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Sample records for red giants ii

  1. The development of the red giant branch. II - Astrophysical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.; Greggio, Laura; Renzini, Alvio

    1990-01-01

    Evolutionary sequences developed in another paper are used here to investigate the properties of the red giant branch (RGB) phase transition. Results are found for compositions in the range Y(MS) between 0.20 and 0.30 and Z between 0.004 and 0.04. The transition mass M(HeF) increases as either Y(MS) decreases or Z increases. The stellar population transition age t(HeF) is virtually independent of composition and close to 0.6 Gyr. The RGB phase transition occurs almost abruptly over a mass range of only a few tenths of a solar mass or, equivalently, over a time interval of about 0.2 Gyr in the life of a stellar population. During the RGB phase transition the core mass Mc at helium ignition increases very rapidly by about 0.15 solar mass, while the luminosity at the tip of the RGB increases by about one order of magnitude. Absolute minima are found for the values of Mc and the RGB tip luminosity.

  2. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  3. DEEP MIXING IN EVOLVED STARS. II. INTERPRETING Li ABUNDANCES IN RED GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Busso, M.; Maiorca, E.; Cristallo, S.; Abia, C.; Uttenthaler, S.; Gialanella, L.

    2011-11-01

    We reanalyze the problem of Li abundances in red giants of nearly solar metallicity. After outlining the problems affecting our knowledge of the Li content in low-mass stars (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}), we discuss deep-mixing models for the red giant branch stages suitable to account for the observed trends and for the correlated variations of the carbon isotope ratio; we find that Li destruction in these phases is limited to masses below about 2.3 M{sub sun}. Subsequently, we concentrate on the final stages of evolution for both O-rich and C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Here, the constraints on extra-mixing phenomena previously derived from heavier nuclei (from C to Al), coupled to recent updates in stellar structure models (including both the input physics and the set of reaction rates used), are suitable to account for the observations of Li abundances below A(Li) {identical_to} log {epsilon}(Li) {approx_equal} 1.5 (and sometimes more). Also, their relations with other nucleosynthesis signatures of AGB phases (like the abundance of F, and the C/O and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios) can be explained. This requires generally moderate efficiencies (M-dot < or approx. 0.3-0.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for non-convective mass transport. At such rates, slow extra mixing does not remarkably modify Li abundances in early AGB phases; on the other hand, faster mixing encounters a physical limit in destroying Li, set by the mixing velocity. Beyond this limit, Li starts to be produced; therefore, its destruction on the AGB is modest. Li is then significantly produced by the third dredge up. We also show that effective circulation episodes, while not destroying Li, would easily bring the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios to equilibrium, contrary to the evidence in most AGB stars, and would burn F beyond the limits shown by C(N) giants. Hence, we do not confirm the common idea that efficient extra mixing drastically reduces the Li content of C stars with respect to K

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abundances of 4 metal-poor red giants in BooII (Ji+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, A. P.; Frebel, A.; Simon, J. D.; Geha, M.

    2016-04-01

    A total of 16 Boo II member stars were identified with Keck/DEIMOS observations (M. Geha et al. 2015, in preparation). We selected the four brightest members on the red giant branch sample for high-resolution follow-up (see Figure 1). The four target stars were observed with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph on the Clay telescope in the full optical wavelength range from 3500 to 9000Å in March 2010, 2011 and 2014 and in June 2015 (see table 1). (4 data files).

  5. Red giants: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, John

    Fred Hoyle's work on the structure and evolution of red giants, particularly his pathbreaking contribution with Martin Schwarzschild (Hoyle and Schwarzschild 1955), is both lauded and critically assessed. In his later lectures and work with students in the early 1960s, Hoyle presented more physical ways of understanding some of the approximations used, and results obtained, in that seminal paper. Although later ideas by other investigators will be touched upon, Hoyle's viewpoint - that low-mass red giants are essentially white dwarfs with a serious mass-storage problem - is still extremely fruitful. Over the years, I have further developed his method of attack. Relatively recently, I have been able to deepen and broaden the approach, finally extending the theory to provide a unifying treatment of the structure of low-mass stars from the main sequence though both the red-giant and horizontal-branch phases of evolution. Many aspects of these stars that had remained puzzling, even mysterious, for decades have now fallen into place, and some questions have been answered that were not even posed before. With low-mass red giants as the simplest example, this recent work emphasizes that stars, in general, may have at least two distinct but very important centres: (I) a geometrical centre, and (II) a separate nuclear centre, residing in a shell outside a zero-luminosity dense core for example. This two-centre perspective leads to an explicit, analytical, asymptotic theory of low-mass red-giant structure. It enables one to appreciate that the problem of understanding why such stars become red giants is one of anticipating a remarkable yet natural structural bifurcation that occurs in them. This bifurcation occurs because of a combination of known and understandable facts just summarized namely that, following central hydrogen exhaustion, a thin nuclear-burning shell does develop outside a more-or-less dense core. In the resulting theory, both ρsh/ρolinec and

  6. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. II. Magnesium isotopes and pollution scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thygesen, A. O.; Sbordone, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Ventura, P.; Yong, D.; Collet, R.; Christlieb, N.; Melendez, J.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The phenomenon of multiple populations in globular clusters is still far from understood, with several proposed mechanisms to explain the observed behaviour. The study of elemental and isotopic abundance patterns are crucial for investigating the differences among candidate pollution mechanisms. Aims: We derive magnesium isotopic ratios for 13 stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to provide new, detailed information about the nucleosynthesis that has occurred within the cluster. For the first time, the impact of 3D model stellar atmospheres on the derived Mg isotopic ratios is investigated. Methods: Using both tailored 1D atmospheric models and 3D hydrodynamical models, we derive magnesium isotopic ratios from four features of MgH near 5135 Å in 13 giants near the tip of the red giant branch, using high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. Results: We derive the magnesium isotopic ratios for all stars and find no significant offset of the isotopic distribution between the pristine and the polluted populations. Furthermore, we do not detect any statistically significant differences in the spread in the Mg isotopes in either population. No trends were found between the Mg isotopes and [Al/Fe]. The inclusion of 3D atmospheres has a significant impact on the derived 25Mg/24Mg ratio, increasing it by a factor of up to 2.5, compared to 1D. The 26Mg/24Mg ratio, on the other hand, essentially remains unchanged. Conclusions: We confirm the results seen from other globular clusters, where no strong variation in the isotopic ratios is observed between stellar populations, for observed ranges in [Al/Fe]. We see no evidence for any significant activation of the Mg-Al burning chain. The use of 3D atmospheres causes an increase of a factor of up to 2.5 in the fraction of 25Mg, resolving part of the discrepancy between the observed isotopic fraction and the predictions from pollution models. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CaII triplet in red giant spectra (Da Costa, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, G. S.

    2016-07-01

    The data for this study consist of observations of Galactic globular and open clusters, which are used to provide a calibration between CaII triplet line strength and abundance [Fe/H], and observations of a sample of red giants in the disc of the LMC originally studied at high dispersion by Pompeia et al. (2008, Cat. J/A+A/480/379), and for which an updated analysis is available in Van der Swaelmen et al. (2013, Cat. J/A+A/560/A44). All observations were carried out at the Anglo-Australian Telescope using the 2dF multi-object fibre positioner and the AAOmega dual beam spectrograph1. The red arm of the spectrograph was configured with the 1700D grating centred at ~8600Å to give coverage of the CaII triplet lines with a resolution R of approximately 10000. The corresponding blue spectra are not used in this work. (2 data files).

  8. Lithium Abundance in M3 Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givens, Rashad; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance of lithium in the red giant star vZ 1050 (SK 291) in the globular cluster M3. A previous survey of giants in the cluster showed that like IV-101, vZ 1050 displays a prominent Li I 6707 Å feature. vZ 1050 lies on the blue side of the red giant branch about 1.3 magnitudes above the level of the horizontal branch, and may be an asymptotic giant branch star. A high resolution spectrum of M3 vZ1050 was obtained with the ARC 3.5m telescope and the ARC Echelle Spectrograph (ARCES). Atmospheric parameters were determined using Fe I and Fe II lines from the spectrum using the MOOG spectral analysis program, and the lithium abundance was determined using spectrum synthesis.

  9. CA II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. III. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF 14 CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Marcionni, N.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S.; Sarajedini, A.; Grocholski, A. J. E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu

    2015-05-15

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s{sup −1}, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at −1.1 and −0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age–metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abundances of the Ret II brightest red giant members (Ji+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, A. P.; Frebel, A.; Simon, J. D.; Chiti, A.

    2017-01-01

    On 2015 October 1-4 we obtained high-resolution spectra of the brightest nine confirmed members in Reticulum II. We used the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay telescope with a 1.0" slit, which provides a spectral resolution of ~22000 and ~28000 at red and blue wavelengths, respectively. (2 data files).

  11. Far-ultraviolet fluorescence of carbon monoxide in the red giant Arcturus. II - Analysis of high-dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    Faint, diffuse emissions near 1380 A in deeply exposed IUE spectrograms of the red giant Arcturus very likely are associated with bands of the A-X fourth-positive system of carbon monoxide, fluoresced by multiplet UV2 of neutral oxygen near 1305 A. Numerical simulations indicate that the strength of the CO bands is exceedingly sensitive, in the best available one-dimensional model of the chromosphere of Arcturus, to a delicate balance between the rapid inward attenuation of the oxygen radiation field and the rapid outward decline of the molecular absorptivity. The fortuitous character of the overlap region in the single-component model argues that one should also consider the possibility that the pumping occurs in a highly inhomogeneous chromosphere, of the type proposed in previous studies of Arcturus based on observations of the infrared absorption bands of CO.

  12. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO LOCATING THE RED GIANT BRANCH TIP MAGNITUDE. II. DISTANCES TO THE SATELLITES OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, A. R.; Parker, Q. A.; Zucker, D. B.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Tanvir, N.; Fardal, M. A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Valls-Gabaud, D.

    2012-10-10

    In 'A Bayesian Approach to Locating the Red Giant Branch Tip Magnitude (Part I)', a new technique was introduced for obtaining distances using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) standard candle. Here we describe a useful complement to the technique with the potential to further reduce the uncertainty in our distance measurements by incorporating a matched-filter weighting scheme into the model likelihood calculations. In this scheme, stars are weighted according to their probability of being true object members. We then re-test our modified algorithm using random-realization artificial data to verify the validity of the generated posterior probability distributions (PPDs) and proceed to apply the algorithm to the satellite system of M31, culminating in a three-dimensional view of the system. Further to the distributions thus obtained, we apply a satellite-specific prior on the satellite distances to weight the resulting distance posterior distributions, based on the halo density profile. Thus in a single publication, using a single method, a comprehensive coverage of the distances to the companion galaxies of M31 is presented, encompassing the dwarf spheroidals Andromedas I-III, V, IX-XXVII, and XXX along with NGC 147, NGC 185, M33, and M31 itself. Of these, the distances to Andromedas XXIV-XXVII and Andromeda XXX have never before been derived using the TRGB. Object distances are determined from high-resolution tip magnitude posterior distributions generated using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique and associated sampling of these distributions to take into account uncertainties in foreground extinction and the absolute magnitude of the TRGB as well as photometric errors. The distance PPDs obtained for each object both with and without the aforementioned prior are made available to the reader in tabular form. The large object coverage takes advantage of the unprecedented size and photometric depth of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey. Finally, a

  13. Mass loss from red giants - Results from ultraviolet spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    New instrumentation in space, primarily the IUE spacecraft, has enabled the application of ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques to the determination of physical properties and reliable mass loss rates for red giant winds. One important result is the determination of where in the H-R diagram are found stars with hot outer atmospheres and with cool winds. So far it appears that single cool stars, except perhaps the so-called hybrid stars, have either hot outer atmospheres or cool winds but not both. The C II resonance (1335 A) and intersystem (2325 A) multiplets have been used to derive temperatures, densities, and geometrical extents for the chromospheric portions of red giant winds, with the result that the red giants and the earlier giants with hot coronae have qualitatively different chromospheres. Mass loss rates can now be derived accurately from the analysis of asymmetric emission lines, such as the Mg II resonance lines, and from P Cygni profile lines of atoms in the dominant ionization stage when a hot star is available to probe the wind of a red giant. The Zeta Aur systems, consisting of a K-M supergiant and a main sequence B star are important systems for reliable mass loss rates for the red supergiant components are becoming available.

  14. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  15. Chromospheric Activity in Red Giants of M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Whitney, B. A.; Pasquini, L.

    1994-12-01

    Red giants in the old open cluster M67 present a well-studied, homogeneous group of 1.27Msun stars with which to determine the evolution of chromospheric activity and mass loss. Echelle spectra of the Ca II H and K line region (lambda 3950) have been obtained with the 4-m telescope at KPNO, the MMT of the F. L. Whipple Observatory (K only), and the 3.6-m ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. Spectra of 16 red giant stars down to V ~ 11 were obtained; five of the sample are identified as clump giants. The flux of the emission reversal in the Ca II K core has been calibrated using normalization based on the narrow-band absolute spectrophotometry of Gunn &\\ Stryker (1983, ApJS, 52, 121). A new spectral synthesis of the Calcium line region for radiative models of the M67 giants based on Kurucz atmospheres provides the correction necessary to extract the chromospheric component of the flux. The Ca K emission reversals display asymmetries indicative of outward motions for giants more luminous than M_V ~ +0.5. The chromospheric emission flux in Ca II K decreases with increasing stellar luminosity. Clump giants, which are thought to be in a core-helium burning stage, show Ca II emission comparable to the stars on the red giant branch. Evidence for chromospheric variability is found from multiple observations of several objects. Implications of these results upon the evolution of chromospheres and presence of mass loss in giants will be discussed.

  16. Mass loss in red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The circumstellar envelopes surrounding late-type giants and supergiants were studied using high resolution, photoelectric scans of strong optical resonance lines. A method for extracting the circumstellar from the stellar components of the lines allowed a quantitative determination of the physical conditions in the envelopes and the rates of mass loss at various positions in the red giant region of the HR diagram. The observed strengthening of the circumstellar spectrum with increasing luminosity and later spectral type is probably caused by an increase in the mass of the envelopes. The mass loss rate for individual stars is proportional to the visual luminosity; high rates for the supergiants suggest that mass loss is important in their evolution. The bulk of the mass return to the interstellar medium in the red giant region comes from the normal giants, at a rate comparable to that of planetary nebulae.

  17. Heavy elements and mixing in red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Verne V.

    A brief overview of the s-process in red giants is presented, followed by discussions of three specific topics involving heavy-element s-process nucleosynthesis and mixing in red giants: (1) a comparison of neutron densities derived from observations and from the most recent stellar models, (2) how observations of technetium in S stars have led to a natural division of these stars into two separate groups, one of which is the result of single-star stellar evolution while the other is the result of mass transfer in a binary system, (3) a brief discussion of the recent speculative suggestion that gamma-ray induced photofission of heavy elements (Th and U) might be a source of the Tc observed in certain types of red giants.

  18. ɛ Ophiuchi: Revisiting a Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, T.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Gruberbauer, M.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; MOST Team

    2012-09-01

    In only a decade, seismology of red-giant stars has grown from infancy to adulthood in the study of stellar structure and evolution. The stimulants for this accelerated growth have been space observations, first provided by the WIRE star-tracker and MOST, and continuing with CoRoT and Kepler, having detected oscillations in thousands of cool giants. However, almost all of the stars in this impressive sample are faint, with little known about their basic properties. Even reliable spectral classifications are lacking for many of them. MOST is the only space-based photometer capable of continuous observations of bright red giants for which we have independent constraints (e.g., spectroscopy) essential to extract the internal structure from the stars' p-modes.

  19. Asteroseismic Diagram for Subgiants and Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Ning; Tang, Yanke; Yu, Peng; Dou, Xianghua

    2017-02-01

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool for constraining stellar parameters. NASA’s Kepler mission is providing individual eigenfrequencies for a huge number of stars, including thousands of red giants. Besides the frequencies of acoustic modes, an important breakthrough of the Kepler mission is the detection of nonradial gravity-dominated mixed-mode oscillations in red giants. Unlike pure acoustic modes, mixed modes probe deeply into the interior of stars, allowing the stellar core properties and evolution of stars to be derived. In this work, using the gravity-mode period spacing and the large frequency separation, we construct the ΔΠ1–Δν asteroseismic diagram from models of subgiants and red giants with various masses and metallicities. The relationship ΔΠ1–Δν is able to constrain the ages and masses of the subgiants. Meanwhile, for red giants with masses above 1.5 M ⊙, the ΔΠ1–Δν asteroseismic diagram can also work well to constrain the stellar age and mass. Additionally, we calculate the relative “isochrones” τ, which indicate similar evolution states especially for similar mass stars, on the ΔΠ1–Δν diagram.

  20. Assimilation of planets by red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen Karen

    The typical red giant star rotates slowly. This characteristic is expected from the conservation of angular momentum as these stars expand during their evolution. Nevertheless, a small percentage of red giant stars are rapidly rotating. One possible source of these stars' excess angular momenta is the orbital angular momentum of a planetary companion. The transfer of orbital angular momentum to the stellar envelope decays the planet's orbit, ultimately leading to the rapid in-spiral of the planet into the star. Using the known sample of exoplanets around main sequence host stars, I simulated both the future evolution of these stars and the expected interactions with their planets and found that Jupiter-mass planets residing at inner solar system distances---relatively common in exoplanetary systems---can contribute enough angular momentum to cause rapid rotation in their host stars during the red giant phase. Gas giant planets are also massive enough to alter the chemical composition of their host stars' envelopes when they are accreted. The central experiment of this thesis is to search for abundance anomalies in the rapid rotators that could be indicative of planet accretion. Hypothetical anomalies include the replenishment of light elements that are diluted by giant stars during first dredge-up (such as the stellar surface abundance of lithium), changes in isotopic abundance ratios that were altered by nucleosynthesis (such as increasing the stellar surface 12C/13C), and the preferential enhancement of refractory elements (indicative of the accretion of chemically fractionated material such as a planet). To increase the total number of known rapid rotators, I measured rotational velocities in a large database of spectra collected for the Grid Giant Star Survey developed for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission's astrometric grid. The 28 new rapid rotators discovered in this sample were combined with rapid rotators from the literature and a control sample of slow

  1. Variable Red Giants--The MACHO View

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, S C; Cook, K H

    2003-01-03

    The authors present a study of the MACHO red variable population in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study reveals six period-luminosity relations among the red variable population. Only two of these were known prior to MACHO. The results are consistent with Mira pulsation in the fundamental mode. A sequence comprising 26% of the red variable population can not be explained by pulsation. They propose a dust {kappa}-mechanism in the circumstellar environment is responsible for the long period variation of these objects. The luminosity function of the variables shows a sharp edge at the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). This is the first clear indication of a population of variable stars within the immediate vicinity of the TRGB. The results indicate this population amounts to 8% of the RGB population near the TRGB.

  2. Red giants in the vicinity of open clusters. Field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.; Zhao, G.; Liang, Ya.

    2009-08-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the atmospheric abundances of red giants in the vicinity of open clusters. The atmospheric parameters, atmospheric abundances, masses, ages, Galactic velocities, and elements of the Galactic orbits are derived for all the studied stars. We have discovered high metal abundances (close to 0.3dex) for five stars, which we classify as super-metal-rich stars. Several stars have lower [Na/Fe] than normal red giants with similar atmospheric parameters. The kinematic characteristics of these stars are somewhat different from those for objects in the Galactic thin disk. We suggest that the observed effect can be explained by inhomogeneity of the chemical composition of gas-dust clouds, which could be due to different rates of SNe II supernovae in different regions of the Galaxy.

  3. Sizing Up Red-Giant Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    In KIC 9246715, two red-giant stars twins in nearly every way circle each other in a 171-day orbit. This binary pair may be a key to learning about masses and radii of stars with asteroseismology, the study of oscillations in the interiors of stars.Two Ways to MeasureIn order to understand a stars evolution, it is critical that we know its mass and radius. Unfortunately, these quantities are often difficult to pin down!One of the few cases in which we can directly measure stars masses and radii is in eclipsing binaries, wherein two stars eclipse each other as they orbit. If we have a well-sampled light curve for the binary, as well as radial velocities for both stars, then we can determine the stars complete orbital information, including their masses and radii.But there may be another way to obtain stellar mass and radius: asteroseismology. In asteroseismology, oscillations inside stars are used to characterize the stellar interiors. Conveniently, if a star with a convective envelope exhibits solar-like oscillations, these oscillations can be directly compared to those of the Sun. Mass and radius scaling relations which use the Sun as a benchmark and scale based on the stars temperature can then be used to derive the mass and radius of the star.Test Subjects from KeplerSolar-like oscillations from KIC 9246715 are shown in red across different resonant frequencies. The oscillations of a single red-giant star with similar properties are shown upside down in grey for reference. [Rawls et al. 2016]Of course, scaling relations are only useful if we can test them! A team of scientists including Meredith Rawls (New Mexico State University) has identified 18 red-giant eclipsing binaries in the Kepler field of view that also exhibit solar-like oscillations perfect for testing the scaling relations.In a recent study led by Rawls, the team analyzed the first of these binaries, KIC 9246715. Using the Kepler light curves in addition to radial velocity measurements from high

  4. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Quantifying Irregularity in Pulsating Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Esteves, S.; Lin, A.; Menezes, C.; Wu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Hundreds of red giant variable stars are classified as “type L,” which the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) defines as “slow irregular variables of late spectral type...which show no evidence of periodicity, or any periodicity present is very poorly defined....” Self-correlation (Percy and Muhammed 2004) is a simple form of time-series analysis which determines the cycle-to-cycle behavior of a star, averaged over all the available data. It is well suited for analyzing stars which are not strictly periodic. Even for non-periodic stars, it provides a “profile” of the variability, including the average “characteristic time” of variability. We have applied this method to twenty-three L-type variables which have been measured extensively by AAVSO visual observers. We find a continuous spectrum of behavior, from irregular to semiregular.

  6. Long Secondary Periods in variable red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, C. P.; Wood, P. R.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Soszyński, I.

    2009-11-01

    We present a study of a sample of Large Magellanic Cloud red giants exhibiting Long Secondary Periods (LSPs). We use radial velocities obtained from VLT spectral observations and MACHO and OGLE light curves to examine properties of the stars and to evaluate models for the cause of LSPs. This sample is much larger than the combined previous studies of Hinkle et al. and Wood, Olivier & Kawaler. Binary and pulsation models have enjoyed much support in recent years. Assuming stellar pulsation, we calculate from the velocity curves that the typical fractional radius change over an LSP cycle is greater than 30 per cent. This should lead to large changes in Teff that are not observed. Also, the small light amplitude of these stars seems inconsistent with the radius amplitude. We conclude that pulsation is not a likely explanation for the LSPs. The main alternative, physical movement of the star - binary motion - also has severe problems. If the velocity variations are due to binary motion, the distribution of the angle of periastron in our large sample of stars has a probability of 1.4 × 10-3 that it comes from randomly aligned binary orbits. In addition, we calculate a typical companion mass of 0.09Msolar. Less than 1 per cent of low-mass main-sequence stars have companions near this mass (0.06-0.12Msolar) whereas ~25-50 per cent of low-mass red giants end up with LSPs. We are unable to find a suitable model for the LSPs and conclude by listing their known properties.

  7. Abundances in Globular Cluster Red Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, R. M.

    1997-12-01

    Observations of globular cluster red giant branch (RGB) stars have shown star-to-star variations in the abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, and Al, contrary to predictions of standard stellar evolutionary theory. I have modeled the variations in the abundance profiles around the hydrogen-burning shell (H shell) of metal-poor red giant stars by combining four RGB stellar evolutionary sequences of different metallicities with a detailed nuclear reaction network. This approach has significant advantages over previous research: (1) it allows for the variation in the temperature and density around the H shell; (2) it follows the effects of the changing H-shell structure as the sequence evolves; (3) it accounts for the effect of the metallicity on the abundance profiles; (4) it allows the reaction rates to be varied so that their uncertainties may be explored. The results are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. All the models show a region above the H shell in which first C, then O, is depleted in the CN and ON nuclear burning cycles. Within the C-depleted region, the (12) C/(13) C ratio is reduced to its equilibrium value. Just above the O-depleted region, Na is enhanced from proton captures on (22) Ne. In brighter models, Na becomes greatly enhanced within the O-depleted region as the NeNa cycle converts (20) Ne into (23) Na before attaining equilibrium inside the H shell. The more metal-poor models also show Al being increased around the H shell, first from (25,26) Mg, then from (24) Mg in the MgAl cycle. Despite the diminution (24) Mg suffers in synthesizing Al, the models show its abundance is increased due to the NeNa-cycle breakout reaction, (23) Na(p,γ)(24) Mg. This latter result is at odds with observations that show (24) Mg is depleted in a sample of M 13 and NGC 6752 giants (Shetrone 1996, 1997).

  8. THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH DISTANCES TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HOST GALAXIES. II. M66 AND M96 IN THE LEO I GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-08-10

    M66 and M96 in the Leo I Group are nearby spiral galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We estimate the distances to these galaxies from the luminosity of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We obtain VI photometry of resolved stars in these galaxies from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. From the luminosity function of these red giants, we find the TRGB I-band magnitude to be I{sub TRGB} = 26.20 {+-} 0.03 for M66 and 26.21 {+-} 0.03 for M96. These values yield distance modulus (m - M){sub 0} = 30.12 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.12(systematic) for M66 and (m - M){sub 0} = 30.15 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.12(systematic) for M96. These results show that they are indeed the members of the same group. With these results we derive absolute maximum magnitudes of two SNe (SN 1989B in M66 and SN 1998bu in M96). V-band magnitudes of these SNe Ia are {approx}0.2 mag fainter than SN 2011fe in M101, one of the nearest recent SNe Ia. We also derive near-infrared magnitudes for SN 1998bu. Optical magnitudes of three SNe Ia (SN 1989B, SN 1998bu, and SN 2011fe) based on TRGB analysis yield a Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 68.4 {+-} 2.6(random) {+-} 3.7(systematic) km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. This value is similar to the values derived from recent WMAP9 results, H{sub 0} = 69.32 {+-} 0.80 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, and from Planck results, H{sub 0} = 67.3 {+-} 1.2 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, but smaller than other recent determinations based on Cepheid calibration for SNe Ia luminosity, H{sub 0} = 74 {+-} 3 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}.

  9. SEISMIC DIAGNOSTICS OF RED GIANTS: FIRST COMPARISON WITH STELLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Montalban, J.; Miglio, A.; Noels, A.; Scuflaire, R.; Ventura, P.

    2010-10-01

    The clear detection with CoRoT and KEPLER of radial and non-radial solar-like oscillations in many red giants paves the way for seismic inferences on the structure of such stars. We present an overview of the properties of the adiabatic frequencies and frequency separations of radial and non-radial oscillation modes for an extended grid of models. We highlight how their detection allows a deeper insight into the internal structure and evolutionary state of red giants. In particular, we find that the properties of dipole modes constitute a promising seismic diagnostic tool of the evolutionary state of red giant stars. We compare our theoretical predictions with the first 34 days of KEPLER data and predict the frequency diagram expected for red giants in the CoRoT exofield in the galactic center direction.

  10. MAGNETO-THERMOHALINE MIXING IN RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; MacGregor, Keith B. E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2009-05-10

    We revise a magnetic buoyancy model that has recently been proposed as a mechanism for extra mixing in the radiative zones of low-mass red giants. The most important revision is our accounting of the heat exchange between rising magnetic flux rings and their surrounding medium. This increases the buoyant rising time by five orders of magnitude; therefore, the number of magnetic flux rings participating in the mixing has to be increased correspondingly. On the other hand, our revised model takes advantage of the fact that the mean molecular weight of the rings formed in the vicinity of the hydrogen burning shell has been reduced by {sup 3}He burning. This increases their thermohaline buoyancy (hence, decreases the total ring number) considerably, making it equivalent to the pure magnetic buoyancy produced by a frozen-in toroidal field with B {sub {psi}} {approx} 10 MG. We emphasize that some toroidal field is still needed for the rings to remain cohesive while rising. Besides, this field prevents the horizontal turbulent diffusion from eroding the {mu} contrast between the rings and their surrounding medium. We propose that the necessary toroidal magnetic field is generated by differential rotation of the radiative zone that stretches a preexisting poloidal field around the rotation axis, and that magnetic flux rings are formed as a result of its buoyancy-related instability.

  11. A diagnostic for localizing red giant differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klion, Hannah; Quataert, Eliot

    2017-01-01

    We present a simple diagnostic that can be used to constrain the location of the differential rotation in red giants with measured mixed mode rotational splittings. Specifically, in red giants with radii ˜4 R⊙, the splittings of p-dominated modes (sound wave-dominated) relative to those of g-dominated modes (internal gravity wave-dominated) are sensitive to how much of the differential rotation resides in the outer convection zone versus the radiative interior of the red giant. An independently measured surface rotation rate significantly aids breaking degeneracies in interpreting the measured splittings. We apply our results to existing observations of red giants, particularly those of Kepler-56, and find that most of the differential rotation resides in the radiative region rather than in the convection zone. This conclusion is consistent with results in the literature from rotational inversions, but our results are insensitive to some of the uncertainties in the inversion process and can be readily applied to large samples of red giants with even a modest number of measured rotational splittings. We argue that differential rotation in the radiative interior strongly suggests that angular momentum transport in red giants is dominated by local fluid instabilities rather than large-scale magnetic stresses.

  12. Asteroseismology of 1523 misclassified red giants using Kepler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Stello, Dennis; Murphy, Simon J.; Xiang, Maosheng; Bi, Shaolan; Li, Tanda

    2016-12-01

    We analysed solar-like oscillations in 1523 Kepler red giants which have previously been misclassified as subgiants, with predicted νmax values [based on the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC)] between 280 and 700 μHz. We report the discovery of 626 new oscillating red giants in our sample, in addition to 897 oscillators that were previously characterized by Hekker et al. from one quarter of Kepler data. Our sample increases the known number of oscillating low-luminosity red giants by 26 per cent (up to ˜1900 stars). About three quarters of our sample are classified as ascending red giant branch stars, while the remainder are red-clump stars. A novel scheme was applied to determine Δν for 108 stars with νmax close to the Nyquist frequency (387 μHz > νmax > 387 μHz). Additionally, we identified 47 stars oscillating in the super-Nyquist frequency regime, up to 387 μHz, using long-cadence light curves. We show that the misclassifications are most likely due to large uncertainties in KIC surface gravities, and do not result from the absence of broad-band colours or from different physical properties such as reddening, spatial distribution, mass or metallicity. The sample will be valuable to study oscillations in low-luminosity red giants and to characterize planet candidates around those stars.

  13. Explosion of a supernova with a red giant companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, E.; Tuchman, Y.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the collision between spherical ejecta from a supernova and a red giant companion are presented. In contrast to previous numerical studies, in which the companion was a main-sequence star or a compact object, the collision consequences are found to have a dramatic impact upon the red giant. In most cases the red giant companion loses most of its envelope in a time scale of 10 exp 7 s with typical velocities about an order of magnitude less than those of the expanding velocity of the supernova shell. We confirm the conclusion of Chugai (1986) that the stripped hydrogen tends to come off as a low-velocity component interior to the supernova ejecta. Possible observational consequences of the results are discussed.

  14. Coordinated observations of interacting peculiar red giant binaries, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, T.

    1995-01-01

    IUE Observations were begun for a two-year program to monitor the UV variability of three interacting peculiar red giant (PRG) binaries, HD 59643 (C6,s) HD 35155 (S3/2), and HR 1105 (S3.5/2.5). All of these systems were suspected to involve accretion of material from the PRG to a white-dwarf secondary, based mainly on previous IUE investigations. From our earlier surveys of PRG's, they were primary candidates to test the hypothesis that Tc-poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a secondary component rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch.

  15. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r {approx}> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems.

  16. Magnetic braking of stellar cores in red giants and supergiants

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic configurations, stable on the long term, appear to exist in various evolutionary phases, from main-sequence stars to white dwarfs and neutron stars. The large-scale ordered nature of these fields, often approximately dipolar, and their scaling according to the flux conservation scenario favor a fossil field model. We make some first estimates of the magnetic coupling between the stellar cores and the outer layers in red giants and supergiants. Analytical expressions of the truncation radius of the field coupling are established for a convective envelope and for a rotating radiative zone with horizontal turbulence. The timescales of the internal exchanges of angular momentum are considered. Numerical estimates are made on the basis of recent model grids. The direct magnetic coupling of the core to the extended convective envelope of red giants and supergiants appears unlikely. However, we find that the intermediate radiative zone is fully coupled to the core during the He-burning and later phases. This coupling is able to produce a strong spin down of the core of red giants and supergiants, also leading to relatively slowly rotating stellar remnants such as white dwarfs and pulsars. Some angular momentum is also transferred to the outer convective envelope of red giants and supergiants during the He-burning phase and later.

  17. Spectroscopic determination of masses (and implied ages) for red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Melissa; Hogg, David W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martig, Marie; Ho, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The mass of a star is arguably its most fundamental parameter and for red giant stars it implies a stellar evolution age. Stellar masses and ages have never been derived directly from spectra of red giants. However, using the APOGEE Kepler sample of stars, (the APOKASC sample), with high-quality spectra and astroseismic masses, we can build a data-driven spectral model using THE CANNON (arXiv:1501.07604) to infer stellar mass and therefore age from stellar spectra. We determine stellar masses to 0.07 dex from APOGEE DR12 spectra of red giants; these imply age estimates accurate to 0.2 dex (40 percent). THE CANNON constrains the ages foremost from spectral regions with particular absorption lines, elements whose surface abundances reflect mass-dependent dredge-up. We deliver an unprecedented catalog of 85,000 giants (including 20,000 red-clump stars) with mass and age estimates, spanning the entire disk (from the Galactic center to R ˜ 20 kpc). Such stellar age constraints across the Milky Way open up new avenues in Galactic archeology.

  18. Pulsation Properties of Carbon and Oxygen Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Huang, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    We have used up to 12 decades of AAVSO visual observations, and the AAVSO VSTAR software package to determine new and/or improved periods of 5 pulsating biperiodic carbon (C-type) red giants, and 12 pulsating biperiodic oxygen (M-type) red giants. We have also determined improved periods for 43 additional C-type red giants, in part to search for more biperiodic C-type stars, and also for 46 M-type red giants. For a small sample of the biperiodic C-type and M-type stars, we have used wavelet analysis to determine the time scales of the cycles of amplitude increase and decrease. The C-type and M-type stars do not differ significantly in their period ratios (first overtone to fundamental). There is a marginal difference in the lengths of their amplitude cycles. The most important result of this study is that, because of the semiregularity of these stars, and the presence of alias, harmonic, and spurious periods, the periods which we and others derive for these stars—especially the smaller-amplitude ones—must be determined and interpreted with great care and caution. For instance: spurious periods of a year can produce an apparent excess of stars, at that period, in the period distribution.

  19. Evidence for extended chromospheres surrounding red giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence and theoretical arguments are summarized which indicate that regions of partially ionized hydrogen extending several stellar radii are an important feature of red giant and supergiant stars. The implications of the existence of extended chromospheres are examined in terms of the nature of the other atmospheres of, and mass loss from cool stars.

  20. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars. II. Lithium abundance analysis of the red giant clump sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamów, M.; Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Nowak, G.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Standard stellar evolution theory does not predict existence of Li-rich giant stars. Several mechanisms for Li-enrichment have been proposed to operate at certain locations inside some stars. The actual mechanism operating in real stars is still unknown. Aims: Using the sample of 348 stars from the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search, for which uniformly determined atmospheric parameters are available, with chemical abundances and rotational velocities presented here, we investigate various channels of Li enrichment in giants. We also study Li-overabundant giants in more detail in search for origin of their peculiarities. Methods: Our work is based on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph, which we use for determination of abundances and rotational velocities. The Li abundance was determined from the 7Li λ670.8 nm line, while we use a more extended set of lines for α-elements abundances. In a series of Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, we compare Li-overabundant giants with other stars in the sample. We also use available IR photometric and kinematical data in search for evidence of mass-loss. We investigate properties of the most Li-abundant giants in more detail by using multi-epoch precise radial velocities. Results: We present Li and α-elements abundances, as well as rotational velocities for 348 stars. We detected Li in 92 stars, of which 82 are giants. Eleven of them show significant Li abundance A(Li)NLTE> 1.4 and seven of them are Li-overabundant objects, according to common criterion of A(Li) > 1.5 and their location on HR diagram, including TYC 0684-00553-1 and TYC 3105-00152-1, which are two giants with Li abundances close to meteoritic level. For another 271 stars, upper limits of Li abundance are presented. We confirmed three objects with increased stellar rotation. We show that Li-overabundant giants are among the most massive stars from our sample and show larger than average

  1. Sulfur and zinc abundances of red giant stars†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Sato, Bun'ei

    2016-10-01

    Sulfur and zinc are chemically volatile elements, which play significant roles as depletion-free tracers in studying galactic chemical evolution. However, regarding red giants having evolved off the main sequence, reliable abundance determinations of S and Zn seem to be difficult, despite the several studies that have been reported so far. Given this situation, we tried to establish the abundances of these elements for an extensive sample of 239 field GK giants ( - 0.8 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ +0.2), by applying the spectrum-fitting technique to S I 8694-5, S I 6757, and Zn I 6362 lines and by taking into account the non-LTE effect. Besides, similar abundance analysis was done for 160 FGK dwarfs to be used for comparison. The non-LTE corrections for the S and Zn abundances derived from these lines turned out to be ≲ 0.1(-0.2) dex for most cases and not very significant. It revealed that the S I 6757 feature is more reliable as an abundance indicator than S I 8694-5 for the case of red giants, because the latter suffers blending of unidentified lines. The finally resulting [S/Fe]-[Fe/H] and [Zn/Fe]-[Fe/H] relations for GK giants were confirmed to be in good agreement with those for FGK dwarfs, indicating that S and Zn abundances of red giants are reliably determinable from the S I 6757 and Zn I 6362 lines. Accordingly, not only main-sequence stars but also evolved red giant stars are usable for tracing the chemical evolution history of S and Zn in the regime of disk metallicity by using these lines.

  2. Red Giants in Eclipsing Binaries as a Benchmark for Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.

    2016-04-01

    Red giants with solar-like oscillations are astrophysical laboratories for probing the Milky Way. The Kepler Space Telescope revolutionized asteroseismology by consistently monitoring thousands of targets, including several red giants in eclipsing binaries. Binarity allows us to directly measure stellar properties independently of asteroseismology. In this dissertation, we study a subset of eight red giant eclipsing binaries observed by Kepler with a range of orbital periods, oscillation behavior, and stellar activity. Two of the systems do not show solar-like oscillations at all. We use a suite of modeling tools to combine photometry and spectroscopy into a comprehensive picture of each star's life. One noteworthy case is a double red giant binary. The two stars are nearly twins, but have one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes, likely due to stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171 day eccentric orbit. Mixed modes indicate the main oscillating star is on the secondary red clump (a core-He-burning star), and stellar evolution modeling supports this with a coeval history for a pair of red clump stars. The other seven systems are all red giant branch stars (shell-H-burning) with main sequence companions. The two non-oscillators have the strongest magnetic signatures and some of the strongest lifetime tidal forces with nearly-circular 20-34 day orbits. One system defies this trend with oscillations and a 19 day orbit. The four long-period systems (>100 days) have oscillations, more eccentric orbits, and less stellar activity. They are all detached binaries consistent with coevolution. We find the asteroseismic scaling laws are approximately correct, but fail the most for stars that are least like the Sun by systematically overestimating both mass and radius. Strong magnetic activity and tidal effects often occur in tandem and act to suppress solar-like oscillations. These red giant binaries offer an

  3. Spectroscopy of Six Red Giants in the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme H.; Siegel, Michael H.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Winnick, Rebeccah

    2006-10-01

    Keck Observatory LRIS-B (Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) spectra are reported for six red giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy and several comparison giants in the globular cluster M13. Indexes that quantify the strengths of the Ca II H and K lines, the λ3883 and λ4215 CN bands, and the λ4300 G band have been measured. These data confirm evidence of metallicity inhomogeneity within Draco obtained by previous authors. The four brightest giants in the sample have absolute magnitudes in the range -2.6giants and that some giants have higher [C/Fe] ratios than is typical of giants in the globular clusters M13 and M92. Several suggestions are made as to why some Draco stars may have higher [C/Fe] ratios than globular cluster red giants: deep mixing might be inhibited in these Draco stars, they may formerly have been mass-transfer binaries that acquired carbon from a more massive companion, or the Draco dwarf galaxy may have experienced relatively slow chemical evolution over a period of several billion years, allowing carbon-enhanced ejecta from intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to enrich the interstellar medium while star formation was still occurring. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly beta emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, alpha Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  5. Coordinated observations of interacting peculiar red giant binaries, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, T.

    1995-01-01

    IUE and H alpha observations continued on a two-year program to monitor the UV variability of three interacting peculiar red giant (PRG) binaries, HD 59643 (C6,s), HD 35155 (S3/2), and HR 1105 (S3.5/2.5). All of these systems were suspected to involve accretion of material from the PRG to a white-dwarf secondary, based mainly on previous IUE investigations. They were primary candidates from earlier surveys of PRG's to test the hypothesis that the Tc-poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a secondary component rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch.

  6. Reddening estimation for halo red giants using UVBY photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Twarog, Bruce A.

    1994-04-01

    Updated uvby observations for a larger sample of metal-deficient red giants are presented and combined with a select sample of data from the literature transformed to a common system. Using the reddening maps of Burstein & Heiles (1982), new absolute magnitudes, distances, metallicities, and reddenings are derived for each star. The metallicities are determined with a revised calibration of the m1, (b-y) diagram based upon comparison to a complilation of recent spectrsoscopic abundances transformed to a common system. The photometric abundances agree very well with the spectroscopic; the dispersion among the residuals for 58 giants is +/- 0.16 dex. The dereddened indices are used to show that for red giants with (Fe/H) less than -1.5, there is a well-defined relation in the c0, (b-y)0 diagram which exhibits only a weak dependence upon metallicity. Use of the standard relations allows one to obtain reddening estimates for normal halo field giants and globular clusters in the appropriate metallicity range.

  7. Red-giant stars: Chemical clocks in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, N.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.; Nasello, G.

    2016-12-01

    A broad effort is ongoing with large spectroscopic surveys such as APOGEE, ESO-Gaia, RAVE from which stellar parameters, radial velocities and detailed chemical abundances can be measured for CoRoT, Kepler, and K2 targets. In addition, asteroseismic data of red-giants stars observed by the space missions CoRoT and Kepler allow determination of stellar masses, radii, and can be used to determine the position and ages of stars. This association between spectroscopic and asteroseismic constraints provide a new way to understand galactic and stellar evolutions. To exploit all potential of this combination it would be crucial to develop our approach of synthetic populations. We compute stellar populations synthesis with the Besançon Galactic model including the asteroseismic and chemical properties from stellar evolution models. These synthetic populations can be compared with sinificant large surveys as APOKASC (APOGEE+Kepler) or CoRoGEE (CoRoT+APOGEE). We focus here on the carbon and nitrogen surface abundances of Kepler red-giant stars. We underline the importance of transport processes occurring in red-giant stars as rotation and thermohaline instability to understand chemical properties of stellar populations in the Galaxy. The future for this area also starts taking shape with the launch of Gaia, futur spectroscopic surveys such as 4MOST and WEAVE, and the future space mission PLATO that will provide seismic data for more than 100 000 red-giants. Such synthetic population model is a key tool to investigate future observations and better understand the evolution of the Milky Way.

  8. A revised DDO abundance calibration for population I red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Claria, J. J.; Minniti, D.

    1993-12-01

    Several arguments that justify establishing a revised abundance calibration for DDO photometry of population I red giants are presented. The components of the blanketing vector in the DDO C(45-48) vs C(42-45) diagram are determined for late-type dwarfs and giants. We have redefined the DDO cyanogen anomaly and calibrated it against metallicity. The sample of field giants now available with abundances derived from high dispersion spectroscopy is substantially larger than previously available, leading to a more accurate abundance calibration. Iso-abundance lines in the C(41-42) vs C(42-45) diagram have been determined for population IG and K giants and an iterative method for deriving abundances of these stars is described. We show that the new DDO abundances are in very good agreement with those derived from high dispersion spectroscopy. The new method improves by about 0.1 dex the DDO abundances derived for early G and/or late K giants, with respect to the delta(CN) method of Janes (1975).

  9. Model Atmospheres for Irradiated Red Giant Stars with Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufdenberg, J. P.; Barman, T. S.

    2002-12-01

    We will present exploratory model atmosphere calculations applicable to symbiotic binary systems, where a hot white dwarf illuminates the extended atmosphere of a red giant. While sophisticated non-LTE photoionization models exist for these systems (e.g. Proga et al. 1998), detailed models for the ionized-to-neutral transition region in the red giant wind have lacked molecular line opacities. To make improvements in this area, we employ a new version of the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere and planetary radiative transfer code which combines the stellar wind module of Aufdenberg et al. (2002), now modified to treat the winds of cool stars, with the external illumination module of Barman, Hauschildt, & Allard (2001). Our present calculations include illuminated spherically symmetric models, with conditions similar to those found in EG And, that include non-LTE line blanketing, molecular opacity, and a realistic description of the incident white dwarf flux. Our goals include the prediction of changes in the red giant absorption-line spectrum with orbital phase, the prediction of emission-line strengths from the coolest, densest portions of the recombination region, and the detailing modeling of eclipse mapping observations. JPA is supported by a Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship. Some of the calculations for this work were computed on the IBM SP ``Blue Horizon'' of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), with support from the National Science Foundation, and on the IBM SP of the NERSC with support from the DOE.

  10. CARBON ABUNDANCES FOR RED GIANTS IN THE DRACO DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Shetrone, Matthew D.; Stanford, Laura M.; Smith, Graeme H.; Siegel, Michael H.; Bond, Howard E. E-mail: graeme@ucolick.org E-mail: bond@stsci.edu

    2013-05-15

    Measurements of [C/Fe], [Ca/H], and [Fe/H] have been derived from Keck I LRISb spectra of 35 giants in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The iron abundances are derived by a spectrum synthesis modeling of the wavelength region from 4850 to 5375 A, while calcium and carbon abundances are obtained by fitting the Ca II H and K lines and the CH G band, respectively. A range in metallicity of -2.9 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} -1.6 is found within the giants sampled, with a good correlation between [Fe/H] and [Ca/H]. The great majority of stars in the sample would be classified as having weak absorption in the {lambda}3883 CN band, with only a small scatter in band strengths at a given luminosity on the red giant branch. In this sense the behavior of CN among the Draco giants is consistent with the predominantly weak CN bands found among red giants in globular clusters of metallicity [Fe/H] < -1.8. Over half of the giants in the Draco sample have [Fe/H] > -2.25, and among these there is a trend for the [C/Fe] abundance to decrease with increasing luminosity on the red giant branch. This is a phenomenon that is also seen among both field and globular cluster giants of the Galactic halo, where it has been interpreted as a consequence of deep mixing of material between the base of the convective envelope and the outer limits of the hydrogen-burning shell. However, among the six Draco giants observed that turn out to have metallicities -2.65 < [Fe/H] < -2.25 there is no such trend seen in the carbon abundance. This may be due to small sample statistics or primordial inhomogeneities in carbon abundance among the most metal-poor Draco stars. We identify a potential carbon-rich extremely metal-poor star in our sample. This candidate will require follow-up observations for confirmation.

  11. Giants reveal what dwarfs conceal: Li abundance in lower red giant branch stars as diagnostic of the primordial Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Salaris, M.; Bonifacio, P.

    2012-01-01

    The discrepancy between cosmological Li abundance inferred from Population II dwarf stars and that derived from big bang nucleosynthesis calculations is still far from being satisfactorily solved. We investigated, as an alternative route, the use of Li abundances in Population II lower red giant branch stars as empirical diagnostic of the cosmological Li. Both theory and observations suggest that the surface Li abundance in metal-poor red giants after the completion of the first dredge-up and before the red giant branch bump is significantly less sensitive to the efficiency of atomic diffusion, compared with dwarf stars. The surface Li abundances in these objects - after the dilution caused by the first dredge-up - are predicted to be sensitive to the total Li content left in the star, i.e. they are affected only by the total amount of Li eventually burned during the previous main-sequence phase. Standard stellar models computed under different physical assumptions show that the inclusion of the atomic diffusion has an impact of about 0.07 dex in the determination of the primordial Li abundance - much smaller than the case of metal-poor main-sequence turnoff stars - and it is basically unaffected by reasonable variations of other parameters (overshooting, age, initial He abundance and mixing length). We have determined from spectroscopy the surface Li content of 17 halo lower red giant branch stars, in the metallicity range between [Fe/H] ˜- 3.4 and ˜- 1.4 dex, evolving before the extramixing episode that sets in at the red giant branch bump. The initial Li (customarily taken as estimate of the cosmological Li abundance A(Li)0) has then been inferred by accounting for the difference between initial and post-dredge-up Li abundances in the appropriate stellar models. It depends mainly on the Teff scale adopted in the spectroscopic analysis, and is only weakly sensitive to the efficiency of atomic diffusion in the models, so long as one neglects Li destruction

  12. RE-INFLATED WARM JUPITERS AROUND RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-02-10

    Since the discovery of the first transiting hot Jupiters, models have sought to explain the anomalously large radii of highly irradiated gas giants. We now know that the size of hot Jupiter radius anomalies scales strongly with a planet's level of irradiation and numerous models like tidal heating, ohmic dissipation, and thermal tides have since been developed to help explain these inflated radii. In general, however, these models can be grouped into two broad categories: models that directly inflate planetary radii by depositing a fraction of the incident irradiation into the interior and models that simply slow a planet's radiative cooling, allowing it to retain more heat from formation and thereby delay contraction. Here we present a new test to distinguish between these two classes of models. Gas giants orbiting at moderate orbital periods around post-main-sequence stars will experience enormous increases to their irradiation as their host stars move up the sub-giant and red-giant branches. If hot Jupiter inflation works by depositing irradiation into the planet's deep interiors then planetary radii should increase in response to the increased irradiation. This means that otherwise non-inflated gas giants at moderate orbital periods of >10 days can re-inflate as their host stars evolve. Here we explore the circumstances that can lead to the creation of these “re-inflated” gas giants and examine how the existence or absence of such planets can be used to place unique constraints on the physics of the hot Jupiter inflation mechanism. Finally, we explore the prospects for detecting this potentially important undiscovered population of planets.

