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Sample records for red galactic agb

  1. Sodium abundances of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic globular clusters. I. Analysis and results of NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Galactic globular clusters (GC) are known to have multiple stellar populations and be characterised by similar chemical features, e.g. O-Na anti-correlation. While second-population stars, identified by their Na overabundance, have been found from the main sequence turn-off up to the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) in various Galactic GCs, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars have rarely been targeted. The recent finding that NGC 6752 lacks an Na-rich AGB star has thus triggered new studies on AGB stars in GCs, since this result questions our basic understanding of GC formation and stellar evolution theory. Aims: We aim to compare the Na abundance distributions of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic GCs and investigate whether the presence of Na-rich stars on the AGB is metallicity-dependent. Methods: With high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object high-resolution spectrograph FLAMES on ESO/VLT, we derived accurate Na abundances for 31 AGB and 40 RGB stars in the Galactic GC NGC 2808. Results: We find that NGC 2808 has a mean metallicity of -1.11 ± 0.08 dex, in good agreement with earlier analyses. Comparable Na abundance dispersions are derived for our AGB and RGB samples, with the AGB stars being slightly more concentrated than the RGB stars. The ratios of Na-poor first-population to Na-rich second-population stars are 45:55 in the AGB sample and 48:52 in the RGB sample. Conclusions: NGC 2808 has Na-rich second-population AGB stars, which turn out to be even more numerous - in relative terms - than their Na-poor AGB counterparts and the Na-rich stars on the RGB. Our findings are well reproduced by the fast rotating massive stars scenario and they do not contradict the recent results that there is not an Na-rich AGB star in NGC 6752. NGC 2808 thus joins the larger group of Galactic GCs for which Na-rich second-population stars on the AGB have recently been found. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory

  2. A Spitzer/IRAC characterization of Galactic AGB and RSG stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Marengo, Massimo; Hora, Joseph L.; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2015-03-01

    We present new Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) observations of 55 dusty long-period variables (48 asymptotic giant branch, AGB, and 6 red supergiant stars) in the Galaxy that have different chemistry, variability type, and mass-loss rate. O-rich AGB stars (including intrinsic S-type) tend to have redder [3.6]-[8.0] colours than carbon stars for a given [3.6]-[4.5] colour due to silicate features increasing the flux in the 8.0-μm IRAC band. For colours including the 5.8 μm band, carbon stars separate into two distinct sequences, likely due to a variable photospheric C3 feature that is only visible in relatively unobscured, low mass-loss rate sources. Semiregular variables tend to have smaller infrared (IR) excess in [3.6]-[8.0] colour than Miras, consistent with the hypothesis that semiregular variables lose mass discontinuously. Miras have redder colours for longer periods while semiregular variables do not. Galactic AGB stars follow the period-luminosity sequences found for the Magellanic Clouds. Mira variables fall along the fundamental pulsation sequence, while semiregular variables are mostly on overtone sequences. We also derive a relationship between mass-loss rate and [3.6]-[8.0] colour. The fits are similar in shape to those found by other authors for AGBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, but discrepant in overall normalization, likely due to different assumptions in the models used to derive mass-loss rates. We find that IR colours are not unique discriminators of chemical type, suggesting caution when using colour selection techniques to infer the chemical composition of AGB dust returned to the interstellar medium.

  3. Galactic mass-losing AGB stars probed with the IRTS. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bertre, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2003-06-01

    We are using the 2002 data-release from the Japanese space experiment IRTS to investigate the spatial distribution of galactic mass-losing (>2x 10-8 Msund) AGB stars and the relative contribution of C-rich and O-rich ones to the replenishment of the ISM. Our sample contains 126 C-rich and 563 O-rich sources which are sorted on the basis of the molecular bands observed in the range 1.4-4.0 mu m, and for which we estimate distances and mass loss rates from near-infrared photometry (K and L'). There is a clear dependence on galactocentric distance, with O-rich sources outnumbering C-rich ones for rGC< 8 kpc, and the reverse for rGC> 10 kpc. The contribution to the replenishment of the ISM by O-rich AGB stars relative to C-rich ones follows the same trend. Although they are rare ( ~ 10% in our sample), sources with 10-6 Msund < dot {M} < 10-5 Msund dominate the replenishment of the ISM by contributing to ~ 50% of the total of the complete sample. We find 2 carbon stars at more than 1 kpc from the Galactic Plane, that probably belong to the halo of our Galaxy. The complete Tables \\ref{tab_C-rich} and \\ref{tab_O-rich} are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/943}

  4. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Wood, P. R.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Schultheis, M.; Ryde, N.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, 12C/13C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to Teff ≈ 3100 K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly subsolar mean metallicity and only few stars with supersolar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O < 1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.

  5. A Luminous Yellow Post-AGB Star in the Galactic Globular Cluster M79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Siegel, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of a luminous F-type post-asymptotic-giant-branch (PAGB) star in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M79 (NGC 1904). At visual apparent and absolute magnitudes of V=12.20 and {M}V=-3.46, this “yellow” PAGB star is by a small margin the visually brightest star known in any GC. It was identified using CCD observations in the uBVI photometric system, which is optimized to detect stars with large Balmer discontinuities, indicative of very low surface gravities. Follow-up observations with the SMARTS 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes show that the star is not variable in light or radial velocity, and that its velocity is consistent with cluster membership. Near- and mid-infrared observations with 2MASS and WISE show no evidence for circumstellar dust. We argue that a sharp upper limit to the luminosity function exists for yellow PAGB stars in old populations, making them excellent candidates for Population II standard candles, which are four magnitudes brighter than RR Lyrae variables. Their luminosities are consistent with the stars being in a PAGB evolutionary phase, with core masses of ˜ 0.53 {M}⊙ . We also detected four very hot stars lying above the horizontal branch (“AGB-manqué” stars); along with the PAGB star, they are the brightest objects in M79 in the near-ultraviolet. In the Appendix, we give periods and light curves for five variables in M79: three RR Lyrae stars, a Type II Cepheid, and a semiregular variable. Based in part on observations with the 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory.

  6. Evidence of AGB Pollution in Galactic Globular Clusters from the Mg-Al Anticorrelations Observed by the APOGEE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.; D'Antona, F.; Mészáros, Sz.; Lucatello, S.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Shetrone, M.; Tailo, M.; Tang, Baitian; Zamora, O.

    2016-11-01

    We study the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters (GCs), under the hypothesis that stars in the second generation formed from the winds of intermediate-mass stars, ejected during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, possibly diluted with pristine gas, sharing the same chemical composition of first-generation stars. To this aim, we use the recent Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) data, which provide the surface chemistry of a large sample of giant stars, belonging to clusters that span a wide metallicity range. The APOGEE data set is particularly suitable to discriminate among the various pollution scenarios proposed so far, as it provides the surface abundances of Mg and Al, the two elements involved in a nuclear channel extremely sensitive to the temperature, hence to the metallicity of the polluters. The present analysis shows a remarkable agreement between the observations and the theoretical yields from massive AGB stars. In particular, the observed extension of the depletion of Mg and O and the increase in Al is well reproduced by the models and the trend with the metallicity is also fully accounted for. This study further supports the idea that AGB stars were the key players in the pollution of the intra-cluster medium, from which additional generations of stars formed in GCs.

  7. Detailed homogeneous abundance studies of 14 Galactic s-process enriched post-AGB stars: In search of lead (Pb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Karakas, A. I.; Manick, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of Galactic and extragalactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The goal at large is to provide improved observational constraints to the models of the complex interplay between the AGB s-process nucleosynthesis and the associated mixing processes. Aims: Lead (Pb) is the final product of the s-process nucleosynthesis and is predicted to have large overabundances with respect to other s-process elements in AGB stars of low metallicities. However, Pb abundance studies of s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds show a discrepancy between observed and predicted Pb abundances. The determined upper limits based on spectral studies are much lower than what is predicted. In this paper, we focus specifically on the Pb abundance of 14 Galactic s-process enhanced post-AGB stars to check whether the same discrepancy is present in the Galaxy as well. Among these 14 objects, two were not yet subject to a detailed abundance study in the literature. We apply the same method to obtain accurate abundances for the 12 others. Our homogeneous abundance results provide the input of detailed spectral synthesis computations in the spectral regions where Pb lines are located. Methods: We used high-resolution UVES and HERMES spectra for detailed spectral abundance studies of our sample of Galactic post-AGB stars. None of the sample stars display clear Pb lines, and we only deduced upper limits of the Pb abundance by using spectrum synthesis in the spectral ranges of the strongest Pb lines. Results: We do not find any clear evidence of Pb overabundances in our sample. The derived upper limits are strongly correlated with the effective temperature of the stars with increasing upper limits for increasing effective temperatures. We obtain stronger Pb constraints on the cooler objects. Moreover, we confirm the s-process enrichment and carbon enhancement of two

  8. Luminosities and mass-loss rates of SMC and LMC AGB stars and red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Sloan, G. C.; Soszyński, I.; Petersen, E. A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Mass loss is one of the fundamental properties of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, and through the enrichment of the interstellar medium, AGB stars are key players in the life cycle of dust and gas in the universe. However, a quantitative understanding of the mass-loss process is still largely lacking, particularly its dependence on metallicity. Aims: To investigate the relation between mass loss, luminosity and pulsation period for a large sample of evolved stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: Dust radiative transfer models are presented for 101 carbon stars and 86 oxygen-rich evolved stars in the Magellanic Clouds for which 5-35 μm Spitzer IRS spectra are available. The spectra are complemented with available optical and infrared photometry to construct the spectral energy distribution. A minimisation procedure is used to fit luminosity, mass-loss rate and dust temperature at the inner radius. Different effective temperatures and dust content are also considered. Periods from the literature and from new OGLE-III data are compiled and derived. Results: We derive (dust) mass-loss rates and luminosities for the entire sample. Based on luminosities, periods and amplitudes and colours, the O-rich stars are classified as foreground objects, AGB stars and Red Super Giants. For the O-rich stars silicates based on laboratory optical constants are compared to “astronomical silicates”. Overall, the grain type by Volk & Kwok (1988, ApJ, 331, 435) fits the data best. However, the fit based on laboratory optical constants for the grains can be improved by abandoning the small-particle limit. The influence of grain size, core-mantle grains and porosity are explored. A computationally convenient method that seems to describe the observed properties in the 10 μm window are a distribution of hollow spheres with a large vacuum fraction (typically 70%), and grain size of about 1 μm. Relations between mass-loss rates and luminosity and pulsation

  9. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Red horizontal-branch stars in the galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    A class of red horizontal-branch (RHB) stars, similar to those in the "metal-rich" globular cluster M71, has been identified in the Galactic disk, using a quantitative three-dimensional spectral classification system developed earlier (Rose 1984) that uses 2.5-Å resolution spectra in the blue. A prototype for this class is the G5 III star HD 79452, which has been found by Helfer and Wallerstein (1968) to have [Fe/H] = -0.85 and MV = +1. The RHB stars are shown to be evolved stars on the basis of the strength of their Sr II λ4077 line, and are distinguished from post-main-sequence stars evolving through the same region of the HR diagram because of the unique appearance of their CN λ3883 and λ4216 bands. A preliminary estimate has been made of their space density, scale height perpendicular to the Galactic plane, and kinematics by surveying G5 - G7 stars in the Upgren (1962) North Galactic Pole survey.

  11. AGB sodium abundances in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert A. E-mail: iain.mcdonald-2@manchester.ac.uk; and others

    2015-02-01

    A recent analysis comparing the [Na/Fe] distributions of red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6752 found that the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars changes from 30:70 on the RGB to 100:0 on the AGB. The surprising paucity of Na-rich stars on the AGB in NGC 6752 warrants additional investigations to determine if the failure of a significant fraction of stars to ascend the AGB is an attribute common to all globular clusters. Therefore, we present radial velocities, [Fe/H], and [Na/Fe] abundances for 35 AGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc; NGC 104), and compare the AGB [Na/Fe] distribution with a similar RGB sample published previously. The abundances and velocities were derived from high-resolution spectra obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan–Clay 6.5 m telescope. We find the average heliocentric radial velocity and [Fe/H] values to be 〈RV{sub helio.}〉 = −18.56 km s{sup −1} (σ = 10.21 km s{sup −1}) and 〈[Fe/H]〉 = −0.68 (σ = 0.08), respectively, in agreement with previous literature estimates. The average [Na/Fe] abundance is 0.12 dex lower in the 47 Tuc AGB sample compared to the RGB sample, and the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars is 63:37 on the AGB and 45:55 on the RGB. However, in contrast to NGC 6752, the two 47 Tuc populations have nearly identical [Na/Fe] dispersion and interquartile range values. The data presented here suggest that only a small fraction (≲20%) of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc may fail to ascend the AGB, which is a similar result to that observed in M13. Regardless of the cause for the lower average [Na/Fe] abundance in AGB stars, we find that Na-poor stars and at least some Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc evolve through the early AGB phase. The contrasting behavior of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc and NGC 6752 suggests that the RGB [Na/Fe] abundance alone is insufficient for predicting if a star will

  12. Millimeter and some near infra-red observations of short-period Miras and other AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Baas, F.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Stehle, R.; Josselin, E.; Tilanus, R. P. J.

    1999-12-01

    Millimeter observations of 48 oxygen- and 20 carbon-rich AGB Miras with periods shorter than 400 days are presented. In addition, observations of 14 O-rich and 15 C-stars with longer, or no known, periods have also been obtained. The detection statistics is as follows: in 12CO J=1-0 and 2-1 we observed 97 stars, and detected 66 in at least one line. We find 24 new detections in the 1-0 line, 38 new detections in the 2-1 line, and 29 stars have been detected for the first time in one or both lines. In 12CO J=3-2 we observed 14 stars and detected 11, with 4 new detections. In 13CO J=2-1, 3-2 we observed 2 stars and had one new detection. In HCN(1-0) we observed 5 carbon stars and detected 3, one new. In SO(6_5-5_4) we observed the same 5 stars and detected none. In CS(3-2) we observed 8 carbon stars and detected 3, all new. In SiO(3-2, v=0) we observed 34 O-rich stars and detected 25, all new except one. Near-infrared JHK photometry is presented for seven stars. For four stars it is the first NIR data published. The luminosity and dust mass loss rate are obtained for seven very red stars with unknown pulsation period from modelling the spectral energy distribution (SED) and IRAS LRS spectra. Thereby, a new IR supergiant is confirmed (AFGL 2968). For the rest of the sample, luminosity and distance are obtained in a variety of ways: using hipparcos parallaxes, period-luminosity and period-M_K-relations combined with apparent K magnitudes, and kinematic distances. The dust mass loss rate is obtained from model fitting of the SED (either from the literature, or presented in the present paper), or from the observed IRAS 60 mu m flux, corrected for the photospheric contribution. The gas mass loss rate is derived from the observed CO line intensities, as presented here, combined with existing literature data, if any. This allows the derivation of the dust-to-gas ratio. Our and literature CO J = 3-2 data has been used to calibrate the relation between mass loss rate and peak

  13. Using red clump stars to decompose the galactic magnetic field with distance

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  14. The Rb problem in massive AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Zamora, O.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2017-03-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is formed by low- and intermediate-mass stars (0.8 M_{⊙} < M < 8 M_{⊙}) in their last nuclear-burning phase, when they develop thermal pulses (TP) and suffer extreme mass loss. AGB stars are the main contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. In particular, the more massive AGB stars (M > 4 M_{⊙}) are expected to produce light (e.g., Li, N) and heavy neutron-rich s-process elements (such as Rb, Zr, Ba, Y, etc.), which are not formed in lower mass AGB stars and Supernova explosions. Classical chemical analyses using hydrostatic atmospheres revealed strong Rb overabundances and high [Rb/Zr] ratios in massive AGB stars of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds (MC), confirming for the first time that the ^{22}Ne neutron source dominates the production of s-process elements in these stars. The extremely high Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios observed in the most massive stars (specially in the low-metallicity MC stars) uncovered a Rb problem; such extreme Rb and [Rb/Zr] values are not predicted by the s-process AGB models, suggesting fundamental problems in our present understanding of their atmospheres. We present more realistic dynamical model atmospheres that consider a gaseous circumstellar envelope with a radial wind and we re-derive the Rb (and Zr) abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars. The new Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios derived with these dynamical models significantly resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the theoretical predictions of the more massive AGB stars.

  15. Galactic archaeology with asteroseismology and spectroscopy: Red giants observed by CoRoT and APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, F.; Chiappini, C.; Rodrigues, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Mosser, B.; Girardi, L.; Valentini, M.; Noels, A.; Morel, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Schultheis, M.; Baudin, F.; de Assis Peralta, R.; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.; Kallinger, T.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.; Baglin, A.; Santiago, B. X.; Martig, M.; Minchev, I.; Steinmetz, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Cunha, K.; Beers, T. C.; Epstein, C.; García Pérez, A. E.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Majewski, S. R.; Mészáros, Sz.; Nidever, D.; Pan, K.; Pinsonneault, M.; Schiavon, R. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Stassun, K.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, G.

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has recently become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and relative ages for large samples of red giant stars. We present the CoRoGEE dataset, obtained from CoRoT light curves for 606 red giants in two fields of the Galactic disc that have been co-observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of ≲2% in distance, 4% in radius, 9% in mass and 25% in age. We also assessed systematic age uncertainties stemming from different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a broad radial range of the Milky Way disc (5 kpc Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of pure chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the solar neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemodynamical Milky Way disc model indicate that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also show that the age distribution of the [α/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick-disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies. Our results are subject to future improvements due to (a) the still low statistics, because our sample had to be

  16. A new tool for post-AGB SED classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjoya, P.; Suarez, O.; Galluccio, L.; Michel, O.

    We present the results of an unsupervised classification method applied on a set of 344 spectral energy distributions (SED) of post-AGB stars extracted from the Torun catalogue of Galactic post-AGB stars. This method aims to find a new unbiased method for post-AGB star classification based on the information contained in the IR region of the SED (fluxes, IR excess, colours). We used the data from IRAS and MSX satellites, and from the 2MASS survey. We applied a classification method based on the construction of the dataset of a minimal spanning tree (MST) with the Prim's algorithm. In order to build this tree, different metrics have been tested on both flux and color indices. Our method is able to classify the set of 344 post-AGB stars in 9 distinct groups according to their SEDs.

  17. Detached Red Giant Eclipsing Binary Twins: Rosetta Stones to the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, D. M.; Gould, A.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    We identify 34 highly-probable detached, red giant eclipsing binary pairs among 315 candidates in Devor's catalog of ≍10 000 OGLE-II eclipsing binaries. We estimate that there should be at least 200 such systems in OGLE-III. We show that spectroscopic measurements of the metallicities and radial-velocity-derived masses of these systems would independently constrain both the age-metallicity and helium-metallicity relations of the Galactic bulge, potentially breaking the age-helium degeneracy that currently limits our ability to characterize the bulge stellar population. Mass and metallicity measurements alone would be sufficient to immediately validate or falsify recent claims about the age and helium abundance of the bulge. A spectroscopic survey of these systems would constrain models of Milky Way assembly, as well as provide significant auxiliary science on research questions such as mass loss on the red giant branch. We discuss the theoretical uncertainties in stellar evolution models that would need to be accounted for to maximize the scientific yield.

  18. The Origin of the Split Red Clump in the Galactic Bulge of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, M.; Freeman, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Wylie-De-Boer, E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Lewis, G. F.; Yong, D.; Asplund, M.; Lane, R. R.; Kiss, L. L.; Ibata, R.

    2012-09-01

    Near the minor axis of the Galactic bulge, at latitudes b < -5°, the red giant clump stars are split into two components along the line of sight. We investigate this split using the three fields from the ARGOS survey that lie on the minor axis at (l, b) = (0°, -5°), (0°, -7fdg5), (0°, -10°). The separation is evident for stars with [Fe/H] > - 0.5 in the two higher-latitude fields, but not in the field at b = -5°. Stars with [Fe/H] < - 0.5 do not show the split. We compare the spatial distribution and kinematics of the clump stars with predictions from an evolutionary N-body model of a bulge that grew from a disk via bar-related instabilities. The density distribution of the peanut-shaped model is depressed near its minor axis. This produces a bimodal distribution of stars along the line of sight through the bulge near its minor axis, very much as seen in our observations. The observed and modeled kinematics of the two groups of stars are also similar. We conclude that the split red clump of the bulge is probably a generic feature of boxy/peanut bulges that grew from disks, and that the disk from which the bulge grew had relatively few stars with [Fe/H] < - 0.5.

  19. Wet disc contraction to galactic blue nuggets and quenching to red nuggets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, A.; Burkert, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the origin of high-redshift, compact, quenched spheroids (red nuggets) through the dissipative shrinkage of gaseous discs into compact star-forming systems (blue nuggets). The discs, fed by cold streams, undergo violent disc instability that drives gas into the centre (along with mergers). The inflow is dissipative when its time-scale is shorter than the star formation time-scale. This implies a threshold of ˜0.28 in the cold-to-total mass ratio within the disc radius. For the typical gas fraction ˜0.5 at z ˜ 2, this threshold is traced back to a maximum spin parameter of ˜0.05, implying that ˜half the star-forming galaxies contract to blue nuggets, while the rest form extended stellar discs. Thus, the surface density of blue galaxies is expected to be bimodal about ˜109 M⊙ kpc-2, slightly increasing with mass. The blue nuggets are expected to be rare at low z when the gas fraction is low. The blue nuggets quench to red nuggets by complementary internal and external mechanisms. Internal quenching by a compact bulge, in a fast mode and especially at high z, may involve starbursts, stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback, or Q-quenching. Quenching due to hot-medium haloes above 1012 M⊙ provides maintenance and a slower mode at low redshift. These predictions are confirmed in simulations and are consistent with observations at z = 0-3.

  20. Evolution models from the AGB to the PNe and the rapid evolution of SAO 244567

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawlor, Timothy M.; Sebzda, Steven; Peterson, Zach

    2015-08-01

    We present evolution calculations from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to the Planetary Nebula (PNe) phase for models of mass 1 M⊙ over a range of metallicities from primordial, Z = 10-14, through near solar, Z = 0.02. Using our grid of models, we determine a central star mass dependence on initial metallicity. We also present a range of low masses for our low to very low metal models. The understanding of these objects is an important part of galactic evolution and the evolution of the composition of the universe over a broad range of red shits. For our low Z models, we find key differences in how they cross the HR diagram to the PNe phase, compared with models with higher initial Z. Some of our models experience the so called AGB Final Thermal Pulse (AFTP), which is a helium pulse that occurs while leaving the AGB and causes a rapid looping evolution while evolving between the AGB and PN phase. We use these models to make comparisons to the central star of the Stingray Nebula, SAO 244567. This object has been observed to be rapidly evolving (heating) over more than the last 50 years and is the central star of the youngest known planetary nebula. These two characteristics are similar to what is expected for AFTP models. It is a short lived phase that is related to, but different than, very late thermal pulse objects such as Sakurai’s Object, FG Sge, and V605 Aql. These objects experienced a similar thermal pulse, but later on the white dwarf cooling track.

  1. Can Star-Disk Collisions Explain the Missing Red Giants Problem in the Galactic Center?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Kieffer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Observations have revealed a relative paucity of red giant (RG) stars within the central 0.5 pc in the Galactic Center (GC). Motivated by this finding we investigate the hypothesis that collisions of stars with a fragmenting accretion disk are responsible for the observed dearth of evolved stars. We use 3D hydrodynamic simulations to model a star with radius 10 R⊙ and mass 1 M⊙, representative of the missing population of RGs, colliding with high density clumps. We find that multiple collisions with clumps of relatively high column density ≥108 g cm-2 can strip a substantial fraction of the star’s envelope and in principle render it invisible to observations. Because the envelope is unbound on account of the kinetic energy of the star, any significant amount of stripping of the RG population in the GC should be mirrored by a systematic decay of their orbits and possibly by their enhanced rotational velocity. To be viable, this scenario requires that the total mass of the fragmenting disk has been substantial and several orders of magnitude higher than that of the early-type stars which now form the stellar disk in the GC.

  2. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V.

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no

  3. Out on a Limb: Updates on the Search for X-ray Emission from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo; Ramstedt, Sofia; Santiago-Boyd, Andrea; Kastner, Joel; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    X-rays from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are rarely detected, however, few modern X-ray observatories have targeted AGB stars. In 2012, we searched a list of 480 galactic AGB stars and found a total of 13 targeted or serendipitous observations with few detections (Ramstedt et al. 2012). Since this initial search new programs have successfully targeted and detected X-ray emission from a handful of AGB stars. The X-ray emission, when detected, reveals high temperature plasma (>= 10 MK). This plasma might be heated by a large-scale magnetic field or indicate the presence of accretion onto a compact companion. In this poster, we update our search for X-ray emission from AGB stars with a review of their characteristics, potential origins, and impact of X-ray emission in this late stage of stellar evolution.

  4. Clear Evidence for the Presence of Second-generation Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Mészáros, Sz.; Monelli, M.; Cassisi, S.; Stetson, P. B.; Zamora, O.; Shetrone, M.; Lucatello, S.

    2015-12-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are known to host multiple stellar populations: a first generation (FG) with a chemical pattern typical of halo field stars and a second generation (SG) enriched in Na and Al and depleted in O and Mg. Both stellar generations are found at different evolutionary stages (e.g., the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB)). The non detection of SG asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in several metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs suggests that not all SG stars ascend the AGB phase, and that failed AGB stars may be very common in metal-poor GCs. This observation represents a serious problem for stellar evolution and GC formation/evolution theories. We report fourteen SG-AGB stars in four metal-poor GCs (M13, M5, M3, and M2) with different observational properties: horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. By combining the H-band Al abundances obtained by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey with ground-based optical photometry, we identify SG Al-rich AGB stars in these four GCs and show that Al-rich RGB/AGB GC stars should be Na-rich. Our observations provide strong support for present, standard stellar models, i.e., without including a strong mass-loss efficiency, for low-mass HB stars. In fact, current empirical evidence is in agreement with the predicted distribution of FG and SG stars during the He-burning stages based on these standard stellar models.

  5. The role of AGB stars feedback in sustaining galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th.; Khosroshahi, H.

    We have conducted a near-infrared monitoring campaign at the UK InfraRed Telescope, of the Local Group spiral galaxy M 33. The main aim was to identify stars in the very final stage of their evolution, and for which the luminosity is more directly related to the birth mass than the more numerous less-evolved giant stars that continue to increase in luminosity. In first instance, only the central square kiloparsec were monitored and analysed, with the UIST camera. Photometry was obtained for 18,398 stars; of these 812 stars were found to be variable, most of which are asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We constructed the birth mass function and hence derived the star formation history. These stars are also important dust factories. We measure their dust production rates from a combination of our data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-IR photometry. The mass loss rates are seen to increase with increasing strength of pulsation and with increasing bolometric luminosity. We construct a 2D map of the mass return rate, showing a radial decline but also local enhancements due to the concentration of red supergiants. We conclude that star formation in the central region of M 33 can only be sustained if gas is accreted from further out in the disc or from circum-galactic regions. By using data of the wide-field camera (WFCAM), the campaign was expanded to cover two orders of magnitude larger area, comprising the disc of M 33 and its spiral arms. Photometry was obtained for 403,734 stars; of these 4643 stars were found to be variable. We here present the star formation history across the disc of M 33.

  6. CEMP-s Stars: AGB Yield Predictions and Thermohaline Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Straniero, O.; Ivans, I. I.; Preston, G. W.; Aoki, W.

    2008-03-01

    CS 29497-030 and CS 31062-050 belong to a sample of C-rich, s-process rich and extremely metal-poor stars (CEMP-s+r). To explain the s-process enrichment, we considered these stars to be extrinsic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, belonging to binary systems where the more massive AGB companion polluted the observed star (of ~0.8 Msolar) with efficient stellar winds. To explain the r-process enrichment, we assumed that the parental cloud was already enriched in r-process elements. For the main sequence CS 29497-030 we hypothesize that the primary AGB had an initial mass of ~1.3 Msolar and underwent a very limited number of third dredge up episodes. A very small dilution between AGB winds and envelope mass of the observed star is derived by comparing AGB nucleosynthesis yields and observed abundances, consistent with the fact that dwarf stars of ~0.8 Msolar are characterized by a limited subphotospheric convective zone. This is compatible with moderate thermohaline mixing (e.g., [l]). AGB models of higher initial mass undergo an increasing number of third dredge up (TDU) episodes and produce larger carbon and s-process abundances at the surface. For AGB models of 1.5 Msolar and 2 Msolar a good match with the observed s-process abundance distribution can still be found, provided a dilution factor of 0.5 dex or 0.8 dex is applied. The predicted yields of Na and Mg, which are extremely sensitive to the number of thermal pulses, however, would be much higher than observed. CS 31062-050 is a red subgiant that has likely undergone the first dredge up episode, where the convective envelope extends over about 80% of the stellar mass, erasing any effect of thermohaline mixing. The ~1.3 Msolar AGB model will fit the observed elemental distribution, but will only be compatible with a quite large amount of mass accreted by the AGB donor. For this star, AGB models of 1.5 Msolar to 2 Msolar and dilution factors of 1.0 dex to 1.3 dex may be more appropriate, including the

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Torun catalog of post-AGB and related objects (Szczerba+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, R.; Siodmiak, N.; Stasinska, G.; Borkowski, J.

    2007-09-01

    With the ongoing AKARI infrared sky survey, of much greater sensitivity than IRAS, a wealth of post-AGB objects may be discovered. It is thus time to organize our present knowledge of known post-AGB stars in the galaxy with a view to using it to search for new post-AGB objects among AKARI sources. We searched the literature available on the NASA Astrophysics Data System up to 1 October 2006, and defined criteria for classifying sources into three categories: very likely, possible and disqualified post-AGB objects. The category of very likely post-AGB objects is made up of several classes. We have created an evolutionary, on-line catalogue of Galactic post-AGB objects, to be referred to as the Torun catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects. The present version of the catalogue contains 326 very likely, 107 possible and 64 disqualified objects. For the very likely post-AGB objects, the catalogue gives the available optical and infrared photometry, infrared spectroscopy and spectral types, and links to finding charts and bibliography. (3 data files).

  8. TP-AGB Stars in M31: Results from PHAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, L.; Beerman, L. C.; Boyer, M. L.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Dolphin, A.; Fouesnaeu, M.; Hamren, K.; Johnson, L. C.; Lang, D.; Lewis, A.; Marigo, P.; Rosenfield, P.; Senchyna, P.; Seth, A. C.; Veyette, M.; Weisz, D. R.; Williams, B. F.

    2015-08-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program that mapped one-third of M31 from the UV through the near-IR. It provides photometry in up to 6 filters for about 117 million stars distributed across ˜20 kpc of the M31 disk, with a spatial resolution comparable to that routinely attained for the Magellanic Clouds from the ground. These data are revolutionising our view of the spatial distribution of stars and dust across M31. Here we present an overview of PHAT data and results, with a focus on the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars. We comment on (1) the overall spatial distribution of TP-AGB stars as compared to stars of the red giant branch (RGB); (2) the detection of a dramatic drop in the C/M ratio toward the inner M31 disk; (3) the large population of TP-AGB stars in star clusters; (4) an improved view of the planetary nebula population; and (5) the unusual populations of UV-bright stars in the M31 bulge, which correspond to either post-AGB or "failed-AGB” stars. These rich datasets allow us to test the evolution of TP-AGB stars in a metal-rich and star-forming environment, avoiding the incompleteness and distance uncertainties that severely limit similar studies in the Milky Way.

  9. The wind speeds, dust content, and mass-loss rates of evolved AGB and RSG stars at varying metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steven R.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Green, James A.; Wood, Peter R.; Nanni, Ambra; Imai, Hiroshi; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Gómez, José F.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of our survey of 1612-MHz circumstellar OH maser emission from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have discovered four new circumstellar maser sources in the LMC, and increased the number of reliable wind speeds from infrared (IR) stars in the LMC from 5 to 13. Using our new wind speeds, as well as those from Galactic sources, we have derived an updated relation for dust-driven winds: vexp ∝ ZL0.4. We compare the subsolar metallicity LMC OH/IR stars with carefully selected samples of more metal-rich OH/IR stars, also at known distances, in the Galactic Centre and Galactic bulge. We derive pulsation periods for eight of the bulge stars for the first time by using near-IR photometry from the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea survey. We have modelled our LMC OH/IR stars and developed an empirical method of deriving gas-to-dust ratios and mass-loss rates by scaling the models to the results from maser profiles. We have done this also for samples in the Galactic Centre and bulge and derived a new mass-loss prescription which includes luminosity, pulsation period, and gas-to-dust ratio dot{M} = 1.06^{+3.5}_{-0.8} × }10^{-5 (L/10^4 L_{⊙})^{0.9± 0.1}(P/500 {d})^{0.75± 0.3} (r_gd/200)^{-0.03± 0.07} M⊙ yr-1. The tightest correlation is found between mass-loss rate and luminosity. We find that the gas-to-dust ratio has little effect on the mass-loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs within the Galaxy and the LMC. This suggests that the mass-loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs is (nearly) independent of metallicity between a half and twice solar.

  10. AGB Connection and Ultraviolet Luminosity Excess in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, Alberto; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.

    2008-10-01

    Relying on infrared surface brightness fluctuactions to trace AGB properties in a sample of elliptical galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters, we assess the puzzling origin of the ``UV upturn'' phenomenon, recently traced to the presence of a hot horizontal branch (HB) stellar component. The UV upturn actually signals a profound change in the galaxy stellar populations, involving both the hot stellar component and red giant evolution. In particular, the strengthening of the UV rising branch is always seen to correspond to a shortening in AGB deployment; this trend can be readily interpreted as an age effect, perhaps mildly modulated by metal abundance. Brightest stars in ellipticals are all found to be genuine AGB members, all the way, and with the AGB tip exceeding the RGB tip by some 0.5-1.5 mag. The inferred core mass of these stars is found to be lesssim0.57 M⊙ among giant ellipticals. This value accounts for the recognized deficiency of planetary nebulae in these galaxies, as a result of a lengthy transition time for the post-AGB stellar core to become a hard UV emitter and eventually ``fire up'' the nebula. The combined study of galaxy (1550 - V)0 color and integrated Hβ index points to a a bimodal temperature distribution for the HB with both a red clump and an extremely blue component, in a relative proportion [N(RHB) : N(BHB)] ~ [80 : 20]. For the BHB stellar population, [Fe/H] values of either simeq-0.7 or gtrsim+0.5 dex may provide the optimum ranges to feed the needed low-mass stars (M*ll 0.58 M⊙) that at some stage begin to join the standard red clump stars.

  11. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS, INTEGRATED RED GIANT BRANCH MASS LOSS, AND DUST PRODUCTION IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Whitney, B.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Misselt, K.

    2011-04-01

    Fundamental parameters and time evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as d = 4611{sup +213}{sub -200} pc and age as 12 {+-} 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more red giant branch mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more metal-poor {omega} Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of {approx}1000 L{sub sun}, becoming ubiquitous above L = 2000 L{sub sun}. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.

  12. THE FRAGMENTING PAST OF THE DISK AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE CULPRIT FOR THE MISSING RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Chen, Xian E-mail: Xian.Chen@aei.mpg.de

    2014-01-20

    Since 1996 we have known that the Galactic Center (GC) displays a core-like distribution of red giant branch (RGB) stars starting at ∼10'', which poses a theoretical problem because the GC should have formed a segregated cusp of old stars. This issue has been addressed invoking stellar collisions, massive black hole binaries, and infalling star clusters, which can explain it to some extent. Another observational fact, key to the work presented here, is the presence of a stellar disk at the GC. We postulate that the reason for the missing stars in the RGB is closely intertwined with the disk formation process, which initially was gaseous and went through a fragmentation phase to form the stars. Using simple analytical estimates, we prove that during fragmentation the disk developed regions with densities much higher than a homogeneous gaseous disk, i.e., ''clumps'', which were optically thick, and hence contracted slowly. Stars in the GC interacted with them and in the case of RGB stars, the clumps were dense enough to totally remove their outer envelopes after a relatively low number of impacts. Giant stars in the horizontal branch (HB), however, have much denser envelopes. Hence, the fragmentation phase of the disk must have had a lower impact on their distribution, because it was more difficult to remove their envelopes. We predict that future deeper observations of the GC should reveal less depletion of HB stars and that the released dense cores of RGB stars will still be populating the GC.

  13. Post-AGB Evolution Much Faster Than Previously Phought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesicki, K.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    For 32 central stars of PNe we present their parameters interpolated among new evolutionary sequences. The derived stellar final masses are confined between 0.53 and 0.58 M⊙ in good agreement with the peak in the white dwarf mass distribution. Consequently, the inferred star formation history of the Galactic bulge is well restricted between 3 and 11 Gyr and is compatible with other published studies. The new evolutionary tracks proved very good as a tool for analysis of late stages of stars life. The results provide a compelling confirmation of the accelerated post-AGB evolution.

  14. A Complete Sample of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W.; Moehler, S.; Napiwotzki, R.; Heber, U.; Sweigart, A.; Catelan, M.; Stecher, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of globular clusters are often dominated by one or two "UV-bright" stars. The most luminous of these are believed to be post-AGB stars, which go through a luminous UV-bright phase as they leave the AGB and move rapidly across the HR diagram toward their final white dwarf state. During the two flights of the ASTRO observatory in 1990 and 1995, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT, Stecher 1997, PASP, 109, 584) was used to obtained ultraviolet (1600 A) images of 14 globular clusters. These images provide a complete census of hot (> 8000 K) post-AGB stars in the observed globular clusters, because the 40' field of view of UIT is large enough to image the entire population of most Galactic globulars, and because the dominant cool star population is suppressed in ultraviolet images, allowing UV-bright stars to be detected into the cluster core. We have begun a program of optical and STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy to determine the fundamental stellar parameters (\\log L, T_eff, \\log g) of all the hot post-AGB candidates discovered on the UIT images. Among the goals of our program are to test theoretical post-AGB lifetimes across the HR diagram, and to estimate the mass of the currently forming white dwarfs in globular clusters. Two trends are already apparent in our survey. First, the UV-selected sample has removed a bias against the detection of the hottest post-AGB stars, and resulted in the discovery of five cluster post-AGB stars with Teff > 50,000 K. Second, most of the new discoveries have been lower luminosity (2.5 $<$\\log L $<$ 3.0) than expected for stars which leave the AGB during the thermally pulsating phase.

  15. The optically bright post-AGB population of the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aarle, E.; van Winckel, H.; Lloyd Evans, T.; Ueta, T.; Wood, P. R.; Ginsburg, A. G.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The detected variety in chemistry and circumstellar shell morphology of the limited sample of Galactic post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is so large that there is no consensus yet on how the different objects are linked by evolutionary channels. The evaluation is complicated by the fact that their distances and hence luminosities remain largely unknown. Aims: We construct a catalogue of the optically bright post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The sample forms an ideal testbed for stellar evolution theory predictions of the final phase of low- and intermediate-mass stars, because the distance and hence luminosity and also the current and initial mass of these objects is well constrained. Methods: Via cross-correlation of the Spitzer SAGE catalogue with optical catalogues we selected a sample of LMC post-AGB candidates based on their [8] - [24] colour index and estimated luminosity. We determined the fundamental properties of the central stars of 105 of these objects using low-resolution, optical spectra that we obtained at Siding Spring Observatory and SAAO. Results: We constructed a catalogue of 70 high probability and 1337 candidate post-AGB stars that is available at the CDS. About half of the objects in our sample of post-AGB candidates show a spectral energy distribution (SED) that is indicative of a disc rather than an expanding and cooling AGB remnant. Like in the Galaxy, the disc sources are likely associated with binary evolution. Important side products of this research are catalogues of candidate young stellar objects, candidate supergiants with circumstellar dust, and discarded objects for which a spectrum was obtained. These too are available at the CDS. Appendices A-D are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgCatalogues are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A90

  16. Hot Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; Gauba, G.; Fujii, T.; Nakada, Y.

    2001-08-01

    From the study of IRAS sources with far-IR colors similar to planetary nebulae (PNe), several proto-planetary nebulae with hot (OB) post-AGB central stars have been detected. These stars form an evolutionary link between the cooler G,F,A supergiant stars that have evolved off the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and the hot (OB) central stars of PNe. The optical spectra of these objects show strong Balmer emission lines and in some cases low excitation nebular emission lines such as [NII] and [SII] superposed on the OB stellar continuum. The absence of of [OIII] 5007Å line and the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines indicate that photoionisation has just started. The UV(IUE) spectra of some of these objects revealed violet shifted stellar wind P-Cygni profiles of CIV, SiIV and NV, indicating hot and fast stellar wind and post-AGB mass loss. These objects appear to be rapildy evolving into the early stages of PNe similar to that observed in the case of Hen1357 IRAS 17119-5926 (Stingray Nebula) and IRAS 18062+2410 SAO85766.

  17. Optical/Near-infrared Selection of Red Quasi-stellar Objects: Evidence for Steep Extinction Curves toward Galactic Centers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Venemans, B.; Noterdaeme, P.; Vestergaard, M.; Møller, P.; Ledoux, C.; Geier, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for red QSOs using a selection based on optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and near-infrared imaging from UKIDSS. Our main goal with the selection is to search for QSOs reddened by foreground dusty absorber galaxies. For a sample of 58 candidates (including 20 objects fulfilling our selection criteria that already have spectra in the SDSS), 46 (79%) are confirmed to be QSOs. The QSOs are predominantly dust-reddened except for a handful at redshifts z >~ 3.5. However, the dust is most likely located in the QSO host galaxies (and for two, the reddening is primarily caused by Galactic dust) rather than in the intervening absorbers. More than half of the QSOs show evidence of associated absorption (BAL absorption). Four (7%) of the candidates turned out to be late-type stars, and another four (7%) are compact galaxies. We could not identify the remaining four objects. In terms of their optical spectra, these QSOs are similar to the QSOs selected in the FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey except they are on average fainter, more distant, and only two are detected in the FIRST survey. As per the usual procedure, we estimate the amount of extinction using the SDSS QSO template reddened by Small-Magellanic-Cloud-(SMC) like dust. It is possible to get a good match to the observed (rest-frame ultraviolet) spectra, but it is not possible to match the observed near-IR photometry from UKIDSS for nearly all the reddened QSOs. The most likely reasons are that the SDSS QSO template is too red at optical wavelengths due to contaminating host galaxy light and because the assumed SMC extinction curve is too shallow. Three of the compact galaxies display old stellar populations with ages of several Gyr and masses of about 1010 M ⊙ (based on spectral energy distribution modeling). The inferred stellar densities in these galaxies exceed 1010 M ⊙ kpc-2, which is among the highest measured for early-type galaxies. Our survey has

  18. AGB stars and presolar grains

    SciTech Connect

    Busso, M.; Trippella, O.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.

    2014-05-09

    Among presolar materials recovered in meteorites, abundant SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains of AGB origins were found. They showed records of C, N, O, {sup 26}Al and s-element isotopic ratios that proved invaluable in constraining the nucleosynthesis models for AGB stars [1, 2]. In particular, when these ratios are measured in SiC grains, they clearly reveal their prevalent origin in cool AGB circumstellar envelopes and provide information on both the local physics and the conditions at the nucleosynthesis site (the H- and He-burning layers deep inside the structure). Among the properties ascertained for the main part of the SiC data (the so-called mainstream ones), we mention a large range of {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios, extending below the solar value [3], and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios ≳ 30. Other classes of grains, instead, display low carbon isotopic ratios (≳ 10) and a huge dispersion for N isotopes, with cases of large {sup 15}N excess. In the same grains, isotopes currently feeded by slow neutron captures reveal the characteristic pattern expected from this process at an efficiency slightly lower than necessary to explain the solar main s-process component. Complementary constraints can be found in oxide grains, especially Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals. Here, the oxygen isotopes and the content in {sup 26}Al are of a special importance for clarifying the partial mixing processes that are known to affect evolved low-mass stars. Successes in modeling the data, as well as problems in explaining some of the mentioned isotopic ratios through current nucleosynthesis models are briefly outlined.

  19. Duration of the Early Galactic Formation Epoch: HST Photometry for Red-Horizontal Branch Clusters in the Outer Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, J. E.; Stetson, P. B.; McClure, R. D.; van den Bergh, S.; Bolte, M.; Harris, W. E.; van den Berg, D. A.; Bell, R. A.; Fahlman, G. G.; Richer, H. B.; Bond, H. E.

    1997-12-01

    Last year we presented evidence from HST photometry of the low-metallicity cluster NGC 2419 (M_V = -9.5, R_⊙ ~ 90 kpc, [Fe/H] = -2.2) that globular cluster formation began at essentially the same time throughout a region of the Galactic halo now almost 200 kpc in diameter (Harris et al. 1997 AJ 114, 1030). We now turn to the time spread of halo formation, with the ultimate aim of addressing the relative roles of mergers over the first 4 or more Gyrs (Searle & Zinn 1978, ApJ, 225, 357; Lee, Demarque & Zinn 1994 ApJ, 423, 248) versus models favoring a rapid collapse (Eggen, Lynden-Bell & Sandage 1962, ApJ, 236, 748; Stetson, VandenBerg & Bolte 1996, PASP, 108, 560), or some combination of those and other processes. We provide the first reliable measurements from the giant branch through the main-sequence turnoffs of red-horizontal-branch clusters in the outer halo, which are frequently postulated to be younger than most other globular clusters. From WFPC2 F555W (`V') and F814W (`I') photometry for Pal 3 (M_V = -5.2, R_⊙ ~ 87 kpc), Pal 4 (M_V = -5.8, R_⊙ ~ 98 kpc), and Eridanus (M_V = -4.8, R_⊙ ~ 78 kpc), all with [Fe/H] ~ -1.5, we estimate their relative ages by making differential comparisons among them and with respect to inner-halo objects of, presumably, comparable chemical compositions. It seems likely at this stage of our analysis that (a) the three clusters are the same age to our measurement precision of ~ 1 Gyr, and, (b) the CMDs of all three outer halo clusters differ from those of M 3 and M 5 (our template clusters of similar metallicity), in the sense that the outer halo clusters are younger by ~ 3 Gyr, or they are ~ 0.5 dex more metal-rich than currently thought. Large uncertainties in chemical compositions (He, [alpha /Fe], [CNO/Fe]) for outer halo and template clusters alike mask the true interpretation.

  20. INFRARED TWO-COLOR DIAGRAMS FOR AGB STARS, POST-AGB STARS, AND PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2015-08-01

    We present various infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-AGB stars, and Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and investigate possible evolutionary tracks. We use catalogs from the available literature for the sample of 4903 AGB stars (3373 O-rich; 1168 C-rich; 362 S-type), 660 post-AGB stars (326 post-AGB; 334 pre-PN), and 1510 PNe in our Galaxy. For each object in the catalog, we cross-identify the IRAS, AKARI, Midcourse Space Experiment, and 2MASS counterparts. The IR 2CDs can provide useful information about the structure and evolution of the dust envelopes as well as the central stars. To find possible evolutionary tracks from AGB stars to PNe on the 2CDs, we investigate spectral evolution of post-AGB stars by making simple but reasonable assumptions on the evolution of the central star and dust shell. We perform radiative transfer model calculations for the detached dust shells around evolving central stars in the post-AGB phase. We find that the theoretical dust shell model tracks using dust opacity functions of amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon roughly coincide with the densely populated observed points of AGB stars, post-AGB stars, and PNe on various IR 2CDs. Even though some discrepancies are inevitable, the end points of the theoretical post-AGB model tracks generally converge in the region of the observed points of PNe on most 2CDs.

  1. AGB stars in the disk, satellites, and halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, Katherine M.

    2016-08-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are simultaneously one of the most important and least well understood phases of stellar evolution. Luminous, red, AGB stars are excellent tracers of kinematical and morphological structure, and track the presence of intermediate age populations. In addition, they contribute significantly to the near-infrared flux and gas/dust budgets of galaxies. As a result, they are essential for studying galaxies in both the local and distance universe. However, their observable properties depend on complicated physical processes, including dredge-up, dust production, and stellar pulsations. As a result, they are difficult to model on both the individual and population-level scales. Homogenous samples of AGB stars are necessary to calibrate ever improving models. In this thesis I use data from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey to identify and characterize clean, homogenous samples of carbon- and oxygen-rich AGB stars (carbon stars and M-stars, respectively) in the disk, satellites and halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Using these stars, I constrain the ratio (C/M) of carbon- to oxygen-rich in fields throughout the M31 system, compare the AGB stars to their observationally similar contaminants (extrinsic carbon stars and oxygen-rich red giant branch stars), and discuss major physical properties (color, temperature, metallicity, dust production, and variability).

  2. Post-AGB Binaries and Their Connection to the B[e] Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Winckel, H.

    2017-02-01

    We argue in this contribution that secondary stable disks around evolved stars can be found over a wide range in luminosity all over the HR-diagram. The disks around B[e] supergiants form the high luminosity end of similar structures found around post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) stars as well as the recently discovered post-Red Giant Branch (post-RGB) stars. We focus here on the observational properties of disks around binary post-AGB stars and end with a link to the B[e] phenomenon.

  3. The composition of freshly-formed dust in recent (post-)AGB thermal pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a candidate Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star undergoing a thermal pulse (TP). WISE J1810--3305 is one of only two sources in the WISE sky survey which show very red WISE colors but a very blue 2MASS [K] vs. WISE [W1 (3.4 mu m)] color, and drastic brightening at 12 mu m since IRAS observation. This favours a scenario in which we have caught a massive dust ejection event during a TP that began only ~15 years ago. The other source is Sakurai's object, which also underwent a massive dust expulsion around the same time, but is in a later evolutionary (post-AGB) phase. Few firm constraints exist on the TP stage because of its brevity. These objects provide a unique opportunity for understanding TP evolution and dust production in real-time. Here we propose COMICS spectroscopy of WISE J1810--3305 in order to study the composition of the circumstellar dust. We will search for molecular bands, and identify whether the central object is an Oxygen or Carbon rich AGB star. We also propose identical spectroscopy of Sakurai's object in order to compare AGB with post-AGB evolution. These objects are presently brightest in the mid-IR, and COMICS is the only ground-based mid-IR camera with the requisite capability for observation.

  4. Improving the distances of post-AGB objects in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Shane B.; Frew, David J.; Owers, Matt S.; Parker, Quentin A.; Bojičič, Ivan S.

    2016-07-01

    Post-AGB (PAGB) stars are short-lived, low-intermediate mass objects transitioning from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the white dwarf (WD) phase. These objects are characterised by a constant, core-mass dependent luminosity and a large infrared excess from the dusty envelope ejected at the top of the AGB. PAGB stars provide insights into the evolution of their direct descendants, planetary nebulae (PNe). Calculation of physical characteristics of PAGB are dependent on accurately determined distances scarcely available in the literature. Using the Torun catalogue for PAGB objects, supplemented with archival data, we have determined distances to the known population of Galactic PAGB stars. This is by modelling their spectral energy distributions (SED) with black bodies and numerically integrating over the entire wavelength range to determine the total integrated object flux. For most PAGB stars we assumed their luminosities are based on their positional characteristics and stellar evolution models. RV Tauri stars however are known to follow a period-luminosity relation (PLR) reminiscent of type-2 Cepheids. For these variable PAGB stars we determined their luminosities via the PLR and hence their distances. This allows us to overcome the biggest obstacle to characterising these poorly understood objects that play a vital part in Galactic chemical enrichment.

  5. SiO and H2O Maser Observations of Red Supergiants in Star Clusters Embedded in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Shuji; Nakashima, Jun-Ichi; Zhang, Yong; Chong, Selina S. N.; Koike, Kazutaka; Kwok, Sun

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of radio observations of red supergiants in a star cluster, Stephenson (1990, AJ, 99, 1867)'s #2, and of candidates for red supergiants in three star clusters, Mercer et al. (2005, ApJ, 635, 560)'s #4, #8, and #13, in the SiO and H2O maser lines. The Stephenson's #2 cluster and nearby aggregation at the southwest contain more than 15 red supergiants. We detected one red supergiant at the center of Stephenson's #2 and three in a southwest aggregation in the SiO maser line; three out of these four were also detected in the H2O maser line. The average radial velocity of the four detected objects is 97 km s-1, giving a kinematic distance of 5.5 kpc, which locates this cluster near the base of the Scutum-Crux spiral arm. We also detected six SiO emitting objects associated with other star clusters. In addition, mapping observations in the CO J = 1-0 line toward these clusters revealed that an appreciable amount of molecular gas still remains around the Stephenson's #2 cluster in contrast to the prototypical red-supergiant cluster, Bica et al. (2003, A&A, 404, 223)'s #122. This indicates that the time scale of gas expulsion differs considerably in individual clusters.

  6. Duplicity: Its Part in the AGB's Downfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Keller, D.

    2015-08-01

    Half or more of stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by a companion star in a binary system. Many binaries have short enough orbits that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by an exchange of mass and angular momentum between the stars. Such mass transfer is highly likely on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) because this is when a star is both very large and has strong wind mass loss. Direct mass transfer truncates the AGB, and its associated nucleosynthesis, prematurely compared to the case of a single star. In wide binaries we can probe nucleosynthesis in the long-dead AGB primary star by today observing its initially lower-mass companion. The star we see now may be polluted by ejecta from the primary either through a wind or Roche-lobe overflow. We highlight recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in (ex-)AGB mass-transfer systems, such as carbon and barium stars, and the link between binary stars and planetary nebulae; finally, we suggest AGB stars as a possible source of the enigmatic element, lithium.

