochromes and blue/UV-A-light-absorbing cryptochromes. We have undertaken a genetic screen to identify additional components downstream of the photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a short hypocotyl mutant under red and blue light, hypersensitive to red and blue 1 (hrb1). Mutation in HRB1 also enhances the end-of-day far-red light response, inhibits leaf expansion and petiole elongation, and attenuates the expression of CAB3 and CHS. Double mutant analysis indicates that phyB is epistatic to hrb1 under red light, and cry1 cry2 is epistatic to hrb1 under blue light for both hypocotyl growth and light-regulated gene expression responses. HRB1 localizes to the nucleus and belongs to a protein family of Drought induced 19 (Di19). HRB1 and all other family members contain a ZZ-type zinc finger domain, which in other organisms is implicated in protein-protein interactions between dystrophin and calmodulin and between transcriptional adaptors and activators. HRB1 activity is also required for red and blue light-induced expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4). pif4 shows a very similar hypersensitive response as hrb1 to both red light and blue light and is epistatic to hrb1 in control of light-regulated gene expression responses. Thus, the roles of HRB1 and PIF4 together in regulating both red and blue light responses may represent points where red light signaling and blue light signaling intersect.

  6. Importance of Mean Red Cell Distribution Width in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Ahmed; Farooq, Junaid H; Assad, Salman; Ghazanfar, Haider; Ahmed, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Red cell distribution width (RDW), expressed in femtoliters (fl), is a measure of the variation in the size of circulating erythrocytes and is often expressed as a direct measurement of the width of the distribution. We aim to observe the mean value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in hypertensive patients. Increased RDW can be used as a tool for early diagnosis, as an inflammatory marker, and a mortality indicator in hypertensive patients due to its close relation to inflammation. Materials and methodology Hypertensive patients who had the condition for more than one year duration, diagnosed according to the Joint National Committee (JNC 7) criteria were subjected to complete blood count and RDW measurement. One hundred patients, aged between 12 years and 65 years were enrolled from the outpatient department of medicine at the Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Results The mean age (± SD) of the patients was 51.48 ± 10.08 years. Out of 100 patients 69% were males whereas 31% were females. The overall frequency of hypertension more than five years was 55% subjects whereas 45% individuals had duration of hypertension less than five years. Mean RDW in females was found to be 49.35±8.42 fl while mean RDW in males was 44.78±7.11 fl. An independent sample t-test was applied to assess if there was any significant difference between age and gender. No significant difference between age and gender was found (p<0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to assess any association of RDW with gender. RDW values in females was found to be statistically significantly higher than in males (U=603, p=0.01). Linear regression showed that mean RDW value increased with increasing age (P <0.001). Conclusions A significant number of patients with hypertension have increased levels of RDW. Therefore, it is recommended that serum RDW should be checked regularly in patients with hypertension. PMID:28070471

  7. Platelet and red blood cell indices in Harris platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naina, Harris V K; Harris, Samar

    2010-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) or macro thrombocytopenias are relatively rare, but their prevalence is likely underestimated from complexities of diagnosis and a spectrum of subclinical phenotypes. Harris platelet syndrome (HPS) is the most common IGPD reported from the Indian subcontinent. Of note there are an increased number of hemoglobinopathies reported from the geographic location. We analysed red blood cell and platelet indices of blood donors with HPS from the north eastern part of India and compared them with blood indices of blood donors of south India. We found a statistically significant lower platelet count in blood donors with HPS (median, range) 132 (71-267) vs. 252 (160-478) as compared to donors from south India (P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in donors with HPS 13.1, (range 12-21.9 fl) as compared to donors from south India 7.35 (range 6-9.2 fl) (P < 0.001). This study showed that blood donors with HPS had a low median platelet bio-mass 0.17 (0.10-0.38%) vs. 0.19 (0.13-0.28%) in donors from south India. The platelet distribution width (PDW) was 17.4 (14.9-19.6) in donors with HPS vs. 16.38 (15.2-18.5) in south Indian blood donors (P < 0.001). Thirty-three donors with HPS had a normal platelet count with MPV more than 12 fL. Only donors with HPS had giant platelets and thrombocytopenia on peripheral blood smear examination. None of these donors had Dohle body inclusion in their leukocytes. Compared to donors from south India, donors with HPS had a significantly lower hemoglobin 13.8 (12-16.3 gm/dL) vs. 14.8 (12-18) respectively (P < 0.001) while red distribution width (RDW) was higher in HPS 13.6 (11.5-16.7) vs. 12.8 (11.4-15.1). However we did not find any statistically significant difference in MCV, MCH, MCHC between the two groups. Peripheral blood smear did not show any obvious abnormal red blood cell morphology. In the blood donors with HPS we found a statistically higher MPV

  8. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  9. Antigens protected functional red blood cells by the membrane grafting of compact hyperbranched polyglycerols.

    PubMed

    Chapanian, Rafi; Constantinescu, Iren; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran

    2013-01-02

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is vital for the treatment of a number of acute and chronic medical problems such as thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia. Due to the presence of multitude of antigens on the RBC surface (~308 known antigens), patients in the chronic blood transfusion therapy develop alloantibodies due to the miss match of minor antigens on transfused RBCs. Grafting of hydrophilic polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) forms an exclusion layer on RBC membrane that prevents the interaction of antibodies with surface antigens without affecting the passage of small molecules such as oxygen, glucose, and ions. At present no method is available for the generation of universal red blood donor cells in part because of the daunting challenge presented by the presence of large number of antigens (protein and carbohydrate based) on the RBC surface and the development of such methods will significantly improve transfusion safety, and dramatically improve the availability and use of RBCs. In this report, the experiments that are used to develop antigen protected functional RBCs by the membrane grafting of HPG and their characterization are presented. HPGs are highly biocompatible compact polymers, and are expected to be located within the cell glycocalyx that surrounds the lipid membrane and mask RBC surface antigens.

  10. Depletion of high molecular weight dextran from the red cell surface measured by particle electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rad, Samar; Gao, Jie; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K; Neu, Björn

    2009-02-01

    The reversible aggregation of human red blood cells (RBC) by proteins or polymers continues to be of biological and biophysical interest, yet the mechanistic details governing the process are still being explored. A depletion model has been proposed for aggregation by the neutral polyglucose dextran and its applicability at high molecular weights has been recently documented. In the present study the depletion of high molecular weight dextrans on the red cell surface was measured as a function of polymer molecular mass (40 kDa-28 MDa), ionic strength (5 and 15 mM NaCl) and polymer concentration (< or =0.9 g/dL). The experimental data clearly indicate an increasing depletion effect with increasing molecular weight: the effects of medium viscosity on RBC mobility were markedly overestimated by the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation, with the difference increasing with dextran molecular mass. These results agree with the concept of polymer depletion near the RBC surface and lend strong support to a "depletion model" mechanism for dextran-mediated RBC aggregation. Our findings provide important new insight into polymer-RBC interactions and suggest the usefulness of this model for fundamental studies of cell-cell affinity and for the development of new agents to stabilize or destabilize specific bio-fluids.

  11. The first mutant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that forms a red chromophore.

    PubMed

    Mishin, Alexander S; Subach, Fedor V; Yampolsky, Ilia V; King, William; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2008-04-22

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, and its mutants are widely used in biomedical studies as fluorescent markers. In spite of the enormous efforts of academia and industry toward generating its red fluorescent mutants, no GFP variants with emission maximum at more than 529 nm have been developed during the 15 years since its cloning. Here, we used a new strategy of molecular evolution aimed at generating a red-emitting mutant of GFP. As a result, we have succeeded in producing the first GFP mutant that substantially matures to the red-emitting state with excitation and emission maxima at 555 and 585 nm, respectively. A novel, nonoxidative mechanism for formation of the red chromophore in this mutant that includes a dehydration of the Ser65 side chain has been proposed. Model experiments showed that the novel dual-color GFP mutant with green and red emission is suitable for multicolor flow cytometry as an additional color since it is clearly separable from both green and red fluorescent tags.

  12. Clinical utility of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Alden; Good, David; Reis, Marciano

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoiesis involves proliferation and differentiation of small population of hematopoietic stem cells resident in the bone marrow into mature red blood cells. The determination of the cellular composition of the blood is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of diseases and monitoring of therapy. Flow cytometric analysis is increasingly being used to characterize the heterogeneous cell populations present in the blood and the hematopoietic cell differentiation and maturation pathways of the bone marrow. Here we discuss the role of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red blood cell disorders. First, we discuss flow cytometric analysis of reticulocytes. Next, we review salient quantitative methods that can be used for detection of fetal-maternal hemorrhage (FMH). We also discuss flow cytometric analysis of high hemoglobin F (HbF) in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), red cell survival and red cell volume. We conclude by discussing cell cycle of erythroid cells.

  13. Red fluorescent protein DsRed: parametrization of its chromophore as an amino acid residue for computer modeling in the OPLS-AA force field.

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, D V; Vrzheshch, E P; Drutsa, V L; Vrzheshch, P V

    2006-10-01

    Topology of the neutral form of the DsRed fluorescent protein chromophore as a residue of [(4-cis)-2-[(1-cis)-4-amino-4-oxobutanimidoyl]-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-1-yl]acetic acid was calculated with OPLS-AA force field. Use of this topology and molecular dynamics simulation allows calculating the parameters of proteins that contain such residue in their polypeptide chains. The chromophore parameters were obtained by ab initio (RHF/6-31G**) quantum chemical calculations applying density functional theory (B3LYP). Using this chromophore, we have calculated the molecular dynamics trajectory of tetrameric fluorescent protein DsRed in solution at 300 K (4 nsec). Correctness of the chromophore parametrization was revealed by comparison of quantitative characteristics of the chromophore structure obtained from the molecular dynamic simulations of DsRed protein with the quantitative characteristics of the chromophore based on the crystallographic X-ray data of fluorescent protein DsRed (PDB ID: 1ZGO, 1G7K, and 1GGX), and also with the quantitative characteristics of the chromophore obtained by quantum chemical calculations. Inclusion of the neutral form of DsRed protein chromophore topology into the OPLS-AA force field yielded the extended force field OPLS-AA/DsRed. This force field can be used for molecular dynamics calculations of proteins containing the DsRed chromophore. The parameter set presented in this study can be applied for similar extension in any other force fields.

  14. Red blood cell as an adaptive optofluidic microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    The perspective of using live cells as lenses could open new revolutionary and intriguing scenarios in the future of biophotonics and biomedical sciences for endoscopic vision, local laser treatments via optical fibres and diagnostics. Here we show that a suspended red blood cell (RBC) behaves as an adaptive liquid-lens at microscale, thus demonstrating its imaging capability and tunable focal length. In fact, thanks to the intrinsic elastic properties, the RBC can swell up from disk volume of 90 fl up to a sphere reaching 150 fl, varying focal length from negative to positive values. These live optofluidic lenses can be fully controlled by triggering the liquid buffer’s chemistry. Real-time accurate measurement of tunable focus capability of RBCs is reported through dynamic wavefront characterization, showing agreement with numerical modelling. Moreover, in analogy to adaptive optics testing, blood diagnosis is demonstrated by screening abnormal cells through focal-spot analysis applied to an RBC ensemble as a microlens array.

  15. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  16. Red blood cell as an adaptive optofluidic microlens.

    PubMed

    Miccio, L; Memmolo, P; Merola, F; Netti, P A; Ferraro, P

    2015-03-11

    The perspective of using live cells as lenses could open new revolutionary and intriguing scenarios in the future of biophotonics and biomedical sciences for endoscopic vision, local laser treatments via optical fibres and diagnostics. Here we show that a suspended red blood cell (RBC) behaves as an adaptive liquid-lens at microscale, thus demonstrating its imaging capability and tunable focal length. In fact, thanks to the intrinsic elastic properties, the RBC can swell up from disk volume of 90 fl up to a sphere reaching 150 fl, varying focal length from negative to positive values. These live optofluidic lenses can be fully controlled by triggering the liquid buffer's chemistry. Real-time accurate measurement of tunable focus capability of RBCs is reported through dynamic wavefront characterization, showing agreement with numerical modelling. Moreover, in analogy to adaptive optics testing, blood diagnosis is demonstrated by screening abnormal cells through focal-spot analysis applied to an RBC ensemble as a microlens array.