  13. Is PZ MON a Red Dwarf or a Red Giant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar', N. I.; Sergeev, S. G.

    Hipparcos data (ESA 1997) give for PZ Mon a parallax π = 0.71 +- 1.17 mas that is not in agreement with earlier estimations of distance to the star of 15-30 ps and with its status of K- dwarf. There are presented spectra of PZ Mon in the region 3750-6150 Α with resolution of 7 ≍ Α, which were carried out in the Nasmith focus of 2.6 m reflector in the Crimean Astrophysical observatory. Intensities of molecular absorptions in this spectral range are determined relative a nearby continuum and their relations between absolute magnitudes are considered. The calculated Mν =6.74 and r=29 ps correspond to an earlier classiffication of PZ Mon as a red dwarf.

  14. Chemical Abundance Analysis of the Symbiotic Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, Cezary; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of symbiotic stars - the long period, interacting binary systems - composed of red giant donor and a hot, compact companion is important for our understanding of binary stellar evolution in systems where mass loss or transfer take place involving RGB/AGB stars. The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants can track the mass exchange history and can determine their parent stellar population. However, the number of these objects with fairly well determined photospheric composition is insufficient for statistical considerations. Here we present the detailed chemical abundance analysis obtained for the first time for 14 M-type symbiotic giants. The analysis is based on the high resolution (R ˜ 50000), high S/N ˜ 100, near-IR spectra (at H- and K-band regions) obtained with Phoenix/Gemini South spectrometer. Spectrum synthesis employing standard LTE analysis and atmosphere models was used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Sc, Ti, Fe, and Ni). Our analysis reveals mostly slightly sub-solar or near-solar metallicities. We obtained significantly subsolar metallicities for RW Hya, RT Ser, and Hen 3-1213 and slightly super-solar metallicity in V455 Sco. The very low ^{12}C/^{13}C isotopic ratios, ˜6-11, and significant enrichment in nitrogen ^{14}N isotope in almost all giants in our sample indicate that they have experienced the first dredge-up.

  15. Oxygen isotopic ratios in intermediate-mass red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Straniero, O.; Hinkle, K. H.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The abundances of the three main isotopes of oxygen are altered in the course of the CNO-cycle. When the first dredge-up mixes the burning products to the surface, the nucleosynthesis processes can be probed by measuring oxygen isotopic ratios. Aims: By measuring 16O/17O and 16O/18O in red giants of known mass we compare the isotope ratios with predictions from stellar and galactic evolution modelling. Methods: Oxygen isotopic ratios were derived from the K-band spectra of six red giants. The sample red giants are open cluster members with known masses of between 1.8 and 4.5 M⊙. The abundance determination employs synthetic spectra calculated with the COMARCS code. The effect of uncertainties in the nuclear reaction rates, the mixing length, and of a change in the initial abundance of the oxygen isotopes was determined by a set of nucleosynthesis and mixing models using the FUNS code. Results: The observed 16O/17O ratios are in good agreement with the model results, even if the measured values do not present clear evidence of a variation with the stellar mass. The observed 16O/18O ratios are clearly lower than the predictions from our reference model. Variations in nuclear reaction rates and mixing length parameter both have only a very weak effect on the predicted values. The 12C/13C ratios of the K giants studied implies the absence of extra-mixing in these objects. Conclusions: A comparison with galactic chemical evolution models indicates that the 16O/18O abundance ratio underwent a faster decrease than predicted. To explain the observed ratios, the most likely scenario is a higher initial 18O abundance combined with a lower initial 16O abundance. Comparing the measured 18O/17O ratio with the corresponding value for the interstellar medium points towards an initial enhancement of 17O as well. Limitations imposed by the observations prevent this from being a conclusive result.

  16. Radio Emission from Red-Giant Hot Jupiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, Yuka; Spiegel, David S.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Nordhaus, Jason; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-01-01

    When planet-hosting stars evolve off the main sequence and go through the red-giant branch, the stars become orders of magnitudes more luminous and, at the same time, lose mass at much higher rates than their main sequence counterparts. Accordingly, if planetary companions exist around these stars at orbital distances of a few au, they will be heated up to the level of canonical hot Jupiters and also be subjected to a dense stellar wind. Given that magnetized planets interacting with stellar winds emit radio waves, such "Red-Giant Hot Jupiters" (RGHJs) may also be candidate radio emitters. We estimate the spectral auroral radio intensity of RGHJs based on the empirical relation with the stellar wind as well as a proposed scaling for planetary magnetic fields. RGHJs might be intrinsically as bright as or brighter than canonical hot Jupiters and about 100 times brighter than equivalent objects around main-sequence stars. We examine the capabilities of low-frequency radio observatories to detect this emission and find that the signal from an RGHJ may be detectable at distances up to a few hundred parsecs with the Square Kilometer Array.

  17. RADIO EMISSION FROM RED-GIANT HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Spiegel, David S.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Nordhaus, Jason; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-04-01

    When planet-hosting stars evolve off the main sequence and go through the red-giant branch, the stars become orders of magnitudes more luminous and, at the same time, lose mass at much higher rates than their main-sequence counterparts. Accordingly, if planetary companions exist around these stars at orbital distances of a few au, they will be heated up to the level of canonical hot Jupiters and also be subjected to a dense stellar wind. Given that magnetized planets interacting with stellar winds emit radio waves, such “Red-Giant Hot Jupiters” (RGHJs) may also be candidate radio emitters. We estimate the spectral auroral radio intensity of RGHJs based on the empirical relation with the stellar wind as well as a proposed scaling for planetary magnetic fields. RGHJs might be intrinsically as bright as or brighter than canonical hot Jupiters and about 100 times brighter than equivalent objects around main-sequence stars. We examine the capabilities of low-frequency radio observatories to detect this emission and find that the signal from an RGHJ may be detectable at distances up to a few hundred parsecs with the Square Kilometer Array.

  18. Radio Emission from Red-giant Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yuka; Spiegel, David S.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Nordhaus, Jason; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-04-01

    When planet-hosting stars evolve off the main sequence and go through the red-giant branch, the stars become orders of magnitudes more luminous and, at the same time, lose mass at much higher rates than their main-sequence counterparts. Accordingly, if planetary companions exist around these stars at orbital distances of a few au, they will be heated up to the level of canonical hot Jupiters and also be subjected to a dense stellar wind. Given that magnetized planets interacting with stellar winds emit radio waves, such “Red-Giant Hot Jupiters” (RGHJs) may also be candidate radio emitters. We estimate the spectral auroral radio intensity of RGHJs based on the empirical relation with the stellar wind as well as a proposed scaling for planetary magnetic fields. RGHJs might be intrinsically as bright as or brighter than canonical hot Jupiters and about 100 times brighter than equivalent objects around main-sequence stars. We examine the capabilities of low-frequency radio observatories to detect this emission and find that the signal from an RGHJ may be detectable at distances up to a few hundred parsecs with the Square Kilometer Array.

  19. Far-ultraviolet fluorescence of carbon monoxide in the red giant Arcturus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented that many of the weak features observed with International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) in the far-ultraviolet (1150-2000 A) spectrum of the archetype red giant Arcturus (K2 III) are A-X fourth positive bands of carbon monoxide excited by chromospheric emissions of O I, C I, and H I. The appearance of fluorescent CO bands near the wavelength of commonly used indicators of high-temperature (T greater than 20,000 K) plasma, such as C II at wavelength 1335 and C IV at wavelength 1548, introduces a serious ambiguity in diagnosing the presence of hot material in the outer atmospheres of the cool giants by means of low-dispersion IUE spectra.

  20. Type II Migration and Giant Planet Survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.

    2003-01-01

    Type II migration, in which a newly formed large planet opens a gap in its precursor circumstellar nebula and subsequently evolves with it, has been implicated as a delivery mechanism responsible for close stellar companions. Large scale migration is possible in a viscously spreading disk of surface density sigma (r,t) when most of it is sacrificed to the primary in order to promote a small portion of the disk to much higher angular momentum orbits. Embedded planets generally follow its evolution unless their own angular momentum is comparable to that of the disk. The fraction of the starting disk mass, M (sub d) = 2pi integral rsigma(r,0)dr, that is consumed by the star depends on the distance at which material escapes the disk's outer boundary. If the disk is allowed to expand indefinitely, virtually all of the disk will fall into the primary in order to send a vanishingly small portion to infinity. For such a case, it is difficult to explain the survival of any giant planets, including Jupiter and Saturn. Realistically, however, there are processes that could truncate a disk at a finite distance, r(sub d). Recent numerical modeling has illustrated that planets can survive in this case. We show here that much of these results can be understood by simple conservation arguments.

  1. The Asteroseismic Signature of Magnetic Red Giant Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, Matteo; Fuller, Jim

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler satellite has identified thousands of red giant branch (RGB) stars showing solar-like oscillations. These pulsation modes provide the opportunity to study the deep interiors of stars other than the Sun. We demonstrate that a strong magnetic field in the core of RGB stars can suppress the amplitude of dipolar oscillation modes. Suppressed dipolar modes are indeed observed in about 10% of ascending RGB stars, and we identify these as stars with strongly magnetized cores.The observed fraction and mass distribution of these stars suggests that they could be the descendants of magnetic Ap stars.For the first time, our work allows us to constrain the magnetic field in the deep interiors of a large population of stars. This paves the road for the study of stellar magnetic field evolution, and its role in transporting angular momentum and chemical species.

  2. Formation of Hydrocarbons in the Outflows from Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne; Kress, Monika; Tielens, Alexander G.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of hydrocarbons in the oxygen-rich outflows from red giants was studied. The existence of organic molecules in such outflows has been known for several years; however, their surprisingly high abundances has been a mystery since all of the carbon had been thought to be irretrievably locked up in CO, the most strongly bound molecule. CO is the first molecule to form from the atoms present in the star's extended atmosphere, and as strong stellar winds drive a cooling outflow, dust grains condense out. In oxygen-rich outflows, the dust is thought to be composed mainly of silicates and other metal oxides. Perhaps the noble metals can condense out in metallic form, in particular the relatively abundant transition metals iron and nickel. We proposed that perhaps the carbon reservoir held as CO can be accessed through a catalytic process involving the chemisorption of CO and H2 onto grains rich in metallic iron. CO and H2 are the two most abundant molecules in circumstellar outflows, and they both are known to dissociate on transition metal surfaces at elevated temperatures, freeing carbon to form organic molecules such as methane. We believe methane is a precursor molecule to the organics observed in oxygen-rich red giants. We have developed a nonequilibrium numerical model of a surface chemical (catalytic) process. Based on this model, we believe that methane can be formed under the conditions present in circumstellar outflows. Although the methane formation rates are exceptionally low under these conditions, over dynamical timescales, a significant amount of CO can be converted to methane and driven further out in the envelope, explaining the presence of organics there.

  3. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-05-20

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  4. Tests of two convection theories for red giant and red supergiant envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Two theories of stellar envelope convection are considered here in the context of red giants and red supergiants of intermediate to high mass: Boehm-Vitense's standard mixing-length theory (MLT) and Canuto & Mazzitelli's new theory incorporating the full spectrum of turbulence (FST). Both theories assume incompressible convection. Two formulations of the convective mixing length are also evaluated: l proportional to the local pressure scale height (H(sub P)) and l proportional to the distance from the upper boundary of the convection zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red phase of core helium burning. Since the theoretically predicted effective temperatures for cool stars are known to be sensitive to the assigned value of the mixing length, this quantity has been individually calibrated for each evolutionary sequence. The calibration is done in a composite Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the red giant and red supergiant members of well-observed Galactic open clusters. The MLT model requires the constant of proportionality for the convective mixing length to vary by a small but statistically significant amount with stellar mass, whereas the FST model succeeds in all cases with the mixing lenghth simply set equal to z. The structure of the deep stellar interior, however, remains very nearly unaffected by the choices of convection theory and mixing lenghth. Inside the convective envelope itself, a density inversion always occurs, but is somewhat smaller for the convectively more efficient MLT model. On physical grounds the FST model is preferable, and seems to alleviate the problem of finding the proper mixing length.

  5. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  6. The chemical compositions and evolutionary status of red giants in the open cluster NGC 6940

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcek Topcu, G.; Afşar, M.; Sneden, C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the high-resolution (R ≈ 60 000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≃ 120) spectroscopic analysis of 12 red giant members of the Galactic open cluster NGC 6940. We applied Yonsei-Yale isochrones to the colour-magnitude diagram, which suggested an age of 1.1 Gyr for the cluster with a turn-off mass of 2 M⊙. Atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and ξt) were determined via equivalent widths of Fe I, Fe II, Ti I, and Ti II lines. Calculated mean metallicity of the cluster is <[Fe/H]> = 0.04 ± 0.02. We derived abundances of α (Mg, Si, Ca), Fe-group (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn), and n-capture (Y, La, Nd, Eu) elements to be about solar. Light odd-Z elements Na and Al are slightly enhanced in MMU 108 and MMU 152 by ˜0.34 and ˜0.16 dex, respectively. Abundances of light elements Li, C, N, O, and 12C/13C ratios were derived from spectrum syntheses of the Li I resonance doublet at 6707 Å, [O I] line at 6300 Å, C2 Swan bandheads at 5164 and 5635 Å, and strong 12,13CN system lines in the 7995-8040 Å region. Most carbon isotopic ratios are similar to those found in other solar-metallicity giants, but MMU 152 has an unusual value of 12C/13C = 6. Evaluation of the LiCNO abundances and 12C/13C ratios along with the present theoretical models suggests that all the red giants in our sample are core-helium-burning clump stars.

  7. On Lithium-rich Red Giants: Engulfment on the Giant Branch of Trumpler 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Gómez, Claudia; Chanamé, Julio; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2016-12-01

    The Gaia-ESO survey recently reported on a large sample of lithium (Li) abundance determinations for evolved stars in the rich open cluster Trumpler 20. They argue for a scenario where virtually all stars experience post-main-sequence mixing and Li is preserved in only two objects. We present an alternate explanation, where Li is normal in the vast majority of cluster stars and anomalously high in these two cases. We demonstrate that the Li upper limits in the red giants can be explained with a combination of main-sequence depletion and standard dredge-up and that they are close to the detected levels in other systems of similar age. In our framework, two of the detected giants are anomalously Li-rich, and we propose that both could have been produced by the engulfment of a substellar mass companion of {16}-10+6 {M}{{J}}. This would imply that ˜ 5 % of 1.8 {M}⊙ stars in this system, and by extension elsewhere, should have substellar mass companions of high mass that could be engulfed at some point in their lifetimes. We discuss future tests that could confirm or refute this scenario.

  8. The spectroscopic indistinguishability of red giant branch and red clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseron, T.; Hawkins, K.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Stellar spectroscopy provides useful information on the physical properties of stars such as effective temperature, metallicity and surface gravity. However, those photospheric characteristics are often hampered by systematic uncertainties. The joint spectro-sismo project (APOGEE+Kepler, aka APOKASC) of field red giants has revealed a puzzling offset between the surface gravities (log g) determined spectroscopically and those determined using asteroseismology, which is largely dependent on the stellar evolutionary status. Aims: Therefore, in this letter, we aim to shed light on the spectroscopic source of the offset. Methods: We used the APOKASC sample to analyse the dependencies of the log g discrepancy as a function of stellar mass and stellar evolutionary status. We discuss and study the impact of some neglected abundances on spectral analysis of red giants, such as He and carbon isotopic ratio. Results: We first show that, for stars at the bottom of the red giant branch where the first dredge-up had occurred, the discrepancy between spectroscopic log g and asteroseismic log g depends on stellar mass. This seems to indicate that the log g discrepancy is related to CN cycling. Among the CN-cycled elements, we demonstrate that the carbon isotopic ratio (12C /13C) has the largest impact on stellar spectrum. In parallel, we observe that this log g discrepancy shows a similar trend as the 12C /13C ratios as expected by stellar evolution theory. Although we did not detect a direct spectroscopic signature of 13C, other corroborating evidences suggest that the discrepancy in log g is tightly correlated to the production of 13C in red giants. Moreover, by running the data-driven algorithm (the Cannon) on a synthetic grid trained on the APOGEE data, we try to evaluate more quantitatively the impact of various 12C /13C ratios. Conclusions: While we have demonstrated that 13C indeed impacts all parameters, the size of the impact is smaller than the observed offset

  9. Detached Red Giant Eclipsing Binary Twins: Rosetta Stones to the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, D. M.; Gould, A.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    We identify 34 highly-probable detached, red giant eclipsing binary pairs among 315 candidates in Devor's catalog of ≍10 000 OGLE-II eclipsing binaries. We estimate that there should be at least 200 such systems in OGLE-III. We show that spectroscopic measurements of the metallicities and radial-velocity-derived masses of these systems would independently constrain both the age-metallicity and helium-metallicity relations of the Galactic bulge, potentially breaking the age-helium degeneracy that currently limits our ability to characterize the bulge stellar population. Mass and metallicity measurements alone would be sufficient to immediately validate or falsify recent claims about the age and helium abundance of the bulge. A spectroscopic survey of these systems would constrain models of Milky Way assembly, as well as provide significant auxiliary science on research questions such as mass loss on the red giant branch. We discuss the theoretical uncertainties in stellar evolution models that would need to be accounted for to maximize the scientific yield.

  10. A compact system of small planets around a former red-giant star.

    PubMed

    Charpinet, S; Fontaine, G; Brassard, P; Green, E M; Van Grootel, V; Randall, S K; Silvotti, R; Baran, A S; Ostensen, R H; Kawaler, S D; Telting, J H

    2011-12-21

    Planets that orbit their parent star at less than about one astronomical unit (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance) are expected to be engulfed when the star becomes a red giant. Previous observations have revealed the existence of post-red-giant host stars with giant planets orbiting as close as 0.116 AU or with brown dwarf companions in tight orbits, showing that these bodies can survive engulfment. What has remained unclear is whether planets can be dragged deeper into the red-giant envelope without being disrupted and whether the evolution of the parent star itself could be affected. Here we report the presence of two nearly Earth-sized bodies orbiting the post-red-giant, hot B subdwarf star KIC 05807616 at distances of 0.0060 and 0.0076 AU, with orbital periods of 5.7625 and 8.2293 hours, respectively. These bodies probably survived deep immersion in the former red-giant envelope. They may be the dense cores of evaporated giant planets that were transported closer to the star during the engulfment and triggered the mass loss necessary for the formation of the hot B subdwarf, which might also explain how some stars of this type did not form in binary systems.

  11. Studies of the Long Secondary Periods in Pulsating Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Deibert, E.

    2016-12-01

    We have used systematic, sustained visual observations from the AAVSO International Database and the AAVSO time-series analysis package VSTAR to study the unexplained "long secondary periods" (LSPs) in 27 pulsating red giants. In our sample, the LSPs range from 479 to 2967 days, and are on average 8.1 +/- 1.3 times the excited pulsation period. There is no evidence for more than one LSP in each star. In stars with both the fundamental and first overtone radial period present, the LSP is more often about 10 times the latter. The visual amplitudes of the LSPs are typically 0.1 magnitude and do not correlate with the LSP. The phase curves tend to be sinusoidal, but at least two are sawtooth. The LSPs are stable, within their errors, over the timespan of our data, which is typically 25,000 days. The amplitudes, however, vary by up to a factor of two or more on a time scale of roughly 20-30 LSPs. There is no obvious difference between the carbon (C) stars and the normal oxygen (M) stars. Previous multicolor observations showed that the LSP color variations are similar to those of the pulsation period, and of the LSPs in the Magellanic Clouds, and not like those of eclipsing stars. We note that the LSPs are similar to the estimated rotation periods of the stars, though the latter have large uncertainties. This suggests that the LSP phenomenon may be a form of modulated rotational variability.

  12. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES IN RED GIANTS OF M4: EVIDENCE FOR ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR POLLUTION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Orazi, Valentina; Marino, Anna F. E-mail: anna.marino@unipd.i

    2010-06-20

    The determination of Li and proton-capture element abundances in globular cluster (GC) giants allows us to constrain several key questions on the multiple population scenarios in GCs, from formation and early evolution to pollution and dilution mechanisms. In this Letter, we present our results on Li abundances for a large sample of giants in the intermediate-metallicity GC NGC 6121 (M4), for which Na and O have been already determined by Marino et al. The stars analyzed are both below and above the red giant branch bump luminosity. We found that the first and second generation stars share the same Li content, suggesting that a Li production must have occurred. This provides strong observational evidence supporting the scenario in which asymptotic giant branch stars are GC polluters.

  13. Dynamics and Stellar Content of the Giant Southern Stream in M31. I. Keck Spectroscopy of Red Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rich, R. Michael; Reitzel, David B.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Geha, Marla C.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Patterson, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents the first results from a large spectroscopic survey of red giant branch (RGB) stars in M31 using DEIMOS on the Keck 10 m telescope. A photometric prescreening method, based on the intermediate-width DDO51 band centered on the Mg b/MgH absorption feature, was used to select spectroscopic targets. RGB candidates were targeted in a small section of M31's giant southern tidal stream at a projected distance of 31 kpc from the galaxy's center. We isolate a clean sample of 68 RGB stars by removing contaminants (foreground Milky Way dwarf stars and background galaxies) using a combination of spectroscopic, imaging, and photometric methods: radial velocity and the surface gravity-sensitive Na I doublet are particularly useful in this regard. About 65% of the M31 stars are found to be members of the giant southern stream, while the rest appear to be members of the general spheroid population. The mean (heliocentric) radial velocity of the stream in our field is -458 km s-1, blueshifted by -158 km s-1 relative to M31's systemic velocity, in good agreement with recent velocity measurements at other points along the stream. The intrinsic velocity dispersion of the stream is found to be 15+8-15 km s-1 (90% confidence limit). A companion paper by Font and coworkers discusses possible orbits, implications of the coldness of the stream, and properties of the progenitor satellite galaxy. The kinematics, and possibly the metallicity distribution, of the general spheroid (i.e., nonstream) population in this region of M31 indicate that it is significantly different from samples drawn from other parts of the M31 spheroid; this is probably an indication of substructure in the bulge and halo. The stream appears to have a higher mean metallicity than the general spheroid, <[Fe/H]>~-0.54 versus -0.74, and a smaller metallicity spread. The relatively high metallicity of the stream implies that its progenitor must have been a luminous dwarf galaxy. The Ca II triplet line

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Constraints on the Winds and Astrospheres of Red Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Harper, Graham M.

    2016-10-01

    We report on an ultraviolet spectroscopic survey of red giants observed by the Hubble Space Telescope, focusing on spectra of the Mg ii h and k lines near 2800 Å in order to study stellar chromospheric emission, winds, and astrospheric absorption. We focus on spectral types between K2 III and M5 III, a spectral type range with stars that are noncoronal, but possessing strong, chromospheric winds. We find a very tight relation between Mg ii surface flux and photospheric temperature, supporting the notion that all K2-M5 III stars are emitting at a basal flux level. Wind velocities (V w ) are generally found to decrease with spectral type, with V w decreasing from ˜40 km s-1 at K2 III to ˜20 km s-1 at M5 III. We find two new detections of astrospheric absorption, for σ Pup (K5 III) and γ Eri (M1 III). This absorption signature had previously only been detected for α Tau (K5 III). For the three astrospheric detections, the temperature of the wind after the termination shock (TS) correlates with V w , but is lower than predicted by the Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions, consistent with the idea that red giant TSs are radiative shocks rather than simple hydrodynamic shocks. A full hydrodynamic simulation of the γ Eri astrosphere is provided to explore this further. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-13462. This paper also presents observations obtained with the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin.

  15. Testing the core of red-giant-branch stars using the period spacing of gravity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, Nadège; Diego, Bossini; Miglio, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    The blooming of asteroseismology of red-giant stars with the CoRoT and Kepler space missions paves the way to a better understanding of the stellar structure and physical processes occurring in low-mass-giant stars.We investigate the effect of rotation on the asymptotic period spacing of gravity modes (DP) and on the coupling strength between acoustic and gravity modes. We focus on red-giant-branch stars (RGB) which ignite He in degenerate conditions (M<2.0Msun), and we compare standard models with those including the effects of rotation and overshooting beyond the convective core.We find that, in the case of red-giant stars below the RGB bump, additional transport processes of chemicals have an impact on DP, hence on the determination of the stellar mass when DP is used as a constraint. Moreover we show that the coupling strength gives a direct signature of rotation occuring in red-giant stars. Whether this signature can be inferred from current data needs however to be investigated further. Finally we show that, irrespective of additional transport processes occurring during the main sequence, the period spacing of red-giant stars brighter than the RGB bump is an accurate proxy for the stellar luminosity, due to the well known relation between MHecore and luminosity.

  16. Lithium in Open Cluster Red Giants Hosting Substellar Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2016-02-01

    We have measured stellar parameters, [Fe/H], lithium abundances, rotation, and 12C/13C in a small sample of red giants (RGs) in three open clusters that are each home to a RG star that hosts a substellar companion (SSC) (NGC 2423 3, NGC 4349 127, and BD+12 1917 in M67). Our goal is to explore whether the presence of SSCs influences the Li content. Both 12C/13C and stellar rotation are measured as additional tracers of stellar mixing. One of the companion hosts, NGC 2423 3, is found to be Li-rich with A(Li){}{{NLTE}} = 1.56 dex, and this abundance is significantly higher than the A(Li) of the two comparison stars in NGC 2423. All three SSC hosts have the highest A(Li) and 12C/13C when compared to the control RGs in their respective clusters; however, except for NGC 2423 3, at least one control star has similarly high abundances within the uncertainties. Higher A(Li) could suggest that the formation or presence of planets plays a role in the degree of internal mixing on or before the RG branch. However, a multitude of factors affect A(Li) during the RG phase, and when the abundances of our sample are compared with the abundances of RGs in other open clusters available in the literature, we find that they all fall well within a much larger distribution of A(Li) and 12C/13C. Thus, even the high Li in NGC 2423 3 cannot be concretely tied to the presence of the SSC.

  17. Lithium in Open Cluster Red Giants Hosting Substellar Companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured stellar parameters, [Fe/H], lithium abundances, rotation, and (12)C/13C in a small sample of red giants (RGs) in three open clusters that are each home to a RG star that hosts a substellar companion (SSC) (NGC 2423 3, NGC 4349 127, and BD+12 1917 in M67). Our goal is to explore whether the presence of SSCs influences the Li content. Both (12)C/13C and stellar rotation are measured as additional tracers of stellar mixing. One of the companion hosts, NGC 2423?3, is found to be Li-rich with A(Li)(sub NLTE) = 1.56 dex, and this abundance is significantly higher than the A(Li) of the two comparison stars in NGC 2423. All three SSC hosts have the highest A(Li) and (12)C/13C when compared to the control RGs in their respective clusters; however, except for NGC 2423?3, at least one control star has similarly high abundances within the uncertainties. Higher A(Li) could suggest that the formation or presence of planets plays a role in the degree of internal mixing on or before the RG branch. However, a multitude of factors affect A(Li) during the RG phase, and when the abundances of our sample are compared with the abundances of RGs in other open clusters available in the literature, we find that they all fall well within a much larger distribution of A(Li) and (12)C/13C. Thus, even the high Li in NGC 2423 3 cannot be concretely tied to the presence of the SSC.

  18. The lithium abundances of a large sample of red giants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. J.; Tan, K. F.; Wang, L.; Zhao, G.; Li, H. N.; Sato, Bun'ei; Takeda, Y. E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-20

    The lithium abundances for 378 G/K giants are derived with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium correction considered. Among these are 23 stars that host planetary systems. The lithium abundance is investigated, as a function of metallicity, effective temperature, and rotational velocity, as well as the impact of a giant planet on G/K giants. The results show that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. The lithium abundance has no correlation with rotational velocity at v sin i < 10 km s{sup –1}. Giants with planets present lower lithium abundance and slow rotational velocity (v sin i < 4 km s{sup –1}). Our sample includes three Li-rich G/K giants, 36 Li-normal stars, and 339 Li-depleted stars. The fraction of Li-rich stars in this sample agrees with the general rate of less than 1% in the literature, and the stars that show normal amounts of Li are supposed to possess the same abundance at the current interstellar medium. For the Li-depleted giants, Li-deficiency may have already taken place at the main sequence stage for many intermediate mass (1.5-5 M {sub ☉}) G/K giants. Finally, we present the lithium abundance and kinematic parameters for an enlarged sample of 565 giants using a compilation of the literature, and confirm that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. With the enlarged sample, we investigate the differences between the lithium abundance in thin-/thick-disk giants, which indicate that the lithium abundance in thick-disk giants is more depleted than that in thin-disk giants.

  19. Kinematic detection of supernova remnants in giant H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1986-12-01

    In a kinematic survey of giant H II regions in M 101, four sources that have large velocity widths at low intensity levels are detected. Two of these large-velocity-width sources (LVWSs) are, within the limit of resolution, coincident with nonthermal radio sources several times as luminous as Cas A. The LVWS in NGC 5471 B is so bright that it is possible to separate its broad profile from the narrower profile of the background H II region. H-alpha CCD photometry, optical spectroscopy, and high-resolution radio data are combined to derive its physical properties, which support Skillman's (1985) identification of the object as a supernova remnant. The other LVWSs might be supernova remnants embedded in giant H II regions, unusually massive wind-driven shells, or the combination of both.

  20. High surface magnetic field in red giants as a new signature of planet engulfment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privitera, Giovanni; Meynet, Georges; Eggenberger, Patrick; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia; Vidotto, Aline A.; Bianda, Michele; Villaver, Eva; ud-Doula, Asif

    2016-09-01

    Context. Red giant stars may engulf planets. This may increase the rotation rate of their convective envelope, which could lead to strong dynamo-triggered magnetic fields. Aims: We explore the possibility of generating magnetic fields in red giants that have gone through the process of a planet engulfment. We compare them with similar models that evolve without any planets. We discuss the impact of magnetic braking through stellar wind on the evolution of the surface velocity of the parent star. Methods: By studying rotating stellar models with and without planets and an empirical relation between the Rossby number and the surface magnetic field, we deduced the evolution of the surface magnetic field along the red giant branch. The effects of stellar wind magnetic braking were explored using a relation deduced from magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Results: The stellar evolution model of a red giant with 1.7 M⊙ without planet engulfment and with a time-averaged rotation velocity during the main sequence equal to 100 km s-1 shows a surface magnetic field triggered by convection that is stronger than 10 G only at the base of the red giant branch, that is, for gravities log g> 3. When a planet engulfment occurs, this magnetic field can also appear at much lower gravities, that is, at much higher luminosities along the red giant branch. The engulfment of a 15 MJ planet typically produces a dynamo-triggered magnetic field stronger than 10 G for gravities between 2.5 and 1.9. We show that for reasonable magnetic braking laws for the wind, the high surface velocity reached after a planet engulfment may be maintained sufficiently long to be observable. Conclusions: High surface magnetic fields for red giants in the upper part of the red giant branch are a strong indication of a planet engulfment or of an interaction with a companion. Our theory can be tested by observing fast-rotating red giants such as HD 31994, Tyc 0347-00762-1, Tyc 5904-00513-1, and Tyc 6054

  1. A LITHIUM-RICH RED GIANT BELOW THE CLUMP IN THE KEPLER CLUSTER, NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Rich, Evan; Twarog, Bruce A.; Deliyannis, Constantine P. E-mail: evan66210@gmail.com E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu

    2013-04-10

    WIYN/HYDRA spectra in the Li 6708 A region have been obtained for 332 probable members of the old open cluster, NGC 6819. Preliminary analysis shows a pattern of Li depletion from the top of the turnoff to the base of the giant branch. Starting 1 mag below the level of the clump, all brighter giants have A(Li) below 1.0, with most having upper limits below 0.5. Star W007017, located below the first-ascent red giant bump is Li-rich with A(Li) = 2.3. As a highly probable single-star astrometric and radial-velocity cluster member, its discrepant asteroseismic membership could be a by-product of the processes that triggered Li enhancement. Its color-magnitude diagram location is consistent with only one proposed enhanced mixing process among first-ascent red giants.

  2. On Lithium-rich Red Giants. I. Engulfment of Substellar Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Gómez, Claudia; Chanamé, Julio; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2016-10-01

    A small fraction of red giants are known to be lithium (Li) rich, in contradiction with expectations from stellar evolutionary theory. A possible explanation for these atypical giants is the engulfment of an Li-rich planet or brown dwarf by the star. In this work, we model the evolution of Li abundance in canonical red giants including the accretion of a substellar mass companion. We consider a wide range of stellar and companion masses, Li abundances, stellar metallicities, and planetary orbital periods. Based on our calculations, companions with masses lower than 15 {M}J dissolve in the convective envelope and can induce Li enrichment in regimes where extra mixing does not operate. Our models indicate that the accretion of a substellar companion can explain abundances up to A(Li) ≈ 2.2, setting an upper limit for Li-rich giants formed by this mechanism. Giants with higher abundances need another mechanism to be explained. For reasonable planetary distributions, we predict the Li abundance distribution of low-mass giants undergoing planet engulfment, finding that between 1% and 3% of them should have {{A}}({Li})≥slant 1.5. We show that depending on the stellar mass range, this traditional definition of Li-rich giants is misleading, as isolated massive stars would be considered anomalous while giants engulfing a companion would be set aside, flagged as normal. We explore the detectability of companion engulfment, finding that planets with masses higher than ∼ 7 {M}J produce a distinct signature, and that descendants of stars originating in the Li dip and low-luminosity red giants are ideal tests of this channel.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR MASS EJECTION ASSOCIATED WITH LONG SECONDARY PERIODS IN RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, P. R.; Nicholls, C. P. E-mail: nicholls@mso.anu.edu.a

    2009-12-10

    Approximately 30% of luminous red giants exhibit a long secondary period (LSP) of variation in their light curves in addition to a shorter primary period of oscillation. The cause of the LSP has so far defied explanation: leading possibilities are binarity and a nonradial mode of oscillation. Here, large samples of red giants in the Large Magellanic Cloud both with and without LSPs are examined for evidence of an 8 or 24 mum mid-IR excess caused by circumstellar dust. It is found that stars with LSPs show a significant mid-IR excess compared to stars without LSPs. Furthermore, the near-IR J - K color seems unaffected by the presence of the 24 mum excess. These findings indicate that LSPs cause mass ejection from red giants and that the lost mass and circumstellar dust is most likely in either a clumpy or a disk-like configuration. The underlying cause of the LSP and the mass ejection remains unknown.

  4. A simple model to describe intrinsic stellar noise for exoplanet detection around red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Thomas S. H.; Chaplin, William J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Huber, Daniel; Campante, Tiago L.; Handberg, Rasmus; Lund, Mikkel N.; Veras, Dimitri; Kuszlewicz, James S.; Farr, Will M.

    2017-02-01

    In spite of the huge advances in exoplanet research provided by the NASA Kepler Mission, there remain only a small number of transit detections around evolved stars. Here, we present a reformulation of the noise properties of red-giant stars, where the intrinsic stellar granulation and the stellar oscillations described by asteroseismology play a key role. The new noise model is a significant improvement on the current Kepler results for evolved stars. Our noise model may be used to help understand planet detection thresholds for the ongoing K2 and upcoming TESSmissions, and serve as a predictor of stellar noise for these missions. As an application of our noise model, we explore the minimum detectable planet radii for red giant stars, and find that Neptune-sized planets should be detectable around low-luminosity red giant branch stars.

  5. 3D LTE spectral line formation with scattering in red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.; Collet, R.; Nordlund, Å.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of coherent isotropic continuum scattering on the formation of spectral lines in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) using 3D hydrodynamical and 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres of red giant stars. Methods: Detailed radiative transfer with coherent and isotropic continuum scattering is computed for 3D hydrodynamical and 1D hydrostatic models of late-type stellar atmospheres using the SCATE code. Opacities are computed in LTE, while a coherent and isotropic scattering term is added to the continuum source function. We investigate the effects of scattering by comparing continuum flux levels, spectral line profiles and curves of growth for different species with calculations that treat scattering as absorption. Results: Rayleigh scattering is the dominant source of scattering opacity in the continuum of red giant stars. Photons may escape from deeper, hotter layers through scattering, resulting in significantly higher continuum flux levels beneath a wavelength of λ ≲ 5000 Å. The magnitude of the effect is determined by the importance of scattering opacity with respect to absorption opacity; we observe the largest changes in continuum flux at the shortest wavelengths and lowest metallicities; intergranular lanes of 3D models are more strongly affected than granules. Continuum scattering acts to increase the profile depth of LTE lines: continua gain more brightness than line cores due to their larger thermalization depth in hotter layers. We thus observe the strongest changes in line depth for high-excitation species and ionized species, which contribute significantly to photon thermalization through their absorption opacity near the continuum optical surface. Scattering desaturates the line profiles, leading to larger abundance corrections for stronger lines, which reach -0.5 dex at 3000 Å for Fe ii lines in 3D with excitation potential χ = 2 eV at [Fe/H] = -3.0. The corrections are less severe for low-excitation lines, longer

  6. A search for soft X-ray emission from red-giant coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Mason, K. O.; Sanford, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Hills has pointed out that if red-giant coronae are weak sources of soft X-rays, then the problems of the identification of the local component of the soft X-ray background and the observed lack of gas in globular clusters may be simultaneously resolved. Using instrumentation aboard OAO Copernicus, we have searched unsuccessfully for emission in the 10-100 A band from four nearby red giants. In all cases, our upper limits are of the order of the minimum theoretically predicted fluxes.

  7. Extinctions and Distances of Dark Clouds from Ugrijhk Photometry of Red Clump Giants: the North America and Pelican Nebulae Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straižys, V.; Laugalys, V.

    A possibility of applying 2MASS J, H, Ks, IPHAS r, i and MegaCam u, g photometry of red giants for determining distances to dark clouds is investigated. Red clump giants with a small admixture of G5--K1 and M2--M3 stars of the giant branch can be isolated and used in determining distances to separate clouds or spiral arms. Interstellar extinctions of background red giants can be also used for mapping dust surface density in the cloud.

  8. Granulation in Red Giants: Observations by the Kepler Mission and Three-dimensional Convection Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; García, R. A.; Huber, D.; Jiménez, A.; Mosser, B.; Bedding, T. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Régulo, C.; Stello, D.; Chaplin, W. J.; De Ridder, J.; Hale, S. J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kjeldsen, H.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, S. E.

    2011-11-01

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze ~1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale τgran and power P gran). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, νmax) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T eff)). We show that τeffvpropν-0.89 max and P granvpropν-1.90 max, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T eff, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  9. Period spacings in red giants. III. Coupling factors of mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Takata, M.; Vrard, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The power of asteroseismology relies on the capability of global oscillations to infer the stellar structure. For evolved stars, we benefit from unique information directly carried out by mixed modes that probe their radiative cores. This third article of the series devoted to mixed modes in red giants focuses on their coupling factors, which have remained largely unexploited up to now. Aims: With the measurement of coupling factors, we intend to give physical constraints on the regions surrounding the radiative core and the hydrogen-burning shell of subgiants and red giants. Methods: A new method for measuring the coupling factor of mixed modes was implemented, which was derived from the method recently implemented for measuring period spacings. This new method was automated so that it could be applied to a large sample of stars. Results: Coupling factors of mixed modes were measured for thousands of red giants. They show specific variation with mass and evolutionary stage. Weak coupling is observed for the most evolved stars on the red giant branch only; large coupling factors are measured at the transition between subgiants and red giants as well as in the red clump. Conclusions: The measurement of coupling factors in dipole mixed modes provides a new insight into the inner interior structure of evolved stars. While the large frequency separation and the asymptotic period spacings probe the envelope and core, respectively, the coupling factor is directly sensitive to the intermediate region in between and helps determine its extent. Observationally, the determination of the coupling factor is a prior to precise fits of the mixed-mode pattern and can now be used to address further properties of the mixed-mode pattern, such as the signature of buoyancy glitches and core rotation.

  10. GRANULATION IN RED GIANTS: OBSERVATIONS BY THE KEPLER MISSION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; Garcia, R. A.; Jimenez, A.; Regulo, C.; Mosser, B.; Elsworth, Y.; Chaplin, W. J.; Hale, S. J.; De Ridder, J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Mullally, F.

    2011-11-10

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze {approx}1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale {tau}{sub gran} and power P{sub gran}). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, {nu}{sub max}) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T{sub eff})). We show that {tau}{sub eff}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.89}{sub max} and P{sub gran}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1.90}{sub max}, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T{sub eff}, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  11. Can Life Develop in the Expanded Habitable Zones around Red Giant Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Bruno; Schneider, Jean; Danchi, William C.

    2005-07-01

    We present some new ideas about the possibility of life developing around subgiant and red giant stars. Our study concerns the temporal evolution of the habitable zone. The distance between the star and the habitable zone, as well as its width, increases with time as a consequence of stellar evolution. The habitable zone moves outward after the star leaves the main sequence, sweeping a wider range of distances from the star until the star reaches the tip of the asymptotic giant branch. Currently there is no clear evidence as to when life actually formed on the Earth, but recent isotopic data suggest life existed at least as early as 7×108 yr after the Earth was formed. Thus, if life could form and evolve over time intervals from 5×108 to 109 yr, then there could be habitable planets with life around red giant stars. For a 1 Msolar star at the first stages of its post-main-sequence evolution, the temporal transit of the habitable zone is estimated to be several times 109 yr at 2 AU and around 108 yr at 9 AU. Under these circumstances life could develop at distances in the range 2-9 AU in the environment of subgiant or giant stars, and in the far distant future in the environment of our own solar system. After a star completes its first ascent along the red giant branch and the He flash takes place, there is an additional stable period of quiescent He core burning during which there is another opportunity for life to develop. For a 1 Msolar star there is an additional 109 yr with a stable habitable zone in the region from 7 to 22 AU. Space astronomy missions, such as proposed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and Darwin, that focus on searches for signatures of life on extrasolar planets, should also consider the environments of subgiants and red giant stars as potentially interesting sites for understanding the development of life. We performed a preliminary evaluation of the difficulty of interferometric observations of planets around red giant stars

  12. Surface activity and oscillation amplitudes of red giants in eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gaulme, P.; Jackiewicz, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Mosser, B.

    2014-04-10

    Among the 19 red-giant stars belonging to eclipsing binary systems that have been identified in Kepler data, 15 display solar-like oscillations. We study whether the absence of mode detection in the remaining 4 is an observational bias or possibly evidence of mode damping that originates from tidal interactions. A careful analysis of the corresponding Kepler light curves shows that modes with amplitudes that are usually observed in red giants would have been detected if they were present. We observe that mode depletion is strongly associated with short-period systems, in which stellar radii account for 16%-24% of the semi-major axis, and where red-giant surface activity is detected. We suggest that when the rotational and orbital periods synchronize in close binaries, the red-giant component is spun up, so that a dynamo mechanism starts and generates a magnetic field, leading to observable stellar activity. Pressure modes would then be damped as acoustic waves dissipate in these fields.

  13. A preliminary investigation of Giant red mustard (Brassica juncea) as a deterrent of silverleaf whitefly oviposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different pairs of plants planted in a single pot were tested in the greenhouse for oviposition preference by the silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring [Homoptera: Aleyrodidae]). Treatments consisted of the following in single pots: 2 giant red mustard plants (Brassica juncea ...

  14. Testing the cores of first ascent red giant stars using the period spacing of g modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, N.; Bossini, D.; Miglio, A.; Vrard, M.; Mosser, B.

    2016-03-01

    In the context of the determination of stellar properties using asteroseismology, we study the influence of rotation and convective-core overshooting on the properties of red giant stars. We used models in order to investigate the effects of these mechanisms on the asymptotic period spacing of gravity modes (ΔΠ1) of red-giant stars that ignite He burning in degenerate conditions (M ≲ 2.0 M⊙). We also compare the predictions of these models with Kepler observations. For a given Δν, ΔΠ1 depends not only on the stellar mass, but also on mixing processes that can affect the structure of the core. We find that in the case of more evolved red-giant-branch stars and regardless of the transport processes occurring in their interiors, the observed ΔΠ1 can provide information as to their stellar luminosity, within ˜10-20 per cent. In general, the trends of ΔΠ1 with respect to mass and metallicity that are observed in Kepler red-giant stars are well reproduced by the models.

  15. Perfluorooctanesulfonate and periluorooctanoate in red panda and giant panda from China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiayin; Li, Ming; Jin, Yihe; Saito, Norimitsu; Xu, Muqi; Wei, Fuwen

    2006-09-15

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are important perfluorochemicals (PFCs) in various applications. Recently, it has been shown that these compounds are widespread in the environment, wildlife, and humans. The giant panda and the red panda belong to the order Carnivora, but are highly specialized as bamboo feeders. Both species are considered rare and endangered. In this study, we report for the first time on levels of PFOS and PFOA in serum of the giant panda and the red panda captured in zoos and animal parks from six provinces in China. PFOS was the predominant compound in all panda samples measured (ranging from 0.80 to 73.80 microg/L for red panda and from 0.76 to 19.00 microg/L for giant panda). The PFOA level ranged from 0.33 to 8.20 microg/L for red panda, and from 0.32 to 1.56 microg/L for giant panda. There was a positive significant correlation between concentrations of PFOS and PFOA in the serum obtained from pandas. No age- or sex- related differences were observed in concentrations of the fluorochemicals in panda sera. Greater concentrations of the fluorochemicals were found for those individuals collected from zoos near urbanized or industrialized areas than for other areas. These data combined with other reported data suggest that there are large differences in distribution of perfluorinated compounds in terrestrial animals.

  16. K2 red giant asteroseismology using Bayesian Asteroseismology data Modeling (BAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, Joel; Stello, Dennis; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2017-01-01

    The re-purposed Kepler mission, K2, boasts an impressive panoramic view of tens of thousands of red giants along the ecliptic, zooming in on clusters of various ages and metalliticies and probing Galactic sight lines inaccessible to the original Kepler field of view. However, its compromised pointing has introduced spurious features in stellar light curves and has reduced its photometric quality compared to that of the original Kepler mission. Enhanced data processing techniques above and beyond those used for Kepler are therefore required in order to translate observed K2 stellar light curves in to reliable fundamental parameters like surface gravity, radius, and mass with asteroseismology. I will present results from one such effort -- the Bayesian Asteroseismology data Modeling (BAM) pipeline. I will discuss the state of science with red giants in K2, with particular emphasis on a sample of red giants analyzed with the BAM. Implications for Galactic population studies using K2 red giants will be presented, with an eye toward completeness and contamination.

  17. Multi-wavelength observations of the peculiar red giant HR 3126

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesce, Joseph E.; Stencel, Robert E.; Walter, Frederick M.; Doggett, Jesse; Dachs, Joachim; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Mundt, Reinhard

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the red giant HR 3126 are combined with multi-wavelength data in order to provide a firmer basis for explaining the arc-minute sized nebula surrounding the object. Possibilities as to the location of HR 3126 on the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, and to the formation mechanisms of the reflection nebula IC 2220 associated with it, are summarized.

  18. Suppression of Quadrupole and Octupole Modes in Red Giants Observed by Kepler *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Cantiello, Matteo; Fuller, Jim; Garcia, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An exciting new theoretical result shows that observing suppression of dipole oscillation modes in red giant stars can be used to detect strong magnetic fields in the stellar cores. A fundamental facet of the theory is that nearly all the mode energy leaking into the core is trapped by the magnetic greenhouse effect. This results in clear predictions for how the mode visibility changes as a star evolves up the red giant branch, and how that depends on stellar mass, spherical degree, and mode lifetime. Here, we investigate the validity of these predictions with a focus on the visibility of different spherical degrees. We find that mode suppression weakens for higher degree modes with a reduction in the quadrupole mode visibility of up to 49%, and no detectable suppression of octupole modes, in agreement with theory. We find evidence for the influence of increasing mode lifetimes on the visibilities along the red giant branch, in agreement with previous independent observations. These results support the theory that strong internal magnetic fields cause suppression of non-radial modes in red giants. We also find preliminary evidence that stars with suppressed dipole modes on average have slightly lower metallicity than normal stars.

  19. An automated technique for locating metal-deficient red giants from objective-prism spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, C.; Morrison, H.L. )

    1990-10-01

    A semi-automated technique designed to locate metal-weak G and K giants from objective-prism spectra in combination with temperature information from direct plates is described. An accurate wavelength calibration of the spectra made it possible to measure abundance using a line-strength index based on Ca II H and K as a function of color. Criteria based on spectral features between 3500 and 5300 A are described which enable metal-weak giant candidates to be isolated from foreground dwarfs. The technique has been used to locate metal-weak giants in several Galactic fields. 39 refs.

  20. What Makes Red Giants Tick? Linking Tidal Forces, Activity, and Solar-Like Oscillations via Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Gaulme, Patrick; McKeever, Jean; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to advances in asteroseismology, red giants have become astrophysical laboratories for studying stellar evolution and probing the Milky Way. However, not all red giants show solar-like oscillations. It has been proposed that stronger tidal interactions from short-period binaries and increased magnetic activity on spotty giants are linked to absent or damped solar-like oscillations, yet each star tells a nuanced story. In this work, we characterize a subset of red giants in eclipsing binaries observed by Kepler. The binaries exhibit a range of orbital periods, solar-like oscillation behavior, and stellar activity. We use orbital solutions together with a suite of modeling tools to combine photometry and spectroscopy in a detailed analysis of tidal synchronization timescales, star spot activity, and stellar evolution histories. These red giants offer an unprecedented opportunity to test stellar physics and are important benchmarks for ensemble asteroseismology.