  7. THE CONTRIBUTION OF TP-AGB STARS TO THE MID-INFRARED COLORS OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chisari, Nora E.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2012-07-10

    We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 {mu}m. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

  8. The Contribution of TP-AGB Stars to the Mid-infrared Colors of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, Nora E.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2012-07-01

    We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 μm. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

  9. Discriminating among stellar population synthesis models of the TP-AGB phase in early quiescent galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Mason; Newman, Andrew; Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    Galactic evolution at high redshifts is largely understood through stellar population synthesis (SPS) modeling of spectra and photometry integrated over all starlight of a galaxy. However, complex and poorly understood stellar phases like the unstable thermally-pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase make SPS modeling a difficult task. Recent models fail to agree on the TP-AGB contribution to the infrared luminosity, leading to significant discrepancy among the properties derived from modern SPS models when applied to early galaxies. Here we provide a thorough assessment of each of the most widely used SPS models by comparing their results and assessing their accuracy in modeling our unique dataset. We combine high-resolution spectroscopic observations from Keck/MOSFIRE with photometric data for 21 early quiescent galaxies with redshifts of z ~ 2. These galaxies are around the age of peak TP-AGB activity, between ~0.3 and 2 Gyr, and therefore provide an ideal test of the models. We find that models with a “light” TP-AGB contribution provide much better descriptions of our galaxies at ages of ~1 Gyr or less. This is true at high statistical significance and holds for models with or without dust reddening. However, contrary to previous studies, the model-dependent photometrically estimated ages are similar among the models, but they show only moderate agreement with the more model-independent spectroscopic ages derived from stellar absorption lines. The largest discrepancies are found for the Charlot & Bruzual (2007) models which show an artificial clustering of ages around 1 Gyr. The TP-AGB “light” models require more reddening, which can be independently tested by examining dust emission in the mid-infrared. The modeled fluxes are also mostly consistent with mid-infrared observations, with the exception of one model. Resolving these differences among the models will substantially strengthen our estimates of the properties of early quiescent

  10. Evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars. IV. Constraining mass loss and lifetimes of low mass, low metallicity AGB stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Bressan, Alessandro; Dolphin, Andrew; Aringer, Bernhard

    2014-07-20

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≲ –0.86) galaxies taken from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury sample, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars, N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB}, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass loss fail to explain the observed N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB} ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H] ≲ –0.86, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M ≲ 1 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes of ∼0.5 Myr and higher masses (M ≲ 3 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes ≲ 1.2 Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge-up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.

  11. Searching for dark clouds in the outer galactic plane. I. A statistical approach for identifying extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Most of what is known about clustered star formation to date comes from well studied star forming regions located relatively nearby, such as Rho-Ophiuchus, Serpens and Perseus. However, the recent discovery of infrared dark clouds may give new insights in our understanding of this dominant mode of star formation in the Galaxy. Though the exact role of infrared dark clouds in the formation process is still somewhat unclear, they seem to provide useful laboratories to study the very early stages of clustered star formation. Infrared dark clouds have been identified predominantly toward the bright inner parts of the galactic plane. The low background emission makes it more difficult to identify similar objects in mid-infrared absorption in the outer parts. This is unfortunate, because the outer Galaxy represents the only nearby region where we can study effects of different (external) conditions on the star formation process. Aims: The aim of this paper is to identify extended red regions in the outer galactic plane based on reddening of stars in the near-infrared. We argue that these regions appear reddened mainly due to extinction caused by molecular clouds and young stellar objects. The work presented here is used as a basis for identifying star forming regions and in particular the very early stages. An accompanying paper describes the cross-identification of the identified regions with existing data, uncovering more on the nature of the reddening. Methods: We use the Mann-Whitney U-test, in combination with a friends-of-friends algorithm, to identify extended reddened regions in the 2MASS all-sky JHK survey. We process the data on a regular grid using two different resolutions, 60´´ and 90´´. The two resolutions have been chosen because the stellar surface density varies between the crowded spiral arm regions and the sparsely populated galactic anti-center region. Results: We identify 1320 extended red regions at the higher resolution and 1589 in the

  12. Chemical Abundances in Field Red Giants from High-resolution H-band Spectra Using the APOGEE Spectral Linelist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcìa Pèrez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants (α Boo and μ Leo), two M-giants (β And and δ Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes 12C, 13C, 14N, and 16O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of 12C synthesized during 4He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to ~0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  13. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  14. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  15. The creation of AGB fallback shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The possibility that mass ejected during Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stellar evolution phases falls back towards the star has been suggested in applications ranging from the formation of accretion discs to the powering of late-thermal pulses. In this paper, we seek to explicate the properties of fallback flow trajectories from mass-loss events. We focus on a transient phase of mass ejection with sub-escape speeds, followed by a phase of a typical AGB wind. We solve the problem using both hydrodynamic simulations and a simplified one-dimensional analytic model that matches the simulations. For a given set of initial wind characteristics, we find a critical shell velocity that distinguishes between `shell fallback' and `shell escape'. We discuss the relevance of our results for both single and binary AGB stars. In particular, we discuss how our results help to frame further studies of fallback as a mechanism for forming the substantial population of observed post-AGB stars with dusty discs.

  16. The Compensation Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  17. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  18. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  19. 2011 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report, the second of AGB's studies of higher education governance, documents the extent to which college and university boards are following good-governance practices. In addition, it takes a focused look at board engagement to determine the degree to which governing boards are actively, intellectually, and strategically involved with their…

  20. The Facilities Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  1. STAR-TO-STAR IRON ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 3201

    SciTech Connect

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaeel E-mail: iii@physics.utah.edu E-mail: patrick.francois@obspm.fr E-mail: richard.monier@unice.fr

    2013-02-10

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  2. Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars. V. Constraining the Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Intermediate-mass, Low-metallicity AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Bressan, Alessandro; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass loss, and dust production can dramatically affect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al., in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging -1.59 ≲ {{[Fe/H]}} ≲ -0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ˜4 M ⊙, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. Transitory O-rich chemistry in heavily obscured C-rich post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Engels, D.; Perea-Calderón, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spitzer/IRS spectra of eleven heavily obscured C-rich sources rapidly evolving from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to Planetary Nebulae are presented. IRAM 30m observations for three of these post-AGBs are also reported. A few (3) of these sources are known to exhibit strongly variable maser emission of O-bearing molecules such as OH and H2 O, suggesting a transitory O-rich chemistry because of the quickly changing physical and chemical conditions in this short evolutionary phase. Interestingly, the Spitzer/IRS spectra show a rich circumstellar carbon chemistry, as revealed by the detection of small hydrocarbon molecules such as C2H2, C4H2, C6H2, C6H6, and HCN. Benzene is detected towards two sources, bringing up to three the total number of Galactic post-AGBs where this molecule has been detected. In addition, we report evidence for the possible detection of other hydrocarbon molecules like HC3N, CH3C2H, and CH3 in several of these sources. The available IRAM 30m data confirm that the central stars are C-rich - in despite of the presence of O-rich masers - and the presence of high velocity molecular outflows together with extreme AGB mass-loss rates (∼⃒10-4 Mʘ /yr). Our observations confirm the polymerization model of Cernicharo [1] that predicts a rich photochemistry in the neutral regions of these objects on timescales shorter than the dynamical evolution of the central HII region, leading to the formation of small C-rich molecules and a transitory O-rich chemistry.

  4. Models of AGB Stars and their Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of recursive thermonuclear runaways makes the computation of AGB evolutionary sequences and the related nucleosynthesis a challenging task for stellar modelers. In the last 20 years many efforts have been made to improve the physical description of the interiors of these stars. Nevertheless, the majority of the extant nucleosynthesis results are based on post-process calculations, in which the evolution of the nuclear network and that of the stellar structure are treated separately and, hence, decoupled. In this paper, we review the latest attempts made to obtain more reliable nucleosynthesis calculations based on the physical processes expected to be at work in AGB stars, such as the mixing induced by convection and rotation.

  5. AGB star intershell abundances inferred from UV spectra of extremely hot post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Reiff, E.; Kruk, J. W.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  6. The 2014 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge-Clark, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    "The 2014 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance" is the fourth in AGB's studies of college and university governance. This report, based on survey responses from 592 public and independent boards, addresses a range of important governance topics that are receiving attention from boards and the news media, including presidential…

  7. High resolution spectroscopy of the high latitude rapidly evolving post-AGB star SAO 85766 (= IRAS 18062+2410)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, P.; Sivarani, T.; Manchado, A.; Sanz Fernández de Córdoba, L.

    2000-05-01

    SAO 85766 (b = +20o) is an IRAS source with far-infrared colours similar to planetary nebulae. According to the HDE catalogue, its spectrum in 1940 was that of an A5 star. The UV fluxes and colours derived from data obtained by the TD1 satellite in 1972 also indicate that SAO 85766 was an A-type supergiant at that epoch. However, high resolution spectra of SAO 85766 obtained in 1993 in the wavelength interval 4350Ä to 8820Ä shows that now it is similar to that of an early B type post-AGB supergiant. In addition to the absorptions lines typical of a B1I type star, the spectrum of SAO 85766 is found to show numerous permitted and forbidden emission lines of several elements, typically observed in the spectra of young high density low excitation planetary nebulae. From an analysis of the absorption lines we have estimated Teff=22000+/-500 K, log g=3.0+/-0.5, xi t=15+/-2km s-1 and [M/H]=-0.6. Carbon is found to be strongly underabundant ([C/Fe] = -1.0), similarly to what has been observed in other high galactic latitude hot post-AGB stars. The underabundance of carbon and metals, high galactic latitude, high radial velocity (46 km s-1), the presence of planetary nebula type detached cold circumstellar dust shell and also the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines in the spectrum indicate that SAO 85766 is a low mass star in the post-AGB stage of evolution. The above mentioned characteristics and the variations observed in the spectrum of SAO 85766 suggest that it has rapidly evolved during the past 50 years and it is now in the early stages of the planetary nebula phase. The central star may just have become hot enough to photoionize the circumstellar envelope ejected during the previous AGB phase. >From an analysis of the nebular emission lines we find Te=10000+/- 500K and Ne=2.5 104 cm-3. The nebula also shows an abundance pattern similar to that of the central star. The rapid post-AGB evolution of SAO 85766 appears to be similar to that observed in the

  8. Presenting Optical Spectra of AGB Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, K.; Guhathakurta, P.; Toloba, E.; Dorman, C. E.; Seth, A. C.; Splash Collaboration; Phat Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We present optical spectra of oxygen- and carbon-rich AGB stars in the disk of the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31). Our AGB sample is drawn from the ˜10 000 stars covered by both the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. This dual coverage means that we have moderate resolution optical spectra taken with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10-m telescope, as well as six-filter HST photometry spanning the ultraviolet, optical and infrared. Our full AGB sample contains 143 carbon-rich AGB stars (C stars) and ˜1700 oxygen-rich AGB stars (M giants). We explore the spatial and kinematic distribution of these stars, the C/M ratio, spectral trends as a function of physical properties, and the fit to synthetic photometry.

  9. Approaching a Physical Calibration of the AGB Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The widespread impact of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars on the observed properties of galaxies is universally accepted. Despite their importance, severe uncertainties plague AGB models and propagate through to current population synthesis studies of galaxies, undermining the interpretation of a galaxy's basic properties (mass, age, chemical evolution, dust budget). The only reliable path forward is to apply a physically-sound calibration of AGB stellar models in which all main physical processes and their interplay are taken into account (e.g., mixing, mass loss, nucleosynthesis, pulsation, molecular chemistry, dust formation). In this context, I will review recent and ongoing efforts to calibrate the evolution of AGB stars, which combine an all-round theoretical approach anchored by stellar physics with exceptionally high quality data of resolved AGB stars in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.

  10. Detailed abundance study of four s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aarle, E.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The photospheric abundances of evolved solar-type stars of different metallicities serve as probes into stellar evolution theory. Aims: Stellar photospheres of post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars bear witness to the internal chemical enrichment processes, integrated over their entire stellar evolution. Here we study post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With their known distances, these rare objects are ideal tracers of AGB nucleosynthesis and dredge-up phenomena. Methods: We used the UVES spectrograph mounted on the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory, to obtain high-resolution spectra with high signal-to-noise of a sample of four post-AGB stars. The objects display a spectral energy distribution that indicates the presence of circumstellar dust. We perform a detailed abundance analysis on the basis of these spectra. Results: All objects are C-rich, and strongly enhanced in s-process elements. We deduced abundances of heavy s-process elements for all stars in the sample, and even found an indication of the presence of Hg in the spectrum of one object. The metallicity of all stars except J053253.51-695915.1 is considerably lower than the average value that is observed for the LMC. The derived luminosities show that we witness the late evolution of low-mass stars with initial masses close to 1 M⊙. An exception is J053253.51-695915.1 and we argue that this object is likely a binary. Conclusions: We confirmed the correlation between the efficiency of the third-dredge up and the neutron exposure that is detected in Galactic post-AGB stars. The non-existence of a correlation between metallicity and neutron irradiation is also confirmed and expanded to smaller metallicities. We confirm the status of 21 μm stars as post-carbon stars. Current theoretical AGB models overestimate the observed C/O ratios and fail to reproduce the variety of s-process abundance patterns that is observed in otherwise very similar objects

  11. Discovery of a Metal-poor, Luminous Post-AGB Star that Failed the Third Dredge-up.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Van Winckel, H.; Wood, P. R.; Asplund, M.; Karakas, A. I.; Lattanzio, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars are known to be chemically diverse. In this paper we present the first observational evidence of a star that has failed the third dredge-up (TDU). J005252.87-722842.9 is an A-type (T eff = 8250 ± 250 K) luminous (8200 ± 700 L ⊙) metal-poor ([Fe/H] = ‑1.18 ± 0.10) low-mass (M initial ≈ 1.5–2.0 M ⊙) post-AGB star in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Through a systematic abundance study, using high-resolution optical spectra from UVES, we found that this likely post-AGB object shows an intriguing photospheric composition with no confirmed carbon-enhancement (upper limit of [C/Fe] < 0.50) nor enrichment of s-process elements. We derived an oxygen abundance of [O/Fe] = 0.29 ± 0.1. For Fe and O, we took the effects of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium into account. We could not derive an upper limit for the nitrogen abundance as there are no useful nitrogen lines within our spectral coverage. The chemical pattern displayed by this object has not been observed in single or binary post-AGBs. Based on its derived stellar parameters and inferred evolutionary state, single-star nucleosynthesis models predict that this star should have undergone TDU episodes while on the AGB, and it should be carbon enriched. However, our observations are in contrast with these predictions. We identify two possible Galactic analogs that are likely to be post-AGB stars, but the lack of accurate distances (hence luminosities) to these objects does not allow us to confirm their post-AGB status. If they have low luminosities, then they are likely to be dusty post-RGB stars. The discovery of J005252.87-722842.9 reveals a new stellar evolutionary channel whereby a star evolves without any TDU episodes.

  12. Ultraviolet Properties of Galactic Globular Clusters with GALEX. I. The Color-Magnitude Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Rood, Robert T.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Beccari, Giacomo; Rey, Soo-Chang; Rhee, Jaehyon; Rich, R. Michael; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2012-05-01

    We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data for 44 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained during three GALEX observing cycles between 2004 and 2008. This is the largest homogeneous data set on the UV photometric properties of Galactic GCs ever collected. The sample selection and photometric analysis are discussed, and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented. The blue and intermediate-blue horizontal branch is the dominant feature of the UV CMDs of old Galactic GCs. Our sample is large enough to display the remarkable variety of horizontal branch shapes found in old stellar populations. Other stellar types that are obviously detected are blue stragglers and post-core-He burning stars. The main features of UV CMDs of Galactic GCs are briefly discussed. We establish the locus of post-core-He burning stars in the UV CMD and present a catalog of candidate asymptotic giant branch (AGB), AGB-manqué, post early-AGB, and post-AGB stars within our cluster sample. The authors dedicate this paper to the memory of co-author Bob Rood, a pioneer in the theory of the evolution of low-mass stars, and a friend, who sadly passed away on 2011 November 2.

  13. ULTRAVIOLET PROPERTIES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS WITH GALEX. I. THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Rhee, Jaehyon; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara E-mail: emanuele.dalessandr2@unibo.it E-mail: barbara.lanzoni@unibo.it; and others

    2012-05-15

    We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data for 44 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained during three GALEX observing cycles between 2004 and 2008. This is the largest homogeneous data set on the UV photometric properties of Galactic GCs ever collected. The sample selection and photometric analysis are discussed, and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented. The blue and intermediate-blue horizontal branch is the dominant feature of the UV CMDs of old Galactic GCs. Our sample is large enough to display the remarkable variety of horizontal branch shapes found in old stellar populations. Other stellar types that are obviously detected are blue stragglers and post-core-He burning stars. The main features of UV CMDs of Galactic GCs are briefly discussed. We establish the locus of post-core-He burning stars in the UV CMD and present a catalog of candidate asymptotic giant branch (AGB), AGB-manque, post early-AGB, and post-AGB stars within our cluster sample.

  14. Isotopic zirconium as a probe of AGB nucleosynthesis theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaney, R. A.

    Nuclear reaction network calculations of the zirconium relative isotope abundances in AGB stars are presented. It is shown how these isotopic abundances depend on the AGB stellar mass and on the uncertain neutron absorption cross section for Zr-96. With regard to observations of the zirconium isotopes in S stars, it is shown how the many neutron exposure mechanisms associated with AGB thermal pulses cannot be operating in these stars. A less predictable scheme in which only a few neutron exposures take place appears to be more consistent with the reported S star observations.

  15. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  16. Monitoring Observatinos of H2O and SiO Masers Toward Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Yoon, Dong-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of simultaneous monitoring observations of H_2O 6_{1,6}-5_{2,3} (22 GHz) and SiO J=1-0, 2-1, 3-2 maser lines (43, 86, 129 GHz) toward five post-AGB (candidate) stars, using the 21-m single-dish telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network. Depending on the target objects, 7 - 11 epochs of data were obtained. We detected both H_2O and SiO maser lines from four sources: OH16.1-0.3, OH38.10-0.13, OH65.5+1.3, and IRAS 19312+1950. We could not detect H_2O maser emission toward OH13.1+5.1 between the late OH/IR and post-AGB stage. The detected H_2O masers show typical double-peaked line profiles. The SiO masers from four sources, except IRAS 19312+1950, show the peaks around the stellar velocity as a single peak, whereas the SiO masers from IRAS 19312+1950 occur above the red peak of the H_2O maser. We analyzed the properties of detected maser lines, and investigated their evolutionary state through comparison with the full widths at zero power. The distribution of observed target sources was also investigated in the IRAS two-color diagram in relation with the evolutionary stage of post-AGB stars. From our analyses, the evolutionary sequence of observed sources is suggested as OH65.5+1.3 → OH13.1+5.1 → OH16.1-0.3 → OH38.10-0.13, except for IRAS 19312+1950. In addition, OH13.1+5.1 from which the H_2O maser has not been detected is suggested to be on the gateway toward the post-AGB stage. With respect to the enigmatic object, IRAS 19312+1950, we could not clearly figure out its nature. To properly explain the unusual phenomena of SiO and H_2O masers, it is essential to establish the relative locations and spatial distributions of two masers using VLBI technique. We also include the 1.2 - 160 μm spectral energy distribution using photometric data from the following surveys: 2MASS, WISE, MSX, IRAS, and AKARI (IRC and FIS). In addition, from the IRAS LRS spectra, we found that the depth of silicate absorption features shows significant variations

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 2808 AGB and RGB stars Na abundance (Wang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-05-01

    The high-resolution spectra of our sample of AGB and RGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808 were obtained with the high-resolution multi-object spectrograph FLAMES, mounted on ESO/VLT-UT2. A combined mode was used where the brightest five objects was observed with UVES-fibre and the remaining targets with GIRAFFE/Medusa. The basic information of our sample stars are listed in Table 2, including the evolutionary phase, instrument used for observation, coordinates, photometry and barycentric radial velocity. Our Fe abundances were derived from the equivalent widths of Fe lines, while the Na abundances were determined with spectra synthesis. Both FeI and Na abundances have been corrected for the non-LTE effect. In Table 4 we show the derived stellar parameters of our sample stars, and the Na abundances are shown in Table 6. (3 data files).

  18. Spectroscopic survey of post-AGB star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Miranda, L. F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims:Our goal is to establish the true nature of post-AGB star candidates and to identify new post-AGB stars. Methods: We used low resolution optical spectroscopy and we compared the spectra of the candidate post-AGB stars with those of stars in the library specta available in the literature and with spectra of "standard" post-AGB stars, and direct imaging in narrow-band filters. Results: Spectra were obtained for 16 objects: 14 objects have not been observed previously and 2 objects are already known post-AGB stars used as "standards" for identification. From the spectra we identify: six new post-AGB stars with spectral types between G5 and F5, two H ii regions the morphology of which is revealed in the direct images for the first time, a G giant with infrared emission, a young stellar object, a probable post-AGB star with emission lines and three objects for which the classification is still unclear. As a whole, our results provide new, reliable identifications for 10 objects among listed post-AGB star candidates. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), and at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada, which is operated by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas through the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Granada, Spain). Appendices A-D are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. AGB Stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portman, Matthew; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Held, Leander; Kastner, Joel; SAGE Team

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved, pulsating variable stars that generate massive outflows of gas and dust, thereby enriching the interstellar medium (ISM) in the products of stellar nucleosynthesis. Recent studies find the dustiest, most extreme AGB stars contribute a disproportionately large amount of matter to their host galaxies; these extreme AGB stars are also the most variable, and they emit most of their energy at mid-infrared wavelengths. Therefore, using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have imaged several target AGB stars identified in previous surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Our aim is to obtain light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns wavelength for these extreme AGB stars. Using multiple epochs of data taken within the last 3 years by our survey and then further comparing this data to past surveys of the SMC and LMC with Spitzer, we were able to generate preliminary light curves for a sample of 30 extreme AGB stars, as well as for other stars found within the image fields. This research project was made possible by the Rochester Institute of Technology Center for Imaging Science Research Experience for Undergraduates program, funded by National Science Foundation grant PHY-1359361 to RIT.

  20. SUPER-AGB-AGB EVOLUTION AND THE CHEMICAL INVENTORY IN NGC 2419

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Carini, Roberta; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; D'Ercole, Annibale; Vesperini, Enrico

    2012-12-20

    We follow the scenario of formation of second-generation stars in globular clusters by matter processed by hot bottom burning (HBB) in massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and super-AGB stars (SAGB). In the cluster NGC 2419 we assume the presence of an extreme population directly formed from the AGB and SAGB ejecta, so we can directly compare the yields for a metallicity Z = 0.0003 with the chemical inventory of the cluster NGC 2419. At such a low metallicity, the HBB temperatures (well above 10{sup 8} K) allow a very advanced nucleosynthesis. Masses {approx}6 M{sub Sun} deplete Mg and synthesize Si, going beyond Al, so this latter element is only moderately enhanced; sodium cannot be enhanced. The models are consistent with the observations, although the predicted Mg depletion is not as strong as in the observed stars. We predict that the oxygen abundance must be depleted by a huge factor (>50) in the Mg-poor stars. The HBB temperatures are close to the region where other p-capture reactions on heavier nuclei become possible. We show that high potassium abundance found in Mg-poor stars can be achieved during HBB by p-captures on the argon nuclei, if the relevant cross section(s) are larger than listed in the literature or if the HBB temperature is higher. Finally, we speculate that some calcium production is occurring owing to proton capture on potassium. We emphasize the importance of a strong effort to measure a larger sample of abundances in this cluster.

  1. Dust production in supernovae and AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, the role of supernovae on dust has changed; it has been long proposed that supernovae are dust destroyers, but now recent observations show that core-collapse supernovae can become dust factories. Theoretical models of dust evolution in galaxies have predicted that core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in galaxies, if these supernovae can form a significant mass of dust (0.1-1 solar masses). The Herschel Space Observatory and ALMA detected dust in the ejecta of Supernova 1987A. They revealed an estimated 0.5 solar masses of dust. Herschel also found nearly 0.1 solar masses of dust in historical supernovae remnants, namely Cassiopeia A and the Crab Nebula. If dust grains can survive future interaction with the supernova winds and ambient interstellar medium, core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar media of galaxies. We further discuss the total dust mass injected by AGB stars and SNe into the interstellar medium of the Magellanic Clouds.

  2. Near-IR spectra of ISOGAL sources in the inner Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheis, M.; Lançon, A.; Omont, A.; Schuller, F.; Ojha, D. K.

    2003-07-01

    We present near-IR spectra (HK-band) of a sample of 107 sources with mid-IR excesses at 7 and 15;mu m detected during the ISOGAL survey. Making use of the DENIS interstellar extinction map from Schultheis et al. (1999) we derive luminosities and find that the Mbol vs. 12CO and M_bol vs. H2O diagrams are powerful tools for identifying supergiants, AGB stars, giants and young stellar objects. The majority of our sample are AGB stars ( ~ 80%) while we find four good supergiant candidates, nine young stellar objects and 12 RGB candidates. We have used the most recent K0-[15] relation by Jeong et al. (\\cite{Jeong2002}) based on recent theoretical modeling of dust formation of AGB stars to determine mass-loss rates. The mass-loss rates of the supergiants are comparable with those in the solar neighbourhood while the long-period variables cover a mass-loss range from -5 < log dot M < -7. The red giant candidates lie at the lower end of the mass-loss rate range between -6.5 < log dot M < -9. We used the equivalent width of the CO bandhead at 2.3 μm, the NaI doublet and the CaI triplet to estimate metallicities using the relation by Ramírez et al. (\\cite{Ramirez2000}). The metallicity distribution of the ISOGAL objects shows a mean [Fe/H] ~ -0.25 dex with a dispersion of +/- 0.40 dex which is in agreement with the values of Ramírez et al. (\\cite{Ramirez2000}) for Galactic Bulge fields between b = -4o and b = -1.3o. A comparison with the solar neighbourhood sample of Lançon & Wood (\\cite{LW}) shows that our sample is ~ 0.5 dex more metal-rich on average. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. The spectra are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?/A+A/405/531

  3. On the missing second generation AGB stars in NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Santi; Salaris, Maurizio; Pietrinferni, Adriano; Vink, Jorick S.; Monelli, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    In recent years the view of Galactic globular clusters as simple stellar populations has changed dramatically, it is now thought that basically all globular clusters host multiple stellar populations, each with its own chemical abundance pattern and colour-magnitude diagram sequence. Recent spectroscopic observations of asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have disclosed a low [Na/Fe] abundance for the whole sample, suggesting that they are all first generation stars, and that all second generation stars fail to reach the AGB in this cluster. A scenario proposed to explain these observations invokes strong mass loss in second generation horizontal branch stars - all located at the hot side of the blue and extended horizontal branch of this cluster - possibly induced by the metal enhancement associated to radiative levitation. This enhanced mass loss would prevent second generation stars from reaching the asymptotic giant branch phase, thus explaining at the same time the low value of the ratio between horizontal branch and asymptotic giant branch stars (the R2 parameter) observed in NGC 6752. We have critically discussed this mass-loss scenario, finding that the required mass-loss rates are of the order of 10-9 M⊙ yr-1, significantly higher than current theoretical and empirical constraints. By making use of synthetic horizontal branch simulations, we demonstrate that our modelling correctly predicts the R2 parameter for NGC 6752, without the need to invoke very efficient mass loss during the core He-burning stage. As a test of our stellar models we show that we can reproduce the observed value of R2 for both M 3, a cluster of approximately the same metallicity and with a redder horizontal branch morphology, and M 13, a cluster with a horizontal branch very similar to NGC 6752. However, our simulations for the NGC 6752 horizontal branch predict however the presence of a significant fraction of second generation stars (about 50%) along

  4. Ultraviolet emission from main-sequence companions of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Guerrero, Martín A.

    2016-09-01

    Although the majority of known binary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are symbiotic systems (i.e. with a white dwarf as a secondary star), main-sequence companions of AGB stars can be more numerous, even though they are more difficult to find because the primary high luminosity hampers the detection of the companion at visual wavelengths. However, in the ultraviolet the flux emitted by a secondary with Teff > 5500 ˜ 6000 K may prevail over that of the primary, and then it can be used to search for candidates to binary AGB stars. In this work, theoretical atmosphere models are used to calculate the UV excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands due to a main-sequence companion. After analysing a sample of confirmed binary AGB stars, we propose as a criterium for binarity: (1) the detection of the AGB star in the GALEX far-UV band and/or (2) a GALEX near-UV observed-to-predicted flux ratio >20. These criteria have been applied to a volume-limited sample of AGB stars within 500 pc of the Sun; 34 out of the sample of 58 AGB stars (˜60 per cent) fulfill them, implying to have a main-sequence companion of spectral type earlier than K0. The excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands cannot be attributed to a single temperature companion star, thus suggesting that the UV emission of the secondary might be absorbed by the extended atmosphere and circumstellar envelope of the primary or that UV emission is produced in accretion flows.

  5. Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  6. (Re)Solving Mysteries Of Convection And Mass Loss Of AGB Stars: What New Models And Observations Tell Us About Long-Standing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfner, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    The recent progress in high-spatial-resolution techniques, spanning wavelengths from the visual to the radio regime, is leading to new valuable insights into the complex dynamical atmospheres of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and their wind forming regions. Striking examples are images of asymmetries and inhomogeneities in the photospheric and dust-forming layers which vary on time-scales of months. These features are probably related to large-scale convective flows predicted by 3D 'star-in-a-box' models. Furthermore, high-resolution observations make it possible to measure dust condensation distances, and they give information about the chemical composition and sizes of dust grains in the close vicinity of cool giants. These are essential constraints for building realistic models of wind acceleration and developing a predictive theory of mass loss for AGB stars, which is a crucial ingredient of stellar and galactic chemical evolution models.

  7. The ALMA detection of CO rotational line emission in AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Marigo, P.; Sloan, G. C.; Decin, L.; Feast, M. W.; Goldman, S. R.; Justtanont, K.; Kerschbaum, F.; Matsuura, M.; McDonald, I.; Olofsson, H.; Sahai, R.; van Loon, J. Th.; Wood, P. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Boyer, M. L.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Jones, O. C.; Lagadec, E.; Meixner, M.; Rawlings, M. G.; Srinivasan, S.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Low- and intermediate-mass stars lose most of their stellar mass at the end of their lives on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Determining gas and dust mass-loss rates (MLRs) is important in quantifying the contribution of evolved stars to the enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: This study attempts to spectrally resolve CO thermal line emission in a small sample of AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Methods: The Atacama Large Millimeter Array was used to observe two OH/IR stars and four carbon stars in the LMC in the CO J = 2-1 line. Results: We present the first measurement of expansion velocities in extragalactic carbon stars. All four C stars are detected and wind expansion velocities and stellar velocities are directly measured. Mass-loss rates are derived from modelling the spectral energy distribution and Spitzer/IRS spectrum with the DUSTY code. The derived gas-to-dust ratios allow the predicted velocities to agree with the observed gas-to-dust ratios. The expansion velocities and MLRs are compared to a Galactic sample of well-studied relatively low MLRs stars supplemented with extreme C stars with properties that are more similar to the LMC targets. Gas MLRs derived from a simple formula are significantly smaller than those derived from dust modelling, indicating an order of magnitude underestimate of the estimated CO abundance, time-variable mass loss, or that the CO intensities in LMC stars are lower than predicted by the formula derived for Galactic objects. This could be related to a stronger interstellar radiation field in the LMC. Conclusions: Although the LMC sample is small and the comparison to Galactic stars is non-trivial because of uncertainties in their distances (hence luminosities), it appears that for C stars the wind expansion velocities in the LMC are lower than in the solar neighbourhood, while the MLRs appear to be similar. This is in agreement with dynamical dust-driven wind models.

  8. Thermohaline Mixing and Isotopic Ratios in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, R. J.

    2015-08-01

    I investigate the effects of thermohaline mixing on the isotopic ratios of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. While thermohaline mixing has been shown to be an effective means of changing the surface composition of low-mass stars while they ascend the upper part of the giant branch, the effect of this mechanism on the AGB is almost negligible. The carbon isotopic ratio is barely affected during the earliest pulses, and as the 12C content increases due to third dredge-up this effect becomes seriously curtailed. This is because structural changes affect the relative locations of 3He-burning and the CNO cycle. While the isotopic ratios are barely affected by thermohaline mixing on the AGB, there is a substantial increase in the surface lithium abundance due to the action of this mechanism.

  9. CN and CH Abundance Analysis in a Sample of Eight Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolinski, Jason P.; Lee, Y.; Beers, T. C.; Martell, S. L.; An, D.; Sivarani, T.

    2011-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters exhibit star-to-star variations in their light element abundances that are not predicted by formation and evolution models involving single stellar generations. Recently it has been suggested that internal pollution from early supernovae and AGB winds may have played important roles in forming a second generation of enriched stars. We present updated results of a CN and CH abundance analysis of stars from the base to the tip of the red giant branch, and in some cases down onto the main sequence, for eight globular clusters with available photometric and spectroscopic data from SDSS-I and SDSS-II/SEGUE. These results include a discussion of the radial distribution of CN enrichment and how this may impact the current paradigm. Funding for SDSS-I and SDSS-II has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, the Max Planck Society, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS Web Site is http://www.sdss.org/. This work was supported in part by grants PHY 02-16783 and PHY 08-22648: Physics Frontiers Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  10. Nucleosynthesis Predictions for Intermediate-Mass AGB Stars: Comparison to Observations of Type I Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; vanRaai, Mark A.; Lugaro, Maria; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    2008-01-01

    Type I planetary nebulae (PNe) have high He/H and N/O ratios and are thought to be descendants of stars with initial masses of approx. 3-8 Stellar Mass. These characteristics indicate that the progenitor stars experienced proton-capture nucleosynthesis at the base of the convective envelope, in addition to the slow neutron capture process operating in the He-shell (the s-process). We compare the predicted abundances of elements up to Sr from models of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to measured abundances in Type I PNe. In particular, we compare predictions and observations for the light trans-iron elements Se and Kr, in order to constrain convective mixing and the s-process in these stars. A partial mixing zone is included in selected models to explore the effect of a C-13 pocket on the s-process yields. The solar-metallicity models produce enrichments of [(Se, Kr)/Fe] less than or approx. 0.6, consistent with Galactic Type I PNe where the observed enhancements are typically less than or approx. 0.3 dex, while lower metallicity models predict larger enrichments of C, N, Se, and Kr. O destruction occurs in the most massive models but it is not efficient enough to account for the greater than or approx. 0.3 dex O depletions observed in some Type I PNe. It is not possible to reach firm conclusions regarding the neutron source operating in massive AGB stars from Se and Kr abundances in Type I PNe; abundances for more s-process elements may help to distinguish between the two neutron sources. We predict that only the most massive (M grester than or approx.5 Stellar Mass) models would evolve into Type I PNe, indicating that extra-mixing processes are active in lower-mass stars (3-4 Stellar Mass), if these stars are to evolve into Type I PNe.

  11. Tidal Distortion of the Envelope of an AGB Star IRS 3 near Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Cotton, W.; Schödel, R.; Royster, M. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Kunneriath, D.

    2017-03-01

    We present radio and millimeter continuum observations of the Galactic center taken with the Very Large Array (VLA) and ALMA at 44 and 226 GHz, respectively. We detect radio and millimeter emission from IRS 3, lying ∼4.″5 NW of Sgr A*, with a spectrum that is consistent with the photospheric emission from an AGB star at the Galactic center. Millimeter images reveal that the envelope of IRS 3, the brightest and most extended 3.8 μm Galactic center stellar source, consists of two semicircular dust shells facing the direction of Sgr A*. The outer circumstellar shell, at a distance of 1.6 × 104 au, appears to break up into “fingers” of dust directed toward Sgr A*. These features coincide with molecular CS (5–4) emission and a near-IR extinction cloud distributed between IRS 3 and Sgr A*. The NE–SW asymmetric shapes of the IRS 3 shells seen at 3.8 μm and radio are interpreted as structures that are tidally distorted by Sgr A*. Using the kinematics of CS emission and the proper motion of IRS 3, the tidally distorted outflowing material from the envelope after 5000 yr constrains the distance of IRS 3 to ∼0.7 pc in front of or ∼0.5 pc behind Sgr A*. This suggests that the mass loss by stars near Sgr A* can supply a reservoir of molecular material near Sgr A*. We also present dark features in radio continuum images coincident with the envelope of IRS 3. These dusty stars provide examples in which high-resolution radio continuum images can identify dust-enshrouded stellar sources embedded in an ionized medium.

  12. Cool Bottom Processing on the AGB and Presolar Grain Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nollett, Kenneth M.; Busso, M.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe results from a model of cool bottom processing (CBP) in AGB (asymptotic giant branch) stars. We predict O, Al, C and N isotopic compositions of circumstellar grains. Measured compositions of mainstream SiC grains and many oxide grains are consistent with CBP. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of southern post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D. J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Pollard, K. R.; Albrow, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 20 post-AGB stars from Mt John University Observatory. Photometric measures were carried our suing Johnson BV and Cousins RI filters, and the radial velocity measurements were acquired using spectra from an echelle spectrograph. Our program spanned five years and the stars covered a range of spectral types from B to K in order to investigate the behavior of post-AGB stars as they evolve away from the AGB. A number of stars proved to be variable inways incompatible with post-AGB models and are reclassified. Periodicities are presented for a number of stars. Photometrically, HD 70379 was found to be pulsating in two modes with periods of 85 and 97 d. The radial velocities also varied, with the peak amplitude occurring when the photometry was also changing most. AI CMi presented three different types of spectra associated with photometric brightness, with varying strengths of narrow emission lines and molecular bandheads. The Hα profiles in almost all of the stars show evidence of emission which varies on time scales of days to months. The Na D line profiles are generally complex showing between 4 and 7 components due to both circumstellar and interstellar material.

  14. Winds of Binary AGB Stars as Observed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Paladini, C.; Cox, N. L. J.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Pourbaix, D.; Mohamed, S.; Siopis, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of the large-scale environments of binary AGB stars as part of the Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample. From the literature we found 18 of the objects to be members of physically bound multiple systems. Several show a large-scale far-IR emission which differs significantly from spherical symmetry. A probable cause is the gravitational force of the companion on the stellar AGB wind and the mass-losing star itself. A spiral pattern is thereby imprinted in the dusty stellar wind. The most remarkable structures are found around o Ceti, W Aquilæ, R Aquarii, and π1 Gruis. The environments of o Cet and W Aql show a spiral pattern while the symbiotic nature of R Aqr is revealed as two opposing arms which reflect a nova outburst. The emission around π1 Gru is dominated by two structures, a disk and an arc, which are presumably not caused by the same companion. We found evidence that π1 Gru is a hierarchical triple system in which a close companion attracts the AGB wind onto the orbital plane and the outer companion forms a spiral arm. These far-IR observations underline the role of a companion as a major external influence in creating asymmetric winds in the AGB phase, even before the star becomes a planetary nebula (PN).

  15. The Governance Committee: Independent Institutions. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. B.; Lanier, James L.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimal committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices outlined in this publication support the objectives of board…

  16. Milky Way red dwarfs in the BoRG survey; galactic scale-height and the distribution of dwarf stars in WFC3 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, B. W.; Bouwens, R.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; Ryan, R.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.

    2014-06-10

    -redshift galaxies. The relative ubiquity of M-dwarfs however will make them ideal tracers of Galactic halo substructure with EUCLID and reference stars for James Webb Space Telescope observations.

  17. Modeling galactic chemical evolution in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruta, Carolyn Cynthia

    The most fundamental challenges to models of galactic chemical evolution (GCE) are uncertainties in the basic inputs, including the properties of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), stellar nucleosynthetic yields, and the rate of return of mass and energy to the interstellar and intergalactic medium by Type Ia and II supernovae and stellar winds. In this dissertation, we provide a critical examination of widely available stellar nucleosynthetic yield data, with an eye toward modeling GCE in the broad scope of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We examine the implications of uncertain inputs for the Galactic stellar IMF, and nucleosynthetic yields from stellar-evolution calculations, on our ability to ask detailed questions regarding the observed Galactic chemical-abundance patterns. We find a marked need for stellar feedback data from stars of initial mass 8 to 12 Msun and above 40 M sun, and for initial stellar metallicities above and below solar, Z sun=0.02. We find the largest discrepancies amongst nucleosynthetic yield calculations are due to various groups' treatment of hot bottom burning, formation of the 13C pocket in asymptotic giant-branch (AGB) stars, and details of mass loss, rotation, and convection in all stars. Our model of GCE is used to post-process simulations to explore in greater detail the nucleosynthetic evolution of the stellar populations and interstellar/intergalactic medium, and to compare directly to the chemical abundances of the Milky Way stellar halo and dwarf spheroidal galaxy stellar populations.

  18. Galactic planetary nebulae with precise nebular abundances as a tool to understand the evolution of asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Yagüe, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present nucleosynthesis predictions (HeCNOCl) from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models, with diffusive overshooting from all the convective borders, in the metallicity range Z⊙/4 < Z < 2 Z⊙. They are compared to recent precise nebular abundances in a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) that is divided among double-dust chemistry (DC) and oxygen-dust chemistry (OC) according to the infrared dust features. Unlike the similar subsample of Galactic carbon-dust chemistry PNe recently analysed by us, here the individual abundance errors, the higher metallicity spread, and the uncertain dust types/subtypes in some PNe do not allow a clear determination of the AGB progenitor masses (and formation epochs) for both PNe samples; the comparison is thus more focused on a object-by-object basis. The lowest metallicity OC PNe evolve from low-mass (˜1 M⊙) O-rich AGBs, while the higher metallicity ones (all with uncertain dust classifications) display a chemical pattern similar to the DC PNe. In agreement with recent literature, the DC PNe mostly descend from high-mass (M ≥ 3.5 M⊙) solar/supersolar metallicity AGBs that experience hot bottom burning (HBB), but other formation channels in low-mass AGBs like extra mixing, stellar rotation, binary interaction, or He pre-enrichment cannot be disregarded until more accurate C/O ratios would be obtained. Two objects among the DC PNe show the imprint of advanced CNO processing and deep second dredge-up, suggesting progenitors masses close to the limit to evolve as core collapse supernovae (above 6M⊙). Their actual C/O ratio, if confirmed, indicate contamination from the third dredge-up, rejecting the hypothesis that the chemical composition of such high-metallicity massive AGBs is modified exclusively by HBB.

  19. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  20. Galactic warp kinematics: model vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, H.; Figueras, F.; Aguilar, L.; Mateu, C.; Romero-Gómez, M.; López-Corredoira, M.; Garzón, F.

    2015-05-01

    We test the capability of several methods to identify and characterise the warping of the stellar disc of our Galaxy in the Gaia era. We have developed a first kinematic model for the galactic warp and derived the analytical expressions for the force field of a warped Miyamoto- Nagai potential. We have generated realistic mock catalogues of OB, A and red clump stars within the warped galactic disc, where a very complete model of Gaia observables and their expected errors are included. We use the family of Great Circle Cell Counts (GC3) methods and LonKin methods for detecting and characterising the galactic warp. As a complementary work, we look into one of the existing proper motion catalogue namely the UCAC4, and look for the kinematic signature of the warp. We demonstrate the necessity of correcting for a possible residual rotation of the Hipparcos celestial reference frame with respect to the extra galactic inertial one.

  1. Stellar Evolution with Rotation: Mixing Processes in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driebe, T.; Blöcker, T.

    We included diffusive angular momentum transport and rotationally induced mixing processes in our stellar evolution code and studied the influence of rotation on the evolution of intermediate mass stars (M*=2dots6 Msolar) towards and along the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). The calculations start in the fully convective pre-main sequence phase and the initial angular momentu m was adjusted such that on the zero-age main sequence vrot=200 km/ s is achieved. The diffusion coefficients for the five rotational instabilities considered (dynamical shear, secular shear, Eddington-Sweet (ES) circulation, Solberg-Høiland-instability and Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability) were adopted from Heger et al. (2000, ApJ 528, 368). Mixing efficiency and sensitivity of these processes against molecular weight gradients have been determined by calibration of the main sequence width. In this study we focus on the abundance evolution of carbon. On the one hand, the surface abundance ratios of 12C/13C a nd 12C/16O at the base of the AGB were found to be ≈ 7dots 10 and ≈ 0.1, resp., being a factor of two lower than in non-rotating models. This results from the slow but continuously operating rotationally induced mixing due to the ES-circulation and the GSF-instability during the long main sequence phase. On the other hand, 13C serves as neutron source for interior s-process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars vi a 13C(α,n)16O. Herwig et al. (1997, A&A 324, L81) found that a 13C pocket is forme d in the intershell region of 3 Msolar AGB star if diffusive overshoot is considered. Our calculations show, that mixing processes due to rotation open an alternative channel for the formation of a 13C pocket as found by Langer et al. (1999, A&A 346, L37). Again, ES-circulation and GSF-instability are the predominant rotational mixing processes.

  2. HIRAS images of fossil dust shells around AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.; Kester, Do J. M.; Bontekoe, Tj. Romke; Loup, C.

    1994-01-01

    We present high resolution HIRAS 60 and 100 micron images of AGB stars surrounded by fossil dust shells. Resolving the extended emission of the circumstellar dust allows a determination of the mass loss history of the star. We show that the geometry of the 60 micron emission surrounding HR 3126 agrees well with that of the optical reflection nebula. The emission around the carbon star U Hya is resolved into a central point source and a ring of dust, and the mass loss rate in the detached shell is 70 times higher than the current mass loss rate.

  3. Leadership in Governance: The View from AGB's Current and Former Board Chairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusteeship, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The challenges with which college and university boards must grapple promise to become only more complex in the coming years, placing ever-greater demands on the leaders of those boards. This article presents a conversation between Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) President Richard D. Legon and two AGB leaders who…

  4. THE ABUNDANCE OF FLUORINE IN NORMAL G AND K STARS OF THE GALACTIC THIN DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Pilachowski, C. A.; Pace, Cameron E-mail: cjamespace@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    The abundance of fluorine is determined from the (2-0) R9 2.3358 μm feature of the molecule HF for several dozen normal G and K stars in the Galactic thin disk from spectra obtained with the Phoenix IR spectrometer on the 2.1 m telescope at Kitt Peak. The abundances are analyzed in the context of Galactic chemical evolution to explore the contributions of supernovae and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the abundance of fluorine in the thin disk. The average abundance of fluorine in the thin disk is found to be [F/Fe] = +0.23 ± 0.03, and the [F/Fe] ratio is flat or declines slowly with metallicity in the range from –0.6 < [Fe/H] < +0.3, within the limits of our estimated uncertainty. The measured abundance of fluorine and lack of variation with metallicity in Galactic thin disk stars suggest neutrino spallation in Type II supernovae contributes significantly to the Galactic fluorine abundance, although contributions from AGB stars may also be important.

  5. ALMA observations of the nearby AGB star L2 Puppis. I. Mass of the central star and detection of a candidate planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Homan, W.; Richards, A. M. S.; Decin, L.; McDonald, I.; Montargès, M.; Ohnaka, K.

    2016-12-01

    Six billion years from now, while evolving on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), the Sun will metamorphose from a red giant into a beautiful planetary nebula. This spectacular evolution will impact the solar system planets, but observational confirmations of the predictions of evolution models are still elusive as no planet orbiting an AGB star has yet been discovered. The nearby AGB red giant L2 Puppis (d = 64 pc) is surrounded by an almost edge-on circumstellar dust disk. We report new observations with ALMA at very high angular resolution (18 × 15 mas) in band 7 (ν ≈ 350 GHz) that allow us to resolve the velocity profile of the molecular disk. We establish that the gas velocity profile is Keplerian within the central cavity of the dust disk, allowing us to derive the mass of the central star L2 Pup A, mA = 0.659 ± 0.011 ± 0.041 M⊙ (± 6.6%). From evolutionary models, we determine that L2 Pup A had a near-solar main-sequence mass, and is therefore a close analog of the future Sun in 5 to 6 Gyr. The continuum map reveals a secondary source (B) at a radius of 2 AU contributing fB/fA = 1.3 ± 0.1% of the flux of the AGB star. L2 Pup B is also detected in CO emission lines at a radial velocity of vB = 12.2 ± 1.0 km s-1. The close coincidence of the center of rotation of the gaseous disk with the position of the continuum emission from the AGB star allows us to constrain the mass of the companion to mB = 12 ± 16 MJup. L2 Pup B is most likely a planet or low-mass brown dwarf with an orbital period of about five years. Its continuum brightness and molecular emission suggest that it may be surrounded by an extended molecular atmosphere or an accretion disk. L2 Pup therefore emerges as a promising vantage point on the distant future of our solar system.

  6. The pathways of C: from AGB stars, to the Interstellar Medium, and finally into the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    The origin, and role of C in the formation of first solar system aggregates is described. Stellar grains evidence demonstrates that Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars were nearby to the solar nebula at the time of solar system formation. Such stars continue to burn H and He in shells that surround the C-O core. During their evolution, flashes occur in the He shell and the C, and O produced are eventually dredged up into the star's envelop and then to the stellar surface, and finally masively ejected to the interstellar medium (IM). Once in a molecular cloud, the electrophilicity of C makes this element reactable with the surrounding gas to produce different molecular species. Primitive meteorites, particularly these known as chondrites, preserved primeval materials of the disk. The abundances of short-lived radionuclides (SLN), inferred to have been present in the early solar system (ESS), are a constraint on the birth and early evolution of the solar system as their relatively short half lives do not allow the observed abundances to be explained by galactic chemical evolution processes. We present a model of a 6.5 solar masses star of solar metallicity that simultaneously match the abundances of SLNs inferred to have been present in the ESS by using a dilution factor of 1 part of AGB material per 300 parts of original solar nebula material, and taking into account a time interval between injection of SLNs and consolidation of chondrites equal to 0.53 Myr [2]. Such a polluting source does not overproduce 53Mn, as supernova models do, and only marginally affects isotopic ratios of stable elements. The AGB stars released O- and C-rich gas with important oxidizing implications to first solar system materials as recently detected in circumstellar environments [3]. REF: [1] Lada C.J. and Lada E.A. 2003. Ann. Rev. A&A. 41: 57; [2] Trigo-Rodriguez J.M. et al. 2009. MAPS 44: 627; [3] Decin L. et al. 2010. Nature 467: 64.

  7. Mass-loss on the red giant branch: the value and metallicity dependence of Reimers' η in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The impact of metallicity on the mass-loss rate from red giant branch (RGB) stars is studied through its effect on the parameters of horizontal branch (HB) stars. The scaling factors from Reimers and Schröder and Cuntz are used to measure the efficiency of RGB mass-loss for typical stars in 56 well-studied Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The median values among clusters are, respectively, η _R = 0.477 ± 0.070 ^{+0.050}_{-0.062} and η _SC = 0.172 ± 0.024 ^{+0.018}_{-0.023} (standard deviation and systematic uncertainties, respectively). Over a factor of 200 in iron abundance, η varies by ≲30 per cent, thus mass-loss mechanisms on the RGB have very little metallicity dependence. Any remaining dependence is within the current systematic uncertainties on cluster ages and evolution models. The low standard deviation of η among clusters (≈14 per cent) contrasts with the variety of HB morphologies. Since η incorporates cluster age, this suggests that age accounts for the majority of the `second parameter problem', and that a Reimers-like law provides a good mass-loss model. The remaining spread in η correlates with cluster mass and density, suggesting helium enrichment provides the third parameter explaining HB morphology of GCs. We close by discussing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) mass-loss, finding that the AGB tip luminosity is better reproduced and η has less metallicity dependence if GCs are more co-eval than generally thought.

  8. Post-AGB stars in the SMC as tracers of stellar evolution: the extreme s-process enrichment of the 21 μm star J004441.04-732136.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Karakas, A. I.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Wood, P. R.

    2012-05-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we want to focus on the still poorly understood asymptotic giant branch (AGB) third dredge-up processes and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: We confront accurate spectral abundance analyses of post-AGB stars in both the Magellanic Clouds, to state-of-the-art AGB model predictions. With this comparison we aim at improving our understanding of the 3rd dredge-up phenomena and their dependencies on initial mass and metallicity. Methods: Because of the well constrained distance with respect to Galactic post-AGB stars, we choose an extra-galactic post-AGB star for this contribution, namely the only known 21 μm object of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): J004441.04-732136.4. We used optical UVES spectra to perform an accurate spectral abundance analysis. With photometric data of multiple catalogues we construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) and perform a variability analysis. The results are then compared to predictions of tailored theoretical chemical AGB evolutionary models for which we used two evolution codes. Results: Spectral abundance results reveal J004441.04-732136.4 to be one of the most s-process enriched objects found up to date, while the photospheric C/O ratio of 1.9 ± 0.7, shows the star is only modestly C-rich. J004441.04-732136.4 also displays a low [Fe/H] = -1.34 ± 0.32, which is significantly lower than the mean metallicity of the SMC. From the SED, a luminosity of 7600 ± 200 L⊙ is found, together with E(B - V) = 0.64 ± 0.02. According to evolutionary post-AGB tracks, the initial mass should be ≈1.3 M⊙. The photometric variability shows a clear period of 97.6 ± 0.3 days. The detected C/O as well as the high s-process overabundances (e.g. [Y/Fe] = 2.15, [La/Fe] = 2.84) are hard to reconcile with the predictions. The chemical models also predict a high Pb abundance, which is not compatible with the detected spectrum, and a very high 12C/13C, which is not yet constrained

  9. Large-scale asymmetries in the winds of (binary) AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Paladini, C.; Mecina, M.; Pourbaix, D.; Groenewegen, M.; Mohamed, S.

    2014-04-01

    Observations of 78 Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and Red Supergiants were carried out with the PACS photometer on-board Herschel as part of the MESS (Mass loss of Evolved StarS) program. For about 60% of these objects, the dusty wind differs from spherically symmetric and reveals a complex morphology. The majority of these asymmetries are caused by a rather simple incident, the interaction of the stellar wind with the interstellar medium. A bow shock is formed in direction of the stellar motion where the two media interact. However, also much more irregular shapes are encountered in the sample. These structures are often related to the binarity of the stellar system. Accreted material by the companion can cause nova outbursts or bipolar outflows which are relatively common. A rather rare encounter are Archimedean spirals that are imprinted in the wind which are now found for a handful of objects, among W Aquilae observed with Herschel and R Sculptoris with ALMA. The most complicated structures in the MESS sample indicate the interplay of multiple interacting influences. A prominent case is o Ceti (Mira). Its exceptionally high space motion produces a strong bow shock and its white dwarf companion drags an Archimedean spiral into the deformed stellar wind bubble and pierces it with a fast bipolar outflow.