  17. Fibrinogen and red blood cells in venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Maria M; Walton, Bethany L; Byrnes, James R; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2014-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively termed venous thromboembolism (VTE), affect over 1 million Americans each year. VTE is triggered by inflammation and blood stasis leading to the formation of thrombi rich in fibrin and red blood cells (RBCs). However, little is known about mechanisms regulating fibrin and RBC incorporation into venous thrombi, or how these components mediate thrombus size or resolution. Both elevated circulating fibrinogen (hyperfibrinogenemia) and abnormal fibrin(ogen) structure and function, including increased fibrin network density and resistance to fibrinolysis, have been observed in plasmas from patients with VTE. Abnormalities in RBC number and/or function have also been associated with VTE risk. RBC contributions to VTE are thought to stem from their effects on blood viscosity and margination of platelets to the vessel wall. More recent studies suggest RBCs also express phosphatidylserine, support thrombin generation, and decrease fibrinolysis. RBC interactions with fibrin(ogen) and cells, including platelets and endothelial cells, may also promote thrombus formation. The contributions of fibrin(ogen) and RBCs to the pathophysiology of VTE warrants further investigation.

  18. Pure red cell aplasia and lymphoproliferative disorders: an infrequent association.

    PubMed

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  19. Picosecond-hetero-FRET microscopy to probe protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tramier, Marc; Gautier, Isabelle; Piolot, Tristan; Ravalet, Sylvie; Kemnitz, Klaus; Coppey, Jacques; Durieux, Christiane; Mignotte, Vincent; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté

    2002-01-01

    By using a novel time- and space-correlated single-photon counting detector, we show that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fused to herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) monomers can be used to reveal homodimerization of TK in the nucleus and cytoplasm of live cells. However, the quantification of energy transfer was limited by the intrinsic biexponential fluorescence decay of the donor CFP (lifetimes of 1.3 +/- 0.2 ns and 3.8 +/- 0.4 ns) and by the possibility of homodimer formation between two TK-CFP. In contrast, the heterodimerization of the transcriptional factor NF-E2 in the nucleus of live cells was quantified from the analysis of the fluorescence decays of GFP in terms of 1) FRET efficiency between GFP and DsRed chromophores fused to p45 and MafG, respectively, the two subunits of NF-E2 (which corresponds to an interchromophoric distance of 39 +/- 1 A); and 2) fractions of GFP-p45 bound to DsRed-MafG (constant in the nucleus, varying in the range of 20% to 70% from cell to cell). The picosecond resolution of the fluorescence kinetics allowed us to discriminate between very short lifetimes of immature green species of DsRed-MafG and that of GFP-p45 involved in FRET with DsRed-MafG. PMID:12496124

  20. Nitric oxide measurements in hTERT-RPE cells and subcellular fractions exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Denton, Michael L.; Holwitt, Eric A.

    2014-02-01

    Cells in a tissue culture model for laser eye injury exhibit increased resistance to a lethal pulse of 2.0-μm laser radiation if the cells are first exposed to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light 24 hr prior to the lethal laser exposure. Changes in expression of various genes associated with apoptosis have been observed, but the biochemical link between light absorption and gene expression remains unknown. Cytochome c oxidase (CCOX), in the electron transport chain, is the currentlyhypothesized absorber. Absorption of the red light by CCOX is thought to facilitate displacement of nitric oxide (NO) by O2 in the active site, increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. However, NO is also an important regulator and mediator of numerous physiological processes in a variety of cell and tissue types that is synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases. In an effort to determine the relative NO contributions from these competing pathways, we measured NO levels in whole cells and subcellular fractions, with and without exposure to red light, using DAF-FM, a fluorescent dye that stoichiometrically reacts with NO. Red light induced a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in fluorescence intensity in whole cells and some subcellular fractions. Whole cells exhibited the highest overall fluorescence intensity followed by (in order) cytosolic proteins, microsomes, then nuclei and mitochondria.

  1. Peripheral red blood cell split chimerism as a consequence of intramedullary selective apoptosis of recipient red blood cells in a case of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism.

  2. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments.

  3. Red Blood Cell Susceptibility to Pneumolysin: CORRELATION WITH MEMBRANE BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Petrov, Peter G; Khafaji, Mawya A; Mughal, Muhammad K; Naylor, Claire E; Shore, Angela C; Gooding, Kim M; Casanova, Francesco; Mitchell, Tim J; Titball, Richard W; Winlove, C Peter

    2016-05-06

    This study investigated the effect of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the plasma membrane as well as membrane morphology on the susceptibility of human red blood cells to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin, a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, using single cell studies. We show a correlation between the physical properties of the membrane (bending rigidity and surface and dipole electrostatic potentials) and the susceptibility of red blood cells to pneumolysin-induced hemolysis. We demonstrate that biochemical modifications of the membrane induced by oxidative stress, lipid scrambling, and artificial cell aging modulate the cell response to the toxin. We provide evidence that the diversity of response to pneumolysin in diabetic red blood cells correlates with levels of glycated hemoglobin and that the mechanical properties of the red blood cell plasma membrane are altered in diabetes. Finally, we show that diabetic red blood cells are more resistant to pneumolysin and the related toxin perfringolysin O relative to healthy red blood cells. Taken together, these studies indicate that the diversity of cell response to pneumolysin within a population of human red blood cells is influenced by the biophysical and biochemical status of the plasma membrane and the chemical and/or oxidative stress pre-history of the cell.

  4. Generation of a fast maturating red fluorescent protein by a combined approach of elongation mutagenesis and functional salvage screening

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eun-Sil; Han, Sang-Soo; Cheong, Dea-Eun; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be useful as indicators or reporters must have rapid maturation time, high quantum yield and photobleaching stability. A red fluorescent protein DsRed that has a high quantum yield and photostability has an innately slow maturation time when compared to other fluorescence proteins. In this study, we combined a functional salvage screen (FSS) and elongation mutagenesis to obtain a DsRed variant that maintained structural features closely linked with a high quantum yield and photostability and evolved to have a rapid maturation time. It is expected that the variant generated here, FmRed (fast maturating red fluorescent protein), will be widely used as an indicator or reporter because it maintained traits superior to that of the wild-type protein and also matured rapidly.

  5. Red cell substitutes from hemoglobin--do we start all over again?

    PubMed

    Kluger, Ronald

    2010-08-01

    Red cells are the oxygen-carrying components of blood. In modern medical practice, transfusions are given as suspensions of type-matched red cells in saline to replace lost blood, preventing organ damage and allowing for recovery. Since red cells cannot be stored for more than about 40 days and because they can transmit infections, alternative materials for transfusions were developed to replace the oxygenation function of the red cells. One approach involves chemically stabilizing hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein of the red cell, while also adjusting its oxygenation properties to replicate that of the red cell. Evaluation of clinical trials of all products led to the conclusion that none that were tested would be suitable for clinical use [Natanson C, Kern SJ, Lurie P, Banks SM, Wolfe SM: Cell-free hemoglobin-based blood substitutes and risk of myocardial infarction and death: a meta-analysis. J Am Med Assoc 2008, 299:2304-2312]. Most notably, the materials increased blood pressure and some were associated with increased risk of heart attacks. More recently, it was found that materials from covalent addition of polyethylene glycol polymers (PEG) to hemoglobin do not elicit the undesired effects on blood pressure [Vandegriff K, Bellelli A, Samaja M, Malavalli A, Brunori M, Winslow RM: Rates of NO binding to MP4, a non-hypertensive polyethylene glycol-conjugated hemoglobin. FASEB J 2003, 17:A183; Vandegriff KD, Malavalli A, Wooldridge J, Lohman J, Winslow RM: MP4: a new nonvasoactive PEG-Hb conjugate. Transfusion 2003, 43:509-516]. Also, materials with higher oxygen affinity than red cells are able to provide oxygenation at the sites in capillaries that have the most critical need for oxygen [Villela NR, Cabrales P, Tsai AG, Intaglietta M: Microcirculatory effects of changing blood hemoglobin oxygen affinity during hemorrhagic shock resuscitation in an experimental model. Shock 2009, 31:645-652]. It had been considered that the origin of the negative effects

  6. Quantifying the deformation of the red blood cell skeleton in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Zhu, Qiang

    2012-02-01

    To quantitatively predict the response of red blood cell (RBC) membrane in shear flow, we carried out multiphysics simulations by coupling a three-level multiscale approach of RBC membranes with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for surrounding flows. Our multiscale approach includes a model of spectrins with the domain unfolding feature, a molecular-based model of the junctional complex with detailed protein connectivity and a whole cell Finite Element Method (FEM) model with the bilayer-skeleton friction derived from measured transmembrane protein diffusivity based on the Einstein-Stokes relation. Applying this approach, we investigated the bilayer-skeleton slip and skeleton deformation of healthy RBCs and RBCs with hereditary spherocytosis anemia during tank-treading motion. Compared with healthy cells, cells with hereditary spherocytosis anemia sustain much larger skeleton-bilayer slip and area deformation of the skeleton due to deficiency of transmembrane proteins. This leads to extremely low skeleton density and large bilayer-skeleton interaction force, both of which may cause bilayer loss. This finding suggests a possible mechanism of the development of hereditary spherocytosis anemia.

  7. A cell line derived from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Goodman, Cynthia L; Stanley, David; Ringbauer, Joseph A; Beeman, Richard W; Silver, Kristopher; Park, Yoonseong

    2012-08-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a model organism for agricultural and medical research and its complete genome is sequenced. We established a continuously replicating T. castaneum cell line to complement existing physiological, genetic, and genomic research tools. We set up trial cell cultures from egg, pupa, and adult stages as tissue sources and incubated them in six separate cell culture media to determine the optimal combination of tissue source and medium for cell replication. Our most promising culture was generated by co-culturing adult (∼75 %) and pupal tissues in EX-CELL 420 medium containing 9 % FBS. Our new cell culture is designated BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 (TcA) and it has been subcultured more than 90 times. Amplification of genomic DNA with species-specific primers yielded DNA fragments of the expected sizes and with sequences identical to those from the published Tribolium genome. Additionally, we characterized this line using DNA fingerprinting (DAF-PCR) and compared it with three other coleopteran cell lines and its conspecific pupae to confirm identity. Its doubling time is 155.2 hr. Early passages consisted of attached cells and vesicles in suspension, whereas later passages consisted primarily of attached, spherical cells. Similar to other established cell lines, the ploidy of TcA cells was variable, ranging from 20 chromosomes/cell (diploid) to above 30 chromosomes/cell. TcA cells withstood incubation at 40°C for 1 h with no decrease in viability. We recorded increased levels of one heat shock protein (43 kDa) and of the hsp68a transcript following exposure to 40°C. Taken together, this represents the first report of a continuously replicating T. castaneum cell line. We expect the BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 line will become a useful tool in Tribolium research.

  8. The structure of a far-red fluorescent protein, AQ143, shows evidence in support of reported red-shifting chromophore interactions.

    PubMed

    Wannier, Timothy M; Mayo, Stephen L

    2014-08-01

    Engineering fluorescent proteins (FPs) to emit light at longer wavelengths is a significant focus in the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomarkers, as far-red light penetrates tissue with minimal absorption, allowing better imaging inside of biological hosts. Structure-guided design and directed evolution have led to the discovery of red FPs with significant bathochromic shifts to their emission. Here, we present the crystal structure of one of the most bathochromically shifted FPs reported to date, AQ143, a nine-point mutant of aeCP597, a chromoprotein from Actinia equina. The 2.19 Å resolution structure reveals several important chromophore interactions that contribute to the protein's far-red emission and shows dual occupancy of the green and red chromophores.