  1. HD 181068: a red giant in a triply eclipsing compact hierarchical triple system.

    PubMed

    Derekas, A; Kiss, L L; Borkovits, T; Huber, D; Lehmann, H; Southworth, J; Bedding, T R; Balam, D; Hartmann, M; Hrudkova, M; Ireland, M J; Kovács, J; Mezo, Gy; Moór, A; Niemczura, E; Sarty, G E; Szabó, Gy M; Szabó, R; Telting, J H; Tkachenko, A; Uytterhoeven, K; Benko, J M; Bryson, S T; Maestro, V; Simon, A E; Stello, D; Schaefer, G; Aerts, C; ten Brummelaar, T A; De Cat, P; McAlister, H A; Maceroni, C; Mérand, A; Still, M; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L; Turner, N; Tuthill, P G; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kjeldsen, H; Quintana, E V; Tenenbaum, P; Twicken, J D

    2011-04-08

    Hierarchical triple systems comprise a close binary and a more distant component. They are important for testing theories of star formation and of stellar evolution in the presence of nearby companions. We obtained 218 days of Kepler photometry of HD 181068 (magnitude of 7.1), supplemented by ground-based spectroscopy and interferometry, which show it to be a hierarchical triple with two types of mutual eclipses. The primary is a red giant that is in a 45-day orbit with a pair of red dwarfs in a close 0.9-day orbit. The red giant shows evidence for tidally induced oscillations that are driven by the orbital motion of the close pair. HD 181068 is an ideal target for studies of dynamical evolution and testing tidal friction theories in hierarchical triple systems.

  2. Three Red Giants With Substellar-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Wolszczan, A.; Nowak, G.; Adamów, M.; Kowalik, K.; Maciejewski, G.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present three giant stars from the ongoing Penn State-Toruń Planet Search with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which exhibit radial velocity (RV) variations that point to the presence of planetary-mass companions around them. BD+49 828 is a M=1.52+/- 0.22 {{M}⊙ } K0 giant with a m sin i=1.6-0.2+0.4 {{M}J} minimum mass companion in a = 4.2+0.32-0.2 AU (2590+300-180d), e = 0.35+0.24-0.10 orbit. HD 95127, a log L/{{L}⊙ }=2.28+/- 0.38, R=20+/- 9 {{R}⊙ }, M=1.20+/- 0.22 {{M}⊙ } K0 giant, has a m sin i = 5.01-0.44+0.61 {{M}J} minimum mass companion in a = 1.28+0.01-0.01 AU (482+5-5d), e = 0.11+0.15-0.06 orbit. Finally, HD 216536 is a M=1.36+/- 0.38 {{M}⊙ } K0 giant with a msin i=1.47-0.12+0.20 {{M}J} minimum mass companion in a=0.609-0.002+0.002 AU (148.6-0.7+0.7d), e = 0.38+0.12-0.10 orbit. Both HD 95127 b and HD 216536 b in their compact orbits are very close to the engulfment zone and hence prone to ingestion in the near future. BD+49 828 b is among the longest-period planets detected with the RV technique until now and it will remain unaffected by stellar evolution up to a very late stage of its host. We discuss general properties of planetary systems around evolved stars and planet survivability using existing data on exoplanets in more detail. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  3. Iron Abundances and Atmospheric Parameters of Red Giants in the Open Cluster IC 4756

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Julie O.

    Three red giants were investigated within the open cluster IC 4756 using observations taken from the McDonald Observatory's 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope and the Sandiford Cassegrain Echelle Spectrometer (SES). Iron abundances were calculated for each star based on the equivalent widths of Fe I and Fe II lines measured using the line lists of Bubar and King (2010) and Schuler et al. (2005). Also derived were the basic atmospheric parameters: effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and microturbulence. Her 35, Her 85, and Her 249 were found to have corresponding [Fe I/H] of 0.06 +/- 0.04, -0.16 +/- 0.03, and -0.16 +/- 0.06 as derived from the neutral lines. These values, when compared to the results of other studies, suggest that the cluster has an overall metallicity within the solar to subsolar value. This would indicate IC 4756 as a slightly metal-poor object. The star Her 85 is also examined to determine if derived atmospheric parameters support the classification of more recent studies as a nonmember of the cluster. The studies base their decisions on its deviation in radial velocity from the cluster mean. It is concluded that there is little solid evidence to support the dismissal of Her 85 from metallicity studies of IC 4756 and present-day membership and proper motion studies with modern equipment are required to confirm or reject this theory.

  4. A new method for the asteroseismic determination of the evolutionary state of red-giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Yvonne; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Davies, Guy R.

    2017-04-01

    Determining the ages of red-giant stars is a key problem in stellar astrophysics. One of the difficulties in this determination is to know the evolutionary state of the individual stars - i.e. have they started to burn Helium in their cores? That is the topic of this paper. Asteroseismic data provide a route to achieving this information. What we present here is a highly autonomous way of determining the evolutionary state from an analysis of the power spectrum of the light curve. The method is fast and efficient and can provide results for a large number of stars. It uses the structure of the dipole-mode oscillations, which have a mixed character in red-giant stars, to determine some measures that are used in the categorization. It does not require that all the individual components of any given mode be separately characterized. Some 6604 red-giant stars have been classified. Of these, 3566 are determined to be on the red-giant branch, 2077 are red-clump and 439 are secondary-clump stars. We do not specifically identify the low-metallicity, horizontal-branch stars. The difference between red-clump and secondary-clump stars is dependent on the manner in which Helium burning is first initiated. We discuss that the way the boundary between these classifications is set may lead to mis-categorization in a small number of stars. The remaining 522 stars were not classified either because they lacked sufficient power in the dipole modes (so-called depressed dipole modes) or because of conflicting values in the parameters.

  5. The evolution of the gut microbiota in the giant and the red pandas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Guo, Wei; Han, Shushu; Kong, Fanli; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Heming; Yang, Mingyao; Xu, Huailiang; Zeng, Bo; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2015-01-01

    The independent dietary shift from carnivore to herbivore with over 90% being bamboo in the giant and the red pandas is of great interests to biologists. Although previous studies have shown convergent evolution of the giant and the red pandas at both morphological and molecular level, the evolution of the gut microbiota in these pandas remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to determine whether the gut microbiota of the pandas converged due to the same diet, or diverged. We characterized the fecal microbiota from these two species by pyrosequencing the 16S V1–V3 hypervariable regions using the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform. We also included fecal samples from Asian black bears, a species phylogenetically closer to the giant panda, in our analyses. By analyzing the microbiota from these 3 species and those from other carnivores reported previously, we found the gut microbiotas of the giant pandas are distinct from those of the red pandas and clustered closer to those of the black bears. Our data suggests the divergent evolution of the gut microbiota in the pandas. PMID:25985413

  6. Convective-core Overshoot and Suppression of Oscillations: Constraints from Red Giants in NGC 6811

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arentoft, T.; Brogaard, K.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Kjeldsen, H.; Mosumgaard, J. R.; Sandquist, E. L.

    2017-04-01

    Using data from the NASA spacecraft Kepler, we study solar-like oscillations in red giant stars in the open cluster NGC 6811. We determine oscillation frequencies, frequency separations, period spacings of mixed modes, and mode visibilities for eight cluster giants. The oscillation parameters show that these stars are helium-core-burning red giants. The eight stars form two groups with very different oscillation power spectra; the four stars with the lowest Δν values display rich sets of mixed l = 1 modes, while this is not the case for the four stars with higher Δν. For the four stars with lowest Δν, we determine the asymptotic period spacing of the mixed modes, ΔP, which together with the masses we derive for all eight stars suggest that they belong to the so-called secondary clump. Based on the global oscillation parameters, we present initial theoretical stellar modeling that indicates that we can constrain convective-core overshoot on the main sequence and in the helium-burning phase for these ∼2 M ⊙ stars. Finally, our results indicate less mode suppression than predicted by recent theories for magnetic suppression of certain oscillation modes in red giants.

  7. Stripped Red Giants - Helium Core White Dwarf Progenitors and their sdB Siblings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2017-03-01

    Some gaps in the mosaic of binary star evolution have recently been filled by the discoveries of helium-core white dwarf progenitors (often called extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs) as stripped cores of first-giant branch objects. Two varieties can be distinguished. One class is made up by SB1 binaries, companions being white dwarfs as well. Another class, the so-called EL CVn stars, are composite spectrum binaries, with A-Type companions. Pulsating stars are found among both classes. A riddle is posed by the apparently single objects. There is a one-to-one correspondence of the phenomena found for these new classes of star to those observed for sdB stars. In fact, standard evolutionary scenarios explain the origin of sdB stars as red giants that have been stripped close to the tip of first red giant branch. A subgroup of subluminous B stars can also be identified as stripped helium-cores of red giants. They form an extension of the ELM sequence to higher temperatures. Hence low mass white dwarfs of helium cores and sdB stars in binaries are close relatives in terms of stellar evolution.

  8. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Hydrogen lines in red giants directly trace stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Maria; Serenelli, Aldo; Schönrich, Ralph; Ruchti, Greg; Korn, Andreas; Hekker, Saskia; Kovalev, Mikhail; Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Gilmore, Gerry; Randich, Sofia; Asplund, Martin; Rix, Hans-Walter; Casey, Andrew R.; Jofre, Paula; Pancino, Elena; Recio-Blanco, Alejandra; de Laverny, Patrick; Smiljanic, Rodolfo; Tautvaisiene, Grazina; Bayo, Amelia; Lewis, Jim; Koposov, Sergey; Hourihane, Anna; Worley, Clare; Morbidelli, Lorenzo; Franciosini, Elena; Sacco, Germano; Magrini, Laura; Damiani, Francesco; Bestenlehner, Joachim M.

    2016-10-01

    Red giant stars are perhaps the most important type of stars for Galactic and extra-galactic archaeology: they are luminous, occur in all stellar populations, and their surface temperatures allow precise abundance determinations for many different chemical elements. Yet, the full star formation and enrichment history of a galaxy can be traced directly only if two key observables can be determined for large stellar samples: age and chemical composition. While spectroscopy is a powerful method to analyse the detailed abundances of stars, stellar ages are the missing link in the chain, since they are not a direct observable. However, spectroscopy should be able to estimate stellar masses, which for red giants directly infer ages provided their chemical composition is known. Here we establish a new empirical relation between the shape of the hydrogen line in the observed spectra of red giants and stellar mass determined from asteroseismology. The relation allows determining stellar masses and ages with an accuracy of 10-15%. The method can be used with confidence for stars in the following range of stellar parameters: 4000 < Teff < 5000 K, 0.5 < log g< 3.5, -2.0 < [Fe/H] < 0.3, and luminosities log L/LSun < 2.5. Our analysis provides observational evidence that the Hα spectral characteristics of red giant stars are tightly correlated with their mass and therefore their age. We also show that the method samples well all stellar populations with ages above 1 Gyr. Targeting bright giants, the method allows obtaining simultaneous age and chemical abundance information far deeper than would be possible with asteroseismology, extending the possible survey volume to remote regions of the Milky Way and even to neighbouring galaxies such as Andromeda or the Magellanic Clouds even with current instrumentation, such as the VLT and Keck facilities.

  9. Resolved Stellar Halos of M87 and NGC 5128: Metallicities from the Red-Giant Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Sarah A.

    2016-08-01

    We have searched halo fields of two giant elliptical galaxies: M87, using HST images at 10 kpc from the galactic center, and NGC 5128 (Cen A), using VIMOS VLT images at 65 kpc from the center and archival HST data from 8 to 38 kpc from the center. We have resolved thousands of red-giant-branch (RGB) stars in these stellar halo fields using V and I filters, and, in addition, measured the metallicity using stellar isochrones. The metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the inner stellar halo of M87 is similar to that of NGC 5128's stellar halo.

  10. Is mass loss from red giant stars dust driven?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, J. A.

    1992-12-01

    Long period variable stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch are observed to be losing mass in the form of cool dusty molecular stellar winds at rates from 10-7 to 10-4 Msunyr-1. The driving force for this mass loss is thought to be radiation pressure on dust particles. The dust transfers its momentum to gas molecules via collisions. This paper discusses the existing evidence for this scenario. New results, from analysis of 22 GHz H2O maser observations made by Merlin, show that the cruical acceleration past the stellar escape velocity of the central star takes place in the inner circumstellar envelope around the central star. The analysis of the velocity fields of the circumstellar envelopes of VX Sgr and VY CMa using the model described by Chapman and Cohen (1986) are discussed.

  11. ASTEROSEISMIC CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR POPULATIONS AMONG 13,000 RED GIANTS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Benomar, Othman; White, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Mosser, Benoit

    2013-03-10

    Of the more than 150,000 targets followed by the Kepler Mission, about 10% were selected as red giants. Due to their high scientific value, in particular for Galaxy population studies and stellar structure and evolution, their Kepler light curves were made public in late 2011. More than 13,000 (over 85%) of these stars show intrinsic flux variability caused by solar-like oscillations making them ideal for large-scale asteroseismic investigations. We automatically extracted individual frequencies and measured the period spacings of the dipole modes in nearly every red giant. These measurements naturally classify the stars into various populations, such as the red giant branch, the low-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 1.8) helium-core-burning red clump, and the higher-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}> 1.8) secondary clump. The period spacings also reveal that a large fraction of the stars show rotationally induced frequency splittings. This sample of stars will undoubtedly provide an extremely valuable source for studying the stellar population in the direction of the Kepler field, in particular when combined with complementary spectroscopic surveys.

  12. An empirical mass-loss law for Population II giants from the Spitzer-IRAC survey of Galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Fabbri, S.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Dalessandro, E.; Rich, R. M.; Valenti, E.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The main aim of the present work is to derive an empirical mass-loss (ML) law for Population II stars in first and second ascent red giant branches. Methods: We used the Spitzer InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) photometry obtained in the 3.6-8 μm range of a carefully chosen sample of 15 Galactic globular clusters spanning the entire metallicity range and sampling the vast zoology of horizontal branch (HB) morphologies. We complemented the IRAC photometry with near-infrared data to build suitable color-magnitude and color-color diagrams and identify mass-losing giant stars. Results: We find that while the majority of stars show colors typical of cool giants, some stars show an excess of mid-infrared light that is larger than expected from their photospheric emission and that is plausibly due to dust formation in mass flowing from them. For these stars, we estimate dust and total (gas + dust) ML rates and timescales. We finally calibrate an empirical ML law for Population II red and asymptotic giant branch stars with varying metallicity. We find that at a given red giant branch luminosity only a fraction of the stars are losing mass. From this, we conclude that ML is episodic and is active only a fraction of the time, which we define as the duty cycle. The fraction of mass-losing stars increases by increasing the stellar luminosity and metallicity. The ML rate, as estimated from reasonable assumptions for the gas-to-dust ratio and expansion velocity, depends on metallicity and slowly increases with decreasing metallicity. In contrast, the duty cycle increases with increasing metallicity, with the net result that total ML increases moderately with increasing metallicity, about 0.1 M⊙ every dex in [Fe/H]. For Population II asymptotic giant branch stars, we estimate a total ML of ≤0.1 M⊙, nearly constant with varying metallicity. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  13. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. IV. Oxygen diagnostics in extremely metal-poor red giants with infrared OH lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Spite, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of Galactic chemical evolution, measurements of its abundance in the atmospheres of the oldest Galactic stars are still scarce and rather imprecise. This is mainly because only a few spectral lines are available for the abundance diagnostics. At the lowest end of the metallicity scale, oxygen can only be measured in giant stars and in most of cases such measurements rely on a single forbidden [O i] 630 nm line that is very weak and frequently blended with telluric lines. Although molecular OH lines located in the ultraviolet and infrared could also be used for the diagnostics, oxygen abundances obtained from the OH lines and the [O i] 630 nm line are usually discrepant to a level of ~ 0.3-0.4 dex. Aims: We study the influence of convection on the formation of the infrared (IR) OH lines and the forbidden [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of extremely metal-poor (EMP) red giant stars. Our ultimate goal is to clarify whether a realistic treatment of convection with state-of-the-art 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres may help to bring the oxygen abundances obtained using the two indicators into closer agreement. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 50 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 200-600) spectra of four EMP red giant stars obtained with the VLT CRIRES spectrograph. For each EMP star, 4-14 IR OH vibrational-rotational lines located in the spectral range of 1514-1548 and 1595-1632 nm were used to determine oxygen abundances by employing standard 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis methodology. We then corrected the 1D LTE abundances obtained from each individual OH line for the 3D hydrodynamical effects, which was done by applying 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections that were determined using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres. Results: We find that the influence of convection on the formation of [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of EMP giants

  14. The Keck Aperture Masking Experiment: Dust Enshrouded Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, T. D.; Monnier, J. D.; Tuthill, P. G.; Danchi, W. C.; Anderson, M.

    2012-01-01

    While the importance of dusty asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to galactic chemical enrichment is widely recognised, a sophisticated understanding of the dust formation and wind-driving mechanisms has proven elusive due in part to the difficulty in spatially-resolving the dust formation regions themselves. We have observed twenty dust-enshrouded AGB stars as part of the Keck Aperture Masking Experiment, resolving all of them in multiple near-infrared bands between 1.5 m and 3.1 m. We find 45% of the targets to show measurable elongations that, when correcting for the greater distances of the targets, would correspond to significantly asymmetric dust shells on par with the well-known cases of IRC +10216 or CIT 6. Using radiative transfer models, we find the sublimation temperature of Tsub(silicates) = 1130 90K and Tsub(amorphous carbon) = 1170 60 K, both somewhat lower than expected from laboratory measurements and vastly below temperatures inferred from the inner edge of YSO disks. The fact that O-rich and C-rich dust types showed the same sublimation temperature was surprising as well. For the most optically-thick shells ( 2.2 m > 2), the temperature profile of the inner dust shell is observed to change substantially, an effect we suggest could arise when individual dust clumps become optically-thick at the highest mass-loss rates.

  15. Fast core rotation in red-giant stars as revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul G; Montalban, Josefina; Kallinger, Thomas; De Ridder, Joris; Aerts, Conny; García, Rafael A; Hekker, Saskia; Dupret, Marc-Antoine; Mosser, Benoit; Eggenberger, Patrick; Stello, Dennis; Elsworth, Yvonne; Frandsen, Søren; Carrier, Fabien; Hillen, Michel; Gruberbauer, Michael; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Miglio, Andrea; Valentini, Marica; Bedding, Timothy R; Kjeldsen, Hans; Girouard, Forrest R; Hall, Jennifer R; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A

    2011-12-07

    When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant. Convection takes place over much of the star's radius. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars rotate faster than their envelopes; indirect evidence supports this. Information about the angular-momentum distribution is inaccessible to direct observations, but it can be extracted from the effect of rotation on oscillation modes that probe the stellar interior. Here we report an increasing rotation rate from the surface of the star to the stellar core in the interiors of red giants, obtained using the rotational frequency splitting of recently detected 'mixed modes'. By comparison with theoretical stellar models, we conclude that the core must rotate at least ten times faster than the surface. This observational result confirms the theoretical prediction of a steep gradient in the rotation profile towards the deep stellar interior.

  16. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-23

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~10(5) gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈10(7) gauss.

  17. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A.; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~105 gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈107 gauss.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Halo red giants reddening (Anthony-Twarog+, 1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Twarog, B. J.; Twarog, B. A.

    1994-10-01

    Updated uvby observations for a larger sample of metal-deficient red giants are presented and combined with a select sample of data from the literature transformed to a common system. Using the reddening maps of Burstein & Heiles [AJ, 87, 1165 (1982)], new absolute magnitudes, distances, metallicities, and reddenings are derived for each star. The metallicities are determined with a revised calibration of the m1, (b-y) diagram based upon comparison to a compilation of recent spectroscopic abundances transformed to a common system. The photometric abundances agree very well with the spectroscopic; the dispersion among the residuals for 58 giants is ±0.16dex. The dereddened indices are used to show that for red giants with [Fe/H]<-1.5, there is a well-defined relation in the c0, (b-y)0 diagram which exhibits only a weak dependence upon metallicity. Use of the standard relations allows one to obtain reddening estimates for normal halo field giants and globular clusters in the appropriate metallicity range. (2 data files).

  19. INTERNAL ROTATION OF THE RED-GIANT STAR KIC 4448777 BY MEANS OF ASTEROSEISMIC INVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mauro, M. P.; Cardini, D.; Ventura, R.; Paternò, L.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Hekker, S.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Beck, P. G.; De Smedt, K.; Tkachenko, A.; Bloemen, S.; Davies, G. R.; Garcia, R. A.; Mosser, B.

    2016-01-20

    We study the dynamics of the stellar interior of the early red-giant star KIC 4448777 by asteroseismic inversion of 14 splittings of the dipole mixed modes obtained from Kepler observations. In order to overcome the complexity of the oscillation pattern typical of red-giant stars, we present a procedure to extract the rotational splittings from the power spectrum. We find not only that the core rotates from a minimum of 8 to a maximum of 17 times faster than the surface, confirming previous inversion results generated for other red giants (Deheuvels et al.), but we also estimate the variation of the angular velocity within the helium core with a spatial resolution of 0.001R and verify the hypothesis of a sharp discontinuity in the inner stellar rotation. The results show that the entire core rotates rigidly and provide evidence for an angular velocity gradient around the base of the hydrogen-burning shell; however, we do not succeed in characterizing the rotational slope, due to the intrinsic limits of the applied techniques. The angular velocity, from the edge of the core, appears to decrease with increasing distance from the center, reaching an average value in the convective envelope of 68 ± 22 nHz. We conclude that a set of data that includes only dipolar modes is sufficient to infer quite accurately the rotation of a red giant not only in the dense core but also, with a lower level of confidence, in part of the radiative region and in the convective envelope.

  20. The Orbital Nature of 81 Ellipsoidal Red Giant Binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R.; Nicholls, C. P.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we collect a sample of 81 ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and we study their orbital natures individually and statistically. The sample contains 59 systems with circular orbits and 22 systems with eccentric orbits. We derive orbital solutions using the 2010 version of the Wilson–Devinney code. The sample is selection-bias corrected, and the orbital parameter distributions are compared to model predictions for the LMC and to observations in the solar vicinity. The masses of the red giant primaries are found to range from about 0.6 to 9 {M}ȯ with a peak at around 1.5 {M}ȯ , in agreement with studies of the star formation history of the LMC, which find a burst of star formation beginning around 4 Gyr ago. The observed distribution of mass ratios q={m}2/{m}1 is more consistent with the flat q distribution derived for the solar vicinity by Raghavan et al. than it is with the solar vicinity q distribution derived by Duquennoy & Mayor. There is no evidence for an excess number of systems with equal mass components. We find that about 20% of the ellipsoidal binaries have eccentric orbits, twice the fraction estimated by Soszynski et al. Our eccentricity evolution test shows that the existence of eccentric ellipsoidal red giant binaries on the upper parts of the red giant branch (RGB) can only be explained if tidal circularization rates are ∼1/100 the rates given by the usual theory of tidal dissipation in convective stars.

  1. Internal Rotation of the Red-giant Star KIC 4448777 by Means of Asteroseismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, M. P.; Ventura, R.; Cardini, D.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Paternò, L.; Beck, P. G.; Bloemen, S.; Davies, G. R.; De Smedt, K.; Elsworth, Y.; García, R. A.; Hekker, S.; Mosser, B.; Tkachenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the stellar interior of the early red-giant star KIC 4448777 by asteroseismic inversion of 14 splittings of the dipole mixed modes obtained from Kepler observations. In order to overcome the complexity of the oscillation pattern typical of red-giant stars, we present a procedure to extract the rotational splittings from the power spectrum. We find not only that the core rotates from a minimum of 8 to a maximum of 17 times faster than the surface, confirming previous inversion results generated for other red giants (Deheuvels et al.), but we also estimate the variation of the angular velocity within the helium core with a spatial resolution of 0.001R and verify the hypothesis of a sharp discontinuity in the inner stellar rotation. The results show that the entire core rotates rigidly and provide evidence for an angular velocity gradient around the base of the hydrogen-burning shell; however, we do not succeed in characterizing the rotational slope, due to the intrinsic limits of the applied techniques. The angular velocity, from the edge of the core, appears to decrease with increasing distance from the center, reaching an average value in the convective envelope of 68 ± 22 nHz. We conclude that a set of data that includes only dipolar modes is sufficient to infer quite accurately the rotation of a red giant not only in the dense core but also, with a lower level of confidence, in part of the radiative region and in the convective envelope.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler faint red giants (Mathur+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; Garcia, R. A.; Huber, D.; Regulo, C.; Stello, D.; Beck, P. G.; Houmani, K.; Salabert, D.

    2016-11-01

    From the H14 catalog (Huber+, 2014, J/ApJS/211/2), we selected GKM dwarfs according to the following criteria: logg>=4.25 and Teff<=5500K. We also added a few tens of stars from the asteroseismic sample of solar-like stars from Chaplin et al. (2011ApJ...732...54C) where red-giant-like oscillations were detected. These additional stars have Teff>5500K. (4 data files).

  3. Detection of the Tip of Red Giant Branc in NGC 5128

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soria, Roberto; Mould, Jeremy R.; Watson, Alan M.; Gallagher, John S., III; Ballester, Gilda E.; Burrows, Christopher J.; Casertano, Stefano; Clarke, John T.; Crisp, David; Griffiths, Richard E.; Hester, J. Jeff; Hoessel, John G.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Scowen, Paul A.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Trauger, John T.; Westphal, James A.

    1996-01-01

    We present a color-magnitude diagram of more than 10,000 stars in the halo of galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), based on WFPC2 images through the V and I filters. The position of the red-giant branch stars is compared with the loci of the RGB in six well-studied globular clusters and in the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 185;...

  4. The asteroseismic signature of strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations and little is known about their amplitude, geometry and evolution. I will discuss how strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, which arises from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation mode energy within the core of the star. Physically, the effect stems from magnetic tension forces created by sufficiently strong fields, which break the spherical symmetry of the wave propagation cavity. The loss of wave energy within the core reduces the mode visibility at the stellar surface, and we find that our predicted visibilities are in excellent agreement with a class of red giants exhibiting depressed dipole oscillation modes. The Kepler satellite has already observed hundreds of these red giants, which we identify as stars with strongly magnetized cores. Field strengths larger than roughly 10^5 G can produce the observed depression, and in one case we measure a core field strength of 10^7 G.

  5. K2-97b: A (Re-?)Inflated Planet Orbiting a Red Giant Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Huber, Daniel; Gaidos, Eric J.; Lopez, Eric D.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Barclay, Thomas; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Mann, Andrew W.; Petigura, Erik; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2016-12-01

    Strongly irradiated giant planets are observed to have radii larger than thermal evolution models predict. Although these inflated planets have been known for over 15 years, it is unclear whether their inflation is caused by the deposition of energy from the host star or the inhibited cooling of the planet. These processes can be distinguished if the planet becomes highly irradiated only when the host star evolves onto the red giant branch. We report the discovery of K2-97b, a 1.31 ± 0.11 R J, 1.10 ± 0.11 M J planet orbiting a 4.20 ± 0.14 R ⊙, 1.16 ± 0.12 M ⊙ red giant star with an orbital period of 8.4 days. We precisely constrained stellar and planetary parameters by combining asteroseismology, spectroscopy, and granulation noise modeling along with transit and radial velocity measurements. The uncertainty in planet radius is dominated by systematic differences in transit depth, which we measure to be up to 30% between different light-curve reduction methods. Our calculations indicate the incident flux on this planet was {170}-60+140 times the incident flux on Earth, while the star was on the main sequence. Previous studies suggest that this incident flux is insufficient to delay planetary cooling enough to explain the present planet radius. This system thus provides the first evidence that planets may be inflated directly by incident stellar radiation rather than by delayed loss of heat from formation. Further studies of planets around red giant branch stars will confirm or contradict this hypothesis and may reveal a new class of re-inflated planets.

  6. PLANET ENGULFMENT BY {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitomo, M.; Ikoma, M.; Sato, B.; Ida, S.; Katsuta, Y.

    2011-08-20

    Recent radial-velocity surveys for GK clump giants have revealed that planets also exist around {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} stars. However, no planets have been found inside 0.6 AU around clump giants, in contrast to solar-type main-sequence stars, many of which harbor short-period planets such as hot Jupiters. In this study, we examine the possibility that planets were engulfed by host stars evolving on the red-giant branch (RGB). We integrate the orbital evolution of planets in the RGB and helium-burning phases of host stars, including the effects of stellar tide and stellar mass loss. Then we derive the critical semimajor axis (or the survival limit) inside which planets are eventually engulfed by their host stars after tidal decay of their orbits. Specifically, we investigate the impact of stellar mass and other stellar parameters on the survival limit in more detail than previous studies. In addition, we make detailed comparisons with measured semimajor axes of planets detected so far, which no previous study has done. We find that the critical semimajor axis is quite sensitive to stellar mass in the range between 1.7 and 2.1 M{sub sun}, which suggests a need for careful comparison between theoretical and observational limits of the existence of planets. Our comparison demonstrates that all planets orbiting GK clump giants that have been detected are beyond the survival limit, which is consistent with the planet-engulfment hypothesis. However, on the high-mass side (>2.1M{sub sun}), the detected planets are orbiting significantly far from the survival limit, which suggests that engulfment by host stars may not be the main reason for the observed lack of short-period giant planets. To confirm our conclusion, the detection of more planets around clump giants, especially with masses {approx}> 2.5M{sub sun}, is required.

  7. RED GIANTS IN ECLIPSING BINARY AND MULTIPLE-STAR SYSTEMS: MODELING AND ASTEROSEISMIC ANALYSIS OF 70 CANDIDATES FROM KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Gaulme, P.; McKeever, J.; Rawls, M. L.; Jackiewicz, J.; Mosser, B.; Guzik, J. A.

    2013-04-10

    Red giant stars are proving to be an incredible source of information for testing models of stellar evolution, as asteroseismology has opened up a window into their interiors. Such insights are a direct result of the unprecedented data from space missions CoRoT and Kepler as well as recent theoretical advances. Eclipsing binaries are also fundamental astrophysical objects, and when coupled with asteroseismology, binaries provide two independent methods to obtain masses and radii and exciting opportunities to develop highly constrained stellar models. The possibility of discovering pulsating red giants in eclipsing binary systems is therefore an important goal that could potentially offer very robust characterization of these systems. Until recently, only one case has been discovered with Kepler. We cross-correlate the detected red giant and eclipsing-binary catalogs from Kepler data to find possible candidate systems. Light-curve modeling and mean properties measured from asteroseismology are combined to yield specific measurements of periods, masses, radii, temperatures, eclipse timing variations, core rotation rates, and red giant evolutionary state. After using three different techniques to eliminate false positives, out of the 70 systems common to the red giant and eclipsing-binary catalogs we find 13 strong candidates (12 previously unknown) to be eclipsing binaries, one to be a non-eclipsing binary with tidally induced oscillations, and 10 more to be hierarchical triple systems, all of which include a pulsating red giant. The systems span a range of orbital eccentricities, periods, and spectral types F, G, K, and M for the companion of the red giant. One case even suggests an eclipsing binary composed of two red giant stars and another of a red giant with a {delta}-Scuti star. The discovery of multiple pulsating red giants in eclipsing binaries provides an exciting test bed for precise astrophysical modeling, and follow-up spectroscopic observations of many

  8. Chemical Abundances in a Sample of Red Giants in the Open Cluster NGC 2420 from APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, Diogo; Cunha, K.; Smith, V.; Allende Prieto, C.; Pinsonneault, M.; Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Mészáros, Sz.; Bovy, J.; García Pérez, A. E.; Anders, F.; Bizyaev, D.; Carrera, R.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Holtzman, J.; Ivans, I.; Majewski, S. R.; Shetrone, M.; Sobeck, J.; Pan, K.; Tang, B.; Villanova, S.; Geisler, D.

    2016-10-01

    NGC 2420 is a ˜2 Gyr old well-populated open cluster that lies about 2 kpc beyond the solar circle, in the general direction of the Galactic anti-center. Most previous abundance studies have found this cluster to be mildly metal-poor, but with a large scatter in the obtained metallicities. Detailed chemical abundance distributions are derived for 12 red-giant members of NGC 2420 via a manual abundance analysis of high-resolution (R = 22,500) near-infrared (λ1.5-1.7 μm) spectra obtained from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. The sample analyzed contains six stars that are identified as members of the first-ascent red giant branch (RGB), as well as six members of the red clump (RC). We find small scatter in the star-to-star abundances in NGC 2420, with a mean cluster abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.16 ± 0.04 for the 12 red giants. The internal abundance dispersion for all elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni) is also very small (˜0.03-0.06 dex), indicating a uniform cluster abundance distribution within the uncertainties. NGC 2420 is one of the clusters used to calibrate the APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundance Pipeline (ASPCAP). The results from this manual analysis compare well with ASPCAP abundances for most of the elements studied, although for Na, Al, and V there are more significant offsets. No evidence of extra-mixing at the RGB luminosity bump is found in the 12C and 14N abundances from the pre-luminosity-bump RGB stars in comparison to the post-He core-flash RC stars.

  9. CHEMICAL TAGGING OF THREE DISTINCT POPULATIONS OF RED GIANTS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6752

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Gratton, R. G.; Lucatello, S.; D'Orazi, V. E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it

    2012-05-01

    We present aluminum, magnesium, and silicon abundances in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6752 for a sample of more than 130 red giants with homogeneous oxygen and sodium abundances. We find that [Al/Fe] shows a spread of about 1.4 dex among giants in NGC 6752 and is anticorrelated with [Mg/Fe] and [O/Fe] and correlated with [Na/Fe] and [Si/Fe]. These relations are not continuous in nature, but the distribution of stars is clearly clustered around three distinct Al values, low, intermediate, and high. These three groups nicely correspond to the three distinct sequences previously detected using Stroemgren photometry along the red giant branch. These two independent findings strongly indicate the existence of three distinct stellar populations in NGC 6752. Comparing the abundances of O and Mg, we find that the population with intermediate chemical abundances cannot originate from material with the same composition of the most O- and Mg-poor population, diluted by material with that of the most O- and Mg-rich one. This calls for different polluters.

  10. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  11. "Giant" red and green core/shell quantum dots with high color purity and photostability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo; Xu, Ruilin; Zhuo, Ningze; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Haibo; Cui, Yiping; Zhang, Jiayu

    2016-03-01

    "Giant" red CdSe/CdS and green CdSeS/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), whose color purity were ∼100% and 91%, respectively, were synthesized, and the color gamut could be more than 120% relative to the NTSC color space for the display utilizing these two kinds of QDs. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement showed that the PL dynamics was evolved from tri-exponential decay to bi-exponential type with the increase of the shell thickness, and the PL decay characteristics of these giant QDs did not evidently change under long-term UV irradiation, indicating that the thick shell could isolate the effect of the surface's defects on the exciton's recombination within these QDs. Their high photostability could have an advantage in the application on display and white-light LEDs.

  12. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  13. Chemical Abundances in Field Red Giants from High-resolution H-band Spectra Using the APOGEE Spectral Linelist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcìa Pèrez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants (α Boo and μ Leo), two M-giants (β And and δ Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes 12C, 13C, 14N, and 16O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of 12C synthesized during 4He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to ~0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  14. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  15. On the oxygen abundances of M 67 stars from the turn-off point through the red giant branch†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    With an aim to examine whether the surface oxygen composition suffers any appreciable change due to evolution-induced mixing of nuclear-processed material in the envelope of red giants, abundance determinations for O/Fe/Ni based on the synthetic spectrum-fitting method were performed by using the moderate-dispersion spectra in the 7770-7792 Å region (comprising O I 7771-5, Fe I 7780, and Ni I 7788 lines) for 16 stars of the old open cluster M 67 in various evolutionary stages from the turn-off point through the red giant branch. We could not find any meaningful difference in the oxygen abundances between the non-giant group (Teff > 5000 K) and the red-giant group (Teff < 5000 K), which are almost consistent with each other on average (despite that both have rather large dispersions of a few tenths dex caused by insufficient data quality), though only one giant star (S 1054) appears to show an exceptionally low O abundance and thus needs a more detailed study. This result may suggest that oxygen content in the stellar envelope is hardly affected (or any changes are insignificant) by the mixing of H-burning products in the red giant phase, as far as M 67 stars of low mass (˜ 1.3 M⊙) are concerned, which is consistent with the prediction from the conventional stellar evolution theory of first dredge-up.

  16. Serosurvey of ex situ giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in China with implications for species conservation.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, I Kati; Howard, JoGayle; Montali, Richard J; Hayek, Lee-Ann; Dubovi, Edward; Zhang, Zhihe; Yan, Qigui; Guo, Wanzhu; Wildt, David E

    2007-12-01

    Conservation strategies for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) include the development of a self-sustaining ex situ population. This study examined the potential significance of infectious pathogens in giant pandas ex situ. Serologic antibody titers against canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine adenovirus (CAV), canine coronavirus (CCV), canine herpesvirus, canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, and Leptospira interrogans were measured in 44 samples taken from 19 giant pandas between 1998 and 2003 at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Sichuan, China. Seroassays also included samples obtained in 2003 from eight red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) housed at the same institution. All individuals had been vaccinated with a Chinese canine vaccine that included modified live CDV, CPV, CAV, CCV, and CPIV. Positive antibody titers were found only against CDV, CPV, and T. gondii. Sera were negative for antibodies against the other six pathogens. Results indicate that the quality of the vaccine may not be reliable and that it should not be considered protective or safe in giant pandas and red pandas. Positive antibody titers against T. gondii were found in seven of the 19 giant pandas. The clinical, subclinical, or epidemiologic significance of infection with these pathogens via natural exposure or from modified live vaccines in giant pandas is unknown. Research in this area is imperative to sustaining a viable population of giant pandas and other endangered species.

  17. Start II, red ink, and Boris Yeltsin

    SciTech Connect

    Arbatov, A.

    1993-04-01

    Apart from the vulnerability implied by the START II treaty, it will bear the burden of the general political opposition to the Yeltsin administration. START II will be seen as part of an overall Yeltsin-Andrei Kozyrev foreign policy that is under fire for selling out Russian national interests in Yugoslavia, the Persian Gulf, and elsewhere. This article discusses public opinion concerning START II, the cost of its implementation, and the general purpose of the treaty.

  18. Nitrogen depletion in field red giants: mixing during the He flash?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseron, T.; Lagarde, N.; Miglio, A.; Elsworth, Y.; Gilmore, G.

    2017-01-01

    We combine simultaneous constraints on stellar evolutionary status from asteroseismology, and on nitrogen abundances derived from large spectroscopic surveys, to follow nitrogen surface abundances all along the evolution of a low-mass star, comparing model expectations with data. After testing and calibrating the observed yields from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey, we first show that nitrogen surface abundances follow the expected trend after the first dredge-up occurred, i.e. that the more massive is the star, the more nitrogen is enhanced. Moreover, the behaviour of nitrogen data along the evolution confirms the existence of non-canonical extramixing on the red giant branch (RGB) for all low-mass stars in the field. But more surprisingly, the data indicate that nitrogen has been depleted between the RGB tip and the red clump. This may suggest that some nitrogen has been burnt near or at the He flash episode.

  19. KIC 9246715: The Double Red Giant Eclipsing Binary with Odd Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Gaulme, Patrick; McKeever, Jean; Jackiewicz, Jason; Orosz, Jerome A.; Corsaro, Enrico; Beck, Paul G.; Mosser, Benoît; Latham, David W.; Latham, Christian A.

    2016-02-01

    We combine Kepler photometry with ground-based spectra to present a comprehensive dynamical model of the double red giant eclipsing binary KIC 9246715. While the two stars are very similar in mass ({M}1={2.171}-0.008+0.006 {M}⊙ , {M}2={2.149}-0.008+0.006 {M}⊙ ) and radius ({R}1={8.37}-0.07+0.03 {R}⊙ , {R}2={8.30}-0.03+0.04 {R}⊙ ), an asteroseismic analysis finds one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes. A second set of oscillations from the other star may exist, but this marginal detection is extremely faint. Because the two stars are nearly twins, KIC 9246715 is a difficult target for a precise test of the asteroseismic scaling relations, which yield M = 2.17 ± 0.14 M⊙ and R = 8.26 ± 0.18 R⊙. Both stars are consistent with the inferred asteroseismic properties, but we suspect the main oscillator is Star 2 because it is less active than Star 1. We find evidence for stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171 day eccentric orbit, which are likely responsible for the essential lack of solar-like oscillations in one star and weak oscillations in the other. Mixed modes indicate the main oscillating star is on the secondary red clump (a core-He-burning star), and stellar evolution modeling supports this with a coeval history for a pair of red clump stars. This system is a useful case study and paves the way for a detailed analysis of more red giants in eclipsing binaries, an important benchmark for asteroseismology.

  20. DUST IS FORMING ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH OF 47 Tuc

    SciTech Connect

    Origlia, Livia; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Rood, Robert T.; Fabbri, Sara; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Rich, R. Michael E-mail: flavio.fusipecci@oabo.inaf.i E-mail: sara.fabbri@studio.unibo.i E-mail: emanuele.dalessandr2@unibo.i

    2010-07-20

    We present additional evidence that dust is really forming along the red giant branch (RGB) of 47 Tuc at luminosities ranging from above the horizontal branch to the RGB tip. The presence of dust had been inferred from an infrared excess in the (K - 8) color, with K measured from high spatial resolution ground-based near-IR photometry and '8' referring to Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 8 {mu}m photometry. We show how (K - 8) is a far more sensitive diagnostic for detecting tiny circumstellar envelopes around warm giants than colors using only the Spitzer-IRAC bands, for example, the (3.6 - 8) color used by Boyer et al. In addition, we also show high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys I-band images of the giant stars that have (K - 8) color excess. These images clearly demonstrate that the Boyer et al. statement that our detections of color excess associated with stars below the RGB tip arise from blends and artifacts is simply not valid.

  1. The Tip of the red giant branch distance to the perfect spiral galaxy M74 hosting three core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Sung Jang, In; Gyoon Lee, Myung E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    M74 (NGC 628) is a famous face-on spiral galaxy, hosting three core-collapse supernovae (SNe): SN Ic 2002ap, SN II-P 2003gd, and SN II-P 2013ej. However, its distance is not well known. We present a distance estimation for this galaxy based on the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) method. We obtain photometry of the resolved stars in the arm-free region of M74 from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars shows a dominant red giant branch (RGB) as well as blue main sequence stars, red helium burning stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars. The I-band luminosity function of the RGB stars shows the TRGB to be at I {sub TRGB} = 26.13 ± 0.03 mag, and T {sub RGB} = 25.97 ± 0.03. From this, we derive the distance modulus to M74 to be 30.04 ± 0.04 (random) ± 0.12 (systematic) (corresponding to a linear distance of 10.19 ± 0.14 ± 0.56 Mpc). With this distance estimate, we calibrate the standardized candle method for SNe II-P. From the absolute magnitudes of SN 2003gd, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H {sub 0} = 72 ± 6 (random) ± 7 (systematic) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. It is similar to recent estimates based on the luminosity calibration of Type Ia supernovae.

  2. Oscillations in g-mode period spacings in red giants as a way to determine their state of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, M. S.; Stello, D.; Avelino, P. P.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we consider the sensitivity of gravity-mode period spacings to sharp changes in the inner structure of red giant stars, more specifically in the buoyancy frequency inside the g-mode propagation cavity. Based on a comparison between the solutions to the linear pulsation equations in the Cowling approximation for pure g-modes with results obtained with a full oscillation code we identify and correctly interpret the signature of the above-mentioned sharp variations in the period spacings. Two examples, of red giant models in different evolutionary phases, are discussed. Detection of these signatures in CoRoT, Kepler or future PLATO red-giant stars would pin down their evolutionary state in an unprecedented way.

  3. Survival of a brown dwarf after engulfment by a red giant star.

    PubMed

    Maxted, P F L; Napiwotzki, R; Dobbie, P D; Burleigh, M R

    2006-08-03

    Many sub-stellar companions (usually planets but also some brown dwarfs) orbit solar-type stars. These stars can engulf their sub-stellar companions when they become red giants. This interaction may explain several outstanding problems in astrophysics but it is unclear under what conditions a low mass companion will evaporate, survive the interaction unchanged or gain mass. Observational tests of models for this interaction have been hampered by a lack of positively identified remnants-that is, white dwarf stars with close, sub-stellar companions. The companion to the pre-white dwarf AA Doradus may be a brown dwarf, but the uncertain history of this star and the extreme luminosity difference between the components make it difficult to interpret the observations or to put strong constraints on the models. The magnetic white dwarf SDSS J121209.31 + 013627.7 may have a close brown dwarf companion but little is known about this binary at present. Here we report the discovery of a brown dwarf in a short period orbit around a white dwarf. The properties of both stars in this binary can be directly observed and show that the brown dwarf was engulfed by a red giant but that this had little effect on it.

  4. Asteroseismology of 19 low-luminosity red giant stars from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Hernández, F.; García, R. A.; Corsaro, E.; Triana, S. A.; De Ridder, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Frequencies of acoustic and mixed modes in red giant stars are now determined with high precision thanks to the long continuous observations provided by the NASA's Keplermission. Here we consider the eigenfrequencies of nineteen low-luminosity red giant stars selected in a recent publication for a detailed peak-bagging analysis. Aims: Our objective is to obtain stellar parameters by using individual mode frequencies and spectroscopic information. Methods: We use a forward modelling technique based on a minimization procedure combining the frequencies of the p-modes, the period spacing of the dipolar modes, and the spectroscopic data. Results: Consistent results between the forward modelling technique and values derived from the seismic scaling relations are found but the errors derived using the former technique are lower. The average error for log g is 0.002 dex, compared to 0.011 dex from the frequency of maximum power, νmax, and 0.10 dex from the spectroscopic analysis. Relative errors in the masses and radii are on average 2% and 0.5% respectively, compared to 3% and 2% derived from the scaling relations. No reliable determination of the initial helium abundances and the mixing length parameters could be made. Finally, for our grid of models with given input physics, we found that low-mass stars require higher values of the overshooting parameter.

  5. Comparative genomics reveals convergent evolution between the bamboo-eating giant and red pandas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Ma, Shuai; Ma, Tianxiao; Shan, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Nie, Yonggang; Ning, Zemin; Yan, Li; Xiu, Yunfang; Wei, Fuwen

    2017-01-31

    Phenotypic convergence between distantly related taxa often mirrors adaptation to similar selective pressures and may be driven by genetic convergence. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) belong to different families in the order Carnivora, but both have evolved a specialized bamboo diet and adaptive pseudothumb, representing a classic model of convergent evolution. However, the genetic bases of these morphological and physiological convergences remain unknown. Through de novo sequencing the red panda genome and improving the giant panda genome assembly with added data, we identified genomic signatures of convergent evolution. Limb development genes DYNC2H1 and PCNT have undergone adaptive convergence and may be important candidate genes for pseudothumb development. As evolutionary responses to a bamboo diet, adaptive convergence has occurred in genes involved in the digestion and utilization of bamboo nutrients such as essential amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins. Similarly, the umami taste receptor gene TAS1R1 has been pseudogenized in both pandas. These findings offer insights into genetic convergence mechanisms underlying phenotypic convergence and adaptation to a specialized bamboo diet.

  6. Asymptotic analysis of dipolar mixed modes of oscillations in red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Masao

    2016-12-01

    Dipolar modes of solar-like oscillations of red giant stars are analyzed asymptotically. Because of the high mass concentration in the helium core, the oscillations of the stars are composed of internal gravity waves in the core and acoustic waves in the envelope. The two types of oscillations interact with each other through a thin intermediate evanescent region to form an eigenmode of the mixed character. The process of the eigenmode formation is analyzed by assuming that the wavelength of the oscillations is much shorter than the scale height of the equilibrium stellar structure. Special care is paid to the following two points: (1) the effect of the perturbation to the gravitational potential is fully taken into account; (2) the interaction between the gravity waves in the core and the acoustic waves in the envelope can be strong. The condition that every eigenfrequency of the oscillations should satisfy is formulated. Also discussed are the amplitude ratio between the core and the envelope, and the transmission and reflection of the progressive-wave solutions at the intermediate evanescent region. The analysis should be of fundamental use in the interpretation of the observed solar-like oscillations in red giant stars.

  7. Asteroseismology of red giants: From analysing light curves to estimating ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. R.; Miglio, A.

    2016-09-01

    Asteroseismology has started to provide constraints on stellar properties that will be essential to accurately reconstruct the history of the Milky Way. Here we look at the information content in data sets representing current and future space missions (CoRoT, Kepler, K2, TESS, and PLATO) for red giant stars. We describe techniques for extracting the information in the frequency power spectrum and apply these techniques to Kepler data sets of different observing length to represent the different space missions. We demonstrate that for KIC 12008916, a low-luminosity red giant branch star, we can extract useful information from all data sets, and for all but the shortest data set we obtain good constraint on the g-mode period spacing and core rotation rates. We discuss how the high precision in these parameters will constrain the stellar properties of stellar radius, distance, mass and age. We show that high precision can be achieved in mass and hence age when values of the g-mode period spacing are available. We caution that tests to establish the accuracy of asteroseismic masses and ages are still ``work in progress''.

  8. TESTING CONVECTIVE-CORE OVERSHOOTING USING PERIOD SPACINGS OF DIPOLE MODES IN RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Montalban, J.; Noels, A.; Dupret, M.-A.; Scuflaire, R.; Miglio, A.; Ventura, P.

    2013-04-01

    Uncertainties on central mixing in main-sequence (MS) and core He-burning (He-B) phases affect key predictions of stellar evolution such as late evolutionary phases, chemical enrichment, ages, etc. We propose a test of the extension of extra-mixing in two relevant evolutionary phases based on period spacing ({Delta}P) of solar-like oscillating giants. From stellar models and their corresponding adiabatic frequencies (respectively, computed with ATON and LOSC codes), we provide the first predictions of the observable {Delta}P for stars in the red giant branch and in the red clump (RC). We find (1) a clear correlation between {Delta}P and the mass of the helium core (M{sub He}); the latter in intermediate-mass stars depends on the MS overshooting, and hence it can be used to set constraints on extra-mixing during MS when coupled with chemical composition; and (2) a linear dependence of the average value of the asymptotic period spacing (({Delta}P){sub a}) on the size of the convective core during the He-B phase. A first comparison with the inferred asymptotic period spacing for Kepler RC stars also suggests the need for extra-mixing during this phase, as evinced from other observational facts.