  10. From AGBs to PNe: understanding the observations of evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, Flavia

    2015-08-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars represent one of the main stellar sources for dust production in the Universe. We provide a description of the formation and growth of dust particles in the circumstellar envelope of AGBs, based on detailed calculations of the AGB evolutionary phase. We use stellar population synthesis to interpret the Spitzer observations of dusty AGBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Our results show that carbon-rich and oxygen-rich stars evolve into different and separated regions of the observational diagrams obtained with the Spitzer bands. This allows a straight comparison with the spectroscopically confirmed samples of AGBs in the LMC present in the literature. The overall impact of AGBs on the dust production rate in the LMC is also discussed.The interpretation of the AGB population of the LMC is used to describe the observed chemical abundances of the Planetary Nebulae in the same galaxy. This analysis outlines a clear distinction between stars which experience Hot Bottom Burning and those the Third Dredge Up.

  11. Where Galactic Snakes Live

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment. The sinuous object is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems. In fact, astronomers say the 'snake's belly' may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming.

    The galactic creepy crawler to the right of the snake is another thick cloud core, in which additional burgeoning massive stars might be lurking. The colorful regions below the two cloud cores are less dense cloud material, in which dust has been heated by starlight and glows with infrared light. Yellow and orange dots throughout the image are monstrous developing stars; the red star on the 'belly' of the snake is 20 to 50 times as massive as our sun. The blue dots are foreground stars.

    The red ball at the bottom left is a 'supernova remnant,' the remains of massive star that died in a fiery blast. Astronomers speculate that radiation and winds from the star before it died, in addition to a shock wave created when it exploded, might have played a role in creating the snake.

    Spitzer was able to spot the two black cloud cores using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The objects are hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because their heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, they first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud cores are so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of them, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky. Now, that's spooky!

    Spitzer's new view of the region provides the best look yet at the massive embryonic stars hiding inside the snake. Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope

  12. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    in the halo; 32. Baade-Wesselink analyses of field vs. cluster RR lyrae variables; 33. The rotation of population II A stars; 34. Horizontal branch stars and possibly related objects; 35. A new group of post-AGB objects - the hot carbon-poor stars; 36. MK classifications of hot stars in the halo 37. Photometry of XX Virginis and V716 Ophiuchi and the period luminosity relations of type II cepheids; 38. Rotation and oxygen line strengths in blue horizontal branch stars; Part V. Miscellaneous: 39. UBV CCd photometry of the halo of M31; 40. Can stars still form in the galactic halo?; 41. The ultraviolet imaging telescope on the Astro -1 and Astro -2 missions; 42. Are analogues of hot subdwarf stars responsible for the UVX phenomenon in galaxy nucleli; 43. A survey for field BHB stars outside the solar circle; 44. Post-AGB A and F supergiants as standard candles; 45. The extended horizontal-branch: a challenge for stellar evolution theory; 46. Astronomical patterns in fractals: the work of A. G. Davis Philip on the Mandelbrot Set; Part VI. Summary: 47. Final remarks; Author index; Subject index.

  13. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    in the halo; 32. Baade-Wesselink analyses of field vs. cluster RR lyrae variables; 33. The rotation of population II A stars; 34. Horizontal branch stars and possibly related objects; 35. A new group of post-AGB objects - the hot carbon-poor stars; 36. MK classifications of hot stars in the halo 37. Photometry of XX Virginis and V716 Ophiuchi and the period luminosity relations of type II cepheids; 38. Rotation and oxygen line strengths in blue horizontal branch stars; Part V. Miscellaneous: 39. UBV CCd photometry of the halo of M31; 40. Can stars still form in the galactic halo?; 41. The ultraviolet imaging telescope on the Astro -1 and Astro -2 missions; 42. Are analogues of hot subdwarf stars responsible for the UVX phenomenon in galaxy nucleli; 43. A survey for field BHB stars outside the solar circle; 44. Post-AGB A and F supergiants as standard candles; 45. The extended horizontal-branch: a challenge for stellar evolution theory; 46. Astronomical patterns in fractals: the work of A. G. Davis Philip on the Mandelbrot Set; Part VI. Summary: 47. Final remarks; Author index; Subject index.

  14. Erratum: “Milky Way Red Dwarfs in the Borg Survey; Galactic Scale-Height and the Distribution of Dwarfs Stars in WFC3 Imaging" (2014, ApJ, 788, 77)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.; Bouwens, R.; Ryan, R.; van Vledder, I.; van der Vlugt, D.

    2016-07-01

    In the catalog of M-dwarfs presented in Holwerda et al. (2014, H14 hereafter), there is an issue with the conversion from celestial coordinates to Galactic ones, done with pyephem a wrapper around a trusted and vetted library ephermis. Here we present the corrected coordinates (using AstroPy) and distances based on AB magnitudes. We have amended the tables and figures accordingly. The relation between vertical scale-height (z0) and M- dwarf subtype found in H14 is no longer present. We find a scale-height of 600 pc for all types, in part due to the presence of a second Galactic structural component.

  15. Binarity and Accretion: X-Ray Emission from AGB stars with FUV Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-10-01

    We propose a pilot survey for X-ray emission from AGB stars that are candidates for having binary companions with active accretion. These objects were identified via our innovative technique to search for FUV/NUV excesses in AGB stars using GALEX. The detection (or non-detection) of X-rays from this sample will enable us to begin testing models for the origin of the UV-excesses, leading to vital breakthroughs in our understanding of accretion-related phenomena and binarity in AGB stars. A larger survey, optimised using results fron this study, will be proposed in future cycles.

  16. Spectroscopic analysis of four post-AGB candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, R. E.; Giridhar, S.; Pereira, C. B.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Muneer, S.

    2014-10-01

    We have done a detailed abundance analysis of four unexplored candidate post- Asymptotic Giant Branch(AGB) stars IRAS 13110 - 6629, IRAS 17579 - 3121, IRAS 18321 - 1401 and IRAS 18489 - 0629 using high resolution spectra. We have constructed Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for these objects using the existing photometric data combined with infrared (IR) fluxes. For all sample stars, the SEDs exhibit double peaked energy distribution with well separated IR peaks showing the presence of dusty circumstellar material. The CNO abundances indicate the production of N via CN cycling, but observed [C/Fe] indicates the mixing of carbon produced by He burning by third dredge up although C/O ratio remains less that 1. A moderate DG-effect is clearly seen for IRAS 18489 - 0629 and IRAS 17579 - 3121 while a large scatter observed in depletion plots for IRAS 18321 - 1401 and IRAS 13110 - 6629 indicate the presence of other processes affecting the observed abundance pattern.

  17. ARGOS - II. The Galactic bulge survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K.; Ness, M.; Wylie-de-Boer, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Asplund, M.; Lewis, G.; Yong, D.; Lane, R.; Kiss, L.; Ibata, R.

    2013-02-01

    We describe the motivation, field locations and stellar selection for the Abundances and Radial velocity Galactic Origins Survey (ARGOS) spectroscopic survey of 28 000 stars in the bulge and inner disc of the Milky Way galaxy across latitudes of b = -5° to -10°. The primary goal of this survey is to constrain the formation processes of the bulge and establish whether it is predominantly a merger or instability remnant. From the spectra (R = 11 000), we have measured radial velocities and determined stellar parameters, including metallicities and [α/Fe] ratios. Distances were estimated from the derived stellar parameters and about 14 000 stars are red giants within 3.5 kpc of the Galactic Centre. In this paper, we present the observations and analysis methods. Subsequent papers (III and IV) will discuss the stellar metallicity distribution and kinematics of the Galactic bulge and inner disc, and the implications for the formation of the bulge.

  18. The TP-AGB phase: a new model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, P.; Bressan, A.; Chiosi, C.

    1996-09-01

    This study deals with the TP-AGB phase of low and intermediate-mass stars (0.7<=M/Msun_<=5). To this aim, a semi-analytical model is constructed. A representative set of TP-AGB evolutionary models is calculated for two classes of initial metallicity (Z=0.02 and Z=0.008). A detailed analysis is performed to estimate the changes in the surface chemical composition caused by (1) the inter-shell nucleosynthesis and convective dredge-up; (2) nuclear burning in the deepest layers of the convective envelope; and (3) mass loss by stellar wind. The evolution of the abundances of 13 chemical elements (H, ^3^He, ^4^He, ^12^C, ^13^C, ^14^N, ^15^N, ^16^O, ^17^O,^18^O, ^20^Ne, ^22^Ne, ^25^Mg) is followed. In particular, the formation of carbon stars is investigated. We use the observed luminosity function of carbon stars in the LMC as the constraint whose fulfillment determines the values of the parameters adopted in the model, namely: the minimum core mass for dredge-up M_c_^min^ and the efficiency of the third dredge-up λ. In this way, we derive a proper calibration which the reliability of the chemical analysis stands on. We calculate the stellar yields for both metallicities to provide new data for these key-ingredients in the process of chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. The chemical composition of PNe is derived and compared to the latest experimental data both in the Galaxy and in the LMC, which leads to a partial agreement. Observed information on the correlation between luminosity and pulsational period of Mira and OH/IR variables is used to test further our results. Finally, we predict the initial-final mass relation and we compare it to the semi-empirically determined one for the solar neighbourhood. The agreement turns out to be satisfactory.

  19. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  20. The FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, Steven N.; Flamingos-2 Galactic Center Survey Team

    2010-03-01

    The FLAMINGOS-2 instrument achieved high-quality first-light observations on the Gemini South telescope in September 2009 and is undergoing further testing and scientific commissioning into early 2010. Based on the results so far, FLAMINGOS-2 (F2) on the Gemini 8-meter telescope is an extremely powerful wide-field near-infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph. In order to take best advantage of the strengths of F2 early in its life cycle, we propose to use 21 nights of Gemini guaranteed time in 3 surveys - the FLAMINGOS-2 Early Science Surveys (F2ESS). The F2ESS will encompass 3 corresponding scientific themes - the Galactic Center, extragalactic astronomy, and star formation. In particular, the Galactic Center Survey will identify the IR couterparts to several hundred new X-ray binaries in the Galactic Center. This will allow us to identify the nature of the mysterious Chandra source population in the Galactic Center and provide tremendous opportunities for multi-wavelength follow-up observations. In addition, the "by-catch" of this survey will be a catalog of several thousand red giant branch stars with accurate spectroscopy -- these can be used to measure the star formation history of the Galactic Center and thus constrain the mass evolution history of the supermassive black hole in Sgr A*. In this poster, I review the plans for carrying out this survey with F2, data analysis plans and software, and the expected scientific impact from this powerful new observational tool.

  1. Galactic Halos of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows two companion galaxies, NGC 4625 (top) and NGC 4618 (bottom), and their surrounding cocoons of cool hydrogen gas (purple). The huge set of spiral arms on NGC 4625 (blue) was discovered by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Though these arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light, they glow brightly in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light.

    The vibrant spiral arms are also quite lengthy, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far.

    Astronomers do not know why NGC 4625 grew arms while NGC 4618 did not. The purple nebulosity shown here illustrates that hydrogen gas - an ingredient of star formation - is diffusely distributed around both galaxies. This means that other unknown factors led to the development of the arms of NGC 4625.

    Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own.

    The image is composed of ultraviolet, visible-light and radio data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, the Netherlands, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. Radio emissions are colored purple.

  2. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  3. ÔøºA VLTI survey of dusty envelopes of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, C.; Klotz, D.; Sacuto, S.; Lagadec, E.; Wittkowski, M.; Hron, J.; Jorissen, A.; Groenewegen, M.; Kerschbaum, F.; Verhoelst, T.; Richichi, A.; Olofsson, H.

    2014-04-01

    Taking advantage of the results from the Herschel Mass-Loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) program we initiated a coordinated effort to study the same sample of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars with different techniques. The aim is to characterise the geometry of the mass-loss process in AGB stars at different spatial scales. Being able to understand the shaping-mechanism on this evolutionary stage is crucial also for the successors. In this contribution we present the results of the VLTI/MIDI Large Program on AGB stars. While MESS probes the interface between the stellar atmosphere and the interstellar medium with MIDI we probe the onset of the stellar wind and of the dust formation. Our sample of 15 AGB stars cover different chemistry and variability type, spanning ideally the all AGB evolution. In our study we report spectral variability but not interferometric variability. This fact has implications on the size of the structures involved in the dust formation process. We detect asymmetric structures and elongation in a few cases, and we make an attempt to connect this with the evolution on the AGB.

  4. The B[e] phenomenon and galactic dust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    Cosmic dust is very important in the evolution of the Universe, because it is used for creation of planets and ultimately life. It is partially produced in the interstellar space but also in the immediate environments of stars. Until recently, only cool stars and very luminous hot stars were considered to be dust producers. We found a new large group of Galactic hot stars with mod- erately low luminosities that seem to produce even more dust than the lumi- nous hot stars. I review known types of stars that produce dust and describe properties of the newly discovered group. A detailed comparison with post- AGB objects that show some similar properties is presented. Hypotheses about the origin and the evolutionary status of this group is discussed.

  5. Multiple populations in more metal-rich galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria J.

    In this thesis we present chemical abundances for bright stars in the intermediate metallicity globular cluster (GC) M5, and the relatively metal-rich GCs M71 and 47 Tuc with the goal of improving the understanding of chemical evolution in the metallicity regime sampled by these three GCs. The first chapter presents a brief historical overview in light element abundance variations in globular clusters. In the second chapter we present the results obtained for 47 Tuc, the most-metal rich cluster of my sample. 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since it is the closest massive GC. Chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu were determined for 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The average [Fe/H]= --0.79+/-0.09 dex is consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ~ --0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields

  6. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  7. The great galactic centre mystery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riegler, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations of the center of the Galaxy show a varying positron-electron annihilation radiation emission, while at radio wavelengths a non-thermal compact source surrounded by ionized gas moving at high velocities can be seen. Line emission maps for atomic and ionized hydrogen and molecular gas suggest gas expulsion and a massive collapsed object. IR observations show that ionized gas in the central few parsecs of the Galactic center is concentrated in at least 14 small clouds. Charge-coupled device images show a pair of faint, very red sources within a few arc seconds of IRS 16 and the compact non-thermal radio source. The positron-electron annihilation line emission implies an annihilation rate of 10 to the 43rd per sec, compared with an observed luminosity at IR wavelengths of 10 to the 40 erg per sec. Some models are briefly discussed.

  8. Sc and neutron-capture abundances in Galactic low- and high-α field halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishlock, C. K.; Yong, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Alves-Brito, A.; Meléndez, J.; Nissen, P. E.; Kobayashi, C.; Casey, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    We determine relative abundance ratios for the neutron-capture elements Zr, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu for a sample of 27 Galactic dwarf stars with -1.5 < [Fe/H] <-0.8. We also measure the iron-peak element Sc. These stars separate into three populations (low- and high-α halo and thick-disc stars) based on the [α/Fe] abundance ratio and their kinematics as discovered by Nissen & Schuster. We find differences between the low- and high-α groups in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], [La/Zr], [Y/Eu], and [Ba/Eu] when including Y and Ba from Nissen & Schuster. For all ratios except [La/Zr], the low-α stars have a lower abundance compared to the high-α stars. The low-α stars display the same abundance patterns of high [Ba/Y] and low [Y/Eu] as observed in present-day dwarf spheroidal galaxies, although with smaller abundance differences, when compared to the high-α stars. These distinct chemical patterns have been attributed to differences in the star formation rate between the two populations and the contribution of low-metallicity, low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the low-α population. By comparing the low-α population with AGB stellar models, we place constraints on the mass range of the AGB stars.

  9. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  10. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  11. Optical Properties of Amorphous Alumina Dust in the Envelopes around O-Rich AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2016-08-01

    We investigate optical properties of amorphous alumina (Al_2O_3) dust grains in the envelopes around O-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using laboratory measured optical data. We derive the optical constants of amorphous alumina over a wide wavelength range that satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relation and reproduce the laboratory data. Using the amorphous alumina and silicate dust, we compare the radiative transfer model results with the observed spectral energy distributions. Comparing the theoretical models with observations on various IR two-color diagrams for a large sample of O-rich AGB stars, we find that the amorphous alumina dust (about 10-40%) mixed with amorphous silicate better models the observed points for the O-rich AGB stars with thin dust envelopes.

  12. The heterotrimeric G-protein β subunit, AGB1, plays multiple roles in the Arabidopsis salinity response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-10-01

    Salinity stress includes both osmotic and ionic toxicity. Sodium homeostasis is influenced by Na(+) uptake and extrusion, vacuolar Na(+) compartmentation and root to shoot Na(+) translocation via transpiration. The knockout mutant of the Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein Gβ subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salt, exhibiting a leaf bleaching phenotype. We show that AGB1 is mainly involved in the ionic toxicity component of salinity stress and plays roles in multiple processes of Na(+) homeostasis. agb1 mutants accumulate more Na(+) and less K(+) in both shoots and roots of hydroponically grown plants, as measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. agb1 plants have higher root to shoot translocation rates of radiolabelled (24) Na(+) under transpiring conditions, as a result of larger stomatal apertures and increased stomatal conductance. (24) Na(+) tracer experiments also show that (24) Na(+) uptake rates by excised roots of agb1 and wild type are initially equal, but that agb1 has higher net Na(+) uptake at 90 min, implicating possible involvement of AGB1 in the regulation of Na(+) efflux. Calcium alleviates the salt hypersensitivity of agb1 by reducing Na(+) accumulation to below the toxicity threshold. Our results provide new insights into the regulatory pathways underlying plant responses to salinity stress, an important agricultural problem.

  13. A New Generation of PARSEC-COLIBRI Stellar Isochrones Including the TP-AGB Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Bressan, Alessandro; Rosenfield, Philip; Aringer, Bernhard; Chen, Yang; Dussin, Marco; Nanni, Ambra; Pastorelli, Giada; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Trabucchi, Michele; Bladh, Sara; Dalcanton, Julianne; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Montalbán, Josefina; Wood, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new generation of PARSEC–COLIBRI stellar isochrones that includes a detailed treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, covering a wide range of initial metallicities (0.0001 < Zi < 0.06). Compared to previous releases, the main novelties and improvements are use of new TP-AGB tracks and related atmosphere models and spectra for M and C-type stars; inclusion of the surface H+He+CNO abundances in the isochrone tables, accounting for the effects of diffusion, dredge-up episodes and hot-bottom burning; inclusion of complete thermal pulse cycles, with a complete description of the in-cycle changes in the stellar parameters; new pulsation models to describe the long-period variability in the fundamental and first-overtone modes; and new dust models that follow the growth of the grains during the AGB evolution, in combination with radiative transfer calculations for the reprocessing of the photospheric emission. Overall, these improvements are expected to lead to a more consistent and detailed description of properties of TP-AGB stars expected in resolved stellar populations, especially in regard to their mean photometric properties from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We illustrate the expected numbers of TP-AGB stars of different types in stellar populations covering a wide range of ages and initial metallicities, providing further details on the “C-star island” that appears at intermediate values of age and metallicity, and about the AGB-boosting effect that occurs at ages close to 1.6-Gyr for populations of all metallicities. The isochrones are available through a new dedicated web server.

  14. Probing the collimation of pristine post-AGB jets with STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2009-07-01

    The shaping of planetary and protoplanetary nebulae {PNe and PPNe} is probably the most exciting yet least understood problem in the late evolution of 1-8 solar mass stars. An increasing number of astronomers believe that fast jet-like winds ejected in the PPN phase are responsible for carving out the diverse shapes in the dense envelopes of the Asymptotic Giant Branch {AGB} stars. To date, the properties of these post-AGB jets have not been characterized and, indeed, their launching/collimation mechanism is still subject to controversial debate. This is due to the lack of the direct observations probing the spatio-kinematic structure of post-AGB winds in the stellar vicinity { 10e16cm}, which is only possible with HST+STIS. Recently, STIS observations have allowed us for the first time the DIRECT study of the structure and kinematics of the elusive post-AGB winds in one PPN, He3-1475 {Sanchez Contreras & Sahai 2001}. Those winds have been discovered through H-alpha blue-shifted absorption features in the inner 0.3"-0.7" of the nebula. These STIS observations have revealed an ultra-fast collimated outflow relatively unaffected by the interaction with the AGB wind that is totally hidden in ground-based spectroscopic observations and HST images. The discovery of the pristine ultra-fast { 2300km/s} jet in He3-1475 is the first observational confirmation of the presence of collimated outflows as close as 10e16cm from the central star. Most importantly, the spatio-kinematic structure of the ultra-fast jet clearly rules out hydrodynamical collimation alone and favors magnetic wind collimation. Therefore, STIS observations provide a unique method of probing the structure, kinematics, and collimation mechanism of the elusive post-AGB winds. We now propose similar observations for a sample of bipolar PPNe with ongoing post-AGB ejections in order to investigate the frequency of jets like those in He3-1475 in other PPNe and elucidate their nature and collimation mechanism

  15. Establishing binarity amongst Galactic RV Tauri stars with a disc⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manick, Rajeev; Van Winckel, Hans; Kamath, Devika; Hillen, Michel; Escorza, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Context. Over the last few decades it has become more evident that binarity is a prevalent phenomenon amongst RV Tauri stars with a disc. This study is a contribution to comprehend the role of binarity upon late stages of stellar evolution. Aims: In this paper we determine the binary status of six Galactic RV Tauri stars, namely DY Ori, EP Lyr, HP Lyr, IRAS 17038-4815, IRAS 09144-4933, and TW Cam, which are surrounded by a dusty disc. The radial velocities are contaminated by high-amplitude pulsations. We disentangle the pulsations from the orbital signal in order to determine accurate orbital parameters. We also place them on the HR diagram, thereby establishing their evolutionary nature. Methods: We used high-resolution spectroscopic time series obtained from the HERMES and CORALIE spectrographs mounted on the Flemish Mercator and Swiss Leonhard Euler Telescopes, respectively. An updated ASAS/AAVSO photometric time series is analysed to complement the spectroscopic pulsation search and to clean the radial velocities from the pulsations. The pulsation-cleaned orbits are fitted with a Keplerian model to determine the spectroscopic orbital parameters. We also calibrated a PLC relationship using type II cepheids in the LMC and apply the relation to our Galactic sample to obtain accurate distances and hence luminosities. Results: All six of the Galactic RV Tauri stars included in this study are binaries with orbital periods ranging between 650 and 1700 days and with eccentricities between 0.2 and 0.6. The mass functions range between 0.08 to 0.55 M⊙ which points to an unevolved low-mass companion. In the photometric time series we detect a long-term variation on the timescale of the orbital period for IRAS 17038-4815, IRAS 09144-4933, and TW Cam. Our derived stellar luminosities indicate that all except DY Ori and EP Lyr are post-AGB stars. DY Ori and EP Lyr are likely examples of the recently discovered dusty post-RGB stars. Conclusions: The orbital parameters

  16. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  17. Spitzer Digs Up Galactic Fossil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a globular cluster previously hidden in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Globular clusters are compact bundles of old stars that date back to the birth of our galaxy, 13 or so billion years ago. Astronomers use these galactic 'fossils' as tools for studying the age and formation of the Milky Way.

    Most clusters orbit around the center of the galaxy well above its dust-enshrouded disc, or plane, while making brief, repeated passes through the plane that each last about a million years. Spitzer, with infrared eyes that can see into the dusty galactic plane, first spotted the newfound cluster during its current pass. A visible-light image (inset of Figure 1) shows only a dark patch of sky.

    The red streak behind the core of the cluster is a dust cloud, which may indicate the cluster's interaction with the Milky Way. Alternatively, this cloud may lie coincidentally along Spitzer's line of sight.

    Follow-up observations with the University of Wyoming Infrared Observatory helped set the distance of the new cluster at about 9,000 light-years from Earth - closer than most clusters - and set the mass at the equivalent of 300,000 Suns. The cluster's apparent size, as viewed from Earth, is comparable to a grain of rice held at arm's length. It is located in the constellation Aquila.

    Astronomers believe that this cluster may be one of the last in our galaxy to be uncovered.

    This image composite was taken on April 21, 2004, by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

    Galactic Fossil Found Behind Curtain of Dust In Figure 2, the image mosaic shows the same patch of sky in various wavelengths of light. While the

  18. Near infrared photographic sky survey. 1: Catalog of red stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craine, E. R.; Duerr, R. E.; Horner, V. M.; Imhoff, C. L.; Routsis, D. E.; Swihart, D. L.; Turnshek, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Red stellar objects for which V-1 was greater than a value of about 2 (supm). 5 were extracted from photographs of 23 program fields. Tabular data for each field show the object name; the 1950 epoch right ascension, declination, galactic longitude, galactic latitude; radial distance from field venter in decimal degrees; color classes; and objects ordered by redness.

  19. Sublimating comets as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in the gas outflow from AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, D. P.; Matese, John J.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A growing amount of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that most main sequence stars are surrounded by disks of cometary material. The dust production by comets in such disks is investigated when the central stars evolve up the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Once released, the dust is ablated and accelerated by the gas outflow and the fragments become the seeds necessary for condensation of the gas. The origin of the requisite seeds has presented a well known problem for classical nucleation theory. This model is consistent with the dust production observed in M giants and supergiants (which have increasing luminosities) and the fact that earlier supergiants and most WR stars (whose luminosities are unchanging) do not have significant dust clouds even though they have significant stellar winds. Another consequence of the model is that the spatial distribution of the dust does not, in general, coincide with that of the gas outflow, in contrast to the conventional condensation model. A further prediction is that the condensation radius is greater that that predicted by conventional theory which is in agreement with IR interferometry measurements of alpha-Ori.

  20. Iron and Nickel Isotopic Compositions of Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from AGB Stars Measured with CHILI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, R.; Stephan, T.; Davis, A. M.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; Gyngard, F.; Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Dauphas, N.

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous iron and nickel isotopic studies in presolar SiC mainstream grains measured on CHILI show the expected AGB star anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes. Neutron-poor isotopes are dominated by GCE and show clear correlations with silicon.

  1. The LF of TP-AGB stars in the LMC/SMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruzual, Gustavo; Charlot, Stephane; GonzalezLopezlira, Rosa; Srinivasan, Sundar; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We show that Monte Carlo simulations of the TP-AGB stellar population in the LMC and SMC galaxies using the CB. models produce LF and color distributions that are in closer agreement with observations than those obtained with the BC03 and CB07 models. This is a progress report of work that will be published elsewhere.

  2. FUV and Optical Spectroscopy of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature and surface gravity) and abundances of the hot, post-AGB (PAGB) stars in globular clusters observed with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the Astro-l and 2 missions.

  3. S-process nucleosynthesis in AGB models with the FST prescription for convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Lugaro, M.

    The chemical evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends greatly on the input physics (e.g., mass loss recipe, convective model). Variations in the hot bottom burning (HBB) strength, third dredge-up (TDU) efficiency and AGB evolutionary timescale are among the main consequences of adopting different input physics. The ATON evolutionary code stands apart from others in that it uses the Blöcker mass loss prescription and the Full Spectrum of Turbulence (FST) convective model. We have developed an s-process module for ATON by extending the element network from 30 to 320 elements, which uses the physical inputs (such as temperature or density) calculated by ATON. Here we present the first preliminary results of s-process nucleosynthesis for ATON AGB models with different progenitor masses. These preliminary results are compared with predictions from other AGB nucleosynthesis models that use different input physics. We also outline our future tasks to improve the current s-process ATON simulations.

  4. AGB Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality," approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of Governing Boards (AGB) in March 2011, urges institutional administrators and governing boards to engage fully in this area of board responsibility. The seven principles in this statement offer suggestions to…

  5. AGB stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Gallino, R.; Busso, M.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to estimate the possible contribution of some short-lived nuclei to the early solar nebula from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) sources. Low mass (1 to 3 solar mass) AGB stars appear to provide a site for synthesis of the main s process component for solar system material with an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations varies as exp(-tau/tau(sub 0)) (where tau is the time integrated neutron flux with a mean neutron exposure tau(sub 0)) for solar abundances with tau(sub 0) = 0.28 mb(sup -1). Previous workers estimated the synthesis of key short-lived nuclei which might be produced in AGB stars. While these calculations exhibit the basic characteristics of nuclei production by neutron exposure, there is need for a self-consistent calculation that follows AGB evolution and takes into account the net production from a star and dilution with the cloud medium. Many of the general approaches and the conclusions arrived at were presented earlier by Cameron. The production of nuclei for a star of 1.5 solar mass during the thermal pulsing of the AGB phase was evaluated. Calculations were done for a series of thermal pulses with tau(sub 0) = 0.12 and 0.28 mb(sup -1). These pulses involve s nucleosynthesis in the burning shell at the base of the He zone followed by the ignition of the H burning shell at the top of the He zone. After about 10-15 cycles the abundances of the various nuclei in the He zone become constant. Computations of the abundances of all nuclei in the He zone were made following Gallino. The mass of the solar nebula was considered to consist of some initial material of approximately solar composition plus some contributions from AGB stars. The ratios of the masses required from the AGB He burning zone to the ISM necessary to produce the observed value of Pd-107/Pd-108 in the early solar system were calculated and this dilution factor was applied to all other relevant nuclei.

  6. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  7. Production and Recycling of Carbon in the Early Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Johannes; Thidemann Hansen, Terese; Nordström, Birgitta

    2015-08-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars - [Fe/H] below ~ -3 - are fossil records of the conditions in the early halo. High-resolution 8m-class spectroscopy has shown that the detailed abundance pattern of EMP giant stars is surprisingly uniform and essentially Solar (e.g. Bonifacio+ 2012), apart from the usual α-enhancement in the halo. In the simplest picture, iron is a proxy for both overall metallicity and time, so the EMP stars should form before the oldest and most metal-poor Galactic globular clusters, notably at the lowest metallicities ([Fe/H] ≲ -3.5).It is thus striking that 20-40% of the EMP giants are strongly enhanced in carbon - the CEMP stars (Lucatello+ 2006). This is conventionally ascribed to mass transfer from a former AGB binary companion, and from a limited compilation of data, Lucatello+ (2005) concluded that most or all CEMP stars are indeed binaries, similar to the classical Ba and CH stars (e.g. Jorissen+ 1998). However, most of the sample was of the inner-halo CEMP-s variety (C and s-process elements both enhanced), while CEMP-no stars dominate the outer halo (Carollo+ 2014). Our precise radial velocity monitoring for CEMP stars over 8 years shed light on this issue.Our data suggest a normal binary frequency for the CEMP-no stars; i.e. the C was not produced in a binary companion, but in sites at interstellar distances, e.g. ‘faint’ SNe, and imprinted on the natal clouds of the low-mass stars we observe. This has immediate implications for the formation of dust in primitive, high-redshift galaxies (Watson+ 2015) and the origin of C-enhanced DLAs (Cooke+ 2011, 2012). The CEMP-s binary orbits are also revealing, with periods up to several decades and generally low amplitudes and eccentricities, suggesting that EMP AGB stars have very large radii, facilitating extensive mass loss. More work on faint SNe and EMP AGB envelopes is needed!

  8. RELICS OF ANCIENT POST-AGB STARS IN A PRIMITIVE METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhav, M.; Huss, G. R.; Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Zinner, E.; Gallino, R.

    2013-11-10

    Graphite is one of the many presolar circumstellar condensate species found in primitive meteorites. While the isotopic compositions of low-density graphite grains indicate an origin in core-collapse supernovae, some high-density grains have extreme isotopic anomalies in C, Ca, and Ti, which cannot be explained by envelope predictions of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars or theoretical supernova models. The Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies, however, match the predictions of He-shell abundances in AGB stars. In this study, we show that the C, Ca, and Ti isotopic anomalies are consistent with nucleosynthesis predictions of the H-ingestion phase during a very late thermal pulse (VLTP) event in post-AGB stars. The low {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotopic ratios in these grains are a result of abundant {sup 12}C efficiently capturing the protons that are being ingested during the VLTP. Very high neutron densities of ∼10{sup 15} cm{sup –3}, typical of the i-process, are achieved during this phase in post-AGB stars. The large {sup 42,43,44}Ca excesses in some graphite grains are indicative of neutron capture nucleosynthesis during VLTP. The comparison of VLTP nucleosynthesis calculations to the graphite data also indicate that apparent anomalies in the Ti isotopic ratios are due to large contributions from {sup 46,48}Ca, which cannot be resolved from the isobars {sup 46,48}Ti during the measurements. We conclude that presolar graphite grains with moderate to extreme Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies originate in post-AGB stars that suffer a VLTP.

  9. The Hubble Space TelescopeUV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters - V. Constraints on formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzini, A.; D'Antona, F.; Cassisi, S.; King, I. R.; Milone, A. P.; Ventura, P.; Anderson, J.; Bedin, L. R.; Bellini, A.; Brown, T. M.; Piotto, G.; van der Marel, R. P.; Barbuy, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Hidalgo, S.; Marino, A. F.; Ortolani, S.; Salaris, M.; Sarajedini, A.

    2015-12-01

    We build on the evidence provided by our Legacy Survey of Galactic globular clusters (GC) to submit to a crucial test four scenarios currently entertained for the formation of multiple stellar generations in GCs. The observational constraints on multiple generations to be fulfilled are manifold, including GC specificity, ubiquity, variety, predominance, discreteness, supernova avoidance, p-capture processing, helium enrichment and mass budget. We argue that scenarios appealing to supermassive stars, fast rotating massive stars and massive interactive binaries violate in an irreparable fashion two or more among such constraints. Also the scenario appealing to asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars as producers of the material for next generation stars encounters severe difficulties, specifically concerning the mass budget problem and the detailed chemical composition of second-generation stars. We qualitatively explore ways possibly allowing one to save the AGB scenario, specifically appealing to a possible revision of the cross-section of a critical reaction rate destroying sodium, or alternatively by a more extensive exploration of the vast parameter space controlling the evolutionary behaviour of AGB stellar models. Still, we cannot ensure success for these efforts and totally new scenarios may have to be invented to understand how GCs formed in the early Universe.

  10. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Gallino, Roberto

    2014-05-02

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 – 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr = 4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of

  11. The Galactic Habitable Zone: Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo; Brownlee, Donald; Ward, Peter

    2001-07-01

    We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution. The single most important factor is likely the dependence of terrestrial planet mass on the metallicity of its birth cloud. We estimate, very approximately, that a metallicity at least half that of the Sun is required to build a habitable terrestrial planet. The mass of a terrestrial planet has important consequences for interior heat loss, volatile inventory, and loss of atmosphere. A key issue is the production of planets that sustain plate tectonics, a critical recycling process that provides feedback to stabilize atmospheric temperatures on planets with oceans and atmospheres. Due to the more recent decline from the early intense star formation activity in the Milky Way, the concentration in the interstellar medium of the geophysically important radioisotopes 40K, 235,238U, and 232Th has been declining relative to Fe, an abundant element in the Earth. Also likely important are the relative abundances of Si and Mg to Fe, which affects the mass of the core relative to the mantle in a terrestrial planet. All these elements and isotopes vary with time and location in the Milky Way; thus, planetary systems forming in other locations and times in the Milky Way with the same metallicity as the Sun will not necessarily form habitable Earth-like planets. As a result of the radial Galactic metallicity gradient, the outer limit of the GHZ is set primarily by the minimum required metallicity to build large terrestrial planets. Regions of the Milky Way least likely to contain Earth-mass planets are the halo (including globular clusters), the thick disk, and the outer thin disk. The bulge should contain Earth

  12. Galactic-scale civilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  13. The Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic bulge is the least studied component of our Galaxy. Yet, its formation and evolution are key to understand the formation of the Galaxy itself. Studies on the Galactic bulge have increased significantly in the last years, but still there are many points of controversy. This volume contains several contributions from experts in different aspects of the bulge. Issues discussed include the following: the presence of an old spheroidal bulge, or identification of its old stellar population with the thick disk or halo; fraction of stars younger than 10 Gyr is estimated to be of < 5 to 22% depending on method and authors; multiple populations or only a metal-poor and a metal-rich ones; spheroidal or ellipsoidal distribution of RR Lyrae; formation of the bulge from early mergers or from secular evolution of the bar; different methods of mapping extinction; selection and identification of bulge globular clusters.

  14. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  15. Short-lived radioactivity in the early solar system: The Super-AGB star hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, Maria; Doherty, Carolyn L.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Maddison, Sarah T.; Liffman, Kurt; García-Hernández, D. A.; Siess, Lionel; Lattanzio, John C.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of the most primitive solar system condensates, such as calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) and micron-sized corundum grains, show that short-lived radionuclides (SLR), e.g., 26Al, were present in the early solar system. Their abundances require a local or stellar origin, which, however, is far from being understood. We present for the first time the abundances of several SLR up to 60Fe predicted from stars with initial mass in the range approximately 7-11 M⊙. These stars evolve through core H, He, and C burning. After core C burning they go through a "Super"-asymptotic giant branch (Super-AGB) phase, with the H and He shells activated alternately, episodic thermal pulses in the He shell, a very hot temperature at the base of the convective envelope (approximately 108 K), and strong stellar winds driving the H-rich envelope into the surrounding interstellar medium. The final remnants of the evolution of Super-AGB stars are mostly O-Ne white dwarfs. Our Super-AGB models produce 26Al/27Al yield ratios approximately 0.02-0.26. These models can account for the canonical value of the 26Al/27Al ratio using dilutions with the solar nebula of the order of 1 part of Super-AGB mass per several 102 to several 103 of solar nebula mass, resulting in associated changes in the O-isotope composition in the range Δ17O from 3 to 20‰. This is in agreement with observations of the O isotopic ratios in primitive solar system condensates, which do not carry the signature of a stellar polluter. The radionuclides 41Ca and 60Fe are produced by neutron captures in Super-AGB stars and their meteoritic abundances are also matched by some of our models, depending on the nuclear and stellar physics uncertainties as well as the meteoritic experimental data. We also expect and are currently investigating Super-AGB production of SLR heavier than iron, such as 107Pd.

  16. Is CO radio line emission a reliable mass-loss-rate estimator for AGB stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstedt, Sofia; Scḧier, Frederik; Olofsson, Hans

    The final evolutionary stage of low- to intermediate-mass stars, as they evolve along the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), is characterized by mass loss so intense (10-8-10-4 Msol yr-1) that eventually the AGB life time is determined by it. The material lost by the star is enriched in nucleo-synthesized material and thus AGB stars play an important role in the chemical evolution of galaxies. A reliable mass-loss-rate estimator is of utmost importance in order to increase our understanding of late stellar evolution and to reach conclusions about the amount of enriched material recycled by AGB stars. For low-mass-loss-rate AGB stars, modelling of observed rotational CO radio line emission has proven to be a good tool for estimating mass-loss rates [Olofsson et al. (2002) for M-type stars and Schöier & Olofsson (2001) for carbon stars], but several lines are needed to get good constraints. For high-mass-loss-rate objects the situation is more complicated, the main reason being saturation of the optically thick CO lines. Moreover, Kemper et al. (2003) introduced temporal changes in the mass-loss rate, or alternatively, spatially varying turbulent motions, in order to explain observed line-intensity ratios. This puts into question whether it is possible to model the circumstellar envelope using a constant mass-loss rate, or whether the physical structure of the outflow is more complex than normally assumed. We present observations of CO radio line emission for a sample of intermediate- to high-mass-loss-rate AGB stars. The lowest rotational transition line (J =1-0) was observed at OSO and the higher-frequency lines (J =2-1, 3-2, 4-3 and in some cases 6-5) were observed at the JCMT. Using a detailed, non-LTE, radiative transfer model we are able to reproduce observed line ratios (Figure 1) and constrain the mass-loss rates for the whole sample, using a constant mass-loss rate and a "standard" circumstellar envelope model. However, for some objects only a lower limit to

  17. The Nearby AGB Star L2 Puppis: The Birth Of a Planetary Nebula?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Montargès, M.; Lagadec, E.

    2015-12-01

    Adaptive optics observations in the infrared (VLT/NACO, Kervella et al. [6]) and visible (VLT/SPHERE, Kervella et al. [7]) domains revealed that the nearby AGB star L2 Pup (d = 64 pc) is surrounded by a dust disk seen almost edge-on. Thermal emission from a large dust "loop" is detected at 4 μm up to more than 10 AU from the star. We also detect a secondary source at a separation of 32 mas, whose nature is uncertain. L2 Pup is currently a relatively "young" AGB star, so we may witness the formation of a planetary nebula. The mechanism that breaks the spherical symmetry of mass loss is currently uncertain, but we propose that the dust disk and companion are key elements in the shaping of the bipolar structure. L2 Pup emerges as an important system to test this hypothesis.

  18. UV Excess and AGB Evolution in Elliptical-Galaxy Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Buzzoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    The puzzling origin of the ``UV-upturn'' phenomenon, observed in some elliptical galaxies, has recently been settled by identifying hot HB stars as main contributors to galaxy ultraviolet luminosity excess. While a blue HB morphology seems a natural characteristic of metal-poor stellar populations, its appearance in metal-rich systems, often coupled with a poorer rate of planetary nebulae per unit galaxy luminosity, might be calling for an intimate connection between UV excess and AGB properties in early-type galaxies. In this work, we want to briefly assess this issue relying on infrared surface brightness fluctuations as a powerful tool to trace AGB properties in external galaxies with unresolved stellar populations.

  19. Constraints of the Physics of Low-mass AGB Stars from CH and CEMP Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Karinkuzhi, D.; Goswami, A.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze a set of published elemental abundances from a sample of CH stars which are based on high resolution spectral analysis of ELODIE and SUBARU/HDS spectra. All the elemental abundances were derived from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres, and thus they represent the largest homogeneous abundance data available for CH stars to date. For this reason, we can use the set to constrain the physics and the nucleosynthesis occurring in low mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) s.tars. CH stars have been polluted in the past from an already extinct AGB companion and thus show s-process enriched surfaces. We discuss the effects induced on the surface AGB s-process distributions by different prescriptions for convection and rotation. Our reference theoretical FRUITY set fits only part of the observations. Moreover, the s-process observational spread for a fixed metallicity cannot be reproduced. At [Fe/H] > -1, a good fit is found when rotation and a different treatment of the inner border of the convective envelope are simultaneously taken into account. In order to increase the statistics at low metallicities, we include in our analysis a selected number of CEMP stars and, therefore, we compute additional AGB models down to [Fe/H] = -2.85. Our theoretical models are unable to attain the large [hs/ls] ratios characterizing the surfaces of those objects. We speculate on the reasons for such a discrepancy, discussing the possibility that the observed distribution is a result of a proton mixing episode leading to a very high neutron density (the so-called i-process).

  20. A PILOT DEEP SURVEY FOR X-RAY EMISSION FROM fuvAGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ∼(0.002–0.2) L{sub ⊙} and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ∼(35–160) × 10{sup 6} K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  1. Surprising detection of an equatorial dust lane on the AGB star IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, S. V.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Canovas, H.; Pols, O. R.; Rodenhuis, M.; de Juan Ovelar, M.; Keller, C. U.; Decin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Understanding the formation of planetary nebulae remains elusive because in the preceding asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase these stars are heavily enshrouded in an optically thick dusty envelope. Methods: To further understand the morphology of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars we observe the closest carbon-rich AGB star IRC+10216 in scattered light. Results: When imaged in scattered light at optical wavelengths, IRC+10216 surprisingly shows a narrow equatorial density enhancement, in contrast to the large-scale spherical rings that have been imaged much further out. We use radiative transfer models to interpret this structure in terms of two models: firstly, an equatorial density enhancement, commonly observed in the more evolved post-AGB stars, and secondly, in terms of a dust rings model, where a local enhancement of mass-loss creates a spiral ring as the star rotates. Conclusions: We conclude that both models can be used to reproduce the dark lane in the scattered light images, which is caused by an equatorially density enhancement formed by dense dust rather than a bipolar outflow as previously thought. We are unable to place constraints on the formation of the equatorial density enhancement by a binary system. Final reduced images (FITS) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A3Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  2. On the nature of the most obscured C-rich AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Karakas, A. I.; Dell'Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Di Criscienzo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The stars in the Magellanic Clouds with the largest degree of obscuration are used to probe the highly uncertain physics of stars in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase of evolution. Carbon stars in particular provide key information on the amount of third dredge-up and mass-loss. We use two independent stellar evolution codes to test how a different treatment of the physics affects the evolution on the AGB. The output from the two codes is used to determine the rates of dust formation in the circumstellar envelope, where the method used to determine the dust is the same for each case. The stars with the largest degree of obscuration in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are identified as the progeny of objects of initial mass 2.5-3 M⊙ and ˜1.5 M⊙, respectively. This difference in mass is motivated by the difference in the star formation histories of the two galaxies, and offers a simple explanation of the redder infrared colours of C-stars in the LMC compared to their counterparts in the SMC. The comparison with the Spitzer colours of C-rich AGB stars in the SMC shows that a minimum surface carbon mass fraction X(C) ˜ 5 × 10-3 must have been reached by stars of initial mass around 1.5 M⊙. Our results confirm the necessity of adopting low-temperature opacities in stellar evolutionary models of AGB stars. These opacities allow the stars to obtain mass-loss rates high enough (≳10-4 M⊙ yr-1) to produce the amount of dust needed to reproduce the Spitzer colours.

  3. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - I. AGB evolution and dust production in IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Boyer, M. L.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    We used models of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, which also describe the dust-formation process in the wind, to interpret the combination of near- and mid-infrared photometric data of the dwarf galaxy IC 1613. This is the first time that this approach is extended to an environment different from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). Our analysis, based on synthetic population techniques, shows nice agreement between the observations and the expected distribution of stars in the colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with JHK and Spitzer bands. This allows a characterization of the individual stars in the AGB sample in terms of mass, chemical composition and formation epoch of the progenitors. We identify the stars exhibiting the largest degree of obscuration as carbon stars evolving through the final AGB phases, descending from 1-1.25 M⊙ objects of metallicity Z = 10-3 and from 1.5-2.5 M⊙ stars with Z = 2 × 10-3. Oxygen-rich stars constitute the majority of the sample (˜65 per cent), mainly low-mass stars (<2 M⊙) that produce a negligible amount of dust (≤10-7 M⊙ yr-1). We predict the overall dust-production rate from IC 1613, mostly determined by carbon stars, to be ˜6 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1 with an uncertainty of 30 per cent. The capability of the current generation of models to interpret the AGB population in an environment different from the MCs opens the possibility to extend this kind of analysis to other Local Group galaxies.

  4. Large-scale environments of binary AGB stars probed by Herschel. I. Morphology statistics and case studies of R Aquarii and W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Nowotny, W.; Cox, N. L. J.; Aringer, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Decin, L.; van Eck, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kornfeld, K.; Mecina, M.; Posch, Thomas; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample offers a selection of 78 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) observed with the PACS photometer on-board Herschel at 70 μm and 160 μm. For most of these objects, the dusty AGB wind is not spherically symmetric and the wind shape can be subdivided into four classes. In the present paper we concentrate on the influence of a companion on the morphology of the stellar wind. Literature was searched to find binaries in the MESS sample, which were subsequently linked to their wind-morphology class to assert that the binaries are not distributed equally among the classes. In the second part of the paper we concentrate on the circumstellar environment of the two prominent objects R Aqr and W Aql. Each shows a characteristic signature of a companion interaction with the stellar wind. For the symbiotic star R Aqr, PACS revealed two perfectly opposing arms that in part reflect the previously observed ring-shaped nebula in the optical. However, from the far-IR there is evidence that the emitting region is elliptical rather than circular. The outline of the wind of W Aql seems to follow a large Archimedean spiral formed by the orbit of the companion but also shows strong indications of an interaction with the interstellar medium. We investigated the nature of the companion of W Aql and found that the magnitude of the orbital period supports the size of the spiral outline. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  5. Overview of Galactic Archaelogy with Kepler and K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jennifer; APOKASC Team; APO-K2 Team

    2017-01-01

    The exquisite lightcurves of the Kepler and K2 missions have been an unexpected boon to the field of near-field cosmology. Ages and evolutionary states can now be derived for field red giants, by combining seismic and granulation signatures with spectroscopic data. Red giants, far more luminous than the main-sequence turnoff stars usually used, allow us to probe the evolution of the whole Galaxy. Originally these investigations were restricted to a single line of sight in the direction of Cygnus. With the failure of the reaction wheels and the start of the K2 program, we now probe distinctly different Galactic populations, including the inner and outer disks, the bulge-halo interface, and far more ofthe Galactic halo. I will present an overview of some of the Galactic archaeology efforts underway with Kepler and K2 data, focusing on our calibration of absolute ages. I will also present results on Galactic chemical evolution and the timescales for the formation of the elements.

  6. VLT/NACO Imaging of the Nearest AGB Star, L2 Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Perrin, G.; Chesneau, O.

    2015-08-01

    AGB stars are the most important contributors to the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. During their later evolutionary stages they experience intense pulsations and eject most of their layers as they become planetary nebulae (PNe). The process leading to the formation of bipolar PNe remains poorly understood. It is assumed that the circumstellar disk of an AGB star could collimate the stellar wind to form a bipolar PN, yet very few of these disks have been observed. Using the adaptive-optics system of the VLT/NACO instrument at the Paranal Observatory and a "lucky imaging" technique, our team obtained near-infrared diffraction-limited images of the nearest AGB star, L2 Puppis. The deconvolved images reveal a dark structure in front of the star whose morphology and photometry match a dusty edge-on disk of olivine and pyroxene modeled with a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. The L band images also show a loop structure, possibly the signature of an interacting hidden companion.

  7. The 13C Neutron Source and s-Processing in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, Oscar; Busso, Maurizio; Palmerini, Sara; La Cognata, Marco

    The main component of the s-process accounts for about 50% of elements heavier than Kr, through n-captures occurring in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, where the 13C(α, n)16O reaction is the main neutron source. Its activation below the convective envelope at third dredge-up (TDU) and its efficiency are still matters of debate, as: (i) the astrophysical factor is affected by a broad resonance near the reaction threshold and (ii) mixing mechanisms to locally produce 13C were so far mimicked mainly parametrically. We discuss both problems and, in particular, we adopt one of the recent model proposed for producing 13C and based on an exact multi-D analytical solution of MHD equations, where magnetic buoyancy induces partial mixing at the envelope border. The resulting distribution of 13C is used, together with our upgraded prescription for the reaction rate, to reproduce solar abundances through AGB models. It can account for the chemical evolution of s-elements and for the s/(C/O) ratios in low-metallicity post-AGB stars.

  8. Supershells and galactic fountains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, B. M.

    1989-03-01

    In the gaseous disk of our Galaxy as well as in other galaxies, HI structures (shells, bubbles, holes, etc.) on scales of 0.1-1 kpc are recognized to be common features; see e.g. the comprehensive review by Tenorio-Tagle and Bodenheimer (1988). The larger ones are usually named with the prefix "super". The estimated energies which are required to produee sueh large objeets are high - up to some 1054 erg. These energetic events must exert a significant influenee upon the gaseous galactic disk and eorona.

  9. Does the Galactic Bulge Have Fewer Planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    distribution of host distances from a simulated microlensing survey, correcting for dominant selection effects. They then compared the distribution of distances in this model sample to the distribution of distances measured for the actual, observed systems.Histogram and cumulative distribution (black lines) of distance estimates for microlensing planet hosts. Red lines show the distributions predicted by the model if the disk and bulge abundances were the same. [Penny et al. 2016]Intriguingly, the two distributions dont match when you assume that the planet abundances in the disk and the bulge are the same. The relative abundances appear to be higher in the disk than in the bulge, according to the teams results: the observations agree with a model in which the bulge/disk abundance ratio is less than 0.54.Whats to Blame?There are a few ways to interpret this result: 1) distance measurements for the sample of planets discovered by microlensing have errors, 2) the model is too simplified; it needs to also include dependence of planet abundance and detection sensitivity on properties like host mass and metallicity, or 3) the galactic bulge actually has fewer planets than the disk.Penny and collaboratorssuspect some combination of the first two interpretations is most likely, but an actual paucity of planets in the galactic bulge cant be ruled out. Performing similar analysis on a larger sample of microlensing planets expected from upcoming, second-generation microlensing searches and obtaining more accurate distance measurements will help us to address this puzzlemore definitively in the future.CitationMatthew T. Penny et al 2016 ApJ 830 150. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/830/2/150

  10. THE INNER GALACTIC BULGE: EVIDENCE FOR A NUCLEAR BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Ortwin; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2012-01-15

    Recent data from the VVV survey have strengthened evidence for a structural change in the Galactic bulge inward of |l| {<=} 4 Degree-Sign . Here we show with an N-body barred galaxy simulation that a boxy bulge formed through the bar and buckling instabilities effortlessly matches measured bulge longitude profiles for red clump stars. The same simulation snapshot was earlier used to clarify the apparent boxy bulge-long bar dichotomy, for the same orientation and scaling. The change in the slope of the model longitude profiles in the inner few degrees is caused by a transition from highly elongated to more nearly axisymmetric isodensity contours in the inner boxy bulge. This transition is confined to a few degrees from the Galactic plane; thus the change of slope is predicted to disappear at higher Galactic latitudes. We also show that the nuclear star count map derived from this simulation snapshot displays a longitudinal asymmetry similar to that observed in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) data, but is less flattened to the Galactic plane than the 2MASS map. These results support the interpretation that the Galactic bulge originated from disk evolution and question the evidence advanced from star count data for the existence of a secondary nuclear bar in the Milky Way.