  9. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  10. Modulation of ligand-mediated human red cell agglutinability by prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.; Weinstein, R.S.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol induces the transformation of human red cells from bioconcave discs to echinocytes in vitro. In addition, they have observed that ethanol can enhance the agglutination of red cells by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin or poly-L-lysine. Incubation of washed human red cells with 5 and 10% ethanol (v/v) in phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3 at 25/sup 0/C produced a 30% increase in ligand-mediated agglutinability within 12 min. Simultaneous addition of ethanol and one of the following prostaglandin derivatives, PGE/sub 1/, pge/sub 2/, pgf/sub 2/-alpha, or PGl/sub 2/ (10/sup -9/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/ M) prevented the shape-associated increases in red cell agglutinability. Thromboxane-B/sub 2/ had no effect on agglutinability. Prostaglandins did not prevent ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations per se under identical experimental conditions. As intragastric administration of 100% ethanol results in the formation of spiculated red cell thrombi in postcapillary venules of rat gastric mucosa, they postulate that the cytoprotective role of prostanoids in preventing mucosal ulceration may be due in part to their capacity to inhibit intravascular ligand mediated red cell agglutination, hemostasis, and their sequelae, epithelial necrosis. Moreover, the data suggest that ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations and ligand-mediated agglutination represent two distinct and independent biological phenomena.

  11. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  12. A Teenage Girl with Acute Dyspnea and Hypoxemia during Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tanpowpong, P.; Thongpo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) can cause morbidity and mortality. We present the case of teenager who developed dyspnea and hypoxemia few hours after red cell transfusion. After being admitted for close monitoring and oxygen therapy, her symptoms spontaneously resolved. Message: dyspnea during red cell transfusion should raise the suspicion of TRALI. PMID:27891282

  13. Cryopreserved packed red blood cells in surgical patients: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Kim, Young; Hoehn, Richard; Jernigan, Peter; Pritts, Timothy

    2016-09-08

    Since the advent of anticoagulation and component storage of human blood products, allogeneic red blood cell transfusion has been one of the most common practices in modern medicine. Efforts to reduce the biochemical effects of storage, collectively known as the red blood cell storage lesion, and prolong the storage duration have led to numerous advancements in erythrocyte storage solutions. Cryopreservation and frozen storage of red blood cells in glycerol have been successfully utilised by many civilian and military institutions worldwide. Through progressive improvements in liquid storage of erythrocytes in novel storage solutions, the logistical need for cryopreserved red blood cells in the civilian setting has diminished. A growing body of current literature is focused on the clinical consequences of packed red blood cell age. Modern cryopreservation techniques show promise as a cost-effective method to ameliorate the negative effect of the red blood cell storage lesion, while meeting the technical and logistical needs of both civilian and military medicine. This review outlines the history of red blood cell cryopreservation, the clinical impact of red cell storage, and highlights the current literature on frozen blood and its impact on modern transfusion.

  14. Nucleated red blood cell count in term and preterm newborns: reference values at birth.

    PubMed

    Perrone, S; Vezzosi, P; Longini, M; Marzocchi, B; Tanganelli, D; Testa, M; Santilli, T; Buonocore, G

    2005-03-01

    The prognostic value of nucleated red blood cell count at birth in relation to neonatal outcome has been established. However, reference values were needed to usefully interpret this variable. The normal range of reference values for absolute nucleated red blood cell count in 695 preterm and term newborns is reported.

  15. Dipolar relaxation within the protein matrix of the green fluorescent protein: a red edge excitation shift study.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-12-27

    The fluorophore in green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in a highly constrained environment, protected from the bulk solvent by the barrel-shaped protein matrix. We have used the wavelength-selective fluorescence approach (red edge excitation shift, REES) to monitor solvent (environment) dynamics around the fluorophore in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under various conditions. Our results show that EGFP displays REES in buffer and glycerol, i.e., the fluorescence emission maxima exhibit a progressive shift toward the red edge, as the excitation wavelength is shifted toward the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Interestingly, EGFP displays REES when incorporated in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), independent of the hydration state. We interpret the observed REES to the constrained environment experienced by the EGFP fluorophore in the rigid protein matrix, rather than to the dynamics of the bulk solvent. These results are supported by the temperature dependence of REES and characteristic wavelength-dependent changes in fluorescence anisotropy.

  16. Novel procedure for the identification of proteins by mass fingerprinting combining two-dimensional electrophoresis with fluorescent SYPRO red staining.

    PubMed

    Valdes, I; Pitarch, A; Gil, C; Bermúdez, A; Llorente, M; Nombela, C; Méndez, E

    2000-06-01

    The fluorescent sensitive SYPRO Red dye was successfully employed to stain proteins in two-dimensional gels for protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting. Proteins which are not chemically modified during the SYPRO Red staining process are well digested enzymatically in the gel and hence the resulting peptides can be efficiently eluted and analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A SYPRO Red two-dimensional gel of a complex protein extract from Candida albicans was analysed by MALDI-TOF MS. The validity of SYPRO Red staining was demonstrated by identifying, via peptide mass fingerprinting, 10 different C. albicans proteins from a total of 31 selected protein spots. The peptide mass signal intensity, the number of matched peptides and the percentage of coverage of protein sequences from SYPRO Red-stained proteins were similar to or greater than those obtained in parallel with the modified silver protein gel staining. This work demonstrates that fluorescent SYPRO Red staining is compatible with the identification of proteins separated on polyacrylamide gel and that it can be used as an alternative to silver staining. As far as we know, this is the first report in which C. albicans proteins separated using 2-D gels have been identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. The improved technique described here should be very useful for carrying out proteomic studies.

  17. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  18. Dynamics of Red Blood Cells through submicronic splenic slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfer, Emmanuele; Gambhire, Priya; Atwell, Scott; Bedu, Frederic; Ozerov, Igor; Viallat, Annie; Charrier, Anne; Badens, Catherine; Centre de reference Thalassemie, Badens Team; Physics; Engineering of Living Systems Team

    2016-11-01

    Red Blood Cells (RBCs) are periodically monitored for changes in their deformability by the spleen, and are entrapped and destroyed if unable to pass through the splenic interendothelial slits (IESs). In particular, in sickle cell disease (SCD), where hemoglobin form fibers inside the RBCs, and in hereditary spherocytosis (HS), where RBCs are more spherical and membrane-cytoskekeleton bonds are weakened, the loss of RBC deformability leads to spleen dysfunction. By combining photolithography and anisotropic wet etching techniques, we developed a new on-chip PDMS device with channels replicating the submicronic physiological dimensions of IESs to study the mechanisms of deformation of the RBCs during their passage through these biomimetic slits. For the first time, with HS RBCs, we show the disruption of the links between the RBC membrane and the underlying spectrin network. In the case of SCD RBCs we show the appearance of a tip at the front of the RBC with a longer time relaxation due to the increased cytoplasmic viscosity. This work has been carried out thanks to the support of the A*MIDEX project (n° ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the «Investissements d'Avenir». French Government program, managed by ANR.

  19. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  20. Measurement of posttransfusion red cell survival with the biotin label.

    PubMed

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology-information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival, is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin-labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, posttransfusion RBC recovery, RBC life span, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over (51)Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire life spans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented.

  1. Premature red blood cells have decreased aggregation and enhanced aggregability.

    PubMed

    Arbell, D; Orkin, B; Bar-Oz, B; Barshtein, G; Yedgar, S

    2008-06-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic damage. This damage is most obvious in the brain, retina, and gastrointestinal tract. Studies focusing on the rheological properties of premature red blood cells (pRBCs) have consistently shown minimal or no RBC aggregation. Previously, measurements of pRBC aggregation kinetics indicated that specific plasma properties are responsible for the decreased RBC aggregation observed in the neonates, but that their specific RBC properties do not affect it. However, the strength of interaction in the pRBC aggregates as a function of medium composition has not been tested. In our previous research, we described clinically relevant parameters, that is, the aggregate resistance to disaggregation by flow. With the help of a cell flow property analyzer (CFA), we can monitor RBC aggregation by direct visualization of its dynamics during flow. We used the CFA to examine pRBC (from 9 premature babies) in the natural plasma and in PBS buffer supplemented with dextran (500 kDa) to distinguish between RBC intrinsic-cellular and plasma factors. pRBCs suspended in the native plasma showed minimal or no aggregation in comparison to normal adult RBC. When we transferred pRBCs from the same sample to the dextran solution, enhanced resistance to disaggregation by flow was apparent.

  2. Invasive Thymoma with Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kiyoki, Yusuke; Ueda, Sho; Yamaoka, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Seiich; Inagaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a case involving a 67-yearold female patient who was referred to our hospital due to severe anemia (hemoglobin, 5.0 g/dL), thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 0.6 × 104/μL), and a mediastinal shadow with calcification noted on X-ray. On admission, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected, and bone marrow biopsy revealed few megakaryocytes and severely reduced numbers of erythroid cells. The diagnosis was thymoma with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAMT). On Day 8 of admission, the patient received immunosuppressive therapy together with cyclosporine for the 2 severe hematologic diseases, which were stabilized within 2 months. Subsequently, total thymectomy was performed. The diagnosis of the tumor invading the left lung was invasive thymoma, Masaokakoga stage III. The histological diagnosis was World Health Organization type AB. Thymoma accompanied with PRCA and AAMT is very rare, and, based on our case, immunotherapeutic therapy for the hematologic disorders should precede surgical intervention. PMID:28053696

  3. Impact of environment on Red Blood Cell ability to withstand mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Tarasev, M; Chakraborty, S; Light, L; Davenport, R

    2016-11-04

    Susceptibility of red blood cells (RBC) to hemolysis under mechanical stress is represented by RBC mechanical fragility (MF), with different types or intensities of stress potentially emphasizing different perturbations of RBC membranes. RBC membrane mechanics were shown to depend on cell environment, with many details not yet understood. Here, stress was applied to RBC using a bead mill with oscillation up to 50 Hz, over durations up to 50 minutes. MF profiles plot percent lysis upon stresses of progressive durations. Supplementing media with polyethylene glycol (PEG) which interacts with the cell membrane, but not Dextran which does not, resulted in higher resistance to hemolysis. Albumin, and to a lesser extent fibrinogen and globulins (at physiological concentrations), significantly increased cell ability to withstand mechanical stress versus with un-supplemented buffer solution and with PEG. This is partly due to changes in rheology, per tests done including (PEG) and Dextran, but is mostly due to cell-protein interaction, noting the effect of pH on RBC MF with albumin but not with buffer. Presence of lipids reduced RBC resistance to potentially hemolytic stress with lypemic plasma effecting lower "protection" from induced hemolysis than essentially fatty-acid free plasma. This effect was less dependent on incubation than on fatty-acid presence during stressing. The reduced propensity for hemolysis afforded by plasma proteins also depended markedly on the speed of the bead, potentially reflecting changes from a predominantly Von Karman trail at lower frequencies to an increasingly disorganized turbulent wake at higher frequencies.

  4. Influence of Red Blood Cells on Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery in Microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jifu; Thomas, Antony; Liu, Yaling

    2011-12-22

    Multifunctional nanomedicine holds considerable promise as the next generation of medicine that allows for targeted therapy with minimal toxicity. Most current studies on Nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery consider a Newtonian fluid with suspending NPs. However, blood is a complex biological fluid composed of deformable cells, proteins, platelets, and plasma. For blood flow in capillaries, arterioles and venules, the particulate nature of the blood needs to be considered in the delivery process. The existence of the cell-free-layer and NP-cell interaction will largely influence both the dispersion and binding rates, thus impact targeted delivery efficacy. In this paper, a particle-cell hybrid model is developed to model NP transport, dispersion, and binding dynamics in blood suspension. The motion and deformation of red blood cells is captured through the Immersed Finite Element Method. The motion and adhesion of individual NPs are tracked through Brownian adhesion dynamics. A mapping algorithm and an interaction potential function are introduced to consider the cell-particle collision. NP dispersion and binding rates are derived from the developed model under various rheology conditions. The influence of red blood cells, vascular flow rate, and particle size on NP distribution and delivery efficacy is characterized. A non-uniform NP distribution profile with higher particle concentration near the vessel wall is observed. Such distribution leads to over 50% higher particle binding rate compared to the case without RBC considered. The tumbling motion of RBCs in the core region of the capillary is found to enhance NP dispersion, with dispersion rate increases as shear rate increases. Results from this study contribute to the fundamental understanding and knowledge on how the particulate nature of blood influences NP delivery, which will provide mechanistic insights on the nanomedicine design for targeted drug delivery applications.