  9. Multi-periodic pulsations of a stripped red-giant star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Pierre F L; Serenelli, Aldo M; Miglio, Andrea; Marsh, Thomas R; Heber, Ulrich; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart; Copperwheat, Chris; Smalley, Barry; Breedt, Elmé; Schaffenroth, Veronika

    2013-06-27

    Low-mass white-dwarf stars are the remnants of disrupted red-giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low-mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, whereas others stay bright for millions of years because of stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood, so the potential use of low-mass white dwarfs as independent clocks with which to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low-mass white dwarfs form cannot fully be exploited. Here we report precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low-mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this disrupted red-giant star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our data. Very cool low-mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low-mass white-dwarf precursor is a type of pulsating star not hitherto seen. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes.

  10. Halos of Spiral Galaxies. I. The Tip of the Red Giant Branch as a Distance Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Rich, R. M.; Brown, T. M.; Smith, T. E.

    2005-11-01

    We have imaged the halo populations of a sample of nearby spiral galaxies using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope with the aim of studying the stellar population properties and relating them to those of the host galaxies. In four galaxies, the red giant branch is sufficiently well populated to measure the magnitude of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), a well-known distance indicator. Using both the Sobel edge-detection technique and maximum likelihood analysis to measure the I-band magnitude of the TRGB, we determine distances to four nearby galaxies: NGC 253, NGC 4244, NGC 4945, and NGC 4258. For the first three galaxies, the TRGB distance is here determined more directly, and is likely to be more accurate, than previous distance estimates. In the case of NGC 4258, our TRGB distance is in good agreement with the geometrical maser distance, supporting the Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus (m-M)0=18.50 that is generally adopted in recent estimates of the Hubble constant. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  11. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    PubMed

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  12. IMPLICATIONS OF RAPID CORE ROTATION IN RED GIANTS FOR INTERNAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT IN STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2013-09-20

    Core rotation rates have been measured for red giant stars using asteroseismology. These data, along with helioseismic measurements and open cluster spin-down studies, provide powerful clues about the nature and timescale for internal angular momentum transport in stars. We focus on two cases: the metal-poor red giant KIC 7341231 ({sup O}tto{sup )} and intermediate-mass core helium burning stars. For both, we examine limiting case studies for angular momentum coupling between cores and envelopes under the assumption of rigid rotation on the main sequence. We discuss the expected pattern of core rotation as a function of mass and radius. In the case of Otto, strong post-main-sequence coupling is ruled out and the measured core rotation rate is in the range of 23-33 times the surface value expected from standard spin-down models. The minimum coupling timescale (0.17-0.45 Gyr) is significantly longer than that inferred for young open cluster stars. This implies ineffective internal angular momentum transport in early first ascent giants. By contrast, the core rotation rates of evolved secondary clump stars are found to be consistent with strong coupling given their rapid main-sequence rotation. An extrapolation to the white dwarf regime predicts rotation periods between 330 and 0.0052 days, depending on mass and decoupling time. We identify two key ingredients that explain these features: the presence of a convective core and inefficient angular momentum transport in the presence of larger mean molecular weight gradients. Observational tests that can disentangle these effects are discussed.

  13. Implications of Rapid Core Rotation in Red Giants for Internal Angular Momentum Transport in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2013-09-01

    Core rotation rates have been measured for red giant stars using asteroseismology. These data, along with helioseismic measurements and open cluster spin-down studies, provide powerful clues about the nature and timescale for internal angular momentum transport in stars. We focus on two cases: the metal-poor red giant KIC 7341231 ("Otto") and intermediate-mass core helium burning stars. For both, we examine limiting case studies for angular momentum coupling between cores and envelopes under the assumption of rigid rotation on the main sequence. We discuss the expected pattern of core rotation as a function of mass and radius. In the case of Otto, strong post-main-sequence coupling is ruled out and the measured core rotation rate is in the range of 23-33 times the surface value expected from standard spin-down models. The minimum coupling timescale (0.17-0.45 Gyr) is significantly longer than that inferred for young open cluster stars. This implies ineffective internal angular momentum transport in early first ascent giants. By contrast, the core rotation rates of evolved secondary clump stars are found to be consistent with strong coupling given their rapid main-sequence rotation. An extrapolation to the white dwarf regime predicts rotation periods between 330 and 0.0052 days, depending on mass and decoupling time. We identify two key ingredients that explain these features: the presence of a convective core and inefficient angular momentum transport in the presence of larger mean molecular weight gradients. Observational tests that can disentangle these effects are discussed.

  14. Five Groups of Red Giants with Distinct Chemical Composition in the Globular Cluster NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2015-09-01

    The chemical composition of multiple populations in the massive globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 is addressed with the homogeneous abundance reanalysis of 140 red giant branch stars. UVES spectra for 31 stars and GIRAFFE spectra for the other giants were analyzed with the same procedures used for about 2500 giants in 23 GCs in our FLAMES survey, deriving abundances of Fe, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Sc, Cr, Mn, and Ni. Iron, elements from α capture, and those in the Fe group do not show intrinsic scatter. On our UVES scale, the metallicity of NGC 2808 is [Fe/H] =\\-1.129+/- 0.005+/- 0.034 (± statistical ± systematic error) with σ = 0.030 (31 stars). The main features related to proton-capture elements are retrieved, but the improved statistics and the smaller associated internal errors allow us to uncover five distinct groups of stars along the Na-O anticorrelation. We observe large depletions in Mg, anticorrelated with enhancements of Na and also Si, suggestive of unusually high temperatures for proton captures. About 14% of our sample is formed by giants with solar or subsolar [Mg/Fe] ratios. Using the [Na/Mg] ratios, we confirm the presence of five populations with different chemical compositions that we call P1, P2, I1, I2, and E in order of decreasing Mg and increasing Na abundances. Statistical tests show that the mean ratios in any pair of groups cannot be extracted from the same parent distribution. The overlap with the five populations recently detected from UV photometry is good but not perfect, confirming that more distinct components probably exist in this complex GC. Based on data collected at the ESO telescopes under program 072.D-0507 and during the FLAMES Science Verification program.

  15. The Giant Branch of omega Centauri. IV. Abundance Patterns Based on Echelle Spectra of 40 Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, John E.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1995-07-01

    Abundances of some 20 elements have been determined for a (biased) sample of 40 red giants having Mv < -1.5 in the chemically inhomogeneous globular cluster ω Centauri. The results are based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra and permit one to examine the roles of primordial enrichment and stellar evolutionary mixing effects in the cluster. Our basic conclusions are as follows (1) There is an abundance range -1.8 < [Fe/H] < -0.8, and even more metal rich stars may exist in the cluster. (2) For the α (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) and iron peak (Cr, Ni) elements and Sc and V, [metal/Fe] is flat as a function of [Fe/H] and is consistent with primordial enrichment from stars having mass greater than 10 Msun, as has been found for field halo stars. (3) There is a large scatter in the abundances of C, N, and 0. The bulk of the stars have -0.9 < [C/Fe] < -0.3 and [O/Fe] ˜ 0.3, as is found at the red giant branch tip in other "normal" (showing no spread in [Fe/H]) clusters of similar abundance, while there also exists a group of CN-strong stars having [C/Fe] ˜ -0.7 and [O/Fe] ˜ -0.5. Nitrogen appears to be enhanced in all of these carbon-depleted stars. These results are most readily explained in terms of evolutionary mixing effects not predicted by standard stellar evolution calculations and are consistent with the earlier suggestions of Cohen & Bell (1986) and Paltoglou & Norris (1989) concerning processing in both the CN and ON cycles in the stars being observed. In contrast, the group of CO-strong stars first identified by Persson et al. (1980) has [C/Fe] ˜ 0.0, [O/Fe] ˜ 0.4, and [N/Fe] ˜ 0.4 (or 0.9 if the nitrogen scale of Brown and Wallerstein is correct) and is suggestive of primordial enrichment of carbon and/or nitrogen from intermediate- and possibly low-mass stars, tempered by later stellar evolutionary effects. (4) [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] are anticorrelated with [O/Fe], and there is a positive correlation between [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe], all of which

  16. Multi-wavelength Radio Continuum Emission Studies of Dust-free Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Drake, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (α Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for α Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of α Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For α Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of α Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for α Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  17. MULTI-WAVELENGTH RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION STUDIES OF DUST-FREE RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Drake, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (α Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for α Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of α Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For α Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of α Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for α Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  18. Multi-wavelength Radio Continuum Emission Studies of Dust-free Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Dranke, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (alpha Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (alpha Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for alpha Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of alpha Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For alpha Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of alpha Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for alpha Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  19. Dipole modes with depressed amplitudes in red giants are mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Belkacem, K.; Pinçon, C.; Takata, M.; Vrard, M.; Barban, C.; Goupil, M.-J.; Kallinger, T.; Samadi, R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Seismic observations with the space-borne Kepler mission have shown that a number of evolved stars exhibit low-amplitude dipole modes, which is referred to as depressed modes. Recently, these low amplitudes have been attributed to the presence of a strong magnetic field in the stellar core of those stars. Subsequently, and based on this scenario, the prevalence of high magnetic fields in evolved stars has been inferred. It should be noted, however, that this conclusion remains indirect. Aims: We intend to study the properties of mode depression in evolved stars, which is a necessary condition before reaching conclusions about the physical nature of the mechanism responsible for the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. Methods: We perform a thorough characterization of the global seismic parameters of depressed dipole modes and show that these modes have a mixed character. The observation of stars showing dipole mixed modes that are depressed is especially useful for deriving model-independent conclusions on the dipole mode damping. We use a simple model to explain how mode visibilities are connected to the extra damping seen in depressed modes. Results: Observations prove that depressed dipole modes in red giants are not pure pressure modes but mixed modes. This result, observed in more than 90% of the bright stars (mV ≤ 11), invalidates the hypothesis that depressed dipole modes result from the suppression of the oscillation in the radiative core of the stars. Observations also show that, except for visibility, seismic properties of the stars with depressed modes are equivalent to those of normal stars. The measurement of the extra damping that is responsible for the reduction of mode amplitudes, without any prior on its physical nature, potentially provides an efficient tool for elucidating the mechanism responsible for the mode depression. Conclusions: The mixed nature of the depressed modes in red giants and their unperturbed global seismic

  20. The Segue K giant survey. II. A catalog of distance determinations for the Segue K giants in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ma, Zhibo; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Ivans, Inese I.; Jacobson, Heather R.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Lucatello, Sara; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian; Zhao, Gang; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    We present an online catalog of distance determinations for 6036 K giants, most of which are members of the Milky Way's stellar halo. Their medium-resolution spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration are used to derive metallicities and rough gravity estimates, along with radial velocities. Distance moduli are derived from a comparison of each star's apparent magnitude with the absolute magnitude of empirically calibrated color-luminosity fiducials, at the observed (g – r){sub 0} color and spectroscopic [Fe/H]. We employ a probabilistic approach that makes it straightforward to properly propagate the errors in metallicities, magnitudes, and colors into distance uncertainties. We also fold in prior information about the giant-branch luminosity function and the different metallicity distributions of the SEGUE K-giant targeting sub-categories. We show that the metallicity prior plays a small role in the distance estimates, but that neglecting the luminosity prior could lead to a systematic distance modulus bias of up to 0.25 mag, compared to the case of using the luminosity prior. We find a median distance precision of 16%, with distance estimates most precise for the least metal-poor stars near the tip of the red giant branch. The precision and accuracy of our distance estimates are validated with observations of globular and open clusters. The stars in our catalog are up to 125 kpc from the Galactic center, with 283 stars beyond 50 kpc, forming the largest available spectroscopic sample of distant tracers in the Galactic halo.

  1. The Effect of Scattering on the Temperature Stratification of 3D Model Atmospheres of Metal-Poor Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, Remo; Hayek, Wolfgang; Asplund, Martin

    2011-08-01

    We study the effects of different approximations of scattering in 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations on the photospheric temperature stratification of metal-poor red giant stars. We find that assuming a Planckian source function and neglecting the contribution of scattering to extinction in optically thin layers provides a good approximation of the effects of coherent scattering on the photospheric temperature balance.

  2. Laboratory submillimeter transition frequencies of Li-7H and Li-6H. [used for abundance investigations in red giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plummer, G. M.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental (J = 1 - 0) rotational transition frequencies of Li-7H and Li-6H in their ground (v = 0) vibrational states and of Li-7H in its first excited (v = 1) vibrational state have been measured in the laboratory. Use of these transition frequencies should permit astronomical investigations of LiH abundances in red giant stars of high lithium abundance.

  3. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Blood Donors; Blood Transfusion; HIV Infections; HIV-1; HIV-2; HTLV-I; HTLV-II; Retroviridae Infections; Hepatitis, Viral, Human; Hepatitis B; Hepacivirus; West Nile Virus

  4. Deep genetic divergence in giant red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827) across a wide distributional range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M. V.; Heras, S.; Maltagliati, F.; Roldán, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The giant red shrimp, Aristaeomorpha foliacea, is a commercially important species in the Mediterranean Sea (MED), Mozambique Channel (MOZ), and north western Australia (AUS). 685 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene was sequenced in 317 individuals from six Mediterranean and two Indian Ocean localities. Genetic diversity estimates of Indian Ocean samples were higher than those of MED counterparts. AMOVA, phylogenetic tree, haplotype network and Bayesian assignment analyses detected three haplogroups, corresponding to MED, MOZ and AUS, separated by three and 38 mutational steps, respectively. Within MED shallow genetic divergence between populations was dependent on local oceanographical characteristics. Mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests provided a consistent indication of past population expansion in each region considered. Our results provide the first evidence of genetic structure in A. foliacea and suggest a scenario of allopatric speciation within the Indian Ocean that, however needs deeper examination.

  5. IS DUST FORMING ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN 47 Tuc?

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Shiao, Bernie; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles; Misselt, Karl; Hora, Joe; Indebetouw, Remy; Whitney, Barbara

    2010-03-10

    Using Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire red giant branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below {approx}1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.

  6. Tidal Interaction among Red Giants Close Binary Systems in APOGEE Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Majewski, Steven R.; Troup, Nicholas William; Weinberg, Nevin N.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), the tidal evolution of binaries containing a red giant branch (RGB) star with a stellar or substellar companion was investigated. The tide raised by the companion in the RGB star leads to exchange of angular momentum between the orbit and the stellar spin, causing the orbit to contract. The tidal dissipation rate is computed using turbulent viscosity acting on the equilibrium tidal flow, where careful attention is paid to the effects of reduced viscosity for close-in companions. Evolutionary models for the RGB stars, from the zero-age main sequence to the present, were acquired from the MESA code. "Standard" turbulent viscosity gives rise to such a large orbital decay that many observed systems have decay times much shorter than the RGB evolution time. Several theories for "reduced" turbulent viscosity are investigated, and reduce the number of systems with uncomfortably short decay times.

  7. Kepler-432 b: a massive planet in a highly eccentric orbit transiting a red giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Lillo-Box, J.; Southworth, J.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Barrado, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first disclosure of the planetary nature of Kepler-432 b (aka Kepler object of interest KOI-1299.01). We accurately constrained its mass and eccentricity by high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. By simultaneously fitting these new data and Kepler photometry, we found that Kepler-432 b is a dense transiting exoplanet with a mass of Mp = 4.87 ± 0.48MJup and radius of Rp = 1.120 ± 0.036RJup. The planet revolves every 52.5 d around a K giant star that ascends the red giant branch, and it moves on a highly eccentric orbit with e = 0.535 ± 0.030. By analysing two near-IR high-resolution images, we found that a star is located at 1.1'' from Kepler-432, but it is too faint to cause significant effects on the transit depth. Together with Kepler-56 and Kepler-91, Kepler-432 occupies an almost-desert region of parameter space, which is important for constraining the evolutionary processes of planetary systems. RV data (Table A.1) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/L5

  8. Digging in the coronal graveyard - A Rosat observation of the red giant Arcturus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Fleming, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Juergen H. M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A deep exposure of the bright star Arcturus (Alpha Bootis: K1 III) with the Roentgensatellit (Rosat) failed to detect soft X-ray emission from the archetype 'noncoronal' red giant. The 3-sigma upper limit in the energy band 0.1-2.4 keV corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of less than 3 x 10 to the 25th erg/s, equivalent to a coronal surface flux density of less than 0.0001 solar. The nondetection safely eliminates coronal irradiation as a possible mechanism to produce the highly variable He I 10830 feature and emphasizes the sharp decline in solarlike coronal activity that accompanies the evolution of low-mass single stars away from the main sequence. While the most conspicuous object in the Rosat field of view was not visible in X-rays, at least one fainter star is among the about 60 sources recorded: the Sigma Sct variable CN Boo, an A8 giant in the UMa Stream.

  9. Red giants in the outer halo of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5128/Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Sarah A.; Flynn, Chris; Harris, William E.; Valtonen, Mauri

    2015-03-01

    We used VIMOS on VLT to perform V and I band imaging of the outermost halo of NGC 5128/Centaurus A ((m - M)0 = 27.91±0.08), 65 kpc from the galaxy's center and along the major axis. The stellar population has been resolved to I0 ≈ 27 with a 50% completeness limit of I0 = 24.7, well below the tip of the red-giant branch (TRGB), which is seen at I0 ≈ 23.9. The surface density of NGC 5128 halo stars in our fields was sufficiently low that dim, unresolved background galaxies were a major contaminant in the source counts. We isolated a clean sample of red-giant-branch (RGB) stars extending to ≈0.8 mag below the TRGB through conservative magnitude and color cuts, to remove the (predominantly blue) unresolved background galaxies. We derived stellar metallicities from colors of the stars via isochrones and measured the density falloff of the halo as a function of metallicity by combining our observations with HST imaging taken of NGC 5128 halo fields closer to the galaxy center. We found both metal-rich and metal-poor stellar populations and found that the falloff of the two follows the same de Vaucouleurs' law profiles from ≈8 kpc out to ≈70 kpc. The metallicity distribution function (MDF) and the density falloff agree with the results of two recent studies of similar outermost halo fields in NGC 5128. We found no evidence of a "transition" in the radial profile of the halo, in which the metal-rich halo density would drop rapidly, leaving the underlying metal-poor halo to dominate by default out to greater radial extent, as has been seen in the outer halo of two other large galaxies. If NGC 5128 has such a transition, it must lie at larger galactocentric distances.

  10. GRANULATION SIGNATURES IN THE SPECTRUM OF THE VERY METAL-POOR RED GIANT HD 122563

    SciTech Connect

    RamIrez, I.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Lambert, D. L.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2010-12-20

    A very high resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 200, 000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {approx_equal} 340) blue-green spectrum of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -2.6) red giant star HD 122563 has been obtained by us at McDonald Observatory. We measure the asymmetries and core wavelengths of a set of unblended Fe I lines covering a wide range of line strength. Line bisectors exhibit the characteristic C-shape signature of surface convection (granulation) and they span from about 100 m s{sup -1} in the strongest Fe I features to 800 m s{sup -1} in the weakest ones. Core wavelength shifts range from about -100 to -900 m s{sup -1}, depending on line strength. In general, larger blueshifts are observed in weaker lines, but there is increasing scatter with increasing residual flux. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we synthesize the same set of spectral lines using a state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulation for a stellar atmosphere of fundamental parameters similar to those of HD 122563. We find good agreement between model predictions and observations. This allows us to infer an absolute zero point for the line shifts and radial velocity. Moreover, it indicates that the structure and dynamics of the simulation are realistic, thus providing support to previous claims of large 3D-LTE corrections to elemental abundances and fundamental parameters of very metal-poor red giant stars obtained with standard 1D-LTE spectroscopic analyses, as suggested by the hydrodynamic model used here.

  11. Ransom, Religion, and Red Giants: C.S. Lewis and Fred Hoyle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Famed fantasy writer C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) was known to friends as a well-read astronomy aficionado. However, this medieval scholar and Christian apologist embraced a pre-Copernican universe (with its astrological overtones) in his Chronicles of Narnia series and defended the beauty and relevance of the geocentric model in his final academic work, "The Discarded Image". In the "Ransom Trilogy” ("Out of the Silent Planet", "Perelandra", and "That Hideous Strength") philologist Ransom (loosely based on Lewis's close friend J.R.R. Tolkien) travels to Lewis's visions of Mars and Venus, where he interacts with intelligent extraterrestrials, battles with evil scientists, and aids in the continuation of extraterrestrial Christian values. In the final book, Ransom is joined by a handful of colleagues in open warfare against the satanic N.I.C.E. (National Institute for Coordinated Experiments). Geneticist and evolutionary biologist J.B.S. Haldane criticized Lewis for his scientifically inaccurate descriptions of the planets, and his disdain for the scientific establishment. Lewis responded to the criticism in essays of his own. Another of Lewis's favorite scientific targets was atheist Fred Hoyle, whom he openly criticized for anti-Christian statements in Hoyle's BBC radio series. Writer and Lewis friend Dorothy L. Sayers voiced her own criticism of Hoyle. In a letter, Lewis dismissed Hoyle as "not a great philosopher (and none of my scientific colleagues think much of him as a scientist.” Given Lewis's lack of respect for Hoyle, and use of creative license in describing the planets, and the flat-earth, "geocentric” Narnia, it is surprising that Lewis very carefully includes an astronomically correct description of red giants in two novels in the Narnia series ("The Magician's Nephew" and "The Last Battle"). This inclusion is even more curious given that Fred Hoyle is well-known as one of the pioneers in the field of stellar death and the properties of red giants.

  12. Constraining the efficiency of angular momentum transport with asteroseismology of red giants: the effect of stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggenberger, P.; Lagarde, N.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Ekström, S.; Georgy, C.; Meynet, G.; Salmon, S.; Ceillier, T.; García, R. A.; Mathis, S.; Deheuvels, S.; Maeder, A.; den Hartogh, J. W.; Hirschi, R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Constraints on the internal rotation of red giants are now available thanks to asteroseismic observations. Preliminary comparisons with rotating stellar models indicate that an undetermined additional process for the internal transport of angular momentum is required in addition to purely hydrodynamic processes. Aims: We investigate how asteroseismic measurements of red giants can help us characterize the additional transport mechanism. Methods: We first determine the efficiency of the missing transport mechanism for the low-mass red giant KIC 7341231 by computing rotating models that include an additional viscosity corresponding to this process. We then discuss the change in the efficiency of this transport of angular momentum with the mass, metallicity, and evolutionary stage in the light of the corresponding viscosity determined for the more massive red giant KIC 8366239. Results: In the case of the low-mass red giant KIC 7341231, we find that the viscosity corresponding to the additional mechanism is constrained to the range νadd = 1 × 103-1.3 × 104 cm2 s-1. This constraint on the efficiency of the unknown additional transport mechanism during the post-main sequence is obtained independently of any specific assumption about the modeling of rotational effects during the pre-main sequence and the main sequence (in particular, the braking of the surface by magnetized winds and the efficiency of the internal transport of angular momentum before the post-main-sequence phase). When we assume that the additional transport mechanism is at work during the whole evolution of the star together with a solar-calibrated braking of the surface by magnetized winds, the range of νadd is reduced to 1-4 × 103 cm2 s-1. In addition to being sensitive to the evolutionary stage of the star, the efficiency of the unknown process for internal transport of angular momentum increases with the stellar mass.

  13. Evidence for enhanced mixing on the super-meteoritic Li-rich red giant HD 233517

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.

    2015-02-01

    Context. HD 233517 is among the most Li-rich stars in the sky. It is a rapidly rotating, single K giant thought to be on its first ascent on the red giant branch. The star has also the highest known infrared excess among any of the known first-ascent giants. Aims: We revisit the physical parameters of the system and aim to map its surface temperature distribution. Methods: New time-series photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy were obtained with our robotic facilities STELLA and Amadeus Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT) in 2007-2011. Inverse line-profile modelling is performed on a total of 167 échelle spectra and six Doppler images are presented. Results: Light and radial-velocity variations suggest a stellar rotation period of 47.6±0.3 d. The atmospheric parameters agree with previous studies and verify a super-meteoritic log 7Li abundance of 4.29±0.10 with undetected 6Li, while the metals are generally deficient by -0.4 dex with respect to the Sun. We determine a lower than normal isotopic carbon ratio of 12C/13C = 9+4-2. Our Doppler images indicate warm and cool spots with an average temperature contrast of just ±65 K with respect to the effective temperature. Doppler maps from Li i 670.78 reveal practically identical surface morphology, with a higher average contrast of ±160 K and errors that are five times larger. Reconstructions with simultaneously 1617 and 3007 spectral lines showed both a signal degradation with respect to our 56-line final image. An error analysis indicates an average temperature error per surface pixel of just ±4 K. Conclusions: HD 233517 appears to be an old (≈10-Gyr) single 0.95-M⊙ giant currently undergoing mild mass loss in the form of a wind. The cool and warm photospheric features are interpreted to be merely locations of suppressed and enhanced convection, respectively, probably intermingled by a yet undetected weak magnetic field. The low carbon-isotope ratio is indicative of extra mixing rather than of an

  14. AMPLITUDES OF SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS: CONSTRAINTS FROM RED GIANTS IN OPEN CLUSTERS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Benomar, Othman; Kallinger, Thomas; Basu, Sarbani; Mosser, BenoIt; Hekker, Saskia; Mathur, Savita; GarcIa, Rafael A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Verner, Graham A.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Meibom, Soeren; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Szabo, Robert

    2011-08-10

    Scaling relations that link asteroseismic quantities to global stellar properties are important for gaining understanding of the intricate physics that underpins stellar pulsations. The common notion that all stars in an open cluster have essentially the same distance, age, and initial composition implies that the stellar parameters can be measured to much higher precision than what is usually achievable for single stars. This makes clusters ideal for exploring the relation between the mode amplitude of solar-like oscillations and the global stellar properties. We have analyzed data obtained with NASA's Kepler space telescope to study solar-like oscillations in 100 red giant stars located in either of the three open clusters, NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811. By fitting the measured amplitudes to predictions from simple scaling relations that depend on luminosity, mass, and effective temperature, we find that the data cannot be described by any power of the luminosity-to-mass ratio as previously assumed. As a result we provide a new improved empirical relation which treats luminosity and mass separately. This relation turns out to also work remarkably well for main-sequence and subgiant stars. In addition, the measured amplitudes reveal the potential presence of a number of previously unknown unresolved binaries in the red clump in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, pointing to an interesting new application for asteroseismology as a probe into the formation history of open clusters.

  15. The Very Slow Wind from the Pulsating Semiregular Red Giant, L2 Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Chen, C.; Plavchan, P.

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 1 1.7 and 17.9 micron images at the Keck I telescope of the circumstellar dust emission from L(sub 2) Pup, which is one of the nearest ( D = 61 pc) mass-losing, pulsating red giants that has a substantial infra-red excess. We propose that the star is losing mass at a rate of approx.3 x 10(exp -7) Solar Mass/yr. Given its relatively low luminosity (approx. 1500 Solar Luminosity), relatively high effective temperature (near 3400 K), relatively short period (approx. 140 days), and inferred gas outflow speed of 3.5 km/s, standard models for dust-driven mass loss do not apply. Instead, the wind may be driven by the stellar pulsations, with radiation pressure on dust being relatively unimportant. as described in some recent calculations. L(sub 2) Pup may serve as the prototype of this phase of stellar evolution, in which a star could lose approx. 15% of its initial main-sequence mass. Subject headings: circumstellar matter - stars: individual (L2 Puppis) - stars: mass loss

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF A ROTATING RED GIANT STAR. I. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELS OF TURBULENT CONVECTION AND ASSOCIATED MEAN FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, A. S. E-mail: palacios@graal.univ-montp2.fr

    2009-09-10

    With the development of one-dimensional stellar evolution codes including rotation and the increasing number of observational data for stars of various evolutionary stages, it becomes more and more possible to follow the evolution of the rotation profile and angular momentum distribution in stars. In this context, understanding the interplay between rotation and convection in the very extended envelopes of giant stars is very important considering that all low- and intermediate-mass stars become red giants after the central hydrogen burning phase. In this paper, we analyze the interplay between rotation and convection in the envelope of red giant stars using three-dimensional numerical experiments. We make use of the Anelastic Spherical Harmonics code to simulate the inner 50% of the envelope of a low-mass star on the red giant branch. We discuss the organization and dynamics of convection, and put a special emphasis on the distribution of angular momentum in such a rotating extended envelope. To do so, we explore two directions of the parameter space, namely, the bulk rotation rate and the Reynolds number with a series of four simulations. We find that turbulent convection in red giant stars is dynamically rich, and that it is particularly sensitive to the rotation rate of the star. Reynolds stresses and meridional circulation establish various differential rotation profiles (either cylindrical or shellular) depending on the convective Rossby number of the simulations, but they all agree that the radial shear is large. Temperature fluctuations are found to be large and in the slowly rotating cases, a dominant l = 1 temperature dipole influences the convective motions. Both baroclinic effects and turbulent advection are strong in all cases and mostly oppose one another.

  17. STRUCTURAL GLITCHES NEAR THE CORES OF RED GIANTS REVEALED BY OSCILLATIONS IN G-MODE PERIOD SPACINGS FROM STELLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Townsend, R. H. D.

    2015-06-01

    With recent advances in asteroseismology it is now possible to peer into the cores of red giants, potentially providing a way to study processes such as nuclear burning and mixing through their imprint as sharp structural variations—glitches—in the stellar cores. Here we show how such core glitches can affect the oscillations we observe in red giants. We derive an analytical expression describing the expected frequency pattern in the presence of a glitch. This formulation also accounts for the coupling between acoustic and gravity waves. From an extensive set of canonical stellar models we find glitch-induced variation in the period spacing and inertia of non-radial modes during several phases of red giant evolution. Significant changes are seen in the appearance of mode amplitude and frequency patterns in asteroseismic diagrams such as the power spectrum and the échelle diagram. Interestingly, along the red giant branch glitch-induced variation occurs only at the luminosity bump, potentially providing a direct seismic indicator of stars in that particular evolution stage. Similarly, we find the variation at only certain post-helium-ignition evolution stages, namely, in the early phases of helium core burning and at the beginning of helium shell burning, signifying the asymptotic giant branch bump. Based on our results, we note that assuming stars to be glitch-free, while they are not, can result in an incorrect estimate of the period spacing. We further note that including diffusion and mixing beyond classical Schwarzschild could affect the characteristics of the glitches, potentially providing a way to study these physical processes.

  18. The dynamic atmospheres of red giant stars. Spectral synthesis in high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.

    2005-11-01

    Light is the only source of information we have to study distant stars. Our knowledge about the state of the matter inside stars has been gathered by analysing star light (photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry, polarimetry, etc.). Of central importance in this context are stellar atmospheres, which are the transition regions from the optically thick stellar interiors where the electromagnetic radiation is generated to the optically thin outer layers from where the photons can leave the star. However, the atmosphere of a star is not only the region where most of the observable radiation is emitted or in other words the layers which are "visible from outside". The atmosphere also leaves an imprint on the stellar spectrum as the radiation passes through, most of the line spectrum is formed there. Thus, the light serves as a probe for the physical processes within stellar atmospheres, especially spectroscopy is one of the major tools in stellar astrophysics. Applying the underlying physical principles in numerical simulations (model atmospheres, synthetic spectra) is the second -- complementary and necessary -- step towards a deeper understanding of stellar atmospheres and for deriving stellar parameters (e.g. T_eff, L, log g, chemical composition) of observed objects. This thesis is dedicated to the outer layers of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, which have rather remarkable properties compared to atmospheres of most other types of stars. AGB stars represent low- to intermediate mass stars at a late stage of their evolution. Forming a sub-group among all red giants, they exhibit large extensions, low effective temperatures and high luminosities. The evolutionary phase of the AGB -- complex but decisive for stellar evolution -- is characterised by several important phenomena as for example nucleo-synthesis in explosively burning shells (thermal pulses), convective processes (dredge up), large-amplitude pulsations with long periods or a pronounced mass loss. Red

  19. A survey for red varibles INT he LMC - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Neill; Glass, I. S.; Catchpole, R. M.

    1988-05-01

    Infrared photometry of a sample of 126 variables drawn from a 16 sq deg area of the northern LMC is presented. Most of these stars were previously unknown and the majority prove the be long period red-giant variables. Most of the latter stars fall within two groups in the /K(0), log(P)/ diagram, the lower luminosity ones being Miras which obey a definite period-luminosity relation. Using the latter stars as distance estimators is discussed. The /M(bol), P/ diagram is compared with the theoretical tracks calculated by Wood, Bessell & Fox (1983), and it is found that the distribution of stars is probably consistent with a lull in star formation in the LMC from about 10 to the 9th - 2 x 10 to the 8th yr ago, although this conclusion depends strongly on the luminosity at which stars of different initial mass enter the thermally pulsing AGB.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The SEGUE K giant survey. II. Distances of 6036 stars (Xue+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.-X.; Ma, Z.; Rix, H.-W.; Morrison, H. L.; Harding, P.; Beers, T. C.; Ivans, I. I.; Jacobson, H. R.; Johnson, J.; Lee, Y. S.; Lucatello, S.; Rockosi, C. M.; Sobeck, J. S.; Yanny, B.; Zhao, G.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-08-01

    SDSS and its extensions use a dedicated 2.5m telescope to obtain ugriz imaging and resolution (defined as R=λ/Δλ)~2000 spectra for 640 (SDSS spectrograph) or 1000 (BOSS spectrograph) objects over a 7deg2 field. Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE), one of the key projects executed during SDSS-II and SDSS-III, obtained some 360000 spectra of stars in the Galaxy, selected to explore the nature of stellar populations from 0.5kpc to 100kpc (Yanny et al. 2009, cat. J/AJ/137/4377; and C. M. Rockosi et al., in preparation). Data from SEGUE is a significant part of the ninth SDSS public data release (DR9; Ahn et al. 2012, cat. V/139). The SEGUE project obtained spectra for a large number of different stellar types: 18 for SEGUE-1 (see Yanny et al. 2009, cat. J/AJ/137/4377, for details) and 11 for SEGUE-2 (C. M. Rockosi et al. in preparation). Three of these target types were specifically designed to detect K giants: these are designated "l-color K giants", "red K giants", and "proper-motion K giants." The K-giant targets from these three categories all have 0.5<(g-r)0<1.3, 0.5<(u-g)0<3.5, and proper motions smaller than 11mas/yr. We present a catalog containing the distance moduli, observed information, and SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP) atmospheric parameters for 6036 SEGUE K giants (see Table4). For each object in the catalog, we also list some of the basic observables such as (R.A., decl.), extinction-corrected apparent magnitudes and dereddened colors, as well as the information obtained from the spectra--heliocentric radial velocities plus SSPP atmospheric parameters. In addition, we provide the Bayesian estimates of the distance moduli, distances to the Sun, Galactocentric distances, the absolute magnitudes and their uncertainties, along with the distance moduli at (5%, 16%, 50%, 84%, 95%) confidence of L(DM). (2 data files).

  1. [Automated measurement of reticulocyte count by flow cytometry. II: Analysis of the blood containing abnormal erythrocytes or giant platelets].

    PubMed

    Oyamatsu, T; Shimizu, N; Takeuchi, K; Yamamoto, M; Kawai, Y; Watanabe, K; Iri, H

    1989-07-01

    We have examined the influence of erythrocytes containing inclusion bodies, nucleated red cells or giant platelets on the measurement of reticulocyte count by automated machine, R-1000. Correlation of the reticulocyte count between automated and conventional method was extremely good in the blood containing red cells with Jolly bodies, Pappenheimer bodies or basophilic stippling . However, correlation was poor when the sample contained the nucleated red cells. Reticulocyte count was decreased in the blood with significant amounts of nucleated red cells. Since nucleated red cells themselves are not counted as reticulocytes in the machine, this was considered to be due to increased young reticulocytes which frequently appeared with nucleated red cells. Both cold agglutinated red cells and giant platelets apparently influenced the reticulocyte count by the R-1000. These results suggest that red cells with Jolly bodies, Pappenheimer bodies or basophilic stippling do not influence the automatic counting of reticulocytes. Although nucleated red cells, cold agglutinated red cells and giant platelets affected the reticulocyte count, the machine shows abnormal flags in most of above cases (except highly agglutinated red cells), so that one can recount reticulocytes by conventional method. We conclude the machine can safely count the reticulocytes even in the blood containing abnormal red cells or platelets.

  2. High spectral resolution spectroscopy of the SiO fundamental lines in red giants and red supergiants with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The mass-loss mechanism in red giants and red supergiants is not yet understood well. The SiO fundamental lines near 8 μm are potentially useful for probing the outer atmosphere, which is essential for clarifying the mass-loss mechanism. However, these lines have been little explored until now. Aims: We present high spectral resolution spectroscopic observations of the SiO fundamental lines near 8.1 μm in 16 bright red giants and red supergiants. Our sample consists of seven normal (i.e., non-Mira) K-M giants (from K1.5 to M6.5), three Mira stars, three optically bright red supergiants, two dusty red supergiants, and the enigmatic object GCIRS3 near the Galactic center. Methods: Our program stars were observed between 8.088 μm and 8.112 μm with a spectral resolution of 30 000 using VLT/VISIR. Results: We detected SiO fundamental lines in all of our program stars except for GCIRS3. The SiO lines in normal K and M giants as well as optically bright (i.e., not dusty) red supergiants do not show P-Cyg profiles or blueshifts, which means the absence of systematic outflows in the SiO line forming region. We detected P-Cyg profiles in the SiO lines in the dusty red supergiants VY CMa and VX Sgr, with the latter object being a new detection. These SiO lines originate in the outflowing gas with the thermal dust continuum emission seen as the background. The outflow velocities of the SiO line forming region in VY CMa and VX Sgr are estimated to be 27 km s-1 and 17 km s-1, respectively. We derived basic stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, luminosity, and mass) for the normal K-M giants and optically bright red supergiants in our sample and compared the observed VISIR spectra with synthetic spectra predicted from MARCS photospheric models. Most of the SiO lines observed in the program stars warmer than ~3400 K are reasonably reproduced by the MARCS models, which allowed us to estimate the silicon abundance as well as the 28Si/29Si and 28Si

  3. Surprising Rapid Collapse of Sirius B from Red Giant to White Dwarf Through Mass Transfer to Sirius a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz; Ali, Ola

    2013-03-01

    Sirius was observed in antiquity as a red star. In his famous astronomy textbook the Almagest written 140 AD, Ptolemy described the star Sirius as fiery red. He curiously depicted it as one of six red-colored stars. The other five are class M and K stars, such as Arcturus and Betelgeuse. Apparent confirmation in ancient Greek and Roman sources are found and Sirius was also reported red in Europe about 1400 years ago. Sirius must have changed to a white dwarf in the night of Ascension. The star chapter in the Quran started with "by the star as it collapsed (1) your companion have not gone astray nor being misled (2), and in verse 49 which is the rotation period of the companion Sirius B around Sirius A, it is said" He is the Lord of Sirius (49). If Sirius actually was red what could have caused it to change into the brilliant bluish-white star we see today? What the naked eye perceives as a single star is actually a binary star system, consisting of a white main sequence star of spectral type A1V, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, termed Sirius B. The red color indicates that the star seen then was a red giant. It looks that what they have seen in antiquity was Sirius B which was then a red giant and it collapsed to form a white dwarf. Since there is no evidence of a planetary nebula, then the red Sirius paradox can be solved in terms of stellar evolution with mass transfer. Sirius B was the most massive star which evolved to a red giant and filled the Roche lobe. Mass transfer to Sirius A occurred through the Lagrangian point. Sirius A then became more massive while Sirius B lost mass and shrank. Sirius B then collapsed abruptly into a white dwarf. In the case of Algol, Ptolmy observed it as white star but it was red at the time of El sufi. At present it is white. The rate of mass transfer from Sirius B to Sirius A, and from Algol B to A is estimated from observational data of colour change from red to bullish white to be 0

  4. Chemical composition of semi-regular variable giants. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. A.; Martin, P.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: The aim of this work was to derive the elemental abundances in four stars classified as semiregular variables of the type “d” (SRd). These stars should presumably belong to the Galactic halo population. Methods: Elemental abundances have been derived from both local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) analyses, applied to high-resolution (R ≅ 80 000) spectra obtained with the CFHT ESPaDOnS spectrograph. Results: We have derived the abundances of 29 chemical elements in V463 Her, V894 Her, CW CVn, and MS Hya, and arrived at the following conclusions. Conclusions: The stars of our programme have a chemical composition that does not agree with their presumable status as metal-deficient halo giants. All studied SRd giants have relative-to-solar elemental abundances typical of the thick/thin Galactic disc stars. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  5. Galactic archaeology with asteroseismology and spectroscopy: Red giants observed by CoRoT and APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, F.; Chiappini, C.; Rodrigues, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Mosser, B.; Girardi, L.; Valentini, M.; Noels, A.; Morel, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Schultheis, M.; Baudin, F.; de Assis Peralta, R.; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.; Kallinger, T.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.; Baglin, A.; Santiago, B. X.; Martig, M.; Minchev, I.; Steinmetz, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Cunha, K.; Beers, T. C.; Epstein, C.; García Pérez, A. E.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Majewski, S. R.; Mészáros, Sz.; Nidever, D.; Pan, K.; Pinsonneault, M.; Schiavon, R. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Stassun, K.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, G.

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has recently become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and relative ages for large samples of red giant stars. We present the CoRoGEE dataset, obtained from CoRoT light curves for 606 red giants in two fields of the Galactic disc that have been co-observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of ≲2% in distance, 4% in radius, 9% in mass and 25% in age. We also assessed systematic age uncertainties stemming from different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a broad radial range of the Milky Way disc (5 kpc

  6. Panel 1: A pulsating red giant star and a compact, hot white dwarf star orbit each other.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Panel 1: A pulsating red giant star and a compact, hot white dwarf star orbit each other. Panel 2: The red giant sheds much of its outer layers in a stellar wind. The white dwarf helps concentrate the wind along a thin equatorial plane. The white dwarf accretes some of this escaping gas forming a disk around the itself. Panel 3: When enough gas accumulates on the white dwarf's surface it explodes as a nova outburst. Most of the hot gas forms a pair of expanding bubbles above and below the equatorial disk. Panel 4: A few thousand years after the bubbles expand into space, the white dwarf goes through another nova outburst and makes another pair of bubbles, which form a distinctive hourglass shape.

  7. Systematic trend of water vapour absorption in red giant atmospheres revealed by high resolution TEXES 12 μm spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Lambert, J.; Farzone, M.; Richter, M. J.; Josselin, E.; Harper, G. M.; Eriksson, K.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The structures of the outer atmospheres of red giants are very complex. Recent interpretations of a range of different observations have led to contradictory views of these regions. It is clear, however, that classical model photospheres are inadequate to describe the nature of the outer atmospheres. The notion of large optically thick molecular spheres around the stars (MOLspheres) has been invoked in order to explain spectro-interferometric observations and low- and high-resolution spectra. On the other hand high-resolution spectra in the mid-IR do not easily fit into this picture because they rule out any large sphere of water vapour in LTE surrounding red giants. Aims: In order to approach a unified scenario for these outer regions of red giants, more empirical evidence from different diagnostics are needed. Our aim here is to investigate high-resolution, mid-IR spectra for a range of red giants, spanning spectral types from early K to mid M. We want to study how the pure rotational lines of water vapour change with effective temperature, and whether we can find common properties that can put new constraints on the modelling of these regions, so that we can gain new insights. Methods: We have recorded mid-IR spectra at 12.2 - 12.4 μm at high spectral resolution of ten well-studied bright red giants, with TEXES mounted on the IRTF on Mauna Kea. These stars span effective temperatures from 3450 K to 4850 K. Results: We find that all red giants in our study cooler than 4300 K, spanning a wide range of effective temperatures (down to 3450 K), show water absorption lines stronger than expected and none are detected in emission, in line with what has been previously observed for a few stars. The strengths of the lines vary smoothly with spectral type. We identify several spectral features in the wavelength region that are undoubtedly formed in the photosphere. From a study of water-line ratios of the stars, we find that the excitation temperatures, in the

  8. The properties of red giant stars along the Sagittarius tidal tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shi, W. B.; Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, J. K.; Ruan, G. P.; Liang, Y. C.; Zhou, L.; Ren, H. B.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y. H.; Wang, Y. F.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to measure the metallicity distribution and velocity distribution of red giant branch (RGB) stars along the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr) streams. Thanks to the large number of stars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) sample, we can study the properties of streams as a function of the Λ⊙ from the Sgr core. Methods: Using the 22 000 RGB stars from the ninth data release of SDSS, we selected 1100 RGB stars belonging to the streams of the Sgr. As compared with red horizontal branch stars (Shi et al. 2012, ApJ, 751, 130) the RGB stars constitute a large sample size and extend to a metal-poor component of [Fe/H] -3.0 dex. In particular, this RGB sample has a significant number of stars in the second wrap of the leading stream of the Sgr (leading arm 2), and thus provides a good opportunity to understand the properties of the leading stream. Results: We derive a metallicity gradient of -(2.3 ± 0.5) × 10-3 dex deg-1 in leading arm 2 for the first time, of -(1.6 ± 0.4) × 10-6 dex deg-1 for the leading arm 1, and of -(1.3 ± 0.3) × 10-3 dex deg-1 for the trailing arm 1. We check the distribution of Sgr stars in phase space and find a velocity dispersion of 21.5 km s-1 for leading arm 1. Finally, we identify a possible new branch in leading arm 1. Full Table A.1 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A54

  9. Resolving the Tip of the Red Giant Branch of Two New Candidate Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, Erik

    2014-10-01

    We propose to use ACS/WFC to observe two faint dwarf galaxies recently discovered via their HI emission. Based on a blind HI search of 40 HI clumps from 7500 square degrees of the GALFA-HI survey, these two candidates are the only objects with optical counterparts. They show HI and Halpha emission consistent with nearby galaxies, and have blue stars that are barely resolved in ground-based optical imaging with good seeing. These resolved stars are consistent with the galaxies being at Local Group distances. If they are in the Local Group, these galaxies are both less luminous and more compact than the recently-discovered Leo P, also found first with HI observations. They may then also be the faintest known star-forming galaxies. The ground-based imaging leaves large distance uncertainty, however, because the tip of the red giant branch cannot be resolved. We propose one orbit per galaxy of ACS/WFC imaging in F606W and F814W to measure accurate TRGB distances and determine if they truly are Local Group galaxies. If so, these galaxies provide tests on both the efficacy of Lambda CDM in predicting the properties of dwarf galaxies in low density environments, and the lowest-luminosity data points on models of galaxy star formation.

  10. Characterization of the Red Giant HR 2582 Using the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; McAlister, Harold A.; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Farrington, Christopher D.; Vargas, Norm; van Belle, Gerard T.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2013-07-01

    We present the fundamental parameters of HR 2582, a high-mass red giant star whose evolutionary state is a mystery. We used the CHARA Array interferometer to directly measure the star's limb-darkened angular diameter (1.006 ± 0.020 mas) and combined our measurement with parallax and photometry from the literature to calculate its physical radius (35.76 ± 5.31 R ⊙), luminosity (517.8 ± 17.5 L ⊙), bolometric flux (14.8 ± 0.5 × 10-8 erg s-1 cm-2), and effective temperature (4577 ± 60 K). We then determined the star's mass (5.6 ± 1.7 M ⊙) using our new values with stellar oscillation results from Baudin et al. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models, we estimated HR 2582's age to be 165^{+20}_{-15} Myr. While our measurements do not provide the precision required to definitively state where the star is in its evolution, it remains an excellent test case for evaluating stellar interior models.

  11. Interspecific communicative and coordinated hunting between groupers and giant moray eels in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Bshary, Redouan; Hohner, Andrea; Ait-el-Djoudi, Karim; Fricke, Hans

    2006-12-01

    Intraspecific group hunting has received considerable attention because of the close links between cooperative behaviour and its cognitive demands. Accordingly, comparisons between species have focused on behaviours that can potentially distinguish between the different levels of cognitive complexity involved, such as "intentional" communication between partners in order to initiate a joint hunt, the adoption of different roles during a joint hunt (whether consistently or alternately), and the level of food sharing following a successful hunt. Here we report field observations from the Red Sea on the highly coordinated and communicative interspecific hunting between the grouper, Plectropomus pessuliferus, and the giant moray eel, Gymnothorax javanicus. We provide evidence of the following: (1) associations are nonrandom, (2) groupers signal to moray eels in order to initiate joint searching and recruit moray eels to prey hiding places, (3) signalling is dependent on grouper hunger level, and (4) both partners benefit from the association. The benefits of joint hunting appear to be due to complementary hunting skills, reflecting the evolved strategies of each species, rather than individual role specialisation during joint hunts. In addition, the partner species that catches a prey item swallows it whole immediately, making aggressive monopolisation of a carcass impossible. We propose that the potential for monopolisation of carcasses by one partner species represents the main constraint on the evolution of interspecific cooperative hunting for most potentially suitable predator combinations.