  11. The lead discrepancy in intrinsically s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Wood, P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Our understanding of the s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is incomplete. AGB models predict, for example, large overabundances of lead (Pb) compared to other s-process elements in metal-poor low-mass AGB stars. This is indeed observed in some extrinsically enhanced metal-poor stars, but not in all. An extensive study of intrinsically s-process enriched objects is essential for improving our knowledge of the AGB third dredge-up and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: We compare the spectral abundance analysis of the SMC post-AGB star J004441.04-732136.4 with state-of-the-art AGB model predictions with a main focus on Pb. The low signal-to-noise (S/N) in the Pb line region made the result of our previous study inconclusive. We acquired additional data covering the region of the strongest Pb line. Methods: By carefully complementing re-reduced previous data, with newly acquired UVES optical spectra, we improve the S/N of the spectrum around the strongest Pb line. Therefore, an upper limit for the Pb abundance is estimated from a merged weighted mean spectrum using synthetic spectral modeling. We then compare the abundance results from the combined spectra to predictions of tailored AGB evolutionary models from two independent evolution codes. In addition, we determine upper limits for Pb abundances for three previously studied LMC post-AGB objects. Results: Although theoretical predictions for J004441.04-732136.4 match the s-process distribution up to tungsten (W), the predicted very high Pb abundance is clearly not detected. The three additional LMC post-AGB stars show a similar lack of a very high Pb abundance. Conclusions: From our study, we conclude that none of these low-mass, low-metallicity post-AGB stars of the LMC and SMC are strong Pb producers. This conflicts with current theoretical predictions. Based on observations collected with the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chili) of programme

  12. Chemical abundance study of two strongly s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the LMC: J051213.81-693537.1 and J051848.86-700246.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of extra-galactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The aim of our programme is to derive chemical abundances of stars covering a large range in luminosity and metallicity with the ultimate goal of testing, constraining, and improving our knowledge of the poorly understood AGB phase, especially the third dredge-up mixing processes and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: Post-AGB photospheres are dominated by atomic lines and indicate the effects of internal chemical enrichment processes over the entire stellar lifetime. In this paper, we study two carefully selected post-AGB stars: J051213.81-693537.1 and J051848.86-700246.9 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Both objects show signs of s-process enhancement. The combination of favourable atmospheric parameters for detailed abundance studies and their known distances (and hence luminosities and initial masses) make these objects ideal probes of the AGB third dredge-up and s-process nucleosynthesis in that they provide observational constraints for theoretical AGB models. Methods: We use high-resolution optical UVES spectra to determine accurate stellar parameters and subsequently perform detailed elemental abundance studies of post-AGB stars. Additionally, we use available photometric data covering optical and IR bands to construct spectral energy distributions for reddening and luminosity determinations. We then estimate initial masses from theoretical post-AGB tracks. Results: We obtained accurate atmospheric parameters for J051213.81-693537.1 (Teff = 5875 ± 125 K, log g = 1.00 ± 0.25 dex, [Fe/H] = -0.56 ± 0.16 dex) and J051848.86-700246.9 (Teff = 6000 ± 125 K, log g = 0.50 ± 0.25 dex, [Fe/H] = -1.06 ± 0.17 dex). Both stars show extreme s-process enrichment associated with relatively low C/O ratios of 1.26 ± 0.40 and 1.29 ± 0.30 for J051213-693537.1 and J051848

  13. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  14. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiener, Juergen

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  15. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  16. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  17. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of ... 2000 - The Red Sea between the East Africa coast and Saudi Arabian peninsula. project:  MISR category:  ...

  18. GALACTIC S STARS: INVESTIGATIONS OF COLOR, MOTION, AND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, Elizabeth; Green, Paul J.; Gray, Richard O.

    2011-09-01

    Known bright S stars, recognized as such by their enhanced s-process abundances and C/O ratio, are typically members of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) or the red giant branch. Few modern digital spectra for these objects have been published, from which intermediate resolution spectral indices and classifications could be derived. For published S stars, we find accurate positions using the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and use the FAST spectrograph of the Tillinghast reflector on Mt. Hopkins to obtain the spectra of 57 objects. We make available a digital S star spectral atlas consisting of 14 spectra of S stars with diverse spectral features. We define and derive basic spectral indices that can help distinguish S stars from late-type (M) giants and carbon stars. We convolve all our spectra with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey bandpasses, and employ the resulting gri magnitudes together with 2MASS JHK{sub s} mags to investigate S star colors. These objects have colors similar to carbon and M stars, and are therefore difficult to distinguish by color alone. Using near- and mid-infrared colors from IRAS and Akari, we identify some of the stars as intrinsic (AGB) or extrinsic (with abundances enhanced by past mass transfer). We also use V band and 2MASS magnitudes to calculate a temperature index for stars in the sample. We analyze the proper motions and parallaxes of our sample stars to determine upper and lower limit absolute magnitudes and distances, and confirm that most are probably giants.

  19. Galactic Hearts of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

    This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

    When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

    At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

    How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

    Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

    Spitzer detected the same

  20. STELLAR TRANSITS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence E-mail: bkocsis@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10{sup 6} solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or {approx}10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  1. Galactic Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, Benjamin P.

    The precise phase-space distribution and properties of Galactic dark matter necessary for its direct and indirect detection are currently unknown. Since the distributions of normal and dark matter in the Milky Way are coupled to each other as they both move in the same gravitational potential, constraints on the distribution and properties of dark matter can be derived by studying the distribution of visible matter in the Galaxy and making some general assumptions regarding the phase-space distribution of the dark matter. In this study, the visible components of the Galaxy have been comprehensively reviewed to create an axisymmetric model of the Galaxy that is consistent with the available observations, and the dark matter phase-space distribution is assumed to follow a lowered-isothermal form. Poisson's equations are then solved self-consistently to construct models of the spatial and velocity distribution of Galactic dark matter. The total gravitational potential from normal and dark matter are calculated and compared to the current observations of the rotation curve and to the radial velocity distributions of blue horizontal-branch and blue straggler stars. It is found that this analysis allows for a wide range of parameters for the dark matter. The implications for direct and indirect detection of dark matter are discussed in detail. In the appendices, two additional projects are presented. In Appendix A, the recent observations of the positron fraction and the total electron spectrum in cosmic rays are addressed by considering a nested leaky-box model for the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. This is found to obviate the need for exotic processes such as the annihilation or decay of dark matter to explain the recent observations. In Appendix B, we discuss a novel dark matter detector involving triggered cavitation in acoustic fields. The theory behind the detector is presented in detail, and we discuss the work than has been done to create a prototype

  2. Multi-color photometry of the Galactic globular cluster M 75 = NGC 6864. A new sensitive metallicity indicator and the position of the horizontal branch in UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, V.; Alcaíno, G.; Marconi, G.; Alvarado, F.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:We carry out and analyze new multi-color photometry of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M 75 in UBVI and focus on the brighter sequences of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD), with particular emphasis on their location in U-based CMD. Specifically, we study the level both of the horizontal (HB) and red giant branches (RGB) relative to the main-sequence turnoff (TO) in the U magnitude. Methods: Along with the presented photometry of M 75, we use our collection of photometric data on GCs belonging to the metal-poor range, [Fe/H]{ZW}<-1.1 dex, obtained from observations with different equipment, but calibrated by standard stars situated in the observed cluster fields. Results: We confirm our earlier finding, and extend it to a larger magnitude range. We demonstrate that Δ U_TO^BHB expressing the difference in U magnitude between the TO point and the level of the blue HB, near its red boundary, of the metal-poor GCs observed with the EMMI camera of the NTT/ESO telescope is about 0.4-0.5 mag smaller as compared to GCs observed with the 100 arcsec telescope and 1.3 m Warsaw telescope of the Las Campanas Observatory. At the same time, Δ U_TO^RGB, the difference in U magnitude between the TO and RGB inflection (brightest) points, does not show such an apparent dependence on the characteristics of U filters used, but it depends on cluster metallicity. We have shown, for the first time, the dependence of the parameter Δ U_TO^RGB on [Fe/H] and have estimated its analytical expression, by assuming a linear relation between the parameter and metallicity. Its slope, Δ U_TO^RGB/Δ[Fe/H] 1.2 mag/dex, is approximately a factor of two steeper than that of the dependence of the RGB bump position in the V magnitude on metallicity. The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) clump and features of the RGB luminosity function (LF) of M 75 are also discussed. Based on observations with the 1.3 m Warsaw telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Individual photometry measurements are only

  3. Galactic plane gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tumer, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of the SAS 2 data together with the COS B results shows that the distribution of galactic gamma-radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The radiation is primarily confined to a thin disc which exhibits offsets from b = 0 degrees similar to warping at radio frequencies. The principal distinction of the gamma-radiation is a stronger contrast in intensity between the region from 310 to 45 degrees in longitude and the regions away from the center that can be attributed to a variation in cosmic-ray density as a function of position in Galaxy. The diffuse galactic gamma-ray energy spectrum shows no significant variation in direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that for the galactic component of the gamma-radiation at high altitudes. The uniformity of the galactic gamma-ray spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of altitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma-ray sources at high altitudes indicate a diffuse origin for bulk of the galactic gamma-radiation rather than a collection of localized sources.

  4. Mass loss from red giants: its development, dust properties, and dependence on the stellar parameters mass, luminosity and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Peter; Blommaert, Joris; Cioni, Maria-Rosa; Feast, Michael; Groenewegen, Martin; Habing, Harm; Hony, Sacha; Loup, Cecile; Matsuura, Mikako; Omont, Alain; Waters, Rens; Whitelock, Patricia; Zijlstra, Albert; van Loon, Jacco

    2004-09-01

    We wish to obtain low resolution IRS spectra of highly evolved, low and intermediate mass stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Our sample of stars consists of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in both the general field of the Clouds and in clusters, and it complements the GTO samples of Houck and Kemper. The stars range from lower luminosity stars with small mass loss rates in the two clusters NGC419 and NGC1978 to dust-enshrouded stars in the "superwind" phase. The stars have been studied from the ground (mostly by members of this team) in order to determine spectral types, pulsation periods and amplitudes, and optical and near-infrared fluxes. Our aim is to use the IRS spectra to empirically determine the dependence of mass loss rate on stellar mass, luminosity, pulsation period and amplitude, and metallicity. We will also examine the dust properties as a function of mass loss rate, luminosity and photospheric chemical type. The AGB mass loss law resulting from this study will allow accurate AGB stellar evolution calculations to be made, meaning that reliable estimates can be made of the total mass loss from an AGB star, the stellar remnant mass, and the amounts of nucleosynthetic products ejected. Since the rate of mass return to, and enrichment of, the interstellar medium by low and intermediate mass stars depends critically on the mass loss rate and surface enrichment during the AGB phase, an accurate mass loss law will greatly enhance the reliability of galactic enrichment models. Our total request is for 31.4 hours.

  5. The Galactic nucleus: A unique region in the Galactic ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genzel, Reinhard; Poglitsch, Albrecht

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus is a unique region in the Galactic ecosystem. It is also superb laboratory of modern astrophysics where astronomers can study, at unprecedented spatial resolution and across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, physical processes that may also happen at the cores of other galaxies. Infrared observations from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory have made important contributions to unraveling the mysteries of the Galactic nucleus and this review highlights some of these measurements, as well as recent results regarding the central parsec.

  6. Tip-AGB stellar evolution in the presence of a pulsating, dust-induced ``superwind"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, K.-P.; Winters, J. M.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1999-09-01

    We present selected ``superwind" mass-loss histories and the related tip-AGB stellar evolution models, which have been computed according to the characteristics of a dust-induced, carbon-rich wind, and which include several recent improvements as compared to Schröder et al. (1998). We discuss the (initial) stellar mass-range of 1 to 2.5 Msun, with a nearly solar composition (X=0.28, Y=0.70, Z=0.02). In each time-step, mass-loss rates are used, which are consistent with the actual stellar parameters, and which are based on our pulsating, dust-induced wind models for carbon-rich stars (Fleischer et al. 1992), including a detailed and consistent treatment of dust formation, radiative transfer and radiative wind acceleration. The resulting ``superwind" mass-loss rates reach 2 to 3* 10(-5) Msun yr(-1) . For this reason, they become an influential factor of tip-AGB stellar evolution - but also vice versa, since our mass-loss rates vary strongly with effective temperature (dot {M} ~ T_eff(-8) (roughly), see Arndt et al. 1997), reflecting the temperature sensitivity of the dust formation process on a macroscopic scale. With all tip-AGB models of an initial stellar mass Mi >~ 1.3 Msun we find superwinds with a total mass outflow of 0.26 to >~ 0.55 Msun during their final 3* 10(4) yrs, just as required for PN-formation. Furthermore, a thermal pulse leads to a very short (100 to 200 yrs) interruption of the ``superwind" of these models. A critical (Eddington-like) luminosity Lc is required for the radiation driven wind models, which our evolution models fail to reach for Mi <~ 1.1 Msun. With slightly larger stellar masses, L_tAGB is near Lc and thermal pulses can trigger very short ``superwind" bursts, as already pointed out by Schröder et al. (1998). We find good agreement between our improved models and the mass-loss characteristics of the thin CO shells found by Olofsson et al. (1990, 1993, 1996, 1998) around some carbon-rich Mira stars.

  7. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  8. An Analytical Approach to the Evolution and Death of AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, Henry Alexander; Willson, Lee Anne M.; Marengo, Massimo; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.

    2017-01-01

    Pop. I and II stars have a significant amount of metals throughout their structure, In the final stages of their evolution, intermediate mass stars (between 0.7 and 2 solar masses) ascend the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). During their last few hundred thousand years on the AGB, these stars quickly lose their envelopes, recycling their metals as dust into the interstellar medium. The rate at which this happens consequently impacts the formation rate of stars, stellar systems, and the wider distribution of s-process isotopes.At the end of their life cycles, AGB stars experience a steep increase in mass loss rate. We can define the death line in two steps. First we define the critical mass loss rate to be where the mass loss rate equals the initial mass divided by the evolution time. Then the death line is where the rate of change of logMdot equals the rate of change of logL. Most of the stars we observe to be rapidly losing mass appear in the death zone between 0.1 and 10 times the critical mass loss rate.Assuming the mass loss rate increases exponentially with time, or, equivalently, the luminosity increases as a power of a characteristic exponent b, then the width of the death zone is the change in logL. This directly implies time is inversely proportional to b. This can be found for any mass-loss rate formula near the death line. By combining this with what we know about the initial-final mass relation and the core mass-luminosity relation, we can test for b with three observables — duration (width) of the death zone, the amplitude of mass loss variations (when L varies on an observable time scale such as a shell flash), and distributions of luminosity and pulsation period.By applying the initial mass function (IMF) and star formation rate (SFR) of an observed region, we can relate these observables to the characteristic exponent. We will need to look at nearby regions where we can see large numbers of AGB stars, such as the Magellanic clouds. We will show that

  9. Chemistry and distribution of daughter species in the circumstellar envelopes of O-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Millar, Tom J.; Heays, Alan N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Context. Thanks to the advent of Herschel and ALMA, new high-quality observations of molecules present in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are being reported that reveal large differences from the existing chemical models. New molecular data and more comprehensive models of the chemistry in circumstellar envelopes are now available. Aims: The aims are to determine and study the important formation and destruction pathways in the envelopes of O-rich AGB stars and to provide more reliable predictions of abundances, column densities, and radial distributions for potentially detectable species with physical conditions applicable to the envelope surrounding IK Tau. Methods: We use a large gas-phase chemical model of an AGB envelope including the effects of CO and N2 self-shielding in a spherical geometry and a newly compiled list of inner-circumstellar envelope parent species derived from detailed modeling and observations. We trace the dominant chemistry in the expanding envelope and investigate the chemistry as a probe for the physics of the AGB phase by studying variations of abundances with mass-loss rates and expansion velocities. Results: We find a pattern of daughter molecules forming from the photodissociation products of parent species with contributions from ion-neutral abstraction and dissociative recombination. The chemistry in the outer zones differs from that in traditional PDRs in that photoionization of daughter species plays a significant role. With the proper treatment of self-shielding, the N → N2 and C+→ CO transitions are shifted outward by factors of 7 and 2, respectively, compared with earlier models. An upper limit on the abundance of CH4 as a parent species of (≲2.5 × 10-6 with respect to H2) is found for IK Tau, and several potentially observable molecules with relatively simple chemical links to other parent species are determined. The assumed stellar mass-loss rate, in particular, has an impact on the

  10. The Keck Aperture Masking Experiment: Dust Enshrouded Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, T. D.; Monnier, J. D.; Tuthill, P. G.; Danchi, W. C.; Anderson, M.

    2012-01-01

    While the importance of dusty asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to galactic chemical enrichment is widely recognised, a sophisticated understanding of the dust formation and wind-driving mechanisms has proven elusive due in part to the difficulty in spatially-resolving the dust formation regions themselves. We have observed twenty dust-enshrouded AGB stars as part of the Keck Aperture Masking Experiment, resolving all of them in multiple near-infrared bands between 1.5 m and 3.1 m. We find 45% of the targets to show measurable elongations that, when correcting for the greater distances of the targets, would correspond to significantly asymmetric dust shells on par with the well-known cases of IRC +10216 or CIT 6. Using radiative transfer models, we find the sublimation temperature of Tsub(silicates) = 1130 90K and Tsub(amorphous carbon) = 1170 60 K, both somewhat lower than expected from laboratory measurements and vastly below temperatures inferred from the inner edge of YSO disks. The fact that O-rich and C-rich dust types showed the same sublimation temperature was surprising as well. For the most optically-thick shells ( 2.2 m > 2), the temperature profile of the inner dust shell is observed to change substantially, an effect we suggest could arise when individual dust clumps become optically-thick at the highest mass-loss rates.

  11. Galactic planetary science.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy.

  12. Galactic planetary science

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets—mainly radial velocity and transit—or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even ‘just’ in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current ‘understanding’. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  13. Pulsational variability in proto-planetary nebulae and other post-AGB objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Light and velocity curves of several classes of pulsating stars have been successfully modeled to determine physical properties of the stars. In this observational study, we review briefly the pulsational variability of the main classes of post-AGB stars. Our attention is focused in particular on proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe), those in the short-lived phase from AGB stars to the planetary nebulae. New light curves and period analyses have been used to determine the following general properties of the PPNe variability: (a) periods range from 35 to 160 days for those of F—G spectral types, with much shorter periods (< 1 day) found for those of early-B spectral type; (b) there is a correlation between the pulsation period, maximum amplitude, and temperature of the star, with cooler stars pulsating with longer periods and larger amplitudes; (c) similar correlations are found for carbon-rich, oxygen-rich, and lower-metalicity PPNe; and (d) multiple periods are found for all of them, with P2/P1 = 1.0±0.1. New models are needed to exploit these results.

  14. Active galactic nuclei as scaled-up Galactic black holes.

    PubMed

    McHardy, I M; Koerding, E; Knigge, C; Uttley, P; Fender, R P

    2006-12-07

    A long-standing question is whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary like Galactic black hole systems when appropriately scaled up by mass. If so, we can then determine how AGN should behave on cosmological timescales by studying the brighter and much faster varying Galactic systems. As X-ray emission is produced very close to the black holes, it provides one of the best diagnostics of their behaviour. A characteristic timescale--which potentially could tell us about the mass of the black hole--is found in the X-ray variations from both AGN and Galactic black holes, but whether it is physically meaningful to compare the two has been questioned. Here we report that, after correcting for variations in the accretion rate, the timescales can be physically linked, revealing that the accretion process is exactly the same for small and large black holes. Strong support for this linkage comes, perhaps surprisingly, from the permitted optical emission lines in AGN whose widths (in both broad-line AGN and narrow-emission-line Seyfert 1 galaxies) correlate strongly with the characteristic X-ray timescale, exactly as expected from the AGN black hole masses and accretion rates. So AGN really are just scaled-up Galactic black holes.

  15. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Cunningham, V.

    2015-12-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions contains ˜2000 H ii region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic H ii region mid-infrared morphology of WISE 12 μ {{m}} emission surrounding 22 μ {{m}} emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope hydrogen radio recombination line and radio continuum detections in the X-band (9 GHz; 3 cm) of 302 WISE H ii region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone 225^\\circ ≥slant {\\ell }≥slant -20^\\circ , | {\\text{}}b| ≤slant 6^\\circ . Here we extend the sky coverage of our H ii region Discovery Survey, which now contains nearly 800 H ii regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, 5 have ({\\ell },{\\text{}}b,v) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to the Galactic warp, these nebulae are found at Galactic latitudes >1° in the first Galactic quadrant, and therefore were missed in previous surveys of the Galactic plane. One additional region has a longitude and velocity consistent with the OSC but lies at a negative Galactic latitude (G039.183-01.422 -54.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1). With Heliocentric distances >22 kpc and Galactocentric distances >16 kpc, the OSC H ii regions are the most distant known in the Galaxy. We detect an additional three H ii regions near {\\ell }≃ 150^\\circ whose LSR velocities place them at Galactocentric radii >19 kpc. If their distances are correct, these nebulae may represent the limit to Galactic massive star formation.

  16. JASMINE: galactic structure surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Naoteru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Taihei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Suganuma, Masahiro; Niwa, Yoshito; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Matsuhara, Hideo; Noda, Atsushi; Tsuiki, Atsuo; Utashima, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Akira

    2006-06-01

    We introduce a Japanese plan of infrared(z-band:0.9μm) space astrometry(JASMINE-project). JASMINE is the satellite (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration) which will measure distances and apparent motions of stars around the center of the Milky Way with yet unprecedented precision. It will measure parallaxes, positions with the accuracy of 10 micro-arcsec and proper motions with the accuracy of ~ 4microarcsec/ year for stars brighter than z=14mag. JASMINE can observe about ten million stars belonging to the bulge components of our Galaxy, which are hidden by the interstellar dust extinction in optical bands. Number of stars with σ/π < 0.1 in the direction of the Galactic central bulge is about 1000 times larger than those observed in optical bands, where π is a parallax and σ is an error of the parallax. With the completely new "map of the bulge in the Milky Way", it is expected that many new exciting scientific results will be obtained in various fields of astronomy. Presently, JASMINE is in a development phase, with a target launch date around 2015. We adopt the following instrument design of JASMINE in order to get the accurate positions of many stars. A 3-mirrors optical system(modified Korsch system)with a primary mirror of~ 0.85m is one of the candidate for the optical system. On the astro-focal plane, we put dozens of new type of CCDs for z-band to get a wide field of view. The accurate measurements of the astrometric parameters requires the instrument line-of-sight highly stability and the opto-mechanical highly stability of the payload in the JASMINE spacecraft. The consideration of overall system(bus) design is now going on in cooperation with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency(JAXA).

  17. The Galactic stellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study of the Milky Way stellar discs in the context of galaxy formation is discussed. In particular, we explore the properties of the Milky Way disc using a new sample of about 550 dwarf stars for which we have recently obtained elemental abundances and ages based on high-resolution spectroscopy. For all the stars we also have full kinematic information as well as information about their stellar orbits. We confirm results from previous studies that the thin and the thick discs have distinct abundance patterns. But we also explore a larger range of orbital parameters than what has been possible in our previous studies. Several new results are presented. We find that stars that reach high above the Galactic plane and have eccentric orbits show remarkably tight abundance trends. This implies that these stars formed out of well-mixed gas that had been homogenized over large volumes. We find some evidence that suggest that the event that most likely caused the heating of this stellar population happened a few billion years ago. Through a simple, kinematic exploration of stars with super-solar [Fe/H], we show that the solar neighbourhood contains metal-rich, high velocity stars that are very likely associated with the thick disc. Additionally, the HR1614 moving group and the Hercules and Arcturus stellar streams are discussed and it is concluded that, probably, a large fraction of the groups and streams so far identified in the disc are the result of evolution and interactions within the stellar disc rather than being dissolved stellar clusters or engulfed dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Also based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain, and at the European Southern Observatories on La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Proposals no. 65.L-0019(B), 67.B-0108(B), 69.B-0277.

  18. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  19. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  20. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Star and Red Supergiant Star Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William T.; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We present an update of our investigation of differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  1. Comparative Studies of the Dust around Red Supergiant and Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela K.; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret; Sloan, Greg; Jones, Olivia

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of red supergiant (RSG) and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies and in various Milky Way globular clusters. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper), the Spitzer program SMC-Spec (PI: G. Sloan), and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 μm emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars and assess effects of varying metallicity (LMC versus SMC versus Milky Way globular cluster) and other properties (mass-loss rate, luminosity, etc.) on the dust originating from these stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  2. Comparative Studies of the Dust around Red Supergiant and Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, B. A.; Srinivasan, S.; Speck, A.; Volk, K.; Kemper, F.; Reach, W.; Lagadec, E.; Bernard, J.-P.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Sloan, G. C.; Jones, O.

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of red supergiant (RSG) and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies and in various Milky Way globular clusters. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper), the Spitzer program SMC-Spec (PI: G. Sloan), and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars and assess effects of varying metallicity (LMC versus SMC versus Milky Way globular cluster) and other properties (mass-loss rate, luminosity, etc.) on the dust originating from these stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  3. SMA Spectral Line Imaging Survey at 279 - 355 GHz of the Oxygen-rich AGB Star IK Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Patel, N. A.; Young, K. H.; Gottlieb, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Dedicated, unbiased spectral scans of asymptotic giant branch stars have so far been published only for a few carbon-rich stars, with a strong focus on the nearby and bright IRC +10216. We present results from a spectral survey of the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tau obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at ~ 0'.9 angular resolution in the frequency range 279-355 GHz, expanding the molecular inventory for M-type evolved stars and filling an observational gap. The survey shows over 140 emission lines, belonging to more than 30 species. The emission of AlO and of several vibrationally excited species traces the acceleration of the wind. Isotopic ratios for carbon, silicon, and sulfur will be derived from the observed emission of isotopologues of CO, SiO, SiS, HCN, SO, and SO2. This will allow us to constrain the AGB nucleosynthesis of IK Tau. We highlight the first detection of PO and PN around an oxygen-rich AGB star, detected at unexpectedly high abundances, and emphasise the importance of unbiased spectral surveys of AGB stars and the need for updated chemical models.

  4. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A Primer for University and College Board Members. An AGB White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The environment in which MOOCs and other forms of online education operate is changing virtually every day. Based upon a presentation given to the board of directors of AGB, this white paper is an effort to give board chairs, presidents, and others some context to help guide discussions on their own campuses. It provides a primer on MOOCs,…

  5. Studies of circumstellar shells in AGB stars by multifrequency (sub)mm-VLBI observations of maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, F.; Desmurs, J. F.; Bujarrabal, V.; Baudry, A.; de Vicente, P.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Alcolea, J.; Diaz-Pulido, A.; Gómez, M.

    2017-03-01

    VLBI observations of maser emission are a basic tool to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around evolved stars, mainly around AGB and post-AGB stars. The maser lines of water and silicon monoxide are particularly intense. They provide us with high spatial resolution data on the very inner CSEs around AGB stars, including the pulsating layers previous to grain formation and outer regions where the fast expansion characteristic of such envelopes is already present. The analysis of the pumping mechanism of SiO masers and of the physical conditions in the emitting clumps requires accurate maps of the various lines, which show different excitation requirements. A large observational effort is being done to obtain (quasi-)simultaneous multiline data at the highest spatial resolution, using VLBI techniques, which makes possible to compare the relative distribution of the maser lines. We present the state-of-the-art in the field, and discuss preliminary results of SiO masers observed with the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) which provide a new view into the physics of these AGB envelopes. The participation of ALMA in these VLBI arrays will boost the study of these masers, at higher frequencies.

  6. Red Hill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  7. Galactic evolution of Beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; King, Jeremy R.

    1993-12-01

    The abundance of Be in the lowest-metallicity stars is a probe of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and its abundance in halo and disk stars is a probe of galactic evolution and stellar structure. We present observations of the Be II resonance lines in 14 halo stars and 27 (mostly old) disk stars with (Fe/H) from -2.7 to +0.13. The spectra were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii (CFH) 3.6 m telescope and have a measured resolution of 0.13 A and a median signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 50. For 18 of the 41 stars we have also made observations of the O I triplet at the Palomar 5 m telescope, the UH 2.2 m telescope, and the CFH telescope. Stellar parameters of Teff, log g, and (Fe/H) were carefully determined from several independent estimates. Abundances are determined for log N (Be/H) and (O/H) from measured equivalent widths, model parameters, and Kurucz (1991) model atmospheres with the RAI10 model atmosphere abundance program. The agreement with previously published Be detections is very good (a mean difference of 0.05 dex) for five of six determinations in four halo stars and in four of five disk stars. The agreement with very recently published O abundances is 0.0075 dex. It is plausible, but far from conclusive, that there is a plateau in the amount of Be present in the lowest metallicity stars: log N (Be/H) approximately -12.8 for (Fe/H) less than -2.2 As (Fe/H) increases from -2.2 to -1.0, log N (Be/H) increases and the slope is 1.2-1.3, indicating a faster increase in Be than in Fe. This is consistent with the production of Be by spallation reactions between cosmic rays and O atoms from massive stars and the production of Fe from intermediate mass stars. Evidence for stellar processing of Be exists in the disk stars and in at least two of the halo stars. A plot of Be abundance vs O abundances shows that Be increases as O1.12, indicating that Be is produced primarily is the vicinity of supernovae envelopes, but a small and interesting fraction is produced in

  8. Investigation of Faint Galactic Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostandyan, G. R.; Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the optical variability study of the comparatively faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by searching the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-resolution (lr) spectral plates at high Galactic latitudes using a recent wide-area variability databases. The light curves from the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) databases were exploited to study the variability nature of them. From the 120 detected objects 54 are N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) C stars. 9 stars belongs to the group of Mira-type, 43 are Semi-Regular (SR), and 2 stars are Irregular (Irr) - type variables. The variability types of 27 objects has been established for the first time. From 66 objects showing early-type spectra 57 are CH-type stars, 4 objects are R-type stars and 5 are dC candidates. K-band absolute magnitudes, distances, and height from the Galactic plane were estimated for all of them. We aim to better understand the nature of the selected C stars through spectroscopy, 2MASS photometric colours, and variability data.

  9. A G-protein β subunit, AGB1, negatively regulates the ABA response and drought tolerance by down-regulating AtMPK6-related pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-bei; Chen, Ming; Ma, Ya-nan; Xu, Zhao-shi; Li, Lian-cheng; Chen, Yao-feng; Ma, You-zhi

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are versatile regulators involved in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the function of G-proteins is primarily associated with ABA signaling. However, the downstream effectors and the molecular mechanisms in the ABA pathway remain largely unknown. In this study, an AGB1 mutant (agb1-2) was found to show enhanced drought tolerance, indicating that AGB1 might negatively regulate drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Data showed that AGB1 interacted with protein kinase AtMPK6 that was previously shown to phosphorylate AtVIP1, a transcription factor responding to ABA signaling. Our study found that transcript levels of three ABA responsive genes, AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 (downstream gene of AtVIP1), were significantly up-regulated in agb1-2 lines after ABA or drought treatments. Other ABA-responsive and drought-inducible genes, such as RD29A (downstream gene of AtMYB44), were also up-regulated in agb1-2 lines. Furthermore, overexpression of AtVIP1 resulted in hypersensitivity to ABA at seed germination and seedling stages, and significantly enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. These results suggest that AGB1 was involved in the ABA signaling pathway and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis through down-regulating the AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 cascade.

  10. Presolar Graphite from AGB Stars: Microstructure and s-Process Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, Thomas K.; Stadermann, Frank J.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-10-01

    Correlated transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry with submicron spatial resolution (NanoSIMS) investigations of the same presolar graphites spherules from the Murchison meteorite were conducted, to link the isotopic anomalies with the mineralogy and chemical composition of the graphite and its internal grains. Refractory carbide grains (especially titanium carbide) are commonly found within the graphite spherules, and most have significant concentrations of Zr, Mo, and Ru in solid solution, elements primarily produced by s-process nucleosynthesis. The effect of chemical fractionation on the Mo/Ti ratio in these carbides is limited, and therefore from this ratio one can infer the degree of s-process enrichment in the gas from which the graphite condensed. The resulting s-process enrichments within carbides are large (~200 times solar on average), showing that most of the carbide-containing graphites formed in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. NanoSIMS measurements of these graphites also show isotopically light carbon (mostly in the 100<12C/13C<400 range). The enrichment of these presolar graphites in both s-process elements and 12C considerably exceeds that astronomically observed around carbon stars. However, a natural correlation exists between 12C and s-process elements, as both form in the He intershell region of thermally pulsing AGB stars and are dredged up together to the surface. Their observation together suggests that these graphites may have formed in chemically and isotopically inhomogeneous regions around AGB stars, such as high-density knots or jets. As shown in the companion paper, a gas density exceeding that expected for smooth mass outflows is required for graphite of the observed size to condense at all in circumstellar environments, and the spatially inhomogeneous, high-density regions from which they condense may also be incompletely mixed with the surrounding gas. We have greatly expanded

  11. SIZES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2012-02-20

    A study is made of deviations from the mean power-law relationship between the Galactocentric distances and the half-light radii of Galactic globular clusters. Surprisingly, deviations from the mean R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship do not appear to correlate with cluster luminosity, cluster metallicity, or horizontal-branch morphology. Differences in orbit shape are found to contribute to the scatter in the R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship of Galactic globular clusters.

  12. The Heliosphere and Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heliosphere deflects galactic cosmic rays from entering the system. Galactic cosmic rays are a very high energy form of particle radiation that are extremely difficult to shield against and are...

  13. Galactic Chemical Evolution: The Impact of the 13C-pocket Structure on the s-process Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F.; Gallino, R.

    2017-01-01

    The solar s-process abundances have been analyzed in the framework of a Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE) model. The aim of this work is to implement the study by Bisterzo et al., who investigated the effect of one of the major uncertainties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) yields, the internal structure of the 13C pocket. We present GCE predictions of s-process elements computed with additional tests in the light of suggestions provided in recent publications. The analysis is extended to different metallicities, by comparing GCE results and updated spectroscopic observations of unevolved field stars. We verify that the GCE predictions obtained with different tests may represent, on average, the evolution of selected neutron-capture elements in the Galaxy. The impact of an additional weak s-process contribution from fast-rotating massive stars is also explored.

  14. IS THE POST-AGB STAR SAO 40039 MILDLY HYDROGEN-DEFICIENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S. Sumangala; Pandey, Gajendra; Giridhar, Sunetra; Lambert, David L. E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2011-08-10

    We have conducted an LTE abundance analysis for SAO 40039, a warm post-AGB star whose spectrum is known to show surprisingly strong He I lines for its effective temperature and has been suspected of being H-deficient and He-rich. High-resolution optical spectra are analyzed using a family of model atmospheres with different He/H ratios. Atmospheric parameters are estimated from the ionization equilibrium set by neutral and singly ionized species of Fe and Mg, the excitation of Fe I and Fe II lines, and the wings of the Paschen lines. On the assumption that the He I lines are of photospheric and not chromospheric origin, a He/H ratio of approximately unity is found by imposing the condition that the adopted He/H ratio of the model atmosphere must equal the ratio derived from the observed He I triplet lines at 5876, 4471, and 4713 A, and singlet lines at 4922 and 5015 A. Using the model with the best-fitting atmospheric parameters for this He/H ratio, SAO 40039 is confirmed to exhibit mild dust-gas depletion, i.e., the star has an atmosphere deficient in elements of high condensation temperature. The star appears to be moderately metal-deficient with [Fe/H] = -0.4 dex. But the star's intrinsic metallicity as estimated from Na, S, and Zn, elements of a low condensation temperature, is [Fe/H]{sub o} {approx_equal} -0.2 ([Fe/H]{sub o} refers to the star's intrinsic metallicity). The star is enriched in N and perhaps O as well, changes reflecting the star's AGB past and the event that led to He enrichment.

  15. The carbon star adventure: modelling atmospheres of a set of C-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Gioia; Paladini, Claudia; Hron, Josef; Aringer, Bernard; Erikssonn, Kjell; Groenewegen, Martin

    2015-08-01

    We study the atmospheres of a set of carbon rich AGB stars to improve our understanding of the dynamic processes happening in there.For the first time we compare in a systematic way spectrometric, photometric and mid-infrared (VLTI/MIDI) interferometric measurements with different type of model atmospheres: (1) hydrostatic models + MOD-dusty models (Groenewegen, 2012) added a posteriori; (2) self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres (Eriksson et al. 2014). These allow to interpret in a coherent way the dynamic behavior of gas and dust. In addition, the geometric model fitting tool for interferometric data GEM-FIND is applied to carry out a first interpretation of the structural environment of the stars.The results underline that the joint use of different kind of observations, as photometry, spectroscopy and interferometry, is essential for understanding and modeling the atmosphere of pulsating C-rich AGB stars. For our first target, the carbon-rich Mira star RU Vir, the dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO/SWS spectra in the wavelength range λ = [2.9, 13.0] μm. However, the object turned out to be “peculiar”: we notice a discrepancy in the visible part of the SED, and in the visibilities. Possible causes are intra/inter-cycle variations in the dynamic model atmospheres, and an eventual presence of a companion star and/or disk or clumps in the atmosphere of RU Vir (Rau et al. subm.). Results on further targets will also be presented.The increased sample of C-rich stars of this work provides crucial constraints for the atmospheric structure and the formation of SiC. Moreover the second generation VLTI instrument MATISSE will be a perfect tool to detect and study asymmetries, as it will allow interferometric imaging in the L, M, and N bands.

  16. A census of AGB stars in Local Group galaxies. II. NGC 185 and NGC 147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.; Kerschbaum, F.; Olofsson, H.; Schwarz, H. E.

    2003-05-01

    We present results of our ongoing photometric survey of Local Group galaxies, using a four filter technique based on the method of Wing (\\cite{Wing71}) to identify and characterise the late-type stellar content. Two narrow band filters centred on spectral features of TiO and CN allow us to distinguish between AGB stars of different chemistries [M-type (O-rich) and C-type (C-rich)]. The major parts of two dwarf galaxies of the M 31 subgroup - NGC 185 and NGC 147 - were observed. From photometry in V and i we estimate the tip of the RGB, and derive distance moduli respectively. With additional photometric data in the narrow band filters TiO and CN we identify 154 new AGB carbon stars in NGC 185 and 146 in NGC 147. C/M ratios are derived, as well as mean absolute magnitudes , bolometric magnitudes M_bol, luminosity functions, and the spatial/radial distributions of the C stars in both galaxies. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Table A.1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strabg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/93

  17. The Reddening of Red Supergiants: When Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Plez, Bertrand; Levesque, Emily M.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Josselin, Eric

    2005-12-01

    Deriving the physical properties of red supergiants (RSGs) depends on accurate corrections for reddening by dust. We use our recent modeling of the optical spectra of RSGs to address this topic. First, we find that previous broadband studies have underestimated the correction for extinction in the visible, and hence the luminosities (if derived from V); the shift in the effective wavelengths of the standard B and V bandpasses necessitates using an effective value of the ratio R'V=4.2 to correct broadband photometry of RSGs if RV=3.1 for early-type stars viewed through the same dust, where we have assumed the standard reddening law of Cardelli and coauthors. Use of the Fitzpatrick reddening law would lead to R'V=3.8, as well as slightly lower values of extinction derived from spectrophotometry, but results in slightly poorer fits. Second, we find that a significant fraction of RSGs in Galactic OB associations and clusters show up to several magnitudes of excess visual extinction compared to OB stars in the same regions; we argue that this is likely due to circumstellar dust around the RSGs. We also show that the RSG dust production rate (as indicated by the 12 μm excess) is well correlated with bolometric luminosity, contrary to what has been found by earlier studies. The stars with the highest amount of extra visual extinction also show significant near-UV (NUV) excesses compared to the stellar models reddened by the standard reddening law. This NUV excess is likely due to scattering of the star's light by the dust and/or a larger average grain size than that typical of grains found in the diffuse interstellar medium. Similar excesses have been attributed to circumstellar dust around R Coronae Borealis stars. Finally, we estimate that the RSGs contribute dust grains at the rate of 3×10-8Msolar yr-1 kpc-2 in the solar neighborhood, comparable to what we estimate for late-type WCs, 1×10-7Msolar yr-1 kpc-2. In the solar neighborhood this represents only a few

  18. The Galactic Nova Rate Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, a reliable estimate of the Galactic nova rate has remained elusive. Here, the overall Galactic nova rate is estimated by extrapolating the observed rate for novae reaching m≤slant 2 to include the entire Galaxy using a two component disk plus bulge model for the distribution of stars in the Milky Way. The present analysis improves on previous work by considering important corrections for incompleteness in the observed rate of bright novae and by employing a Monte Carlo analysis to better estimate the uncertainty in the derived nova rates. Several models are considered to account for differences in the assumed properties of bulge and disk nova populations and in the absolute magnitude distribution. The simplest models, which assume uniform properties between bulge and disk novae, predict Galactic nova rates of ∼50 to in excess of 100 per year, depending on the assumed incompleteness at bright magnitudes. Models where the disk novae are assumed to be more luminous than bulge novae are explored, and predict nova rates up to 30% lower, in the range of ∼35 to ∼75 per year. An average of the most plausible models yields a rate of {50}-23+31 yr‑1, which is arguably the best estimate currently available for the nova rate in the Galaxy. Virtually all models produce rates that represent significant increases over recent estimates, and bring the Galactic nova rate into better agreement with that expected based on comparison with the latest results from extragalactic surveys.

  19. Synergies of CoRoT asteroseismology and APOGEE spectroscopy -- Applications to Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Friedrich; Chiappini, Cristina; Silva Rodrigues, Thaíse; Miglio, Andrea; Montalbàn, Josefina; Mosser, Benoit; Girardi, Leo; Valentini, Marica; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    We present the first coherent dataset of 678 solar-like oscillating CoRoT red-giant stars located in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been followed up spectroscopically by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE).For the first time in a homogeneous analysis, ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars have been measured over a largeradial range of the Milky Way's disc (4.5 kpc Galactic evolution.Specifically, we measure the age dependence of the radial metallicity distribution in the thin disc over the past 10 billion years. We also report the discovery of a group of apparently young red-giant stars exhibiting enhanced [α/Fe] abundance ratios with respect to Solar values (Chiappini et al. 2015). Their existence is not explained by standard chemical evolution models of the Milky Way, and shows that the chemical-enrichment history of the Galactic disc is more complex. Our tentative interpretation of these and previous intriguing observations in the Milky Way is that these stars were formed close to the end of the Galactic bar, near corotation.We also highlight some possibilities to use the present sample to constrain stellar models (thermo-haline mixing, determining evolutionary stages from spectroscopy alone).

  20. Evolution of massive AGB stars. II. model properties at non-solar metallicity and the fate of Super-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siess, L.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Massive AGB (hereafter super-AGB or SAGB) stars ignite carbon off-center and have initial masses ranging between Mup, the minimum initial mass for carbon ignition, and M_mas the minimum mass for the formation of an iron core collapse supernova. In this mass interval, stars more massive than Mn will undergo an electron capture supernova (EC-SN). Aims: We study the fate and selected evolutionary properties of SAGB stars up to the end of the carbon burning phase as a function of metallicity and core overshooting. Methods: The method is based on the analysis of a large set of stellar models covering the mass range 5-13 M⊙ and calculated for 7 different metallicities between Z=10-5 and twice solar. Core overshooting was considered in two subsets for Z=10-4 and 0.02. The models are available online at http://www-astro.ulb.ac.be/ siess/database.html. The fate of SAGB stars is investigated through a parametric model which allows us to assess the role of mass loss and of the third dredge-up. Results: Our main results can be summarized as follows: a) prior to C-burning, the evolution of SAGB stars is very similar to that of intermediate-mass stars, being more luminous, b) SAGB stars suffer a large He enrichment at the end of the second dredge-up, c) the limiting masses Mup, Mn and M_mas present a nonlinear behavior with Z, characterized by a minimum around Z=10-4, d) the values of Mup, Mn and M_mas are decreased by 2 M⊙ when core overshooting is considered, e) our models predict a minimum oxygen-neon white dwarf mass of 1.05 M⊙, f) the determination of Mn is highly dependent on the mass loss and core growth rates, g) the evolutionary channel for EC-SN is limited to a very narrow mass range of ⪉1-1.5 M⊙ width and this mass window can be further decreased if some metallicity scaling factor is applied to the mass loss rate, h) the final fate of SAGB stars is connected to the second dredge-up and this property allowed us to refine the initial mass range for

  1. The K2 Galactic Archaeology Program Data Release. I. Asteroseismic Results from Campaign 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Zinn, Joel; Elsworth, Yvonne; Garcia, Rafael A.; Kallinger, Thomas; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoit; Sharma, Sanjib; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy; Huber, Daniel; Jones, Caitlin D.; Miglio, Andrea; Silva Aguirre, Victor

    2017-01-01

    NASA's K2 mission is observing tens of thousands of stars along the ecliptic, providing data suitable for large-scale asteroseismic analyses to inform galactic archaeology studies. Its first campaign covered a field near the north Galactic cap, a region never covered before by large asteroseismic-ensemble investigations, and was therefore of particular interest for exploring this part of our Galaxy. Here we report the asteroseismic analysis of all stars selected by the K2 Galactic Archaeology Program during the mission's “north Galactic cap” campaign 1. Our consolidated analysis uses six independent methods to measure the global seismic properties, in particular the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum power. From the full target sample of 8630 stars we find about 1200 oscillating red giants, a number comparable with estimates from galactic synthesis modeling. Thus, as a valuable by-product we find roughly 7500 stars to be dwarfs, which provide a sample well suited for galactic exoplanet occurrence studies because they originate from our simple and easily reproducible selection function. In addition, to facilitate the full potential of the data set for galactic archaeology, we assess the detection completeness of our sample of oscillating red giants. We find that the sample is at least nearly complete for stars with 40 ≲ {ν }\\max /μHz ≲ 270 and {ν }\\max ,{detect}< 2.6× {10}6\\cdot {2}-{\\text{Kp}} μHz. There is a detection bias against helium core burning stars with {ν }\\max ∼ 30 μHz, affecting the number of measurements of {{Δ }}ν and possibly also {ν }\\max . Although we can detect oscillations down to {\\text{Kp}} = 15, our campaign 1 sample lacks enough faint giants to assess the detection completeness for stars fainter than {\\text{Kp}} ∼ 14.5.

  2. Red giants in the vicinity of open clusters. Field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.; Zhao, G.; Liang, Ya.

    2009-08-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the atmospheric abundances of red giants in the vicinity of open clusters. The atmospheric parameters, atmospheric abundances, masses, ages, Galactic velocities, and elements of the Galactic orbits are derived for all the studied stars. We have discovered high metal abundances (close to 0.3dex) for five stars, which we classify as super-metal-rich stars. Several stars have lower [Na/Fe] than normal red giants with similar atmospheric parameters. The kinematic characteristics of these stars are somewhat different from those for objects in the Galactic thin disk. We suggest that the observed effect can be explained by inhomogeneity of the chemical composition of gas-dust clouds, which could be due to different rates of SNe II supernovae in different regions of the Galaxy.

  3. Galactic arm structure and gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    Unexpectedly high energy gamma radiation over a broad region of the galactic plane in the general direction of the galactic center was observed. A model is proposed wherein the galactic cosmic rays are preferentially located in the high matter density regions of galactic arm segments, as a result of the weight of the matter in these arms tieing the magnetic fields and hence the cosmic rays to these regions. The presently observed galactic gamma ray longitudinal distribution can be explained with the current estimate of the average galactic matter density: if the average arm to interarm matter ratio is five to one for the major arm segments toward the galactic center from the sun; and if the cosmic ray density normalized to its local value is assumed to be directly proportional to the matter density.

  4. Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf

    2006-03-01

    Space radiation is a major hazard to astronauts in long-duration human space explosion. Astronauts are exposed to an enormous amount of radiation during their missions away from the Earth in outer space. Deep space is a rich environment of protons, gamma rays and cosmic rays. A healthy 40 years old man staying on Earth away from large doses of radiation stands a 20% chance of dying from cancer. If the same person travels into a 3- year Mars mission, the added risk should increase by 19%. This indicates that there is 39% chance of having cancer after he comes back to Earth. Female astronaut chances to get cancer is even almost double the above percentage. The greatest threat to astronauts en route to the red planet is galactic cosmic rays (GCR). GCRs penetrate through the skin of spaceships and people like tiny firearm bullets, breaking the strands of DNA molecules, damaging genes, and killing cells. Understanding the nature of the GCRs, their effect on biological cells, and their interactions with different shielding materials is the key point to shield against them in long space missions. In this paper we will present a model to evaluate the biological effects of GCRs and suggestion different ways to shield against them.

  5. Structure of the Galactic Halo Towards the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinman, T. D.; Bragaglia, A.; Cacciari, C.; Buzzoni, A.; Spagna, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have used RR Lyrae and Blue HB stars as tracers of the old Galactic halo, in order to study the halo structure and the galactic rotation as a function of height above the plane. Our sample includes 40 RR Lyrae and 80 BHB stars that are about 2 to 15 kpc above the plane, in a roughly 250 deg2 area around the North Galactic Pole (NGP). We use proper motions (derived from the GSCII data base) and radial velocities to determine the rotation of the halo. From the whole sample the motion appears to be significantly more retrograde than the samples in the solar neighbourhood, confirming Majewski (1992) results and our own preliminary results based on 1/3 the present sample (Kinman et al. 2003; Spagna et al. 2003). However, the better statistics have now revealed the likely existence of two components, whose characteristics need an accurate analysis of systematic errors on the proper motions in order to be assessed in detail.

  6. Formation of Galactic Prominence in the Galactic Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Han; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-02-01

    We carried out 2.5-dimensional resistive MHD simulations to study the formation mechanism of molecular loops observed by Fukui et al. in the Galactic central region. Since it is hard to form molecular loops by lifting up dense molecular gas, we study the formation mechanism of molecular gas in rising magnetic arcades. This model is based on the in situ formation model of solar prominences, in which prominences are formed by cooling instability in helical magnetic flux ropes formed by imposing converging and shearing motion at footpoints of the magnetic arch anchored to the solar surface. We extended this model to Galactic center scale (a few hundreds of parsecs). Numerical results indicate that magnetic reconnection taking place in the current sheet that formed inside the rising magnetic arcade creates dense blobs confined by the rising helical magnetic flux ropes. Thermal instability taking place in the flux ropes forms dense molecular filaments floating at high Galactic latitude. The mass of the filament increases with time and can exceed {10}5 {M}ȯ .

  7. On the introduction of {sup 17}O+p reaction rates evaluated through the THM in AGB nucleosynthesis calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2014-05-09

    The rates for the {sup 17}O(p,αα{sup 14}N, {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 18}F and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions deduced trough the Trojan Horse Method (THM) have been introduced into a state-of-the-art asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis and cool bottom process. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis.

  8. Shielding against galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Thibeault, S. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.; Kiefer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ions of galactic origin are modified but not attenuated by the presence of shielding materials. Indeed, the number of particles and the absorbed energy behind most shield materials increases as a function of shield thickness. The modification of the galactic cosmic ray composition upon interaction with shielding is the only effective means of providing astronaut protection. This modification is intimately conntected with the shield transport porperties and is a strong function of shield composition. The systematic behavior of the shield properites in terms of microscopic energy absorption events will be discussed. The shield effectiveness is examined with respect to convectional protection practice and in terms of a biological endpoint: the efficiency for reduction of the probability of transformation of shielded C3H1OT1/2 mouse cells. The relative advantage of developing new shielding technologies is discussed in terms of a shield performance as related to biological effect and the resulting uncertainty in estimating astronaut risk.

  9. Sulphur molecules in the circumstellar envelopes of M-type AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; De Beck, E.; Black, J. H.; Olofsson, H.; Justtanont, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: The sulphur compounds SO and SO2 have not been widely studied in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. By presenting and modelling a large number of SO and SO2 lines in the low mass-loss rate M-type AGB star R Dor, and modelling the available lines of those molecules in a further four M-type AGB stars, we aim to determine their circumstellar abundances and distributions. Methods: We use a detailed radiative transfer analysis based on the accelerated lambda iteration method to model circumstellar SO and SO2 line emission. We use molecular data files for both SO and SO2 that are more extensive than those previously available. Results: Using 17 SO lines and 98 SO2 lines to constrain our models for R Dor, we find an SO abundance of (6.7 ± 0.9) × 10-6 and an SO2 abundance of 5 × 10-6 with both species having high abundances close to the star. We also modelled 34SO and found an abundance of (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10-7, giving an 32SO/34SO ratio of 21.6 ± 8.5. We derive similar results for the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances and their distributions for the low mass-loss rate object W Hya. For the higher mass-loss rate stars, we find shell-like SO distributions with peak abundances that decrease and peak abundance radii that increase with increasing mass-loss rate. The positions of the peak SO abundance agree very well with the photodissociation radii of H2O. We also modelled SO2 in two higher mass-loss rate stars but our models for these were less conclusive. Conclusions: We conclude that for the low mass-loss rate stars, the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances are much higher than predicted by chemical models of the extended stellar atmosphere. These two species may also account for all the available sulphur. For the higher mass-loss rate stars we find evidence that SO is most efficiently formed in the circumstellar envelope, most likely through the photodissociation of H2O and the subsequent reaction between S and OH. The S

  10. MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION AND ITS VARIATION WITH GALACTIC LONGITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li Aigen E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.c

    2009-12-10

    Based on the data obtained from the Spitzer/Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIPMSE) Legacy Program and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project, we derive the extinction in the four IRAC bands, [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0] mum, relative to the 2MASS K{sub s} band (at 2.16 mum) for 131 GLIPMSE fields along the Galactic plane within |l| <= 65 deg., using red giants and red clump giants as tracers. As a whole, the mean extinction in the IRAC bands (normalized to the 2MASS K{sub s} band), A{sub [3.6]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.63+-0.01, A{sub [4.5]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.57+-0.03, A{sub [5.8]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.49+-0.03, A{sub [8.0]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.55+-0.03, exhibits little variation with wavelength (i.e., the extinction is somewhat flat or gray). This is consistent with previous studies and agrees with that predicted from the standard interstellar grain model for R{sub V} = 5.5 by Weingartner and Draine. As far as individual sightline is concerned, however, the wavelength dependence of the mid-infrared interstellar extinction A{sub l}ambda/A{sub K{sub s}} varies from one sightline to another, suggesting that there may not exist a 'universal' IR extinction law. We, for the first time, demonstrate the existence of systematic variations of extinction with Galactic longitude which appears to correlate with the locations of spiral arms as well as with the variation of the far-infrared luminosity of interstellar dust.