  5. Influence of Red Blood Cells on Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery in Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jifu; Thomas, Antony; Liu, Yaling

    2012-01-01

    Multifunctional nanomedicine holds considerable promise as the next generation of medicine that allows for targeted therapy with minimal toxicity. Most current studies on Nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery consider a Newtonian fluid with suspending NPs. However, blood is a complex biological fluid composed of deformable cells, proteins, platelets, and plasma. For blood flow in capillaries, arterioles and venules, the particulate nature of the blood needs to be considered in the delivery process. The existence of the cell-free-layer and NP-cell interaction will largely influence both the dispersion and binding rates, thus impact targeted delivery efficacy. In this paper, a particle-cell hybrid model is developed to model NP transport, dispersion, and binding dynamics in blood suspension. The motion and deformation of red blood cells is captured through the Immersed Finite Element Method. The motion and adhesion of individual NPs are tracked through Brownian adhesion dynamics. A mapping algorithm and an interaction potential function are introduced to consider the cell-particle collision. NP dispersion and binding rates are derived from the developed model under various rheology conditions. The influence of red blood cells, vascular flow rate, and particle size on NP distribution and delivery efficacy is characterized. A non-uniform NP distribution profile with higher particle concentration near the vessel wall is observed. Such distribution leads to over 50% higher particle binding rate compared to the case without RBC considered. The tumbling motion of RBCs in the core region of the capillary is found to enhance NP dispersion, with dispersion rate increases as shear rate increases. Results from this study contribute to the fundamental understanding and knowledge on how the particulate nature of blood influences NP delivery, which will provide mechanistic insights on the nanomedicine design for targeted drug delivery applications. PMID:22375153

  6. Electrophoretic characterization of aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, kidney cells, lynphocytes and chamber coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based electrokinetic data on the electrophoresis flight experiment to be flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project experiment MA-011 are stipulated. Aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, embryonic kidney cells and lymphocytes were evaluated by analytical particle electrophoresis. The results which aided in the interpretation of the final analysis of the MA-011 experiment are documented. The electrophoresis chamber surface modifications, the buffer, and the material used in the column system are also discussed.

  7. Quantitative colorimetric assay for total protein applied to the red wine Pinot noir.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark R; Penner, Mike H; Bennett, Samuel E; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2011-07-13

    A standard method for assaying protein in red wine is currently lacking. The method described here is based on protein precipitation followed by dye binding quantification. Improvements over existing approaches include minimal sample processing prior to protein precipitation with cold trichloroacetic acid/acetone and quantification based on absorbance relative to a commercially available standard representative of proteins likely to be found in wine, the yeast mannoprotein invertase. The precipitation method shortened preparation time relative to currently published methods and the mannoprotein standard yielded values comparable to those obtained by micro-Kjeldahl analysis. The assay was used to measure protein in 48 Pinot noir wines from 6 to 32 years old. The protein content of these wines was found to range from 50 to 102 mg/L with a mean value of 70 mg/L. The availability of a simple and relatively rapid procedure for assaying protein provides a practical tool to quantify a wine component that has been overlooked in routine analyses of red wines.

  8. [In vitro generation of blood red cells from stem cells: a sketch of the future].

    PubMed

    Mazurier, Christelle; Douay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Human adult pluripotent stem cells, stem cells of embryonic origin and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) provide cellular sources for new promising regenerative medicine approaches. Because these cells can be patient-specific, they allow considering a personalized medicine appropriate to the diagnosis of each. The generation of cultured red blood cells (cRBC) derived from stem cells is emblematic of personalized medicine. Indeed, these cells have the advantage of being selected according to a blood phenotype of interest and they may provide treatments to patients in situation of impossible transfusion (alloimmunized patients, rare phenotypes). Essential progresses have established proof of concept for this approach, still a concept some years ago. From adult stem cells, all steps of upstream research were successfully achieved, including the demonstration of the feasibility of injection into human. This leads us to believe that Red Blood Cells generated in vitro from stem cells will be the future players of blood transfusion. However, although theoretically ideal, these stem cells raise many biological challenges to overcome, although some tracks are identified.

  9. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests. PMID:24910468

  10. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-02-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests.

  11. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for estimating red cell survival of transfused red cells-validation using CR-51 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.; Kickler, T.; Smith, B.; LaFrance, N.

    1984-01-01

    The survival time of transfused red cells antigenically distinct from the recipient's red cells was determined using an indirect enzyme linked antiglobulin test. These results were then compared to those determined by Cr-51 labeling. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias and one patient (2 studies) with traumatic hemolytic anemia caused by a prosthetic heart valve were studied. Survival times were performed by transfusing a 5cc aliquot of Cr-51 labeled cells along with the remaining unit. One hour post transfusion, a blood sample was drawn and used as the 100% value. Subsequent samples drawn over a 2-3 week period were then compared to the initial sample to determine percent survival for both methods. The ELISA method for measuring red cell survival in antigenically distinct cells is in close agreement with the Cr-51 method. Although CR-51 labeling is the accepted method for red cell survival determination the ELISA method can be used when radioisotopes are unavailable or contraindicated or when the decision to estimate red cell survival is made after transfusion.

  12. Autophagic vesicles on mature human reticulocytes explain phosphatidylserine-positive red cells in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Mankelow, Tosti J; Griffiths, Rebecca E; Trompeter, Sara; Flatt, Joanna F; Cogan, Nicola M; Massey, Edwin J; Anstee, David J

    2015-10-08

    During maturation to an erythrocyte, a reticulocyte must eliminate any residual organelles and reduce its surface area and volume. Here we show this involves a novel process whereby large, intact, inside-out phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposed autophagic vesicles are extruded. Cell surface PS is a well-characterized apoptotic signal initiating phagocytosis. In peripheral blood from patients after splenectomy or in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the number of circulating red cells exposing PS on their surface is elevated. We show that in these patients PS is present on the cell surface of red cells in large (∼1.4 µm) discrete areas corresponding to autophagic vesicles. The autophagic vesicles found on reticulocytes are identical to those observed on red cells from splenectomized individuals and patients with SCD. Our data suggest the increased thrombotic risk associated with splenectomy, and patients with hemoglobinopathies is a possible consequence of increased levels of circulating mature reticulocytes expressing inside-out PS-exposed autophagic vesicles because of asplenia.

  13. Elastic thickness compressibilty of the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, V; Ritchie, K; Mohandas, N; Evans, E

    2001-09-01

    We have used an ultrasensitive force probe and optical interferometry to examine the thickness compressibility of the red cell membrane in situ. Pushed into the centers of washed-white red cell ghosts lying on a coverglass, the height of the microsphere-probe tip relative to its closest approach on the adjacent glass surface revealed the apparent material thickness, which began at approximately 90 nm per membrane upon detection of contact (force approximately 1-2 pN). With further impingement, the apparent thickness per membrane diminished over a soft compliant regime that spanned approximately 40 nm and stiffened on approach to approximately 50 nm under forces of approximately 100 pN. The same force-thickness response was obtained on recompression after retraction of the probe, which demonstrated elastic recoverability. Scaled by circumferences of the microspheres, the forces yielded energies of compression per area which exhibited an inverse distance dependence resembling that expected for flexible polymers. Attributed to the spectrin component of the membrane cytoskeleton, the energy density only reached one thermal energy unit (k(B)T) per spectrin tetramer near maximum compression. Hence, we hypothesized that the soft compliant regime probed in the experiments represented the compressibility of the outer region of spectrin loops and that the stiff regime < 50 nm was the response of a compact mesh of spectrin backed by a hardcore structure. To evaluate this hypothesis, we used a random flight theory for the entropic elasticity of polymer loops to model the spectrin network. We also examined the possibility that additional steric repulsion and apparent thickening could arise from membrane thermal-bending excitations. Fixing the energy scale to k(B)T/spectrin tetramer, the combined elastic response of a network of ideal polymer loops plus the membrane steric interaction correlated well with the measured dependence of energy density on distance for a statistical

  14. The rat red blood cell proteome is altered by priming with 2-butoxyethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Palkar, Prajakta S.; Kakhniashvili, David G.; Goodman, Steven R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-08-01

    Administration of a low priming dose of 2-butoxyethanol (BE, 500 mg/kg, p.o.) 7 days prior to a larger LD{sub 90} dose (1500 mg BE/kg, p.o.) offers protection against the lethal dose-induced hemolysis and death in female Sprague Dawley rats because of prompt and efficient replacement of red blood cells (RBCs) with new resilient RBCs. The objective of the present work was to analyze the altered proteome of RBCs upon priming with BE in order to identify the potential anti-hemolytic survival proteins induced in the primed rat RBCs (P-RBCs) as opposed to vehicle-treated RBCs (V-RBCs). The RBCs from the two groups were fractionated into membrane and cytosolic fractions. The cytosolic fractions were further fractionated for proteomic analysis into 3 fractions. The fractions were labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescent dyes and subjected to 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to analyze the protein profiles. Seven membrane and 8 cytosolic proteins were found to be significantly increased ({>=} 2.5 fold) in P-RBCs as compared to V-RBCs. The identified proteins can be classified into antioxidant, membrane skeleton, protein turnover, lipid raft, and energy metabolism components. Increased levels of the proteins from antioxidant and membrane skeleton groups were confirmed by Western blot analysis. The study provides the first report on protein profiling of rat RBCs as well as on alteration of the proteome upon exposure to a priming dose of hemotoxicant. Further studies are needed to prove the protective role of the identified proteins and will initiate the field of survival/protective/anti-hemolytic proteins in RBCs.

  15. Crystal structure of a novel red copper protein from Nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.L.; Arciero, D.M.; Hooper, A.B.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Nitrosocyanin (NC) is a mononuclear red copper protein isolated from the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. Although NC exhibits some sequence homology to classic blue copper proteins, its spectroscopic and electrochemical properties are drastically different. The 1.65 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of oxidized NC reveals an unprecedented trimer of single domain cupredoxins. Each copper center is partially covered by an unusual extended {beta}-hairpin structure from an adjacent monomer. The copper ion is coordinated by His 98, His 103, Cys 95, a single side chain oxygen of Glu 60, and a solvent molecule. In the 2.3 {angstrom} resolution structure of reduced NC, His 98 shifts away from the copper ion, and the solvent molecule is not observed. The arrangement of these ligands renders the coordination geometry of the NC red copper center distinct from that of blue copper centers. In particular, the red copper center has a higher coordination number and lacks the long Cu-S(Met) and short Cu-S(Cys) bond distances characteristic of blue copper. Moreover, the red copper center is square pyramidal whereas blue copper is typically distorted tetrahedral. Analysis of the NC structure provides insight into possible functions of this new type of biological copper center.

  16. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  17. Cell Stress Proteins in Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Fernandez-Garcia, Carlos Ernesto; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Burillo, Elena; Egido, Jesus; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    Cell stress proteins (CSPs) are a large and heterogenous family of proteins, sharing two main characteristics: their levels and/or location are modified under stress and most of them can exert a chaperon function inside the cells. Nonetheless, they are also involved in the modulation of several mechanisms, both at the intracellular and the extracellular compartments. There are more than 100 proteins belonging to the CSPs family, among them the thioredoxin (TRX) system, which is the focus of the present paper. TRX system is composed of several proteins such as TRX and peroxiredoxin (PRDX), two thiol-containing enzymes that are key players in redox homeostasis due to their ability to scavenge potential harmful reactive oxygen species. In addition to their main role as antioxidants, recent data highlights their function in several processes such as cell signalling, immune inflammatory responses, or apoptosis, all of them key mechanisms involved in atherothrombosis. Moreover, since TRX and PRDX are present in the pathological vascular wall and can be secreted under prooxidative conditions to the circulation, several studies have addressed their role as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). PMID:22792412

  18. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopic signatures for lung cells' epithelial mesenchymal transition: A preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Atasi; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Mukherjee, Anirban; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2017-02-01

    Infra red (IR) spectral characterization can provide label-free cellular metabolic signatures of normal and diseased circumstances in a rapid and non-invasive manner. Present study endeavoured to enlist Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopic signatures for lung normal and cancer cells during chemically induced epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) for which global metabolic dimension is not well reported yet. Occurrence of EMT was validated with morphological and immunocytochemical confirmation. Pre-processed spectral data was analyzed using ANOVA and principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA). Significant differences observed in peak area corresponding to biochemical fingerprint (900-1800 cm- 1) and high wave-number (2800-3800 cm- 1) regions contributed to adequate PCA-LDA segregation of cells undergoing EMT. The findings were validated by re-analysis of data using another in-house built binary classifier namely vector valued regularized kernel approximation (VVRKFA), in order to understand EMT progression. To improve the classification accuracy, forward feature selection (FFS) tool was employed in extracting potent spectral signatures by eliminating undesirable noise. Gradual increase in classification accuracy with EMT progression of both cell types indicated prominence of the biochemical alterations. Rapid changes in cellular metabolome noted in cancer cells within first 24 h of EMT induction along with higher classification accuracy for cancer cell groups in comparison to normal cells might be attributed to inherent differences between them. Spectral features were suggestive of EMT triggered changes in nucleic acid, protein, lipid and bound water contents which can emerge as the useful markers to capture EMT related cellular characteristics.