  12. Optical and IR Color Calibration of the Tip of the Red Giant Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shoko

    1999-08-01

    We will calibrate directly the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance indicator as a function of color, both in optical and IR wavelengths. The TRGB has been shown both observationally and theoretically to be an excellent distance indicator in I-band, mainly because of its insensitivity to both metallicity and age in this particular wavelength. Currently, the I-band TRGB is calibrated by Galactic globular clusters. However, the current calibration (in I- band) requires a roundabout way of calculating the TRGB magnitude in terms of bolometric magnitude and bolometric correction, which are dependent on the metallicity and (V-I) color of the TRGB stars. In addition, in the IR, the TRGB magnitude has some metallicity dependence, thus some color dependence. This proposal aims at the direct color calibration of the TRGB magnitude in both optical and IR. Observations of several halo fields of M31 will provide good number statistics of RGB stars of luminosities around the TRGB, which is not delivered by the Galactic globular cluster data, thereby enabling the direct calibration of the TRGB magnitude as a function of color. The absolute zero point of the calibration will be provided by the observations of the Galactic globular clusters.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RED GIANT HR 2582 USING THE CHARA ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; McAlister, Harold A.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Farrington, Christopher D.; Vargas, Norm; Van Belle, Gerard T.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2013-07-20

    We present the fundamental parameters of HR 2582, a high-mass red giant star whose evolutionary state is a mystery. We used the CHARA Array interferometer to directly measure the star's limb-darkened angular diameter (1.006 {+-} 0.020 mas) and combined our measurement with parallax and photometry from the literature to calculate its physical radius (35.76 {+-} 5.31 R{sub Sun }), luminosity (517.8 {+-} 17.5 L{sub Sun }), bolometric flux (14.8 {+-} 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), and effective temperature (4577 {+-} 60 K). We then determined the star's mass (5.6 {+-} 1.7 M{sub Sun }) using our new values with stellar oscillation results from Baudin et al. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models, we estimated HR 2582's age to be 165{sup +20}{sub -15} Myr. While our measurements do not provide the precision required to definitively state where the star is in its evolution, it remains an excellent test case for evaluating stellar interior models.

  14. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  15. POPULATION EFFECTS ON THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION DERIVED FROM THE RED GIANT BRANCH

    SciTech Connect

    Ordoñez, Antonio J.; Sarajedini, Ata E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu

    2015-06-15

    We have tested the reliability of the red giant branch (RGB) as a metallicity indicator accounting for observational errors as well as the complexity of star formation histories and chemical evolution histories observed in various stellar systems. We generate model color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) produced with a variety of evolutionary histories and compare the resultant metallicity estimates from the colors and magnitudes of RGB stars to the true input metallicities. We include realistic models for photometric errors and completeness in our synthetic CMDs. As expected, for simple simple stellar populations dominated by old stars, the RGB provides a very accurate estimate of the modular metallicity value for a population. An error in the age of a system targeted for this type of study may produce metallicity errors of a few tenths of a dex. The size of this metallicity error depends linearly on the age error, and we find this dependence to be stronger with more precise photometry. If the population has experienced any significant star formation within the last ∼6 Gyr, the metallicity estimates, [M/H], derived from the RGB may be in error by up to ∼0.5 dex. Perhaps the most important consideration for this technique is an accurate, independent estimate of the average age for the target stellar system, especially if it is probable that a significant fraction of the population formed less than ∼6 Gyr ago.

  16. Can Star-Disk Collisions Explain the Missing Red Giants Problem in the Galactic Center?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Kieffer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Observations have revealed a relative paucity of red giant (RG) stars within the central 0.5 pc in the Galactic Center (GC). Motivated by this finding we investigate the hypothesis that collisions of stars with a fragmenting accretion disk are responsible for the observed dearth of evolved stars. We use 3D hydrodynamic simulations to model a star with radius 10 R⊙ and mass 1 M⊙, representative of the missing population of RGs, colliding with high density clumps. We find that multiple collisions with clumps of relatively high column density ≥108 g cm-2 can strip a substantial fraction of the star’s envelope and in principle render it invisible to observations. Because the envelope is unbound on account of the kinetic energy of the star, any significant amount of stripping of the RG population in the GC should be mirrored by a systematic decay of their orbits and possibly by their enhanced rotational velocity. To be viable, this scenario requires that the total mass of the fragmenting disk has been substantial and several orders of magnitude higher than that of the early-type stars which now form the stellar disk in the GC.

  17. Orbital and physical parameters of eclipsing binaries from the ASAS catalogue - IX. Spotted pairs with red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, M.; Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; Smith, A. M. S.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Espinoza, N.; Jordán, A.; Brahm, R.; Hempel, M.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric solutions for three spotted systems with red giant components. Absolute physical and orbital parameters for these double-lined detached eclipsing binary stars are presented for the first time. These were derived from the V-, and I-band ASAS and WASP photometry, and new radial velocities calculated from high quality optical spectra we obtained with a wide range of spectrographs and using the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique (TODCOR). All of the investigated systems (ASAS J184949-1518.7, BQ Aqr, and V1207 Cen) show the differential evolutionary phase of their components consisting of a main-sequence star or a subgiant and a red giant, and thus constitute very informative objects in terms of testing stellar evolution models. Additionally, the systems show significant chromospheric activity of both components. They can be also classified as classical RS CVn-type stars. Besides the standard analysis of radial velocities and photometry, we applied spectral disentangling to obtain separate spectra for both components of each analysed system which allowed for a more detailed spectroscopic study. We also compared the properties of red giant stars in binaries that show spots, with those that do not, and found that the activity phenomenon is substantially suppressed for stars with Rossby number higher than ˜1 and radii larger than ˜20 R⊙.

  18. Amino acid composition and functional properties of giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) collagen hydrolysates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zunying; Su, Yicheng; Zeng, Mingyong

    2011-03-01

    Giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) is an under-utilized species due to its high tendency to autolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from this species. The degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE, emulsion activity index (EAI), emulsion stability index (ESI), foam expansion (FE), and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were investigated. The effects of pH on the EAI, ESI FE and FS of hydrolysates were also investigated. The results indicated that the β and α 1 chains of the collagen were effectively hydrolyzed by trypsin at 50°c with an Enzyme/Substrate (E/S) ration of 1:20 (w:w). The DH of collagen was up to 17.3% after 3 h hydrolysis with trypsin. The hydrolysates had a molecular weight distribution of 1.1-17 kDa, and were abundant in glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), glutamic acid (Glu), alanine (Ala) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) residues. The hydrolysates were fractionated into three fractions (< 3 kDa, 3-10 kDa, and > 10 kDa), and the fraction of 3-10 kDa exhibited a higher EAI value than the fraction of > 10 kDa ( P<0.05). The fraction of > 10 kDa had higher FE and FS values than other fractions ( P<0.05). The pH had an important effect on the EAI, ESI, FE and FS. All the fractions showed undesirable emulsion and forming properties at pH 4.0. Under pH 7.0 and pH 10.0, the 3-10 kDa fraction showed higher EAI value and the fraction of > 10 kDa showed higher FE value, respectively. They are hoped to be utilized as functional ingredients in food and nutraceutical industries.

  19. Testing the Asteroseismic Scaling Relations for Red Giants with Eclipsing Binaries Observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulme, P.; McKeever, J.; Jackiewicz, J.; Rawls, M. L.; Corsaro, E.; Mosser, B.; Southworth, J.; Mahadevan, S.; Bender, C.; Deshpande, R.

    2016-12-01

    Given the potential of ensemble asteroseismology for understanding fundamental properties of large numbers of stars, it is critical to determine the accuracy of the scaling relations on which these measurements are based. From several powerful validation techniques, all indications so far show that stellar radius estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations are accurate to within a few percent. Eclipsing binary systems hosting at least one star with detectable solar-like oscillations constitute the ideal test objects for validating asteroseismic radius and mass inferences. By combining radial velocity (RV) measurements and photometric time series of eclipses, it is possible to determine the masses and radii of each component of a double-lined spectroscopic binary. We report the results of a four-year RV survey performed with the échelle spectrometer of the Astrophysical Research Consortium’s 3.5 m telescope and the APOGEE spectrometer at Apache Point Observatory. We compare the masses and radii of 10 red giants (RGs) obtained by combining radial velocities and eclipse photometry with the estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations. We find that the asteroseismic scaling relations overestimate RG radii by about 5% on average and masses by about 15% for stars at various stages of RG evolution. Systematic overestimation of mass leads to underestimation of stellar age, which can have important implications for ensemble asteroseismology used for Galactic studies. As part of a second objective, where asteroseismology is used for understanding binary systems, we confirm that oscillations of RGs in close binaries can be suppressed enough to be undetectable, a hypothesis that was proposed in a previous work.

  20. Asteroseismology of Red-Giant Stars: Mixed Modes, Differential Rotation, and Eccentric Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Paul G.

    2013-12-01

    Astronomers are aware of rotation in stars since Galileo Galilei attributed the movement of sunspots to rotation of the Sun in 1613. In contrast to the Sun, whose surface can be resolved by small telescopes or even the (protected) eye, we detect stars as point sources with no spatial information. Numerous techniques have been developed to derive information about stellar rotation. Unfortunately, most observational data allow only for the surface rotational rate to be inferred. The internal rotational profile, which has a great effect on the stellar structure and evolution, remains hidden below the top layers of the star - the essential is hidden to the eyes. Asteroseismology allows us to "sense" indirectly deep below the stellar surface. Oscillations that propagate through the star provide information about the deep stellar interiors while they also distort the stellar surface in characteristic patterns leading to detectable brightness or velocity variations. Also, certain oscillation modes are sensitive to internal rotation and carry information on how the star is spinning deep inside. Thanks to the unprecedented quality of NASA's space telescope Kepler, numerous detailed observations of stars in various evolutionary stages are available. Such high quality data allow that for many stars, rotation can not only be constrained from surface rotation, but also investigated through seismic studies. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the oscillations and internal rotational gradient of evolved single and binary stars. It is shown that the seismic analysis can reach the cores of oscillating red-giant stars and that these cores are rapidly rotating, while nested in a slowly rotating convective envelope.

  1. The chromosphere of VV cephei and the distribution of circumstellar dust around red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Wendy Hagen

    1992-01-01

    The work on this project has followed two separate paths of inquiry. The first project was entitled 'the Chromosphere of VV Cephei.' The examination of the archival spectra revealed significant changes in the spectra. Therefore, we obtained additional observing time with IUE to monitor the system during the summer of 1991. Short-term changes continue to be seen in both the overall spectrum and individual line profiles. Work continues on this object. The second project was entitled 'the Distribution of Circumstellar Dust around Red Giants and Supergiants.' A number of cool evolved stars are surrounded by dust shells of sufficient angular size as to appear extended in the IRAS survey data. The aim of this project has been to convolve the predictions of the flux distribution from model dust shells with the IRAS beam profiles in order to reproduce the observed IRAS scans. At the time of the last status report, the cross-scan profiles of the IRAS detectors had just been added to the modeling procedure. For scans in which the star passed near the detector center, there was no significant variation in predicted scan profile for different detectors. Scans in which the detector did not pass over the bright central star had been anticipated to be particularly useful in determining the dust distribution; however, significant differences in the predicted scan profiles were seen for different detector profiles. For this reason, and due to the cross-talk effects discussed in the previous status report, further work on the scans not including a central star has been postponed in favor of further analysis of scans passing over the central star.

  2. Atmospheric parameters and chemical properties of red giants in the CoRoT asteroseismology fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Miglio, A.; Lagarde, N.; Montalbán, J.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.; Eggenberger, P.; Hekker, S.; Kallinger, T.; Mosser, B.; Valentini, M.; Carrier, F.; Hareter, M.; Mantegazza, L.

    2014-04-01

    A precise characterisation of the red giants in the seismology fields of the CoRoT satellite is a prerequisite for further in-depth seismic modelling. High-resolution FEROS and HARPS spectra were obtained as part of the ground-based follow-up campaigns for 19 targets holding great asteroseismic potential. These data are used to accurately estimate their fundamental parameters and the abundances of 16 chemical species in a self-consistent manner. Some powerful probes of mixing are investigated (the Li and CNO abundances, as well as the carbon isotopic ratio in a few cases). The information provided by the spectroscopic and seismic data is combined to provide more accurate physical parameters and abundances. The stars in our sample follow the general abundance trends as a function of the metallicity observed in stars of the Galactic disk. After an allowance is made for the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, the observational signature of internal mixing phenomena is revealed through the detection at the stellar surface of the products of the CN cycle. A contamination by NeNa-cycled material in the most massive stars is also discussed. With the asteroseismic constraints, these data will pave the way for a detailed theoretical investigation of the physical processes responsible for the transport of chemical elements in evolved, low- and intermediate-mass stars. Based on observations collected at La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS and HARPS spectrograph at the 2.2 and 3.6-m telescopes under programs LP178.D-0361, LP182.D-0356, and LP185.D-0056.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables A.2 to A.6 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A119

  3. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V.

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no

  4. Fundamental stellar parameters and age-metallicity relation of Kepler red giants in comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Tajitsu, A.; Sato, B.; Liu, Y.-J.; Chen, Y.-Q.; Zhao, G.

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (effective temperature, metallicity, etc) were determined for a large sample of ˜100 red giants in the Kepler field, for which mass, radius, and evolutionary status had already been asteroseismologically established. These two kinds of spectroscopic and seismic information suffice to define the position on the `luminosity versus effective temperature' diagram and to assign an appropriate theoretical evolutionary track to each star. Making use of this advantage, we examined whether the stellar location on this diagram really matches the assigned track, which would make an interesting consistency check between theory and observation. It turned out that satisfactory agreement was confirmed in most cases (˜90 per cent, though appreciable discrepancies were seen for some stars such as higher mass red-clump giants), suggesting that recent stellar evolution calculations are practically reliable. Since the relevant stellar age could also be obtained by this comparison, we derived the age-metallicity relation for these Kepler giants and found the following characteristics: (1) the resulting distribution is quite similar to what was previously concluded for F-, G-, and K-type stars dwarfs; (2) the dispersion of metallicity progressively increases as the age becomes older; (3) nevertheless, the maximum metallicity at any stellar age remains almost flat, which means the existence of super/near-solar metallicity stars in a considerably wide age range from ˜(2-3) × 108 to ˜1010 yr.

  5. Hydra observations of aluminum abundances in the red giants ofthe globular clusters M80 and NGC 6752

    SciTech Connect

    Suntzeff, N B; Cavallo, R M; Pilachowski, C A

    2004-01-05

    Aluminum and other metal abundances were determined in 21 red giants in the globular clusters NGC 6752 and M80 as part of a larger study to determine whether the aluminum distribution on the red giant branch is related to the second parameter effect that causes clusters of similar metallicity to display different horizontal branch morphologies. The observations were obtained of the Al I lines near 6700 Angstroms with the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope and Hydra multi-object spectrograph. The spectra have a resolving power of 18000 or 9400, with typical S/N ratios of 100-200. Mean [Fe/H] values obtained from the spectra are -1.58 for NGC 6751 and -1.73 for M80; this represents the spectroscopic iron abundance determination for M80. Both NGC 6752 and M80 display a spread in aluminum abundance with mean [Al/Fe] ratios of +0.51 and +0.37 respectively. No trend in the variation of the mean AI abundance with position on the giant branch is discernible in either cluster with our small sample.

  6. High-resolution abundance analysis of red giants in the metal-poor bulge globular cluster HP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Cantelli, E.; Vemado, A.; Ernandes, H.; Ortolani, S.; Saviane, I.; Bica, E.; Minniti, D.; Dias, B.; Momany, Y.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Siqueira-Mello, C.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The globular cluster HP 1 is projected at only 3.̊33 from the Galactic center. Together with its distance, this makes it one of the most central globular clusters in the Milky Way. It has a blue horizontal branch (BHB) and a metallicity of [Fe/H] ≈ -1.0. This means that it probably is one of the oldest objects in the Galaxy. Abundance ratios can reveal the nucleosynthesis pattern of the first stars as well as the early chemical enrichment and early formation of stellar populations. Aims: High-resolution spectra obtained for six stars were analyzed to derive the abundances of the light elements C, N, O, Na, and Al, the alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, and the heavy elements Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, and Eu. Methods: High-resolution spectra of six red giants that are confirmed members of the bulge globular cluster HP 1 were obtained with the 8 m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph in FLAMES-UVES configuration. The spectroscopic parameter derivation was based on the excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe i and Fe ii. Results: We confirm a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.06 ± 0.10, by adding the two stars that were previously analyzed in HP 1. The alpha-elements O and Mg are enhanced by about +0.3 ≲ [O,Mg/Fe] ≲ +0.5 dex, Si is moderately enhanced with +0.15 ≲ [Si/Fe] ≲ +0.35 dex, while Ca and Ti show lower values of -0.04 ≲ [Ca,Ti/Fe] ≲ +0.28 dex. The r-element Eu is also enhanced with [Eu/Fe] ≈ +0.4, which together with O and Mg is indicative of early enrichment by type II supernovae. Na and Al are low, but it is unclear if Na-O are anticorrelated. The heavy elements are moderately enhanced, with -0.20 < [La/Fe] < +0.43 dex and 0.0 < [Ba/Fe] < +0.75 dex, which is compatible with r-process formation. The spread in Y, Zr, Ba, and La abundances, on the other hand, appears to be compatible with the spinstar scenario or other additional mechanisms such as the weak r-process. Observations collected at the European Southern

  7. Formation of giant H II regions following supernova explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartori, L.

    1971-01-01

    The principal optical properties of type I supernovae are summarized. These include the light curve and the spectrum. The spectra consist of broad bands with very little continuum. According to the theory presented, the observed light is principally fluorescence, excited in the medium surrounding the supernova by ultraviolet radiation originating from the explosion. It is proposed that the spectrum that impinges on the fluorescent medium while emission is taking place must fall abruptly across the Lyman edge of He II. Such a filtering action is plausibly provided by a much denser internal region, rich in helium, immediately surrounding the exploding object. This will form a Stromgren sphere during the time the intense UV pulse is passing through it. The dense region also slows down the photons below the edge by Thomson scattering, thereby spreading out the UV pulse in time. Various proposed mechanisms for the production of ionization in the Gum nebula are discussed.

  8. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2) gene in giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    PubMed

    Ling, S S; Zhu, Y; Lan, D; Li, D S; Pang, H Z; Wang, Y; Li, D Y; Wei, R P; Zhang, H M; Wang, C D; Hu, Y D

    2017-01-23

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Ursidae), has a unique bamboo-based diet; however, this low-energy intake has been sufficient to maintain the metabolic processes of this species since the fourth ice age. As mitochondria are the main sites for energy metabolism in animals, the protein-coding genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chains, particularly cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in electron transfer, could play an important role in giant panda metabolism. Therefore, the present study aimed to isolate, sequence, and analyze the COX2 DNA from individuals kept at the Giant Panda Protection and Research Center, China, and compare these sequences with those of the other Ursidae family members. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the COX2 gene had three point mutations that defined three haplotypes, with 60% of the sequences corresponding to haplotype I. The neutrality tests revealed that the COX2 gene was conserved throughout evolution, and the maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, using homologous sequences from other Ursidae species, showed clustering of the COX2 sequences of giant pandas, suggesting that this gene evolved differently in them.

  9. Properties of the giant H II regions and bar in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brière, É.; Cantin, S.; Spekkens, K.

    2012-09-01

    In order to better understand the impact of the bar on the evolution of spiral galaxies, we measure the properties of giant H II regions and the bar in the SB(s)b galaxy NGC 5430. We use two complementary data sets, both obtained at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic: a hyperspectral data cube from the imaging Fourier transform spectrograph SpIOMM (Spectromètre-Imageur à transformée de Fourier de l-Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic) and high-resolution spectra across the bar from a long-slit spectrograph. We flux-calibrate SpIOMM spectra for the first time, and produce Hα and [N II]λ6584 Å intensity maps from which we identify 51 giant H II regions in the spiral arms and bar. We evaluate the type of activity, the oxygen abundance and the age of the young populations contained in these giant H II regions and in the bar. Thus, we confirm that NGC 5430 does not harbour a strong active galactic nucleus, and that its Wolf-Rayet knot shows a pure H II region nature. We find no variation in abundance or age between the bar and spiral arms, nor as a function of galactocentric radius. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a chemical mixing mechanism is at work in the galaxy's disc to flatten the oxygen abundance gradient. Using the STARBURST99 model, we estimate the ages of the young populations, and again find no variations in age between the bar and the arms or as a function of radius. Instead, we find evidence for two galaxy-wide waves of star formation, about 7.1 and 10.5 Myr ago. While the bar in NGC 5430 is an obvious candidate to trigger these two episodes, it is not clear how the bar could induce widespread star formation on such a short time-scale.

  10. Testing Scaling Relations for Solar-like Oscillations from the Main Sequence to Red Giants Using Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D.; Hekker, S.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Verner, G. A.; Bonanno, A.; Buzasi, D. L.; Campante, T. L.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Hale, S. J.; Kallinger, T.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Chaplin, W. J.; De Ridder, J.; García, R. A.; Appourchaux, T.; Frandsen, S.; Houdek, G.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Broomhall, A. M.; Corsaro, E.; Salabert, D.; Sanderfer, D. T.; Seader, S. E.; Smith, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    We have analyzed solar-like oscillations in ~1700 stars observed by the Kepler Mission, spanning from the main sequence to the red clump. Using evolutionary models, we test asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum power (νmax), the large frequency separation (Δν), and oscillation amplitudes. We show that the difference of the Δν-νmax relation for unevolved and evolved stars can be explained by different distributions in effective temperature and stellar mass, in agreement with what is expected from scaling relations. For oscillation amplitudes, we show that neither (L/M) s scaling nor the revised scaling relation by Kjeldsen & Bedding is accurate for red-giant stars, and demonstrate that a revised scaling relation with a separate luminosity-mass dependence can be used to calculate amplitudes from the main sequence to red giants to a precision of ~25%. The residuals show an offset particularly for unevolved stars, suggesting that an additional physical dependency is necessary to fully reproduce the observed amplitudes. We investigate correlations between amplitudes and stellar activity, and find evidence that the effect of amplitude suppression is most pronounced for subgiant stars. Finally, we test the location of the cool edge of the instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram using solar-like oscillations and find the detections in the hottest stars compatible with a domain of hybrid stochastically excited and opacity driven pulsation.

  11. VLTI/AMBER Studies of the Atmospheric Structure and Fundamental Parameters of Red Giant and Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Fabregat, J.; Freytag, B.; Guirado, J. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Quirrenbach, A.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present recent near-IR interferometric studies of red giant and supergiant stars, which are aimed at obtaining information on the structure of the atmospheric layers and constraining the fundamental parameters of these objects. The observed visibilities of six red supergiants (RSGs), and also of one of the five red giants observed, indicate large extensions of the molecular layers, as previously observed for Mira stars. These extensions are not predicted by hydrostatic PHOENIX model atmospheres, hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations of stellar convection, or self-excited pulsation models. All these models based on parameters of RSGs lead to atmospheric structures that are too compact compared to our observations. We discuss how alternative processes might explain the atmospheric extensions for these objects. As the continuum appears to be largely free of contamination by molecular layers, we can estimate reliable Rosseland angular radii for our stars. Together with distances and bolometric fluxes, we estimate the effective temperatures and luminosities of our targets, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks.

  12. Rotational and Radial Velocities of 1.3-2.2 M ⊙ Red Giants in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ~1.6M ⊙ arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  13. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ∼1.6M {sub ☉} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  14. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J.; Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C.; Dolphin, A. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or E-mail: koo@ucolick.or E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co

    2010-03-20

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  15. ASTEROSEISMOLOGY OF RED GIANTS FROM THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF KEPLER DATA: GLOBAL OSCILLATION PARAMETERS FOR 800 STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Mosser, B.; Mathur, S.; Kallinger, T.; Hekker, S.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Chaplin, W. J.; Hale, S. J.; Buzasi, D. L.; Preston, H. L.; De Ridder, J.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; GarcIa, R. A.; Clarke, B. D.

    2010-11-10

    We have studied solar-like oscillations in {approx}800 red giant stars using Kepler long-cadence photometry. The sample includes stars ranging in evolution from the lower part of the red giant branch to the helium main sequence. We investigate the relation between the large frequency separation ({Delta}{nu}) and the frequency of maximum power ({nu}{sub max}) and show that it is different for red giants than for main-sequence stars, which is consistent with evolutionary models and scaling relations. The distributions of {nu}{sub max} and {Delta}{nu} are in qualitative agreement with a simple stellar population model of the Kepler field, including the first evidence for a secondary clump population characterized by M {approx}> 2 M{sub sun} and {nu}{sub max} {approx_equal} 40-110 {mu}Hz. We measured the small frequency separations {delta}{nu}{sub 02} and {delta}{nu}{sub 01} in over 400 stars and {delta}{nu}{sub 03} in over 40. We present C-D diagrams for l = 1, 2, and 3 and show that the frequency separation ratios {delta}{nu}{sub 02}/{Delta}{nu} and {delta}{nu}{sub 01}/{Delta}{nu} have opposite trends as a function of {Delta}{nu}. The data show a narrowing of the l = 1 ridge toward lower {nu}{sub max}, in agreement with models predicting more efficient mode trapping in stars with higher luminosity. We investigate the offset {epsilon} in the asymptotic relation and find a clear correlation with {Delta}{nu}, demonstrating that it is related to fundamental stellar parameters. Finally, we present the first amplitude-{nu}{sub max} relation for Kepler red giants. We observe a lack of low-amplitude stars for {nu}{sub max} {approx}> 110 {mu}Hz and find that, for a given {nu}{sub max} between 40 and 110 {mu}Hz, stars with lower {Delta}{nu} (and consequently higher mass) tend to show lower amplitudes than stars with higher {Delta}{nu}.

  16. Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets are surrounded by rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense medium inhomogeneities. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. Aims: We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. Methods: We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. Results: The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interactions is potentially enhanced by a factor of ~100 when accounting for the whole surface of the shock induced by the obstacle, instead of just the obstacle section. The observer gamma-ray luminosity, including the effective obstacle size, the flow velocity and Doppler boosting effects, can be ~300 (γj/10)2 times higher than when the emitting flow is assumed at rest and only the obstacle section is considered, where γj is the jet Lorentz factor. For a whole population of red giants inside the jet of an active galactic nucleus, the predicted persistent gamma-ray luminosities may be potentially detectable for a jet pointing approximately to the observer. Conclusions: Obstacles interacting with relativistic outflows, for instance clouds and populations of stars for extragalactic jets, or stellar wind inhomogeneities in microquasar jets and in winds of pulsars in binaries, should be taken into account when

  17. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. I. Fundamental parameters and chemical abundance patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thygesen, A. O.; Sbordone, L.; Andrievsky, S.; Korotin, S.; Yong, D.; Zaggia, S.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Ventura, P.; D'Antona, F.; Meléndez, J.; D'Ercole, A.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The study of chemical abundance patterns in globular clusters is key importance to constraining the different candidates for intracluster pollution of light elements. Aims: We aim at deriving accurate abundances for a wide range of elements in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to add new constraints to the pollution scenarios for this particular cluster, expanding the range of previously derived element abundances. Methods: Using tailored 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) atmospheric models, together with a combination of equivalent width measurements, LTE, and NLTE synthesis, we derive stellar parameters and element abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 13 red giant stars near the tip of the RGB. Results: We derive abundances of a total 27 elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy). Departures from LTE were taken into account for Na, Al, and Ba. We find a mean [Fe/H] = -0.78 ± 0.07 and [ α/ Fe ] = 0.34 ± 0.03 in good agreement with previous studies. The remaining elements show good agreement with the literature, but including NLTE for Al has a significant impact on the behavior of this key element. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of an Na-O anti-correlation in 47 Tucanae found by several other works. Our NLTE analysis of Al shifts the [Al/Fe] to lower values, indicating that this may be overestimated in earlier works. No evidence of an intrinsic variation is found in any of the remaining elements. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (Programmes 084.B-0810 and 086.B-0237).Full Tables 2, 5, and 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A108Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS, INTEGRATED RED GIANT BRANCH MASS LOSS, AND DUST PRODUCTION IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Whitney, B.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Misselt, K.

    2011-04-01

    Fundamental parameters and time evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as d = 4611{sup +213}{sub -200} pc and age as 12 {+-} 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more red giant branch mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more metal-poor {omega} Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of {approx}1000 L{sub sun}, becoming ubiquitous above L = 2000 L{sub sun}. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.

  19. FUSE Cycle 3 Program CO22: Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly(beta) emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, a Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  20. The CoRoT-GES Collaboration: Improving red giants spectroscopic surface gravitity and abundances with asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, M.; Chiappini, C.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Rodrigues, T.; Mosser, B.; Anders, F.; the CoRoT RG Group; GES Consortium, the

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays large spectroscopic surveys, like the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES), provide unique stellar databases for better investigating the formation and evolution of our Galaxy. Great attention must be paid to the accuracy of the basic stellar properties derived: large uncertainties in stellar parameters lead to large uncertainties in abundances, distances and ages. Asteroseismology has a key role in this context: when seismic information is combined with information derived from spectroscopic analysis, highly precise constraints on distances, masses, extinction and ages of red giants can be obtained. In the light of this promising joint action, we started the CoRoT-GES collaboration. We present a set of 1111 CoRoT stars, observed by GES from December 2011 to July 2014, these stars belong to the CoRoT field LRc01, pointing at the inner Galactic disk. Among these stars, 534 have reliable global seismic parameters. By combining seismic informations and spectroscopy, we derived precise stellar parameters, ages, kinematic and orbital parameters and detailed element abundances for this sample of stars. We also show that, thanks to asteroseismology, we are able to obtain a higher precision than what can be achieved by the standard spectroscopic means. This sample of CoRoT red giants, spanning Galactocentric distances from 5 to 8 kpc and a wide age interval (1-13 Gyr), provides us a representative sample for the inner disk population.

  1. DISCOVERY OF A RED GIANT WITH SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS IN AN ECLIPSING BINARY SYSTEM FROM KEPLER SPACE-BASED PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Hekker, S.; Debosscher, J.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Van Winckel, H.; Beck, P. G.; Blomme, J.; Huber, D.; Hidas, M. G.; Stello, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Brown, T. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J. M.; Pigulski, A.

    2010-04-20

    Oscillating stars in binary systems are among the most interesting stellar laboratories, as these can provide information on the stellar parameters and stellar internal structures. Here we present a red giant with solar-like oscillations in an eclipsing binary observed with the NASA Kepler satellite. We compute stellar parameters of the red giant from spectra and the asteroseismic mass and radius from the oscillations. Although only one eclipse has been observed so far, we can already determine that the secondary is a main-sequence F star in an eccentric orbit with a semi-major axis larger than 0.5 AU and orbital period longer than 75 days.

  2. Feedback in nearby dwarf starburst galaxies and giant extragalactic H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Colleen

    Giant extragalactic H II regions in nearby normal galaxies are similar to dwarf starburst galaxies in luminosity/star formation rate, physical size, and stellar population, although they differ in gravitational potential, star formation rate per unit area, and surrounding environment. This dissertation compares feedback processes in these two types of star-forming regions. Feedback, the cycle which regulates the, relationship between star formation, the interstellar medium, and the intergalactic medium, is empirically measured via observations of interstellar gas in star-forming regions, where stellar winds and supernovae create galactic-scale outflows of interstellar gas and dust which in turn may heat and enrich the intergalactic medium. These kiloparsec-scale winds are most directly probed via the supernova-heated hot gas. However, the cold and photoionized warm interstellar gas from the disk is entrained in the flow and also traces large-scale motions of outflowing matter. I investigate this via optical and ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of the cold neutral medium, as well as emission-line studies of the Ha recombination in the warm ionized gas. The H II regions in disks initially seem physically similar to dwarf starburst galaxies; shell fragments of ionized gas are found in both environments via high-resolution Ha emission spectroscopy. However, while complex Na D absorption profiles trace outflowing cold, neutral gas accelerated to near the escape velocity, no such counterpart is detected in the H II regions in outer disks. The lack of large-scale outflows of cold, neutral gas from the H II regions indicates that while dwarf starburst galaxies and the giant H II regions in normal galaxies may have similar properties, yet the feedback cycle in these regions is different.

  3. The K2 M67 Study: Revisiting Old Friends with K2 Reveals Oscillating Red Giants in the Open Cluster M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Vanderburg, Andrew; Casagrande, Luca; Gilliland, Ron; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Sandquist, Eric; Leiner, Emily; Mathieu, Robert; Soderblom, David R.

    2016-12-01

    Observations of stellar clusters have had a tremendous impact in forming our understanding of stellar evolution. The open cluster M67 has a particularly important role as a calibration benchmark for stellar evolution theory due to its near-solar composition and age. As a result, it has been observed extensively, including attempts to detect solar-like oscillations in its main sequence and red giant stars. However, any asteroseismic inference has so far remained elusive due to the difficulty in measuring these extremely low-amplitude oscillations. Here we report the first unambiguous detection of solar-like oscillations in the red giants of M67. We use data from the Kepler ecliptic mission, K2, to measure the global asteroseismic properties. We find a model-independent seismic-informed distance of 816 ± 11 pc, or {(m-M)}0 = 9.57+/- 0.03 mag, an average red giant mass of 1.36+/- 0.01 {M}⊙ , in agreement with the dynamical mass from an eclipsing binary near the cluster turn-off, and ages of individual stars compatible with isochrone fitting. We see no evidence of strong mass loss on the red giant branch. We also determine seismic {log}g of all the cluster giants with a typical precision of ˜ 0.01 dex. Our results generally show good agreement with independent methods and support the use of seismic scaling relations to determine global properties of red giant stars with near-solar metallicity. We further illustrate that the data are of such high quality that future work on individual mode frequencies should be possible, which would extend the scope of seismic analysis of this cluster.

  4. Light Phenomena over the ESO Observatories II: Red Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horálek, P.; Christensen, L. L.; Bór, J.; Setvák, M.

    2016-03-01

    A rare atmospheric phenomenon, known as red sprites, was observed and captured on camera from the La Silla Observatory. This event signalled the first time that these extremely short-lived flashes of red light, originating in the Earth’s upper atmosphere, were photographed from a major astronomical observatory. Further images of red sprites from the La Silla Paranal Observatory sites are presented and the nature of red sprites is discussed.

  5. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24 μm variability

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 μm variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ∼750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.8±0.9)×10{sup 4} L{sub ⊙} and a total DPR of (2.3±0.1)×10{sup −5} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} <−7.1 mag, L > 54,000 L{sub ⊙}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  6. Formation history of old open clusters constrained by detailed asteroseismology of red giant stars observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, E.; Lee, Y.-N.; García, R. A.; Hennebelle, P.; Mathur, S.; Beck, P. G.; Mathis, S.; Stello, D.; Bouvier, J.

    2016-12-01

    Stars originate by the gravitational collapse of a turbulent molecular cloud, often forming clusters of thousands of stars. Stellar clusters therefore play an important role in our understanding of star formation, a fundamental problem in astrophysics that is difficult to investigate because pre-stellar cores are typically obscured by dust. Thanks to a Bayesian analysis of about 50 red giants of NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, two old open clusters observed by NASA Kepler, we characterize thousands of individual oscillation modes. We show for the first time how the measured asteroseismic properties lead us to a discovery about the rotation history of these clusters. Finally, our findings are compared to 3D hydrodynamical simulations for stellar cluster formation to put strong constraints on the physical processes of turbulence and rotation, which are in action in the early formation stage of the stellar clusters.

  7. STAR-TO-STAR IRON ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 3201

    SciTech Connect

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaeel E-mail: iii@physics.utah.edu E-mail: patrick.francois@obspm.fr E-mail: richard.monier@unice.fr

    2013-02-10

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  8. Al-26 from red giants. [connections with anomalous Mg-26 content in meteorites and solar system formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgaard, H.

    1980-01-01

    Simplified models of thermally pulsing red giants are investigated, with particular emphasis on predicting the extent to which nuclear processing at the base of the convective envelope in conjunction with processing in the thermally unstable He shell can synthesize Al-26 (tau/1/2/ = 7.2 x 10 to the 5th yr). Values of Al-26/Al-27 of about 0.5-1, with Al-27/Al-27(solar) of about 1-2, are predicted in some cases. It is pointed out that such results can lead to isotope shifts in the absorption lines of AlH and AlO, which should be observationally identifiable in some late-type supergiants. The possible connection with the anomalous Mg-26 content (assigned to the decay of Al-26) detected in some meteorites and the connection with formation of the solar system are also touched on.

  9. THREE DISCRETE GROUPS WITH HOMOGENEOUS CHEMISTRY ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 2808

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, E.

    2014-11-10

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC 2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4 dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation because they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps, each with different chemical compositions. One group (P) shows a primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC 2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of giants with homogeneous chemistry. The composition of the I group cannot be reproduced by mixing of matter with extreme processing in hot H-burning and gas with pristine, unprocessed composition, as also found in the recent analysis of three discrete groups in NGC 6752. This finding suggests that different classes of polluters were probably at work in NGC 2808 as well.

  10. THE FRAGMENTING PAST OF THE DISK AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE CULPRIT FOR THE MISSING RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Chen, Xian E-mail: Xian.Chen@aei.mpg.de

    2014-01-20

    Since 1996 we have known that the Galactic Center (GC) displays a core-like distribution of red giant branch (RGB) stars starting at ∼10'', which poses a theoretical problem because the GC should have formed a segregated cusp of old stars. This issue has been addressed invoking stellar collisions, massive black hole binaries, and infalling star clusters, which can explain it to some extent. Another observational fact, key to the work presented here, is the presence of a stellar disk at the GC. We postulate that the reason for the missing stars in the RGB is closely intertwined with the disk formation process, which initially was gaseous and went through a fragmentation phase to form the stars. Using simple analytical estimates, we prove that during fragmentation the disk developed regions with densities much higher than a homogeneous gaseous disk, i.e., ''clumps'', which were optically thick, and hence contracted slowly. Stars in the GC interacted with them and in the case of RGB stars, the clumps were dense enough to totally remove their outer envelopes after a relatively low number of impacts. Giant stars in the horizontal branch (HB), however, have much denser envelopes. Hence, the fragmentation phase of the disk must have had a lower impact on their distribution, because it was more difficult to remove their envelopes. We predict that future deeper observations of the GC should reveal less depletion of HB stars and that the released dense cores of RGB stars will still be populating the GC.

  11. A kinematic search for supernova remnants in giant extragalactic H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Skillman, E. D.; Sramek, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    We have obtained velocity fields of the Giant H II complexes NGC 5471 in M101, NGC 2363 in NGC 2366, and the largest H II region in NGC 2403 from H-alpha observations using the TAURUS imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. We have detected five H-alpha sources with velocity profiles which are broad when compared with the surrounding H II region. Region B in NGC 5471 has been previously determined to contain a supernova remnant by the presence of nonthermal radio continuum radiation and enhanced (O I) and (S II) emission (Skillman 1985) and broad H-alpha emission (Chu & Kennicutt 1986). Two broad H-alpha sources in NGC 2363 coincide with regions where strong splitting has been found in the (O III) line (Roy et al. 1991). Two more broad H-alpha sources have been identified in the largest H II region in NGC 2403. Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum observations with a resolution of 2 sec at lambda(6) and lambda(20) cm of all 3 H II complexes are presented. In addition, high resolution (subarcsecond) VLA images of NGC 5471 were made at lambda(2) and lambda(6) cm. The presence of a nonthermal source in region NGC 5471 B was confirmed while region NGC 5471 A appears to be dominated by thermal emission. The nonthermal spectral index in NGC 2363 A indicates the existence of none or more supernova remnants at the position of a large velocity width source detected in H-alpha emission. No similar nonthermal sources were detected in NGC 2403 #1. Supernovae explosions and stellar winds are considered as causes for these large velocity width sources (LVWS). If the emission from the LVWSs is attributed to single supernova remnants, they are unusually luminous in both nonthermal radio continuum and H-alpha emision. The very large H-alpha luminosities could be a result of high velocity gas being ionized by the neighboring stellar cluster.

  12. A kinematic search for supernova remnants in giant extragalactic H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hui; Skillman, Evan D.; Sramek, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained velocity fields of the Giant H II complexes NGC 5471 in M101, NGC 2363 in NGC 2366, and the largest H II region in NGC 2403 from H-alpha observations using the TAURUS imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. We have detected five H-alpha sources with velocity profiles which are broad when compared with the surrounding H II region. Region B in NGC 5471 has been previously determined to contain a supernova remnant by the presence of nonthermal radio continuum radiation and enhanced (O I) and (S II) emission (Skillman 1985) and broad H-alpha emission (Chu & Kennicutt 1986). Two broad H-alpha sources in NGC 2363 coincide with regions where strong splitting has been found in the (O III) line (Roy et al. 1991). Two more broad H-alpha sources have been identified in the largest H II region in NGC 2403. Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum observations with a resolution of 2 sec at lambda(6) and lambda(20) cm of all 3 H II complexes are presented. In addition, high resolution (subarcsecond) VLA images of NGC 5471 were made at lambda(2) and lambda(6) cm. The presence of a nonthermal source in region NGC 5471 B was confirmed while region NGC 5471 A appears to be dominated by thermal emission. The nonthermal spectral index in NGC 2363 A indicates the existence of none or more supernova remnants at the position of a large velocity width source detected in H-alpha emission. No similar nonthermal sources were detected in NGC 2403 #1. Supernovae explosions and stellar winds are considered as causes for these large velocity width sources (LVWS). If the emission from the LVWSs is attributed to single supernova remnants, they are unusually luminous in both nonthermal radio continuum and H-alpha emision. The very large H-alpha luminosities could be a result of high velocity gas being ionized by the neighboring stellar cluster.

  13. ATCA Detects Cometary-Shaped Objects In the Giant H II Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mucke, A.; Koribalski, B. S.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Cororan, M. F.; Stevens, I. R.; White, Nicholas E.

    2002-01-01

    Three protoplanetary disks in the giant H II region NGC 3603, originally found by HST (Hubble Space Telescope) + VLT (Very Large Telescope), have been detected with the ATCA (Australia Telescope Compact Array) at 3 and 6 cm. All three ProPlyDs (protoplanetary disks) are clearly resolved, showing a head-tail extent of approx. 4 inches. Proplyd 3 shows the most pronounced head-tail structure with a 3 cm flux density ratio between head and tail of about 10:1. The tail is very well defined and at least 2 inches long, pointing away from the central star cluster. Unfortunately, ProPlyD 3 is rather faint in the low-sensitivity HST broad band image shown by Brandner et al.; it is located outside the region of their high sensitivity HST H(alpha) image.

  14. Close to the Dredge: Precise X-Ray C and N Abundances in λ Andromeda and Its Precocious Red Giant Branch Mixing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Ball, B.; Eldridge, John J.; Ness, J.-U.; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2011-11-01

    Chandra LETG+HRC-S and XMM-Newton RGS spectra of H-like C and N lines formed in the corona of the primary star of the RS CVn-type binary λ And, a mildly metal-poor G8 III-IV first ascent giant that completed dredge-up ~50 Myr ago, have been used to make a precise measurement of its surface C/N ratio. We obtain the formal result [C/N] = 0.03 ± 0.07, which is typical of old disk giants and in agreement with standard dredge-up theory for stars <~ 1 M sun. In contrast, these stars as a group, including λ And, have 12C/13C lsim 20, which is much lower than standard model predictions. We show that the abundances of the old disk giants are consistent with models including thermohaline mixing that begins at the red giant branch luminosity function "bump." Instead, λ And indicates that the 12C/13C anomaly can be present immediately following dredge-up, contrary to current models of extra mixing on the red giant branch. In the context of other recent C and N abundance results for RS CVn-type binaries it seems likely that the anomaly is associated with either strong magnetic activity, fast rotation, or both, rather than close binarity itself.

  15. The mass-ratio and eccentricity distributions of barium and S stars, and red giants in open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Swaelmen, M.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. A complete set of orbital parameters for barium stars, including the longest orbits, has recently been obtained thanks to a radial-velocity monitoring with the HERMES spectrograph installed on the Flemish Mercator telescope. Barium stars are supposed to belong to post-mass-transfer systems. Aims: In order to identify diagnostics distinguishing between pre- and post-mass-transfer systems, the properties of barium stars (more precisely their mass-function distribution and their period-eccentricity (P-e) diagram) are compared to those of binary red giants in open clusters. As a side product, we aim to identify possible post-mass-transfer systems among the cluster giants from the presence of s-process overabundances. We investigate the relation between the s-process enrichment, the location in the (P-e) diagram, and the cluster metallicity and turn-off mass. Methods: To invert the mass-function distribution and derive the mass-ratio distribution, we used the method pioneered by Boffin et al. (1992) that relies on a Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm. The derivation of s-process abundances in the open-cluster giants was performed through spectral synthesis with MARCS model atmospheres. Results: A fraction of 22% of post-mass-transfer systems is found among the cluster binary giants (with companion masses between 0.58 and 0.87 M⊙, typical for white dwarfs), and these systems occupy a wider area than barium stars in the (P-e) diagram. Barium stars have on average lower eccentricities at a given orbital period. When the sample of binary giant stars in clusters is restricted to the subsample of systems occupying the same locus as the barium stars in the (P-e) diagram, and with a mass function compatible with a WD companion, 33% (=4/12) show a chemical signature of mass transfer in the form of s-process overabundances (from rather moderate - about 0.3 dex - to more extreme - about 1 dex). The only strong barium star in our sample is found in the cluster with

  16. GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li; Chu, You-Hua; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wang, Q. Daniel; Li Jiangtao

    2012-11-20

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (<1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H{alpha} filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a 'hypernova remnant' candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10{sup 52} erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

  17. Solution Concentration and Flow Rate of Fe3+-modified Porphyrin (Red Blood Model) on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Sensor Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminudin, A.; Tjahyono, D. H.; Suprijadi; Djamal, M.; Zaen, R.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-03-01

    Red blood has been of great interest for scientists since it relates to human’ and living creature’s life sustainability. One of the important compounds in red blood is porphyrin. Here, the purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting porphyrin concentration using the assistance of giant magnetoresistance. In short of the method, we added Fe3+ solution to the porphyrin, and the mixed solution was introduced to the magnetic field. Next, the magnetized solution was introduced to the magnetic sensor to indicate the existence of porphyrin in the solution. To confirm the effectiveness of our method in detecting porphyrin, we varied the flow rate and concentration of Fe3+-modified porphyrin solution. The result showed that the more concentration and the slower flow rate affected the higher sensitivity gained. Since this developed method is simple but effective for detecting porphyrin concentration, we believe that further development of this method will be benefit for many applications, specifically relating to the medical uses.

  18. Unexpectedly large mass loss during the thermal pulse cycle of the red giant star R Sculptoris.

    PubMed

    Maercker, M; Mohamed, S; Vlemmings, W H T; Ramstedt, S; Groenewegen, M A T; Humphreys, E; Kerschbaum, F; Lindqvist, M; Olofsson, H; Paladini, C; Wittkowski, M; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Nyman, L-A

    2012-10-11

    The asymptotic-giant-branch star R Sculptoris is surrounded by a detached shell of dust and gas. The shell originates from a thermal pulse during which the star underwent a brief period of increased mass loss. It has hitherto been impossible to constrain observationally the timescales and mass-loss properties during and after a thermal pulse--parameters that determine the lifetime of the asymptotic giant branch and the amount of elements returned by the star. Here we report observations of CO emission from the circumstellar envelope and shell around R Sculptoris with an angular resolution of 1.3″. What was previously thought to be only a thin, spherical shell with a clumpy structure is revealed to also contain a spiral structure. Spiral structures associated with circumstellar envelopes have been previously seen, leading to the conclusion that the systems must be binaries. Combining the observational data with hydrodynamic simulations, we conclude that R Sculptoris is a binary system that underwent a thermal pulse about 1,800 years ago, lasting approximately 200 years. About 3 × 10(-3) solar masses of material were ejected at a velocity of 14.3 km s(-1) and at a rate around 30 times higher than the pre-pulse mass-loss rate. This shows that about three times more mass was returned to the interstellar medium during and immediately after the pulse than previously thought.

  19. Rotation and macroturbulence in bright giants

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1986-11-01

    Spectral line profiles of 35 F, G, and K bright giants were analyzed to obtain rotation rates, v sin i, and macroturbulence dispersion. This sample indicates that rotation rates of cool class II giants is less than 11 km/s, in contrast with some recent periodicity measurements. Macroturbulence dispersion generally increases with effective temperature, but the range of values at a given effective temperature is much larger than seen for lower luminosity classes; this is interpreted in terms of red-giant and blue-loop evolution. No evidence is found for angular momentum dissipation on the first crossing of the H-R diagram. 57 references.

  20. Evaluation of natural colorants and their application on citrus fruit as alternatives to citrus red II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poor peel color of some varieties of oranges and the hybrids, especially for early season fruits, is caused by the subtropical climate of Florida, and has resulted in the use of a red dye on the peel to improve fruit appearance and marketability. Citrus Red II (CR2), the commercial citrus color ...

  1. Compulsory Deep Mixing of 3He and CNO Isotopes in the Envelopes of low-mass Red Giants

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleton, P P; Dearborn, D P; Lattanzio, J C

    2007-03-20

    Three-dimensional stellar modeling has enabled us to identify a deep-mixing mechanism that must operate in all low mass giants. This mixing process is not optional, and is driven by a molecular weight inversion created by the {sup 3}He({sup 3}He,2p){sup 4}He reaction. In this paper we characterize the behavior of this mixing, and study its impact on the envelope abundances. It not only eliminates the problem of {sup 3}He overproduction, reconciling stellar and big bang nucleosynthesis with observations, but solves the discrepancy between observed and calculated CNO isotope ratios in low mass giants, a problem of more than 3 decades standing. This mixing mechanism operates rapidly once the hydrogen burning shell approaches the material homogenized by the surface convection zone. In agreement with observations, Pop I stars between 0.8 and 2.0 M{sub {circle_dot}} develop {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios of 14.5 {+-} 1.5, while Pop II stars process the carbon to ratios of 4.0 {+-} 0.5. In stars less than 1.25 M{sub {circle_dot}}, this mechanism also destroys 90% to 95% of the {sup 3}He produced on the main sequence.