  11. A Nearby Galactic Exemplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    spiral arms are shown with particular clarity in this image as red and pink clouds. With its huge field of view, 34 x 34 arcminutes, similar to the apparent size of the full Moon in the sky, the WFI is an ideal tool for astronomers to study large objects such as NGC 300. NGC 300 is also the home of many interesting astronomical phenomena that have been studied with ESO telescopes. ESO astronomers recently discovered the most distant and one of the most massive stellar-mass black holes yet found (eso1004) in this galaxy, as the partner of a hot and luminous Wolf-Rayet star in a binary system. NGC 300 and another galaxy, NGC 55, are slowly spinning around and towards each other, in the early stages of a lengthy merging process (eso0914). The current best estimate of the distance to the NCG 300 was also determined by astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory (eso0524), among others. Notes [1] Although it is normally considered as member of the Sculptor Group, the most recent distance measurements show that NGC 300 lies significantly closer to us than many of the other galaxies in the group and may be only loosely associated with them. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world

  12. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Maccarone, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Johnson, C.; Greiss, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multi-wavelength survey of two 6×1 degree strips above and below the Galactic plane, including deep r' and i' imaging and time domain photometry from CTIO and shallow, wide-field X-ray imaging with Chandra. Targeting fields above |b|=1 avoids most of the copious extinction along the Galactic plane while maintaining high source density. This results in targets that are accessible to follow up in optical and NIR wavelengths. The X-ray observations are shallow to maximize the number of quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) relative to Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). The goals of the GBS are to conduct a census of Low Mass X-ray Binaries in the Milky Way in order to constrain models of binary evolution, the common envelope phase in particular, and to expand the number of known LMXBs for optical follow up. Mass measurements in particular will help constrain the black hole (BH) mass distribution and the equation of state for neutron stars (NS). Constraining the BH mass distribution will constrain models of their formation in supernovae. The current population of Galactic BHs suffers from selection effects, which the GBS avoids by finding new objects while still in quiescence. We expect to find qLMXBs, magnetic CVs, RS CVn stars, and smaller numbers of other types of sources. After removing duplicates, there are 1640 unique X-ray sources in the 12 square degree survey area, which closely matches the predicted number of 1648. We are currently matching X-ray sources to counterparts in other wavelengths using new photometric and spectroscopic observations as well as in archival data where it exists, and searching for variability and periodicity in the counterparts in photometric data. So far, we have spectroscopically identified 27 interacting binaries including promising candidates for quiescent black holes.

  13. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of the Properties of Dust from Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Speck, A.; Volk, K.; Kemper, C.; Reach, W. T.; Lagadec, E.; Bernard, J.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  14. Simulating Galactic Winds on Supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan

    2017-01-01

    Galactic winds are a ubiquitous feature of rapidly star-forming galaxies. Observations of nearby galaxies have shown that winds are complex, multiphase phenomena, comprised of outflowing gas at a large range of densities, temperatures, and velocities. Describing how starburst-driven outflows originate, evolve, and affect the circumgalactic medium and gas supply of galaxies is an important challenge for theories of galaxy evolution. In this talk, I will discuss how we are using a new hydrodynamics code, Cholla, to improve our understanding of galactic winds. Cholla is a massively parallel, GPU-based code that takes advantage of specialized hardware on the newest generation of supercomputers. With Cholla, we can perform large, three-dimensional simulations of multiphase outflows, allowing us to track the coupling of mass and momentum between gas phases across hundreds of parsecs at sub-parsec resolution. The results of our recent simulations demonstrate that the evolution of cool gas in galactic winds is highly dependent on the initial structure of embedded clouds. In particular, we find that turbulent density structures lead to more efficient mass transfer from cool to hot phases of the wind. I will discuss the implications of our results both for the incorporation of winds into cosmological simulations, and for interpretations of observed multiphase winds and the circumgalatic medium of nearby galaxies.

  15. Constraints on galactic wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-09-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft X-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star formation rate of 0.5-3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v∞ to scale with the star formation rate dot{M}_{ast } (in M⊙ yr-1) approximately as v_∞ ≃ (700-1000) {{km s^{-1}}} {dot{M}_{ast }}^{1/6}. The implied mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting that thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from thermal evaporation within the galactic disc alone, however, are somewhat smaller, 0.2-2, so that a further contribution from cloud ablation or evaporation within the wind may be required. Both models may account for the 1.4 GHz luminosity of unresolved radio sources within starburst galaxies for plausible parameters describing the distribution of relativistic electrons. Further observational tests to distinguish the models are suggested.

  16. Further ALMA observations and detailed modeling of the Red Rectangle

    PubMed Central

    Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.; Santander-García, M.; Van Winckel, H.; Sánchez Contreras, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We aim to study the rotating and expanding gas in the Red Rectangle, which is a well known object that recently left the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. We analyze the properties of both components and the relation between them. Rotating disks have been very elusive in post-AGB nebulae, in which gas is almost always found to be in expansion. Methods We present new high-quality ALMA observations of C17O J=6−5 and H13CN J=4−3 line emission and results from a new reduction of already published 13CO J=3−2 data. A detailed model fitting of all the molecular line data, including previous maps and single-dish observations of lines of CO, CII, and CI, was performed using a sophisticated code that includes an accurate nonlocal treatment of radiative transfer in 2D. These observations (of low- and high-opacity lines requiring various degrees of excitation) and the corresponding modeling allowed us to deepen the analysis of the nebular properties. We also stress the uncertainties, particularly in the determination of the boundaries of the CO-rich gas and some properties of the outflow. Results We confirm the presence of a rotating equatorial disk and an outflow, which is mainly formed of gas leaving the disk. The mass of the disk is ~ 0.01 M⊙, and that of the CO-rich outflow is around ten times smaller. High temperatures of ≳ 100 K are derived for most components. From comparison of the mass values, we roughly estimate the lifetime of the rotating disk, which is found to be of about 10000 yr. Taking data of a few other post-AGB composite nebulae into account, we find that the lifetimes of disks around post-AGB stars typically range between 5000 and more than 20000 yr. The angular momentum of the disk is found to be high, ~ 9 M⊙ AU km s−1, which is comparable to that of the stellar system at present. Our observations of H13CN show a particularly wide velocity dispersion and indicate that this molecule is only abundant in the inner Keplerian disk, at

  17. Post-AGB Stars in Nearby Galaxies as Calibrators for HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes activities carried out with support from the NASA Ultraviolet, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program under Grant NAG 5-6821. The Principal Investigator is Howard E. Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute). STScI Postdoctoral Associates Laura K. Fullton (1998), David Alves (1998-2001), and Michael Siegel (2001) were partially supported by this grant. The aim of the program is to calibrate the absolute magnitudes of post-asymptotic- giant-branch (post-AGB or PAGB) stars, which we believe will be an excellent new "standard candle" for measuring extragalactic distances. The argument is that, in old populations, the stars that are evolving through the PAGB region of the HR diagram arise from only a single main-sequence turnoff mass. In addition, theoretical PAGB evolutionary tracks show that they evolve through this region at constant luminosity; hence the PAGB stars should have an extremely narrow luminosity function. Moreover, as the PAGB stars evolve through spectral types F and A (en route from the AGB to hot stellar remnants and white dwarfs), they have the highest luminosities attained by old stars (both bolometrically and in the visual band). Finally, PAGB stars of these spectral types are very easily identified. because of their large Balmer jumps, which are due to their very low surface gravities. Our approach is first to identify PAGB stars in Milky Way globular clusters and in other Local Group galaxies, which are at known distances, and thus to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for the PAGB stars. With this Milky Way and Local Group luminosity calibration, we will then be in a position to find PAGB stars in more distant galaxies from the ground, and ultimately from the Hubble Space Telescope. and thus derive distances. These PAGB stars are, as noted above, the visually brightest members of Population II, and hence will allow distance measurements to galaxies that do not contain Cepheids, such as

  18. ALMA observations of the vibrationally excited rotational CO transition v = 1, J = 3 - 2 towards five AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, T.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Ramstedt, S.; Lombaert, R.; Maercker, M.; De Beck, E.

    2016-11-01

    We report the serendipitous detection with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of the vibrationally excited pure-rotational CO transition v = 1, J = 3 - 2 towards five asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, o Cet, R Aqr, R Scl, W Aql, and π1 Gru. The observed lines are formed in the poorly understood region located between the stellar surface and the region where the wind starts, the so-called warm molecular layer. We successfully reproduce the observed lines profiles using a simple model. We constrain the extents, densities, and kinematics of the region where the lines are produced. R Aqr and R Scl show inverse P-Cygni line profiles which indicate infall of material on to the stars. The line profiles of o Cet and R Scl show variability. The serendipitous detection towards these five sources shows that vibrationally excited rotational lines can be observed towards a large number of nearby AGB stars using ALMA. This opens a new possibility for the study of the innermost regions of AGB circumstellar envelopes.

  19. Broad-band and multi-band polarimetric observations of post-AGB and RV Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Ramirez-Velez, J.; Hiriart, D.; Lopez, M.; Bonanos, A.

    2013-02-01

    We present optical broad-band (UBVRI) aperture polarimetry of 52 post-AGB stars, selected from De Ruyter et al. (2006) and the Torun Catalog, based on the shape of their SED and near-infrared excess. We find 10 (19%) of the stars in our sample to have high polarization (P > 5%), 30 (56%) intermediate/low polarization (1% < P < 5%) and 13 (25%) very low (or non-polarized) polarization (P < 1%). Our observations show clear evidence of asymmetric circumstellar envelopes or equatorial density enhancement around post-AGB stars, probably formed at the beginning of the AGB phase. Some stars exhibit wavelength-independent polarization suggesting scattered light by large dust grains or free electrons (Thomson scattering), while others show wavelength-dependent polarization originated from scattering by small dust grains (Rayleigh scattering). Finally, we conclude that highly polarized sources (P > 3%), show systematically [12] - [25] > 1.5, J - H > 0.5 and J - K > 0.5, clearly separated from the group of RV Tauri stars, which are found to have very low polarization (P < 3%).

  20. American Red Cross

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Elemental Abundances in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. E.; Tomkin, J.; Lambert, D. L.; Allende Prieto, C.

    Here, we discussed our recent results of elemental abundance survey of Galactic disk based on 181 F- and G-type dwarfs (published by Reddy et al. 2003, MNRAS, 340, 304). Using high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra we obtained quantitative abundances for 27 elements: C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, and Eu. For the entire sample we have determined kinematic (U,V,W) and the orbital parameters (peri- and apo- Galactic distances). The alpha-elements -- O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti -- show [α/Fe] to increase slightly with decreasing [Fe/H]. Heavy elements with dominant contributions at solar metallicity from the s-process show [s/Fe] to decrease slightly with decreasing [Fe/H]. Scatter in [X/Fe] at a fixed [Fe/H] is entirely attributable to the small measurement errors, after excluding the few thick disk stars and the s-process enriched CH subgiants. Tight limits are set on `cosmic' scatter. If a weak trend with [Fe/H] is taken into account, the composition of a thin disk star expressed as [X/Fe] is independent of the star's age and birthplace for elements contributed in different proportions by massive stars (Type II SN), exploding white dwarfs (Type Ia SN), and asymptotic red giant branch stars. By combining our sample with published studies, we deduced properties of thin and thick disk stars. Thick disk stars are primarily identified by their VLSR in the range - 40 to -100 km s-1. These are very old stars with origins in the inner Galaxy and metallicities [Fe/H] <˜-0.4. At the same [Fe/H], the sampled thin disk stars have VLSR ˜0 km s-1, and are generally younger with a birthplace at about the Sun's Galactocentric distance. In the range -0.35 ≥ [Fe/H] ≥ -0.70, well represented by present thin and thick disk samples, [X/Fe] of the thick disk stars is greater than that of thin disk stars for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, and Eu. [X/Fe] is very similar for the thin and thick disk for -- notably -- Na, and iron

  2. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  3. VLTI/MIDI Large Program: AGB Stars at Different Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, C.; Klotz, D.; Wittkowski, M.; Hron, J.; Richichi, A.; Lagadec, E.; Verhoelst, T.; Rau, G.; Sacuto, S.; Jorissen, A.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Olofsson, H.; Kerschbaum, F.

    2015-08-01

    We have observed a sample of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars from the Herschel Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) program with the VLTI MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI). The program aims at providing insight to the atmospheres of those stars, to be able to understand the role of the mass-loss process at different spatial scales. We obtained visibilities and spectra of fourteen objects with different chemistries and variability classes. These observations, together with data we retrieved from the archive, allow us to characterize not only the geometry of the dust-forming region, but in some cases also the time variability in the N band. As previously reported in the literature, we confirm the detection of spectroscopic but not interferometric variability. This result has implications on the size of the structures involved in the dust-formation process. We also report two cases of asymmetric structures; the nature of these structures will be clearly identified only with the second generation VLTI instrument MATISSE.

  4. AGB and RGB stars as tracers of the early and intermediate star-formation history.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.

    The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are the largest members of the Local Group, and their evolution is affected by the evolution of their host as a whole. At the same time, they themselves play an important role in the evolution of the Local Group. Considerable information can be obtained for the Local Group, but little is known about the distances and the full star-formation history of its galaxies. RGB and AGB stars are the keys to trace the full star-formation history of nearby galaxies. These stars are usually the most prominent population of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, but it has been shown (Gallart et al. 1994; Aparicio & Gallart 1994) that they are also observable in dwarf irregular galaxies. This will open the door to the study of the earliest star-formation processes taking place in these galaxies. The star-formation history of the Local Group galaxies is a crucial piece of information for answering basic questions about the evolutionary history of the group.

  5. Revealing the transition from post-AGB stars to planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, Indra; Chapman, Jessica M.; Cohen, Martin; Redman, Matt

    2009-04-01

    In 2005, we used ATCA at 3- & 6-cm to detect the onset of ionizing winds in a biased sub-sample of post-AGB stars selected from an OH maser survey. The evolutionary status of the objects was indicated by 2-colour plots of IRAS and MSX data as well as OH maser profile characteristics. We detected 7/28 sources in radio continuum and found that 2 had non-thermal spectral indices, consistent with wind shock interactions rather than photoionization by an evolving progenitor (Bains et al, 2008, MNRAS submitted). Furthermore, SED modelling of some of the radio-detected sources revealed central star temperatures << 30,000 K, the threshold for significant photoionization. To refine the diagnostic capabilities of the infrared colours and maser characteristics in predicting both the evolutionary phase of these objects and the presence of ionizing winds within them, we now propose to complete the ATCA survey of the remainder of the sample (57 targets) at 3 & 6 cm. This ATCA detection experiment provides an excellent showcase for the unprecedented sensitivity of the CABB.

  6. Abundance Anomalies in NGC6752 - Do AGB Stars Have a Role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Fenner, Y.; Karakas, A. I.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Gibson, B. K.

    2005-07-01

    We are in the process of testing a popular theory that the observed abundance anomalies in the Globular Cluster NGC 6752 are due to `internal pollution' from intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars. To this end we are using a chemical evolution model incorporating custom-made stellar evolution yields calculated using a detailed stellar evolution code. By tracing the chemical evolution of the intracluster gas, which is polluted by two generations of stars, we are able to test the internal pollution scenario in which the Na- and Al-enhanced ejecta from intermediate mass stars is either accreted onto the surfaces of other stars, or goes toward forming new stars. In this paper we focus mainly on the nucleosynthetic yields of the AGB stars and discuss whether these stars are the source of the observed Na-O anticorrelation. Comparing our preliminary results with observational data suggests that the qualitative theory is not supported by this quantitative study.This study has recently been completed and published in [Fenner, Y., Campbell, S.W., Karakas, A.I., Lattanzio, J.C, Gibson, B.K., 2004, MNRAS, 353, 789]. Details of the stellar models will be in a forthcoming paper [Campbell, S. W., et al. 2004, in prep.].

  7. The physics of galactic winds driven by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) drive fast winds in the interstellar medium of their host galaxies. It is commonly assumed that the high ambient densities and intense radiation fields in galactic nuclei imply short cooling times, thus making the outflows momentum conserving. We show that cooling of high-velocity shocked winds in AGN is in fact inefficient in a wide range of circumstances, including conditions relevant to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), resulting in energy-conserving outflows. We further show that fast energy-conserving outflows can tolerate a large amount of mixing with cooler gas before radiative losses become important. For winds with initial velocity vin ≳ 10 000 km s-1, as observed in ultraviolet and X-ray absorption, the shocked wind develops a two-temperature structure. While most of the thermal pressure support is provided by the protons, the cooling processes operate directly only on the electrons. This significantly slows down inverse Compton cooling, while free-free cooling is negligible. Slower winds with vin ˜ 1000 km s-1, such as may be driven by radiation pressure on dust, can also experience energy-conserving phases but under more restrictive conditions. During the energy-conserving phase, the momentum flux of an outflow is boosted by a factor ˜vin/2vs by work done by the hot post-shock gas, where vs is the velocity of the swept-up material. Energy-conserving outflows driven by fast AGN winds (vin ˜ 0.1c) may therefore explain the momentum fluxes Ṗ≫LAGN/c of galaxy-scale outflows recently measured in luminous quasars and ULIRGs. Shocked wind bubbles expanding normal to galactic discs may also explain the large-scale bipolar structures observed in some systems, including around the Galactic Centre, and can produce significant radio, X-ray and γ-ray emission. The analytic solutions presented here will inform implementations of AGN feedback in numerical simulations, which typically do not include all the important

  8. Atomic Hydrogen in a Galactic Center Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of ~14 km s-1, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at ~200 km s-1 in a Galactic wind.

  9. Three Dimensional Stellar Kinematics of the Galactic Bar and Disk: Where APOGEE Meets GLIMPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Robert; Babler, Brian; D'Onghia, Elena; Clarkson, Will; Churchwell, Ed; Kirkpatrick, Davy; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steve

    2016-08-01

    We propose to use the Spitzer Space Telescope to re-image 53 square degrees (fourteen fields) of the inner Galactic plane (galactic longitudes \\|L\\|=6-45 degrees) that have also been targeted by the APOGEE/APOGEE-2 surveys-Sloan III and IV programs to obtain high resolution H band spectroscopy for hundreds of thousands of red giants. We will combine the proposed observations (198 hours) with the original GLIMPSE observations of the Galactic plane in 2004-2005 to measure the proper motions of sources along the Galactic plane over the past decade. When combined with the 43 square degrees of Priority 1 data being obtained for Cycle 12--which cover \\|L\\|< 5 degrees and \\|B\\|<2 degrees, plus Baade's window -we will have proper motion constraints for over 25 million sources. The combination of Spitzer proper motions for millions of sources and APOGEE radial velocities for thousands of sources will be used to constrain models of stellar kinematics for the Galactic bar(s) and disk. We will also use this data to test several bar formation models that have been developed to explain the mysterious 'high-velocity' Milky Way bar stars (Nidever et al 2012b), one of the first APOGEE discoveries. This program will be the most uniform and deep Galactic plane proper motion study as mid-infrared observations are minimally affected by extinction over most of the region we propose to cover. We also expect to be able to find at least 150 high proper motion stars which could be substellar objects and possible micro-lensing candidates against the crowded Galactic disk.

  10. A survey for red varibles INT he LMC - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Neill; Glass, I. S.; Catchpole, R. M.

    1988-05-01

    Infrared photometry of a sample of 126 variables drawn from a 16 sq deg area of the northern LMC is presented. Most of these stars were previously unknown and the majority prove the be long period red-giant variables. Most of the latter stars fall within two groups in the /K(0), log(P)/ diagram, the lower luminosity ones being Miras which obey a definite period-luminosity relation. Using the latter stars as distance estimators is discussed. The /M(bol), P/ diagram is compared with the theoretical tracks calculated by Wood, Bessell & Fox (1983), and it is found that the distribution of stars is probably consistent with a lull in star formation in the LMC from about 10 to the 9th - 2 x 10 to the 8th yr ago, although this conclusion depends strongly on the luminosity at which stars of different initial mass enter the thermally pulsing AGB.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity and kinematics in Galactic bar (Babusiaux+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babusiaux, C.; Katz, D.; Hill, V.; Royer, F.; Gomez, A.; Arenou, F.; Combes, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Gilmore, G.; Haywood, M.; Robin, A. C.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N.; Sartoretti, M.; Schultheis, P.

    2014-01-01

    We observe red clump stars in four fields along the Galactic bar major axis (l=10°, -6°, 6° and b=0°, plus a field at l=0°, b=1°) with low-resolution spectroscopy from FLAMES/GIRAFFE (setup LR08) at the VLT, observing around the CaII triplet. We developed robust methods to extract radial velocity and metallicity estimates from these low signal-to-noise spectra. Results have been derived by fixing atmospheric parameters typical of a red clump star (Teff=4750K, logg=2.5). For some targets, the metallicity could not be derived. (1 data file).

  12. The Contribution of Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Starts to the Luminosities of the Magellanic Clouds at 1-24 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at approx 3 - 4 micron, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at approx 3 - 4 micron and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 micron, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1 - 4 micron. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8 - 1 micron). At longer wavelengths (much > 8 micron), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 micron, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 micron flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 micron flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 micron flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 micron at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  13. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS (Frieswijk+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-04-01

    Basic parameters of 2909 extended red regions in the outer Galactic plane (1320 at 60" and 1589 at 90" resolution). The sources have been extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, Cat. ). For each source Galactic coordinates, total number of resolution cells, linear extend in longitude and latitude and number of 2MASS point sources are given. The calculated reliability of the sources is >99.9%. (1 data file).

  15. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  16. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  17. Potential use of Pseudomonas koreensis AGB-1 in association with Miscanthus sinensis to remediate heavy metal(loid)-contaminated mining site soil.

    PubMed

    Babu, A Giridhar; Shea, Patrick J; Sudhakar, D; Jung, Ik-Boo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2015-03-15

    Endophytic bacteria have the potential to promote plant growth and heavy metal(loid) (HM) removal from contaminated soil. Pseudomonas koreensis AGB-1, isolated from roots of Miscanthus sinensis growing in mine-tailing soil, exhibited high tolerance to HMs and plant growth promoting traits. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed that AGB-1 sequestered HMs extracellularly and their accumulation was visible as dark metal complexes on bacterial surfaces and outside of the cells. DNA sequencing of HM resistance marker genes indicated high homology to the appropriate regions of the arsB, ACR3(1), aoxB, and bmtA determinants. Inoculating mining site soil with AGB-1 increased M. sinensis biomass by 54%, chlorophyll by 27%, and protein content by 28%. High superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, and the lower malondialdehyde content of plants growing in AGB-1-inoculated soil indicate reduced oxidative stress. Metal(loid) concentrations in roots and shoots of plants grown in inoculated soil were higher than those of the controls in pot trials with mine tailing soil. Results suggest that AGB-1 can be used in association with M. sinensis to promote phytostabilization and remediation of HM-contaminated sites.

  18. Characterizing uncertainties of the national-scale forest gross aboveground biomass (AGB) loss estimate: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S.; Potapov, P.; Turubanova, S.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Modern remote sensing techniques enable the mapping and monitoring of aboveground biomass (AGB) carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where a national forest inventory (NFI) has yet to be established due to a lack of infrastructure and political instability. We demonstrate a method for producing national-scale gross AGB loss estimates and quantifying uncertainty of the estimates using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Forest cover type and loss were characterized using published Landsat-based data sets and related to LIDAR-derived biomass data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). We produced two gross AGB loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a conservative estimate accounting for classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a maximal estimate that also took into consideration omitted change at the 30m spatial resolution. Omitted disturbances were largely related to smallholder agriculture, the detection of which is scale-dependent. The use of LIDAR data as a substitute for NFI data to estimate AGB loss based on Landsat-derived activity data was demonstrated. Comparisons of our forest cover loss and AGB estimates with published studies raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and its impact on carbon stock change estimation using remotely sensed data.

  19. Galactic Variable Sky with EGRET and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; /SLAC

    2006-11-28

    The characteristics of the largely-unidentified Galactic sources of gamma rays that were detected by EGRET are reviewed. Proposed source populations that may have the correct spatial, spectral, luminosity, and variability properties to be the origins of the EGRET sources are also presented. Finally, the prospects for studying Galactic gamma-ray sources with the GLAST LAT are reviewed.

  20. A windswept cometary tail on the Galactic center supergiant IRS 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Morris, Mark

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution VLA observations provide evidence of optically thick radio emission from IRS 7, a cool red supergiant star, located at a projected distance of roughly 1 1t-yr from the Galactic center. IRS 7 shows a remarkable tail of ionized gas pointing directly away from the compact nonthermal radio source at the Galactic center, Sgr A(asterisk). Given previous evidence for a strong source of UV emission and for a strong circumnuclear wind emanating from the Galactic center, the free-free emission from IRS 7 and its associated tail are interpreted in terms of the ionization and removal of the circumstellar envelope of the red supergiant either by the ram pressure of the nuclear wind or by the pressure of radiation arising from the immediate vicinity of Sgr A(asterisk). The wind mechanism is preferred because: (1) the force it can potentially exert is much greater; and (2) Sgr A(asterisk) is clearly not a known source of luminous energy in the near-IR, whereas it remains a plausible source of a hot, high-velocity wind. Also considered is the potential effect of a nuclear wind upon the atmospheres of red giants in the inner parsec.

  1. Radial-Velocity Analysis of the Post-AGB Star, HD101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F.; Hearnshaw, J.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzman, E.; Sivarani, T.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2007-08-01

    This project concerns the analysis of the periodicity of the radial velocity of the peculiar emission-line supergiant star HD 101584 (F0 Ia), and also we propose a physical model to account for the observations. From its peculiarities, HD 101584 is a star that is in the post-AGB phase. This study is considered as a key to clarify the multiple aspects related with the evolution of the circum-stellar layer associated with this star's last phase. The star shows many lines with P Cygni profiles, including H-alpha, Na D lines in the IR Ca triplet, indicating a mass outflow. For HD 101584 we have performed a detailed study of its radial-velocity variations, using both emission and absorption lines over a wide range of wavelength. We have analyzed the variability and found a periodicity for all types of lines of 144 days, which must arise from the star's membership in a binary system. The data span a period of five consecutive years and were obtained using the 1-m telescope of Mt John Observatory, in New Zealand., with the echelle and Hercules high resolution spectrographs and CCD camera. HD101584 is known to be an IRAS source, and our model suggests it is a proto-planetary nebula, probably with a bipolar outflow and surrounded by a dusty disk as part of a binary system. We have found no evidence for HD101584 to contain a B9 star as found by Bakker et al (1996). A low resolution IUE spectrum shows the absence of any strong UV continuum that would be expected for a B star to be in this system.

  2. Is the galactic corona produced by galactic flares?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Stern, R.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the differential rotation of the disk of the Galaxy on magnetic field which penetrates the disk is considered. The magnetic field will be progressively distorted from a potential (current-free) form and will at some stage become unstable. It is expected that an MHD instability, a resistive instability, or a combination of the two, will result in the release of the excess magnetic energy and that part of the released energy will be converted into heat. By estimating the energy release and the rate at which this process will occur and by assuming that this energy input is balanced by radiation, estimates were obtained of the parameters of the resulting plasma. It appears that this process alone can heat a galactic corona to temperatures of order 10 to the 6th power K.

  3. Detection of HCN and C2H2 in ISO Spectra of Oxygen-Rich AGB Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Chiar, Jean; Goorvitch, David; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cool oxygen-rich AGB stars were not expected to have organic molecules like HCN in either their photospheres or circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). The discovery of HCN and CS microwave emission from the shallowest CSE layers of these stars was a considerable surprise and much theoretical effort has been expended in explaining the presence of such organics. To further explore this problem, we have undertaken a systematic search of oxygen-rich AGB stellar spectra in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data archive. Our purposes are to find evidence regarding critical molecular species that could be of value in choosing among the proposed theoretical models, to locate spectral features which might give clues to conditions deeper in the CSEs, and to lay the groundwork for future SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) observations. Using carefully reduced observations, we have detected weak absorption features arising from HCN and possibly C2H2 in a small number of oxygen-rich AGB stars. The most compelling case is NML Cyg which shows both HCN (14 microns) and CO2 (15 microns). VY CMa, a similar star, shows evidence for HCN, but not CO2. Two S-type stars show evidence for the C-H bending transitions: W Aql at 14 microns (HCN) and both W Aql and S Cas at 13.7 microns (C2H2). Both W Aql and S Cas as well as S Lyr, a SC-type star, show 3 micron absorption which may arise from the C-H stretch of HCN and C2H2. In the case of NML Cyg, we show that the HCN and CO2 spectral features are formed in the CSE at temperatures well above those of the outermost CSE layers and derive approximate column densities. In the case of the S-stars, we discuss the evidence for the organic features and their photospheric origin.

  4. Seeing red in M32: Constraints on the stellar content from near- and mid-infrared observations and applications for studies of more distant galaxies {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2014-08-10

    The properties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Local Group galaxy M32 are investigated using ground- and space-based observations that span the 1-8 μm wavelength interval, with the goal of demonstrating the utility of infrared observations as probes of stellar content. Comparisons with isochrones indicate that the brightest resolved stars in M32 have ages of a few gigayears and are younger on average than AGB stars with the same intrinsic brightness in the outer disk of M31. Accounting for stellar variability is shown to be essential for modeling AGB luminosity functions (LFs). Model LFs that assume the star-forming history measured by Monachesi et al. and the variability properties of Galactic AGB stars match both the K and [5.8] LFs of M32. Models also suggest that the slope of the [5.8] LF between M{sub [5.8]} = –8.5 and –10.0 is sensitive to the mix of stellar ages, and a sizeable fraction of the stars in M32 must have an age older than 7 Gyr in order to match the [5.8] LF. The structural properties of M32 in the infrared are also investigated. The effective radii that are computed from near-infrared and mid-infrared isophotes are similar to those measured at visible wavelengths, suggesting that the stellar content of M32 is well mixed. However, isophotes at radii >16'' (>60 pc) in the near- and mid-infrared are flatter than those at visible wavelengths. The coefficient of the fourth-order cosine term in the Fourier expansion of isophotes changes from 'boxy' values at r < 16'' to 'disky' values at r > 48''in [3.6] and [4.5]. The mid-infrared colors near the center of M32 do not vary systematically with radius, providing evidence of a well mixed stellar content in this part of the galaxy.

  5. Observações espectroscópicas da candidata a pós-AGB IRAS 19386+0155

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz-Martins, S.; Pereira, C. B.

    2003-08-01

    Nesse trabalho apresentamos a análise fotosférica da estrela candidata a pós-AGB IRAS 19386+0155. Com os dados obtidos no espectrógrafo FEROS foram determinados os parâmetros atmosféricos e abundâncias fotosféricas utilizando o código MOOG. A análise do espectro mostrou que IRAS 19386+0155 possui os seguintes parâmetros atmosféricos : Teff = 6800K, log g = 1.4, [M/H] = -1.5 e Vt = 8.4 km/s. O padrão de abundância obtido para os elementos mais leves (Carbono, Nitrogênio e Oxigênio) e elementos a (Magnésio, Silício e Cálcio) foi inferior ao solar (log C = 7.74, log N = 7.28, Log O = 8.43, log Mg = 7.14, log Si = 7.54 e log Ca = 5.91). Uma inspeção visual do espectro ISO deste objeto revela a presença de poeira fria na forma de silicatos cristalinos. Embora as bandas mais marcantes de silicatos amorfos (em 10 mm e 18mm) não sejam observadas, a emissão em 21 mm, presente em algumas pós-AGBs também não está presente. O espectro ISO parece revelar um meio rico em oxigênio, mas a forma da distribuição de energia no infravermelho não obedece ao padrão apresentado por outras pós-AGBs. Nossos resultados nos levam a sugerir que IRAS 19386+0155 talvez faça parte de um sistema binário, uma vez que outras pós-AGBs que são membros de sistemas binários apresentam padrão de abundância semelhante.

  6. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  7. Galactic Center Fly-in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, A.; Fu, C.-W.; Li, Y.; Frisch, P. C.

    2006-06-01

    Beginning with the familiar constellations of the night sky, we present a multispectral zoom into the core of the Milky Way Galaxy. After traveling over seven orders of magnitude in spatial scale, we discover the violent phenomena occurring within one light year of the Black Hole at the Galactic Core. This animated zoom includes data with wavelengths from radio to X-ray, and is based entirely on data or models that have been aligned at all spatial scales in order to provide a single continuous visual trip into the Center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The visualization challenge has been to align and choreograph data acquired over a wide range of wavelength and spatial scales, and obtain a new scientific as well as educational perspective of the dense core of our Galaxy.

  8. Radio characteristics of galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, J. J.

    1986-02-01

    Radio characteristics of galactic nuclei, providing such unique information as spectral data on source variability, and the long-term history of the central engine and its duration of activity and total energy, are reviewed. The compact radio source characteristics are complicated by orientation-dependent relativistic beaming and by refractive focusing in the interstellar medium. Incoherent synchrotron radiation is thought to be the emission mechanism, with the result that synchrotron self-absorption in compact sources hides the central engine from direct radio observation. However, the history revealed by the extended jets and lobes of radio galaxies and quasars favors a single massive object not supported by radiation pressure, either a spinar or a black hole, as the energy source in radio-galaxy nuclei.

  9. Carbon and Oxygen Galactic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carigi, L.; Peimbert, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2006-06-01

    A chemical evolution model of the Galaxy has been computed to reproduce the O/H gradients from Galactic HII regions. This model solves the C enrichment problem because it fits the C/H and C/O gradients and the C and O histories of the solar vicinity. The model is based on C yields dependent on metallicity (Z) owing to stellar winds. The C yields of massive stars (MS) increase with Z and those of low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) decrease with Z. An important result is that the fraction of carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) due to MS and LIMS is strongly dependent on Z of the ISM, therefore, that fraction depends on time and on the Galactocentric distance. At present and in the solar vicinity about half of the C in the interstellar medium has been produced by MS and half by LIMS.

  10. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  11. THE SAGITTARIUS STREAMS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC HEMISPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Gieles, M.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Niederste-Ostholt, M.; Penarrubia, J.; Smith, M. C.; Bizyaev, D.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Schneider, D. P.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2012-05-01

    The structure of the Sagittarius stream in the southern Galactic hemisphere is analyzed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. Parallel to the Sagittarius tidal track, but {approx}10 Degree-Sign away, there is another fainter and more metal-poor stream. We provide evidence that the two streams follow similar distance gradients but have distinct morphological properties and stellar populations. The brighter stream is broader, contains more metal-rich stars, and has a richer color-magnitude diagram with multiple turnoffs and a prominent red clump as compared to the fainter stream. Based on the structural properties and the stellar population mix, the stream configuration is similar to the Northern 'bifurcation'. In the region of the South Galactic Cap, there is overlapping tidal debris from the Cetus stream, which crosses the Sagittarius stream. Using both photometric and spectroscopic data, we show that the blue straggler population belongs mainly to Sagittarius and the blue horizontal branch stars belong mainly to the Cetus stream in this confused location in the halo.

  12. ON GALACTIC DENSITY MODELING IN THE PRESENCE OF DUST EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schlafly, Edward F.; Green, Gregory M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2016-02-20

    Inferences about the spatial density or phase-space structure of stellar populations in the Milky Way require a precise determination of the effective survey volume. The volume observed by surveys such as Gaia or near-infrared spectroscopic surveys, which have good coverage of the Galactic midplane region, is highly complex because of the abundant small-scale structure in the three-dimensional interstellar dust extinction. We introduce a novel framework for analyzing the importance of small-scale structure in the extinction. This formalism demonstrates that the spatially complex effect of extinction on the selection function of a pencil-beam or contiguous sky survey is equivalent to a low-pass filtering of the extinction-affected selection function with the smooth density field. We find that the angular resolution of current 3D extinction maps is sufficient for analyzing Gaia sub-samples of millions of stars. However, the current distance resolution is inadequate and needs to be improved by an order of magnitude, especially in the inner Galaxy. We also present a practical and efficient method for properly taking the effect of extinction into account in analyses of Galactic structure through an effective selection function. We illustrate its use with the selection function of red-clump stars in APOGEE using and comparing a variety of current 3D extinction maps.

  13. NGC 5694: another foster son of the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Bellazzini, M.; Catelan, M.; Dalessandro, E.; Amigo, P.; Correnti, M.; Cortés, C.; D'Orazi, V.

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of the analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with UVES-FLAMES at the Very Large Telescope for six red giant branch stars in the outer-halo metal-poor ([Fe/H] I = -1.98 and [Fe/H] II = -1.83) Galactic globular cluster NGC 5694, which has been suggested as a possible incomer by Lee et al. based on the anomalous chemical composition of a single cluster giant. We obtain accurate abundances for a large number of elements and we find that (a)the six target stars have the same chemical composition within the uncertainties, except for Na and Al; (b) the average cluster abundance of α elements (with the only exception of Si) is nearly solar, at odds with typical halo stars and globular clusters of similar metallicity; (c) Y, Ba, La and Eu abundances are also significantly lower than in Galactic field stars and star clusters of similar metallicity. Hence, we confirm the Lee et al. classification of NGC 5694 as a cluster of extragalactic origin. We provide the first insight on the Na-O and Mg-Al anticorrelations in this cluster: all the considered stars have very similar abundance ratios for these elements, except one that has significantly lower [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] ratios, suggesting that some degree of early self-enrichment has occurred also in this cluster.

  14. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTiNGS). II. DISCOVERY OF METAL-POOR DUSTY AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan; Barmby, Pauline; Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lagadec, Eric; Lennon, Daniel; Marengo, Massimo; McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert; Sloan, G. C.; Van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-10

    The DUSTiNGS survey (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer) is a 3.6 and 4.5 μm imaging survey of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. Using two epochs, spaced approximately six months apart, we identify a total of 526 dusty variable AGB stars (sometimes called ''extreme'' or x-AGB stars; [3.6]-[4.5] > 0.1 mag). Of these, 111 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –1.5 and 12 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –2.0, making them the most metal-poor dust-producing AGB stars known. We compare these identifications to those in the literature and find that most are newly discovered large-amplitude variables, with the exception of ≈30 stars in NGC 185 and NGC 147, 1 star in IC 1613, and 1 star in Phoenix. The chemical abundances of the x-AGB variables are unknown, but the low metallicities suggest that they are more likely to be carbon-rich than oxygen-rich and comparisons with existing optical and near-IR photometry confirm that 70 of the x-AGB variables are confirmed or likely carbon stars. We see an increase in the pulsation amplitude with increased dust production, supporting previous studies suggesting that dust production and pulsation are linked. We find no strong evidence linking dust production with metallicity, indicating that dust can form in very metal-poor environments.

  15. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in red giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth distribution over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  16. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  17. The Galactic evolution of phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Context. As a galaxy evolves, its chemical composition changes and the abundance ratios of different elements are powerful probes of the underlying evolutionary processes. Phosphorous is an element whose evolution has remained quite elusive until now, because it is difficult to detect in cool stars. The infrared weak P i lines of the multiplet 1, at 1050-1082 nm, are the most reliable indicators of the presence of phosphorus. The availability of CRIRES at VLT has permitted access to this wavelength range in stellar spectra. Aims: We attempt to measure the phosphorus abundance of twenty cool stars in the Galactic disk. Methods: The spectra are analysed with one-dimensional model-atmospheres computed in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The line formation computations are performed assuming LTE. Results: The ratio of phosphorus to iron behaves similarly to sulphur, increasing towards lower metallicity stars. Its ratio with respect to sulphur is roughly constant and slightly larger than solar, [P/S] = 0.10 ± 0.10. Conclusions: We succeed in taking an important step towards the understanding of the chemical evolution of phosphorus in the Galaxy. However, the observed rise in the P/Fe abundance ratio is steeper than predicted by Galactic chemical evolution model developed by Kobayashi and collaborators. Phosphorus appears to evolve differently from the light odd-Z elements sodium and aluminium. The constant value of [P/S] with metallicity implies that P production is insensitive to the neutron excess, thus processes other than neutron captures operate. We suggest that proton captures on 30Si and α captures on 27Al are possibilities to investigate. We see no clear distinction between our results for stars with planets and stars without any detected planet. Based on observations obtained with the CRIRES spectrograph at ESO-VLT Antu 8.2 m telescope at Paranal, Programme 386.D-0130, P.I. E. Caffau.

  18. GALACTIC WARPS IN TRIAXIAL HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Myoungwon; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Ann, Hong Bae E-mail: sungsoo.kim@khu.ac.kr

    2009-05-10

    We study the behavior of galactic disks in triaxial halos both numerically and analytically to see if warps can be excited and sustained in triaxial potentials. We consider the following two scenarios: (1) galactic disks that are initially tilted relative to the equatorial plane of the halo (for a pedagogical purpose), and (2) tilted infall of dark matter relative to the equatorial plane of the disk and the halo. With numerical simulations of 100,000 disk particles in a fixed halo potential, we find that in triaxial halos, warps can be excited and sustained just as in spherical or axisymmetric halos but they show some oscillatory behavior and even can be transformed to a polar-ring system if the halo has a prolate-like triaxiality. The nonaxisymmetric component of the halo causes the disk to nutate, and the differential nutation between the inner and outer parts of the disk generally makes the magnitude of the warp slightly diminish and fluctuate. We also find that warps are relatively weaker in oblate and oblate-like triaxial halos, and since these halos are the halo configurations of disk galaxies inferred by cosmological simulations, our results are consistent with the fact that most of the observed warps are quite weak. We derive approximate formulae for the torques exerted on the disk by the triaxial halo and the dark matter torus, and with these formulae we successfully describe the behavior of the disks in our simulations. The techniques used in deriving these formulae could be applied for realistic halos with more complex structures.

  19. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  20. Galactic Bulge Giants: Probing Stellar and Galactic Evolution. 1. Catalogue of Spitzer IRAC and MIPS Sources (PREPRINT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttenthaler, Stefan; Stute, Matthias; Sahai, Raghvendra; Blommaert, Joris A.; Schultheis, Mathias; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Groenewegen, Martin A.; Price, Stephan D.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. We aim at measuring mass-loss rates and the luminosities of a statistically large sample of Galactic bulge stars at several galactocentric radii. The sensitivity of previous infrared surveys of the bulge has been rather limited, thus fundamental questions for late stellar evolution, such as the stage at which substantial mass-loss begins on the red giant branch and its dependence on fundamental stellar properties, remain unanswered. We aim at providing evidence and answers to these questions. Methods. To this end, we observed seven 15 15 arcmin2 fields in the nuclear bulge and its vicinity with unprecedented sensitivity using the IRAC and MIPS imaging instruments on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. In each of the fields, tens of thousands of point sources were detected. Results. In the first paper based on this data set, we present the observations, data reduction, the final catalogue of sources, and a detailed comparison to previous mid-IR surveys of the Galactic bulge, as well as to theoretical isochrones. We find in general good agreement with other surveys and the isochrones, supporting the high quality of our catalogue.

  1. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Sameshima, H.; Tsujimoto, T.; Peterson, B. A.

    2013-04-10

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  2. CEN 34 - high-mass YSO in M 17 or background post-AGB star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Liu, Yao; Fang, Min; Jiang, Zhibo

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the proposed high-mass young stellar object (YSO) candidate CEN 34, thought to be associated with the star-forming region M 17. Its optical to near-infrared (550-2500 nm) spectrum reveals several photospheric absorption features, such as Hα, the Ca ii triplet, and the CO bandhead, but lacks emission lines. The spectral features in the range 8375-8770 Å are used to constrain an effective temperature Teff = 5250 ± 250 K (early-/mid-G) and a log g = 2.0 ± 0.3 (supergiant). The spectral energy distribution (SED) displays a faint infrared excess that resembles that of a high-mass YSO or an evolved star of intermediate mass. Moreover, the observed temperature and surface gravity are identical for high-mass YSOs and evolved stars. The radial velocity of CEN 34 relative to the local standard of rest (VLSR) as obtained from various photospheric lines is of the order of -60 km s-1 and thus distinct from the +25 km s-1 found for several OB stars in the cluster and for the associated molecular cloud. The SED modeling yields 10-4 M⊙ of circumstellar material, which contributes only a tiny fraction to the total visual extinction (11 mag). The distance of CEN 34 is between 2.0 kpc and 4.5 kpc. In the case of a YSO, a dynamical ejection process is proposed to explain the VLSR difference between CEN 34 and M 17. Additionally, to match the temperature and luminosity, we speculate that CEN 34 had accumulated the bulk of its mass with an accretion rate >4 × 10-3M⊙/yr over a very short time span (~103 yrs), and it is currently undergoing a phase of gravitational contraction without any further mass gain. However, all the aforementioned characteristics of CEN 34 are compatible with an evolved star of 5-7 M⊙ and an age of 50-100 Myr, so it is most likely a background post-AGB star with a distance between 2.0 kpc and 4.5 kpc. We consider the latter classification as the more likely interpretation. Further discrimination of the two possible scenarios should come

  3. How to Spot a Disrupted Galactic Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    orbit and is currently at its furthest distance from the Galactic center. They suggest that the elliptic orbit and advanced age of the clump indicate it is most likely to be a disrupted globular cluster, rather than a dwarf galaxy.Interestingly, when the authors went back to search for a stellar overdensity corresponding to Lamost 1 in photometric data, they were unable to detect it. This reaffirms that their approach of searching for velocity and metallicity clumping is an important tool for discovering otherwise-invisible diffuse streams.BonusCheck out this cool graphic Vickers made using Stellarium and Aladin to demonstratewhere in the sky the stars ofLamost 1 are located. Lamost 1sstars are the red dots in the constellation Draco.CitationJohn J. Vickers et al 2016 ApJ 816 L2. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/816/1/L2

  4. Hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between an AGB star and a main-sequence companion in eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; De Marco, Orsola; Macdonald, Daniel; Galaviz, Pablo; Passy, Jean-Claude; Iaconi, Roberto; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2016-02-01

    The Rotten Egg Nebula has at its core a binary composed of a Mira star and an A-type companion at a separation >10 au. It has been hypothesized to have formed by strong binary interactions between the Mira and a companion in an eccentric orbit during periastron passage ˜800 yr ago. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star interacting with companions with a range of masses in orbits with a range of initial eccentricities and periastron separations. For reasonable values of the eccentricity, we find that Roche lobe overflow can take place only if the periods are ≪100 yr. Moreover, mass transfer causes the system to enter a common envelope phase within several orbits. Since the central star of the Rotten Egg nebula is an AGB star, we conclude that such a common envelope phase must have lead to a merger, so the observed companion must have been a tertiary companion of a binary that merged at the time of nebula ejection. Based on the mass and time-scale of the simulated disc formed around the companion before the common envelope phase, we analytically estimate the properties of jets that could be launched. Allowing for super-Eddington accretion rates, we find that jets similar to those observed are plausible, provided that the putative lost companion was relatively massive.

  5. A second post-AGB nebula that contains gas in rotation and in expansion: ALMA maps of IW Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.; Van Winckel, H.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Santander-García, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the presence of both rotation and expansion in post-AGB nebulae, in particular around IW Car, a binary post-AGB star that was suspected to be surrounded by a Keplerian disk. Methods: We obtained high-quality ALMA observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 lines in IW Car. The maps were analyzed by means of a simplified model of CO emission, based on those used for similar objects. Results: Our observations clearly show the presence of gas components in rotation, in an equatorial disk, and expansion, which shows an hourglass-like structure with a symmetry axis perpendicular to the rotation plane and is probably formed of material extracted from the disk. Our modeling can reproduce the observations and shows moderate uncertainties. The rotation velocity corresponds to a central stellar mass of approximately 1 M⊙. We also derive the total mass of the molecule-rich nebula, found to be of 4 × 10-3M⊙; the outflow is approximately eight times less massive than the disk. From the kinematical age of the outflow and the mass values derived for both components, we infer a (future) lifetime of the disk of approximately 5000-10 000 yr.

  6. Morphological effects on IR band profiles. Experimental spectroscopic analysis with application to observed spectra of oxygen-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanai, A.; Mutschke, H.; Blum, J.; Posch, Th.; Koike, C.; Ferguson, J. W.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: To trace the source of the unique 13, 19.5, and 28 μm emission features in the spectra of oxygen-rich circumstellar shells around AGB stars, we have compared dust extinction spectra obtained by aerosol measurements. Methods: We have measured the extinction spectra for 19 oxide powder samples of eight different types, such as Ti-compounds (TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3, Ti3O5, Al2TiO5, CaTiO3), α-, γ-, χ-δ-κ-Al2O3, and MgAl2O4 in the infrared region (10-50 μm) paying special attention to the morphological (size, shape, and agglomeration) effects and the differences in crystal structure. Results: Anatase (TiO2) particles with rounded edges are the possible 13, 19.5 and 28 μm band carriers as the main contributor in the spectra of AGB stars, and spherically shaped nano-sized spinel and Al2TiO5 dust grains are possibly associated with the anatase, enhancing the prominence of the 13 μm feature and providing additional features at 28 μm. The extinction data sets obtained by the aerosol and CsI pellet measurements have been made available for public use at http://elbe.astro.uni-jena.de.

  7. Breaking news from the HST: the central star of the Stingray Nebula is now returning towards the AGB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, Nicole; Rauch, T.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Todt, H.; Werner, K.

    2017-01-01

    SAO 244567 is a rare example of a star that allows us to witness stellar evolution in real time. Between 1971 and 1990, it changed from a B-type star into the hot central star of the Stingray Nebula. This observed rapid heating has been a mystery for decades, since it is in strong contradiction with the low mass of the star and canonical post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution. We speculated that SAO 244567 might have suffered from a late thermal pulse (LTP) and obtained new observations with Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/COS to follow the evolution of the surface properties of SAO 244567 and to verify the LTP hypothesis. Our non-LTE spectral analysis reveals that the star cooled significantly since 2002 and that its envelope is now expanding. Therefore, we conclude that SAO 244567 is currently on its way back towards the AGB, which strongly supports the LTP hypothesis. A comparison with state-of-the-art LTP evolutionary calculations shows that these models cannot fully reproduce the evolution of all surface parameters simultaneously, pointing out possible shortcomings of stellar evolution models. Thereby, SAO 244567 keeps on challenging stellar evolution theory and we highly encourage further investigations.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water maser emission toward post-AGB and PN (Gomez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. F.; Rizzo, J. R.; Suarez, O.; Palau, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Guerrero, M. A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Torrelles, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The observed sources are listed in Table 1. They comprise most of the sources in Ramos-Larios et al. (2009A&A...501.1207R). They are post-AGB stars and PN candidates with the IRAS color criteria of Suarez et al. (2006A&A...458..173S) and with signs of strong optical obscuration. We have also included some optically visible post-AGB stars from Suarez et al. (2006A&A...458..173S) that were not included in our previous water maser observations of Suarez et al. (2007A&A...467.1085S, 2009A&A...505..217S) or for which those observations had poor sensitivity. We observed the 616-523 transition of H2O (rest frequency = 22235.08MHz) using three different telescopes: the DSS-63 antenna (70m diameter) at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (MDSCC) near Robledo de Chavela (Spain), the 64m antenna at the Parkes Observatory of the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), and the 100m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The observed positions, rms noise per spectral channel, and observing dates are listed in Table 1. (3 data files).

  9. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  10. HEAVY ELEMENT NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE BRIGHTEST GALACTIC ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.

    2012-05-20

    We present updated calculations of stellar evolutionary sequences and detailed nucleosynthesis predictions for the brightest asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galaxy with masses between 5 M{sub Sun} and 9 M{sub Sun }, with an initial metallicity of Z = 0.02 ([Fe/H] = 0.14). In our previous studies we used the Vassiliadis and Wood mass-loss rate, which stays low until the pulsation period reaches 500 days after which point a superwind begins. Vassiliadis and Wood noted that for stars over 2.5 M{sub Sun} the superwind should be delayed until P Almost-Equal-To 750 days at 5 M{sub Sun }. We calculate evolutionary sequences where we delay the onset of the superwind to pulsation periods of P Almost-Equal-To 700-800 days in models of M = 5, 6, and 7 M{sub Sun }. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations show that the 6 and 7 M{sub Sun} models produce the most Rb, with [Rb/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 1 dex, close to the average of most of the Galactic Rb-rich stars ([Rb/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 1.4 {+-} 0.8 dex). Changing the rate of the {sup 22}Ne +{alpha} reactions results in variations of [Rb/Fe] as large as 0.5 dex in models with a delayed superwind. The largest enrichment in heavy elements is found for models that adopt the NACRE rate of the {sup 22}Ne({alpha}, n){sup 25}Mg reaction. Using this rate allows us to best match the composition of most of the Rb-rich stars. A synthetic evolution algorithm is then used to remove the remaining envelope resulting in final [Rb/Fe] of Almost-Equal-To 1.4 dex although with C/O ratios >1. We conclude that delaying the superwind may account for the large Rb overabundances observed in the brightest metal-rich AGB stars.

  11. The Heliosphere and the Galactic Environment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boundaries surrounding our heliosphere can change both due to changes in our galactic environment and through changes in the solar wind emitted by the Sun. We see here an animation of the bound...

  12. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, R. Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-15

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  13. The source and distribution of Galactic positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Dixon, D. D.; Cheng, L.-X.; Leventhal, M.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Skibo, J. G.; Smith, D. M.; Tueller, J.

    1997-01-01

    The oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the Galactic plane and the Galactic center region were combined with observations acquired with other instruments in order to produce a map of the Galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation. Two mapping techniques were applied to the data: the maximum entropy method, and the basis pursuit inversion method. The resulting maps are qualitatively similar and show evidence for a central bulge and a weak galactic disk component. The weak disk is consistent with that expected from positrons produced by the decay of radioactive Al-26 in the interstellar medium. Both maps suggest an enhanced region of emission near l = -4 deg, b = 7 deg, with a flux of approximately 50 percent of that of the bulge. The existence of this emission appears significant, although the location is not well determined. The source of this enhanced emission is presently unknown.