  19. Theoretical models for near forward light scattering by a Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    A number of experimental elastic light scattering studies have been performed in the past few years with the aim of developing automated in vivo tools for differentiating a healthy red blood cell from a Plasmodium falciparum infected cell. This paper examines some theoretical aspects of the problem. An attempt has been made to simulate the scattering patterns of healthy as well as infected individual red blood cells. Two models, namely, a homogeneous sphere model and a coated sphere model have been considered. The scattering patterns predicted by these models are examined. A possible method for discriminating infected red blood cells from healthy ones has been suggested.

  20. Red wine proteins: two dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Mainente, Federica; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Lorenzini, Marilinda; Cecconi, Daniela; Vincenzi, Simone; Rizzi, Corrado; Simonato, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize protein extraction from red wine (cv. Cabernet) in order to obtain a separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) compatible with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins were denatured by sodium dodecyl-sulphate (SDS) and precipitated as potassium salts. The potassium-DS (KDS) protein complexes obtained were treated with different solutions in order to remove the detergent. Proteins were solubilized with different buffers and separated by different electrophoretic approaches [native, urea, acid urea PAGEs and isoelectric focusing (IEF)] as the first-dimension (1-DE). The best 2D separation was achieved by using 10% saccharose in the DS removal step, and 6-cyclohexylhexyl β-d-maltoside detergent in the solubilisation buffer combined with the IEF approach. Several well focalized protein spots were obtained and analyzed through mass-spectrometry.

  1. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chong; Xiong, Li-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury. The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015. Study Selection: Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic. Results: The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion. It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance. Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue. It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations, including trauma, critical care, pediatric, and cardiac surgery patients, which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms. It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity, decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability, and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects, and if so, which factors determine such clinical effects. However, considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance, potential preventive strategies should be considered, especially for the susceptible recipients. PMID:26315088

  2. Red blood cell lifespan, erythropoiesis and hemoglobin control.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Anja; Uehlinger, Dominik E; Gotch, Frank; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and iron deficiency as causes of anemia in patients with limited renal function or end-stage renal disease are well addressed. The concomitant impairment of red blood cell (RBC) survival has been largely neglected. Properties of the uremic environment like inflammation, increased oxidative stress and uremic toxins seem to be responsible for the premature changes in RBC membrane and cytoskeleton. The exposure of antigenic sites and breakdown of the phosphatidylserine asymmetry promote RBC phagocytosis. While the individual response to treatment with EPO-stimulating agents (ESA) depends on both the RBC's lifespan and the production rate, uniform dosing algorithms do not meet that demand. The clinical use of mathematical models predicting ESA-induced changes in hematocrit might be greatly improved once independent estimates of RBC production rate and/or lifespan become available, thus making the concomitant estimation of both parameters unnecessary. Since heme breakdown by the hemoxygenase pathway results in carbon monoxide (CO) which is exhaled, a simple CO breath test has been used to calculate hemoglobin turnover and therefore RBC survival and lifespan. Future research will have to be done to validate and implement this method in patients with kidney failure. This will result in new insights into RBC kinetics in renal patients. Eventually, these findings are expected to improve our understanding of the hemoglobin variability in response to ESA.

  3. Continuum modeling of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daegeun; You, Donghyun

    2016-07-26

    In order to gain better understanding for rheology of an isolated red blood cell (RBC) and a group of multiple RBCs, new continuum models for describing mechanical properties of cellular structures of an RBC and inter-cellular interactions among multiple RBCs are developed. The viscous property of an RBC membrane, which characterizes dynamic behaviors of an RBC under stress loading and unloading processes, is determined using a generalized Maxwell model. The present model is capable of predicting stress relaxation and stress-strain hysteresis, of which prediction is not possible using the commonly used Kelvin-Voigt model. Nonlinear elasticity of an RBC is determined using the Yeoh hyperelastic material model in a framework of continuum mechanics using finite-element approximation. A novel method to model inter-cellular interactions among multiple adjacent RBCs is also developed. Unlike the previous modeling approaches for aggregation of RBCs, where interaction energy for aggregation is curve-fitted using a Morse-type potential function, the interaction energy is analytically determined. The present aggregation model, therefore, allows us to predict various effects of physical parameters such as the osmotic pressure, the thickness of a glycocalyx layer, the penetration depth, and the permittivity, on the depletion and electrostatic energy among RBCs. Simulations for elongation and recovery deformation of an RBC and for aggregation of multiple RBCs are conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the present continuum modeling methods.

  4. Light scattering by adjacent red blood cells: a mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunoglou, Nikolaos K.; Stamatakos, Georgios; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Yova-Loukas, Dido M.

    1995-01-01

    Simple approximate scattering theories such as the Rayleigh-Gans theory are not generally applicable to the case of light scattering by red blood cell (RBC) aggregates, including thrombus. This is mainly due to the extremely short distance separating erythrocytes in the aggregates (of the order of 25 nm) as well as to the substantial size of the aggregates. Therefore, in this paper a new mathematical model predicting the electromagnetic field produced by the scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a system of two adjacent RBCs is presented. Each RBC is modeled as a homogeneous dielectric ellipsoid of complex index of refraction surrounded by transparent plasma. The relative position and orientation of the ellipsoids are arbitrary. Scattering is formulated in terms of an integral equation which, however, contains two singular kernels. The singular equation is transformed into a pair of nonsingular integral equations for the Fourier transform of the internal field of each RBC. The latter equations are solved by reducing them by quadrature into a matrix equation. The resulting solutions are used to estimate the scattering amplitude. Convergence aspects concerning the numerical calculation of the matrix elements originating from the interaction between the RBCs are also presented.

  5. Probing red cell membrane cholesterol movement with cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Steck, Theodore L; Ye, Jin; Lange, Yvonne

    2002-10-01

    We probed the kinetics with which cholesterol moves across the human red cell bilayer and exits the membrane using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin as an acceptor. The fractional rate of cholesterol transfer (% s(-1)) was unprecedented, the half-time at 37 degrees C being ~1 s. The kinetics observed under typical conditions were independent of donor concentration and directly proportional to acceptor concentration. The rate of exit of membrane cholesterol fell hyperbolically to zero with increasing dilution. The energy of activation for cholesterol transfer was the same at high and low dilution; namely, 27-28 Kcal/mol. This behavior is not consistent with an exit pathway involving desorption followed by aqueous diffusion to acceptors nor with a simple one-step collision mechanism. Rather, it is that predicted for an activation-collision mechanism in which the reversible partial projection of cholesterol molecules out of the bilayer precedes their collisional capture by cyclodextrin. Because the entire membrane pool was transferred in a single first-order process under all conditions, we infer that the transbilayer diffusion (flip-flop) of cholesterol must have proceeded faster than its exit, i.e., with a half-time of <1 s at 37 degrees C.

  6. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  7. Osmotic parameters of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; McGann, Locksley E; Acker, Jason P

    2014-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood (cord RBCs) is gathering significant interest for the treatment of fetal and neonatal anemia, due to its high content of fetal hemoglobin as well as numerous other potential benefits to fetuses and neonates. However, in order to establish a stable supply of cord RBCs for clinical use, a cryopreservation method must be developed. This, in turn, requires knowledge of the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs: osmotically inactive fraction (b), hydraulic conductivity (Lp), permeability to cryoprotectant glycerol (Pglycerol), and corresponding Arrhenius activation energies (Ea). For Lp and Pglycerol determination, RBCs were analyzed using a stopped-flow system to monitor osmotically-induced RBC volume changes via intrinsic RBC hemoglobin fluorescence. Lp and Pglycerol were characterized at 4°C, 20°C, and 35°C using Jacobs and Stewart equations with the Ea calculated from the Arrhenius plot. Results indicate that cord RBCs have a larger osmotically inactive fraction compared to adult RBCs. Hydraulic conductivity and osmotic permeability to glycerol of cord RBCs differed compared to those of adult RBCs with the differences dependent on experimental conditions, such as temperature and osmolality. Compared to adult RBCs, cord RBCs had a higher Ea for Lp and a lower Ea for Pglycerol. This information regarding osmotic parameters will be used in future work to develop a protocol for cryopreserving cord RBCs.

  8. A particle dynamic model of red blood cell aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Marianne; Garcia, Damien; Meiselman, Herbert J; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-11-01

    To elucidate the relationship between microscopic red blood cell (RBC) interactions and macroscopic rheological behavior, we propose a two-dimensional particle model capable of mimicking the main characteristics of RBC aggregation kinetics. The mechanical model of RBCs sheared in Couette flow is based on Newton law. We assumed a hydrodynamic force to move particles, a force to describe aggregation and an elasticity force. The role of molecular mass and concentration of neutral polymers on aggregation [Neu, B., and H. J. Meiselman. Biophys. J. 83:2482-2490, 2002] could be mimicked. Specifically, it was shown that for any shear rate (SR), the mean aggregate size (MAS) grew with time until it reached a constant value, which is consistent with in vitro experiments. It was also demonstrated that we could mimic the modal relationship between MAS and SR and the occurrence of maximum aggregation at about 0.1 s(-1). As anticipated, simulations indicated that an increase in aggregation force augmented MAS. Further, augmentation of the depletion layer thickness influenced MAS only for SR close to zero, which is a new finding. To conclude, our contribution reveals that the aggregation force intensity and SR influence the steady state MAS, and that the depletion and layer thickness affect the aggregation speed.

  9. Aggregation of red blood cells in patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Adar, Tomer; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Berliner, Shlomo; Yedgar, Saul; Barshtein, Gershon

    2006-08-01

    Gaucher disease is associated with increased red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, but the pathophysiological significance of this phenomenon and its correlation with disease manifestations are unclear. RBC aggregation was evaluated in 43 patients with Gaucher disease and 53 healthy controls. Dynamic RBC aggregation was examined in a narrow-gap flow chamber at varying shear stress. Compared with the controls, RBC aggregation in Gaucher disease was increased by 25%. Comparison of RBC aggregation in autologous plasma and in dextran (500 kDa) showed an increase both in plasma-dependent (extrinsic) and -independent (intrinsic) RBC aggregation. Subgroup analysis revealed that increased RBC aggregation was limited to patients with an intact spleen. RBC aggregation in patients did not correlate with plasma fibrinogen concentration, disease severity, enzyme replacement therapy or genotype. We conclude that RBC aggregation is increased in patients with Gaucher disease and an intact spleen, possibly reflecting the accumulation of glucocerebroside and other substances in the plasma and RBC membranes of these patients. Our results do not support a role for RBC aggregation in the pathogenesis of vascular complications of Gaucher disease.