  2. Physical conditions near red giant and supergiant stars - An interpretation of SiO VLBI maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Ross, Randy R.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the dynamical structure of circumstellar envelopes around cool giant and supergiant stars depends critically on the knowledge of what happens in the 'near zone' of the envelope, within a few stellar radii of the star. One probe with adequate angular resolution to study the near zone is VLBI observation of the SiO masers. It is shown that VLBI maps of VX Sgr establish that the particle density in the SiO masers is very high (about 10 to the 12th/cu cm), indicating that the masers form in dense cloudlets and not in a spherically expanding wind. The implications of these results for the mechanism of mass loss are discussed.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Masses and ages of red giants (Martig+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martig, M.; Fouesneau, M.; Rix, H.-W.; Ness, M.; Meszaros, S.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Pinsonneault, M.; Serenelli, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Zamora, O.

    2016-10-01

    The APOKASC project is the spectroscopic follow-up by APOGEE (Majewski et al. 2015, in prep., as part of the third phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III; Eisenstein et al., 2011AJ....142...72E) of stars with asteroseismology data from the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The first version of the APOKASC catalogue (Pinsonneault et al., 2014, Cat. J/ApJS/215/19) contains seismic and spectroscopic measurements for 1989 giants, with the spectroscopic information corresponding to APOGEE's Data Release 10 (DR10; Ahn et al., 2014ApJS..211...17A). In this work, we keep the same original sample of 1989 stars and their seismic parameters, but update their Teff and abundances to DR12 values (Alam et al., 2015ApJS..219...12A; Holtzman et al., 2015AJ....150..148H). (2 data files).

  4. Physical conditions near red giant and supergiant stars - an interpretation of SiO VLBI maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, Charles; Ross, Randy R.

    1986-11-01

    Understanding the dynamical structure of circumstellar envelopes around cool giant and supergiant stars depends critically on the knowledge of what happens in the 'near zone' of the envelope, within a few stellar radii of the star. One probe with adequate angular resolution to study the near zone is VLBI observation of the SiO masers. It is shown that VLBI maps of VX Sgr establish that the particle density in the SiO masers is very high (about 10 to the 12th/cu cm), indicating that the masers form in dense cloudlets and not in a spherically expanding wind. The implications of these results for the mechanism of mass loss are discussed.

  5. Mass-loss on the red giant branch: the value and metallicity dependence of Reimers' η in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The impact of metallicity on the mass-loss rate from red giant branch (RGB) stars is studied through its effect on the parameters of horizontal branch (HB) stars. The scaling factors from Reimers and Schröder and Cuntz are used to measure the efficiency of RGB mass-loss for typical stars in 56 well-studied Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The median values among clusters are, respectively, η _R = 0.477 ± 0.070 ^{+0.050}_{-0.062} and η _SC = 0.172 ± 0.024 ^{+0.018}_{-0.023} (standard deviation and systematic uncertainties, respectively). Over a factor of 200 in iron abundance, η varies by ≲30 per cent, thus mass-loss mechanisms on the RGB have very little metallicity dependence. Any remaining dependence is within the current systematic uncertainties on cluster ages and evolution models. The low standard deviation of η among clusters (≈14 per cent) contrasts with the variety of HB morphologies. Since η incorporates cluster age, this suggests that age accounts for the majority of the `second parameter problem', and that a Reimers-like law provides a good mass-loss model. The remaining spread in η correlates with cluster mass and density, suggesting helium enrichment provides the third parameter explaining HB morphology of GCs. We close by discussing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) mass-loss, finding that the AGB tip luminosity is better reproduced and η has less metallicity dependence if GCs are more co-eval than generally thought.

  6. Gravity, Rotation, Ages, and Magnetism of Solar-like Stars and Red Giants observed by Kepler and K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Savita

    Scientific Objectives: Asteroseismology has proved to be a very powerful tool thanks to the high-precision data obtained by the space missions such as Kepler and CoRoT. Solar-like oscillations have been detected and reported for around 15,600 red giants and 540 main-sequence stars observed by the nominal Kepler mission. Hence, these stars have their surface gravities, masses, and radii obtained with seismology. However, according to the latest Kepler star properties catalog (Mathur et al., in prep.) more than 24,000 red giants, 127,000 FGK dwarfs, and 10,000 subgiants were targeted. K2 has been observing 90,000 red giants and dwarfs. Moreover, the continuous photometric data of 4 yrs (resp. 3 mo) collected by Kepler (resp. K2) contain the signature of other phenomena such as convection, rotation, and magnetism, which are very important to understand stellar evolution and can also be used to obtain precise fundamental stellar parameters even when pulsations are not detected. We propose to perform the largest homogeneous analysis to date of seismic oscillations, convection, and rotation/magnetic activity across the full range of stellar spectral types and evolutionary states present in the K2 and Kepler missions. We will use the longest publicly available time series to derive the most accurate surface gravities, rotation periods, evolutionary states, and magnetic activity levels to characterize rotation-age-magnetic activity relationships and oscillations-magnetism interaction. Relevance: The determination of the gravity, mass, radius, and age of planet host stars allow us to better characterize the planetary systems. By studying the stellar surface rotation periods, we can better understand the angular momentum transport involved during the stellar evolution and have more accurate rotation-age relationships. Finally, the study of the magnetic activity of a large number of stars will allow us to put the Sun in a broader context. This work will also have an impact on

  7. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  8. Collagenolytic (necrobiotic) granulomas: part II--the 'red' granulomas.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jane M; Barrett, Terry L

    2004-07-01

    A collagenolytic or necrobiotic non-infectious granuloma is one in which a granulomatous infiltrate develops around a central area of altered collagen and elastic fibers. The altered fibers lose their distinct boundaries and exhibit new staining patterns, becoming either more basophilic or eosinophilic. Within the area of altered collagen, there may be deposition of acellular substances such as mucin (blue) or fibrin (red), or there may be neutrophils with nuclear dust (blue), eosinophils (red), or flame figures (red). These color distinctions can be used as a simple algorithm for the diagnosis of collagenolytic granulomas, i.e. 'blue' granulomas vs. 'red' granulomas. Eight diagnoses are included within these two groupings, which are discussed in this two-part article. In the previously published first part, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis and histologic features of the 'blue' collagenolytic granulomas were discussed. These are the lesions of granuloma annulare, Wegener's granulomatosis, and rheumatoid vasculitis. In this second half of the series, the 'red' collagenolytic granulomas are discussed; these are the lesions of necrobiosis lipoidica, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, rheumatoid nodules, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and eosinophilic cellulitis (Well's Syndrome).

  9. Testing the asymptotic relation for period spacings from mixed modes of red giants observed with the Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysschaert, B.; Beck, P. G.; Corsaro, E.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Aerts, C.; Arentoft, T.; Kjeldsen, H.; García, R. A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Degroote, P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Dipole mixed pulsation modes of consecutive radial order have been detected for thousands of low-mass red-giant stars with the NASA space telescope Kepler. These modes have the potential to reveal information on the physics of the deep stellar interior. Aims: Different methods have been proposed to derive an observed value for the gravity-mode period spacing, the most prominent one relying on a relation derived from asymptotic pulsation theory applied to the gravity-mode character of the mixed modes. Our aim is to compare results based on this asymptotic relation with those derived from an empirical approach for three pulsating red-giant stars. Methods: We developed a data-driven method to perform frequency extraction and mode identification. Next, we used the identified dipole mixed modes to determine the gravity-mode period spacing by means of an empirical method and by means of the asymptotic relation. In our methodology we consider the phase offset, ɛg, of the asymptotic relation as a free parameter. Results: Using the frequencies of the identified dipole mixed modes for each star in the sample, we derived a value for the gravity-mode period spacing using the two different methods. These values differ by less than 5%. The average precision we achieved for the period spacing derived from the asymptotic relation is better than 1%, while that of our data-driven approach is 3%. Conclusions: Good agreement is found between values for the period spacing derived from the asymptotic relation and from the empirical method. The achieved uncertainties are small, but do not support the ultra-high precision claimed in the literature. The precision from our data-driven method is mostly affected by the differing number of observed dipole mixed modes. For the asymptotic relation, the phase offset, ɛg, remains ill defined, but enables a more robust analysis of both the asymptotic period spacing and the dimensionless coupling factor. However, its estimation might

  10. Red giants observed by CoRoT and APOGEE: The evolution of the Milky Way's radial metallicity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, F.; Chiappini, C.; Minchev, I.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Mosser, B.; Rodrigues, T. S.; Santiago, B. X.; Baudin, F.; Beers, T. C.; da Costa, L. N.; García, R. A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Holtzman, J.; Maia, M. A. G.; Majewski, S.; Mathur, S.; Noels-Grotsch, A.; Pan, K.; Schneider, D. P.; Schultheis, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Valentini, M.; Zamora, O.

    2017-03-01

    Using combined asteroseismic and spectroscopic observations of 418 red-giant stars close to the Galactic disc plane (6 kpc < RGal ≲ 13 kpc, | ZGal| < 0.3 kpc), we measure the age dependence of the radial metallicity distribution in the Milky Way's thin disc over cosmic time. The slope of the radial iron gradient of the young red-giant population (-0.058 ± 0.008 [stat.] ±0.003 [syst.] dex/kpc) is consistent with recent Cepheid measurements. For stellar populations with ages of 1-4 Gyr the gradient is slightly steeper, at a value of -0.066 ± 0.007 ± 0.002 dex/kpc, and then flattens again to reach a value of -0.03 dex/kpc for stars with ages between 6 and 10 Gyr. Our results are in good agreement with a state-of-the-art chemo-dynamical Milky-Way model in which the evolution of the abundance gradient and its scatter can be entirely explained by a non-varying negative metallicity gradient in the interstellar medium, together with stellar radial heating and migration. We also offer an explanation for why intermediate-age open clusters in the solar neighbourhood can be more metal-rich, and why their radial metallicity gradient seems to be much steeper than that of the youngest clusters. Already within 2 Gyr, radial mixing can bring metal-rich clusters from the innermost regions of the disc to Galactocentric radii of 5 to 8 kpc. We suggest that these outward-migrating clusters may be less prone to tidal disruption and therefore steepen the local intermediate-age cluster metallicity gradient. Our scenario also explains why the strong steepening of the local iron gradient with age is not seen in field stars. In the near future, asteroseismic data from the K2 mission will allow for improved statistics and a better coverage of the inner-disc regions, thereby providing tighter constraints on theevolution of the central parts of the Milky Way.

  11. A white dwarf companion to the main-sequence star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis and the binary hypothesis for the origin of peculiar red giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the peculiar red giants (PRGs) called MS stars are investigated, and the discovery of a white dwarf (WD) companion to the MS star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis is reported. The observations and data analysis are discussed and compared with those for field WDs in order to derive parameters for the WD and the luminosity of the primary. Detection limits for the other MS stars investigated are derived, and the binary hypothesis for PRGs is reviewed.

  12. On Potassium and Other Abundance Anomalies of Red Giants in NGC 2419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliadis, C.; Karakas, A. I.; Prantzos, N.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Doherty, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    Globular clusters are of paramount importance for testing theories of stellar evolution and early galaxy formation. Strong evidence for multiple populations of stars in globular clusters derives from observed abundance anomalies. A puzzling example is the recently detected Mg-K anticorrelation in NGC 2419. We perform Monte Carlo nuclear reaction network calculations to constrain the temperature-density conditions that gave rise to the elemental abundances observed in this elusive cluster. We find a correlation between stellar temperature and density values that provide a satisfactory match between simulated and observed abundances in NGC 2419 for all relevant elements (Mg, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, and V). Except at the highest densities (ρ ≳ 108 g cm-3), the acceptable conditions range from ≈100 MK at ≈108 g cm-3 to ≈200 MK at ≈10-4 g cm-3. This result accounts for uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates and variations in the assumed initial composition. We review hydrogen-burning sites and find that low-mass stars, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, or supermassive stars cannot account for the observed abundance anomalies in NGC 2419. Super-AGB stars could be viable candidates for the polluter stars if stellar model parameters can be fine-tuned to produce higher temperatures. Novae, involving either CO or ONe white dwarfs, could be interesting polluter candidates, but a current lack of low-metallicity nova models precludes firmer conclusions. We also discuss whether additional constraints for the first-generation polluters can be obtained by future measurements of oxygen, or by evolving models of second-generation low-mass stars with a non-canonical initial composition.

  13. ON POTASSIUM AND OTHER ABUNDANCE ANOMALIES OF RED GIANTS IN NGC 2419

    SciTech Connect

    Iliadis, C.; Karakas, A. I.; Prantzos, N.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Doherty, C. L.

    2016-02-10

    Globular clusters are of paramount importance for testing theories of stellar evolution and early galaxy formation. Strong evidence for multiple populations of stars in globular clusters derives from observed abundance anomalies. A puzzling example is the recently detected Mg–K anticorrelation in NGC 2419. We perform Monte Carlo nuclear reaction network calculations to constrain the temperature–density conditions that gave rise to the elemental abundances observed in this elusive cluster. We find a correlation between stellar temperature and density values that provide a satisfactory match between simulated and observed abundances in NGC 2419 for all relevant elements (Mg, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, and V). Except at the highest densities (ρ ≳ 10{sup 8} g cm{sup −3}), the acceptable conditions range from ≈100 MK at ≈10{sup 8} g cm{sup −3} to ≈200 MK at ≈10{sup −4} g cm{sup −3}. This result accounts for uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates and variations in the assumed initial composition. We review hydrogen-burning sites and find that low-mass stars, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, or supermassive stars cannot account for the observed abundance anomalies in NGC 2419. Super-AGB stars could be viable candidates for the polluter stars if stellar model parameters can be fine-tuned to produce higher temperatures. Novae, involving either CO or ONe white dwarfs, could be interesting polluter candidates, but a current lack of low-metallicity nova models precludes firmer conclusions. We also discuss whether additional constraints for the first-generation polluters can be obtained by future measurements of oxygen, or by evolving models of second-generation low-mass stars with a non-canonical initial composition.

  14. Exclusion of a luminous red giant as a companion star to the progenitor of supernova SN 2011fe.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Bloom, Joshua S; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Miller, Adam A; Cenko, S Bradley; Jha, Saurabh W; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D Andrew; Nugent, Peter E; Butler, Nathaniel R; Ofek, Eran O; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Richards, Joseph W; Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Bildsten, Lars; Shara, Michael M; Bibby, Joanne; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Kulkarni, S R; Law, Nicholas M; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; McCully, Curtis; Patel, Brandon; Maguire, Kate; Shen, Ken J

    2011-12-14

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to result from a thermonuclear explosion of an accreting white dwarf in a binary system, but little is known of the precise nature of the companion star and the physical properties of the progenitor system. There are two classes of models: double-degenerate (involving two white dwarfs in a close binary system) and single-degenerate models. In the latter, the primary white dwarf accretes material from a secondary companion until conditions are such that carbon ignites, at a mass of 1.38 times the mass of the Sun. The type Ia supernova SN 2011fe was recently detected in a nearby galaxy. Here we report an analysis of archival images of the location of SN 2011fe. The luminosity of the progenitor system (especially the companion star) is 10-100 times fainter than previous limits on other type Ia supernova progenitor systems, allowing us to rule out luminous red giants and almost all helium stars as the mass-donating companion to the exploding white dwarf.

  15. Three-dimensional computer simulations of feeding behaviour in red and giant pandas relate skull biomechanics with dietary niche partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Serrano-Alarcón, Francisco J.; Martín-Serra, Alberto; Pastor, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    The red (Ailurus fulgens) and giant (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) pandas are mammalian carnivores convergently adapted to a bamboo feeding diet. However, whereas Ailurus forages almost entirely on younger leaves, fruits and tender trunks, Ailuropoda relies more on trunks and stems. Such difference in foraging mode is considered a strategy for resource partitioning where they are sympatric. Here, we use finite-element analysis to test for mechanical differences and similarities in skull performance between Ailurus and Ailuropoda related to diet. Feeding simulations suggest that the two panda species have similar ranges of mechanical efficiency and strain energy profiles across the dentition, reflecting their durophagous diet. However, the stress distributions and peaks in the skulls of Ailurus and Ailuropoda are remarkably different for biting at all tooth locations. Although the skull of Ailuropoda is capable of resisting higher stresses than the skull of Ailurus, the latter is able to distribute stresses more evenly throughout the skull. These differences in skull biomechanics reflect their distinct bamboo feeding preferences. Ailurus uses repetitive chewing in an extended mastication to feed on soft leaves, and Ailuropoda exhibits shorter and more discrete periods of chomp-and-swallow feeding to break down hard bamboo trunks. PMID:24718096

  16. ABUNDANCES FOR A LARGE SAMPLE OF RED GIANTS IN NGC 1851: HINTS FOR A MERGER OF TWO CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Gratton, R. G.; Lucatello, S.; Momany, Y.; D'Orazi, V.; Catanzaro, G.; Leone, F.; Cassisi, S.; D'Antona, F.; Ortolani, S. E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.i E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.i

    2010-10-10

    We present the abundance analysis of a sample of more than 120 red giants in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 1851, based on FLAMES spectra. We find a small but detectable metallicity spread. This spread is compatible with the presence of two different groups of stars with a metallicity difference of 0.06-0.08 dex, in agreement with earlier photometric studies. If stars are divided into these two groups according to their metallicity, both components show Na-O anticorrelation (signature of a genuine GC nature) of moderate extension. The metal-poor stars are more concentrated than the metal-rich ones. We tentatively propose the hypothesis that NGC 1851 formed from a merger of two individual GCs with a slightly different Fe and {alpha}-element content and possibly an age difference up to 1 Gyr. This is also supported by number ratios of stars on the split subgiant and on the bimodal horizontal branches. The distribution of n-capture process elements in the two components also supports the idea that the enrichment must have occurred in each of the structures separately and not as a continuum of events in a single GC. The most probable explanation is that the proto-clusters formed into a (now dissolved) dwarf galaxy and later merged to produce the present GC.

  17. Three-dimensional computer simulations of feeding behaviour in red and giant pandas relate skull biomechanics with dietary niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Serrano-Alarcón, Francisco J; Martín-Serra, Alberto; Pastor, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    The red (Ailurus fulgens) and giant (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) pandas are mammalian carnivores convergently adapted to a bamboo feeding diet. However, whereas Ailurus forages almost entirely on younger leaves, fruits and tender trunks, Ailuropoda relies more on trunks and stems. Such difference in foraging mode is considered a strategy for resource partitioning where they are sympatric. Here, we use finite-element analysis to test for mechanical differences and similarities in skull performance between Ailurus and Ailuropoda related to diet. Feeding simulations suggest that the two panda species have similar ranges of mechanical efficiency and strain energy profiles across the dentition, reflecting their durophagous diet. However, the stress distributions and peaks in the skulls of Ailurus and Ailuropoda are remarkably different for biting at all tooth locations. Although the skull of Ailuropoda is capable of resisting higher stresses than the skull of Ailurus, the latter is able to distribute stresses more evenly throughout the skull. These differences in skull biomechanics reflect their distinct bamboo feeding preferences. Ailurus uses repetitive chewing in an extended mastication to feed on soft leaves, and Ailuropoda exhibits shorter and more discrete periods of chomp-and-swallow feeding to break down hard bamboo trunks.

  18. Disruption of a red giant star by a supermassive black hole and the case of PS1-10jh

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanović, Tamara; Cheng, Roseanne M.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: rcheng@gatech.edu

    2014-06-20

    The development of a new generation of theoretical models for tidal disruptions is timely, as increasingly diverse events are being captured in surveys of the transient sky. Recently, Gezari et al. reported a discovery of a new class of tidal disruption events: the disruption of a helium-rich stellar core, thought to be a remnant of a red giant (RG) star. Motivated by this discovery and in anticipation of others, we consider tidal interaction of an RG star with a supermassive black hole (SMBH) which leads to the stripping of the stellar envelope and subsequent inspiral of the compact core toward the black hole. Once the stellar envelope is removed the inspiral of the core is driven by tidal heating as well as the emission of gravitational radiation until the core either falls into the SMBH or is tidally disrupted. In the case of the tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, we find that there is a set of orbital solutions at high eccentricities in which the tidally stripped hydrogen envelope is accreted by the SMBH before the helium core is disrupted. This places the RG core in a portion of parameter space where strong tidal heating can lift the degeneracy of the compact remnant and disrupt it before it reaches the tidal radius. We consider how this sequence of events explains the puzzling absence of the hydrogen emission lines from the spectrum of PS1-10jh and gives rise to its other observational features.

  19. SIMULATING THE COMMON ENVELOPE PHASE OF A RED GIANT USING SMOOTHED-PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS AND UNIFORM-GRID CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola; Fryer, Chris L.; Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Herwig, Falk; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to study the rapid infall phase of the common envelope (CE) interaction of a red giant branch star of mass equal to 0.88 M{sub Sun} and a companion star of mass ranging from 0.9 down to 0.1 M{sub Sun }. We first compare the results obtained using two different numerical techniques with different resolutions, and find very good agreement overall. We then compare the outcomes of those simulations with observed systems thought to have gone through a CE. The simulations fail to reproduce those systems in the sense that most of the envelope of the donor remains bound at the end of the simulations and the final orbital separations between the donor's remnant and the companion, ranging from 26.8 down to 5.9 R{sub Sun }, are larger than the ones observed. We suggest that this discrepancy vouches for recombination playing an essential role in the ejection of the envelope and/or significant shrinkage of the orbit happening in the subsequent phase.

  20. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Star and Red Supergiant Star Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William T.; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We present an update of our investigation of differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  1. Comparative Studies of the Dust around Red Supergiant and Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela K.; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret; Sloan, Greg; Jones, Olivia

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of red supergiant (RSG) and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies and in various Milky Way globular clusters. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper), the Spitzer program SMC-Spec (PI: G. Sloan), and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 μm emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars and assess effects of varying metallicity (LMC versus SMC versus Milky Way globular cluster) and other properties (mass-loss rate, luminosity, etc.) on the dust originating from these stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  2. Comparative Studies of the Dust around Red Supergiant and Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, B. A.; Srinivasan, S.; Speck, A.; Volk, K.; Kemper, F.; Reach, W.; Lagadec, E.; Bernard, J.-P.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Sloan, G. C.; Jones, O.

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of red supergiant (RSG) and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies and in various Milky Way globular clusters. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper), the Spitzer program SMC-Spec (PI: G. Sloan), and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars and assess effects of varying metallicity (LMC versus SMC versus Milky Way globular cluster) and other properties (mass-loss rate, luminosity, etc.) on the dust originating from these stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  3. Infrared extinction in the inner Milky Way through red clump giants

    SciTech Connect

    González-Fernández, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Garzón, F.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Hammersley, P. L.

    2014-02-20

    While the shape of the extinction curve in the infrared is considered to be set and the extinction ratios between infrared bands are usually taken to be approximately constant, a number of recent studies point to either a spatially variable behavior of the exponent of the power law or a different extinction law altogether. In this paper, we propose a method to analyze the overall behavior of the interstellar extinction by means of the red-clump population, and we apply it to those areas of the Milky Way where the presence of interstellar matter is heavily felt: areas located in 5° < l < 30° and b = 0°. We show that the extinction ratios traditionally used for the near infrared could be inappropriate for the inner Galaxy and we analyze the behavior of the extinction law from 1 μm to 8 μm.

  4. METALLICITIES, AGE-METALLICITY RELATIONSHIPS, AND KINEMATICS OF RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE OUTER DISK OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Carrera, R.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A.; Hardy, E.

    2011-08-15

    The outer disk of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is studied in order to unveil clues about its formation and evolution. Complementing our previous studies in innermost fields (3 kpc {approx}< R {approx}< 7 kpc), we obtained deep color-magnitude diagrams in six fields with galactocentric distances from 5.2 kpc to 9.2 kpc and different azimuths. The comparison with isochrones shows that while the oldest population is approximately coeval in all fields, the age of the youngest populations increases with increasing radius. This agrees with the results obtained in the innermost fields. Low-resolution spectroscopy in the infrared Ca II triplet region has been obtained for about 150 stars near the tip of the red giant branch in the same fields. Radial velocities and stellar metallicities have been obtained from these spectra. The metallicity distribution of each field has been analyzed together with those previously studied. The metal content of the most metal-poor objects, which are also the oldest according to the derived age-metallicity relationships, is similar in all fields independently of the galactocentric distance. However, while the metallicity of the most metal-rich objects measured, which are the youngest ones, remains constant in the inner 6 kpc, it decreases with increasing radius from there on. The same is true for the mean metallicity. According to the derived age-metallicity relationships, which are consistent with being the same in all fields, this result may be interpreted as an outside-in formation scheme in opposition with the inside-out scenario predicted by {Lambda}CDM cosmology for a galaxy like the LMC. The analysis of the radial velocities of our sample of giants shows that they follow a rotational cold disk kinematics. The velocity dispersion increases as metallicity decreases indicating that the most metal-poor/oldest objects are distributed in a thicker disk than the most metal-rich/youngest ones in agreement with the findings in other disks

  5. Geochemical dynamics of the Atlantis II Deep (Red Sea): II. Composition of metalliferous sediment pore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Blanc, Gérard; Monnin, Christophe; Boulègue, Jacques

    2000-12-01

    The Atlantis II Deep is an axial depression of the Red Sea filled with highly saline brines and covered by layered metalliferous sediment. We report new data on the vertical distribution of major salts and trace metals dissolved in the pore waters of the metalliferous sediments. We have studied the chemical composition of interstitial waters of two sediment cores of the western (core 684) and southwestern (core 683) basins. The major dissolved elements are Na and Cl. Their concentrations are close to those of the brine overlying the sediment. The pore waters are undersaturated with respect to halite at the in situ conditions (62°C, 220 bars), but are saturated at the shipboard conditions (10°C, 1 bar). The salt and water contents of the bulk sediment show that core 683 contained halite in the solid fraction. A part of it precipitated after core collection, but most of it was present in situ. Thermodynamic calculations with a water-rock interaction model based on Pitzer's ion interaction approach reveal that equilibrium between the pore waters and anhydrite is achieved in sediment layers for which observations report the presence of this mineral. We used a transport model, which shows that molecular diffusion can smooth the profile of dissolved salt and partly erase the pore water record of past variations of salinity in the lower brine. For example, we calculated that the pore water record of modern variation of brine salinity is rapidly smoothed by molecular diffusion. The dissolved transition metals show large variations with depth in the interstitial waters. The profiles of core 683 reflect the possible advection of hydrothermal fluid within the sediment of the southwestern basin. The distribution of dissolved metals in core 684 is the result of diagenetic reactions, mainly the reduction of Mn-oxide with dissolved Fe(II), the recrystallization of primary oxide minerals, and the precipitation of authigenic Mn-carbonates.

  6. HERSCHEL FAR-IR OBSERVATIONS OF THE GIANT H II REGION NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Cecco, Alessandra Di; Faustini, Fabiana; Calzoletti, Luca; Paresce, Francesco; Correnti, Matteo

    2015-01-20

    We observed the giant H II region around the NGC 3603 YC with the five broad bands (70, 160, 250, 350, 500 μm) of the SPIRE and PACS instruments, on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Together with what is currently known of the stellar, atomic, molecular, and warm dust components, this additional and crucial information should allow us to better understand the details of the star-formation history in this region. The main objective of the investigation is to study, at high spatial resolution, the distribution and main physical characteristics of the cold dust. By reconstructing the temperature and density maps, we found, respectively, a mean value of 36 K and log{sub 10} N {sub H} = 22.0 ± 0.1 cm{sup –2}. We carried out a photometric analysis detecting 107 point-like sources, mostly confined to the north and south of the cluster. By comparing our data with spectral energy distribution models, we found that 35 sources are well represented by young stellar objects in early evolutionary phases, from Class 0 to Class I. The Herschel detections also provided far-IR counterparts for 4 H{sub 2}O masers and 11 objects previously known from mid-IR observations. The existence of so many embedded sources confirms the hypothesis of intense and ongoing star-formation activity in the region around NGC 3603 YC.

  7. Herschel Far-IR Observations of the Giant H II Region NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cecco, Alessandra; Faustini, Fabiana; Paresce, Francesco; Correnti, Matteo; Calzoletti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We observed the giant H II region around the NGC 3603 YC with the five broad bands (70, 160, 250, 350, 500 μm) of the SPIRE and PACS instruments, on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Together with what is currently known of the stellar, atomic, molecular, and warm dust components, this additional and crucial information should allow us to better understand the details of the star-formation history in this region. The main objective of the investigation is to study, at high spatial resolution, the distribution and main physical characteristics of the cold dust. By reconstructing the temperature and density maps, we found, respectively, a mean value of 36 K and log10 N H = 22.0 ± 0.1 cm-2. We carried out a photometric analysis detecting 107 point-like sources, mostly confined to the north and south of the cluster. By comparing our data with spectral energy distribution models, we found that 35 sources are well represented by young stellar objects in early evolutionary phases, from Class 0 to Class I. The Herschel detections also provided far-IR counterparts for 4 H2O masers and 11 objects previously known from mid-IR observations. The existence of so many embedded sources confirms the hypothesis of intense and ongoing star-formation activity in the region around NGC 3603 YC. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led principal investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. THE GLOBAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE ROLE OF ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Matzner, Christopher D.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-09-01

    We present virial models for the global evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Focusing on the presence of an accretion flow and accounting for the amount of mass, momentum, and energy supplied by accretion and star formation feedback, we are able to follow the growth, evolution, and dispersal of individual GMCs. Our model clouds reproduce the scaling relations observed in both galactic and extragalactic clouds. We find that accretion and star formation contribute roughly equal amounts of turbulent kinetic energy over the lifetime of the cloud. Clouds attain virial equilibrium and grow in such a way as to maintain roughly constant surface densities, with typical surface densities of order 50-200 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}, in good agreement with observations of GMCs in the Milky Way and nearby external galaxies. We find that as clouds grow, their velocity dispersion and radius must also increase, implying that the linewidth-size relation constitutes an age sequence. Lastly, we compare our models to observations of GMCs and associated young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud and find good agreement between our model clouds and the observed relationship between H II regions, young star clusters, and GMCs.

  9. Two groups of red giants with distinct chemical abundances in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553 through the eyes of APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baitian; Cohen, Roger E.; Geisler, Doug; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Villanova, Sandro; Carrera, Ricardo; Zamora, Olga; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Shetrone, Matthew; Frinchaboy, Peter; Meza, Andres; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Lane, Richard R.; Nitschelm, Christian; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2017-02-01

    Multiple populations revealed in globular clusters (GCs) are important windows to the formation and evolution of these stellar systems. The metal-rich GCs in the Galactic bulge are an indispensable part of this picture, but the high optical extinction in this region has prevented extensive research. In this work, we use the high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data from Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) to study the chemical abundances of NGC 6553, which is one of the most metal-rich bulge GCs. We identify 10 red giants as cluster members using their positions, radial velocities, iron abundances, and NIR photometry. Our sample stars show a mean radial velocity of -0.14 ± 5.47 km s-1, and a mean [Fe/H] of -0.15 ± 0.05. We clearly separate two populations of stars in C and N in this GC for the first time. NGC 6553 is the most metal-rich GC where the multiple stellar population phenomenon is found until now. Substantial chemical variations are also found in Na, O, and Al. However, the two populations show similar Si, Ca, and iron-peak element abundances. Therefore, we infer that the CNO, NeNa, and MgAl cycles have been activated, but the MgAl cycle is too weak to show its effect on Mg. Type Ia and Type II supernovae do not seem to have significantly polluted the second generation stars. Comparing with other GC studies, NGC 6553 shows similar chemical variations as other relatively metal-rich GCs. We also confront current GC formation theories with our results, and suggest possible avenues for improvement in the models.

  10. Two Groups of Red Giants with Distinct Chemical Abundances in the Bulge Globular Cluster NGC 6553 Through the Eyes of APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baitian; Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Douglas; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Villanova, Sandro; Carrera, Ricardo; Zamora, Olga; Garcia-Hernandez, D.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fernandez Trincado, Jose Gregorio; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    Multiple populations revealed in globular clusters (GCs) are important windows to the formation and evolution of these stellar systems. The metal-rich GCs in the Galactic bulge are an indispensable part of this picture, but the high optical extinction in this region has prevented extensive research. In this work, we use the high resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data from APOGEE to study the chemical abundances of NGC 6553, which is one of the most metal-rich bulge GCs. We identify ten red giants as cluster members using their positions, radial velocities, iron abundances, and NIR photometry. Our sample stars show a mean radial velocity of -0.14 km/s, and a mean [Fe/H] of -0.15. We clearly separate two populations of stars in C and N in this GC for the first time. NGC 6553 is the most metal-rich GC where the multiple stellar population phenomenon is found until now. Substantial chemical variations are also found in Na, O, and Al. However, the two populations show similar Si, Ca, and iron-peak element abundances. Therefore, we infer that the CNO, NeNa, and MgAl cycles have been activated, but the MgAl cycle is too weak to show its effect on Mg. The Si leakage from the MgAl cycle is negligible. Type Ia and Type II supernovae do not seem to have significantly polluted the second generation stars. Comparing the APOGEE results with other GC studies, we find that NGC 6553 shows similar chemical variations as other relatively metal-rich GCs. We also confront current GC formation theories with our results, and suggest possible avenues for improvement in the models.

  11. The wobbly Galaxy: kinematics north and south with RAVE red-clump giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. E. K.; Steinmetz, M.; Binney, J.; Siebert, A.; Enke, H.; Famaey, B.; Minchev, I.; de Jong, R. S.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G. F.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2013-11-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment survey, combined with proper motions and distance estimates, can be used to study in detail stellar kinematics in the extended solar neighbourhood (solar suburb). Using 72 365 red-clump stars, we examine the mean velocity components in 3D between 6 < R < 10 kpc and -2 < Z < 2 kpc, concentrating on north-south differences. Simple parametric fits to the (R, Z) trends for Vφ and the velocity dispersions are presented. We confirm the recently discovered gradient in mean Galactocentric radial velocity, VR, finding that the gradient is marked below the plane (δ/δR = -8 km s-1 kpc-1 for Z < 0, vanishing to zero above the plane), with a Z gradient thus also present. The vertical velocity, VZ, also shows clear, large-amplitude (|VZ| = 17 km s-1) structure, with indications of a rarefaction-compression pattern, suggestive of wave-like behaviour. We perform a rigorous error analysis, tracing sources of both systematic and random errors. We confirm the north-south differences in VR and VZ along the line of sight, with the VR estimated independent of the proper motions. The complex three-dimensional structure of velocity space presents challenges for future modelling of the Galactic disc, with the Galactic bar, spiral arms and excitation of wave-like structures all probably playing a role.

  12. Detection of a red supergiant progenitor star of a type II-plateau supernova.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Stephen J; Maund, Justyn R; Hendry, Margaret A; Tout, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gerard F; Mattila, Seppo; Benn, Chris R

    2004-01-23

    We present the discovery of a red supergiant star that exploded as supernova 2003gd in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Gemini Telescope imaged this galaxy 6 to 9 months before the supernova explosion, and subsequent HST images confirm the positional coincidence of the supernova with a single resolved star that is a red supergiant of 8(+4)(-2) solar masses. This confirms both stellar evolution models and supernova theories predicting that cool red supergiants are the immediate progenitor stars of type II-plateau supernovae.

  13. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses.

  14. Abundance ratios of red giants in low-mass ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, P.; Monaco, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Moni Bidin, C.; Geisler, D.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. Aims: We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to five different ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) that is based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Methods: Medium-resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Results: Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low-mass galaxies, we found that the [α/Fe] ratios vs.s [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to that which is found for the population of stars that belong to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [α/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We report for the first time the abundance of strontium in CVn II. The star we analyzed in this galaxy has a very high [Sr/Fe] and a very low upper limit of barium which makes it a star with an exceptionally high [Sr/Ba] ratio.

  15. Asteroseismic study on cluster distance moduli for red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S. E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-05-01

    Stellar distance is an important basic parameter in stellar astrophysics. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust; therefore, they are expected to have common properties. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain theoretical models and/or to determine fundamental parameters, such as stellar mass, metal fraction, and distance, when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive a new relation based on solar-like oscillations, photometric observations, and the theory of stellar structure and evolution of red giant branch stars to determine cluster distance moduli through the global oscillation parameters Δν and ν{sub max} and photometric data V. The values of Δν and ν{sub max} are derived from Kepler observations. At the same time, it is used to interpret the trends between V and Δν. From the analyses of this newly derived relation and observational data of NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, we devise a method in which all stars in a cluster are regarded as one entity to determine the cluster distance modulus. This approach fully reflects the characteristic of member stars in a cluster as a natural sample. From this method we derive true distance moduli of 13.09 ± 0.10 mag for NGC 6791 and 11.88 ± 0.14 mag for NGC 6819. Additionally, we find that the distance modulus only slightly depends on the metallicity [Fe/H] in the new relation. A change of 0.1 dex in [Fe/H] will lead to a change of 0.06 mag in the distance modulus.

  16. THE ACS LCID PROJECT. IV. DETECTION OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP IN ISOLATED GALAXIES OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Monelli, M.; Hidalgo, S. L; Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.; Cassisi, S.; Bernard, E. J.; Skillman, E. D. E-mail: carme@iac.e E-mail: shidalgo@iac.e E-mail: ejb@roe.ac.u

    2010-08-01

    We report the detection and analysis of the red giant branch (RGB) luminosity function bump in a sample of isolated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have designed a new analysis approach comparing the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with theoretical best-fit CMDs derived from precise estimates of the star formation histories of each galaxy. This analysis is based on studying the difference between the V magnitude of the RGB bump and the horizontal branch at the level of the RR Lyrae instability strip ({Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB}) and we discuss here a technique for reliably measuring this quantity in complex stellar systems. By using this approach, we find that the difference between the observed and predicted values of {Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB} is +0.13 {+-} 0.14 mag. This is smaller, by about a factor of 2, than the well-known discrepancy between theory and observation at low metallicity commonly derived for Galactic globular clusters (GCs). This result is confirmed by a comparison between the adopted theoretical framework and empirical estimates of the {Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB} parameter for both a large database of Galactic GCs and for four other dwarf spheroidal galaxies for which this estimate is available in the literature. We also investigate the strength of the RGB bump feature (R{sub bump}), and find very good agreement between the observed and theoretically predicted R{sub bump} values. This agreement supports the reliability of the evolutionary lifetimes predicted by theoretical models of the evolution of low-mass stars.

  17. Predicting the fate of binary red giants using the observed sequence E star population: binary planetary nebula nuclei and post-RGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R.; Nicholls, C. P.

    2012-07-01

    Sequence E variables are close binary red giants that show ellipsoidal light variations. They are likely the immediate precursors of planetary nebulae (PNe) with close binary central stars as well as other binary post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) and binary post-red giant branch (post-RGB) stars. We have made a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the fraction of red giant binaries that go through a common envelope event leading to the production of a close binary system or a merged star. The novel aspect of this simulation is that we use the observed frequency of sequence E binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to normalize our calculations. This normalization allows us to produce predictions that are relatively independent of model assumptions. In our standard model, and assuming that the relative numbers of PNe of various types are proportional to their birth rates, we find that in the LMC today the fraction of PNe with close binary central stars is 7-9 per cent, the fraction of PNe with intermediate period binary central stars having separations capable of influencing the nebula shape (orbital periods less than 500 yr) is 23-27 per cent, the fraction of PNe containing wide binaries that are unable to influence the nebula shape (orbital period greater than 500 yr) is 46-55 per cent, the fraction of PNe derived from single stars is 3-19 per cent, and 5-6 per cent of PNe are produced by previously merged stars. We also predict that the birth rate of post-RGB stars is ˜4 per cent of the total PN birth rate, equivalent to ˜50 per cent of the production rate of PNe with close binary central stars. These post-RGB stars most likely appear initially as luminous low-mass helium white dwarf binaries. The average lifetime of sequence E ellipsoidal variability with amplitude more than 0.02 mag is predicted to be ˜0.95 Myr. We use our model and the observed number of red giant stars in the top one magnitude of the RGB in the LMC to predict the number of PNe in

  18. Growth under Red Light Enhances Photosystem II Relative to Photosystem I and Phycobilisomes in the Red Alga Porphyridium cruentum1

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Francis X.; Dennenberg, Ronald J.; Jursinic, Paul A.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1990-01-01

    Acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light absorbed primarily by photosystem I (PSI) or by photosystem II (PSII) was studied in the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161). Cultures grown under green light of 15 microeinsteins per square meter per second (PSII light; absorbed predominantly by the phycobilisomes) exhibited a PSII/PSI ratio of 0.26 ± 0.05. Under red light (PSI light; absorbed primarily by chlorophyll) of comparable quantum flux, cells contained nearly five times as many PSII per PSI (1.21 ± 0.10), and three times as many PSII per cell. About 12% of the chlorophyll was attributed to PSII in green light, 22% in white light, and 39% in red light-grown cultures. Chlorophyll antenna sizes appeared to remain constant at about 75 chlorophyll per PSII and 140 per PSI. Spectral quality had little effect on cell content or composition of the phycobilisomes, thus the number of PSII per phycobilisome was substantially greater in red light-grown cultures (4.2 ± 0.6) than in those grown under green (1.6 ± 0.3) or white light (2.9 ± 0.1). Total photosystems (PSI + PSII) per phycobilisome remained at about eight in each case. Carotenoid content and composition was little affected by the spectral composition of the growth light. Zeaxanthin comprised more than 50% (mole/mole), β-carotene about 40%, and cryptoxanthin about 4% of the carotenoid pigment. Despite marked changes in the light-harvesting apparatus, red and green light-grown cultures have generation times equal to that of cultures grown under white light of only one-third the quantum flux. PMID:16667597

  19. RAVE stars in K2. I. Improving RAVE red giants spectroscopy using asteroseismology from K2 Campaign 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, M.; Chiappini, C.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Mosser, B.; Lund, M. N.; Miglio, A.; Chaplin, W. J.; Rodrigues, T. S.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; Matijevič, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Munari, U.; Bienaymé, O.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Kunder, A.; McMillan, P.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.; Mott, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a set of 87 RAVE stars with detected solar like oscillations, observed during Campaign 1 of the K2 mission (RAVE K2-C1 sample). This data set provides a useful benchmark for testing the gravities provided in RAVE data release 4 (DR4), and is key for the calibration of the RAVE data release 5 (DR5). The RAVE survey collected medium-resolution spectra (R = 7500) centred in the Ca II triplet(8600 Å) wavelength interval, which although being very useful for determining radial velocity and metallicity, even at low S/N, is known be affected by a log (g)-Teff degeneracy. This degeneracy is the cause of the large spread in the RAVE DR4 gravities for giants. The understanding of the trends and offsets that affects RAVE atmospheric parameters, and in particular log (g), is a crucial step in obtaining not only improved abundance measurements, but also improved distances and ages. In the present work, we use two different pipelines, GAUFRE and Sp_Ace, to determine atmospheric parameters and abundances by fixing log (g) to the seismic one. Our strategy ensures highly consistent values among all stellar parameters, leading to more accurate chemical abundances. A comparison of the chemical abundances obtained here with and without the use of seismic log (g) information has shown that an underestimated (overestimated) gravity leads to an underestimated (overestimated) elemental abundance (e.g. [Mg/H] is underestimated by 0.25 dex when the gravity is underestimated by 0.5 dex). We then perform a comparison between the seismic gravities and the spectroscopic gravities presented in the RAVE DR4 catalogue, extracting a calibration for log (g) of RAVE giants in the colour interval 0.50 < (J-KS) < 0.85. Finally, we show a comparison of the distances, temperatures, extinctions (and ages) derived here for our RAVE K2-C1 sample with those derived in RAVE DR4 and DR5. DR5 performs better than DR4 thanks to the seismic calibration, although discrepancies can still be important

  20. Guidelines of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies: an overview and quality appraisal using AGREE II

    PubMed Central

    Vande veegaete, Axel; Borra, Vere; De Buck, Emmy; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To appraise the quality of guidelines developed by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) between 2001 and 2015. Study design Cross-sectional. Methods 2 authors independently assessed the quality of IFRC guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument. Average domain scores were calculated and overall quality scores and recommendation for use were determined. Results Out of 77 identified guidelines, 27 met the inclusion criteria and were assessed. The domains with the highest average scores across guidelines were ‘scope and purpose’, ‘clarity of presentation’ and ‘applicability’. The lowest scoring domains were ‘rigour of development’ and ‘editorial independence’. No guideline can be ‘recommended for immediate use’, 23 guidelines are ‘recommended with modifications’ and 4 guidelines are ‘not recommended’. Conclusions The IFRC produces guidelines that should be adhered to by millions of staff and volunteers in 190 countries. These guidelines should therefore be of high quality. Up until now, the IFRC had no uniform guideline development process. The results of the AGREE II appraisal indicate that the quality of the guidelines needs to be improved. PMID:27678534

  1. Phylogenetic Diversity, Distribution, and Cophylogeny of Giant Bacteria (Epulopiscium) with their Surgeonfish Hosts in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Sou; Ngugi, David K; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Epulopiscium is a group of giant bacteria found in high abundance in intestinal tracts of herbivorous surgeonfish. Despite their peculiarly large cell size (can be up to 600 μm), extreme polyploidy (some with over 100,000 genome copies per cell) and viviparity (whereby mother cells produce live offspring), details about their diversity, distribution or their role in the host gut are lacking. Previous studies have highlighted the existence of morphologically distinct Epulopiscium cell types (defined as morphotypes A to J) in some surgeonfish genera, but the corresponding genetic diversity and distribution among other surgeonfishes remain mostly unknown. Therefore, we investigated the phylogenetic diversity of Epulopiscium, distribution and co-occurrence in multiple hosts. Here, we identified eleven new phylogenetic clades, six of which were also morphologically characterized. Three of these novel clades were phylogenetically and morphologically similar to cigar-shaped type A1 cells, found in a wide range of surgeonfishes including Acanthurus nigrofuscus, while three were similar to smaller, rod-shaped type E that has not been phylogenetically classified thus far. Our results also confirmed that biogeography appears to have relatively little influence on Epulopiscium diversity, as clades found in the Great Barrier Reef and Hawaii were also recovered from the Red Sea. Although multiple symbiont clades inhabited a given species of host surgeonfish and multiple host species possessed a given symbiont clade, statistical analysis of host and symbiont phylogenies indicated significant cophylogeny, which in turn suggests co-evolutionary relationships. A cluster analysis of Epulopiscium sequences from previously published amplicon sequencing dataset revealed a similar pattern, where specific clades were consistently found in high abundance amongst closely related surgeonfishes. Differences in abundance may indicate specialization of clades to certain gut environments

  2. Phylogenetic Diversity, Distribution, and Cophylogeny of Giant Bacteria (Epulopiscium) with their Surgeonfish Hosts in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Sou; Ngugi, David K.; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Epulopiscium is a group of giant bacteria found in high abundance in intestinal tracts of herbivorous surgeonfish. Despite their peculiarly large cell size (can be up to 600 μm), extreme polyploidy (some with over 100,000 genome copies per cell) and viviparity (whereby mother cells produce live offspring), details about their diversity, distribution or their role in the host gut are lacking. Previous studies have highlighted the existence of morphologically distinct Epulopiscium cell types (defined as morphotypes A to J) in some surgeonfish genera, but the corresponding genetic diversity and distribution among other surgeonfishes remain mostly unknown. Therefore, we investigated the phylogenetic diversity of Epulopiscium, distribution and co-occurrence in multiple hosts. Here, we identified eleven new phylogenetic clades, six of which were also morphologically characterized. Three of these novel clades were phylogenetically and morphologically similar to cigar-shaped type A1 cells, found in a wide range of surgeonfishes including Acanthurus nigrofuscus, while three were similar to smaller, rod-shaped type E that has not been phylogenetically classified thus far. Our results also confirmed that biogeography appears to have relatively little influence on Epulopiscium diversity, as clades found in the Great Barrier Reef and Hawaii were also recovered from the Red Sea. Although multiple symbiont clades inhabited a given species of host surgeonfish and multiple host species possessed a given symbiont clade, statistical analysis of host and symbiont phylogenies indicated significant cophylogeny, which in turn suggests co-evolutionary relationships. A cluster analysis of Epulopiscium sequences from previously published amplicon sequencing dataset revealed a similar pattern, where specific clades were consistently found in high abundance amongst closely related surgeonfishes. Differences in abundance may indicate specialization of clades to certain gut environments

  3. Insights into Planet Formation from Debris Disks. II. Giant Impacts in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Mark C.; Jackson, Alan P.

    2016-12-01

    Giant impacts refer to collisions between two objects each of which is massive enough to be considered at least a planetary embryo. The putative collision suffered by the proto-Earth that created the Moon is a prime example, though most Solar System bodies bear signatures of such collisions. Current planet formation models predict that an epoch of giant impacts may be inevitable, and observations of debris around other stars are providing mounting evidence that giant impacts feature in the evolution of many planetary systems. This chapter reviews giant impacts, focussing on what we can learn about planet formation by studying debris around other stars. Giant impact debris evolves through mutual collisions and dynamical interactions with planets. General aspects of this evolution are outlined, noting the importance of the collision-point geometry. The detectability of the debris is discussed using the example of the Moon-forming impact. Such debris could be detectable around another star up to 10 Myr post-impact, but model uncertainties could reduce detectability to a few 100 yr window. Nevertheless the 3 % of young stars with debris at levels expected during terrestrial planet formation provide valuable constraints on formation models; implications for super-Earth formation are also discussed. Variability recently observed in some bright disks promises to illuminate the evolution during the earliest phases when vapour condensates may be optically thick and acutely affected by the collision-point geometry. The outer reaches of planetary systems may also exhibit signatures of giant impacts, such as the clumpy debris structures seen around some stars.