  14. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  15. The galactic globular cluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Meylan, G.

    1994-01-01

    We explore correlations between various properties of Galactic globular clusters, using a database on 143 objects. Our goal is identify correlations and trends which can be used to test and constrain theoretical models of cluster formation and evolution. We use a set of 13 cluster parameters, 9 of which are independently measured. Several arguments suggest that the number of clusters still missing in the obscured regions of the Galaxy is of the order of 10, and thus the selection effects are probably not severe for our sample. Known clusters follow a power-law density distribution with a slope approximately -3.5 to -4, and an apparent core with a core radius approximately 1 kpc. Clusters show a large dynamical range in many of their properties, more so for the core parameters (which are presumably more affected by dynamical evolution) than for the half-light parameters. There are no good correlations with luminosity, although more luminous clusters tend to be more concentrated. When data are binned in luminosity, several trends emerge: more luminous clusters tend to have smaller and denser cores. We interpret this as a differential survival effect, with more massive clusters surviving longer and reaching more evolved dynamical states. Cluster core parameters and concentrations also correlate with the position in the Galaxy, with clusters closer to the Galactic center or plane being more concentrated and having smaller and denser cores. These trends are more pronounced for the fainter (less massive) clusters. This is in agreement with a picture where tidal shocks form disk or bulge passages accelerate dynamical evolution of clusters. Cluster metallicities do not correlate with any other parameter, including luminosity and velocity dispersion; the only detectable trend is with the position in the Galaxy, probably reflecting Zinn's disk-halo dichotomy. This suggests that globular clusters were not self-enriched systems. Velocity dispersions show excellent correlations

  16. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  17. Abundances and Evolution of Lithium in the Galactic Halo and Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Sean G.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Beers, Timothy C.; Suzuki, Takeru Ken; Romano, Donatella; Matteucci, Francesca; Rosolankova, Katarina

    2001-03-01

    We have measured the Li abundance of 18 stars with -2<~[Fe/H]<~-1 and 6000<~Teff<~6400 K, a parameter range that was poorly represented in previous studies. We examine the Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) of this element, combining these data with previous samples of turnoff stars over the full range of halo metallicities. We find that A(Li) increases from a level of ~2.10 at [Fe/H]=-3.5 to ~2.40 at [Fe/H]=-1.0, where A(Li)=log10(n(Li)/n(H))+12.00. We compare the observations with several GCE calculations, including existing one-zone models and a new model developed in the framework of inhomogeneous evolution of the Galactic halo. We show that Li evolved at a constant rate relative to iron throughout the halo and old disk epochs but that during the formation of young disk stars, the production of Li relative to iron increased significantly. These observations can be understood in the context of models in which postprimordial Li evolution during the halo and old disk epochs is dominated by Galactic cosmic-ray fusion and spallation reactions, with some contribution from the ν-process in supernovae. The onset of more efficient Li production (relative to iron) in the young disk coincides with the appearance of Li from novae and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The major challenge facing the models is to reconcile the mild evolution of Li during the halo and old disk phases with the more efficient production (relative to iron) at [Fe/H]>-0.5. We speculate that cool-bottom processing (production) of Li in low-mass stars may provide an important late-appearing source of Li, without attendant Fe production, that might explain the Li production in the young disk. Based on observations obtained with the University College London échelle spectrograph (UCLES) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the Utrecht échelle spectrograph (UES) on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT).

  18. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  19. WIMPs at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW, ZZ, hh, tt{sup -bar}), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb{sup -bar} is also enlarged to 35 GeV≲m{sub χ}≲165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.

  20. WIMPs at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW, ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ≲ mχ ≲ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.

  1. WIMPs at the galactic center

    DOE PAGES

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; ...

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW,more » ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ≲ mχ ≲ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.« less

  2. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  3. SEISMIC DIAGNOSTICS OF RED GIANTS: FIRST COMPARISON WITH STELLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Montalban, J.; Miglio, A.; Noels, A.; Scuflaire, R.; Ventura, P.

    2010-10-01

    The clear detection with CoRoT and KEPLER of radial and non-radial solar-like oscillations in many red giants paves the way for seismic inferences on the structure of such stars. We present an overview of the properties of the adiabatic frequencies and frequency separations of radial and non-radial oscillation modes for an extended grid of models. We highlight how their detection allows a deeper insight into the internal structure and evolutionary state of red giants. In particular, we find that the properties of dipole modes constitute a promising seismic diagnostic tool of the evolutionary state of red giant stars. We compare our theoretical predictions with the first 34 days of KEPLER data and predict the frequency diagram expected for red giants in the CoRoT exofield in the galactic center direction.

  4. Modelling galactic conformity with the colour-halo age relation in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron D.; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sales, Laura V.; Zhu, Emily; Genel, Shy; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons between observational surveys and galaxy formation models find that dark matter haloes' mass can largely explain their galaxies' stellar mass. However, it remains uncertain whether additional environmental variables, known as assembly bias, are necessary to explain other galaxy properties. We use the Illustris simulation to investigate the role of assembly bias in producing galactic conformity by considering 18 000 galaxies with Mstellar > 2 × 109 M⊙. We find a significant signal of galactic conformity: out to distances of about 10 Mpc, the mean red fraction of galaxies around redder galaxies is higher than around bluer galaxies at fixed stellar mass. Dark matter haloes exhibit an analogous conformity signal, in which the fraction of haloes formed at earlier times (old haloes) is higher around old haloes than around younger ones at fixed halo mass. A plausible interpretation of galactic conformity is the combination of the halo conformity signal with the galaxy colour-halo age relation: at fixed stellar mass, particularly towards the low-mass end, Illustris' galaxy colours correlate with halo age, with the reddest galaxies (often satellites) preferentially found in the oldest haloes. We explain the galactic conformity effect with a simple semi-empirical model, assigning stellar mass via halo mass (abundance matching) and galaxy colour via halo age (age matching). Regarding comparison to observations, we conclude that the adopted selection/isolation criteria, projection effects, and stacking techniques can have a significant impact on the measured amplitude of the conformity signal.

  5. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 0.31 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust, and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 +/- 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 23 GHz.

  6. Galactic cosmic radiation environment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.; Troung, A. G.

    2001-02-01

    Models of the radiation environment in free space and in near earth orbits are required to estimate the radiation dose to the astronauts for Mars, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station missions, and to estimate the rate of single event upsets and latch-ups in electronic devices. Accurate knowledge of the environment is critical for the design of optimal shielding during both the cruise phase and for a habitat on Mars or the Moon. Measurements of the energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have been made for nearly four decades. In the last decade, models have been constructed that can predict the energy spectra of any GCR nuclei to an accuracy of better than 25%. Fresh and more accurate measurements have been made in the last year. These measurements can lead to more accurate models. Improvements in these models can be made in determining the local interstellar spectra and in predicting the level of solar modulation. It is the coupling of the two that defines a GCR model. This paper reviews of two of the more widely used models, and a comparison of their predictions with new proton and helium data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and spectra of beryllium to iron in the ~40 to 500 MeV/n acquired by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during the 1997-98 solar minimum. Regressions equations relating the IMP-8 helium count rate to the solar modulation deceleration parameter calculated using the Climax neutron monitor rate have been developed and may lead to improvements in the predictive capacity of the models. .

  7. Origin of Enigmatic Galactic-center Filaments Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Twenty years ago, astronomers discovered a number of enigmatic radio-emitting filaments concentrated near the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. These features initially defied explanation, but a new study of radio images of the Galactic center may point to their possible source. By combining data from the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) astronomer Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University has found evidence that at least some of the filaments spring from the concentrated star-formation regions that populate the Galactic center. Galatic Center Combined VLA and GBT image (green) of the Galactic center, with red inset of GBT data only (red). Bright region on right is location of supermassive black hole. Linear filaments are visible above this area. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Yusef-Zadeh, et.al. (Click on Image for Larger Version) Yusef-Zadeh presented his findings at the Denver, Colorado, meeting of the American Astronomical Society. William Cotton of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, Virginia, and William Hewitt of Northwestern University also contributed to this research. "Astronomers have long puzzled over the cause of these striking features," said Yusef-Zadeh, "and the turbulent nature of the Galactic center has made detailed analysis difficult. With new multi-wavelength radio images of the Galactic center, however, we can finally see a link between areas of starburst activity and these long-linear filaments." The filaments, which range from 10 to 100 light-years in length and are perhaps little more than 1 to 3 light-years across, occur only in a very narrow area, within approximately two degrees of the Galactic center (which translates to approximately 900 light-years across). Early theories about the origin of these filaments suggested that they were somehow related to the Milky Way’s own magnetic field. This was due to the fact that the first filaments detected

  8. DEEP MIXING IN EVOLVED STARS. II. INTERPRETING Li ABUNDANCES IN RED GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Busso, M.; Maiorca, E.; Cristallo, S.; Abia, C.; Uttenthaler, S.; Gialanella, L.

    2011-11-01

    We reanalyze the problem of Li abundances in red giants of nearly solar metallicity. After outlining the problems affecting our knowledge of the Li content in low-mass stars (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}), we discuss deep-mixing models for the red giant branch stages suitable to account for the observed trends and for the correlated variations of the carbon isotope ratio; we find that Li destruction in these phases is limited to masses below about 2.3 M{sub sun}. Subsequently, we concentrate on the final stages of evolution for both O-rich and C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Here, the constraints on extra-mixing phenomena previously derived from heavier nuclei (from C to Al), coupled to recent updates in stellar structure models (including both the input physics and the set of reaction rates used), are suitable to account for the observations of Li abundances below A(Li) {identical_to} log {epsilon}(Li) {approx_equal} 1.5 (and sometimes more). Also, their relations with other nucleosynthesis signatures of AGB phases (like the abundance of F, and the C/O and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios) can be explained. This requires generally moderate efficiencies (M-dot < or approx. 0.3-0.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for non-convective mass transport. At such rates, slow extra mixing does not remarkably modify Li abundances in early AGB phases; on the other hand, faster mixing encounters a physical limit in destroying Li, set by the mixing velocity. Beyond this limit, Li starts to be produced; therefore, its destruction on the AGB is modest. Li is then significantly produced by the third dredge up. We also show that effective circulation episodes, while not destroying Li, would easily bring the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios to equilibrium, contrary to the evidence in most AGB stars, and would burn F beyond the limits shown by C(N) giants. Hence, we do not confirm the common idea that efficient extra mixing drastically reduces the Li content of C stars with respect to K

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC post-AGB, post-RGB star and YSOs (Kamath+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; van Winckel, H.

    2015-06-01

    To obtain an initial sample selection for our spectroscopic survey, we adopted the sample selected by van Aarle et al. (2011A&A...530A..90V, Cat. J/A+A/530/A90), who identified optically visible post-AGB star candidates in the LMC based on photometry. We obtained low-resolution spectra of stars selected from the initial sample of objects. The spectra were taken using the AAOmega double-beam multi-fibre spectrograph mounted on the 3.9m Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO). AAOmega allows for the simultaneous observation of 392 targets (including science objects, sky-positions, and fiducial guide stars) over a 2 degree field using the 2dF fibre positioner. (11 data files).

  10. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  11. History of the mass ejection in K4-37: from the AGB to the evolved planetary nebula phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, L. F.; Guillén, P. F.; Olguín, L.; Vázquez, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present narrow-band, broad-band and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive images, and high- and intermediate-resolution long-slit spectra of K4-37, a planetary nebula that has never been analysed in detail. Although K4-37 appears bipolar, the morphokinematical analysis discloses the existence of three distinct axes and additional particular directions in the object, indicating that K4-37 is a multi-axis planetary nebula that has probably been shaped by several bipolar outflows at different directions. A 4-6 M⊙ main-sequence progenitor is estimated from the derived high nebular He and N abundances, and very high N/O abundance ratio (∼2.32). The general properties are compatible with K4-37 being a highly evolved planetary nebula located at ∼14 kpc. The WISE image at 22 μm reveals K4-37 to be surrounded by a large (∼13 × 8 pc2) elliptical detached shell probably related to material ejected from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) progenitor. The observed elliptical morphology suggests deformation of an originally spherical AGB shell by the interstellar medium magnetic field or by the influence of a companion. We compare K4-37 and NGC 6309 and found remarkable similarities in their physical structure but noticeably different chemical abundances that indicate very different progenitor mass. This strongly suggests that, irrespective of the initial mass, their (presumably binary) central stars have shared a very similar mass ejection history.

  12. SPITZER DETECTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND SILICATE FEATURES IN POST-AGB STARS AND YOUNG PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrigone, Luciano; Hora, Joseph L.; Umana, Grazia; Trigilio, Corrado

    2009-09-20

    We have observed a small sample of hot post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The stars were selected from the literature on the basis of their far-infrared (IR) excess (i.e., post-AGB candidates) and B spectral type (i.e., close to the ionization of the envelope). The combination of our IRAC observations with Two Micron All Sky Survey and IRAS catalog data, along with previous radio observations in the cm range (where available) allowed us to model the spectral energy distributions of our targets and find that in almost all of them at least two shells of dust at different temperatures must be present, the hot dust component ranging up to 10{sup 3} K. In several targets, grains larger than 1 {mu}m are needed to match the far-IR data points. In particular, in IRAS 17423-1755 grains up to 100 {mu}m must be introduced to match the emission in the millimeter range. We obtained IRS spectra to identify the chemistry of the envelopes and found that more than one-third of the sources in our sample have mixed chemistry, showing both mid-IR bands attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and silicate features. The analysis of the PAH features indicates that these molecules are located in the outflows, far away from the central stars. We consider the larger than expected percentage of mixed-chemistry targets as a selection bias toward stars with a disk or torus around them. Our results strengthen the current picture of mixed chemistry being due to the spatial segregation of different dust populations in the envelopes.

  13. Application of a Theory and Simulation-based Convective Boundary Mixing Model for AGB Star Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, U.; Pignatari, M.; Ritter, C.; Herwig, F.; Denisenkov, P.; Den Hartogh, J. W.; Trappitsch, R.; Hirschi, R.; Freytag, B.; Thielemann, F.; Paxton, B.

    2016-08-01

    The s-process nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends on the modeling of convective boundaries. We present models and s-process simulations that adopt a treatment of convective boundaries based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations and on the theory of mixing due to gravity waves in the vicinity of convective boundaries. Hydrodynamics simulations suggest the presence of convective boundary mixing (CBM) at the bottom of the thermal pulse-driven convective zone. Similarly, convection-induced mixing processes are proposed for the mixing below the convective envelope during third dredge-up (TDU), where the {}13{{C}} pocket for the s process in AGB stars forms. In this work, we apply a CBM model motivated by simulations and theory to models with initial mass M = 2 and M=3 {M}⊙ , and with initial metal content Z = 0.01 and Z = 0.02. As reported previously, the He-intershell abundances of {}12{{C}} and {}16{{O}} are increased by CBM at the bottom of the pulse-driven convection zone. This mixing is affecting the {}22{Ne}(α, n){}25{Mg} activation and the s-process efficiency in the {}13{{C}}-pocket. In our model, CBM at the bottom of the convective envelope during the TDU represents gravity wave mixing. Furthermore, we take into account the fact that hydrodynamic simulations indicate a declining mixing efficiency that is already about a pressure scale height from the convective boundaries, compared to mixing-length theory. We obtain the formation of the {}13{{C}}-pocket with a mass of ≈ {10}-4 {M}⊙ . The final s-process abundances are characterized by 0.36\\lt [{{s}}/{Fe}]\\lt 0.78 and the heavy-to-light s-process ratio is -0.23\\lt [{hs}/{ls}]\\lt 0.45. Finally, we compare our results with stellar observations, presolar grain measurements and previous work.

  14. Diffuse Galactic Soft Gamma-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Lin, R. P.; Slassi-Sennou, S.; Coburn, W.; Pelling, R. M.

    2000-11-01

    The Galactic diffuse soft gamma-ray (30-800 keV) emission has been measured from the Galactic center by the High Resolution Gamma-Ray and Hard X-Ray Spectrometer balloon-borne germanium instrument to determine the spectral characteristics and origin of the emission. The resulting Galactic diffuse continuum is found to agree well with a single power law (plus positronium) over the entire energy range, consistent with RXTE and COMPTEL/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory observations at lower and higher energies, respectively. We find no evidence of spectral steepening below 200 keV, as has been reported in previous observations. The spatial distribution along the Galactic ridge is found to be nearly flat, with upper limits set on the longitudinal gradient and with no evidence of an edge in the observed region. The soft gamma-ray diffuse spectrum is well modeled by inverse Compton scattering of interstellar radiation off of cosmic-ray electrons, minimizing the need to invoke inefficient nonthermal bremsstrahlung emission. The resulting power requirement is well within that provided by Galactic supernovae. We speculate that the measured spectrum provides the first direct constraints on the cosmic-ray electron spectrum below 300 MeV.

  15. Galaxies as Standard Crayons: Measuring Galactic Reddening with Background Passive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston Peek, Joshua; Graves, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the true colors of extra-Galactic sources, we require an accurate map of the extinction generated by the foreground dust in the Milky Way. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), among many others, relies on the maps provided by Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis (1998; SFD98). These are derived from maps of infrared dust emission and dust temperature, based on the assumption that dust absorption can be uniquely determined from its infrared emission properties.  We check these maps using the colors of passively evolving galaxies from the SDSS. Passive galaxies populate a tight, well-defined 'red sequence' in the color-magnitude diagram.  This sequence can be used as a 'standard crayon': an object of known true color.  We search for deviations in the colors of red sequence galaxies as a function of position on the SDSS sky, taking into account small systematic variations with redshift and local galaxy environment. We present a corrected map of Galactic reddening, with very significant differences from SFD98. These maps will be made available to the public to use for more precise Galactic reddening. We also compare our reddening results to an alternative method, using neutral hydrogen (HI) column as a proxy for galactic reddening. We employ new HI maps from GALFA-HI, which has comparable resolution to the SFD98 maps. Additionally, we use the standard crayon method to put constraints on the presence of cold dust in high-velocity clouds, which have been shown to lack dust emission but whose reddening properties have not been accurately measured.

  16. On the atmospheric structure and fundamental parameters of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectro-interferometric studies of red supergiant (RSG) stars using the VLTI/AMBER instrument, which are compared to previously obtained similar observations of AGB stars. Our observations indicate spatially extended atmospheric molecular layers of water vapor and CO, similar as previously observed for Mira stars. Data of VY~CMa indicate that the molecular layers are asymmetric, possibly clumpy. Thanks to the spectro-interferometric capabilities of the VLTI/AMBER instrument, we can isolate continuum bandpasses, estimate fundamental parameters of our sources, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks. For the example of VY CMa, this puts it close to evolutionary tracks of initial mass 25-32 M ⊙. Comparisons of our data to hydrostatic model atmospheres, 3d simulations of convection, and 1d dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models indicate that none of these models can presently explain the observed atmospheric extensions for RSGs. The mechanism that levitates the atmospheres of red supergiant is thus a currently unsolved problem.

  17. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming a cell called a proerythroblast, it will develop into a new red blood cell. The formation of a red ...

  18. FIRE simulations: galactic outflows and their consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2016-06-01

    We study gaseous outflows and their consequences in high-resolution galaxy formation simulations with explicit stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. Collective, galaxy scale, effect of stellar feedback results in episodic ejections of large amount of gas and heavy elements into the circum-galactic medium. Gas ejection episodes follow strong bursts of star formation. Properties of galactic star formation and ejection episodes depend on galaxy mass and redshift and, together with gas infall and recycling, shape the evolution of the circum-galactic medium and galaxies. As a consequence, our simulated galaxies have masses, star formation histories and heavy element content in good agreement with the observed population of galaxies.

  19. Can Galactic H I be radiatively supported?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, A.

    1993-04-01

    I explore the effect of the photolevitation process, through which dusty diffuse clouds can rise to considerable high Galactic latitudes, on the global vertical distribution of the H I in the Galaxy. It is shown that the vertical support may be completely provided by the turbulence in the lower effective gravitational potential determined by the Galactic radiation field. The requirement of a population of fast clouds to match the observed profiles can be relaxed to consider only moderate-to-low values of the dispersion velocities of the neutral gas. In addition, the apparent observed constancy of the H I scale height with galactocentric radius is naturally explained by the model in terms of the similar behavior of the Galactic radiative (inclusive of the H II region distribution) and gravitational fields. Some discussion on the general validity of the study and on possible relevant additional effects is also given.

  20. Chemical trends in the Galactic halo from APOGEE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Alvar, E.; Carigi, L.; Allende Prieto, C.; Hayden, M. R.; Beers, T. C.; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Meza, A.; Schultheis, M.; Santiago, B. X.; Queiroz, A. B.; Anders, F.; da Costa, L. N.; Chiappini, C.

    2017-02-01

    The galaxy formation process in the Λ cold dark matter scenario can be constrained from the analysis of stars in the Milky Way's halo system. We examine the variation of chemical abundances in distant halo stars observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), as a function of distance from the Galactic Centre (r) and iron abundance ([M/H]), in the range 5 ≲ r ≲ 30 kpc and -2.5 < [M/H] < 0.0. We perform a statistical analysis of the abundance ratios derived by the APOGEE pipeline (ASPCAP) and distances calculated by several approaches. Our analysis reveals signatures of a different chemical enrichment between the inner and outer regions of the halo, with a transition at about 15 kpc. The derived metallicity distribution function exhibits two peaks, at [M/H] ∼ -1.5 and ∼-2.1, consistent with previously reported halo metallicity distributions. We obtain a difference of ∼0.1 dex for α-element-to-iron ratios for stars at r > 15 kpc and [M/H] > -1.1 (larger in the case of O, Mg, and S) with respect to the nearest halo stars. This result confirms previous claims for low-α stars found at larger distances. Chemical differences in elements with other nucleosynthetic origins (Ni, K, Na, and Al) are also detected. C and N do not provide reliable information about the interstellar medium from which stars formed because our sample comprises red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch stars and can experience mixing of material to their surfaces.

  1. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  2. The Diffuse Galactic Far-ultraviolet Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamden, Erika T.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark

    2013-12-01

    We present an all-sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Å) background using Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin2 pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all-sky maps of 100 μm emission, N H I column, and Hα intensity. We measure a consistent low level far-UV (FUV) intensity at zero points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 Å-1 non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 μm emission below 100 μm values of 8 MJy sr-1. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and N H I below 1021 cm-2. The relationship between FUV and Hα intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20°. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 ± 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 ± 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.

  3. The diffuse galactic far-ultraviolet sky

    SciTech Connect

    Hamden, Erika T.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark

    2013-12-20

    We present an all-sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Å) background using Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin{sup 2} pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all-sky maps of 100 μm emission, N {sub H} {sub I} column, and Hα intensity. We measure a consistent low level far-UV (FUV) intensity at zero points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} Å{sup –1} non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 μm emission below 100 μm values of 8 MJy sr{sup –1}. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and N {sub H} {sub I} below 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. The relationship between FUV and Hα intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20°. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 ± 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 ± 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.

  4. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  5. Asteroseismology for Galactic archaeology: bridging two fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Serenelli, Aldo M.

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of field stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. An overview of the ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) is presented, along with recent results using asteroseismology to investigate the vertical age structure of the Milky Way disc.

  6. Spectroscopic determination of masses (and implied ages) for red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Melissa; Hogg, David W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martig, Marie; Ho, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The mass of a star is arguably its most fundamental parameter and for red giant stars it implies a stellar evolution age. Stellar masses and ages have never been derived directly from spectra of red giants. However, using the APOGEE Kepler sample of stars, (the APOKASC sample), with high-quality spectra and astroseismic masses, we can build a data-driven spectral model using THE CANNON (arXiv:1501.07604) to infer stellar mass and therefore age from stellar spectra. We determine stellar masses to 0.07 dex from APOGEE DR12 spectra of red giants; these imply age estimates accurate to 0.2 dex (40 percent). THE CANNON constrains the ages foremost from spectral regions with particular absorption lines, elements whose surface abundances reflect mass-dependent dredge-up. We deliver an unprecedented catalog of 85,000 giants (including 20,000 red-clump stars) with mass and age estimates, spanning the entire disk (from the Galactic center to R ˜ 20 kpc). Such stellar age constraints across the Milky Way open up new avenues in Galactic archeology.

  7. Further ALMA observations and detailed modeling of the Red Rectangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.; Santander-García, M.; van Winckel, H.; Sánchez Contreras, C.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We aim to study the rotating and expanding gas in the Red Rectangle, which is a well known bipolar nebula surrounding a double stellar system whose primary is a post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star. We analyze the properties of both components and the relation between them. Rotating disks have been very elusive in post-AGB nebulae, in which gas is almost always found to be in expansion. Methods: We present new high-quality ALMA observations of this source in C17O J = 6-5 and H13CN J = 4-3 line emission and results from a new reduction of already published 13CO J = 3-2 data. A detailed model fitting of all the molecular line data, also discussing previous maps and single-dish observations of lines of CO, CII, and CI, was performed using a sophisticated code that includes an accurate nonlocal treatment of radiative transfer in 2D (assuming axial symmetry). These observations (of low- and high-opacity lines requiring various degrees of excitation) and the corresponding modeling allowed us to deepen the analysis of the nebular properties. We also stress the uncertainties, particularly in the determination of the boundaries of the CO-rich gas and some properties of the outflow. Results: We confirm the presence of a rotating equatorial disk and an outflow, which is mainly formed of gas leaving the disk. The mass of the disk is ~0.01 M⊙, and that of the CO-rich outflow is around ten times smaller. High temperatures of ≳100 K are derived for most components. From comparison of the mass values, we roughly estimate the lifetime of the rotating disk, which is found to be of about 10 000 yr. Taking data of a few other post-AGB composite nebulae into account, we find that the lifetimes of disks around post-AGB stars typically range between about 5000 and more than 20 000 yr. The angular momentum of the disk is found to be high, ~9 M⊙ AU km s-1, which is comparable to that of the stellar system at present. Our observations of H13CN show a particularly wide

  8. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  9. Palomar 13: An Unusual Stellar System in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Patrick; Djorgovski, S. G.; Meylan, G.; Castro, Sandra; McCarthy, J. K.

    2002-08-01

    We report the first results of a program to study the internal kinematics of globular clusters in the outer halo of the Milky Way. Using the Keck telescope and High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer, we have measured precise radial velocities for 30 candidate red giants in the direction of Palomar 13, an object traditionally cataloged as a compact, low-luminosity globular cluster. We have combined these radial velocities with published proper motion membership probabilities and new CCD photometry from the Keck and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes to isolate a sample of 21 probable members. We find a systemic velocity of s=24.1+/-0.5 km s-1 and a projected, intrinsic velocity dispersion of σp=2.2+/-0.4 km s-1. Although modest, this dispersion is nevertheless several times larger than that expected for a globular cluster of this luminosity and central concentration. Taken at face value, it implies a mass-to-light ratio of ΥV=40+24-17 based on the best-fit King-Michie model. The surface density profile of Palomar 13 also appears unusual compared to most Galactic globular clusters; depending upon the details of background subtraction and model-fitting, Palomar 13 either contains a substantial population of ``extratidal'' stars, or is considerably more spatially extended than previously suspected. The full surface density profile is equally well fitted by a King-Michie model having a high concentration and large tidal radius, or by a Navarro-Frenk-White model. We examine-and tentatively reject-a number of possible origins for the observed characteristics of Palomar 13 (e.g., velocity ``jitter'' among the red giant branch stars, spectroscopic binary stars, nonstandard mass functions, modified Newtonian dynamics) and conclude that the two leading explanations are either catastrophic heating during a recent perigalacticon passage or the presence of a dark matter halo. The available evidence therefore suggests that Palomar 13 is either a globular cluster that is now in

  10. Search for EeV protons of galactic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, T.; Shibata, F.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, H.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tirone, A. H.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic rays in the energy range 1018.0-1018.5 eV are thought to have a light, probably protonic, composition. To study their origin one can search for anisotropy in their arrival directions. Extragalactic cosmic rays should be isotropic, but galactic cosmic rays of this type should be seen mostly along the galactic plane, and there should be a shortage of events coming from directions near the galactic anticenter. This is due to the fact that, under the influence of the galactic magnetic field, the transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior is well advanced, and this qualitative picture persists over the whole energy range. Guided by models of the galactic magnetic field that indicate that the enhancement along the galactic plane should have a standard deviation of about 20° in galactic latitude, and the deficit in the galactic anticenter direction should have a standard deviation of about 50° in galactic longitude, we use the data of the Telescope Array surface detector in 1018.0 to 1018.5 eV energy range to search for these effects. The data are isotropic. Neither an enhancement along the galactic plane nor a deficit in the galactic anticenter direction is found. Using these data we place an upper limit on the fraction of EeV cosmic rays of galactic origin at 1.3% at 95% confidence level.

  11. FROM THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAM OF {omega} CENTAURI AND (SUPER-)ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STELLAR MODELS TO A GALACTIC PLANE PASSAGE GAS PURGING CHEMICAL EVOLUTION SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Herwig, Falk; VandenBerg, Don A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Ferguson, Jason; Paxton, Bill E-mail: vandenbe@uvic.ca E-mail: paxton@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated the color-magnitude diagram of {omega} Centauri and find that the blue main sequence (bMS) can be reproduced only by models that have a helium abundance in the range Y = 0.35-0.40. To explain the faint subgiant branch of the reddest stars ('MS-a/RG-a' sequence), isochrones for the observed metallicity ([Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.7) appear to require both a high age ({approx}13 Gyr) and enhanced CNO abundances ([CNO/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 0.9). Y Almost-Equal-To 0.35 must also be assumed in order to counteract the effects of high CNO on turnoff colors and thereby to obtain a good fit to the relatively blue turnoff of this stellar population. This suggests a short chemical evolution period of time (<1 Gyr) for {omega} Cen. Our intermediate-mass (super-)asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models are able to reproduce the high helium abundances, along with [N/Fe] {approx}2 and substantial O depletions if uncertainties in the treatment of convection are fully taken into account. These abundance features distinguish the bMS stars from the dominant [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -1.7 population. The most massive super-AGB stellar models (M{sub ZAMS} {>=} 6.8 M{sub Sun }, M{sub He,core} {>=} 1.245 M{sub Sun }) predict too large N enhancements, which limit their role in contributing to the extreme populations. In order to address the observed central concentration of stars with He-rich abundance, we show here quantitatively that highly He- and N-enriched AGB ejecta have particularly efficient cooling properties. Based on these results and on the reconstruction of the orbit of {omega} Cen with respect to the Milky Way, we propose the Galactic plane passage gas purging scenario for the chemical evolution of this cluster. The bMS population formed shortly after the purging of most of the cluster gas as a result of the passage of {omega} Cen through the Galactic disk (which occurs today every {approx}40 Myr for {omega} Cen) when the initial mass function of the dominant

  12. Mass Distributions Implying Flat Galactic Rotation Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    The rotational speeds of stars in the disc of a spiral galaxy are virtually independent of the distances of the stars from the centre of the galaxy. In common parlance, the stellar speed versus distance plot known as a galactic rotation curve is by observation typically nearly flat. This observation provides strong evidence that most galactic…

  13. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  14. YSO Clusters on Galactic Infrared Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gábor; Kiss, Zoltán Tamás; Tóth, L. Viktor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Pásztor, László; Ueno, Munateka; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tamura, Motohide; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu

    The AKARI all sky survey (Murakami et al. Publ. Astron. Soc. Jpn. 59:369, 2007) was investigated for YSO candidates. Distribution of candidate sources have been analysed and compared to that of galactic CO and medium scale structures. Clustering and other inhomogenities have been found.

  15. Star formation inside a galactic outflow.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Carniani, S; Gallagher, R; Cazzoli, S; Arribas, S; Belfiore, F; Bellocchi, E; Colina, L; Cresci, G; Ishibashi, W; Marconi, A; Mannucci, F; Oliva, E; Sturm, E

    2017-04-13

    Recent observations have revealed massive galactic molecular outflows that may have the physical conditions (high gas densities) required to form stars. Indeed, several recent models predict that such massive outflows may ignite star formation within the outflow itself. This star-formation mode, in which stars form with high radial velocities, could contribute to the morphological evolution of galaxies, to the evolution in size and velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component of galaxies, and would contribute to the population of high-velocity stars, which could even escape the galaxy. Such star formation could provide in situ chemical enrichment of the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium (through supernova explosions of young stars on large orbits), and some models also predict it to contribute substantially to the star-formation rate observed in distant galaxies. Although there exists observational evidence for star formation triggered by outflows or jets into their host galaxy, as a consequence of gas compression, evidence for star formation occurring within galactic outflows is still missing. Here we report spectroscopic observations that unambiguously reveal star formation occurring in a galactic outflow at a redshift of 0.0448. The inferred star-formation rate in the outflow is larger than 15 solar masses per year. Star formation may also be occurring in other galactic outflows, but may have been missed by previous observations owing to the lack of adequate diagnostics.

  16. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yar-Mukhamedov, D.

    2015-04-15

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means.

  17. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  18. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  19. The {sup 13}C-pocket structure in AGB models: constraints from zirconium isotope abundances in single mainstream SiC grains

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Savina, Michael R.

    2014-06-20

    We present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different {sup 13}C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar {sup 92}Zr/{sup 94}Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a {sup 13}C-pocket with a flat {sup 13}C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth {sup 13}C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat {sup 13}C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  20. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reaction rate determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-01

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  1. Constraints on the H2O formation mechanism in the wind of carbon-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, R.; Decin, L.; Royer, P.; de Koter, A.; Cox, N. L. J.; González-Alfonso, E.; Neufeld, D.; De Ridder, J.; Agúndez, M.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Khouri, T.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The recent detection of warm H2O vapor emission from the outflows of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H2O vapor formation. In the first, periodic shocks passing through the medium immediately above the stellar surface lead to H2O formation. In the second, penetration of ultraviolet interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar medium leads to the formation of H2O molecules in the intermediate wind. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of H2O emission for a sample of 18 carbon-rich AGB stars and subsequently constrain which of the above mechanisms provides the most likely warm H2O formation pathway. Methods: Using far-infrared spectra taken with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel telescope, we combined two methods to identify H2O emission trends and interpreted these in terms of theoretically expected patterns in the H2O abundance. Through the use of line-strength ratios, we analyzed the correlation between the strength of H2O emission and the mass-loss rate of the objects, as well as the radial dependence of the H2O abundance in the circumstellar outflow per individual source. We computed a model grid to account for radiative-transfer effects in the line strengths. Results: We detect warm H2O emission close to or inside the wind acceleration zone of all sample stars, irrespective of their stellar or circumstellar properties. The predicted H2O abundances in carbon-rich environments are in the range of 10-6 up to 10-4 for Miras and semiregular-a objects, and cluster around 10-6 for semiregular-b objects. These predictions are up to three orders of magnitude greater than what is predicted by state-of-the-art chemical models. We find a negative correlation between the H2O/CO line-strength ratio and gas mass-loss rate for Ṁg> 5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, regardless of the upper-level energy of the relevant transitions

  2. Study of the inner dust envelope and stellar photosphere of the AGB star R Doradus using SPHERE/ZIMPOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, T.; Maercker, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Kervella, P.; de Koter, A.; Ginski, C.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; O'Gorman, E.; Schmid, H.-M.; Lombaert, R.; Lagadec, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. On the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) low- and intermediate-mass stars eject a large fraction of their envelope, but the mechanism driving these outflows is still poorly understood. For oxygen-rich AGB stars, the wind is thought to be driven by radiation pressure caused by scattering of radiation off dust grains. Aims: We study the photosphere, the warm molecular layer, and the inner wind of the close-by oxygen-rich AGB star R Doradus. We focus on investigating the spatial distribution of the dust grains that scatter light and whether these grains can be responsible for driving the outflow of this star. Methods: We use high-angular-resolution images obtained with SPHERE/ZIMPOL to study R Dor and its inner envelope in a novel way. We present observations in filters V, cntHα, and cnt820 and investigate the surface brightness distribution of the star and of the polarised light produced in the inner envelope. Thanks to second-epoch observations in cntHα, we are able to see variability on the stellar photosphere. We study the polarised-light data using a continuum-radiative-transfer code that accounts for direction-dependent scattering of photons off dust grains. Results: We find that in the first epoch the surface brightness of R Dor is asymmetric in V and cntHα, the filters where molecular opacity is stronger, while in cnt820 the surface brightness is closer to being axisymmetric. The second-epoch observations in cntHα show that the morphology of R Dor has changed completely in a timespan of 48 days to a more axisymmetric and compact configuration. This variable morphology is probably linked to changes in the opacity provided by TiO molecules in the extended atmosphere. The observations show polarised light coming from a region around the central star. The inner radius of the region from where polarised light is seen varies only by a small amount with azimuth. The value of the polarised intensity, however, varies by between a factor of 2.3 and 3.7 with

  3. EVOLUTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND YIELDS OF AGB STARS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES. III. INTERMEDIATE-MASS MODELS, REVISED LOW-MASS MODELS, AND THE pH-FRUITY INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-15

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M{sub ⊙}) at different metallicities (−2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M{sub ⊙} ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the {sup 22}Ne(α,n){sup 25}Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY)

  4. Evolution, Nucleosynthesis, and Yields of AGB Stars at Different Metallicities. III. Intermediate-mass Models, Revised Low-mass Models, and the ph-FRUITY Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M⊙) at different metallicities (-2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY).

  5. The adventure of carbon stars. Observations and modeling of a set of C-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G.; Hron, J.; Paladini, C.; Aringer, B.; Eriksson, K.; Marigo, P.; Nowotny, W.; Grellmann, R.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Modeling stellar atmospheres is a complex and intriguing task in modern astronomy. A systematic comparison of models with multi-technique observations is the only efficient way to constrain the models. Aims: We intend to perform self-consistent modeling of the atmospheres of six carbon-rich AGB stars (R Lep, R Vol, Y Pav, AQ Sgr, U Hya, and X TrA) with the aim of enlarging the knowledge of the dynamic processes occurring in their atmospheres. Methods: We used VLTI/MIDI interferometric observations, in combination with spectro-photometric data, and compared them with self-consistent, dynamic model atmospheres. Results: We found that the models can reproduce spectral energy distribution (SED) data well at wavelengths longer than 1 μm, and the interferometric observations between 8 μm and 10 μm. Discrepancies observed at wavelengths shorter than 1 μm in the SED, and longer than 10 μm in the visibilities, could be due to a combination of data- and model-related effects. The models best fitting the Miras are significantly extended, and have a prominent shell-like structure. On the contrary, the models best fitting the non-Miras are more compact, showing lower average mass loss. The mass loss is of episodic or multi-periodic nature but causes the visual amplitudes to be notably larger than the observed ones. A number of stellar parameters were derived from the model fitting: TRoss, LRoss, M, C/O, and Ṁ. Our findings agree well with literature values within the uncertainties. TRoss, and LRoss are also in good agreement with the temperature derived from the angular diameter T(θ(V-K)) and the bolometric luminosity from the SED fitting Lbol, except for AQ Sgr. The possible reasons are discussed in the text. Finally, θRoss and θ(V-K) agree with one another better for the Miras than for the non-Miras targets, which is probably connected to the episodic nature of the latter models. We also located the stars in the H-R diagram, comparing them with evolutionary

  6. Is the 21-micron Feature Observed in Some Post-AGB Stars Caused by the Interaction Between Ti Atoms and Fullerenes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A. III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent measurements of fullerenes and Ti atoms recorded in our laboratory have demonstrated the presence of an infrared feature near 21 pm. The feature observed has nearly the same shape and position as is observed for one of the most enigmatic features in post-asymptotic giant blanch (AGB) stars. In our experimental system large cage carbon particles, such as large fullerenes, were produced from CO gas by the Boudouard reaction. Large-cage carbon particles intermixed with Ti atoms were produced by the evaporation of a Ti metal wrapped carbon electrode in CO gas. The infrared spectra of large fullerenes interacting with Ti atoms show a characteristic feature at 20.3 micron that closely corresponds to the 20.1 micron feature observed in post-AGB stars. Both the lab- oratory and stellar spectra also show a small but significant peak at 19.0 micron, which is attributed to fullerenes. Here, we propose that the interaction between fullerenes and Ti atoms may be a plausible explanation for the 21-micron feature seen in some post-AGB stars.

  7. Tests of two convection theories for red giant and red supergiant envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Two theories of stellar envelope convection are considered here in the context of red giants and red supergiants of intermediate to high mass: Boehm-Vitense's standard mixing-length theory (MLT) and Canuto & Mazzitelli's new theory incorporating the full spectrum of turbulence (FST). Both theories assume incompressible convection. Two formulations of the convective mixing length are also evaluated: l proportional to the local pressure scale height (H(sub P)) and l proportional to the distance from the upper boundary of the convection zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red phase of core helium burning. Since the theoretically predicted effective temperatures for cool stars are known to be sensitive to the assigned value of the mixing length, this quantity has been individually calibrated for each evolutionary sequence. The calibration is done in a composite Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the red giant and red supergiant members of well-observed Galactic open clusters. The MLT model requires the constant of proportionality for the convective mixing length to vary by a small but statistically significant amount with stellar mass, whereas the FST model succeeds in all cases with the mixing lenghth simply set equal to z. The structure of the deep stellar interior, however, remains very nearly unaffected by the choices of convection theory and mixing lenghth. Inside the convective envelope itself, a density inversion always occurs, but is somewhat smaller for the convectively more efficient MLT model. On physical grounds the FST model is preferable, and seems to alleviate the problem of finding the proper mixing length.

  8. DUST IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANOMALOUS SILICATE TO OPTICAL EXTINCTION RATIOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Jianwei; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2014-09-01

    Dust plays a central role in the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, little is known about the nature (e.g., size, composition) of the dust that forms a torus around the AGN. In this Letter, we report a systematic exploration of the optical extinction (A{sub V} ) and the silicate absorption optical depth (Δτ{sub 9.7}) of 110 type 2 AGNs. We derive A{sub V} from the Balmer decrement based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and Δτ{sub 9.7} from the Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph data. We find that with a mean ratio of (A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7}) ≲ 5.5, the optical-to-silicate extinction ratios of these AGNs are substantially lower than that of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) for which A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ≈ 18.5. We argue that the anomalously low A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ratio could be due to the predominance of larger grains in the AGN torus compared to that in the Galactic diffuse ISM.

  9. Tracing the evolution of the Galactic bulge with chemodynamical modelling of alpha-elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Barbuy, B.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Galactic bulge abundances can be best understood as indicators of bulge formation and nucleosynthesis processes by comparing them with chemo-dynamical evolution models. Aims: The aim of this work is to study the abundances of alpha-elements in the Galactic bulge, including a revision of the oxygen abundance in a sample of 56 bulge red giants. Methods: Literature abundances for O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti in Galactic bulge stars are compared with chemical evolution models. For oxygen in particular, we reanalysed high-resolution spectra obtained using FLAMES+UVES on the Very Large Telescope, now taking each star's carbon abundances, derived from CI and C2 lines, into account simultaneously. Results: We present a chemical evolution model of alpha-element enrichment in a massive spheroid that represents a typical classical bulge evolution. The code includes multi-zone chemical evolution coupled with hydrodynamics of the gas. Comparisons between the model predictions and the abundance data suggest a typical bulge formation timescale of 1-2 Gyr. The main constraint on the bulge evolution is provided by the O data from analyses that have taken the C abundance and dissociative equilibrium into account. Mg, Si, Ca and Ti trends are well reproduced, whereas the level of overabundance critically depends on the adopted nucleosynthesis prescriptions. Observations collected both at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196)

  10. Characterization of the VVV Survey RR Lyrae Population across the Southern Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minniti, Dante; Dékány, Istvan; Majaess, Daniel; Palma, Tali; Pullen, Joyce; Rejkuba, Marina; Alonso-García, Javier; Catelan, Marcio; Contreras Ramos, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Oscar A.; Hempel, Maren; Irwin, Mike; Lucas, Philip W.; Saito, Roberto K.; Tissera, Patricia; Valenti, Elena; Zoccali, Manuela

    2017-04-01

    Deep near-IR images from the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey were used to search for RR Lyrae stars in the Southern Galactic plane. A sizable sample of 404 RR Lyrae of type ab stars was identified across a thin slice of the fourth Galactic quadrant (295° < ℓ < 350°, ‑2.°24 < b < ‑1.°05). The sample’s distance distribution exhibits a maximum density that occurs at the bulge tangent point, which implies that this primarily Oosterhoff type I population of RRab stars does not trace the bar delineated by their red clump counterparts. The bulge RR Lyrae population does not extend beyond ℓ ∼ 340°, and the sample’s spatial distribution presents evidence of density enhancements and substructure that warrants further investigation. Indeed, the sample may be employed to evaluate Galactic evolution models, and is particularly lucrative since half of the discovered RR Lyrae are within reach of Gaia astrometric observations.

  11. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Andrews, B.; Epstein, C.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Jackson, K.; Majewski, S. R.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beaton, R. L.; Nidever, D. L.; Pinto, H. J. Rocha; Girardi, L.; Cudworth, K. M.; Munn, J.; Blake, C. H.; Covey, K.; Deshpande, R.; Fleming, S. W.; Fabbian, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s and others

    2013-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of {approx}10{sup 5} red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.

  12. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  13. THE NATURE OF OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Brusa, Marcella; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Huchra, John P.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick Z.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Maineri, Vincenzo

    2009-11-20

    We present infrared, optical, and X-ray data of 48 X-ray bright, optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. These objects exhibit the X-ray luminosity of an AGN but lack broad and narrow emission lines in their optical spectrum. We show that despite the lack of optical emission lines, most of these optically dull AGNs are not well described by a typical passive red galaxy spectrum: instead they exhibit weak but significant blue emission like an unobscured AGN. Photometric observations over several years additionally show significant variability in the blue emission of four optically dull AGNs. The nature of the blue and infrared emission suggest that the optically inactive appearance of these AGNs cannot be caused by obscuration intrinsic to the AGNs. Instead, up to approx70% of optically dull AGNs are diluted by their hosts, with bright or simply edge-on hosts lying preferentially within the spectroscopic aperture. The remaining approx30% of optically dull AGNs have anomalously high f{sub X} /f{sub O} ratios and are intrinsically weak, not obscured, in the optical. These optically dull AGNs are best described as a weakly accreting AGN with a truncated accretion disk from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  14. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  15. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    During the period of reionization that followed the dark ages of our universe, hydrogen was transformed from a neutral state, which is opaque to radiation, to an ionized one, which is transparent to radiation. But what generated the initial ionizing radiation? The recent discovery of multiple distant galaxies offers evidence for how this process occurred.Two Distant GalaxiesWe believe reionization occurred somewhere between a redshift of z = 6 and 7, because Ly-emitting galaxies drop out at roughly this redshift. Beyond this distance, were generally unable to see the light from these galaxies, because the universe is no longer transparent to their emission. This is not always the case, however: if a bubble of ionized gas exists around a distant galaxy, the radiation can escape, allowing us to see the galaxy.This is true of two recently-discovered Ly-emitting galaxies, confirmed to be at a redshift of z~7 and located near one another in a region known as the Bremer Deep Field. The fact that were able to see the radiation from these galaxies means that they are in an ionized HII region presumably one of the earlier regions to have become reionized in the universe.But on their own, neither of these galaxies is capable of generating an ionized bubble large enough for their light to escape. So what ionized the region around them, and what does this mean for our understanding of how reionization occurred in the universe?A Little Help From FriendsLocation in different filters of the objects in the Hubble Bremer Deep Field catalog. The z~7 selection region is outlined by the grey box. BDF-521 and BDF-3299 were the two originally discovered galaxies; the remaining red markers indicate the additional six galaxies discovered in the same region. [Castellano et al. 2016]A team of scientists led by Marco Castellano (Rome Observatory, INAF) investigated the possibility that there are other, faint galaxies near these two that have helped to ionize the region. Performing a survey

  16. A cost effective and operational methodology for wall to wall Above Ground Biomass (AGB) and carbon stocks estimation and mapping: Nepal REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, H., Sr.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Koju, U. A.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Nemani, R. R.; Manandhar, U.; Thapa, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nepal is a landlocked country with 39% forest cover of the total land area (147,181 km2). Under the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and implemented by the World Bank (WB), Nepal chosen as one of four countries best suitable for results-based payment system for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+) scheme. At the national level Landsat based, from 1990 to 2000 the forest area has declined by 2%, i.e. by 1467 km2, whereas from 2000 to 2010 it has declined only by 0.12% i.e. 176 km2. A cost effective monitoring and evaluation system for REDD+ requires a balanced approach of remote sensing and ground measurements. This paper provides, for Nepal a cost effective and operational 30 m Above Ground Biomass (AGB) estimation and mapping methodology using freely available satellite data integrated with field inventory. Leaf Area Index (LAI) generated based on propose methodology by Ganguly et al. (2012) using Landsat-8 the OLI cloud free images. To generate tree canopy height map, a density scatter graph between the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) estimated maximum height and Landsat LAI nearest to the center coordinates of the GLAS shots show a moderate but significant exponential correlation (31.211*LAI0.4593, R2= 0.33, RMSE=13.25 m). From the field well distributed circular (750m2 and 500m2), 1124 field plots (0.001% representation of forest cover) measured which were used for estimation AGB (ton/ha) using Sharma et al. (1990) proposed equations for all tree species of Nepal. A satisfactory linear relationship (AGB = 8.7018*Hmax-101.24, R2=0.67, RMSE=7.2 ton/ha) achieved between maximum canopy height (Hmax) and AGB (ton/ha). This cost effective and operational methodology is replicable, over 5-10 years with minimum ground samples through integration of satellite images. Developed AGB used to produce optimum fuel wood scenarios using population and road

  17. The near-infrared counterpart of a variable galactic plane radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Phillips, Andrew C.; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A near-infrared counterpart to the highly variable, unresolved galactic plane radio source GT 0116 + 622 is identified. This source is of particular interest, as it has been previously suggested to be the counterpart of the gamma-ray source Cas gamma-l. The present NIR and red images detect a faint, spatially extended (3 arcsec FWHM), very red object coincident with the radio position. There is complex spatial structure which may be due in part to an unrelated superposed foreground object. Observations on multiple nights show no evidence for flux variability, despite the high amplitude variability on a time-scale of days reported for the radio source. The data are consistent with an interpretation of GT 0116 + 622 as an unusually variable, obscured active galaxy at a distance of several hundred megaparsecs, although more exotic, and in particular galactic, interpretations cannot yet be ruled out. If the object is extragalactic, the previously suggested identification with the gamma-ray source would seem unlikely.

  18. Galactic wind in NGC 4460: New observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oparin, D. V.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    NGC 4460 is an isolated lenticular galaxy, in which galactic wind has been earlier discovered as a gas outflow associated with circumnuclear regions of star formation. Using the results of observations in the H α line with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the SAO RAS 6-m telescope, we studied the kinematics of the ionized gas in this galaxy. The parameters of gas outflow from the plane of the galactic disk were refined within a simple geometric model. We show that it is impossible to characterize the wind by a fixed velocity value. Characteristic outflow velocities are within 30-80 km s-1, and they are insufficient to make the swept-out matter ultimately leave the galaxy.

  19. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  20. A Speeding Binary in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of a hyper-velocity binary star system in the halo of the Milky Way poses a mystery: how was this system accelerated to its high speed?Accelerating StarsUnlike the uniform motion in the Galactic disk, stars in the Milky Ways halo exhibit a huge diversity of orbits that are usually tilted relative to the disk and have a variety of speeds. One type of halo star, so-called hyper-velocity stars, travel with speeds that can approach the escape velocity of the Galaxy.How do these hyper-velocity stars come about? Assuming they form in the Galactic disk, there are multiple proposed scenarios through which they could be accelerated and injected into the halo, such as:Ejection after a close encounter with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic centerEjection due to a nearby supernova explosionEjection as the result of a dynamical interaction in a dense stellar population.Further observations of hyper-velocity stars are necessary to identify the mechanism responsible for their acceleration.J1211s SurpriseModels of J1211s orbit show it did not originate from the Galactic center (black dot). The solar symbol shows the position of the Sun and the star shows the current position of J1211. The bottom two panels show two depictions(x-y plane and r-z plane) of estimated orbits of J1211 over the past 10 Gyr. [Nmeth et al. 2016]To this end, a team of scientists led by Pter Nmeth (Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nrnberg) recently studied the candidate halo hyper-velocity star SDSS J121150.27+143716.2. The scientists obtained spectroscopy of J1211 using spectrographs at the Keck Telescope in Hawaii and ESOs Very Large Telescope in Chile. To their surprise, they discovered the signature of a companion in the spectra: J1211 is actually a binary!Nmeth and collaborators found that J1211, located roughly 18,000 light-years away, is moving at a rapid ~570 km/s relative to the galactic rest frame. The binary system consists of a hot (30,600 K) subdwarf and a

  1. Brown dwarfs as dark galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Walker, Terry P.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that the dark matter in galactic halos can consist of brown dwarf stars is considered. The radiative signature for such halos consisting solely of brown dwarfs is calculated, and the allowed range of brown dwarf masses, the initial mass function (IMF), the stellar properties, and the density distribution of the galactic halo are discussed. The prediction emission from the halo is compared with existing observations. It is found that, for any IMF of brown dwarfs below the deuterium burning limit, brown dwarf halos are consistent with observations. Brown dwarf halos cannot, however, explain the recently observed near-IR background. It is shown that future satellite missions will either detect brown dwarf halos or place tight constraints on the allowed range of the IMF.

  2. The MSX Galactic Plane Survey Submillimeter Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, S.; Carey, S.; Egan, M. P.