  10. Analysis of Red Blood Cell Behavior in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Haruki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) is a main component of blood accounting for 40 percent in volume, and enclosed by a twodimensional hyper elastic membrane. RBCs strongly influence rheological properties and mass transport of blood. The deformation of RBCs in capillary and at narrowing is also important in considering mechano-transduction of RBCs and hemolysis, though it has not been clarified in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the behavior of a RBC flowing in a narrow tube. To carry out the fluid-structure interaction analysis, we coupled a boundary element method to analyze the velocity of the internal and external fluid with a finite element method to analyze the deformation of the membrane. The boundary element method has good calculation accuracy and its computational cost is low because three-dimensional flow filed can be calculated by a two-dimensional computational mesh. The background flow in a tube is pressure-driven Poiseuille flow. Additionally, to reduce the computational time, we implemented massive parallel computation by using GPUs. The results show that the deformation of a RBC is strongly affected by the Capillary number, which is the ratio of viscous force to the elastic force, radius of the tube, and the initial orientation.

  11. Introduction to porcine red blood cells: implications for xenotransfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, A

    2000-04-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. The domestic pig is considered the most likely donor species for xenotransplantation. However, identification of xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes and elucidation of their possible roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction are necessary for developing clinical strategies to circumvent immunological incompatibility between humans and pigs. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GIcNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated. Our data suggest that non-alphaGal xenoantigen(s) identified on the porcine erythrocyte membrane are not only recognized by xenoreactive human natural antibodies but are also involved in complement-mediated hemolysis.

  12. Procoagulant activity in stored units of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Aleshnick, Maya; Foley, Jonathan H; Keating, Friederike K; Butenas, Saulius

    2016-06-10

    The procoagulant activity (PA) of stored units of red blood cells (RBC) increases over time, which is related to the expression/exposure of tissue factor (TF). However, there is a discrepancy between the TF measured and changes in PA observed, suggesting that other blood components contribute to this activity. Our goal was to evaluate changes in PA of stored RBCs and to determine possible contributors to it. RBC units from 4 healthy donors were prepared and stored at 4 °C. On selected days, RBC aliquots were reconstituted with autologous plasma and tested in the thromboelastography assay. Corresponding supernatants were tested in a clotting assay. For all donors, the clotting time (CT) of reconstituted RBC units decreased from ∼3000-4000s on day 1 to ∼1000-1600s on day 30, with the most dramatic changes occurring between days 1 and 5. Anti-TF antibody slightly prolonged the CT. The concentration of TF did not change significantly over time and was within the range of 0.3-2.3 pM. Bovine lactadherin (LTD) prolonged the CT of the RBC (by 2.4-3.4-fold in days 3-5 and by 1.3-1.8-fold at day 30). Anti-TF antibody together with LTD had a cumulative effect on the CT prolongation. CT of supernatants responded to both anti-TF and anti-FXIa antibodies. Three contributors to the PA of stored RBC were identified, i.e. FXIa in solution and phosphatidylserine and TF exposed on blood cells and microparticles. Failure of LTD and antibodies to completely eliminate PA suggests that other components of blood could contribute to it.

  13. An innovative shape equation to quantify the morphological characteristics of parasitized red blood cells by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Motevalli Haghi, Afsaneh; Faghihi, Shahab

    2013-04-01

    The morphology of red blood cells is affected significantly during maturation of malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. A novel shape equation is presented that defines shape of parasitized red blood cells by P. falciparum (Pf-red blood cells) and P. vivax (Pv-red blood cells) at four stages of infection. The Giemsa-stained thin blood films are prepared using blood samples collected from healthy donors, patients having P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria. The diameter and thickness of healthy red blood cells plus Pf-red blood cells and Pv-red blood cells at each stage of infection are measured from their optical images using Olysia and Scanning Probe Image Processor softwares, respectively. Using diameters and thicknesses of parasitized red blood cells, a shape equation is fitted and relative two-dimensional shapes are plotted using MATHEMATICA. The shape of Pf-red blood cell drastically changes at ring stage as its thickness increases by 82%, while Pv-red blood cell remains biconcave (30% increase in thickness). By trophozoite and subsequent schizont stage, the Pf-red blood cell entirely loses its biconcave shape and becomes near spherical (diameter and thickness of ~8 µm). The Pv-red blood cell remains biconcave throughout the parasite development even though its volume increases. These results could have practical use for faster diagnosis, prediction, and treatment of human malaria and sickle-cell diseases.

  14. Pseudohyperkalaemia and pseudomacrocytosis caused by inherited red-cell disorders of the 'hereditary stomatocytosis' group.

    PubMed

    Chetty, M C; Stewart, G W

    2001-01-01

    Unusual dominantly inherited conditions of the red cell, collected under the generic title 'hereditary stomatocytosis and allied disorders', exist, in which the red cell 'leaks' the univalent cations sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+). In some kindreds with these disorders, bizarre temperature effects can occur that have profound effects on the way in which the cells behave when removed from the body and cooled to either room or refrigerator temperatures. In some types, the cells lose K+ at room temperature, giving rise to pseudohyperkalaemia; in others, this occurs in concert with swelling of the red cell and pseudomacrocytosis. In some of these conditions, a red-cell abnormality is clearly demonstrated by the presence of haemolytic anaemia; however, routine haematology can be virtually normal in the milder versions. All are inherited as dominants, although new mutations can be seen.

  15. Triiodothyronine improves the primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells in severely undernourished weanling mice

    SciTech Connect

    Filteau, S.M.; Perry, K.J.; Woodward, B.

    1987-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted in which weanling mice were fed a nutritionally complete diet either ad libitum or in restricted quantities such that they lost about 30% of their initial weight over a 14-day period. In Experiments 1 and 2, half the animals from each group received dietary triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) supplements. In Experiment 3, food-intake-restricted mice were fed graded levels of potassium iodide. Malnutrition reduced the number of nucleated cells per spleen, the number of splenic IgG plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 10/sup 6/ cells, and the serum antibody titers against sheep red blood cells as determined by radioimmunoassay. T/sub 3/ supplements increased antibody titers, the number of nucleated cells per spleen, and both IgM and IgG PFC per 10/sup 6/ spleen cells in malnourished mice, but had no effect on well-nourished mice. The beneficial effect of T/sub 3/ was not a result of improved protein, energy, or iodine status in the malnourished mice.

  16. Ethanol induces human red cell shape transformations and enhanced ligand-mediated agglutinability

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.S.; McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol concentrations are markedly elevated in rat stomach wall when ulcerogenic doses of 100 % ethanol (2 ml for 5 to 10 minutes) are instilled in rat gastric lumen. The authors observed that red cells in gastric mucosal postcapillary venules become spiculated and interadherent under these conditions. The authors have now studied this phenomenon in vitro using washing human red cells. Concentrations of high grade ethanol ranging from 2 to 10% (v/v) in physiological buffered saline (pH 7.3) without Ca/sup + +/ or Mg/sup + +/ at 25/sup 0/C rapidly transformed human red cells into spiculated forms. 2% ethanol transformed human red cells into disco-echinocytes in 15 min. whereas 10% ethanol transformed red blood cells into echinocytes within 3 min. Washing out of ethanol at 1 hour reverted the echinocytes into discocytes. However, following 3 hours of incubation in 10% ethanol washing out of ethanol produced stomatocytes. The ethanol-induced echinocytic shape transformations were accompanied by a dose-related increase in red cell agglutinability with poly-L-lysine or the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin. The enhanced agglutinability was reversed by restoring the red cell shape changes and alterations in surface properties may play a role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers.

  17. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms.

    PubMed

    Pletneva, Nadya V; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A; Chertkova, Rita V; Martynov, Vladimir I; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    The fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the C(α)-N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double C(α)=C(β) bond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement.

  18. What befalls the proteins and water in a living cell when the cell dies?

    PubMed

    Ling, Gilbert N; Fu, Ya-zhen

    2005-01-01

    The solvency of solutes of varying molecular size in the intracellular water of freshly-killed Ehrlich carcinoma cells fits the same theoretical curve that describes the solvency of similar solutes in a 36% solution of native bovine hemoglobin--a protein found only in red blood cells and making up 97.3% of the red cell's total intracellular proteins. The merging of the two sets of data confirms the prediction of the AI Hypothesis that key intracellular protein(s) in dying cells undergo(es) a transition from: (1) one in which the polypeptide NHCO groups assume a fully-extended conformation with relatively strong power of polarizing and orienting the bulk-phase water in multilayers; to (2) one in which most of the polypeptide NHCO groups are engaged in alpha-helical and other "introvert" conformations (see below for definition) with much weaker power in polarizing-orienting multilayers of bulk-phase water. This concordance of the two sets of data also shows that what we now call native hemoglobin--supposedly denoting hemoglobin found in its natural state in living red blood cells--, in fact, more closely resembles the water-polarizing, and -orienting intracellular proteins in dead cells. Although in the dead Ehrlich carcinoma cells as well as in the 36% solution of native hemoglobin, much of the protein's polypeptide NHCO groups are engaged in alpha-helical and other "introvert" conformation (Perutz 1969; Weissbluth 1974), both systems produce a weak but nonetheless pervasive and "long-range" water polarization and orientation. It is suggested that in both the dead Ehrlich carcinoma ascites cells and in the 36% native bovine hemoglobin solution, enough polypeptide NHCO groups assume the fully-extended conformation to produce the weak but far-reaching multilayer water polarization and orientation observed.

  19. Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Sickle Cell Disease: Listen to Your Ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Lee, Sally A.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization occurs in approximately 30% of transfused sickle cell disease patients compared to 2–5% of all transfusion recipients. Because RBC transfusion is an important part of therapy in sickle cell disease, the need for additional antigen matching once alloimmunization occurs is problematic and leads to therapeutic limitations. Thus, identification of risk factors would benefit this patient population. Genome-wide analyses, in particular, methods which take into account genetic ancestry such as admixture mapping, could identify molecular markers which could be used to identify immune responders to transfusion. PMID:25670930

  20. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy.

  1. Quantitative absorption cytometry for measuring red blood cell hemoglobin mass and volume.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Malka, Roy; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Schaak, Diane; Higgins, John M

    2014-04-01

    We present an optical system, called the quantitative absorption cytometer (QAC), to measure the volume and hemoglobin mass of red blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. In contrast to clinical hematology analyzers, where cells are sphered in order for both volume and hemoglobin to be measured accurately, the QAC measures cells in their normal physiological shape. Human red blood cells are suspended in a refractive index-matching absorbing buffer, driven through a microfluidic channel, and imaged using a transmission light microscope onto a color camera. A red and a blue LED illuminate cells and images at each color are used to independently retrieve cell volume and hemoglobin mass. This system shows good agreement with red blood cell indices retrieved by a clinical hematology analyzer and in fact measures a smaller coefficient of variation of hemoglobin concentration. In addition to cell indices, the QAC returns height and mass maps of each measured cell. These quantitative images are valuable for analyzing the detailed morphology of individual cells as well as statistical outliers found in the data. We also measured red blood cells in hypertonic and hypotonic buffers to quantify the correlation between volume and hemoglobin mass under osmotic stress. Because this method is invariant to cell shape, even extremely nonspherical cells in hypertonic buffers can be measured accurately.

  2. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  3. Remote ischemia preconditioning increases red blood cell deformability through red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Kollikowski, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-09-12

    Remote ischemia preconditioning (rIPC), short cycles of ischemia (I) and reperfusion (R) of a region remote from the heart, protects against myocardial I/R injury. This effect is triggered by endothelial derived nitric oxide (NO) production. Red blood cells (RBC) are also capable of NO production and it is hypothesized that the beneficial effect of rIPC in terms of cardioprotection is strengthened by increased RBC dependent NO production and improved RBC function after rIPC maneuver. For this purpose, twenty male participants were subjected to four cycles of no-flow ischemia with subsequent reactive hyperemia within the forearm. Blood sampling and measurement of blood pressures and heart rate were carried out pre intervention, after each cycle and 15 min post intervention at both the non-treated and treated arm. These are the first results that show improved RBC deformability in the treated arm after rIPC cycles 1- 4 caused by significantly increased RBC-NO synthase activation. This in turn was associated to increased NO production in both arms after rIPC cycles 3 + 4. Also, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased after rIPC. The findings lead to the conclusion that the cardioprotective effects associated with rIPC include improvement of the RBC-NOS/NO signaling in RBC.