  4. Defining the far-red limit of photosystem II in spinach.

    PubMed

    Thapper, Anders; Mamedov, Fikret; Mokvist, Fredrik; Hammarström, Leif; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2009-08-01

    The far-red limit of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry was studied in PSII-enriched membranes and PSII core preparations from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) after application of laser flashes between 730 and 820 nm. Light up to 800 nm was found to drive PSII activity in both acceptor side reduction and oxidation of the water-oxidizing CaMn(4) cluster. Far-red illumination induced enhancement of, and slowed down decay kinetics of, variable fluorescence. Both effects reflect reduction of the acceptor side of PSII. The effects on the donor side of PSII were monitored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Signals from the S(2)-, S(3)-, and S(0)-states could be detected after one, two, and three far-red flashes, respectively, indicating that PSII underwent conventional S-state transitions. Full PSII turnover was demonstrated by far-red flash-induced oxygen release, with oxygen appearing on the third flash. In addition, both the pheophytin anion and the Tyr Z radical were formed by far-red flashes. The efficiency of this far-red photochemistry in PSII decreases with increasing wavelength. The upper limit for detectable photochemistry in PSII on a single flash was determined to be 780 nm. In photoaccumulation experiments, photochemistry was detectable up to 800 nm. Implications for the energetics and energy levels of the charge separated states in PSII are discussed in light of the presented results.

  5. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  6. Post-main-sequence and POST red giant branch variables with pulsation periods less than one day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggen, Olin J.

    1994-06-01

    Post-main-sequence (mass 1 to 3 solar masses) and post-giant branch (0.5 to 1 solar mass) pulsators are discussed on the basis of four color and H beta light curves published elsewhere. The post-main-sequence variables, called ultrashort period cepheid (USPC) (delta Sct), pulsate in the fundamental and first harmonic modes of radial pulsation and, in many cases, in nonradial modes. The variables for which photometry allows accurate, luminosity estimates and are known to pulsate simultaneously in the fundamental and first harmonic or in the fundamental mode alone, define a PL relation (MV = -2.80 log P - 0.60, fundamental). It is notable that the slope of this relation is in the range of slopes found for classical cepheids. Accurate V photometry is lacking for many of the variables known as 'anomalous cepheids', but the available data divide them into low mass, pseudocepheids (BL Her and W Vir stars) and post-main-sequence USPC (delta Sct) variables. Four USPC in NGC 5053 and six in NGC 6466, for which accurate photometry is available, give remarkably consistent moduli of 16.06 +/- 0.05 and 15.98 +/- 0.08 mag, respectively, for the clusters, in which they are blue stragglers similar to SX Phe in Kapteyn's star group. The assumption that the four post-giant branch variables, called VSPC (RR Lyr), S Ari, SU Dra, and ST Leo in Kapteyn's star group and RR Lyr in the Groombridge 1830 group, are physical members of these groups and share their V-velocities, leads to a calibration of the photometry for the derivation of reddening, luminosity, and heavy element abundance of 45 field variables. The resulting reddenings are consistent with values obtained by other methods and the metallicities are consistent with the most accurately available spectroscopic determinations of delta S and of Ca II K. The luminosities of the bulk of the variables confirm Sandage's (1993) relation between MV and (Fe/H). Four or five of the field variables are probably binary, including BB Vir

  7. Brominated flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides in captive giant panda (ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) from China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Cheng; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Dai, Jia-Yin; Zhang, Xiu-Lan; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Guo, Wei; Xu, Mu-Qi; Mai, Bi-Xian; Weit, Fu-Wen

    2008-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were investigated in captive giant and red panda tissues from China. The total concentrations of OCPs, PCBs, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in tissues ranged from 16.3 to 888 ng/g lipid weight (lw), 24.8 to 854 ng/g lw, and 16.4 to 2158 ng/g lw, respectively. p,p'-DDE and beta-HCH were major OCP contaminants. PCBs 99, 118, 153/132, 170, 180, and 209 were the major contributing congeners determined. Among PBDEs, congener BDE-209 was the most frequent and abundant, followed by BDE-206, BDE-208, BDE-207, BDE-203, BDE-47, and BDE-153. Decabromodiphenyl ethane (DeBDethane) was detected in 87 and 71% of the giant and red panda samples with concentrations up to 863 ng/g lw, respectively. The remarkable levels and dominance of BDE-209 and DeBDethane may relate to significant production, usage, or disposal of BFRs in China. The positive significant correlation between concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in captive pandas may suggest that the exposure routes of PBDEs and PCBs to panda are similar. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the occurrence of DeBDethane in captive wildlife samples. Therefore, further studies are warranted to better understand DeBDethane production, transport, uptake, and toxicological effect.

  8. Increased genetic risk or protection for canine autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis in Giant Schnauzers depends on DLA class II genotype.

    PubMed

    Wilbe, M; Sundberg, K; Hansen, I R; Strandberg, E; Nachreiner, R F; Hedhammar, A; Kennedy, L J; Andersson, G; Björnerfeldt, S

    2010-06-01

    Dogs represent an excellent comparative model for autoimmune thyroiditis as several dog breeds develop canine lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT), which is clinically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in human. We obtained evidence that dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II genotype function as either genetic risk factor that predisposes for CLT or as protective factor against the disease. Genetic diversity at their DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 loci were defined and potential association to major histocompatibility complex II haplotypes and alleles was analyzed. Giant Schnauzers carrying the DLA-DRB1*01201/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00201 haplotype showed an increased risk (odds ratio of 6.5) for developing CLT. The same risk haplotype has, to date, been observed in three different breeds affected by this disease, Giant Schnauzer, Dobermann, and Labrador Retriever, indicating that it is a common genetic risk factor in a variety of breeds affected by this disease. Importantly, protection for development of the disease was found in dogs carrying the DLA-DRB1*01301/DQA1*00301/DQB1*00501 haplotype (odds ratio of 0.3).

  9. Ozonation of azo dyes (Orange II and Acid Red 27) in saline media.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alessandra C; Pic, Jean Stephane; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L; Dezotti, Marcia

    2009-09-30

    Ozonation of two azo dyes was investigated in a monitored bench scale bubble column reactor (8.5-L), varying liquid media salt content (0, 1, 40 and 100 g L(-1), NaCl). In experiments with Orange II pH was varied (5, 7.5 and 9) but ozonation of Acid Red 27 was performed at pH 7.5. Ozone self-decomposition rate-constant increased with salt concentration. Color removal was very effective and fast achieved under all experimental conditions. For the two azo dyes tested, more than 98% of color intensity was removed in 30-min ozonation assays. However, only partial mineralization of azo dyes (45%-Orange II; 20%-Acid Red 27) was attained in such experiments. The degree of mineralization (TOC removal) was negatively affected by salt concentration. Biodegradation assays conducted by respirometry revealed the inhibitory effect of dye degradation products formed during ozonation.

  10. Isotopic constraints on the origin of the Atlantis II, Suakin and Valdivia brines, Red Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1986-01-01

    The origin of three Red Sea submarine brine pools was investigated by analysis of the S and O isotope ratios of dissolved sulfate and Sr isotope ratios of dissolved Sr in the brines. Sulfur and O isotope ratios of sulfate and Sr isotope ratios of evaporitic source rocks for the brines were measured for comparison. The S, O and Sr isotope ratios of evaporites recovered from DSDP site 227 are consistent with an upper Miocene evaporites age. The Valdivia Deep brine formed by karstic dissolution of Miocene evaporites by overlying seawater and shows no signs of hydrothermal input. The Suakin Deep brines are derived from, or have isotopically exchanged with Miocene or older evaporites. There has been only minor dilution of the brine by overlying seawater. Strontium isotope ratios of Suakin brine may indicate addition of a minor (15%) amount of volcanic Sr to the brine, but there is no evidence of high temperature brine-rock interaction. The sulfate in the Atlantis II brine was apparently derived from seawater. The O isotope ratio of sulfate in the present Atlantis II brine could reflect isotopic exchange between seawater sulfate and the brine at approximately 255??C. Approximately 30% of the Sr in the Atlantis II brine is derived from the underlying basalt, probably by hydrothermal leaching. Atlantis II brine is the only known example from the Red Sea which has a significant high-temperature hydrothermal history. ?? 1986.

  11. 75 FR 8367 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; REDS-II-Does Pre-Donation Behavioral Deferral Increase the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: REDS-II Does Pre-Donation... ``layers of safety'' concept, increase the safety of the blood supply, studies with sufficiently...

  12. Stellar Evolution in NGC 6791: Mass Loss on the Red Giant Branch and the Formation of Low-Mass White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalirai, Jasonjot S.; Bergeron, P.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Reitzel, David B.; Rich, R. Michael; Richer, Harvey B.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first detailed study of the properties (temperatures, gravities, and masses) of the NGC 6791 white dwarf population. This unique stellar system is both one of the oldest (8 Gyr) and most metal-rich ([Fe/H]~+0.4) open clusters in our Galaxy and has a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) that exhibits both a red giant clump and a much hotter extreme horizontal branch. Fitting the Balmer lines of the white dwarfs in the cluster using Keck/LRIS spectra suggests that most of these stars are undermassive, =0.43+/-0.06 Msolar, and therefore could not have formed from canonical stellar evolution involving the helium flash at the tip of the red giant branch. We show that at least 40% of NGC 6791's evolved stars must have lost enough mass on the red giant branch to avoid the flash and therefore did not convert helium into carbon-oxygen in their core. Such increased mass loss in the evolution of the progenitors of these stars is consistent with the presence of the extreme horizontal branch in the CMD. This unique stellar evolutionary channel also naturally explains the recent finding of a very young age (2.4 Gyr) for NGC 6791 from white dwarf cooling theory; helium-core white dwarfs in this cluster will cool ~3 times slower than carbon-oxygen-core stars, and therefore the corrected white dwarf cooling age is in fact >~7 Gyr, consistent with the well-measured main-sequence turnoff age. These results provide direct empirical evidence that mass loss is much more efficient in high-metallicity environments and therefore may be critical in interpreting the ultraviolet upturn in elliptical galaxies. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Based on observations obtained at the

  13. Detection of the Epstein-Barr virus and DNA-topoisomerase II- α in recurrent and nonrecurrent giant cell lesion of the jawbones.

    PubMed

    Zyada, Manal M; Salama, Nagla M

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II-α correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs) as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II-α using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II-α in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs) and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs). Student t-test showed that mean Topo II-α labelling index (LI) in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (P = 0.0001). Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II-α LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II-α LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II-α LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  14. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope "Chemical Abundances Of Stars In The Halo" (CASH) Project. I. The Lithium-, r-, and s-enhanced Metal-poor Giant HK-II 17435-00532

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Frebel, A.; Shetrone, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Rhee, J.; Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Sneden, C.; Beers, T. C.; Cowan, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first detailed abundance analysis of the metal-poor giant HK-II 17435-00532. This star was observed as part of the University of Texas Long-Term "Chemical Abundances of Stars in the Halo" (CASH) Project. A spectrum was obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with a resolving power of R 15,000. Our analysis reveals that this star may be located on the red giant branch, red horizontal branch, or early asymptotic giant branch. We find that this metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-2.2) star has an unusually high lithium abundance (log ɛ (Li)=+2.1), mild carbon ([C/Fe]=+0.7) and sodium ([Na/Fe]=+0.6) enhancement, as well as enhancement of both s-process ([Ba/Fe]=+0.8) and r-process ([Eu/Fe]=+0.5) material. The high Li abundance can be explained by self-enrichment through extra mixing mechanisms that connect the convective envelope with the outer regions of the H-burning shell. If so, HK-II 17435-00532 is the most metal-poor star in which this short-lived phase of Li enrichment has been observed. The r- and s-process material was not produced in this star but was either present in the gas from which HK-II 17435-00532 formed or was transferred to it from a more massive binary companion. Despite the current non-detection of radial velocity variations (over a time span of 180 days), it is possible that HK-II 17435-00532 is in a long-period binary system, similar to other stars with both r and s enrichment. We acknowledge support from the W.J. McDonald Fellowship of McDonald Observatory (to A.F), NASA's AAS Small Research Grant Program and the GALEX GI grant 05-GALEX05-27 (to J.R.), the Italian MIUR-PRIN06 Project "Late phases of Stellar Evolution: Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae, AGB Stars, Planetary Nebulae" (to R.G.), and the U.S. National Science Foundation (grants AST06-07708 to C.S., AST04-06784, AST07-07776 and PHY02-15783 to T.C.B., and AST 07-07447 to J.J.C.).

  15. BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations in giant H II regions using strong and semistrong lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Morisset, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the Bayesian oxygen and nitrogen abundance determinations (BOND) method. BOND is a Bayesian code (available at: http://bond.ufsc.br) to simultaneously derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions. It compares observed emission lines to a grid of photoionization models without assuming any relation between O/H and N/O. Our grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Varying starburst ages accounts for variations in the ionizing radiation field hardness, which arise due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastic sampling of the initial mass function. All previous approaches assume a strict relation between the ionizing field and metallicity. The other novelty is extracting information on the nebular physics from semistrong emission lines. While strong lines ratios alone ([O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ and [N II]/Hβ) lead to multiple O/H solutions, the simultaneous use of [Ar III]/[Ne III] allows one to decide whether an H II region is of high or low metallicity. Adding He I/Hβ pins down the hardness of the radiation field. We apply our method to H II regions and blue compact dwarf galaxies, and find that the resulting N/O versus O/H relation is as scattered as the one obtained from the temperature-based method. As in previous strong-line methods calibrated on photoionization models, the BOND O/H values are generally higher than temperature-based ones, which might indicate the presence of temperature fluctuations or kappa distributions in real nebulae, or a too soft ionizing radiation field in the models.

  16. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF THE VIRGO GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4636. II. KINEMATICS OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Hong Soo; Hwang, Ho Seong; Arimoto, Nobuo; Tamura, Naoyuki; Onodera, Masato E-mail: hspark@astro.snu.ac.k E-mail: masato.onodera@cea.f E-mail: naoyuki@subaru.naoj.or

    2010-02-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system in the giant elliptical galaxy (gE) NGC 4636 in the Virgo cluster. Using the photometric and spectroscopic database of 238 GCs (108 blue GCs and 130 red GCs) at the galactocentric radius 0.'39 < R < 15.'43, we have investigated the kinematics of the GC system. The NGC 4636 GC system shows weak overall rotation, which is dominated by the red GCs. However, both the blue GCs and red GCs show some rotation in the inner region at R < 4.'3 (=2.9R{sub eff} = 18.5 kpc). The velocity dispersion for all the GCs is derived to be sigma{sub p} = 225{sup +12}{sub -9} km s{sup -1}. The velocity dispersion for the blue GCs (sigma{sub p} = 251{sup +18}{sub -12} km s{sup -1}) is slightly larger than that for the red GCs (sigma{sub p} = 205{sup +11}{sub -13} km s{sup -1}). The velocity dispersions for the blue GCs about the mean velocity and about the best-fit rotation curve have a significant variation depending on the galactocentric radius. Comparison of observed stellar and GC velocity dispersion profiles (VDPs) with the VDPs calculated from the stellar mass profile shows that the mass-to-light ratio should increase as the galactocentric distance increases, indicating the existence of an extended dark matter halo. From the comparison of the observed GC VDPs and the VDPs calculated for the X-ray mass profiles in the literature, we find that the orbit of the GC system is tangential, and that the orbit of the red GCs is slightly more tangential than that of the blue GCs. We compare the GC kinematics of NGC 4636 with those of other six gEs, finding that the kinematic properties of the GCs are diverse among gEs. We find several correlations between the kinematics of the GCs and the global parameters of their host galaxies. We discuss the implication of the results for the formation models of the GC system in gEs, and suggest a mixture scenario for the origin of the GCs in gEs.

  17. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  18. The Mg II h and k interstellar lines in the spectrum of the G-type giant HD 156854

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurzadian, G. A.; Cholakian, V. G.; Kondo, Y.; Shore, Steven N.; Terzian, Yervant

    1990-01-01

    The results of the measurements and analysis of the IUE observations of the 2800 Mg II doublet in the spectrum of HD 156854, a G9 III star, are presented. The relative power of the magnesium chromosphere, R(Mg) = 0.00001, is in agreement with the known data for giants of the same class. The emission profiles of this doublet present absorption cores, which are of interstellar origin. Taking into account the interstellar depletion of Mg, the derived density of interstellar hydrogen is n(H) = 0.001/cu cm, which agrees with the conclusion (Paresce 1984) about the possibility of large hydrogen concentrations in some directions of the Galaxy far from the sun.

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE SYMBIOTIC NOVA PU VUL-OUTBURSTING WHITE DWARF, NEBULAE, AND PULSATING RED GIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Hachisu, Izumi

    2012-05-01

    We present a composite light-curve model of the symbiotic nova PU Vul (Nova Vulpeculae 1979) that shows a long-lasting flat optical peak followed by a slow decline. Our model light curve consists of three components of emission, i.e., an outbursting white dwarf (WD), its M-giant companion, and the nebulae. The WD component dominates in the flat peak while the nebulae dominate after the photospheric temperature of the WD rises to log T (K) {approx}> 4.5, suggesting its WD origin. We analyze the 1980 and 1994 eclipses to be total eclipses of the WD occulted by the pulsating M-giant companion with two sources of the nebular emission; one is an unocculted nebula of the M-giant's cool-wind origin and the other is a partially occulted nebula associated to the WD. We confirmed our theoretical outburst model of PU Vul by new observational estimates, which spanned 32 yr, of the temperature and radius. Also our eclipse analysis confirmed that the WD photosphere decreased by two orders of magnitude between the 1980 and 1994 eclipses. We obtain the reddening E(B - V) {approx} 0.3 and distance to PU Vul d {approx} 4.7 kpc. We interpret the recent recovery of brightness in terms of eclipse of the hot nebula surrounding the WD, suggesting that hydrogen burning is ongoing. To detect supersoft X-rays, we recommend X-ray observations around 2014 June when absorption by neutral hydrogen is minimum.

  20. A histological study of ovarian development in the giant red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Crustacea: Decapoda: Aristeidae) from the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Perdichizzi, Anna; Pirrera, Laura; Micale, Valeria; Muglia, Ugo; Rinelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive features of the giant red shrimp, Aristaeomorpha foliacea, were investigated in the southern Tyrrhenian sea by experimental trawl sampling. The annual length-frequency distribution showed a multimodal trend in females, ranging between 16 and 67 mm carapace length (CL), and a unimodal trend in males (18-45 mm CL). Mature males occurred in different proportions all year round, while females displayed seasonal maturity (June-September), with a peak in July. Six oocyte developmental stages were identified, the most advanced of which (Pv, postvitellogenic) had never been described before in this species. Ovary development followed a group-synchronous pattern, with the yolked oocyte stock clearly separated from the reservoir of unyolked oocytes, suggesting that A. foliacea is a total spawner, with determinate fecundity. Based upon histological findings, a revision of macroscopic maturity staging employed in Mediterranean bottom trawl surveys (MEDITS) is proposed.

  1. Toward long-term all-sky time domain surveys-SINDICS: a prospective concept for a Seismic INDICes Survey of half a million red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Eric; Haywood, Misha; Mosser, Benoit; García, Rafael A.; Babusiaux, Carine; Ballot, Jérôme; Samadi, Reza; Katz, David; Belkacem, Kevin; Bernardi, Pernelle; Buey, Tristan

    2015-09-01

    CoRoT and Kepler have brought a new and deep experience in long-term photometric surveys and how to use them. This is true for exoplanets characterizing, stellar seismology and beyond for studying several other phenomena, like granulation or activity. Based on this experience, it has been possible to propose new generation projects, like TESS and PLATO, with more specific scientific objectives and more ambitious observational programs in terms of sky coverage and/or duration of the observations. In this context and as a prospective exercise, we explore here the possibility to set up an all-sky survey optimized for seismic indices measurement, providing masses, radii and evolution stages for half a million solar-type pulsators (subgiants and red giants), in our galactic neighborhood and allowing unprecedented stellar population studies.

  2. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. II. Super Li-rich giant HD 107028

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamów, M.; Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Kowalik, K.; Nowak, G.; Adamczyk, M.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Lithium-rich giant stars are rare objects. For some of them, Li enrichment exceeds the abundance of this element found in solar system meteorites, suggesting that these stars have gone through a Li enhancement process. Aims: We identified a Li-rich giant HD 107028 with A(Li) > 3.3 in a sample of evolved stars observed within the PennState Toruń Planet Search. In this work we study different enhancement scenarios and we try to identify the one responsible for Li enrichment in HD 107028. Methods: We collected high-resolution spectra with three different instruments, covering different spectral ranges. We determined stellar parameters and abundances of selected elements with both equivalent width measurements and analysis, and spectral synthesis. We also collected multi-epoch high-precision radial velocities in an attempt to detect a companion. Results: Collected data show that HD 107028 is a star at the base of the red giant branch (RGB). Except for high Li abundance, we have not identified any other anomalies in its chemical composition, and there is no indication of a low-mass or stellar companion. We exclude Li production at the luminosity function bump on the RGB as the effective temperature and luminosity suggest that the evolutionary state is much earlier than the RGB bump. We also cannot confirm the Li enhancement by contamination as we do not observe any anomalies that are associated with this scenario. Conclusions: After evaluating various scenarios of Li enhancement we conclude that the Li-overabundance of HD 107028 originates from main-sequence evolution, and may be caused by diffusion processes. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on

  3. Characteristics of lead(II) adsorption onto "Natural Red Earth" in simulated environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahatantila, K.; Vithanage, M. S.; Seike, Y.; Okumura, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lead is considered as a non-biodegradable and potentially toxic heavy metal and it is found as a common environmental pollutant. Adsorption characteristics of Pb(II) onto natural iron and aluminum coated sand, which is called Natural Red Earth (NRE), have been studied to ascertain the effect of pH, ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature and time. Lead(II) adsorption achieved its maximum adsorption of nearly 100% at neutral to slightly acidic conditions. The optimum pH was nearly 5.5 and 6.5 for 2.41 and 24.1 μmol/L initial Pb(II) concentrations, respectively. Lead(II) adsorption was independent of 100 fold variation of ionic strength (0.001 - 0.1), indirectly evidencing dominance of an inner-sphere surface complexation mechanism for 10 fold variation of initial Pb(II) concentrations (2.41 and 24.1 μmol/L). Adsorption edges were quantified with a 2pK generalized diffuse double layer model considering two site types, >FeOH and >AlOH, for Pb(II) binding. The modeling results better fit with the mixture of monodentate and bidentated binding of Pb(II) onto >FeOH site and bidentate binding of Pb(II) onto >AlOH site. The intrinsic constants obtained were log KFeOPb=13.93, log K(FeO)2Pb=11.88 and log K(AlO)2Pb=13.21. Time required to reach the equilibrium was also increase from 15 min to 1hr with increasing Pb(II) concentrations from 2.41 to 24.1 μmol/L. Kinetic data fitted better to pseudo second order kinetic model. Lead(II) adsorption onto NRE was better explained by Two-site Langmuir isotherm with sorption maximum of 1.39x10-2 and 2.30x10-3 mol/kg for two sites with different affinities. Negative Gibbs free energy values indicated spontaneity of Pb(II) adsorption onto NRE, and entropy and enthalpy of adsorption were 124.04 J/K mol and 17.71 KJ/mol, respectively. These results suggested that the NRE could be effectively used as a low cost candidate for removal of Pb(II) from environmental water, since use of low cost materials to treat

  4. Abundances in Stars from the Red Giant Branch Tip to Near the Main-Sequence Turnoff in M71. III. Abundance Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Solange V.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2002-06-01

    We present abundance ratios for 23 elements with respect to Fe in a sample of stars with a wide range in luminosity, from luminous giants to stars near the turnoff in a globular cluster. Our sample of 25 stars in M71 includes 10 giant stars more luminous than the red horizontal branch (RHB), three HB stars, nine giant stars less luminous than the RHB, and three stars near the turnoff. The analyzed spectra, obtained with HIRES at the Keck Observatory, are of high dispersion (R=λ/Δλ=35,000). We find that the neutron capture, the iron peak, and the α-element abundance ratios show no trend with Teff and low scatter around the mean between the top of the RGB and near the main-sequence turnoff. The α-elements Mg, Ca, Si, and Ti are overabundant relative to Fe. The anticorrelation between O and Na abundances observed in other metal-poor globular clusters is detected in our sample and extends to the main sequence. A statistically significant correlation between Al and Na abundances is observed among the M71 stars in our sample, extending to MV=+1.8, fainter than the luminosity of the RGB bump in M5. Lithium is varying, as expected, and Zr may be varying from star to star as well. M71 appears to have abundance ratios very similar to M5, whose bright giants were studied by Ivans et al., but seems to have a smaller amplitude of star-to-star variations at a given luminosity, as might be expected from its higher metallicity. Neither extremely O-poor, Na-rich stars nor extremely O-rich, Na-poor, stars such as are observed in M5 and in M13, are present in our sample of M71 stars. The results of our abundance analysis of 25 stars in M71 provide sufficient evidence of abundance variations at unexpectedly low luminosities to rule out the mixing scenario. Either alone or, even more powerfully, combined with other recent studies of C and N abundances in M71 stars, the existence of such abundance variations cannot be reproduced within the context of our current understanding of

  5. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. V. Oxygen abundance in the metal-poor giant HD 122563 from OH UV lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Kučinskas, A.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Klevas, J.; Steffen, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Spite, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of the early Galactic evolution, its abundance trends with metallicity are still relatively poorly known at [Fe/H] ≲ -2.5. This is in part due to a lack of reliable oxygen abundance indicators in the metal-poor stars, and in part due to shortcomings in 1D LTE abundance analyses where different abundance indicators, such as OH lines located in the UV and IR or the forbidden [O I] line at 630 nm, frequently provide inconsistent results. Aims: In this study, we determined the oxygen abundance in the metal-poor halo giant HD 122563 using a 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmosphere. Our main goal was to understand whether a 3D LTE analysis can help to improve the reliability of oxygen abundances that are determined from OH UV lines in comparison to those obtained using standard 1D LTE methodology. Methods: The oxygen abundance in HD 122563 was determined using 71 OH UV lines located in the wavelength range between 308-330 nm. The analysis was performed using a high-resolution VLT UVES spectrum with a 1D LTE spectral line synthesis performed using the SYNTHE package and classical ATLAS9 model atmosphere. Subsequently, a 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres were used to compute 3D-1D abundance corrections. For this, the microturbulence velocity used with the 1D LHD model atmosphere was derived from the hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmosphere of HD 122563. The obtained abundance corrections were then applied to determine 3D LTE oxygen abundances from each individual OH UV line. Results: As in previous studies, we found trends in the 1D LTE oxygen abundances determined from OH UV lines with line parameters, such as the line excitation potential, χ, and the line equivalent width, W. These trends become significantly less pronounced in 3D LTE. Using OH UV lines, we determined a 3D LTE oxygen abundance in HD 122563 of A(O)3D LTE = 6.23 ± 0.13 ([O/Fe] = 0.07 ± 0.13). This is in fair agreement

  6. Reprocessing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of spectroscopic binaries. II. Systems with a giant component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.

    2003-02-01

    By reanalyzing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of a large sample of spectroscopic binaries containing a giant, we obtain a sample of 29 systems fulfilling a carefully derived set of constraints and hence for which we can derive an accurate orbital solution. Of these, one is a double-lined spectroscopic binary and six were not listed in the DMSA/O section of the catalogue. Using our solutions, we derive the masses of the components in these systems and statistically analyze them. We also briefly discuss each system individually. Based on observations from the Hipparcos astrometric satellite operated by the European Space Agency (ESA 1997) and on data collected with the Simbad database.

  7. Insight into glucosidase II from the red marine microalga Porphyridium sp. (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Levy-Ontman, Oshrat; Fisher, Merav; Shotland, Yoram; Tekoah, Yoram; Malis Arad, Shoshana

    2015-12-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most important post-translational modifications that occur in various organisms, and is of utmost importance for protein function, stability, secretion, and loca-lization. Although the N-linked glycosylation pathway of proteins has been extensively characterized in mammals and plants, not much information is available regarding the N-glycosylation pathway in algae. We studied the α 1,3-glucosidase glucosidase II (GANAB) glycoenzyme in a red marine microalga Porphyridium sp. (Rhodophyta) using bioinformatic and biochemical approaches. The GANAB-gene was found to be highly conserved evolutionarily (compo-sed of all the common features of α and β subunits) and to exhibit similar motifs consistent with that of homolog eukaryotes GANAB genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed its wide distribution across an evolutionarily vast range of organisms; while the α subunit is highly conserved and its phylogenic tree is similar to the taxon evolutionary tree, the β subunit is less conserved and its pattern somewhat differs from the taxon tree. In addition, the activity of the red microalgal GANAB enzyme was studied, including functional and biochemical characterization using a bioassay, indicating that the enzyme is similar to other eukaryotes ortholog GANAB enzymes. A correlation between polysaccharide production and GANAB activity, indicating its involvement in polysaccharide biosynthesis, is also demonstrated. This study represents a valuable contribution toward understanding the N-glycosylation and polysaccharide biosynthesis pathways in red microalgae.

  8. The Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distances to Type Ia Supernova Host Galaxies. IV. Color Dependence and Zero-point Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-01-01

    We present a revised Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) calibration, accurate to 2.7% of distance. A modified TRGB magnitude corrected for its color dependence, the QT magnitude, is introduced for better measurement of the TRGB. We determine the color–magnitude relation of the TRGB from photometry of deep images of HST/ACS fields around eight nearby galaxies. The zero-point of the TRGB at the fiducial metallicity ([Fe/H] = ‑1.6 ({(V-I)}0,{TRGB}=1.5)) is obtained from photometry of two distance anchors, NGC 4258 (M106) and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), to which precise geometric distances are known: MQT,TRGB = ‑4.023 ± 0.073 mag from NGC 4258 and MQT,TRGB = ‑4.004 ± 0.096 mag from the LMC. A weighted mean of the two zero-points is MQT,TRGB = ‑4.016 ± 0.058 mag. Quoted uncertainty is ∼2× smaller than those of previous calibrations. We compare the empirical TRGB calibration derived in this study with theoretical stellar models, finding that there are significant discrepancies, especially for red color ({({{F}}606{{W}}-{{F}}814{{W}})}0≳ 2.5). We provide the revised TRGB calibration in several magnitude systems for future studies.

  9. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION AT THE PERIPHERY OF THE EVOLVED GIANT H II REGION W 39

    SciTech Connect

    Kerton, C. R.; Arvidsson, K.; Alexander, M. J. E-mail: karvidsson@adlerplanetarium.org

    2013-03-15

    We present the first detailed study of the large, {approx}30 pc diameter, inner-Galaxy H II region W 39. Radio recombination line observations combined with H I absorption spectra and Galactic rotation models show that the region lies at V{sub LSR} = +65.4 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to a near kinematic distance of 4.5 {+-} 0.2 kpc. Analysis of radio continuum emission shows that the H II region is being powered by a cluster of OB stars with a combined hydrogen-ionizing luminosity of log (Q) {>=} 50, and that there are three compact H II regions located on the periphery of W 39, each with log (Q) {approx} 48.5 (single O7-O9 V star equivalent). In the infrared, W 39 has a hierarchical bubble morphology, and is a likely site of sequential star formation involving massive stars. Kinematic models of the expansion of W 39 yield timescales of the order of Myr, consistent with a scenario where the formation of the smaller H II regions has been triggered by the expansion of W 39. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL data, we show that star formation activity is not distributed uniformly around the periphery of W 39 but is concentrated in two areas that include the compact H II regions as well as a number of intermediate-mass Class I and Class II young stellar objects.

  10. A SUCCESSFUL BROADBAND SURVEY FOR GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULAE. II. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Ly{alpha} nebulae (or Ly{alpha} {sup b}lobs{sup )} at 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 within 8.5 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} h {sup -3} {sub 70} Mpc{sup 3}. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Ly{alpha} nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Ly{alpha} emission at 1.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Ly{alpha} nebulae span a range of Ly{alpha} equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Ly{alpha} nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Ly{alpha} nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.

  11. A Successful Broadband Survey for Giant Lyα Nebulae. II. Spectroscopic Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Lyα nebulae (or Lyα "blobs") at 2 <~ z <~ 3 within 8.5 deg2 of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Boötes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of ≈108 h -3 70 Mpc3. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Lyα nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Lyα emission at 1.7 <~ z <~ 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Lyα nebulae span a range of Lyα equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Lyα nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 <~ z <~ 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Lyα nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.

  12. A Tale of Giants and Dwarfs: How the Red Sequence in Clusters Grew Over The Last 9.5 Gyr.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Gregory; Tran, K.; Papovich, C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how star formation was turned off in galaxies over time and how these passive galaxies then evolve is a major focus of galaxy evolution studies. Equally important is uncovering what role environmental processes play. Here we discuss the evolution of the red sequence in galaxy clusters over the past 9.5 Gyr of cosmic time, as revealed by deep YJK imaging with HAWK-I/VLT of a confirmed massive cluster at z=1.62. We use these data to measure the luminosity function (LF) of red sequence galaxies and chart the growth of the passive sequence. We compare the shape of the LF and the total light on the red sequence in the z=1.62 cluster with clusters at 0.4red galaxies in the z=1.62 cluster when compared to likely descendant clusters at lower redshift. After correcting for the evolving mass to light ratio, we find that the total amount of stellar mass on the red sequence increases rapidly from z=1.62 to z=0.7 and then increases more slowly to z=0. We will discuss scenarios for how the rapid growth in the total light over a period of 3.2 Gyr can be reconciled with the lack of evolution in the shape of the luminosity function. One possibility is that galaxies are added to the red sequence, but that other processes, e.g. dry merging, must be at play to explain the lack of evolution in the LF shape and to populate the bright end. At z<0.7 the amount of merging in the deep cluster potential well decreases and the LF shape begins to rapidly evolve.

  13. Phosphorescent Platinum(II) and Palladium(II) Complexes with Azatetrabenzoporphyrins—New Red Laser Diode-Compatible Indicators for Optical Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new class of oxygen indicators is described. Platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of azatetrabenzoporphyrins occupy an intermediate position between tetrabenzoporphyrins and phthalocyanines and combine features of both. The new dyes are excitable in the red part of the spectrum and possess strong room-temperature NIR phosphorescence. Other features include excellent spectral compatibility with the red laser diodes and 632.8 nm line of He−Ne laser, excellent photostability, and significantly shorter decay times than for the respective meso-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrins. Applicability of the complexes for optical oxygen sensing is demonstrated. PMID:20186289

  14. Giant molecular filaments in the Milky Way. II. The fourth Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu-Vicente, J.; Ragan, S.; Kainulainen, J.; Henning, Th.; Beuther, H.; Johnston, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Filamentary structures are common morphological features of the cold, molecular interstellar medium (ISM). Recent studies have discovered massive, hundred-parsec-scale filaments that may be connected to the large-scale, Galactic spiral arm structure. Addressing the nature of these giant molecular filaments (GMFs) requires a census of their occurrence and properties. Aims: We perform a systematic search of GMFs in the fourth Galactic quadrant and determine their basic physical properties. Methods: We identify GMFs based on their dust extinction signatures in the near- and mid-infrared and the velocity structure probed by 13CO line emission. We use the 13CO line emission and ATLASGAL dust emission data to estimate the total and dense gas masses of the GMFs. We combine our sample with an earlier sample from literature and study the Galactic environment of the GMFs. Results: We identify nine GMFs in the fourth Galactic quadrant: six in the Centaurus spiral arm and three in inter-arm regions. Combining this sample with an earlier study using the same identification criteria in the first Galactic quadrant results in 16 GMFs, nine of which are located within spiral arms. The GMFs have sizes of 80-160 pc and 13CO-derived masses between 5-90 × 104M⊙. Their dense gas mass fractions are between 1.5-37%, which is higher in the GMFs connected to spiral arms. We also compare the different GMF-identification methods and find that emission and extinction-based techniques overlap only partially, thereby highlighting the need to use both to achieve a complete census. Table A.2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A131

  15. Isotopic studies of epigenetic features in metalliferous sediment, Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, Robert A.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1988-01-01

    The unique depositional environment of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea produces a stratiform metalliferous deposit of greater areal extent than deposits formed by buoyant-plume systems typical of the midocean ridges because of much more efficient metal entrapment. Isotopic analyses of strontium, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen from the metalliferous sediments indicate that three major sources contribute dissolved components to the hydrothermal system: seawater, Miocene evaporites, and rift-zone basalt. An areally restricted magnetite-hematite-pyroxene assemblage formed at high temperatures, possibly in response to hydrothermal convection initiated by intrusion of basalt into the metalliferous sediment. A correlation between smectite Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios and oxygen isotope temperatures suggests that smectite is a potentially important chemical geothermometer, and confirms geochemical calculations indicating that Mg-rich smectite is more stable than Fe-rich smectite at elevated temperatures.

  16. The Wolf-Rayet star population in the most massive giant H II regions of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band images of NGC 604, NGC 595, and NGC 592, the most massive giant H II regions (GHRs) in M33 have been obtained, in order to study their Wolf-Rayet content. These images reveal the presence of nine candidates in NGC 604 (seven WN, two WC), 10 in NGC 595 (nine WN, one WC), and two in NGC 592 (two WN). Precise positions and estimated magnitudes are given for the candidates, half of which have so far been confirmed spectroscopically as genuine W-R stars. The flux in the emission lines of all candidates is comparable to that of normal Galactic W-R stars of similar subtype. A few of the putative superluminous W-R stars are shown to be close visual double or multiple stars; their newly estimated luminosities are now more compatible with those of normal W-R stars. NGC 595 seems to be overabundant in W-R stars for its mass compared to other GHRs, while NGC 604 is normal. Factors influencing the W-R/O number ratio in GHRs are discussed: metallicity and age appear to be the most important.

  17. Laboratory variables for assessing iron deficiency in REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Wright, David J.; Mast, Alan E.; Carey, Patricia M.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Simon, Toby L.; Cable, Ritchard G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Iron deficiency is common in regular blood donors. We evaluated the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) hematology analyzer indices to assess iron status as a part of donor management. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1659 male and female donors from the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II) Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study who were either first-time/reactivated (FT/ RA; no donations for 2 years) or frequent donors were recruited into a longitudinal study of regular donation of RBCs. Of these, 1002 donors returned 15 to 24 months later for a final assessment. Absent iron stores (AIS) was defined as plasma ferritin level of less than 12 µ.g/L. Logarithm of the ratio of soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin of at least 2.07 (≥97.5% in FT/RA males) was used to define iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to assess selected RBC indices (e.g., percentage of hypochromic mature RBCs, proportion of hypochromic mature RBCs [HYPOm], and hemoglobin [Hb] content of reticulocytes [CHr]) in identifying AIS and IDE. RESULTS HYPOm and CHr detected IDE with comparable sensitivity, 72% versus 69%, but differed in specificity: HYPOm 68% and CHr 53%. For detecting AIS, sensitivity was improved to 85% for HYPOm and 81% for CHr but specificity was reduced for both. Venous Hb had high specificity but poor sensitivity for IDE and AIS. A plasma ferritin level of less than 26.7 u.g/L was a good surrogate for assessing IDE. CONCLUSION RBC indices correlate with AIS and IDE and are more informative than Hb measurement, but lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be used as diagnostic tools in blood donors at risk for iron deficiency. PMID:23617531

  18. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga.

    PubMed

    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-03-11

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionary relationships. Here we report the structure of PSII from a red alga Cyanidium caldarium at 2.76 Å resolution, which revealed the structure and interaction sites of PsbQ', a unique, fourth extrinsic protein required for stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex in the lumenal surface of PSII. The PsbQ' subunit was found to be located underneath CP43 in the vicinity of PsbV, and its structure is characterized by a bundle of four up-down helices arranged in a similar way to those of cyanobacterial and higher plant PsbQ, although helices I and II of PsbQ' were kinked relative to its higher plant counterpart because of its interactions with CP43. Furthermore, two novel transmembrane helices were found in the red algal PSII that are not present in cyanobacterial PSII; one of these helices may correspond to PsbW found only in eukaryotic PSII. The present results represent the first crystal structure of PSII from eukaryotic oxygenic organisms, which were discussed in comparison with the structure of cyanobacterial PSII.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Seismology and spectroscopy of CoRoGEE red giants (Anders+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, F.; Chiappini, C.; Rodrigues, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Montalban, J.; Mosser, B.; Girardi, L.; Valentini, M.; Noels, A.; Morel, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Schultheis, M.; Baudin, F.; de Assis Peralta, R.; Hekker, S.; Themessl, N.; Kallinger, T.; Garcia, R. A.; Mathur, S.; Baglin, A.; Santiago, B. X.; Martig, M.; Minchev, I.; Steinmetz, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Cunha, K.; Beers, T. C.; Epstein, C.; Garcia Perez, A. E.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Majewski, S. R.; Meszaros, Sz.; Nidever, D.; Pan, K.; Pinsonneault, M.; Schiavon, R. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Stassun, K.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, G.

    2016-08-01

    For the 606 successfully observed stars, asteroseismic parameters from CoRoT, spectroscopic data from APOGEE (SDSS DR12), wide-band photometry from OBSCAT, APASS, SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE are presented. Additional information from the EXODAT archive, stellar parameters from PARAM (Rodrigues et al. 2014MNRAS.445.2758R), cross-matches to the APOGEE red-clump catalogue (Bovy et al. 2014ApJ...790..127B), the UCAC-4 catalogue (Zacharias et al., 2013, Cat. I/322), and derived stellar kinematics are also included. (2 data files).

  20. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3

    SciTech Connect

    Navarete, F.; Figueredo, E.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Blum, R. D.; Conti, P. S.

    2011-09-15

    Spectrophotometric distances in the K band have been reported by different authors for a number of obscured Galactic H II regions. Almost 50% of them show large discrepancies compared to the classical method using radial velocities measured in the radio spectral region. In order to provide a crucial test of both methods, we selected a target that does not present particular difficulty for any method and which has been measured by as many techniques as possible. The W3 star-forming complex, located in the Perseus arm, offers a splendid opportunity for such a task. We used the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North telescope to classify candidate 'naked photosphere' OB stars based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Two of the targets are revealed to be mid-O-type main-sequence stars leading to a distance of d = 2.20 kpc. This is in excellent agreement with the spectrophotometric distance derived in the optical band (d = 2.18 pc) and with a measurement of the W3 trigonometric parallax (d = 1.95 kpc). Such results confirm that the spectrophotometric distances in the K band are reliable. The radio-derived kinematic distance, on the contrary, gives a distance twice as large (d = 4.2 kpc). This indicates that this region of the Perseus arm does not follow the Galactic rotation curve, and this may also be the case for other H II regions for which discrepancies have been found.

  1. Mass loss from red giants: its development, dust properties, and dependence on the stellar parameters mass, luminosity and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Peter; Blommaert, Joris; Cioni, Maria-Rosa; Feast, Michael; Groenewegen, Martin; Habing, Harm; Hony, Sacha; Loup, Cecile; Matsuura, Mikako; Omont, Alain; Waters, Rens; Whitelock, Patricia; Zijlstra, Albert; van Loon, Jacco

    2004-09-01

    We wish to obtain low resolution IRS spectra of highly evolved, low and intermediate mass stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Our sample of stars consists of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in both the general field of the Clouds and in clusters, and it complements the GTO samples of Houck and Kemper. The stars range from lower luminosity stars with small mass loss rates in the two clusters NGC419 and NGC1978 to dust-enshrouded stars in the "superwind" phase. The stars have been studied from the ground (mostly by members of this team) in order to determine spectral types, pulsation periods and amplitudes, and optical and near-infrared fluxes. Our aim is to use the IRS spectra to empirically determine the dependence of mass loss rate on stellar mass, luminosity, pulsation period and amplitude, and metallicity. We will also examine the dust properties as a function of mass loss rate, luminosity and photospheric chemical type. The AGB mass loss law resulting from this study will allow accurate AGB stellar evolution calculations to be made, meaning that reliable estimates can be made of the total mass loss from an AGB star, the stellar remnant mass, and the amounts of nucleosynthetic products ejected. Since the rate of mass return to, and enrichment of, the interstellar medium by low and intermediate mass stars depends critically on the mass loss rate and surface enrichment during the AGB phase, an accurate mass loss law will greatly enhance the reliability of galactic enrichment models. Our total request is for 31.4 hours.

  2. Toward shrimp consumption without chemicals: Combined effects of freezing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on some quality characteristics of Giant Red Shrimp (Aristaeomorpha foliacea) during storage.

    PubMed

    Bono, Gioacchino; Okpala, Charles Odilichukwu R; Alberio, Giuseppina R A; Messina, Concetta M; Santulli, Andrea; Giacalone, Gabriele; Spagna, Giovanni

    2016-04-15

    The combined effects of freezing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) (100% N2 and 50% N2+50% CO2) on some quality characteristics of Giant Red Shrimp (GRS) (Aristaeomorpha foliacea) was studied during 12-month storage. In particular, the quality characteristics determined proximal and gas compositions, melanosis scores, pH, total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as well as free amino acid (FAA). In addition, the emergent data were compared to those subject to vacuum packaging as well as conventional preservative method of sulphite treatment (SUL). Most determined qualities exhibited quantitative differences with storage. By comparisons, while pH and TVB-N statistically varied between treatments (P<0.05) and TBA that ranged between ∼0.15 and 0.30 mg MDA/kg appeared least at end of storage for 100% N2 treated-group, the latter having decreased melanosis scores showed such treatments with high promise to keep the colour of GRS sample hence, potential replacement for SUL group. By comparisons also, while some individual FAA values showed increases especially at the 100% N2-treated group, the total FAAs statistically differed with storage (P<0.05). The combination of freezing and MAP treatments as preservative treatment method shows high promise to influence some quality characteristics of GRS samples of this study.

  3. TWO DISTINCT RED GIANT BRANCH POPULATIONS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 2419 AS TRACERS OF A MERGER EVENT IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Wook; Han, Sang-Il; Joo, Seok-Joo; Jang, Sohee; Na, Chongsam; Lim, Dongwook; Kim, Hak-Sub; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Okamoto, Sakurako; Arimoto, Nobuo

    2013-11-20

    Recent spectroscopic observations of the outer halo globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419 show that it is unique among GCs, in terms of chemical abundance patterns, and some suggest that it was originated in the nucleus of a dwarf galaxy. Here we show, from the Subaru narrowband photometry employing a calcium filter, that the red giant branch (RGB) of this GC is split into two distinct subpopulations. Comparison with spectroscopy has confirmed that the redder RGB stars in the hk[=(Ca–b) – (b – y)] index are enhanced in [Ca/H] by ∼0.2 dex compared to the bluer RGB stars. Our population model further indicates that the calcium-rich second generation stars are also enhanced in helium abundance by a large amount (ΔY = 0.19). Our photometry, together with the results for other massive GCs (e.g., ω Cen, M22, and NGC 1851), suggests that the discrete distribution of RGB stars in the hk index might be a universal characteristic of this growing group of peculiar GCs. The planned narrowband calcium photometry for the Local Group dwarf galaxies would help to establish an empirical connection between these GCs and the primordial building blocks in the hierarchical merging paradigm of galaxy formation.

  4. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of the Properties of Dust from Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Speck, A.; Volk, K.; Kemper, C.; Reach, W. T.; Lagadec, E.; Bernard, J.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  5. ALMA Reveals Strong [C II] Emission in a Galaxy Embedded in a Giant Lyα Blob at z = 3.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, Hideki; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Smail, Ian; Ivison, R. J.; Steidel, Charles C.; Chapman, Scott C.; Geach, James E.; Hayes, Matthew; Nagao, Tohru; Ao, Yiping; Kawabe, Ryohei; Yun, Min S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kubo, Mariko; Kato, Yuta; Saito, Tomoki; Ikarashi, Soh; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Lee, Minju; Izumi, Takuma; Mori, Masao; Ouchi, Masami

    2017-01-01

    We report the result from observations conducted with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to detect [C ii] 158 μm fine structure line emission from galaxies embedded in one of the most spectacular Lyα blobs (LABs) at z = 3.1, SSA22-LAB1. Of three dusty star-forming galaxies previously discovered by ALMA 860 μm dust continuum survey toward SSA22-LAB1, we detected the [C ii] line from one, LAB1-ALMA3 at z = 3.0993 ± 0.0004. No line emission was detected, associated with the other ALMA continuum sources or from three rest-frame UV/optical selected zspec ≃ 3.1 galaxies within the field of view. For LAB1-ALMA3, we find relatively bright [C ii] emission compared to the infrared luminosity (L[C ii]/LIR ≈ 0.01) and an extremely high [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm emission line ratio (L[C ii]/L[N ii] > 55). The relatively strong [C ii] emission may be caused by abundant photodissociation regions and sub-solar metallicity, or by shock heating. The origin of the unusually strong [C ii] emission could be causally related to the location within the giant LAB, although the relationship between extended Lyα emission and interstellar medium conditions of associated galaxies is yet to be understand.

  6. Hydrothermal fluid migration and brine pool formation in the Red Sea: the Atlantis II Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical heat and fluid flow simulations of the Atlantis II Deep in the Red Sea were conducted to investigate the development, migration, and discharge of hydrothermal fluids into a submarine depression and determine the conditions necessary to form a brine pool. High-salinity fluids are predicted to form by leaching Miocene evaporates, migrate and convect within young oceanic crust, and discharge onto the seafloor. Predicted fluid discharge temperatures ( T max, 301 °C), discharge fluid velocities ( V max, 0.09 m/s), and salinities ( S max, 21 wt%) increase over time and reach values comparable to modern seafloor observations. Established convection patterns and discharge behavior are robust and are not greatly affected by geometry of rock property changes. Modeling results were used to calculate the minimum conditions for hydrothermal fluids from a developing hydrothermal system to mix with seawater, reverse buoyancy, and begin to form a brine pool in a submarine depression. Under conditions encountered on the seafloor ( T, 25-300 °C; S, 5-25 wt%), fluid mixtures predicted to pond on the seafloor range from late in the mixing process (99 %) at low temperatures ( T, 26 °C) to much earlier (36 % mixing) at higher temperatures ( T, 94 °C). A model of brine pool evolution is proposed that describes the processes and conditions necessary to initiate brine pool formation and compares formation conditions with accumulated ore material in the Atlantis II Deep and other locations.