    The MidCourse Space eXperiment (MSX) surveyed the Galactic plane within 5° latitude in four mid-infrared spectral bands. A set of full resolution (20'') 1.5^circ×1.5^circ images on 6'' pixel centers has been created in each spectral band by co-adding all the survey data. A lower (1.2') resolution atlas of 10^circ×10^circ images provide large-scale panoramas of the plane. A new class of objects has been identified in the images, infrared dark clouds, which are silhouetted against the mid-infrared background emission from the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane. The IRAS ISSA plates indicate that these clouds are dark out to 100 μm. Submillimeter emission traces the form of the dark cloud and reveals cores indicative of class 0 protostars.

  3. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  4. On the biological hazard of galactic antinuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Buck, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of antinuclei in the galactic cosmic-ray beam with biological systems is studied. A nuclei-antinuclei annihilation event observed in nuclear emulsion near the end of the slowing-down trajectories of singly charged particle is discussed. An annihilation event that occurred by capture of the antinucleus into an atomic orbital followed by cascade to or near the ground atomic state and subsequent annihilation with the nuclear material of the atom is described. Microdosimetric quantities relevant to potential biological hazards are estimated. The average linear-energy-transfer spectrum for galactic cosmic ray antinuclei annihilation events in tissues is presented. It is observed that the annihilation in tissues occurs mainly in O and the heavier elements around K.

  5. Stability of BEC galactic dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, F. S.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; González-Avilés, J. J.; Rivera-Paleo, F. J.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we show that spherically symmetric BEC dark matter halos, with the sin r/r density profile, that accurately fit galactic rotation curves and represent a potential solution to the cusp-core problem are unstable. We do this by introducing back the density profiles into the fully time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson system of equations. Using numerical methods to track the evolution of the system, we found that these galactic halos lose mass at an approximate rate of half of its mass in a time scale of dozens of Myr. We consider this time scale is enough as to consider these halos are unstable and unlikely to be formed. We provide some arguments to show that this behavior is general and discuss some other drawbacks of the model that restrict its viability.

  6. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  7. Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Adams, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations

  8. Cosmic rays in a galactic breeze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Giacinti, Gwenael

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the nonthermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to γ -ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of ≈200 GV .

  9. Cosmic Ray Variability and Galactic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2007-05-01

    The spectral analysis of fluctuations of biodiversity (Rohde & Muller, 2005) and the subsequent re-analysis of the diversity record, species origination and extinction rates, gene duplication, etc (Melott & Liebermann, 2007) indicate the presence of a 62$\\pm$3My cyclicity, for the last 500My. Medvedev & Melott (2006) proposed that the cyclicity may be related to the periodicity of the Solar motion with respect to the Galactic plane, which exhibits a 63My oscillation, and the inhomogeneous distribution of Cosmic Rays (CR) throughout the Milky Way, which may affect the biosphere by changing mutation rate, climate, food chain, etc. Here we present a model of CR propagation in the Galactic magnetic fields, in the presence of both the mean field gradient and the strong MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium. We explore the "magnetic shielding effect" as a function of CR energy and composition and estimate the resultant flux of mutagenic secondary muons at the Earth surface.

  10. Positrons and Antiprotons in Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, R.

    2016-10-01

    I consider the impact of recent measurements of positron and antiproton spectra in cosmic rays on our understanding of the origins and propagation of cosmic rays, as well as on the annihilation and decay characteristics of particles of Galactic dark matter, from the perspective of current models postulating energy-dependent leakage of cosmic rays from the Galaxy and of the nested leaky-box model, in which the leakage from the Galaxy is independent of energy. The nested leaky-box model provides a straightforward and consistent explanation of the observed spectral intensities, and finds no compelling need for a contribution from the annihilation or decay of Galactic dark matter. Improved observations and modeling efforts are needed to probe the properties of dark matter deeply enough to be significant to particle physics and cosmology.

  11. The iPTF Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kupfer, Thomas; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Oded Ofek, Eran; Shupe, David L.; Surace, Jason A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory has conducted a survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The major science goals of the survey include mapping variable stars throughout the Galaxy; discovering outbursting sources such as Cataclysmic Variables, FU Ori outbursts, and M-dwarf flares; and identifying rare types of compact binaries. Through 2015 the survey has obtained an average of 60 epochs in R-band in the spatial region 0 < l < 150 degrees, |b| < 20 degrees, with greatest coverage in the |b| < 5 degree region.I will describe the performance of the survey and present initial results, with a focus on variability-based identification of X-ray sources. The Zwicky Transient Facility, to begin in 2017, will include an extensive public variability survey of the Galactic Plane.

  12. Galactic transients from the OGLE survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Przemek

    2016-07-01

    For many years, there were not any systematic, large-scale surveys for transients in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. This gap is being filled by discoveries from the OGLE survey, which has been regularly monitoring the densest sky regions (the Galactic bulge and disk, the Magellanic System) for over twenty years. The OGLE collection of Galactic transients contains several dozen classical novae and over a thousand other cataclysmic variables. I will tell how to select transients from billions of sources observed by the OGLE every night. I will show how the properties of classical novae depend on the underlying stellar population (and the star formation history). I will also discuss the preliminary results of the search for transients in the Milky Way disk from the OGLE-IV Galaxy Variability Survey. Finally, I will show some transients of yet unknown origin and present the OGLE-IV real time monitoring systems.

  13. Detailed Abundance Analysis of a Metal-poor Giant in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Fritz, T. K.; Rich, R. M.; Thorsbro, B.; Schultheis, M.; Origlia, L.; Chatzopoulos, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report the first results from our program to examine the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster connected to Sgr A*, with the goal of inferring the star formation and enrichment history of this system, as well as its connection and relationship with the central 100 pc of the bulge/bar system. We present the first high-resolution (R ˜ 24,000), detailed abundance analysis of a K = 10.2 metal-poor, alpha-enhanced red giant projected at 1.5 pc from the Galactic center, using NIRSPEC on Keck II. A careful analysis of the dynamics and color of the star locates it at about {26}-16+54 pc line-of-sight distance in front of the nuclear cluster. It probably belongs to one of the nuclear components (cluster or disk), not to the bar/bulge or classical disk. A detailed spectroscopic synthesis, using a new line list in the K band, finds [Fe/H] ˜ -1.0 and [α/Fe] ˜ +0.4, consistent with stars of similar metallicity in the bulge. As known giants with comparable [Fe/H] and alpha enhancement are old, we conclude that this star is most likely to be a representative of the ˜10 Gyr old population. This is also the most metal-poor-confirmed red giant yet discovered in the vicinity of the nuclear cluster of the Galactic center. We consider recent reports in the literature of a surprisingly large number of metal-poor giants in the Galactic center, but the reported gravity of {log}g˜ 4 for these stars calls into question their reported metallicities.

  14. Weighing the local dark matter with RAVE red clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaymé, O.; Famaey, B.; Siebert, A.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2014-11-01

    We determine the Galactic potential in the solar neigbourhood from RAVE observations. We select red clump stars for which accurate distances, radial velocities, and metallicities have been measured. Combined with data from the 2MASS and UCAC catalogues, we build a sample of ~4600 red clump stars within a cylinder of 500 pc radius oriented in the direction of the South Galactic Pole, in the range of 200 pc to 2000 pc distances. We deduce the vertical force and the total mass density distribution up to 2 kpc away from the Galactic plane by fitting a distribution function depending explicitly on three isolating integrals of the motion in a separable potential locally representing the Galactic one with four free parameters. Because of the deep extension of our sample, we can determine nearly independently the dark matter mass density and the baryonic disc surface mass density. We find (i) at 1 kpc Kz/ (2πG) = 68.5 ± 1.0 M⊙ pc-2; and (ii) at 2 kpc Kz/ (2πG) = 96.9 ± 2.2 M⊙ pc-2. Assuming the solar Galactic radius at R0 = 8.5 kpc, we deduce the local dark matter density ρDM(z = 0) = 0.0143 ± 0.0011 M⊙pc-3 = 0.542 ± 0.042 Gev cm-3 and the baryonic surface mass density Σbar = 44.4 ± 4.1 M⊙pc-2. Our results are in agreement with previously published Kz determinations up to 1 kpc, while the extension to 2 kpc shows some evidence for an unexpectedly large amount of dark matter. A flattening of the dark halo of order 0.8 can produce such a high local density in combination with a circular velocity of 240 km s-1. It could also be consistent with a spherical cored dark matter profile whose density does not drop sharply with radius. Another explanation, allowing for a lower circular velocity, could be the presence of a secondary dark component, a very thick disc resulting either from the deposit of dark matter from the accretion of multiple small dwarf galaxies, or from the presence of an effective "phantom" thick disc in the context of effective galactic

  15. Tasmanian low frequency Galactic background surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1987-01-01

    The results of LF (2-20-MHz) radio-astronomy observations obtained in Tasmania during solar-minimum winters since 1956 are briefly summarized. The low ionospheric f0F2 values (near 1 MHz) occurring in Tasmania in these periods are noted; the 2000-ft-diameter Llanherne array used for Galactic mapping at 2-20 MHz is described; the techniques employed are discussed; and sample maps are shown.

  16. Possible microlensing in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej; Szymanski, Michal

    1999-02-01

    The OGLE Early Warning System triggered a microlensing candidate located in the Galactic disk field in Carina. The I=18.0 mag (V=19.6) star designated CAR_SC2 24589 (RA2000=11:07:26.72, DEC2000=-61:22:30.6, l=290.8,b=-1.0) is currently brightening with the light curve consistent with microlensing rise of brightness.

  17. Cellular Automation of Galactic Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukotic, B.; Cirkovic, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a preliminary results of our Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) 2D probabilistic cellular automata models. The relevant time-scales (emergence of life, it's diversification and evolution influenced with the global risk function) are modeled as the probability matrix elements and are chosen in accordance with the Copernican principle to be well-represented by the data inferred from the Earth's fossil record. With Fermi's paradox as a main boundary condition the resulting histories of astrobiological landscape are discussed.

  18. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  19. The age of the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandage, Allan

    1988-01-01

    The galactic disk is a dissipative structure and must, therefore be younger than the halo if galaxy formation generally proceeds by collapse. Just how much younger the oldest stars in the galactic disk are than the oldest halo stars remains an open question. A fast collapse (on a time scale no longer than the rotation period of the extended protogalaxy) permits an age gap of the order of approximately 10 to the 9th power years. A slow collapse, governed by the cooling rate of the partially pressure supported falling gas that formed into what is now the thick stellar disk, permits a longer age gap, claimed by some to be as long as 6 Gyr. Early methods of age dating the oldest components of the disk contain implicit assumptions concerning the details of the age-metallicity relation for stars in the solar neighborhood. The discovery that this relation for open clusters outside the solar circle is different that in the solar neighborhood (Geisler 1987), complicates the earlier arguments. The oldest stars in the galactic disk are at least as old as NGC 188. The new data by Janes on NGC 6791, shown first at this conference, suggest a disk age of at least 12.5 Gyr, as do data near the main sequence termination point of metal rich, high proper motion stars of low orbital eccentricity. Hence, a case can still be made that the oldest part of the galactic thick disk is similar in age to the halo globular clusters, if their ages are the same as 47 Tuc.

  20. Galactic Cosmic Rays: From Earth to Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Theresa J.

    2012-01-01

    For nearly 100 years we have known that cosmic rays come from outer space, yet proof of their origin, as well as a comprehensive understanding of their acceleration, remains elusive. Direct detection of high energy (up to 10(exp 15)eV), charged nuclei with experiments such as the balloon-born, antarctic Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER) have provided insight into these mysteries through measurements of cosmic ray abundances. The abundance of these rare elements with respect to certain intrinsic properties suggests that cosmic rays include a component of massive star ejecta. Supernovae and their remnants (SNe & SNRs), often occurring at the end of a massive star's life or in an environment including massive star material, are one of the most likely candidates for sources accelerating galactic comic ray nuclei up to the requisite high energies. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Detector (Fermi LAT) has improved our understanding of such sources by widening the window of observable energies and thus into potential sources' energetic processes. In combination with multiwavelength observations, we are now better able to constrain particle populations (often hadron-dominated at GeV energies) and environmental conditions, such as the magnetic field strength. The SNR CTB 37A is one such source which could contribute to the observed galactic cosmic rays. By assembling populations of SNRs, we will be able to more definitively define their contribution to the observed galactic cosmic rays, as well as better understand SNRs themselves. Such multimessenger studies will thus illuminate the long-standing cosmic ray mysteries, shedding light on potential sources, acceleration mechanisms, and cosmic ray propagation.

  1. Accretion disk thermal instability in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineshige, S.; Shields, G. A.

    1990-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution and spatial propagation of the thermal instability in accretion disks in galactic nuclei are investigated. Integrations of the vertical structure of the disks are described for different alpha prescriptions, and the thermal stability is examined. Global time-dependent calculations of the unstable disks are performed which show that there are two distinct types of behavior according to the assumed prescription for the viscosity parameter: the 'purr' type and the 'roar' type. The roar type is analyzed in some detail.

  2. Dark Matter and the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstrom, Lars

    2017-01-01

    The question of the identity of dark matter is one of the most outstanding enigmas of contemporary cosmology and particle astrophysics. An overview is given of the subject, a brief history, some proposed particle candidates, and the several methods now available for finally solving this difficult problem. The galactic center is one of the most interesting places for the dark matter search using γ-rays, but also one that has challenging, maybe confusing, other sources of GeV-scale radiation.

  3. Galactic worms. I - Catalog of worm candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl; Reach, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of candidates for the Galactic worms that are possibly the walls surrounding the superbubbles is compiled; 118 isolated structures that appear both in H I and in IR (60 and 100 microns). Fifty-two are possibly associated with H II regions. It is found that the 100-micron emissivity increases systematically toward the Galactic interior, which is consistent with the increase of the general interstellar radiation field. The 100-micron emissivity of the structures associated with the H II regions is larger than that of the structures without associated H II regions. The 60-100-micron ratio is large, 0.28 +/- 0.03, which may indicate that the grains associated with the atomic gas have a relatively large population of small grains. Thirty-five structures appear in the 408-MHz continuum. The IR and the radio continuum properties suggest that the 408-MHz continuum emission in those structures is very likely thermal. The implications of these results on the ionization of gas far from the Galactic plane are discussed.

  4. Stellar and Galactic Astrophysics with SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, A.

    2001-05-01

    SIM will revolutionize stellar and Galactic astrophysics by tackling new questions that could never previously be addressed and making order of magnitude improvements in key parameters. SIM will measure R0 and Theta0 to <2 will enable precise measurements of the Milky Way mass and rotation curve. It will probe the Galactic 3-D mass distribution by 2 independent methods. By calibrating the RR Lyrae MV-[Fe/H] relation as well as obtaining direct distances to clusters and halo field objects, SIM will precisely date halo and globular-cluster formation as a function of metallicity. SIM will obtain 1 measurements for 200 stars of all types ranging from brown dwarfs (BD) to O stars from a broad range of metallicities, including both binaries and single stars, and it will yield precision measurements of white dwarf (WD) and black hole (BH) remnants as well. SIM microlensing will take an unbiased census of all objects in the Galactic bulge, both dark (BD WD NS BH) and luminous, and will resolve the nature of the dark-halo (MACHO) candidates currently being detected toward the LMC.

  5. Superbubble Explosions and the Galactic Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulsrud, Russell

    2014-10-01

    The alpha-omega dynamo appears to be the most likely origin for the galactic magnetic field. However, it has a major problem in that to complete the dynamo operation, flux of the wrong sign must be expelled. For normal situations this is no problem. However, in the case of the galactic disc, the combination of almost perfect flux freezing and a strong gravitational field strongly inhibit this expulsion. It is energetically impossible to expel straight magnetic lines from the disc because they would carry all their ISM with them and their gravitational binding energy is much too large. I propose that the lines can be expelled in a topological manner. This can be done by massive superbubble explosions that can expel a tiny piece of each line leading to a situation where the lines in the disc are broken and act like lines of finite length. Such lines can be random turned in the disc and cause the disappearance of any negative flux. If this proposal should be valid then the alpha-omega dynamo can work to amplify the a very weak field to the present galactic value. This work was supported by the DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. The Making of a Galactic Parallelogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows in unprecedented detail the galaxy Centaurus A's last big meal: a spiral galaxy seemingly twisted into a parallelogram-shaped structure of dust. Spitzer's ability to both see dust and see through it allowed the telescope to peer into the center of Centaurus A and capture this galactic remnant as never before.

    An elliptical galaxy located 11 million light-years from Earth, Centaurus A is one of the brightest sources of radio waves in the sky. These radio waves indicate the presence of a supermassive black hole, which may be 'feeding' off the leftover galactic meal.

    A high-speed jet of gas can be seen shooting above the plane of the galaxy (the faint, fuzzy feature pointing from the center toward the upper left). Jets are a common feature of galaxies, and this one is probably receiving an extra boost from the galactic remnant.

    Scientists have created a model that explains how such a strangely geometric structure could arise. In this model, a spiral galaxy falls into an elliptical galaxy, becoming warped and twisted in the process. The folds in the warped disc create the parallelogram-shaped illusion.

  7. Galactic civilizations - Population dynamics and interstellar diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. I.; Sagan, C.

    1981-01-01

    A model is developed of the interstellar diffusion of galactic civilizations which takes into account the population dynamics of such civilizations. The problem is formulated in terms of potential theory, with a family of nonlinear partial differential and difference equations specifying population growth and diffusion for an organism with advantageous genes that undergoes random dispersal while increasing in population locally, and a population at zero population growth. In the case of nonlinear diffusion with growth and saturation, it is found that the colonization wavefront from the nearest independently arisen galactic civilization can have reached the earth only if its lifetime exceeds 2.6 million years, or 20 million years if discretization can be neglected. For zero population growth, the corresponding lifetime is 13 billion years. It is concluded that the earth is uncolonized not because interstellar spacefaring civilizations are rare, but because there are too many worlds to be colonized in the plausible colonization lifetime of nearby civilizations, and that there exist no very old galactic civilizations with a consistent policy of the conquest of inhabited worlds.

  8. On the physical origin of galactic conformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Behroozi, Peter S.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) of nearby galaxies (so-called galactic conformity) have been observed for projected separations up to 4 Mpc, an effect not predicted by current semi-analytic models. We investigate correlations between the mass accretion rates (dMvir/dt) of nearby haloes as a potential physical origin for this effect. We find that pairs of host haloes `know about' each others' assembly histories even when their present-day separation is greater than thirty times the virial radius of either halo. These distances are far too large for direct interaction between the haloes to explain the correlation in their dMvir/dt. Instead, halo pairs at these distances reside in the same large-scale tidal environment, which regulates dMvir/dt for both haloes. Larger haloes are less affected by external forces, which naturally gives rise to a mass dependence of the halo conformity signal. SDSS measurements of galactic conformity exhibit a qualitatively similar dependence on stellar mass, including how the signal varies with distance. Based on the expectation that halo accretion and galaxy SFR are correlated, we predict the scale-, mass- and redshift-dependence of large-scale galactic conformity, finding that the signal should drop to undetectable levels by z ≳ 1. These predictions are testable with current surveys to z ˜ 1; confirmation would establish a strong correlation between dark matter halo accretion rate and central galaxy SFR.

  9. Dust Temperatures in the Galactic Center Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchilla-Garcia, Luis G.; Morris, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic Center Lobe (GCL), located toward positive latitudes above the Galactic center and extending to a distance of ~150 pc, is apparently a bubble of hot gas that is manifested at all wavelengths from radio to X-rays. In mid- to far-infrared dust emission, the GCL shows several superposed, elongated structures oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane. Among them are the dust ridge centered on AFGL5376 and another defining the Double Helix Nebula (DHN). Using temperature maps constructed from a combination of archival WISE and SPITZER data, we have found that these features exhibit dramatic spatial variations in their dust temperatures, with the DHN and the AFGL5376 ridge being much warmer, and therefore substantially brighter in the 20 - 25 µm range, than several other linear features. Furthermore, the cooler linear structures tend to have rather constant dust temperatures, in sharp contrast to the highly variable emission within the warmer features. We will summarize the implications of these results for the nature of the dust heating sources. The candidate heating mechanisms are direct photon heating by stars in the central cluster, thermal heating by exposure to a hot coronal gas, and the impact of ions driven by magnetosonic waves or shocks.

  10. HEAO 1 measurements of the galactic ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Marshall, F. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Swank, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The HEAO A2 experiment data was systematically searched for unresolved galactic disc emission. Although there were suggestions of non-uniformities in the emission, the data were consistent with a disc of half-thickness 241 + 22 pc and surface emissivity (2-10 keV) at galactic radius R(kpc) of 2.2 10 to the minus 7th power exp(-R/3.5) erg/sq cm to the (-2)power/s (R 7.8 kpc). giving a luminosity of approximately 4.4 10 to the 37th power erg S to the (-1) power. If the model is extrapolated to radii less than 7.8 kpc, the unresolved disc emission is approximately 1.4 10 to the 38th power erg S to the (-1) power (2-10 keV) i.e., a few percent of the luminosity of the galaxy in resolved sources. the disc emission has a spectrum which is significantly softer than that of the high galactic latitude diffuse X-ray background and it is most probably of discrete source origin.

  11. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  12. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J.; Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C.; Dolphin, A. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or E-mail: koo@ucolick.or E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co

    2010-03-20

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  13. Galactic constraints on supernova progenitor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharova, I. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Mishurov, Yu. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: To estimate the mean masses of oxygen and iron ejected per each type of supernovae (SNe) event from observations of the elemental abundance patterns in the Galactic disk and constrain the relevant SNe progenitor models. Methods: We undertake a statistical analysis of the radial abundance distributions in the Galactic disk within a theoretical framework for Galactic chemical evolution which incorporates the influence of spiral arms. This framework has been shown to recover the non-linear behaviour in radial gradients, the mean masses of oxygen and iron ejected during SNe explosions to be estimated, and constraints to be placed on SNe progenitor models. Results: (i) The mean mass of oxygen ejected per core-collapse SNe (CC SNe) event (which are concentrated within spiral arms) is ~0.27 M⊙; (ii) the mean mass of iron ejected by tardy Type Ia SNe (SNeIa, whose progenitors are older/longer-lived stars with ages ≳100 Myr and up to several Gyr, which do not concentrate within spiral arms) is ~0.58 M⊙; (iii) the upper mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa (SNe whose progenitors are younger/shorter-lived stars with ages ≲100 Myr, which are concentrated within spiral arms) is ≤0.23 M⊙ per event; (iv) the corresponding mean mass of iron produced by CC SNe is ≤0.04 M⊙ per event; (v) short-lived SNe (core-collapse or prompt SNeIa) supply ~85% of the Galactic disk's iron. Conclusions: The inferred low mean mass of oxygen ejected per CC SNe event implies a low upper mass limit for the corresponding progenitors of ~23 M⊙, otherwise the Galactic disk would be overabundant in oxygen. This inference is the consequence of the non-linear dependence between the upper limit of the progenitor initial mass and the mean mass of oxygen ejected per CC SNe explosion. The low mean mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa, relative to the mass produced by tardy SNeIa (~2.5 times lower), prejudices the idea that both sub-populations of SNeIa have the same physical nature. We

  14. Chemical Abundance Analysis of the Symbiotic Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, Cezary; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of symbiotic stars - the long period, interacting binary systems - composed of red giant donor and a hot, compact companion is important for our understanding of binary stellar evolution in systems where mass loss or transfer take place involving RGB/AGB stars. The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants can track the mass exchange history and can determine their parent stellar population. However, the number of these objects with fairly well determined photospheric composition is insufficient for statistical considerations. Here we present the detailed chemical abundance analysis obtained for the first time for 14 M-type symbiotic giants. The analysis is based on the high resolution (R ˜ 50000), high S/N ˜ 100, near-IR spectra (at H- and K-band regions) obtained with Phoenix/Gemini South spectrometer. Spectrum synthesis employing standard LTE analysis and atmosphere models was used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Sc, Ti, Fe, and Ni). Our analysis reveals mostly slightly sub-solar or near-solar metallicities. We obtained significantly subsolar metallicities for RW Hya, RT Ser, and Hen 3-1213 and slightly super-solar metallicity in V455 Sco. The very low ^{12}C/^{13}C isotopic ratios, ˜6-11, and significant enrichment in nitrogen ^{14}N isotope in almost all giants in our sample indicate that they have experienced the first dredge-up.

  15. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 1: Diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitudes 310 deg and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7 kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315, 330, 345, 0, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with galactic features and components such as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic-ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  16. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  17. Compact planetary nebulae in the Galactic disk: Analysis of the central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Ibáñez, Manuel; Villaver, Eva; Shaw, Richard A.; Stanghellini, Letizia

    2016-09-01

    Context. We have obtained multi-wavelength observations of compact Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) to probe post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution from the onset of nebular ejection. Here we analyze new observations from HST to derive the masses and evolutionary status of their central stars (CSs). Aims: Our objective here is to derive the masses of the CSs hosted by compact PNe in order to better understand the relationship between the CS properties and those of the surrounding nebulae. We also compare this sample with others we obtained using the same technique in different metallicity environments: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Methods: This paper is based on HST/WFC3 images of 51 targets obtained in a snapshot survey (GO-11657). The high spatial resolution of HST allows us to resolve these compact PNe and distinguish the CS emission from that of their surrounding PNe. We derive CS bolometric luminosities and effective temperatures using the Zanstra technique, from a combination of HST photometry and ground-based spectroscopic data. The targets were imaged through the filters F200LP, F350LP, and F814W from which we derive Johnson V and I magnitudes. We infer CS masses by placing the stars on a temperature-luminosity diagram and compare their location with the best available, single star post-AGB evolutionary tracks. Results: We present new, unique photometric measurements of 50 CSs, and we derive effective temperatures and luminosities for most of them. Central star masses for 23 targets were derived with the evolutionary track technique; the remaining masses were indeterminate most likely because of underestimates of the stellar temperature, or because of substantial errors in the adopted statistical distances to these objects. We expect these problems will be largely overcome when the Gaia distance catalog becomes available. We find that objects with the higher ratios of Zanstra temperatures T(H i)/T( He ii ) tend to have lower-mass progenitors

  18. The Galactic Center compared with nuclei of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    2017-01-01

    Understanding our Galactic Center is easier with insights from nearby galactic nuclei. Both the star formation activity in nuclear gas disks, driven by bars and nuclear bars, and the fueling of low-luminosity AGN, followed by feedback of jets, driving molecular outflows, were certainly present in our Galactic Center, which appears now quenched. Comparisons and diagnostics are reviewed, in particular of m = 2 and m = 1 modes, lopsidedness, different disk orientations, and fossil evidences of activity and feedback.

  19. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  20. Nucleosynthesis in AGB stars: Observation of Mg-25 and Mg-26 in IRC+10216 and possible detection of Al-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelin, M.; Forestini, M.; Valiron, P.; Ziurys, L. M.; Anderson, M. A.; Cernicharo, J.; Kahane, C.

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection in the circumstellar envelope IRC+10216 of millimeter lines of the rare isotopomers (25)MgNC and (26)MgNC, as well as of a line at 234433 MHz, which could be the J= 7-6 transition of (26)AlF (an alternate, although less likely identified would be the J= 9-8 transition of NaF). The derived Mg-24:Mg-25:Mg-26 isotopic abundance ratios (78 : 11+/- 1 : 11 +/-1) are consistent with the solar system values (79.0:10.0:11.0), following Anders & Grevesse 1989). According to new calculations of evolutionary models of 3 solar mass and 5 solar mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, these ratios and the previously measured N, O and Si isotopic ratios imply that the central star had an initial mass 3 solar mass (less than or equal to M(sub *, ini) less than 5 solar mass and has already experienced many 3rd dredge-up events. From this, it can be predicted that the Al-26/Al-27 isotopics ratio lies between 0.01 and 0.08; in fact, the value derived in the case that U234433 arises from (26)AlF is Al-26/Al-27 = 0.04. The identification of the (25)MgNC and (26)MgNC lines was made possible by ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations of the molecule geometrical structure. It was confirmed through millimeter-wave laboratory measurements. The quantum mechanical calculations are briefly described and the laboratory results presented in some detail. The rotation constants B, D, H and the spin-rotation constant gamma of (25)MgNC and (26)MgNC are determined from a fit of laboratory and astronomical data.

  1. s-Processing in AGB Stars Revisited. II. Enhanced 13C Production through MHD-induced Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E.; Nucci, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    Slow neutron captures are responsible for the production of about 50% of elements heavier than iron, mainly occurring during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (1 ≲ M/M⊙ ≲ 3), where the main neutron source is the 13C(α, n)16O reaction. This last reaction is activated from locally produced 13C, formed by partial mixing of hydrogen into the He-rich layers. We present here the first attempt to describe a physical mechanism for the formation of the 13C reservoir, studying the mass circulation induced by magnetic buoyancy without adding new free parameters to those already involved in stellar modeling. Our approach represents the application to the stellar layers relevant for s-processing of recent exact analytical 2D and 3D models for magneto-hydrodynamic processes at the base of convective envelopes in evolved stars in order to promote downflows of envelope material for mass conservation during the occurrence of a dredge-up phenomenon. We find that the proton penetration is characterized by small concentrations, but is extended over a large fractional mass of the He-layers, thus producing 13C reservoirs of several 10-3 M⊙. The ensuing 13C-enriched zone has an almost flat profile, while only a limited production of 14N occurs. In order to verify the effects of our new findings we show how the abundances of the main s-component nuclei can be accounted for in solar proportions and how our large 13C-reservoir allows us to solve a few so far unexplained features in the abundance distribution of post-AGB objects.

  2. s-PROCESSING IN AGB STARS REVISITED. II. ENHANCED {sup 13}C PRODUCTION THROUGH MHD-INDUCED MIXING

    SciTech Connect

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E.; Nucci, M. C.

    2016-02-20

    Slow neutron captures are responsible for the production of about 50% of elements heavier than iron, mainly occurring during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (1 ≲ M/M{sub ⊙} ≲ 3), where the main neutron source is the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction. This last reaction is activated from locally produced {sup 13}C, formed by partial mixing of hydrogen into the He-rich layers. We present here the first attempt to describe a physical mechanism for the formation of the {sup 13}C reservoir, studying the mass circulation induced by magnetic buoyancy without adding new free parameters to those already involved in stellar modeling. Our approach represents the application to the stellar layers relevant for s-processing of recent exact analytical 2D and 3D models for magneto-hydrodynamic processes at the base of convective envelopes in evolved stars in order to promote downflows of envelope material for mass conservation during the occurrence of a dredge-up phenomenon. We find that the proton penetration is characterized by small concentrations, but is extended over a large fractional mass of the He-layers, thus producing {sup 13}C reservoirs of several 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}. The ensuing {sup 13}C-enriched zone has an almost flat profile, while only a limited production of {sup 14}N occurs. In order to verify the effects of our new findings we show how the abundances of the main s-component nuclei can be accounted for in solar proportions and how our large {sup 13}C-reservoir allows us to solve a few so far unexplained features in the abundance distribution of post-AGB objects.

  3. Starburst clusters in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Maryam

    2014-09-01

    The central region of the Galaxy is the most active site of star formation in the Milky Way, where massive stars have formed very recently and are still forming today. The rich population of massive stars in the Galactic center provide a unique opportunity to study massive stars in their birth environment and probe their initial mass function, which is the spectrum of stellar masses at their birth. The Arches cluster is the youngest among the three massive clusters in the Galactic center, providing a collection of high-mass stars and a very dense core which makes this cluster an excellent site to address questions about massive star formation, the stellar mass function and the dynamical evolution of massive clusters in the Galactic center. In this thesis, I perform an observational study of the Arches cluster using K_{s}-band imaging obtained with NAOS/CONICA at the VLT combined with Subaru/Cisco J-band data to gain a full understanding of the cluster mass distribution out to its tidal radius for the first time. Since the light from the Galactic center reaches us through the Galactic disc, the extinction correction is crucial when studying this region. I use a Bayesian method to construct a realistic extinction map of the cluster. It is shown in this study that the determination of the mass of the most massive star in the Arches cluster, which had been used in previous studies to establish an upper mass limit for the star formation process in the Milky Way, strongly depends on the assumed slope of the extinction law. Assuming the two regimes of widely used infrared extinction laws, I show that the difference can reach up to 30% for individually derived stellar masses and Δ A_{Ks}˜ 1 magnitude in acquired K_{s}-band extinction, while the present-day mass function slope changes by ˜ 0.17 dex. The present-day mass function slope derived assuming the more recent extinction law, which suggests a steeper wavelength dependence for the infrared extinction law, reveals

  4. Gamma ray constraints on the galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma-ray signatures of galactic supernovae of all types are performed in order to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma-ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of nuclear yields, we determine galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma-ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse galactic gamma-ray line emission.

  5. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : PGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results. XXVIII), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.

  6. Seeing Red in M32: Constraints on the Stellar Content from Near- and Mid-infrared Observations and Applications for Studies of More Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2014-08-01

    The properties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Local Group galaxy M32 are investigated using ground- and space-based observations that span the 1-8 μm wavelength interval, with the goal of demonstrating the utility of infrared observations as probes of stellar content. Comparisons with isochrones indicate that the brightest resolved stars in M32 have ages of a few gigayears and are younger on average than AGB stars with the same intrinsic brightness in the outer disk of M31. Accounting for stellar variability is shown to be essential for modeling AGB luminosity functions (LFs). Model LFs that assume the star-forming history measured by Monachesi et al. and the variability properties of Galactic AGB stars match both the K and [5.8] LFs of M32. Models also suggest that the slope of the [5.8] LF between M [5.8] = -8.5 and -10.0 is sensitive to the mix of stellar ages, and a sizeable fraction of the stars in M32 must have an age older than 7 Gyr in order to match the [5.8] LF. The structural properties of M32 in the infrared are also investigated. The effective radii that are computed from near-infrared and mid-infrared isophotes are similar to those measured at visible wavelengths, suggesting that the stellar content of M32 is well mixed. However, isophotes at radii >16'' (>60 pc) in the near- and mid-infrared are flatter than those at visible wavelengths. The coefficient of the fourth-order cosine term in the Fourier expansion of isophotes changes from "boxy" values at r < 16'' to "disky" values at r > 48''in [3.6] and [4.5]. The mid-infrared colors near the center of M32 do not vary systematically with radius, providing evidence of a well mixed stellar content in this part of the galaxy. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Exploring wind-driving dust species in cool luminous giants. III. Wind models for M-type AGB stars: dynamic and photometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladh, S.; Höfner, S.; Aringer, B.; Eriksson, K.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Stellar winds observed in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are usually attributed to a combination of stellar pulsations and radiation pressure on dust. Shock waves triggered by pulsations propagate through the atmosphere, compressing the gas and lifting it to cooler regions which creates favourable conditions for grain growth. If sufficient radiative acceleration is exerted on the newly formed grains through absorption or scattering of stellar photons, an outflow can be triggered. Strong candidates for wind-driving dust species in M-type AGB stars are magnesium silicates (Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3). Such grains can form close to the stellar surface, they consist of abundant materials and, if they grow to sizes comparable to the wavelength of the stellar flux maximum, they experience strong acceleration by photon scattering. Aims: The purpose of this study is to investigate if photon scattering on Mg2SiO4 grains can produce realistic outflows for a wide range of stellar parameters in M-type AGB stars. Methods: We use a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamics code with a detailed description for the growth of Mg2SiO4 grains to calculate the first extensive set of time-dependent wind models for M-type AGB stars. This set includes 139 solar-mass models, with three different luminosities (5000 L⊙, 7000 L⊙, and 10 000 L⊙) and effective temperatures ranging from 2600 K to 3200 K. The resulting wind properties, visual and near-IR photometry and mid-IR spectra are compared with observations. Results: We show that the models can produce outflows for a wide range of stellar parameters. We also demonstrate that they reproduce observed mass-loss rates and wind velocities, as well as visual and near-IR photometry. However, the current models do not show the characteristic silicate features at 10 and 18 μm as a result of the cool temperature of Mg2SiO4 grains in the wind. Including a small amount of Fe in the grains further out in the circumstellar envelope will

  8. Galactic evolution of sulphur as traced by globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Koch, A.; Caffau, E.; Sbordone, L.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Sulphur is an important volatile α element, but its role in the Galactic chemical evolution is still uncertain, and more observations constraining the sulphur abundance in stellar photospheres are required. Aims: We derive the sulphur abundances in red giant branch (RGB) stars in three Galactic halo globular clusters (GC) that cover a wide metallicity range (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < -1.2): M 4 (NGC 6121), M 22 (NGC 6656), and M 30 (NGC 7099). The halo field stars show a large scatter in the [S/Fe] ratio in this metallicity span, which is inconsistent with canonical chemical evolution models. To date, very few measurements of [S/Fe] exist for stars in GCs, which are good tracers of the chemical enrichment of their environment. However, some light and α elements show star-to-star variations within individual GCs, and it is as yet unclear whether the α element sulphur also varies between GC stars. Methods: We used the infrared spectrograph CRIRES to obtain high-resolution (R ~ 50 000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 200 per px) spectra in the region of the S I multiplet 3 at 1045 nm for 15 GC stars selected from the literature (six stars in M 4,six stars in M 22, and three stars in M 30). Multiplet 3 is better suited for S abundance derivation than the more commonly used lines of multiplet 1 at 920 nm, since its lines are not blended by telluric absorption or other stellar features at low metallicity. Results: We used spectral synthesis to derive the [S/Fe] ratio of the stars assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We find mean [S/Fe]LTE = 0.58 ± 0.01 ± 0.20 dex (statistical and systematic error) for M 4, [S/Fe]LTE = 0.57 ± 0.01 ± 0.19 dex for M 22, and [S/Fe]LTE = 0.55 ± 0.02 ± 0.16 dex for M 30. The negative NLTE corrections are estimated to be in the order of the systematic uncertainties. We do not detect star-to-star variations of the S abundance in any of the observed GCs, with the possible exception of two individual stars, one in M 22 and one in M

  9. The chemical compositions of Galactic disc F and G dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Bacham E.; Tomkin, Jocelyn; Lambert, David L.; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2003-03-01

    Photospheric abundances are presented for 27 elements from carbon to europium in 181 F and G dwarfs from a differential local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. Stellar effective temperatures (Teff) were adopted from an infrared flux method calibration of Strömgren photometry. Stellar surface gravities (g) were calculated from Hipparcos parallaxes and stellar evolutionary tracks. Adopted Teff and g values are in good agreement with spectroscopic estimates. Stellar ages were determined from evolutionary tracks. Stellar space motions (U, V, W) and a Galactic potential were used to estimate Galactic orbital parameters. These show that the vast majority of the stars belong to the Galactic thin disc. Relative abundances expressed as [X/Fe] generally confirm previously published results. We give results for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd and Eu. The α elements - O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti - show [α/Fe] to increase slightly with decreasing [Fe/H]. Heavy elements with dominant contributions at solar metallicity from the s-process show [s/Fe] to decrease slightly with decreasing [Fe/H]. Scatter in [X/Fe] at a fixed [Fe/H] is entirely attributable to the small measurement errors, after excluding the few thick disc stars and the s-process-enriched CH subgiants. Tight limits are set on `cosmic' scatter. If a weak trend with [Fe/H] is taken into account, the composition of a thin disc star expressed as [X/Fe] is independent of the star's age and birthplace for elements contributed in different proportions by massive stars (Type II supernovae), exploding white dwarfs (Type Ia supernovae) and asymptotic red giant branch stars. By combining our sample with various published studies, comparisons between thin and thick disc stars are made. In this composite sample, thick disc stars are primarily identified by their VLSR in the range -40 to -100 km s-1. These are

  10. NEW DETERMINATION OF THE {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O REACTION RATE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Y. J.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Bai, X. X.; Chen, Y. S.; Fan, Q. W.; Jin, S. J.; Li, E. T.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Shu, N. C.; Lugaro, M.; Buntain, J.; Pang, D. Y.; Karakas, A. I.; Shi, J. R. E-mail: guobing@ciae.ac.cn; and others

    2012-09-10

    We present a new measurement of the {alpha}-spectroscopic factor (S{sub {alpha}}) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the 6.356 MeV 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O through the {sup 13}C({sup 11}B, {sup 7}Li){sup 17}O transfer reaction and we determine the {alpha}-width of this state. This is believed to have a strong effect on the rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction, the main neutron source for slow neutron captures (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Based on the new width we derive the astrophysical S-factor and the stellar rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction. At a temperature of 100 MK, our rate is roughly two times larger than that by Caughlan and Fowler and two times smaller than that recommended by the NACRE compilation. We use the new rate and different rates available in the literature as input in simulations of AGB stars to study their influence on the abundances of selected s-process elements and isotopic ratios. There are no changes in the final results using the different rates for the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction when the {sup 13}C burns completely in radiative conditions. When the {sup 13}C burns in convective conditions, as in stars of initial mass lower than {approx}2 M{sub Sun} and in post-AGB stars, some changes are to be expected, e.g., of up to 25% for Pb in our models. These variations will have to be carefully analyzed when more accurate stellar mixing models and more precise observational constraints are available.

  11. METAL-POOR STARS OBSERVED WITH THE MAGELLAN TELESCOPE. I. CONSTRAINTS ON PROGENITOR MASS AND METALLICITY OF AGB STARS UNDERGOING s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Rossi, Silvia; Frebel, Anna; Beers, Timothy C.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Kennedy, Catherine R.; Christlieb, Norbert; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2013-06-20

    We present a comprehensive abundance analysis of two newly discovered carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. HE 2138-3336 is a s-process-rich star with [Fe/H] = -2.79, and has the highest [Pb/Fe] abundance ratio measured thus far, if non-local thermodynamic equilibrium corrections are included ([Pb/Fe] = +3.84). HE 2258-6358, with [Fe/H] = -2.67, exhibits enrichments in both s- and r-process elements. These stars were selected from a sample of candidate metal-poor stars from the Hamburg/ESO objective-prism survey, and followed up with medium-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectroscopy with GEMINI/GMOS. We report here on derived abundances (or limits) for a total of 34 elements in each star, based on high-resolution (R {approx} 30, 000) spectroscopy obtained with Magellan-Clay/MIKE. Our results are compared to predictions from new theoretical asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models of 1.3 M{sub Sun} with [Fe/H] = -2.5 and -2.8, as well as to a set of AGB models of 1.0 to 6.0 M{sub Sun} at [Fe/H] = -2.3. The agreement with the model predictions suggests that the neutron-capture material in HE 2138-3336 originated from mass transfer from a binary companion star that previously went through the AGB phase, whereas for HE 2258-6358, an additional process has to be taken into account to explain its abundance pattern. We find that a narrow range of progenitor masses (1.0 {<=} M(M{sub Sun }) {<=} 1.3) and metallicities (-2.8 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=}-2.5) yield the best agreement with our observed elemental abundance patterns.

  12. GRIS observations of the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Barthelmy, S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    The 511 keV positron annihilation line source in the Galactic Center (GC) region has reappeared after being in a quiescent state since the early 1980's. Observations are reported made by the GRIS balloon instrument showing that the 511 keV line has returned to an intensity level similar to that seen in the 1970's. The line width was resolved for the first time and a measurement of the spatial extent of the emission along the galactic plane was made. Gamma ray imaging spectrometer (GRIS) is a high resolution germanium (Ge) spectrometer with a 17 deg field-of-view. Eleven hours of data were obtained from GC pointings on balloon flights over Australia on 1 May 1988 and again on 29 October 1988. An additional seven hours were obtained on 30 October 1988 from a point in the galactic plane (GP) 25 deg west of the center. Preliminary results for the line fluxes from the GC are 9.8 + or - 1.9 in May and 12.3 + or - 1.6 in October, and from the GP are 2.4 + or - 1.6 (1 sigma statistical errors). The flux for the off-center pointing is significantly lower than that for the GC pointings and indicates that the dominant emission is narrowly concentrated at the center. The line width for the GC pointing in October is 3.6 + or - 0.5 keV, which implies a temperature for the annihilation medium of less than or + 10(exp 5)K. A step in the continuum emission at 511 keV is found in both the GC and GP data. The step may be due to orthopositronium three-photon annihilation for the GC, but is too large relative to the 511 keV line for the GP to be simply explained by positronium.

  13. ASCA observations of galactic jet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, T.; Kawai, N.; Matsuoka, M.; Dotani, T.; Inoue, H.; Nagase, F.; Tanaka, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamaoka, K.; Brinkmann, W.; Ebisawa, K.; Takeshima, T.; White, N. E.; Harmon, A.; Robinson, C. R.; Zhang, S. N.; Tavani, M.; Foster, R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent studies with ASCA have shown very complicated, strange iron K features in the spectra of galactic jet systems. SS 433, the ``classic'' jet, was found to have pairs of Doppler-shifted lines, contrary to the previous belief that the receding X-ray jet is short and hidden behind the accretion disk. The transient jets, GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40, show spectral dips, which have never been observed in any other source and are interpreted as absorption lines or Doppler-shifted absorption edges. If they are resonant absorption lines of helium-like iron, they would be the evidence of highly ionized, anisotropically distributed plasma near the jet engine. These features peculiar to galactic jet systems are expected to be explained in terms of the nature of the sources and the jet-formation mechanisms. Since ASCA was proved to be an excellent tool for diagnostics of jets, observation campaigns of the jet systems were planned and performed. SS 433 was observed about thirty times in the three years of the campaign, covering the phase space of the 162.5-day precession and the 13-day orbital motion. The extracted physics of the system, such as X-ray-jet length ten times longer than previous estimations, jet kinetic luminosity exceeding 1040 erg s-1, etc., draw a highly energetic and stormy, new picture of SS 433. The transient jets, GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40, were also observed several times. GRS 1915+105 was found to be active in ASCA band even months after onsets of outburst. Violent variations were not seen. GRO J1655-40 was observed to be transit between high and low states, and the low state is consistent to occultation of a component. We review ASCA Observations of galactic jet systems and present some topics from recent progresses.

  14. Planck 2013 results. XIII. Galactic CO emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dempsey, J. T.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fukui, Y.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Handa, T.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hily-Blant, P.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moore, T. J. T.; Morgante, G.; Morino, J.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nakajima, T.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Okuda, T.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Thomas, H. S.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torii, K.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Yoda, T.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Rotational transition lines of CO play a major role in molecular radio astronomy as a mass tracer and in particular in the study of star formation and Galactic structure. Although a wealth of data exists for the Galactic plane and some well-known molecular clouds, there is no available high sensitivity all-sky survey of CO emission to date. Such all-sky surveys can be constructed using the Planck HFI data because the three lowest CO rotational transition lines at 115, 230 and 345 GHz significantly contribute to the signal of the 100, 217 and 353 GHz HFI channels, respectively. Two different component separation methods are used to extract the CO maps from Planck HFI data. The maps obtained are then compared to one another and to existing external CO surveys. From these quality checks the best CO maps, in terms of signal to noise ratio and/or residual contamination by other emission, are selected. Three different sets of velocity-integrated CO emission maps are produced with different trade-offs between signal-to-noise, angular resolution, and reliability. Maps for the CO J = 1 → 0, J = 2 → 1, and J = 3 → 2 rotational transitions are presented and described in detail. They are shown to be fully compatible with previous surveys of parts of the Galactic plane as well as with undersampled surveys of the high latitude sky. The Planck HFI velocity-integrated CO maps for the J = 1 → 0, J = 2 → 1, and J = 3 →2 rotational transitions provide an unprecedented all-sky CO view of the Galaxy. These maps are also of great interest to monitor potential CO contamination of the Planck studies of the cosmological microwave background.

  15. Galactic Distribution of Planets Spitzer Microlens Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Carey, Sean; Yee, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    We will measure the Galactic distribution of planets by obtaining 'microlens parallaxes' of about 700 events, including 18 planetary events, from the comparison of microlens lightcurves observed from Spitzer and Earth, which are separated by 1 AU in projection. As we have demonstrated in two previous programs, the difference in these lightcurves yields both the 'microlens parallax' (ratio of the lens-source relative parallax) to the Einstein radius, and the direction of lens-source relative motion. For planetary events, this measurement directly yields the mass and distance of the planet. For non-planetary events it can be combined with a Galactic model to estimate these quantities with factor 1.4 precision. Hence, the cumulative distributions of planetary events and all events can be compared to determine the relative frequency of planets in the Galactic disk and bulge. The results will be combined with those of current/previous Spitzer campaigns and the current Kepler campaign. This proposal is significantly more sensitive to planets than previous work because it takes advantage of the new KMTNet observing strategy that covers 80 sq.deg at >0.4/hr cadence, 24/7 from 3 southern observatories. This same observing program also provides a unique probe of dark objects. It will yield the first mass-measurement based determination of the isolated-brown-dwarf mass function. Thirteen percent of the observations will specifically target binaries, which will probe systems with dark components (brown dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes) that are difficult or impossible to investigate by other methods. The observations and methods from this work are a test bed for WFIRST microlensing.

  16. YOUNG RADIO PULSARS IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Turk, P. J.; Mnatsakanov, R.; Lynch, R. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Freire, P. C.; Belczynski, K.

    2011-11-20

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters (GCs). As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in GCs and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be <3600. Accounting for beaming and retention considerations, the implied birthrate for any formation scenario for all 97 clusters is <0.25 pulsars century{sup -1} assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities with a dispersion of 10 km s{sup -1}. The implied birthrates for higher velocity dispersions are substantially higher than inferred for such pulsars in the Galactic disk. This suggests that the velocity dispersion of young pulsars in GCs is significantly lower than those of disk pulsars. These numbers may be substantial overestimates due to the fact that the currently known sample of young pulsars is observed only in metal-rich clusters. We propose that young pulsars may only be formed in GCs with metallicities with log[Fe/H] > - 0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447{sup +1420}{sub -399} (the error bars give a 95% confidence interval) and their birthrate is 0.012{sup +0.037}{sub -0.010} pulsars century{sup -1}. The most likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of an OMgNe white dwarf.

  17. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  18. Red Hill Updates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  19. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cirelli, Marco; Taoso, Marco

    2016-07-25

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by dark matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and dark matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including PLANCK measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  20. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  1. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: A Galactic Origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, David; Globus, Noemie; Kumar, Rahul; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    It is suggested that essentially all UHECRs we detect, including those at the highest energies, originate in our Galaxy. It is shown that even if the density of sources decreases with Galactic radius, then the anisotropy and composition can be understood. Inward anisotropy, as recently reported by the Auger collaboration can be understood as drift along the current sheet of UHECRs, originating outside of the solar circle, as predicted in Kumar & Eichler, while those originating within the solar circle exit the Galaxy at high latitudes.

  2. Time variation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Time variations in the flux of galactic cosmic rays are the result of changing conditions in the solar wind. Maximum cosmic ray fluxes, which occur when solar activity is at a minimum, are well defined. Reductions from this maximum level are typically systematic and predictable but on occasion are rapid and unexpected. Models relating the flux level at lower energy to that at neutron monitor energy are typically accurate to 20 percent of the total excursion at that energy. Other models, relating flux to observables such as sunspot number, flare frequency, and current sheet tilt are phenomenological but nevertheless can be quite accurate.

  3. CONDITIONS FOR SUPERNOVAE-DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri E-mail: yus@sfedu.ru

    2013-11-01

    We point out that the commonly assumed condition for galactic outflows, that supernovae (SNe) heating is efficient in the central regions of starburst galaxies, suffers from invalid assumptions. We show that a large filling factor of hot (≥10{sup 6} K) gas is difficult to achieve through SNe heating, irrespective of the SN's initial gas temperature and density, its uniformity, or its clumpiness. We instead suggest that correlated supernovae from OB associations in molecular clouds in the central region can drive powerful outflows if the molecular surface density is >10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}.

  4. Exponential expansion: galactic destiny or technological hubris?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, B. R.

    Is it our destiny to expand exponentially to populate the galaxy, or is such a vision but an extreme example of technological hubris? The overall record of human evolution and dispersion over the Earth can be cited to support the view that we are a uniquely expansionary and technological animal bound for the stars, yet an examination of the fate of individual migrations and exploratory initiatives raises doubts. Although it may be in keeping with our hubristic nature to predict ultimate galactic expansion, there is no way to specify how far expansionary urges may drive our spacefaring descendants.

  5. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  6. KINEMATIC DISTANCES OF GALACTIC PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, A. Y.; Tian, W. W.; Zhu, H.; Wu, D.; Leahy, D. A. E-mail: ayyang@bao.ac.cn

    2016-03-15

    We construct H i absorption spectra for 18 planetary nebulae (PNs) and their background sources using data from the International Galactic Plane Survey. We estimate the kinematic distances of these PNs, among which 15 objects’ kinematic distances are obtained for the first time. The distance uncertainties of 13 PNs range from 10% to 50%, which is a significant improvement with uncertainties of a factor of two or three smaller than most previous distance measurements. We confirm that PN G030.2−00.1 is not a PN because of its large distance found here.

  7. Massive accretion disks in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N. Z.

    In the luminous infrared galaxies, very large masses of interstellar matter have been concentrated in the galactic nuclei at radii less than 300 pc as a result of galactic merging, while in lower luminosity systems, this material is probably concentrated by stellar bars and viscous accretion. In both cases, the nuclear region will be highly obscured by dust at visible wavelengths, forcing studies to longer wavelengths where the extinction is reduced. We review recent high resolution near infrared (HST-NICMOS) and mm-interferometric imaging of the dense gas and dust accretion disks in nearby luminous galactic nuclei. Since this nuclear ISM is the active ingredient for both starburst activity and a likely fuel for central AGNs, the nuclear accretion disks are critical to both the activity and the optical appearance of the nucleus. For a sample of 24 luminous galaxies imaged with NICMOS at 1-2μm, approximately 13 show nuclear point sources, indicating the existence of a central AGN or an intense starburst at <= 50 pc radius. Approximately 14 of the sample galaxies have apparent central dust disks. In the best studied ultraluminous IR galaxy, Arp 220, the 2μm imaging shows dust disks in both of the merging galactic nuclei and mm-CO line imaging indicates molecular gas masses ~ 109Msolar for each disk. The two gas disks in Arp 220 are counterrotating and their dynamical masses are ~ 2×109Msolar, that is, only slightly larger than the gas masses. These disks have radii ~ 100 pc and thickness 10-50 pc. The high brightness temperatures of the CO lines indicate that the gas in the disks has area filling factors ~25-50% and mean densities of >= 104 cm-3. Within these nuclear disks, the rate of massive star formation is undoubtedly prodigious and, given the high viscosity of the gas, there will also be high radial accretion rates, perhaps >= 10 Msolar yr-1. If this inflow persists to very small radii, it is enough to feed even the highest

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebels, Berrie; Aharonian, Felix; Sol, Hélène

    The supermassive black holes harboured in active galactic nuclei are at the origin of powerful jets which can emit copious amounts of γ-rays. The exact interplay between the infalling matter, the black hole and the relativistic outflow is still poorly known, and this parallel session of the 12th Marcel Grossman meeting intended to offer the most up to date status of observational results with the latest generation of ground and space-based instruments, as well as the theoretical developments relevant for the field.