  4. Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells for the measurement of red cell mass in newborn infants: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Linderkamp, O.; Betke, K.; Fendel, H.; Klemm, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Riegel, K.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vitro and in vivo investigations were performed to examine the binding of Tc-99m to neonatal red blood cells (RBC). Labeling efficiency was about 90%, and unbound Tc-99m less than 3% after one washing, in premature and full-term newborns and in children. Thus presence of high percentages of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) did not influence the labeling of RBCs with Tc-99m. RBCs of 11 newborns were hemolysed and the distribution of Tc-99m on RBC components was analyzed. Although Hb F percentage averaged (60.0 +- 8.10)% (s.d.), only (11.9 +- 3.7)% of Tc-99m was bound by Hb F, whereas (45.0 +- 6.1)% was associated with Hb A. RBC membranes bound (13.7 +- 4.3)% and (29.3 +- 4.0)% were found unbound in hemolysates. These results indicate that Tc-99m preferentially binds to beta chains. In vivo equilibration of Tc-99m RBCs and of albumin labeled with Evans blue was investigated in five newborn infants. Tc-99m RBCs were stable in each case during the first hour after injection. Elution of Tc-99m from RBCs was (3.4 +- 1.5)% per h. Body-to-venous hematocrit ratio averaged 0.86 +- 0.03.

  5. Rheological properties of RBC in the microcirculation of mammalian skeletal muscle. [red blood cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrenberg, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    In the investigation the established technique of direct microscopic viewing was combined with the use of a closed circuit television system and cinematography. The red cell flow patterns in all capillaries were found to be oscillatory with characteristic cycle frequencies and amplitudes for all concentrations of inspired oxygen greater than 8%. Generally, there was a transient decrease in mean flow rate with increasing severity of hypoxia, with a gradual return toward control values. Red cell flow patterns are discussed along with questions of red cell configuration.

  6. The acute effects of nifedipine on red cell deformability in angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, D G; Nicholson, H P; Roath, S

    1984-01-01

    In a randomised double-blind study, the effects on red cell deformability of a single sublingual dose of nifedipine were compared with placebo in eight patients with stable angina pectoris. Red cell deformability, measured by filtration and centrifugation techniques, was significantly increased at rest in all eight patients 1 h after nifedipine, while no change occurred after placebo. The improvement in deformability after nifedipine was maintained at the end of a period of exercise and unchanged from resting values after placebo. The results suggest that the increased deformability of red cells after nifedipine could contribute to the therapeutic effects of the drug in myocardial ischaemia. PMID:6704282

  7. Polymer/hemoglobin assemblies: biodegradable oxygen carriers for artificial red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Taihang; Jing, Xiabin; Huang, Yubin

    2011-07-07

    In routine clinical procedures, blood transfusion is now suffering from the defects of the blood products, like cross-matching, short storage time and virus infection. Various blood substitutes have been designed by researchers through continual efforts. With recent progress in nanotechnology, new types of artificial red blood cells with cellular structure are available. This article aims to describe some artificial red blood cells which encapsulate or conjugate hemoglobin molecules through various approaches, especially the nanoscale self-assembly technique, to mitigate the adverse effects of free hemoglobin molecules. These types of artificial red blood cell systems, which make use of biodegradable polymers as matrix materials, show advantages over the traditional types.

  8. Safe extension of red blood cell storage life at 4{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to develop methods to extend the storage life of red blood cells. Extended storage would allow donor to self or autologous transfusion, expand and stabilize the blood supply, reduce the cost of medical care and eliminate the risk of transfusion related infections, including a spectrum of hepatitides (A, B and C) and HIV. The putative cause of red blood cell spoilage at 4 C has been identified as oxidative membrane damage resulting from deoxyhemoglobin and its denaturation products including hemichrome, hemin and Fe{sup 3+}. Trials with carbon monoxide, which is a stabilizer of hemoglobin, have produced striking improvement of red blood cell diagnostics for cells stored at 4 C. Carbonmonoxy hemoglobin is readily converted to oxyhemoglobin by light in the presence of oxygen. These findings have generated a working model and an approach to identify the best protocols for optimal red cell storage and hemoglobin regeneration.

  9. The effect of cyanide on the uptake of gold by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, G G; Haavisto, T M; Jones, H M; Champion, G D

    1984-04-15

    Cyanide markedly increased the rate of uptake of gold by red blood cells when incubated with sodium aurothiomalate, a polymeric gold complex. Thiocyanate had no significant effect on gold uptake. The effect of cyanide was demonstrated to be due to the conversion of aurothiomalate to the complexion, aurocyanide, which is rapidly taken up by red blood cells. At a low ratio (1:20) of cyanide to aurothiomalate, cyanide appeared to act as a shuttle to carry gold into red blood cells. Tobacco smoking is known to increase the concentrations of gold in red blood cells in patients treated with aurothiomalate. The present data indicate that this effect of smoking is most likely due to cyanide inhaled in tobacco smoke and not to thiocyanate, a circulating metabolite of cyanide. An effect of cyanide on the uptake of polymeric gold complexes to target cells such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes is suggested.

  10. N-acetylcysteine improves the quality of red blood cells stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Amen, Florencia; Machin, Andrea; Touriño, Cristina; Rodríguez, Ismael; Denicola, Ana; Thomson, Leonor

    2017-04-06

    Storage inflicts a series of changes on red blood cells (RBC) that compromise the cell survival and functionality; largely these alterations (storage lesions) are due to oxidative modifications. The possibility of improving the quality of packed RBC stored for transfusion including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in the preservation solution was explored. Relatively high concentrations of NAC (20-25 mM) were necessary to prevent the progressive leakage of hemoglobin, while lower concentrations (≥2.5 mM) were enough to prevent the loss of reduced glutathione during the first 21 days of storage. Peroxiredoxin-2 was also affected during storage, with a progressive accumulation of disulfide-linked dimers and hetero-protein complexes in the cytosol and also in the membrane of stored RBC. Although the presence of NAC in the storage solution was unable to avoid the formation of thiol-mediated protein complexes, it partially restored the capacity of the cell to metabolize H2O2, indicating the potential use of NAC as an additive in the preservation solution to improve RBC performance after transfusion.

  11. The familial Parkinson's disease gene DJ-1 (PARK7) is expressed in red cells and plays a role in protection against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiuling; Martin, Florent; Friedman, Jeffrey S

    2010-10-15

    The antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) serves as the primary defense against mitochondrial superoxide. Impaired SOD2 activity in murine hematopoietic cells affects erythroid development, resulting in anemia characterized by intra-mitochondrial iron deposition, reticulocytosis and shortened red cell life span. Gene expression profiling of normal and SOD2 deficient erythroblasts identified the Parkinson's disease locus DJ-1 (Park7) as a differentially expressed transcript. To investigate the role of DJ-1 in hematopoietic cell development and protection against oxidative stress caused by Sod2 loss, we evaluated red cell parameters, reticulocyte count, red cell turnover and reactive oxygen species production in DJ-1 knockout animals and chimeric animals lacking both SOD2 and DJ-1 in hematopoietic cells generated by fetal liver transplantation. We also investigated DJ-1 protein expression in primary murine erythroid and erythroleukemia cells (MEL). Loss of DJ-1 exacerbates the phenotype of SOD2 deficiency, increasing reticulocyte count and decreasing red cell survival. Using MEL cells, we show that DJ-1 is up-regulated at the protein level during erythroid differentiation. These results indicate that DJ-1 plays a physiologic role in protection of erythroid cells from oxidant damage, a function unmasked in the context of oxidative stress.

  12. Simulated Red Blood Cell Motion in Microvessel Bifurcations: Effects of Cell-Cell Interactions on Cell Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jared O.; Restrepo, Juan M.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    Partitioning of red blood cell (RBC) fluxes between the branches of a diverging microvessel bifurcation is generally not proportional to the flow rates, as RBCs preferentially enter the higher-flow branch. A two-dimensional model for RBC motion and deformation is used to investigate the effects of cell-cell mechanical interactions on RBC partitioning in bifurcations. The RBC membrane and cytoplasm are represented by sets of viscoelastic elements immersed in a low Reynolds number flow. Several types of two-cell interactions that can affect partitioning are found. In the most frequent interactions, a `trade-off' occurs, in which a cell entering one branch causes a following cell to enter the other branch. Other types of interactions include `herding,' where the leading cell is caused to enter the same branch as the following cell, and `following,' where the trailing cell is caused to enter the same branch as the leading cell. The combined effect of these cell-cell interactions is a tendency towards more uniform partitioning, which results from the trade-off effect but is reduced by the herding and following effects. With increasing hematocrit, the frequency of interactions increases, and more uniform partitioning results. This prediction is consistent with experimental observations on how hematocrit affects RBC partitioning. PMID:23555330

  13. Monascus ruber-Fermented Buckwheat (Red Yeast Buckwheat) Suppresses Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeok; Park, Jiyoung; Lumbera, Wenchie L; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2017-03-23

    Although various treatments have been used for weight loss to date, obese people rarely have safe and effective treatment options. Therefore, the antiobesity effects of several natural compounds are being actively investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the antiadipogenic effects of Monascus ruber-fermented Fagopyrum esculentum (red yeast buckwheat, RYB) in 3T3-L1 cells. We assessed the intracellular lipid content and adipocyte differentiation by oil red O staining and the expression of genes and proteins associated with adipocyte differentiation by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting in 3T3-L1 cells. RYB dose dependently inhibited 3T3-L1 cell differentiation at concentrations of 50-800 μg/mL, without cytotoxic effects. It also suppressed the expression of adipogenic transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, and adipocyte-specific genes, such as adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), fatty acid synthase, and leptin, during preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Furthermore, RYB reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and cyclin expression and increased p21 and p27 expression, thus causing cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase. Collectively, these results suggest that RYB may be an effective nutraceutical for weight loss as indicated by its ability to suppress adipogenesis-specific gene expression and cause cell cycle arrest at the G1/S interphase.

  14. Biological effects of the electrostatic field: red blood cell-related alterations of oxidative processes in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Hayk A.; Sahakyan, Gohar V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine activities of pro-/antioxidant enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and oxidative modification of proteins and lipids in red blood cells (RBCs) and blood plasma of rats exposed to electrostatic field (200 kV/m) during the short (1 h) and the long periods (6 day, 6 h daily). Short-term exposure was characterized by the increase of oxidatively damaged proteins in blood of rats. This was strongly expressed in RBC membranes. After long-term action, RBC content in peripheral blood was higher than in control ( P < 0.01) and the attenuation of prooxidant processes was shown.

  15. Measuring electrical and mechanical properties of red blood cells with a double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The fluid lipid bilayer viscoelastic membrane of red blood cells (RBC) contains antigen glycolproteins and proteins which can interact with antibodies to cause cell agglutination. This is the basis of most of the immunohematologic tests in blood banks and the identification of the antibodies against the erythrocyte antigens is of fundamental importance for transfusional routines. The negative charges of the RBCs creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. The first counterions cloud strongly binded moving together with the RBC is called the compact layer. This report proposes the use of a double optical tweezers for a new procedure for measuring: (1) the apparent membrane viscosity, (2) the cell adhesion, (3) the zeta potential and (4) the compact layer's size of the charges formed around the cell in the electrolytic solution. To measure the membrane viscosity we trapped silica beads strongly attached to agglutinated RBCs and measured the force to slide one RBC over the other as a function of the relative velocity. The RBC adhesion was measured by slowly displacing two RBCs apart until the disagglutination happens. The compact layer's size was measured using the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied voltage and the zeta potential was obtained by measuring the terminal velocity after releasing the RBC from the optical trap at the last applied voltage. We believe that the methodology here proposed can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  16. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P.; Mañú-Pereira, María del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the patients to

  17. Microvascular response to red blood cell transfusion in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; MacLennan, Paul A; Vandromme-Cusick, Marianne J; Angotti, Jonathan M; Magnotti, Louis J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-03-01

    Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark-field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The perfused proportion of capillaries (PPC) before and after transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD, 21) years, mean Injury Severity Score was 29 (SD, 16), and mean pretransfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 (SD, 0.9) g/dL. No patients had a mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mmHg (mean, 89 [SD, 17] mmHg) or lactate of greater than 2.5 mmol/L (mean, 1.1 [SD, 0.3] mmol/L). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pretransfusion PPC (Spearman r = -0.63, P = 0.0002). Pretransfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, whereas those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion.