  9. Enanas blancas post-AGB deficientes en Hidrógeno: su evolución espectral PG1159-DB-DQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panei, J. A.; Althaus, L. G.; Córsico, A. H.; Serenelli, A. M.; Scóccola, C. G.; García-Berro, E.

    This work explore the formation and evolution of hydrogen-deficient post-AGB white dwarfs. To this end, we compute the complete evolution of an initially 2.7 M sun star from the ZAMS through the thermally pulsing and mass-loss phases to the white dwarf stage. Particular attention is given to the chemical abundance changes during the whole evolution. The evolution is extended to the domain of the helium-rich, carbon-contaminated DQ white dwarfs to exploring the possible evolutionary connection PG1159-DB-DQ.

  10. Large-scale environments of binary AGB stars probed by Herschel. II. Two companions interacting with the wind of π1 Gruis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Paladini, C.; Kerschbaum, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Siopis, C.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Cox, N. L. J.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Klotz, D.; Sadowski, G.; Spang, A.; Cruzalèbes, P.; Waelkens, C.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample observed with PACS on board the Herschel Space Observatory revealed that several asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are surrounded by an asymmetric circumstellar envelope (CSE) whose morphology is most likely caused by the interaction with a stellar companion. The evolution of AGB stars in binary systems plays a crucial role in understanding the formation of asymmetries in planetary nebulæ (PNe), but at present, only a handful of cases are known where the interaction of a companion with the stellar AGB wind is observed. Aims: We probe the environment of the very evolved AGB star π1 Gruis on large and small scales to identify the triggers of the observed asymmetries. Methods: Observations made with Herschel/PACS at 70 μm and 160 μm picture the large-scale environment of π1 Gru. The close surroundings of the star are probed by interferometric observations from the VLTI/AMBER archive. An analysis of the proper motion data of Hipparcos and Tycho-2 together with the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data help identify the possible cause for the observed asymmetry. Results: The Herschel/PACS images of π1 Gru show an elliptical CSE whose properties agree with those derived from a CO map published in the literature. In addition, an arc east of the star is visible at a distance of 38″ from the primary. This arc is most likely part of an Archimedean spiral caused by an already known G0V companion that is orbiting the primary at a projected distance of 460 au with a period of more than 6200 yr. However, the presence of the elliptical CSE, proper motion variations, and geometric modelling of the VLTI/AMBER observations point towards a third component in the system, with an orbital period shorter than 10 yr, orbiting much closer to the primary than the G0V star. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation

  11. Aurora Australis, Red Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a spiked band of red airglow called a 'Red Crown' above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  12. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  13. Egypt and Red Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A panaramic view of eastern Egypt, The Red Sea and Saudi Arabia beyond (24.0N, 33.0E). In this desert country, where water is life, the high Aswan Dam and the impounded waters of the Nile River in the foreground assure water availability into the next century. The Red Sea beyond, part of the Suez Canal seaway, serves as a commercial link to the world and separates Egypt from Saudi Arabia.

  14. Synchrotron Emission Model from a Hypothetical Galactic Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Quintin; Everett, J.; Zwiebel, E.

    2007-12-01

    The ROSAT All Sky Survey (Snowden et al. 1993) discovered a pill-box shaped region of X-ray emission towards the galactic center. Elsewhere, we postulate that the emission is caused by a cosmic-ray and thermally driven Galactic wind (Everett et al, submitted). The objective of this project is to model synchrotron emission from a hypothetical Galactic wind to see whether the model can be tested with radio observations. The wind is launched from the Galactic disk from Galactic radii 1.5 kpc < R < 4.5 kpc to 1 Mpc in height. Observations of the corresponding cylindrical annulus geometry are simulated from Earth at z=0 height and R=8 kpc. We begin with a Galactic wind model fit by Everett et al. to the X-ray emission and integrate the equation for synchrotron intensity on lines of sight through the wind. Initially, we model simple launch geometry to validate our tools and compare the results with analytic single-ray calculations to verify accuracy. We choose to model synchrotron radiation at 1.5 GHz as all-sky surveys observe near this frequency. The result of the model currently predicts that the synchrotron flux from the Galactic wind should be observable using radio telescopes, such as the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, to Galactic latitude b +/- 20 degrees and Galactic longitude l +/- 35 degrees. Comparisons to all-sky surveys will test the existence of a wind-driven synchrotron spectrum. If a synchrotron spectrum comparable to the Galactic wind model is observed, it could provide evidence for the existence of a cosmic-ray and thermally driven Galactic wind.

  15. Red-giant stars: Chemical clocks in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, N.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.; Nasello, G.

    2016-12-01

    A broad effort is ongoing with large spectroscopic surveys such as APOGEE, ESO-Gaia, RAVE from which stellar parameters, radial velocities and detailed chemical abundances can be measured for CoRoT, Kepler, and K2 targets. In addition, asteroseismic data of red-giants stars observed by the space missions CoRoT and Kepler allow determination of stellar masses, radii, and can be used to determine the position and ages of stars. This association between spectroscopic and asteroseismic constraints provide a new way to understand galactic and stellar evolutions. To exploit all potential of this combination it would be crucial to develop our approach of synthetic populations. We compute stellar populations synthesis with the Besançon Galactic model including the asteroseismic and chemical properties from stellar evolution models. These synthetic populations can be compared with sinificant large surveys as APOKASC (APOGEE+Kepler) or CoRoGEE (CoRoT+APOGEE). We focus here on the carbon and nitrogen surface abundances of Kepler red-giant stars. We underline the importance of transport processes occurring in red-giant stars as rotation and thermohaline instability to understand chemical properties of stellar populations in the Galaxy. The future for this area also starts taking shape with the launch of Gaia, futur spectroscopic surveys such as 4MOST and WEAVE, and the future space mission PLATO that will provide seismic data for more than 100 000 red-giants. Such synthetic population model is a key tool to investigate future observations and better understand the evolution of the Milky Way.

  16. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Narayan, Gautham; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Suntzeff, Nick; Welch, Doug; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2014-02-01

    We propose to continue our search for the first light echoes (LEs) associated with historical Galactic supernovae and LBV outbursts: SN 1006, Kepler's SN, RCW 86, Crab Nebula, and P Cygni. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered LEs of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. We propose to continue our search for light echoes of the remaining historical events. With DECam, we have a 10-15 fold improvement in efficiency over the retired CTIO-Mosaic camera, which allows us to cover the bigger search areas of most of the remaining targets. With the KPNO 4-m, we will observe fields too far north for CTIO/DECam. The study of scattered-light echoes from these Galactic supernovae and eruptions will give us the opportunity to directly compare the original outburst and its current remnant, and in favorable cases (like Eta Carinae), it provides a three-dimensional view of the event and/or a spectral time series.

  17. Rice University observations of the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    The most sensitive of the four balloon fight observations of the galactic center made by Rice University was conducted in 1974 from Rio Cuarto, Argentina at a float altitude of 4 mbar. The count rate spectrum of the observed background and the energy spectrum of the galactic center region are discussed. The detector used consists of a 6 inch Nal(T 1ambda) central detector collimated to approximately 15 deg FWHM by a Nal(T lamdba) anticoincidence shield. The shield in at least two interaction mean free paths thick at all gamma ray energies. The instrumental resolution is approximately 11% FWHM at 662 keV. Pulses from the central detector are analyzed by two 256 channel PHA's covering the energy range approximately 20 keV to approximately 12 MeV. The detector is equatorially mounted and pointed by command from the ground. Observations are made by measuring source and background alternately for 10 minute periods. Background is measured by rotating the detector 180 deg about the azimuthal axis.

  18. Galactic X-ray emission from pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of pulsars to the gamma-ray flux from the galactic plane is examined using data from the most recent pulsar surveys. It is assumed that pulsar gamma-rays are produced by curvature radiation from relativistic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production in the strong magnetic and electric fields. Assuming that all pulsars produce gamma-rays in this way, their luminosities can be predicted as a function of period and magnetic field strength. Using the distribution of pulsars in the galaxy as determined from data on 328 pulsars detected in three surveys, the local gamma-ray production spectrum, the longitude profile, and the latitude profile of pulsar gamma-ray flux are calculated. The largest sources of uncertainty in the size of the pulsar contribution are the value of the mean interstellar electron density, the turnover in the pulsar radio luminosity function, and the average pulsar magnetic field strength. A present estimate is that pulsars contribute from 15 to 20 % of the total flux of gamma-rays from the galactic plane.

  19. Statistical Tests of Galactic Dynamo Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamandy, Luke; Shukurov, Anvar; Taylor, A. Russ

    2016-12-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard {α }2{{Ω }} dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time τ to be in the range of 10-20 {Myr}, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus widen the possibilities to constrain interstellar medium parameters using observations of magnetic fields. This work is a step toward systematic statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory. Such studies are becoming more and more feasible as larger data sets are acquired using current and up-and-coming instruments.

  20. The Galactic Distribution of Contact Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Dorn, Leah; Breitfeld, Abby; Mies, Regan; Avery, Tess

    2017-01-01

    The number of eclipsing contact binaries in different galactic latitudes and longitudes show peak distributions in the number per square degree in two latitudinal zones (-30 degrees to -25 degrees and +25 degrees to +30 degrees) and large fluctuations in longitude (Huang and Wade 1966, ApJ, 143, 146). Semi-detached or detached binaries are largely concentrated in the galactic plane as shown by Paczynski et al. (MNRAS, 368, 1311), different from the distribution of contact eclipsing binaries. The differences in distributions of different types of eclipsing binaries may be related to either distances or interstellar reddening. We will present a method to calculate photometric distances of W Urase Majoris systems (W UMa; used as a proxy for contact binaries) from 2MASS J and K magnitudes and interstellar reddening models (Schlafly and Finkbeiner 2011, ApJ. 737, 103). We compare the distances to those calculated from the period-luminosity-color relationship described by Rucinski (2004, NewAR, 48, 703). The W UMa systems are taken from the General Catalog of Variable Stars.

  1. Inhomogeneous chemical enrichment in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2016-08-01

    In a galaxy, chemical enrichment takes place in an inhomogeneous fashion, and the Galactic Halo is one of the places where the inhomogeneous effects are imprinted and can be constrained from observations. I show this using my chemodynamical simulations of Milky Way type galaxies. The scatter in the elemental abundances originate from radial migration, merging/accretion of satellite galaxies, local variation of star formation and chemical enrichment, and intrinsic variation of nucleosynthesis yields. In the simulated galaxies, there is no strong age-metallicity relation. This means that the most metal-poor stars are not always the oldest stars, and can be formed in chemically unevolved clouds at later times. The long-lifetime sources of chemical enrichment such as asymptotic giant branch stars or neutron star mergers can contribute at low metallicities. The intrinsic variation of yields are important in the early Universe or metal-poor systems such as in the Galactic halo. The carbon enhancement of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be best explained by faint supernovae, the low [α/Fe] ratios in some EMP stars naturally arise from low-mass (~ 13 - 15M ⊙) supernovae, and finally, the [α/Fe] knee in dwarf spheroidal galaxies can be produced by subclasses of Type Ia supernovae such as SN 2002cx-like objects and sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions.

  2. The Fingerprint of a Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueras-Lara, Francisco; Schödel, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Because of the unique observational challenges -extreme crowding and extinction- any existing large-scale near-infrared (NIR) imaging data on the Galactic Center (GC) are limited by either one, or a combination, of the following: saturation, lack of sensitivity, too low angular resolution, or lack of multi-wavelength coverage. To overcome this situation, we are currently carrying out a sensitive, 0.2'' resolution JHK imaging survey of the Galactic Centre with HAWK-I/VLT. Thanks to holographic imaging, we achieve a similar resolution than with HST/WFC, but can cover also the long NIR, beyond 2 micrometers, which is essential to deal with extinction. Our survey is supported by an ESO Large Programme and will provide photometrically accurate (few percent uncertainty for H < 18 stars), high-angular resolution, NIR data for an area of several 1000 pc2, a more than ten-fold increase compared to the current state of affairs. Here we present an overview and first results.

  3. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2013-02-01

    We propose to continue our search for the first light echoes (LEs) associated with historical Galactic supernovae and LBV outbursts: SN 1006, Kepler's SN, RCW 86, Crab Nebula, and P Cygni. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of eta Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. We propose to continue our search for light echoes of the remaining historical events. With DECam, we have a 10-15 fold improvement in efficiency over the retired Mosaic camera, which allows us to cover the bigger search areas of most of the remaining targets. The study of scattered-light echoes from these Galactic supernovae and eruptions will give us the opportunity to directly compare the original outburst and its current remnant, and in favorable cases (like Eta Carinae), it provides a three-dimensional view of the event and/or a spectral time series.

  4. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  5. Globular Cluster Contributions to the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah; Grebel, Eva; Lai, David

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project is to confirm chemically that globular clusters are the source of as much as half the population of the Galactic halo. Using moderate-resolution spectroscopy from the SEGUE survey, we have identified a previously unknown population of halo field giants with distinctly strong CN features. CN variations are typically only observed in globular clusters, so these stars are interpreted as immigrants to the halo that originally formed in globular clusters. In one night of Keck/HIRES time, we will obtain high-quality, high- resolution spectra for five such stars, and determine abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, alpha, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements. With this information we can state clearly whether these unusual CN-strong halo stars carry the full abundance pattern seen in CN-strong globular cluster stars, with depleted C, O, and Mg and enhanced N, Na, and Al. This type of coarse ``chemical tagging'' will allow a clearer division of the Galactic halo into contributions from globular clusters and from dwarf galaxies, and will place constraints on theoretical models of globular cluster formation and evolution.

  6. A New Galactic Center Composite Supernova Remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, G. R.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Kassim, N. E.

    2001-12-01

    We report the possible radio detection of a new supernova remnant located only 1 degree east of the Galactic center. The SNR candidate has both a shell and a core component on 6, 20, and 90 cm VLA images. Preliminary measurements indicate that both components have steep spectra between 6 and 20 cm, and that the spectra flatten and become inverted between 20 and 90 cm, due likely to significant free-free absorption. The source may be a composite-type SNR, which constitute only 10% of known SNRS, and which consist of a steep-spectrum radio shell corresponding to expanding debris from the supernova and a flatter spectrum, significantly polarized, core component corresponding to a central neutron star. Further radio and X-ray observations are planned in order to definitively identify this source. The detection of additional SNRs in or near the Galactic center will help place constraints on the star formation rate in this region, and may also provide clues about the GC environment. This research is supported by funding from the Sweet Briar College Faculty Grants program. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopy of candidate red supergiant stars in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2014-11-01

    Context. Clear identifications of Galactic young stellar clusters farther than a few kpc from the Sun are rare, despite the large number of candidate clusters. Aims: We aim to improve the selection of candidate clusters rich in massive stars with a multiwavelength analysis of photometric Galactic data that range from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. Methods: We present a photometric and spectroscopic analysis of five candidate stellar clusters, which were selected as overdensities with bright stars (Ks< 7 mag) in GLIMPSE and 2MASS images. Results: A total of 48 infrared spectra were obtained. The combination of photometry and spectroscopy yielded six new red supergiant stars with masses from 10 M⊙ to 15 M⊙. Two red supergiants are located at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (16.°7, -0.°63) and at a distance of about ~3.9 kpc; four other red supergiants are members of a cluster at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (49.°3, + 0.°72) and at a distance of ~7.0 kpc. Conclusions: Spectroscopic analysis of the brightest stars of detected overdensities and studies of interstellar extinction along their line of sights are fundamental to distinguish regions of low extinction from actual stellar clusters. The census of young star clusters containing red supergiants is incomplete; in the existing all-sky near-infrared surveys, they can be identified as overdensities of bright stars with infrared color-magnitude diagrams characterized by gaps. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO Programme 60.A-9700(E), and 089.D-0876), and on observations collected at the UKIRT telescope (programme ID H243NS).MM is currently employed by the MPIfR. Part of this work was performed at RIT (2009), at ESA (2010), and at the MPIfR.Tables 3, 4, and 6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. A New Insight to the Galactic O Vz Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. I.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Barbá, R.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Walborn, N. R.; Sota, A.; Morrell, N.; Gamen, R.; Alfaro, E.; Sabín-Sanjulián, C.; Herrero, A.

    2014-10-01

    Based on a large sample of spectra from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS, Maíz Apellániz et al. 2011) a systematic study of the Galactic O dwarfs belonging to the luminosity subclass Vz is being performed. Preliminary results suggest a redefinition of the quantitative criterion to assign the ``z'' qualifier to the spectra.

  9. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Ng, C.; Levin, L.; and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° Galactic models—must be included to ease the discrepancy between the detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  10. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 μm and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 ° <= ell <= 67° and |b| <= 1°, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow (~1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  11. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE GALACTIC H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 {mu}m and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 {sup 0} {<=} l {<=} 67{sup 0} and |b| {<=} 1{sup 0}, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow ({approx}1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  12. Electromagnetic dissociation effects in galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of galactic heavy ions by the Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. By using the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta, estimates of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for a variety of reactions applicable to galactic cosmic ray shielding studies are presented and compared with other predictions and with available experimental data.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Candidate red supergiants in Galactic clusters (Messineo+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, M.; Zhu, Q. F.; Ivanov, V. D.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Menten, K. M.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Chen, C.-H. R.

    2015-01-01

    A set of spectroscopic data was taken with the UKIRT 1-5-micron Imager Spectrometer (UIST) on Mauna Kea under program ID H243NS (PI: Kudritzki) on 2008 July 24. For four of the targeted candidate clusters, additional low-resolution and medium-resolution spectra were obtained with the SofI spectrograph mounted on the NTT telescope. Data were taken under program 60.A-9700(E) at Paranal-La Silla Observatory on 2010 August 3, and under program 089.D-0876 on 2012 June 1. (3 data files).

  14. Amorphous carbon in the disk around the post-AGB binary HR 4049. Discerning dust species with featureless opacity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acke, B.; Degroote, P.; Lombaert, R.; de Vries, B. L.; Smolders, K.; Verhoelst, T.; Lagadec, E.; Gielen, C.; Van Winckel, H.; Waelkens, C.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Infrared spectroscopy has been extensively used to determine the mineralogy of circumstellar dust. The identification of dust species with featureless opacities, however, is still ambiguous. Here we present a method to lift the degeneracy using the combination of infrared spectroscopy and interferometry. Aims: The binary post-AGB star HR 4049 is surrounded by a circumbinary disk viewed at a high inclination angle. Apart from gaseous emission lines and molecular emission bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), diamonds, and fullerenes, the 2-25 μm infrared spectrum is featureless. The goal of the paper is to identify the dust species responsible for the smooth spectrum. Methods: We gathered high-angular-resolution measurements in the near- and mid-infrared with the VLTI interferometric instruments AMBER and MIDI. The data set is expanded with archival Geneva optical photometry, ISO-SWS and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectroscopy, and VISIR N-band images and spectroscopy. We computed a grid of radiative-transfer models of the circumbinary disk of HR 4049 using the radiative-transfer code MCMax. We searched for models that provide good fits simultaneously to all available observations. Results: We find that the variable optical extinction towards the primary star is consistent with the presence of very small (0.01 μm) iron-bearing dust grains or amorphous carbon grains. The combination of the interferometric constraint on the disk extent and the shape of the infrared spectrum points to amorphous carbon as the dominant source of opacity in the circumbinary disk of HR 4049. The disk is optically thick to the stellar radiation in the radial direction. At infrared wavelengths it is optically thin. The PAH emission is spatially resolved in the VISIR data and emanates from a region with an extent of several hundreds of AU, with a projected photocenter displacement of several tens of AU from the disk center. The PAHs most likely reside in a bipolar outflow

  15. Using a Weak CN Spectral Feature as a Marker for Massive AGB Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kamath, Anika; Sales, Alyssa; Sarukkai, Atmika; Hays, Jon; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey has produced six-filter photometry at near-ultraviolet, optical and nearly infrared wavelengths (F275W, F336W, F475W, F814W, F110W and F160W) for over 100 million stars in the disk of the of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey, medium resolution (R ~ 2000) spectra covering the wavelength range 4500-9500A were obtained for over 5000 relatively bright stars from the PHAT source catalog using the Keck II 10-meter telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph. While searching for carbon stars in the spectroscopic data set, we discovered a rare population of stars that show a weak CN spectral absorption feature at ~7900A (much weaker than the CN feature in typical carbon stars) along with other spectral absorption features like TiO and the Ca triplet that are generally not present/visible in carbon star spectra but that are typical for normal stars with oxygen rich atmospheres. These 150 or so "weak CN" stars appear to be fairly localized in six-filter space (i.e., in various color-color and color-magnitude diagrams) but are generally offset from carbon stars. Comparison to PARSEC model stellar tracks indicates that these weak CN stars are probably massive (5-10 Msun) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in a relatively short-lived core helium burning phase of their evolution. Careful spectroscopic analysis indicates that the details of the CN spectral feature are about 3-4x weaker in weak CN stars than in carbon stars. The kinematics of weak CN stars are similar to those of other young stars (e.g., massive main sequence stars) and reflect the well ordered rotation of M31's disk.This research project is funded in part by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Much of this work was carried out by high school students and undergraduates under the auspices of the Science Internship Program and LAMAT program at the University of

  16. DDT_yamamura_1: Herschel photometry of WISE J180956.27-330500.2; a newly discovered AGB star undergoing episodic mass ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, I.

    2012-05-01

    We propose to carry out imaging photometry of WISE J180956.27-330500.2 (hereafter WISE J1810) using PACS (at 70, 110, 160 micron) and SPIRE (at 250, 350, 500 micron) in order to obtain the latest far-IR and sub-mm fluxes of the object and constrain the nature of its mass-loss history. WISE J1810 was discovered very recently by us (Gandhi et al. 2012) as an object with a peculiar 2MASS--WISE spectral energy distribution (SED). We propose that the object is an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star presently experiencing an episodic mass-loss event following a thermal pulse. If this is the case, it is the first opportunity of real-time observation of AGB mass ejection at thermal pulse. The infrared SED of this object is rapidly evolving over the past 15 years and updated observations over a broad wavelength range are essential. Herschel is the only available facility with the capability of high-sensitivity, high-spatial resolution observations at far-infrared and sub-mm wavelengths, and can provide indispensable information of the rapidly expanding dust shell of this object. The unique nature of this source, its recent bright appearance and rapid evolution prompt us to request a DDT observation while Herschel is still operating. The requested observing time is 1414 sec, which is the minimum operation time for the observing modes that will be used.

  17. Uncertainties in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    DOE PAGES

    Cote, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; Oshea, Brian W.; ...

    2016-06-15

    Here we use a simple one-zone galactic chemical evolution model to quantify the uncertainties generated by the input parameters in numerical predictions for a galaxy with properties similar to those of the Milky Way. We compiled several studies from the literature to gather the current constraints for our simulations regarding the typical value and uncertainty of the following seven basic parameters: the lower and upper mass limits of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), the slope of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF, the slope of the delay-time distribution function of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the number ofmore » SNe Ia per M⊙ formed, the total stellar mass formed, and the final mass of gas. We derived a probability distribution function to express the range of likely values for every parameter, which were then included in a Monte Carlo code to run several hundred simulations with randomly selected input parameters. This approach enables us to analyze the predicted chemical evolution of 16 elements in a statistical manner by identifying the most probable solutions along with their 68% and 95% confidence levels. Our results show that the overall uncertainties are shaped by several input parameters that individually contribute at different metallicities, and thus at different galactic ages. The level of uncertainty then depends on the metallicity and is different from one element to another. Among the seven input parameters considered in this work, the slope of the IMF and the number of SNe Ia are currently the two main sources of uncertainty. The thicknesses of the uncertainty bands bounded by the 68% and 95% confidence levels are generally within 0.3 and 0.6 dex, respectively. When looking at the evolution of individual elements as a function of galactic age instead of metallicity, those same thicknesses range from 0.1 to 0.6 dex for the 68% confidence levels and from 0.3 to 1.0 dex for the 95% confidence levels. The uncertainty in our chemical

  18. Uncertainties in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; Oshea, Brian W.; Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Jones, Samuel; Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2016-06-15

    Here we use a simple one-zone galactic chemical evolution model to quantify the uncertainties generated by the input parameters in numerical predictions for a galaxy with properties similar to those of the Milky Way. We compiled several studies from the literature to gather the current constraints for our simulations regarding the typical value and uncertainty of the following seven basic parameters: the lower and upper mass limits of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), the slope of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF, the slope of the delay-time distribution function of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the number of SNe Ia per M formed, the total stellar mass formed, and the final mass of gas. We derived a probability distribution function to express the range of likely values for every parameter, which were then included in a Monte Carlo code to run several hundred simulations with randomly selected input parameters. This approach enables us to analyze the predicted chemical evolution of 16 elements in a statistical manner by identifying the most probable solutions along with their 68% and 95% confidence levels. Our results show that the overall uncertainties are shaped by several input parameters that individually contribute at different metallicities, and thus at different galactic ages. The level of uncertainty then depends on the metallicity and is different from one element to another. Among the seven input parameters considered in this work, the slope of the IMF and the number of SNe Ia are currently the two main sources of uncertainty. The thicknesses of the uncertainty bands bounded by the 68% and 95% confidence levels are generally within 0.3 and 0.6 dex, respectively. When looking at the evolution of individual elements as a function of galactic age instead of metallicity, those same thicknesses range from 0.1 to 0.6 dex for the 68% confidence levels and from 0.3 to 1.0 dex for the 95% confidence levels. The uncertainty in our chemical

  19. Red-based cumulus.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    2015-02-01

    Observations and model simulations of cumulus clouds whose bases are tinted red when the Sun is well above the horizon are presented. Conditions for seeing red bases include (1) a red underlying surface (which may consist of dust clouds, as from haboobs) with high albedo, (2) small fractional cloud cover when the Sun is far enough below the zenith for direct sunlight to illuminate much of the surface directly below and around cloud base, (3) optically thick clouds so that the bases are dark, and (4) clouds with bases that are near enough to the observer to appear high in the sky so that the admixture of scattered light from the intervening atmosphere is minimized.

  20. Galactic disk bulk motions as revealed by the LSS-GAC DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Yang; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Chen, Bing-Qiu; Ren, Juan-Juan; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Yang, Ming

    2015-08-01

    We report a detailed investigation of the bulk motions of the nearby Galactic stellar disk, based on three samples selected from the LSS-GAC DR2: a global sample containing 0.57 million FGK dwarfs out to ˜2 kpc, a local subset of the global sample consisting of ˜5400 stars within 150 pc, and an anti-center sample containing ˜4400 AFGK dwarfs and red clump stars within windows a few degrees wide centered on the Galactic Anti-center. The global sample is used to construct a three-dimensional map of bulk motions of the Galactic disk from the solar vicinity out to ˜2 kpc with a spatial resolution of ˜250 pc. Typical values of the radial and vertical components of bulk motion range from -15 km s-1 to 15 km s-1 in contrast, the lag behind the circular motion dominates the azimuthal component by up to ˜15 km s-1. The map reveals spatially coherent, kpc-scale stellar flows in the disk, with typical velocities of a few tens of km s-1. Bending- and breathing-mode perturbations are clearly visible, and vary smoothly across the disk plane. Our data also reveal higher-order perturbations, such as breaks and ripples, in the profiles of vertical motion versus height. From the local sample, we find that stars from different populations exhibit very different patterns of bulk motion. Finally, the anti-center sample reveals a number of peaks in stellar number density in the line-of-sight velocity versus distance distribution, with the nearer ones apparently related to the known moving groups. The “velocity bifurcation” reported by Liu et al. at Galactocentric radii 10-11 kpc is confirmed. However, just beyond this distance, our data also reveal a new triple-peaked structure.

  1. Homogeneous photometry and star counts in the field of 9 Galactic star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. F.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.; Loktin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present homogeneous V, I CCD photometry of nine stellar fields in the two inner quadrants of the Galactic plane. The lines-of-view to most of these fields aim in the direction of the very inner Galaxy, where the Galactic field is very dense, and extinction is high and patchy. Our nine fields are, according to several catalogs, centred on Galactic star clusters, namely Trumpler 13, Trumpler 20, Lynga 4, Hogg 19, Lynga 12, Trumpler 25, Trumpler 26, Ruprecht 128, and Trumpler 34. Apart from their coordinates, and in some cases additional basic data (mainly from the 2MASS archive), their properties are poorly known. By means of star count techniques and field star decontaminated Color Magnitude diagrams, the nature and size of these visual over-densities has been established; and, when possible, new cluster fundamental parameters have been derived. To strengthen our findings, we complement our data-set with JHKs photometry from the 2MASS archive, that we analyze using a suitably defined Q-parameter. Most clusters are projected towards the Carina-Sagittarium spiral arm. Because of that, we detect in the Color Magnitude diagrams of most of the other fields several distinctive sequences produced by young population within the arm. All the clusters are of intermediate or old age. The most interesting cases detected by our study are, perhaps, that of Trumpler 20, which seems to be much older than previously believed, as indicated by its prominent - and double - red clump; and that of Hogg 19, a previously overlooked old open cluster, whose existence in such regions of the Milky Way is puzzling.

  2. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a population of 'blank field sources' (or 'blanks') among the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) bright unidentified X-ray sources with faint optical counterparts. The extreme X-ray over optical flux ratio of blank field sources is not compatible with the main classes of X-ray emitters except for extreme BL Lacertae objects at fx/fv is equal to or less than 35. From the analysis of ROSAT archival data we found evidence for only three sources, out of 16, needing absorption in excess of the Galactic value and no indication of variability. We also found evidence for an extended nature for only one of the five blanks with a serendipitous HRI (High Resolution Imager) detection; this source (1WGA J1226.9+3332) was confirmed as a z=0.89 cluster of galaxies. Palomar images reveal the presence of a red (O - E is equal to or greater than 2) counterpart in the X-ray error circle for six blanks. The identification process brought to the discovery of another high z cluster of galaxies, one (possibly extreme) BL Lac and two apparently normal type 1 AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei). These AGNs, together with four more AGN-like objects seem to form a well defined group: they present type 1 X-ray spectra but red Palomar counterparts. We discuss the possible explanations for the discrepancy between the X-ray and optical data, among which: a suppressed big blue bump emission, an extreme dust to gas (approximately 40 - 60 the Galactic ratio) ratio value and a high redshift (z is greater than or equal to 3.5) QSO (Quasi-Stellar Object) nature. These AGN-like blanks seem to be the bright (and easier to study) analogs of the sources which are being found in deep Chandra observations. Five more blanks have a still an unknown nature.

  3. The Shape Evolution of Galactic Open Clusters from Observations Under Galactic External Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Meng; Abt, Helmut; Zhao, Gang; Li, Chengdong

    2017-02-01

    We present the Galactic characteristics of 154 open clusters using the stellar statistics method with data from the WEBDA database. We find that all clusters in our sample are elongated in shape, which indicates that the spherical clusters are stretched out to be ellipsoid as a function of age ({log}({age}/{year})=6.64{--}9.7). By dividing a cluster into a central core and an outer part, we have computed the apparent ellipticities of these two parts respectively. The scale relations between ellipticities and age indicate that the outer parts of open clusters become more elliptical while the central cores remain circular. We suppose that the outer parts become more elliptical because they are more subjected to the external forces, e.g., Galactic differential rotation, while the central cores form a circular shape under the domination of stellar dynamics. We have also performed an analysis of the crucial influence of cluster mass and location on its shape.

  4. The dusty AGB star RS CrB: first mid-infrared interferometric observations with the Keck telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Koresko, C.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M; Akeson, R.; Appleby, E.; Bell, J.; Booth, A.; Crawford, S.; Dahl, W.; Fanson, J.; Felizardo, C.; Garcia, J.; Gathright, J.; Herstein, J.; Hovland, E.; Hrynevych, M.; Johansson, E.; Le Mignant, D.; Ligon, R.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Moore, J.; Neyman, C.; Palmer, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report interferometric observations of the semiregular variable star RS CrB, a red giant with strong silicate emission features. The data were among the first long-baseline mid-infrared stellar fringes obtained between the Keck telescopes, using parts of the new nulling beam combiner.

  5. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Horne, K.

    2004-01-01

    Echo mapping makes use of the intrinsic variability of the continuum source in active galactic nuclei to map out the distribution and kinematics of line-emitting gas from its light travel time-delayed response to continuum changes. Echo mapping experiments have yielded sizes for the broad line-emitting region in about three dozen AGNs. The dynamics of the line-emitting gas seem to be dominated by the gravity of the central black hole, enabling measurement of the black-hole masses in AGNs. We discuss requirements for future echo-mapping experiments that will yield the high quality velocity-delay maps of the broad-line region that are needed to determine its physical nature.

  6. Primary nucleosynthesis in the galactic disk

    SciTech Connect

    Twarog, B.A.; Wheeler, J.C.

    1982-10-15

    New data on the history of production of C, O, Mg, and Fe are used to reexamine the production of heavy elements in the galactic disk. A standard infall model is used to show that a constant rate of production of heavy elements is consistent with the data and to derive net absolute amounts for several elements. Various models for nucleosynthesis by massive stars are considered. Current models are inconsistent with the simplest picture in which all stars above some limit approx.12 M/sub sun/ explode. Adopting a finite upper or lower mass cutoff to the massive stars which contribute to nucleosynthesis provides a better agreement. Any conclusions that massive stars in a particular mass range explode seem premature, especially when consideration is given to potentially significant contributions to C, O, and Fe production from Type I supernovae.

  7. Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report current status of search and study for Faint High Latitude Carbon Stars (FHLCs). Data for more than 1800 spectroscopically confirmed FHLCs are known, which are found thanks to objective prism surveys and photometric selections. More than half of the detected objects belongs to group of dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Many-sided investigations based on modern astrophysical databases are necessary to study the space distribution of different groups of the FHLC stars and their possible origin in the Halo of our Galaxy. We report about the selection of FHLCs by the spectroscopic surveys: First Byurakan Survey (FBS), Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), LAMOST Pilot Survey and SDSS, as well as by photometric selection: APM Survey for Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo, SDSS and 2MASS JHK colours.

  8. Dark matter superfluidity and galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin

    2016-02-01

    We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the ΛCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ∼mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  9. EGRET sources at intermediate galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the abstracts of four papers (using ROSAT data) that are submitted to refereed journals during the current reporting period. The papers are: (1) Extreme x-ray variability in the narrow-line QSO PHL 1092; (2) The Geminga pulsar (soft x-ray variability and an EUVE observation); (3) a broad-band x-ray study of the geminga pulsar; and (4) Classification of IRAS-selected x-ray galaxies in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The abstracts of these papers are given in the next four sections of this report, and their status is given in the Appendix. Finally, two new projects (De-identifying a non-AGN and EGRET sources at intermediate galactic latitude) for which ROSAT data were recently received are currently being studied under this grant. A summary of work in progress on these new projects is given in the last two sections of this report.

  10. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, K.

    Echo mapping exploits light travel time delays, revealed by multi-wavelength variability studies, to map the geometry, kinematics, and physical conditions of reprocessing sites in photo-ionized gas flows. In active galactic nuclei (AGN), the ultraviolet to near infrared light arises in part from reprocessing of EUV and X-ray light from a compact and erratically variable source in the nucleus. The observed time delays, 0.1-2 days for the continuum and 1-100 days for the broad emission lines, probe regions only micro-arcseconds from the nucleus. Emission-line delays reveal radially stratified ionization zones, identify the nature of the gas motions, and estimate the masses of the central black holes. Continuum time delays map the temperature-radius structure of AGN accretion discs, and provide distances that may be accurate enough to realize the potential of AGNs as cosmological probes.

  11. Relativistic neutrons in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rudak, Bronislaw

    1989-01-01

    The acceleration of protons to relativistic energies in active galactic nuclei leads to the creation of relativistic neutrons which escape from the central engine. The neutrons decay at distances of up to 1-100 pc, depositing their energies and momenta in situ. Energy deposition by decaying neutrons may inhibit spherical accretion and drive a wind, which could be responsible for the velocity fields in emission-line regions and the outflow of broad absorption line systems. Enhanced pressure in the neutron decay region may also help to confine emission line clouds. A fraction of the relativistic proton energy is radiated in gamma-rays with energies which may be as large as about 100,000 GeV.

  12. Galactic Archaeology and Minimum Spanning Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, B. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Flynn, C. M. L.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical tagging of stellar debris from disrupted open clusters and associations underpins the science cases for next-generation multi-object spectroscopic surveys. As part of the Galactic Archaeology project TraCD (Tracking Cluster Debris), a preliminary attempt at reconstructing the birth clouds of now phase-mixed thin disk debris is undertaken using a parametric minimum spanning tree (MST) approach. Empirically-motivated chemical abundance pattern uncertainties (for a 10-dimensional chemistry-space) are applied to NBODY6-realized stellar associations dissolved into a background sea of field stars, all evolving in a Milky Way potential. We demonstrate that significant population reconstruction degeneracies appear when the abundance uncertainties approach ˜0.1 dex and the parameterized MST approach is employed; more sophisticated methodologies will be required to ameliorate these degeneracies.

  13. Galactic cosmic radiation model and its applications.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; O'Neill, P M

    1996-01-01

    A model for the differential energy spectra of galactic cosmic radiation as a function of solar activity is described. It is based on the standard diffusion-convection theory of solar modulation. Estimates of the modulation potential based on fitting this theory to observed spectral measurements from 1954 to 1989 are correlated to the Climax neutron counting rates and to the sunspot numbers at earlier times taking into account the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field at the time of observations. These regression lines then provide a method for predicting the modulation at later times. The results of this model are quantitatively compared to a similar Moscow State University (MSU) model. These model cosmic ray spectra are used to predict the linear energy transfer spectra, differential energy spectra of light (charge < or = 2) ions, and single event upset rates in memory devices. These calculations are compared to observations made aboard the Space Shuttle.

  14. Inhomogeneous chemical enrichment in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2015-08-01

    In a galaxy, chemical enrichment takes place in an inhomogeneous fashion, and the Galactic Halo is one of the places where the inhomogeneous effects are imprinted and can be constrained from observations. I show this using my chemodynamical simulations of Milky Way type galaxies. The scatter in the elemental abundances is originated from radial migration, merging/accretion of satellite galaxies, local variation of star formation and chemical enrichment, and intrinsic variation of nucleosynthesis yields. In the simulated galaxies, there is no strong age-metallicity relations. This means that the most metal poor stars are not always the oldest stars, and can be formed in chemically unevolved clouds at later times. The long-lifetime sources of chemical enrichment such as asymptotic giant blanch stars or neutron star mergers can contribute the abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor stars, which are in good agreement with observations.

  15. Galactic civilizations: Population dynamics and interstellar diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. I.; Sagan, C.

    1978-01-01

    The interstellar diffusion of galactic civilizations is reexamined by potential theory; both numerical and analytical solutions are derived for the nonlinear partial differential equations which specify a range of relevant models, drawn from blast wave physics, soil science, and, especially, population biology. An essential feature of these models is that, for all civilizations, population growth must be limited by the carrying capacity of the environment. Dispersal is fundamentally a diffusion process; a density-dependent diffusivity describes interstellar emigration. Two models are considered: the first describing zero population growth (ZPG), and the second which also includes local growth and saturation of a planetary population, and for which an asymptotic traveling wave solution is found.

  16. An ''archaeological'' quest for galactic supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu

    2009-04-15

    We explore the possibility to observe the effects of electron neutrinos from past galactic supernovae, through a geochemical measurement of the amount of Technetium 97 produced by neutrino-induced reactions in a Molybdenum ore. The calculations we present take into account the recent advances in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, of neutrino oscillations inside a supernova, of the solar neutrino flux at Earth and of possible failed supernovae. The predicted Technetium 97 abundance is of the order of 10{sup 7} atoms per 10 kilotons of ore, which is close to the current geochemical experimental sensitivity. Of this, {approx} 10-20% is from supernovae. Considering the comparable size of uncertainties, more precision in the modeling of neutrino fluxes as well as of neutrino cross sections is required for a meaningful measurement.

  17. Better Galactic mass models through chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Robyn Ellyn; Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F.; Sharma, Sanjib

    2017-01-01

    With the upcoming release of the Gaia catalog and the many multiplexed spectroscopic surveys on the horizon, we are rapidly moving into a new data-driven era in the study of the Milky Way's stellar halo. When combined, these data sets will give us a many-dimensional view of stars in accreted structures in the halo that includes both dynamical information about their orbits and chemical information about their formation histories. Using simulated data from the state-of-the-art Latte simulations of Milky-Way-like galaxies, which include hydrodynamics, feedback, and chemical evolution in a cosmological setting using the FIRE physics model, we demonstrate that while dynamical information alone can be used to constrain models of the Galactic mass distribution in the halo, including the extra dimensions provided by chemical abundances can improve these constraints as well as assist in untangling different accreted components.

  18. Apollo galactic X-ray astronomy observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1971-01-01

    The galactic X-ray observations are a detailed study of the temporal behavior of pulsating X-ray sources. NASA's first X-ray astronomy satellite Uhuru (Explorer 42) has recently discovered fast time variability of pulsations in the output from several sources. The variability occurs on a time scale of minutes, seconds, or less, implying that the emitting regions are very small in size, much smaller than the sun, although they are emitting about a thousand times more power. Fast time variability may provide the clue that is needed to understand the mechanisms which drive pulsating sources. The Apollo observations record the emission from several objects continuously for a period of about an hour. The spacecraft can be pointed at the source for the entire time. On the other hand, Uhuru can observe only for about a minute or two per sighting. Consequently, Apollo has the capability for determining whether periodicities exist in the 10-1000 second range.

  19. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, D.; Savin, D. W.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent X-ray satelitte observations of active galactic nuclei point out shortcomings in our understanding of low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) for iron M- shell ions. In order to resolve this issue and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for modeling astrophysical plasmas, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring at the Max- Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage rings are currently the only laboratory method capable of studying low temperature DR. We use our results to produce experimentally- derived DR rate coefficients. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their DR calculations. Here we will report our recent DR results for selected Fe M-shell ions. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients.

  20. Radiative Energy Loss by Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between galactic cosmic rays and matter are a primary focus of the NASA radiation problem. The electromagnetic forces involved are for the most part well documented. Building on previous research, this study investigated the relative importance of the weak forces that occur when a cosmic ray impinges on different types of materials. For the familiar electromagnetic case, it is known that energy lost in the form of radiation is more significant than that lost via contact collisions the rate at which the energy is lost is also well understood. Similar results were derived for the weak force case. It was found that radiation is also the dominant mode of energy loss in weak force interactions and that weak force effects are indeed relatively weak compared to electromagnetic effects.

  1. Galactic TeV observations with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Chiumun Michelle

    2014-08-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector currently under construction at the Sierra Negra volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The full array will consist of 300 water Cherenkov detectors, which contain 1200 photomultiplier tubes and cover an area of 22,000m^2. It has an instantaneous field of view of 2sr, a duty cycle >90%, and is sensitive to energies between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Data taking began in Summer 2013 with a partial array. I will present the results of HAWC observations of the Galactic plane, which include the complex Cygnus region, and other extended TeV objects with unidentified source associations.

  2. The diffuse galactic gamma ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) detector will provide a much more detailed view of the diffuse galactic gamma ray intensity in terms of higher resolution, greater statistical significance, and broader energy range than earlier missions. These observations will furnish insight into a number of very important questions related to the dynamics and structure of the Galaxy. A diffuse emission model is being developed that incorporates the latest information on matter distribution and source functions. In addition, it is tailored to the EGRET instrument response functions. The analysis code of the model maintains flexibility to accommodate the quality of the data that is anticipated. The discussion here focuses on the issues of the distributions of matter, cosmic rays, and radiation fields, and on the important source functions that enter into the model calculation of diffuse emission.

  3. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  4. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  5. The Data Reduction Pipeline for the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidever, David L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beland, Stephane; Bender, Chad; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Burton, Adam; Desphande, Rohit; Fleming, Scott W.; García Pérez, Ana E.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Shetrone, Matthew; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Wilson, John C.

    2015-12-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R ˜ 22,500), near-infrared (1.51-1.70 μm) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 150,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high signal-to-noise ratio (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (˜0.1 km s-1) RVs, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (≲0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10, DR11 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a 3°-diameter field and the combination of spectrally dithered spectra. We also discuss areas for future improvement.

  6. No Evidence for Multiple Stellar Populations in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster E 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Strader, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Multiple stellar populations are a widespread phenomenon among Galactic globular clusters. Even though the origin of the enriched material from which new generations of stars are produced remains unclear, it is likely that self-enrichment will be feasible only in clusters massive enough to retain this enriched material. We searched for multiple populations in the low mass (M˜ 1.4× {10}4 {M}⊙ ) globular cluster E3, analyzing SOAR/Goodman multi-object spectroscopy centered on the blue cyanogen (CN) absorption features of 23 red giant branch stars. We find that the CN abundance does not present the typical bimodal behavior seen in clusters hosting multistellar populations, but rather a unimodal distribution that indicates the presence of a genuine single stellar population, or a level of enrichment much lower than in clusters that show evidence for two populations from high-resolution spectroscopy. E3 would be the first bona fide Galactic old globular cluster where no sign of self-enrichment is found. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  7. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Bender, Chad; Desphande, Rohit; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Burton, Adam; García Pérez, Ana E.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Wilson, John C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Shetrone, Matthew

    2015-12-15

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R ∼ 22,500), near-infrared (1.51–1.70 μm) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 150,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high signal-to-noise ratio (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (∼0.1 km s{sup −1}) RVs, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (≲0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10, DR11 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a 3°-diameter field and the combination of spectrally dithered spectra. We also discuss areas for future improvement.

  8. A Remarkable Sample of New Symbiotic Stars Towards the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, B.; Mikolajewska, J.; Udalski, A.

    2014-12-01

    Symbiotic stars are the longest orbital period interacting binaries, where nova-like outbursts are generated by the accretion of a high mass loss rate red giant wind onto a white dwarf companion. Long-term photometric monitoring surveys such as OGLE and MACHO are ideal platforms to identify nova-like events in symbiotic stars. However, there are only a handful of known systems within the small footprint of these surveys. We introduce a systematic Hα emission line object survey for new symbiotic stars covering 35 deg2 towards the Galactic Bulge that combines deep 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy with OGLE and MACHO photometry. This powerful combination has uncovered nearly two dozen new symbiotic stars, more than a dozen probable symbiotic stars, and several other unusual Hα emission line stars. While we don't find any nova-like activity, the lightcurves do exhibit semi-regular and Mira pulsations, orbital variations and slower changes due to dust. Here we introduce a few of the new symbiotics, including H1-45, only the fourth known carbon symbiotic Mira. This remarkable discovery may be the first luminous carbon star belonging to the Galactic Bulge, according to its period-luminosity relation distance of 6.2±1.4 kpc, potentially shedding new light on the puzzling lack of luminous carbon stars in the Bulge. We also present two old novae captured in the nebular phase, complementing other surveys to better characterize the old nova population.

  9. Galactic Center gamma-ray ``excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Jovana; Dario Serpico, Pasquale; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 1052÷1053 erg roughly Script O(106) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ``steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  10. Galactic Center gamma-ray ''excess'' from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    SciTech Connect

    Petrović, Jovana; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Zaharijaš, Gabrijela E-mail: serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr

    2014-10-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over the diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in the Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this excess can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ∼ 10{sup 52}÷10{sup 53} erg roughly O(10{sup 6}) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for—together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted ''steady state'' astrophysical sources—before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches (together with the energy budget) what is indirectly inferred by other evidences suggesting a very active Galactic Center in the past, for instance related to intense star formation and accretion phenomena.

  11. Identification of new young stellar objects associated with IRAS point sources. III. The northern Galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.; Persson, S.E.; Matthews, K.; New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque; Palomar Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-08-01

    A third list of new candidate young stellar objects found by searching the vicinities of IRAS positions along the galactic plane is presented. The list comprises 40 new objects in 39 fields with 2.2-micron magnitudes brighter than 10.5, and with near-infrared colors similar to those of fiducial objects such as GL 490. An additional 12 objects are identified as probable YSOs on the basis of incomplete data. Positions accurate to + or - 2 arcsec and deep red CCD pictures of 31 of the fields are given. Contemporaneous 10-micron observations allow an assessment of the reliability of the identifications; at least 80 percent of the near-infrared sources are directly related to the IRAS source, and the remainder are probably associated, but may not be the exciting sources of the regions. 11 refs.

  12. Sagittarius A(asterisk) and the positions of infrared sources in the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, W. J.; Pipher, J. L.; Stein, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of the central region of the Galaxy have been made with the University of Rochester 32 x 32 element InSb array camera in the 1-5 micron wavelength range. The 2.2-micron images have been used to determine positions of infrared features in comparison with that of the galactic center compact radio source Sgr A(asterisk). No infrared source lies precisely at the Sgr A(asterisk) position in the images. However, the infrared source closest to the Sgr A(asterisk) position is a previously little studied source directly south of IRS 7 that was called IRS 16NW and not the often referred to IRS 16C. IRS 16NW is coincident with one of the very red objects seen in various 1-micron images of this region.

  13. Infrared observations of the galactic center. I - Nature of the compact sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Willner, S. P.

    1978-01-01

    Photometry from 1.25 to 12 micrometers and spectrophotometry from 8 to 13 micrometers of the compact sources found in the galactic-center region are reported. In addition, revised 10 and new 20 micrometers maps with 2''.3 resolution are given. The nature of the compact sources is discussed. Some are best identified as stars or star clusters; the brightest source at 2 micrometers is probably a supergiant, and the infrared source near the nonthermal radio source is probably a stellar cluster with density greater than 1 million solar masses/cu pc. Other sources emit most of their luminosity at wavelengths of 10 micrometers and greater; this emission is probably from heated dust. One of the sources is observationally similar to extremely red OH/infrared stars. Other sources have luminosities and linear sizes similar to those of compact H II regions; emission from optically thin silicate dust is seen in these.

  14. Hot subdwarf stars in the Galactic halo Tracers of prominent events in late stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Stephan; Kupfer, Thomas; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are the stripped cores of red giants located at the bluest extension of the horizontal branch. They constitute the dominant population of UV-bright stars in old stellar environments and are most likely formed by binary interactions. We perform the first systematic, spectroscopic analysis of a sample of those stars in the Galactic halo based on data from SDSS. In the course of this project we discovered 177 close binary candidates. A significant fraction of the sdB binaries turned out to have close substellar companions, which shows that brown dwarfs and planets can significantly influence late stellar evolution. Close hot subdwarf binaries with massive white dwarf companions on the other hand are good candidates for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae. We discovered a hypervelocity star, which not only turned out to be the fastest unbound star known in our Galaxy, but also the surviving companion of such a supernova explosion.

  15. Multiplicity of the Galactic Senior Citizens: A high-resolution search for cool subdwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Cool subdwarfs, with spectral types late K and M, are the oldest members of the low-mass stellar population. Mostly present in the galactic halo, subdwarfs are characterized by their low metallicity and high proper-motions. Understanding their binary fraction could give key insights into the star formation process early in the Milky Way's history. However, because of their low luminosity and relative rarity in the solar neighborhood, binary surveys of cool subdwarfs have suffered from small sample sizes and large incompleteness gaps. It appears, however, that the binary fraction of red subdwarfs is much lower than for their main-sequence cousins. Using the highly efficient Robo-AO system, we present the largest high-resolution survey of subdwarfs yet. We find from 349 target cool subdwarfs, 39 are in multiple systems, 13 newly discovered, for a binary fraction of 11 ± 1.8%.

  16. Silicate Dust in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanxia; Li, Aigen; Hao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hypothesizes that all AGNs are surrounded by an anisotropic dust torus and are essentially the same objects but viewed from different angles. However, little is known about the dust that plays a central role in the unification theory. There are suggestions that the AGN dust extinction law appreciably differs from that of the Galaxy. Also, the silicate emission features observed in type 1 AGNs appear anomalous (i.e., their peak wavelengths and widths differ considerably from that of the Galaxy). In this work, we explore the dust properties of 147 AGNs of various types at redshifts z≲ 0.5, with special attention paid to 93 AGNs that exhibit the 9.7 and 18 μm silicate emission features. We model their silicate emission spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find that 60/93 of the observed spectra can be well explained with “astronomical silicate,” while the remaining sources favor amorphous olivine or pyroxene. Most notably, all sources require the dust to be micron-sized (with a typical size of ∼1.5 ± 0.1 μm), much larger than submicron-sized Galactic interstellar grains, implying a flat or “gray” extinction law for AGNs. We also find that, while the 9.7 μm emission feature arises predominantly from warm silicate dust of temperature T ∼ 270 K, the ∼5–8 μm continuum emission is mostly from carbon dust of T ∼ 640 K. Finally, the correlations between the dust properties (e.g., mass, temperature) and the AGN properties (e.g., luminosity, black hole mass) have also been investigated.

  17. galpy: A python LIBRARY FOR GALACTIC DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo

    2015-02-01

    I describe the design, implementation, and usage of galpy, a python package for galactic-dynamics calculations. At its core, galpy consists of a general framework for representing galactic potentials both in python and in C (for accelerated computations); galpy functions, objects, and methods can generally take arbitrary combinations of these as arguments. Numerical orbit integration is supported with a variety of Runge-Kutta-type