  18. Microvascular Response to Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; MacLennan, Paul A.; Vandromme–Cusick, Marianne J.; Angotti, Jonathan M.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Rue, Loring W.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Methods Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The proportion of perfused capillaries (PPC) pre- and post-transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Results Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD=21), mean ISS was 29 (SD=16), and mean pre-transfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dL (SD=0.9). No patients had MAP < 65 mm Hg (mean 89 mm Hg, SD 17) or lactate > 2.5 mmol/L (mean 1.1 mmol/L, SD 0.3). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pre-transfusion PPC (Spearman r= -0.63, p=0.0002). Conclusions Pre-transfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, while those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion. PMID:22344313

  19. Double red cell concentrates -in vitro quality after delayed refrigeration.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Bekoe, Y; Uddin, S; Beard, M; Cardigan, R

    2010-10-01

    Automated collection of red cell concentrates (RCC) presents a number of potential advantages to donors, blood services and recipients, and allows the collection of finished components from sites that are remote from a blood centre. However, data are lacking on how long the collected RCC may be stored at ambient temperature prior to their final storage at 4 °C. In this study, the Haemonetics Cymbal device was used to collect RCC using citrate, phosphate and dextrose (CPD-50) anticoagulant. A total of 10 procedures each yielded two leucodepleted RCC in saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol (SAGM) additive solution. One of each pair of RCC was kept warm in an insulated transport bag for 8 h and the other for 6 h. In vitro assessments of the quality of the RCC were made during subsequent 42-day storage of the RCC at 2-6 °C, and compared with reference data. All collected RCC were within UK and European limits for volume, haematocrit and haemoglobin content. Haemolysis was within specification at Day 42 and was no different in RCC held warm for 6 or 8 hours, but tended to be higher than reference data from whole blood derived RCC. ATP, 2,3 DPG and supernatant potassium levels were all similar in RCC held warm for 6 or 8 hours and reference data. We conclude that the Cymbal device may be used to collect two RCC in SAGM, and the in vitro assessment indicates that RCC may be stored without refrigeration for up to 8 h following collection, prior to final storage at 4 °C.

  20. Isoelectric focusing of red blood cells in a density gradient stabilized column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Miller, T. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Ficoll and cell application pH on red blood cell electrophoretic mobility and focusing pH were investigated by focusing cells in a density gradient stabilized column. Sample loading, cell dispersion, column conductivity, resolution of separation, and the effect of Ampholines were examined.

  1. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall.

  2. Temporal sequence of major biochemical events during Blood Bank storage of packed red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Karon, Brad S.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Jaben, Elizabeth A.; Hoyer, James D.; Thomas, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. We used sensitive spectroscopic techniques to measure changes in Band 3 oligomeric state during storage of packed red blood cells (RBC); these changes were compared to metabolic changes, RBC morphology, cholesterol and membrane protein loss, phospholipid reorganisation of the RBC membrane, and peroxidation of membrane lipid. The aim of the study was to temporally sequence major biochemical events occurring during cold storage, in order to determine which changes may underlie the structural defects in stored RBC. Materials and methods. Fifteen RBC units were collected from normal volunteers and stored under standard blood bank conditions; both metabolic changes and lipid parameters were measured by multiple novel assays including a new mass spectrometric measurement of isoprostane (lipid peroxidation) and flow cytometric assessment of CD47 expression. Band 3 oligomeric state was assessed by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy, and RBC morphology by microscopy of glutaraldehyde-fixed RBC. Results. Extracellular pH decreased and extracellular potassium increased rapidly during cold storage. Band 3 on the RBC membrane aggregated into large oligomers early in the storage period and coincident with changes in RBC morphology. Membrane lipid changes, including loss of unesterified cholesterol, lipid peroxidation and expression of CD47, also changed early during the storage period. In contrast loss of acetylcholinesterase activity and haemolysis of RBC occurred late during storage. Discussion. Our results demonstrate that changes in the macromolecular organisation of membrane proteins on the RBC occur early in storage and suggest that lipid peroxidation and/or oxidative damage to the membrane are responsible for irreversible morphological changes and loss of function during red cell storage. PMID:22507860

  3. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larvae.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Fuiman, Lee A

    2011-06-01

    Protein synthesis is one of the major energy-consuming processes in all living organisms. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis have been studied in a range of animal taxa but have been little studied in fish larvae. Using the flooding-dose method, we measured post-prandial changes in whole-body rates of protein synthesis in regularly fed red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (Linnaeus) larvae for 24-28 h following their daily meal. Fractional rates of protein synthesis increased from a baseline (pre-feeding) rate of 16% day(-1) to a post-prandial peak of 48% day(-1) ca. 8 h after feeding before declining to 12% day(-1) after 24-28 h. The overall mean daily rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 27% day(-1). Although suggested as energetically impossible in larval poikilotherms, our results show that rates in excess of 30% day(-1) can be attained by larval fishes for a few hours but are not sustained. The average daily energetic cost of protein synthesis was estimated as 34% of daily total oxygen consumption, ranging from 19% immediately before feeding to 61% during the post-prandial peak in protein synthesis. This suggests that during the post-prandial peak, protein synthesis will require a large proportion of the hourly energy production, which, given the limited metabolic scope in fish larvae, may limit the energy that could otherwise be allocated to other energy-costly functions, such as foraging and escape responses.

  4. Optical evaluation of red blood cell geometry using micropipette aspiration.

    PubMed

    Engström, K G; Möller, B; Meiselman, H J

    1992-01-01

    Although red blood cell (RBC) geometry has been extensively studied by micropipette aspiration, the small size of RBC and pipettes vs. the optical resolution of light microscopy suggests the need to consider potential errors. The present study addressed such difficulties and investigated four specific problems: (1) use of exact equations to calculate RBC membrane area and volume; (2) calibration of the pipette internal diameter (PID); (3) correction for a noncylindrical pipette barrel; (4) diffraction distortion of the RBC image. The observed PID represents a cylinder lens enlargement that can be theoretically derived from the glass/buffer refractive index ratio (1.49/1.33 = 1.12). This enlargement was experimentally confirmed by: (1) studying pipettes bent to allow measurement through the barrel (horizontal) and at the orifice (vertical), with a resulting diameter ratio of 1.12 +/- 0.01; (2) and by replacing the surrounding buffer with immersion oil and hence abolishing the lens phenomenon (ratio = 1.12 +/- 0.02). In addition, use of aspirated oil droplets demonstrated a 3.2 +/- 0.2% error when the PID is focused at a sharp, maximum diameter. The average pipette cone angle was 1.49 +/- 0.09 degrees and varied considerably with pipette pulling procedures; calculated tongue geometry inside the pipette was affected by the noncylindrical pipette barrel. The RBC diffraction error, demonstrated by touching two aspirated cells held by opposing pipettes, was 0.091 +/- 0.002 microns. The PID, cone angle, and diffraction artifacts significantly (p < 0.001) affected calculated RBC geometry (average errors up to 5.4% for area and 9.6% for volume). Two new methods to calculate, rather than directly measure, the PID from images of a single RBC, during either osmotic or pressure manipulation, were evaluated; the osmotic method closely predicted the PID, whereas the pressure method markedly underestimated the PID. Our results thus confirm the need to consider the above

  5. [Production of mature red blood cell by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Jun; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Ke-Ying; Shang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Na; Wang, Lin; Cui, Shuang; Ni, Lei; Zhao, Bo-Tao; Wang, Dong-Mei; Gao, Song-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Most protocols for in vitro producing red blood cells (RBC) use the CD34(+) cells or embryonic stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow or peripheral blood as the start materials. This study was purposed to produce the mature RBC in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells as start material. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from buffy coat after blood leukapheresis, the mature red blood cells (RBC) were prepared by a 4-step culture protocol. The results showed that after culture by inducing with the different sets of cytokines and supporting by mouse MS-5 cell line, the expansion of PBMNC reached about 1000 folds at the end of the culture. About 90% of cultured RBC were enucleated mature cells which had the comparable morphological characteristics with normal RBC. Colony-forming assays showed that this culture system could stimulate the proliferation of progenitors in PBMNC and differentiate into erythroid cells. The structure and function analysis indicated that the mean cell volume of in vitro cultured RBC was 118 ± 4 fl, which was slight larger than that of normal RBC (80-100 fl); the mean cell hemoglobin was 36 ± 1.2 pg, which was slight higher than that of normal RBC (27-31 pg); the maximal deformation index was 0.46, which approachs level of normal RBC; the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyrurvate kinase levels was consistant with young RBC. It is concluded that PBMNC are feasble, convenient and low-cost source for producing cultured RBC and this culture system is suitable to generate the RBC from PBMNC.

  6. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells -- a proteomic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Brian; Discher, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Many cellular activities are mediated by conformational changes in proteins or else involve rearrangement of protein assemblies. These motions are now commonly investigated in vitro as well as at the single-molecule level. But we sought to develop an in-cell method to study these motions and to do so on a proteomic scale. We have been especially interested in studying molecular responses in cells under stress, and we initially developed a labeling technique in the simplest human cell, the red blood cell. The premise is to label cysteines with cell-viable, thiol-reactive fluorophores in both stressed and unstressed cells. Then, differential labeling of proteins would indicate that under stress, previously buried cysteine residues become exposed and thus accessible to the fluorescent probe. Fluorescence imaging and saparations provide initial clues to structures and proteins, but Mass Spectrometry precisely maps the sites that are exposed. Subsequent work on recombinants and in modeling is then used to explain the cell-derived findings, and the method has now been applied to several nucleated cell types.

  7. Studies with nonradioisotopic sodium chromate. I. Development of a technique for measuring red cell volume

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, W.A.; Hanbury, C.M.; Keegan, T.E.; Pleban, P.; Holme, S. )

    1989-10-01

    A nonradioisotopic method for measuring red cell volume that involves the use of 52Cr-sodium chromate as the red cell label and of graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis of chromium is described. The technique allows the labelling of 20 mL of packed red cells with 40 to 50 micrograms of sodium chromate (Na2CrO4) in 30 minutes at 22 degrees C with 94 +/- 6 percent uptake. Approximately 40 micrograms of Na2CrO4 was injected for in vivo studies. This results in posttransfusion in vivo red cell chromium levels after sample processing in the range of 1 to 7 micrograms per L, which could be quantitated accurately (coefficient of variation = 4.7%) by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The labeling concentration of chromium did not cause increased hemolysis, and the labeled cells exhibited an osmotic fragility curve similar to that of unlabeled, fresh ACD red cells. Red cell glutathione peroxidase was unaffected by labeling, although glutathione reductase was reduced by approximately 13 percent (p less than 0.05). The 52Cr red cell volume-measuring method was evaluated by concurrent in vivo studies with the standard 51Cr and 125I-albumin methods for that procedure. Simultaneous measurement of red cell volumes in seven volunteers by the 51Cr, 52Cr, and 125I-albumin techniques correlated highly with each other (r greater than 0.76), with mean values of 2294 +/- 199, 2191 +/- 180, and 2243 +/- 291 mL, respectively. The standard deviations of the differences were small: 134 mL for 52Cr versus 51Cr and 183 mL for 52Cr versus 125I.

  8. Biosignatures of Kerala red rain cells: Implications in understanding their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, R.; Thomas, M.; Hogg, S.

    2013-09-01

    The red rain that fell over Kerala, southern India (2001-2012) was characterised by the red pigmented particles. Earlier proposal claiming that these are known algal bloom blown from trees (Sampath et al, 2001; DiGregorio, 2007) has been studied by us and disproved. Also, further investigation reporting their extraordinary properties including a suggestion that they lack DNA (Louis and Kumar 2003; 2006; 2008) has been invalidated (Gangappa and Hogg, 2013). However, their claim regarding the growth and replication of these cells at 300ºC needs more