  7. Zonation of Microbial Communities by a Hydrothermal Mound in the Atlantis II Deep (the Red Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Li, Jiang Tao; He, Li Sheng; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhao Ming; Cao, Hui Luo; Batang, Zenon; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea geothermal rift zones, the dispersal of hydrothermal fluids of moderately-high temperatures typically forms subseafloor mounds. Major mineral components of the crust covering the mound are barite and metal sulfides. As a result of the continental rifting along the Red Sea, metalliferous sediments accumulate on the seafloor of the Atlantis II Deep. In the present study, a barite crust was identified in a sediment core from the Atlantis II Deep, indicating the formation of a hydrothermal mound at the sampling site. Here, we examined how such a dense barite crust could affect the local environment and the distribution of microbial inhabitants. Our results demonstrate distinctive features of mineral components and microbial communities in the sediment layers separated by the barite crust. Within the mound, archaea accounted for 65% of the community. In contrast, the sediments above the barite boundary were overwhelmed by bacteria. The composition of microbial communities under the mound was similar to that in the sediments of the nearby Discovery Deep and marine cold seeps. This work reveals the zonation of microbial communities after the formation of the hydrothermal mound in the subsurface sediments of the rift basin. PMID:26485717

  8. Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335. II.Characterization of phycobiliproteins produced during acclimation to far-red light.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yang; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-02-01

    Phycobilisomes (PBS) are antenna complexes that harvest light for photosystem (PS) I and PS II in cyanobacteria and some algae. A process known as far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) occurs when some cyanobacteria are grown in far-red light (FRL). They synthesize chlorophylls d and f and remodel PS I, PS II, and PBS using subunits paralogous to those produced in white light. The FaRLiP strain, Leptolyngbya sp. JSC-1, replaces hemidiscoidal PBS with pentacylindrical cores, which are produced when cells are grown in red or white light, with PBS with bicylindrical cores when cells are grown in FRL. This study shows that the PBS of another FaRLiP strain, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335, are not remodeled in cells grown in FRL. Instead, cells grown in FRL produce bicylindrical cores that uniquely contain the paralogous allophycocyanin subunits encoded in the FaRLiP cluster, and these bicylindrical cores coexist with red-light-type PBS with tricylindrical cores. The bicylindrical cores have absorption maxima at 650 and 711 nm and a low-temperature fluorescence emission maximum at 730 nm. They contain ApcE2:ApcF:ApcD3:ApcD2:ApcD5:ApcB2 in the approximate ratio 2:2:4:6:12:22, and a structural model is proposed. Time course experiments showed that bicylindrical cores were detectable about 48 h after cells were transferred from RL to FRL and that synthesis of red-light-type PBS continued throughout a 21-day growth period. When considered in comparison with results for other FaRLiP cyanobacteria, the results here show that acclimation responses to FRL can differ considerably among FaRLiP cyanobacteria.

  9. Light Scattering Induced Giant Red-Shift in Photoluminescence from CdTe Quantum Dots Encapsulated in Polyacrylamide Gel Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Brett W.; Cai, Tong; Hu, Zhibing; Kim, Moon; Neogi, Arup

    2009-07-01

    The photoluminescence emission from CdTe quantum dots embedded in hydrogel nanospheres based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymer is observed to be modified by the random light scattering within the colloidal medium. Photoluminescence emission from CdTe quantum dots of various size has been observed making the gel fluorescent. The optical properties of the quantum dots entrapped within the gel microspheres can be modified due to change in refractive index, volume density of the surrounding hydrogel medium. A red-shift of ˜100 nm has been observed from quantum dots emitting in the green wavelength region as the cell length is increased. This shift is due to secondary scattering and energy transfer induced by the larger scattering cross-section within the medium which results in a re-excitation of larger sized quantum dots.

  10. Natural selection coupled with intragenic recombination shapes diversity patterns in the major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, He-Min; Ge, Yun-Fa; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2010-05-15

    Ample variations of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are essential for vertebrates to adapt to various environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated the genetic variations and evolutionary patterns of seven functional MHC class II genes (one DRA, two DRB, two DQA, and two DQB) of the giant panda. The results showed the presence of two monomorphic loci (DRA and DQB2) and five polymorphic loci with different numbers of alleles (seven at DRB1, six at DRB3, seven at DQA1, four at DQA2, six at DQB1). The presence of balancing selection in the giant panda was supported by the following pieces of evidence: (1) The observed heterozygosity was higher than expected. (2) Amino acid heterozygosity was significantly higher at antigen-binding sites (ABS) compared with non-ABS sequences. (3) The selection parameter omega (d(N)/d(S)) was significantly higher at ABS compared with non-ABS sequences. (4) Approximately 95.45% of the positively selected codons (P>0.95) were located at or adjacent to an ABS. Furthermore, this study showed that (1) The Qinling subspecies exhibited high omega values across each locus (all >1), supporting its extensive positive selection. (2) The Sichuan subspecies displayed small omega at DRB1 (omega<0.72) and DQA2 (omega<0.48), suggesting that these sites underwent strong purifying selection. (3) Intragenic recombination was detected in DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1. The molecular diversity in classic Aime-MHC class II genes implies that the giant panda had evolved relatively abundant variations in its adaptive immunity along the history of host-pathogen co-evolution. Collectively, these findings indicate that natural selection accompanied by recombination drives the contrasting diversity patterns of the MHC class II genes between the two studied subspecies of giant panda.

  11. Programme for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, Jeddah II Conference, 12-18 January 1976. Provisional Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This publication presents the report of Jeddah II Conference of the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA) hosted by King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah in January 1976. The Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) initiated the conference to study the issues of scientific research on,…

  12. ROTATION OF THE K3 II-III GIANT STAR {alpha} HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental spectroscopic determination of projected rotation rates of slowly rotating stars is challenging because the rotational broadening of the spectral lines is often comparable to, or smaller than, the broadening from other sources, most notably macroturbulence. Fourier techniques have the advantage over direct profile matching when the observed profiles are complete, but when the profiles are severely blended, the Fourier analysis is compromised. A process of modeling partial profiles for determining the rotation rate for stars having blended spectral lines is investigated and applied to the evolved star {alpha} Hya (K3 II-III). Projected rotation higher than 5 km s{sup -1} can be definitively ruled out for this star. Not all lines are equally good, depending on the amount of blending and also depending on the strength of the line, as the balance between the thermal and non-thermal components changes. A modest ambiguity arises between macroturbulence and rotational broadening, but a careful look at the differences between the observations and the models allows one to measure the rotation with acceptable precision. The result for {alpha} Hya is v sin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}.

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios in Arcturus and Aldebaran. Constraining the parameters for non-convective mixing on the red giant branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.; Palmerini, S.; Busso, M.; Cristallo, S.

    2012-12-01

    Context. We re-analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios in the atmospheres of the two bright K giants Arcturus (α Boo) and Aldebaran (α Tau). Aims: These stars are in the evolutionary stage following the first dredge-up (FDU). Previous determinations (dating back more than 20 years) of their 16O/18O ratios showed a rough agreement with FDU expectations; however, the estimated 16O/17O and 12C/13C ratios were lower than in the canonical predictions for red giants. Today these anomalies are interpreted as signs of the occurrence of non-convective mixing episodes. We therefore re-investigated this problem to verify whether the observed data can be reproduced in this scenario and if the fairly well determined properties of the two stars can help us in fixing the uncertain parameters that characterize non-convective mixing and in constraining its physical nature. Methods: We used high-resolution infrared spectra from the literature to derive the 12C/13C and 16O/17O/18O ratios from CO molecular lines near 5 μm, using the local termodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral synthesis method. We made use of the recently published ACE-FTS atlas of the infrared solar spectrum for constructing an updated atomic and molecular line lists in this spectral range. We also reconsidered the determination of the stellar parameters to build the proper atmospheric and evolutionary models. Results: We found that both the C and the O isotopic ratios for the two stars considered actually disagree with pure FDU predictions. This reinforces the idea that non-convective transport episodes occurred in these stars. By reproducing the observed elemental and isotopic abundances with the help of parametric models for the coupled occurrence of nucleosynthesis and mass circulation, we derived constraints on the properties of non-convective mixing, providing information on the so far elusive physics of these phenomena. We find that very slow mixing, like that associated to diffusive processes, is

  14. Modeling of Copper(II), Cadmium(II), and Lead(II) Adsorption on Red Mud from Metal-EDTA Mixture Solutions.

    PubMed

    Güçlü; Apak

    2000-08-15

    The adsorption of toxic heavy metal cations, i.e., Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II), from metal-EDTA mixture solutions on a composite adsorbent having a heterogeneous surface, i.e., bauxite waste red mud, has been investigated and modeled with the aid of a modified surface complexation approach in respect to pH and complexant dependency of heavy metal adsorption. EDTA was selected as the modeling ligand in view of its wide usage as an anthropogenic chelating agent and abundance in natural waters. The adsorption experiments were conducted for metal salts (nitrates), metal-EDTA complexes alone, or in mixtures containing (metal+metal-EDTA). The adsorption equilibrium constants for the metal ions and metal-EDTA complexes were calculated. For all studied cases, the solid adsorbent phase concentrations of the adsorbed metal and metal-EDTA complexes were found by using the derived model equations with excellent compatibility of experimental and theoretically generated adsorption isotherms. The model was useful for metal and metal-EDTA mixture solutions either at their natural pH of equilibration with the sorbent, or after pH elevation with NaOH titration up to a certain pH. Thus adsorption of every single species (M(2+) or MY(2-)) or of possible mixtures (M(2+)+MY(2-)) at natural pH or after NaOH titration could be calculated by the use of simple quadratic model equations, once the initial concentrations of the corresponding species, i.e., [M(2+)](0) or [MY(2-)](0), were known. The compatibility of theoretical and experimental data pairs of adsorbed species concentrations was verified by means of nonlinear regression analysis. The findings of this study can be further developed so as to serve environmental risk assessment concerning the expansion of a heavy metal contaminant plume with groundwater move ment in soil consisting of hydrated-oxide type minerals. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. The giant oyster Hyotissa hyotis from the northern Red Sea as a decadal-scale archive for seasonal environmental fluctuations in coral reef habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titschack, J.; Zuschin, M.; Spötl, C.; Baal, C.

    2010-12-01

    This study explores the giant oyster Hyotissa hyotis as a novel environmental archive in tropical reef environments of the Indo-Pacific. The species is a typical accessory component in coral reefs, can reach sizes of tens of centimetres, and dates back to the Late Pleistocene. Here, a 70.2-mm-long oxygen and carbon isotope transect through the shell of a specimen collected at Safaga Bay, northern Red Sea, in May 1996, is presented. The transect runs perpendicularly to the foliate and vesicular layers of the inner ostracum near the ligament area of the oyster. The measured δ18O and δ13C records show sinusoidal fluctuations, which are independent of shell microstructure. The δ13C fluctuations exhibit the same wavelength as the δ18O fluctuations but are phase shifted. The δ18O record reflects the sea surface temperature variations from 1957 until 1996, possibly additionally influenced by the local evaporation. Due to locally enhanced evaporation in the semi-enclosed Safaga Bay, the δ18Oseawater value is estimated at 2.17‰, i.e., 0.3-0.8‰ higher than published open surface water δ18O values (1.36-1.85‰) from the region. The mean water temperature deviates by only 0.4°C from the expected value, and the minimum and maximum values are 0.5°C lower and 2.9°C higher, respectively. When comparing the mean monthly values, however, the sea surface temperature discrepancy between reconstructed and global grid datasets is always <1.0°C. The δ13C signal is weakly negatively correlated with regional chlorophyll a concentration and with the sunshine duration, which may reflect changes in the bivalve’s respiration. The study emphasises the palaeogeographic context in isotope studies based on fossils, because coastal embayments might not reflect open-water oceanographic conditions.

  16. Looks like a duck, moves like a duck, but does it quack like a duck? Asteroseismology of red-giant stars in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, Andrea; Brogaard, Karsten; Handberg, Rasmus

    2015-08-01

    Undoubtedly one the highlights of the Kepler asteroseismology programme has been the detection of solar-like oscillations in giants belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811. The availability of such constraints has made it possible to infer precise stellar properties (e.g. radius, mass, evolutionary state, age) on a star-by-star basis.These constraints give us a “new pair of eyes” to look at clusters, and they open several exciting opportunities. Based on a detailed analysis of the complete set of 4-years-long Kepler data, we present clear evidence for stars that have undergone non-standard evolution (evolved blue stragglers, low-mass Li-rich stars). We then illustrate the potential of integrated-mass-loss and mass-loss-dispersion measurements in both NGC6791 and NGC6819, which suggest a small true mass scatter among the red-clump stars and thus a very small mass-loss dispersion.We will then show examples of how our analysis based on individual-mode frequencies, as opposed to average seismic parameters and scaling relations, allow us to determine with higher accuracy stellar properties, and to probe features in the deep stellar interior (i.e. acoustic glitches related to Helium ionisation, properties of near-core mixing in the He-core-burning phase).Finally, we will discuss the prospects for seismic analyses of other clusters, in particular the globular cluster M4 which could reveal new insights into mass-loss dispersion and its effect on the horizontal-branch morphology.

  17. The Carina project. VII. Toward the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the C {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} index

    SciTech Connect

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Walker, A. R.; Nonino, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L.; Thévenin, F.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ∼12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} = (U – B) – (B – I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I}. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =–2.32 ± 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =–1.82 ± 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  18. The Carina Project. VII. Toward the Breaking of the Age-Metallicity Degeneracy of Red Giant Branch Stars Using the C U, B, I Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Fabrizio, M.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Walker, A. R.; Cassisi, S.; Gallart, C.; Nonino, M.; Aparicio, A.; Buonanno, R.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L.; Thévenin, F.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ~12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c U, B, I = (U - B) - (B - I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c U, B, I pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c U, B, I. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =-2.32 ± 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =-1.82 ± 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c U, B, I plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  19. The Contribution of Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Starts to the Luminosities of the Magellanic Clouds at 1-24 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at approx 3 - 4 micron, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at approx 3 - 4 micron and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 micron, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1 - 4 micron. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8 - 1 micron). At longer wavelengths (much > 8 micron), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 micron, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 micron flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 micron flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 micron flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 micron at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  20. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  1. Molecular characterization of a gene POLR2H encoded an essential subunit for RNA polymerase II from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda Melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Jie; Hou, Yi-Ling; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2013-02-01

    The Giant Panda is an endangered and valuable gene pool in genetic, its important functional gene POLR2H encodes an essential shared peptide H of RNA polymerases. The genomic DNA and cDNA sequences were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) adopting touchdown-PCR and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The length of the genomic sequence of the Giant Panda is 3,285 bp, including five exons and four introns. The cDNA fragment cloned is 509 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 453 bp encoding 150 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that both the cDNA and its deduced amino acid sequence were highly conserved. Protein structure prediction showed that there was one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, four casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and one amidation site in the POLR2H protein, further shaping advanced protein structure. The cDNA cloned was expressed in Escherichia coli, which indicated that POLR2H fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form brought about the accumulation of an expected 20.5 kDa polypeptide in line with the predicted protein. On the basis of what has already been achieved in this study, further deep-in research will be conducted, which has great value in theory and practical significance.

  2. Genetic differentiation and phylogeny relationships of functional ApoVLDL-II gene in red jungle fowl and domestic chicken populations.

    PubMed

    Musa, Hassan H; Cheng, Jin H; Bao, Wen B; Li, Bi C; Mekki, Dafaalla M; Chen, Guo H

    2007-08-01

    A total of 243 individuals from Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus spadiceus), Rugao, Anka, Wenchang and Silikes chicken populations were used for polymorphism analysis in functional apoVLDL-II gene by Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single strand conformation polymorphism markers. The results show that Anka population has highest gene diversity and Shannon information index, while Red jungle fowl shows highest effective number of allele. In addition, the higher coefficient of genetic differentiation (Gst) across all loci in apoVLDL-II was indicating that high variation is proportioned among populations. As expected total gene diversity (Ht) has upper estimate compared with within population genetic diversity (Hs) across all loci. The mean Gst value across all loci was (0.194) indicating about 19.4% of total genetic variation could be explained by breeds differences, while the remaining 80.6% was accounted for differences among individuals. The average apoVLDL-II gene flow across all loci in five chicken populations was 1.189. The estimates of genetic identity and distance confirm that these genes are significantly different between genetically fat and lean population, because fat type breed Anka shows highest distance with the other Silikes and Rugao whish are genetically lean. In addition, Wenchang and Red jungle fowl were found more closely and genetically related than the other breeds with 49.4% bootstrapping percentages, then they were related to Silikes by 100% bootstrapping percentages followed by Rugao and finally all of them are related with exotic fat breed Anka.

  3. Circadian rhythm of hyperoxidized peroxiredoxin II is determined by hemoglobin autoxidation and the 20S proteasome in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chun-Seok; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Rhee, Sue Goo

    2014-08-19

    The catalytic cysteine of the typical 2-Cys Prx subfamily of peroxiredoxins is occasionally hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid during the peroxidase catalytic cycle. Sulfinic Prx (Prx-SO2H) is reduced back to the active form of the enzyme by sulfiredoxin. The abundance of Prx-SO2H was recently shown to oscillate with a period of ∼24 h in human red blood cells (RBCs). We have now investigated the molecular mechanism and physiological relevance of such oscillation in mouse RBCs. Poisoning of RBCs with CO abolished Prx-SO2H formation, implicating H2O2 produced from hemoglobin autoxidation in Prx hyperoxidation. RBCs express the closely related PrxI and PrxII isoforms, and analysis of RBCs deficient in either isoform identified PrxII as the hyperoxidized Prx in these cells. Unexpectedly, RBCs from sulfiredoxin-deficient mice also exhibited circadian oscillation of Prx-SO2H. Analysis of the effects of protease inhibitors together with the observation that the purified 20S proteasome degraded PrxII-SO2H selectively over nonhyperoxidized PrxII suggested that the 20S proteasome is responsible for the decay phase of PrxII-SO2H oscillation. About 1% of total PrxII undergoes daily oscillation, resulting in a gradual loss of PrxII during the life span of RBCs. PrxII-SO2H was detected in cytosolic and ghost membrane fractions of RBCs, and the amount of membrane-bound PrxII-SO2H oscillated in a phase opposite to that of total PrxII-SO2H. Our results suggest that membrane association of PrxII-SO2H is a tightly controlled process and might play a role in the tuning of RBC function to environmental changes.

  4. Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation. II. Dependence of exoplanet architectures on giant planet and disk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S. N.; Armitage, P. J.; Moro-Martín, A.; Booth, M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Armstrong, J. C.; Mandell, A. M.; Selsis, F.; West, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    We present models for the formation of terrestrial planets, and the collisional evolution of debris disks, in planetary systems that contain multiple marginally unstable gas giants. We previously showed that in such systems, the dynamics of the giant planets introduces a correlation between the presence of terrestrial planets and cold dust, i.e., debris disks, which is particularly pronounced at λ ~ 70 μm. Here we present new simulations that show that this connection is qualitatively robust to a range of parameters: the mass distribution of the giant planets, the width and mass distribution of the outer planetesimal disk, and the presence of gas in the disk when the giant planets become unstable. We discuss how variations in these parameters affect the evolution. We find that systems with equal-mass giant planets undergo the most violent instabilities, and that these destroy both terrestrial planets and the outer planetesimal disks that produce debris disks. In contrast, systems with low-mass giant planets efficiently produce both terrestrial planets and debris disks. A large fraction of systems with low-mass (M ≲ 30 M⊕) outermost giant planets have final planetary separations that, scaled to the planets' masses, are as large or larger than the Saturn-Uranus and Uranus-Neptune separations in the solar system. We find that the gaps between these planets are not only dynamically stable to test particles, but are frequently populated by planetesimals. The possibility of planetesimal belts between outer giant planets should be taken into account when interpreting debris disk SEDs. In addition, the presence of ~ Earth-mass "seeds" in outer planetesimal disks causes the disks to radially spread to colder temperatures, and leads to a slow depletion of the outer planetesimal disk from the inside out. We argue that this may explain the very low frequency of >1 Gyr-old solar-type stars with observed 24 μm excesses. Our simulations do not sample the full range of

  5. Photosystem II Photochemistry and Phycobiliprotein of the Red Algae Kappaphycus alvarezii and Their Implications for Light Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Jianyi; Yao, Chunyan; Liu, Jianguo; Qin, Song; Jiang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein (PBP) genes of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii, raw material of κ-carrageenan used in food and pharmaceutical industries, were analyzed in this study. Minimum saturating irradiance (Ik) of this algal species was less than 115 μmol m−2 s−1. Its actual PSII efficiency (yield II) increased when light intensity enhanced and decreased when light intensity reached 200 μmol m−2 s−1. Under dim light, yield II declined at first and then increased on the fourth day. Under high light, yield II retained a stable value. These results indicate that K. alvarezii is a low-light-adapted species but possesses regulative mechanisms in response to both excessive and deficient light. Based on the PBP gene sequences, K. alvarezii, together with other red algae, assembled faster and showed a closer relationship with LL-Prochlorococcus compared to HL-Prochlorococcus. Many amino acid loci in PBP sequences of K. alvarezii were conserved with those of LL-Prochlorococcus. However, loci conserved with HL-Prochlorococcus but divergent with LL-Prochlorococcus were also found. The diversities of PE and PC are proposed to have played some roles during the algal evolution and divergence of light adaption. PMID:24380080

  6. Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein of the red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii and their implications for light adaptation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Jianyi; Yao, Chunyan; Liu, Jianguo; Qin, Song; Jiang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein (PBP) genes of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii, raw material of κ -carrageenan used in food and pharmaceutical industries, were analyzed in this study. Minimum saturating irradiance (I k) of this algal species was less than 115 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Its actual PSII efficiency (yield II) increased when light intensity enhanced and decreased when light intensity reached 200 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Under dim light, yield II declined at first and then increased on the fourth day. Under high light, yield II retained a stable value. These results indicate that K. alvarezii is a low-light-adapted species but possesses regulative mechanisms in response to both excessive and deficient light. Based on the PBP gene sequences, K. alvarezii, together with other red algae, assembled faster and showed a closer relationship with LL-Prochlorococcus compared to HL-Prochlorococcus. Many amino acid loci in PBP sequences of K. alvarezii were conserved with those of LL-Prochlorococcus. However, loci conserved with HL-Prochlorococcus but divergent with LL-Prochlorococcus were also found. The diversities of PE and PC are proposed to have played some roles during the algal evolution and divergence of light adaption.

  7. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  8. Atmospheric Chemistry in Giant Planets, Brown Dwarfs, and Low-Mass Dwarf Stars. II. Sulfur and Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Channon; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    2006-09-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations are used to model sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in giant planets, brown dwarfs, and extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). The chemical behavior of individual S- and P-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of pressure, temperature, and metallicity. The results are independent of particular model atmospheres, and in principle, the equilibrium composition along the pressure-temperature profile of any object can be determined. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the dominant S-bearing gas throughout substellar atmospheres and approximately represents the atmospheric sulfur inventory. Silicon sulfide (SiS) is a potential tracer of weather in substellar atmospheres. Disequilibrium abundances of phosphine (PH3) approximately representative of the total atmospheric phosphorus inventory are expected to be mixed upward into the observable atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. In hotter objects, several P-bearing gases (e.g., P2, PH3, PH 2, PH, and HCP) become increasingly important at high temperatures.

  9. [A systematic analysis of the Ottoman Red Crescent periodical (part II)].

    PubMed

    Okutan, Y

    2001-01-01

    Founded in 1877, the Ottoman Red Crescent Society rendered a lot of important services in military and civil areas in the Ottoman Empire. The Ottoman Red Crescent Society not only gave health services for the soldiers, but it also attempted to obey the international acts signed for the captives and to rescue them together with the countries involved under the supervision of the international Red Cross. In the civilian area, the Ottoman Red Crescent Society also played an active role to meet the casualties' needs, such as food, clothes, and accommodation following natural disasters like earthquake, flood, fire etc. Ottoman Red Crescent Society published a monthly newsletter called Osmanli Hilâl-i Ahmer Mecmuasi to announce its services more effectively to the public since 15 September 1921 (12 Muharrem 1340). The publication of the newsletter continued as Türkiye Hilâl-i Ahmer Mecmuasi after the 15th issue. Starting with the 85th issue on September 15th, 1928 (30 Rebiülevvel 1347) it was printed with Latin alphabet instead of Arabic letters. A brief translation in French and in English exist in the end of each issue. In the second part of this research, news about the Red Crescent Society's organization; financial supports for the Society and, in return, material and financial aids by she Society; local organizations providing aid to the Society; money collected during Bairams; plays and balls arranged by the Society; and the activities of the womens' branch of the Red Crescent Society, are introduced.

  10. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  11. Harvesting Far-Red Light by Chlorophyll f in Photosystems I and II of Unicellular Cyanobacterium strain KC1.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shigeru; Ohno, Tomoki; Noji, Tomoyasu; Yamakawa, Hisanori; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Wada, Katsuhiro; Kobayashi, Masami; Miyashita, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    Cells of a unicellular cyanobacterium strain KC1, which were collected from Japanese fresh water Lake Biwa, formed chlorophyll (Chl) f at 6.7%, Chl a' at 2.0% and pheophytin a at 0.96% with respect to Chl a after growth under 740 nm light. The far-red-acclimated cells (Fr cells) formed extra absorption bands of Chl f at 715 nm in addition to the major Chl a band. Fluorescence lifetimes were measured. The 405-nm laser flash, which excites mainly Chl a in photosystem I (PSI), induced a fast energy transfer to multiple fluorescence bands at 720-760 and 805 nm of Chl f at 77 K in Fr cells with almost no PSI-red-Chl a band. The 630-nm laser flash, which mainly excited photosystem II (PSII) through phycocyanin, revealed fast energy transfer to another set of Chl f bands at 720-770 and 810 nm as well as to the 694-nm Chl a fluorescence band. The 694-nm band did not transfer excitation energy to Chl f. Therefore, Chl a in PSI, and phycocyanin in PSII of Fr cells transferred excitation energy to different sets of Chl f molecules. Multiple Chl f forms, thus, seem to work as the far-red antenna both in PSI and PSII. A variety of cyanobacterial species, phylogenically distant from each other, seems to use a Chl f antenna in far-red environments, such as under dense biomats, in colonies, or under far-red LED light.

  12. A high-performance aptasensor for mercury(II) based on the formation of a unique ternary structure of aptamer-Hg(2+)-neutral red.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cai; Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Gao, Fei

    2014-08-25

    A highly sensitive and selective electrochemical aptasensor for mercury(II) has been developed based on the formation of a ternary complex between a mercury(II) specific aptamer (MSA), the neutral red (NR) molecule and the Hg(2+) ion without pre-modification of the probe aptamer.

  13. Application of natural colorants on citrus fruit as alternatives to Citrus Red II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warm field temperatures can often result in poor peel color of some citrus varieties, especially early in the harvest season. Under these conditions, Florida oranges, temples, tangelos, and K-Early citrus fruit are allowed to be treated with Citrus Red No.2 (CR2) to help produce a more acceptable pe...

  14. Objective tumor response to denosumab in patients with giant cell tumor of bone: a multicenter phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T.; Morioka, H.; Nishida, Y.; Kakunaga, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Asami, Y.; Inoue, T.; Yoneda, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare primary bone tumor, characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that express receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (RANK), and stromal cells that express RANK ligand (RANKL), a key mediator of osteoclast activation. A RANKL-specific inhibitor, denosumab, was predicted to reduce osteolysis and control disease progression in patients with GCTB. Patients and methods Seventeen patients with GCTB were enrolled. Patients were treated with denosumab at 120 mg every 4 weeks, with a loading dose of 120 mg on days 8 and 15. To evaluate efficacy, objective tumor response was evaluated prospectively by an independent imaging facility on the basis of prespecified criteria. Results The proportion of patients with an objective tumor response was 88% based on best response using any tumor response criteria. The proportion of patients with an objective tumor response using individual response criteria was 35% based on the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria, 82% based on the modified European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria, and 71% based on inverse Choi criteria. The median time of study treatment was 13.1 months. Conclusion The findings demonstrate that denosumab has robust clinical efficacy in the treatment of GCTB. PMID:26205395

  15. Photochemical Formation of Fe(II) and Peroxides in Coastal Seawater Collected around Okinawa Island, Japan - Impact of Red Soil Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, K.; Nakajima, H.; Higuchi, T.; Fujimura, H.; Arakaki, T.; Taira, H.

    2003-12-01

    In a study to elucidate the impacts of red soil pollution on the oxidizing power of seawater, photochemical formation of Fe(II) and peroxides was studied in seawaters collected around Okinawa Island, Japan. The northern part of Okinawa Island suffers from red soil pollution which is caused mainly by land development such as pineapple farming and the construction of recreational facilities. We studied photochemical formation of peroxides and Fe(II) in the same seawater samples because the reaction between HOOH and Fe(II) forms hydroxyl radical (OH radical), the most potent environmental oxidant. Photochemical formation of Fe(II) was fast and reached steady-state in 30 minutes of simulated sunlight illumination and the steady-state Fe(II) concentrations were about 80% of total iron concentrations. Photochemical formation of peroxides was relatively slow and formation kinetics varied, depending on the initial peroxide concentrations. Because photochemical formation of peroxides was faster and total iron concentrations in the red soil polluted seawater were higher, red soil polluted seawater is expected to have greater oxidizing power than seawater that is not polluted with red soil.

  16. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. II. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND SILICON LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Wuerl, Matthias; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: Matthias.Wuerl@physik.uni-muenchen.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2013-02-20

    Medium-resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star-forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in NLTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in NLTE are significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex and -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4400 K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  17. A TALE OF DWARFS AND GIANTS: USING A z = 1.62 CLUSTER TO UNDERSTAND HOW THE RED SEQUENCE GREW OVER THE LAST 9.5 BILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnick, Gregory H.; Tran, Kim-Vy; Papovich, Casey; Momcheva, Ivelina; Willmer, Christopher

    2012-08-10

    We study the red sequence in a cluster of galaxies at z = 1.62 and follow its evolution over the intervening 9.5 Gyr to the present day. Using deep YJK{sub s} imaging with the HAWK-I instrument on the Very Large Telescope, we identify a tight red sequence and construct its rest-frame i-band luminosity function (LF). There is a marked deficit of faint red galaxies in the cluster that causes a turnover in the LF. We compare the red-sequence LF to that for clusters at z < 0.8, correcting the luminosities for passive evolution. The shape of the cluster red-sequence LF does not evolve between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 but at z < 0.6 the faint population builds up significantly. Meanwhile, between z = 1.62 and 0.6 the inferred total light on the red sequence grows by a factor of {approx}2 and the bright end of the LF becomes more populated. We construct a simple model for red-sequence evolution that grows the red sequence in total luminosity and matches the constant LF shape at z > 0.6. In this model the cluster accretes blue galaxies from the field whose star formation is quenched and who are subsequently allowed to merge. We find that three to four mergers among cluster galaxies during the 4 Gyr between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 match the observed LF evolution between the two redshifts. The inferred merger rate is consistent with other studies of this cluster. Our result supports the picture that galaxy merging during the major growth phase of massive clusters is an important process in shaping the red-sequence population at all luminosities.

  18. A Tale of Dwarfs and Giants: Using a z = 1.62 Cluster to Understand How the Red Sequence Grew over the Last 9.5 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Gregory H.; Tran, Kim-Vy; Papovich, Casey; Momcheva, Ivelina; Willmer, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    We study the red sequence in a cluster of galaxies at z = 1.62 and follow its evolution over the intervening 9.5 Gyr to the present day. Using deep YJKs imaging with the HAWK-I instrument on the Very Large Telescope, we identify a tight red sequence and construct its rest-frame i-band luminosity function (LF). There is a marked deficit of faint red galaxies in the cluster that causes a turnover in the LF. We compare the red-sequence LF to that for clusters at z < 0.8, correcting the luminosities for passive evolution. The shape of the cluster red-sequence LF does not evolve between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 but at z < 0.6 the faint population builds up significantly. Meanwhile, between z = 1.62 and 0.6 the inferred total light on the red sequence grows by a factor of ~2 and the bright end of the LF becomes more populated. We construct a simple model for red-sequence evolution that grows the red sequence in total luminosity and matches the constant LF shape at z > 0.6. In this model the cluster accretes blue galaxies from the field whose star formation is quenched and who are subsequently allowed to merge. We find that three to four mergers among cluster galaxies during the 4 Gyr between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 match the observed LF evolution between the two redshifts. The inferred merger rate is consistent with other studies of this cluster. Our result supports the picture that galaxy merging during the major growth phase of massive clusters is an important process in shaping the red-sequence population at all luminosities. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory using the ESO Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal through ESO program 386.A-0514(A).

  19. Unique prokaryotic consortia in geochemically distinct sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and discovery deep brine pools.

    PubMed

    Siam, Rania; Mustafa, Ghada A; Sharaf, Hazem; Moustafa, Ahmed; Ramadan, Adham R; Antunes, Andre; Bajic, Vladimir B; Stingl, Uli; Marsis, Nardine G R; Coolen, Marco J L; Sogin, Mitchell; Ferreira, Ari J S; Dorry, Hamza El

    2012-01-01

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The 'polyextremophiles' that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction.

  20. Unique Prokaryotic Consortia in Geochemically Distinct Sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and Discovery Deep Brine Pools

    PubMed Central

    Siam, Rania; Mustafa, Ghada A.; Sharaf, Hazem; Moustafa, Ahmed; Ramadan, Adham R.; Antunes, Andre; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Uli; Marsis, Nardine G. R.; Coolen, Marco J. L.; Sogin, Mitchell; Ferreira, Ari J. S.; Dorry, Hamza El

    2012-01-01

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The ‘polyextremophiles’ that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction. PMID:22916172

  1. The s-process in low-metallicity stars - II. Interpretation of high-resolution spectroscopic observations with asymptotic giant branch models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Käppeler, F.

    2011-11-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations of 100 metal-poor carbon and s-rich stars (CEMP-s) collected from the literature are compared with the theoretical nucleosynthesis models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) presented in Paper I (MAGBini= 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 2 M⊙, - 3.6 ≲ [ Fe/H ] ≲- 1.5). The s-process enhancement detected in these objects is associated with binary systems: the more massive companion evolved faster through the thermally pulsing AGB phase (TP-AGB), synthesizing s-elements in the inner He intershell, which are partly dredged up to the surface during the third dredge-up (TDU) episode. The secondary observed low-mass companion became CEMP-s by the mass transfer of C- and s-rich material from the primary AGB. We analyse the light elements C, N, O, Na and Mg, as well as the two s-process indicators, [hs/ls] (where ls = is the the light-s peak at N = 50 and hs = the heavy-s peak at N = 82) and [Pb/hs]. We distinguish between CEMP-s with high s-process enhancement, [hs/Fe] >rsim 1.5 (CEMP-sII), and mild s-process enhanced stars, [hs/Fe] < 1.5 (CEMP-sI). To interpret the observations, a range of s-process efficiencies at any given metallicity is necessary. This is confirmed by the high spread observed in [Pb/hs] (˜2 dex). A degeneration of solutions is found with some exceptions: most main-sequence CEMP-sII stars with low [Na/Fe] can only be interpreted with MAGBini= 1.3-1.4 M⊙. Giants having suffered the first dredge-up (FDU) need a dilution >rsim1 dex (dil is defined as the mass of the convective envelope of the observed star, Mobs★, over the material transferred from the AGB to the companion, MtransAGB). Then AGB models with higher AGB initial masses (MAGBini= 1.5-2 M⊙) are adopted to interpret CEMP-sII giants. In general, solutions with AGB models in the mass range MAGBini= 1.3-2 M⊙ and different dilution factors are found for CEMP-sI stars. About half of the CEMP-s stars with europium measurements show a high r

  2. Recent mobility of plastid encoded group II introns and twintrons in five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium.

    PubMed

    Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Price, Dana C; Mohr, Georg; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are closely linked to eukaryote evolution because nuclear spliceosomal introns and the small RNAs associated with the spliceosome are thought to trace their ancient origins to these mobile elements. Therefore, elucidating how group II introns move, and how they lose mobility can potentially shed light on fundamental aspects of eukaryote biology. To this end, we studied five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium purpureum that surprisingly contain 42 group II introns in their plastid genomes. We focused on a subset of these introns that encode mobility-conferring intron-encoded proteins (IEPs) and found them to be distributed among the strains in a lineage-specific manner. The reverse transcriptase and maturase domains were present in all lineages but the DNA endonuclease domain was deleted in vertically inherited introns, demonstrating a key step in the loss of mobility. P. purpureum plastid intron RNAs had a classic group IIB secondary structure despite variability in the DIII and DVI domains. We report for the first time the presence of twintrons (introns-within-introns, derived from the same mobile element) in Rhodophyta. The P. purpureum IEPs and their mobile introns provide a valuable model for the study of mobile retroelements in eukaryotes and offer promise for biotechnological applications.

  3. THE ORIGIN OF [O II] IN POST-STARBURST AND RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaux, B. C.; Lubin, L. M.; Kocevski, D.; Shapley, A.; Gal, R. R.; Squires, G. K.

    2010-06-20

    We present the first results from a near-IR spectroscopic campaign of the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9 and the cluster RX J1821.6+6827 at z {approx} 0.82 to investigate the nature of [O II] {lambda}3727 emission in cluster galaxies at high redshift. Of the 401 members in Cl1604 and RX J1821+6827 confirmed using the Keck II/DEIMOS spectrograph, 131 galaxies have detectable [O II] emission with no other signs of current star formation activity, as well as strong absorption features indicative of a well-established older stellar population. The combination of these features suggests that the primary source of [O II] emission in these galaxies is not a result of star formation processes, but rather due to the presence of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) or Seyfert component. Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope, 19 such galaxies were targeted, as well as 6 additional [O II]-emitting cluster members that exhibited signs of ongoing star formation activity. Nearly half ({approx}47%) of the 19 [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies exhibit [O II] to H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) ratios higher than unity, the typical observed value for star-forming galaxies, with an EW distribution similar to that observed for LINERs at low redshift. A majority ({approx}68%) of these 19 galaxies are classified as LINER/Seyfert based primarily on the emission-line ratio of [N II] {lambda}6584 and H{alpha}. The fraction of LINER/Seyferts increases to {approx}85% for red [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies. The LINER/Seyfert galaxies in our Cl1604 sample exhibit average L([O II])/L(H{alpha}) ratios that are significantly higher than that observed in populations of star-forming galaxies, suggesting that [O II] is a poor indicator of star formation in a significant fraction of high-redshift cluster members. From the prevalence of [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies in both systems and the fraction

  4. Adiabatic Mass Loss in Binary Stars. II. From Zero-age Main Sequence to the Base of the Giant Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hongwei; Webbink, Ronald F.; Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-10-01

    In the limit of extremely rapid mass transfer, the response of a donor star in an interacting binary becomes asymptotically one of adiabatic expansion. We survey here adiabatic mass loss from Population I stars (Z = 0.02) of mass 0.10 M⊙-100 M⊙ from the zero-age main sequence to the base of the giant branch, or to central hydrogen exhaustion for lower main sequence stars. The logarithmic derivatives of radius with respect to mass along adiabatic mass-loss sequences translate into critical mass ratios for runaway (dynamical timescale) mass transfer, evaluated here under the assumption of conservative mass transfer. For intermediate- and high-mass stars, dynamical mass transfer is preceded by an extended phase of thermal timescale mass transfer as the star is stripped of most of its envelope mass. The critical mass ratio qad (throughout this paper, we follow the convention of defining the binary mass ratio as q ≡ Mdonor/Maccretor) above which this delayed dynamical instability occurs increases with advancing evolutionary age of the donor star, by ever-increasing factors for more massive donors. Most intermediate- or high-mass binaries with nondegenerate accretors probably evolve into contact before manifesting this instability. As they approach the base of the giant branch, however, and begin developing a convective envelope, qad plummets dramatically among intermediate-mass stars, to values of order unity, and a prompt dynamical instability occurs. Among low-mass stars, the prompt instability prevails throughout main sequence evolution, with qad declining with decreasing mass, and asymptotically approaching qad = 2/3, appropriate to a classical isentropic n = 3/2 polytrope. Our calculated qad values agree well with the behavior of time-dependent models by Chen & Han of intermediate-mass stars initiating mass transfer in the Hertzsprung gap. Application of our results to cataclysmic variables, as systems that must be stable against rapid mass transfer, nicely

  5. ADIABATIC MASS LOSS IN BINARY STARS. II. FROM ZERO-AGE MAIN SEQUENCE TO THE BASE OF THE GIANT BRANCH

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Hongwei; Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen; Webbink, Ronald F. E-mail: rwebbink@illinois.edu

    2015-10-10

    In the limit of extremely rapid mass transfer, the response of a donor star in an interacting binary becomes asymptotically one of adiabatic expansion. We survey here adiabatic mass loss from Population I stars (Z = 0.02) of mass 0.10 M{sub ⊙}–100 M{sub ⊙} from the zero-age main sequence to the base of the giant branch, or to central hydrogen exhaustion for lower main sequence stars. The logarithmic derivatives of radius with respect to mass along adiabatic mass-loss sequences translate into critical mass ratios for runaway (dynamical timescale) mass transfer, evaluated here under the assumption of conservative mass transfer. For intermediate- and high-mass stars, dynamical mass transfer is preceded by an extended phase of thermal timescale mass transfer as the star is stripped of most of its envelope mass. The critical mass ratio q{sub ad} (throughout this paper, we follow the convention of defining the binary mass ratio as q ≡ M{sub donor}/M{sub accretor}) above which this delayed dynamical instability occurs increases with advancing evolutionary age of the donor star, by ever-increasing factors for more massive donors. Most intermediate- or high-mass binaries with nondegenerate accretors probably evolve into contact before manifesting this instability. As they approach the base of the giant branch, however, and begin developing a convective envelope, q{sub ad} plummets dramatically among intermediate-mass stars, to values of order unity, and a prompt dynamical instability occurs. Among low-mass stars, the prompt instability prevails throughout main sequence evolution, with q{sub ad} declining with decreasing mass, and asymptotically approaching q{sub ad} = 2/3, appropriate to a classical isentropic n = 3/2 polytrope. Our calculated q{sub ad} values agree well with the behavior of time-dependent models by Chen and Han of intermediate-mass stars initiating mass transfer in the Hertzsprung gap. Application of our results to cataclysmic variables, as systems

  6. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. IX - A survey of ultraviolet emission from F-K dwarfs and giants with IUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Marstad, N. C.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Low-dispersion ultraviolet spectra (1150-2000 A) of a representative sample of cool stars, including dwarfs and giants of spectral types F-K, obtained with the IUE, are examined. The observation and the absolute calibration procedures are described. Correlation diagrams are constructed that compare chromospheric and transition-region emission line strengths and broadband coronal soft X-ray fluxes. The transition-region and coronal emission in the G-K dwarfs and G giants is well correlated with the Mg II (wavelength 2800) doublet emission strength, which is symptomatic of chromospheric energy losses. The power-law slopes are steeper than unity, particularly for soft X-rays. The implications of the correlations are discussed with respect to the weakening or disappearance of transition regions and hot coronae in the cool half of the red-giant branch and possible chromospheric and coronal heating mechanisms. It is proposed that the weakness of outer atmospheres in the red giants compared with the yellow giants can be understood as a consequence of stellar evolution, since it is possible that stars of slightly different spectral type in the giant branch have very different main-sequence progenitors.

  7. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  8. Low temperature hydrothermal maturation of organic matter in sediments from the Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Hayes, J. M.; Hartman, Hyman

    1987-01-01

    Hydrocarbons and bulk organic matter of two sediment cores within the Atlantis II Deep are analyzed, and microbial inputs and minor terrestrial sources are found to represent the major sedimentary organic material. Results show that extensive acid-catalyzed reactions are occurring in the sediments, and the Atlantis II Deep is found to exhibit a lower degree of thermal maturation than other hydrothermal or intrusive systems. The lack of carbon number preference noted among the n-alkanes suggests that the organic matter of these sediments has undergone some degree of catagenesis, though yields of hydrocarbons are much lower than those found in other hydrothermal areas, probably due to the effect of lower temperature and poor source-rock characteristics.

  9. Water and heat transport in hilly red soil of southern China: II. Modeling and simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Zhen; Han, Xiao-Fei

    2005-05-01

    Simulation models of heat and water transport have not been rigorously tested for the red soils of southern China. Based on the theory of nonisothermal water-heat coupled transfer, a simulation model, programmed in Visual Basic 6.0, was developed to predict the coupled transfer of water and heat in hilly red soil. A series of soil column experiments for soil water and heat transfer, including soil columns with closed and evaporating top end, were used to test the simulation model. Results showed that in the closed columns, the temporal and spatial distribution of moisture and heat could be very well predicted by the model, while in the evaporating columns, the simulated soil water contents were somewhat different from the observed ones. In the heat flow equation from Taylor and Lary (1964), the effects of soil water evaporation on the heat flow is not involved, which may be the main reason for the differences between simulated and observed results. The predicted temperatures were not in agreement with the observed one with thermal conductivities calculated by de Vries and Wierenga equations, so that it is suggested that K(h), soil heat conductivity, be multiplied by 8.0 for the first 6.5 h and by 1.2 later on. Sensitivity analysis of soil water and heat coefficients showed that the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K(S), and the water diffusivity, D(theta), had great effects on soil water transport; the variation of soil porosity led to the difference of soil thermal properties, and accordingly changed temperature redistribution, which would affect water redistribution.

  10. The Hunt for Red October II: a demonstration for introductory electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zile, Daniel; Sebastian, Thomas; Polyak, Viktor; Rutah, Anjalee; Overduin, James

    We have designed, constructed and tested a small-scale version of the silent submarine depicted in the 1990 Sean Connery thriller The Hunt for Red October. This vessel contains no moving parts. It uses onboard batteries and magnets to propel seawater salt ions out of the back of the boat, producing an equal and opposite forward thrust on the submarine thanks to Newton's third law. Such a craft could be very hard to detect by conventional means. Our objectives were to create a striking teaching demonstration for introductory electromagnetism courses and to determine why (to our knowledge) no navy has yet exploited such a seemingly revolutionary propulsion system for purposes of national defense. As teaching demonstrations, our prototypes are very successful at capturing student interest and convincing them of the reality and practical importance of electromagnetic fields. We have also identified a number of factors that may help to explain why a scaled-up model might not quite function as depicted in the film. We discuss several promising avenues for future student research.

  11. ORIGIN OF LITHIUM ENRICHMENT IN K GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Reddy, Bacham E.; Lambert, David L.

    2011-03-20

    In this Letter, we report on a low-resolution spectroscopic survey for Li-rich K giants among 2000 low-mass (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}) giants spanning the luminosity range from below to above the luminosity of the clump. Fifteen new Li-rich giants including four super Li-rich K giants (log {epsilon}(Li) {>=}3.2) were discovered. A significant finding is that there is a concentration of Li-rich K giants at the luminosity of the clump or red horizontal branch. This new finding is partly a consequence of the fact that our low-resolution survey is the first large survey to include giants well below and above the red giant branch (RGB) bump and clump locations in the H-R diagram. Origin of the lithium enrichment may be plausibly attributed to the conversion of {sup 3}He via {sup 7}Be to {sup 7}Li by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism but the location for the onset of the conversion is uncertain. Two possible opportunities to effect this conversion are discussed: the bump in the first ascent of the RGB and the He-core flash at the tip of the RGB. The finite luminosity spread of the Li-rich giants serves to reject the idea that Li enhancement is, in general, a consequence of a giant swallowing a large planet.

  12. Atypical Histiocytosis in Red Squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Smith, S H; Stevenson, K; Del-Pozo, J; Moss, S; Meredith, A

    2017-03-17

    Four red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) were subjected to necropsy examination over a 3-year period as part of a broader surveillance study. The squirrels presented with cutaneous, subcutaneous and/or internal swellings and nodules that consisted microscopically of sheets of atypical round cells and multinucleated giant cells. There was moderate anisokaryosis with rare mitoses. Nuclei ranged from oval to indented or C-shaped and some were bizarre, twisted or multilobulated. Many giant cells also had a bizarre morphology, with anisokaryosis within individual cells. Giant cell nuclei were often multilobulated, ring-shaped or segmented. Affected internal organs varied depending on the squirrel, but included lymph node, kidney, intestinal tract and lungs. Representative lesions from each of the four squirrels were negative for acid-fast organisms. Formalin-fixed tissues from all four squirrels and ethanol-fixed tissue from one animal were negative for Mycobacterium by polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemically, the majority of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells in all four squirrels strongly expressed vimentin and class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex. Otherwise, the atypical mononuclear and multinucleated cells were negative for CD3, Pax-5, Mac387, CD18 and E-cadherin. Based on the combination of cellular morphology, arrangement and immunophenotype, a novel form of atypical histiocytosis is considered most likely in these squirrels, although the exact origin and triggering factors remain uncertain.

  13. A large-scale genetic analysis reveals a strong contribution of the HLA class II region to giant cell arteritis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F David; Mackie, Sarah L; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J; Hoffman, Gary S; Khalidi, Nader A; Koening, Curry L; Langford, Carol A; McAlear, Carol A; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G; Warrington, Kenneth J; Ytterberg, Steven R; Gregersen, Peter K; Pease, Colin T; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Bakker, Paul I W; Barrett, Jennifer H; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A; González-Gay, Miguel A; Morgan, Ann W; Martín, Javier

    2015-04-02

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10(-40), OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1(∗)04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10(-43)) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10(-46)), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10(-45)) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10(-6), OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10(-6), OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10(-5), OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function.

  14. Burns and frostbite in the Red Army during World War II.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Vladimir; Biryukov, Alexey; Chmyrev, Igor; Tarasenko, Mikhail; Kabanov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    The start of World War II (WWII) led to the deployment of combat troops in several continents. Destruction and many casualties among both the military and civilians became an inevitable consequence. A large amount of people injured were in need of life-saving treatment and a speedy return to duty. Intensive studies of the specific issues of diagnosis and treatment of thermal injury were conducted in the Soviet Union before the war. The first special units for patients with burn injuries were created, and the first specialists received their first clinical experience. The contributions of famous Soviet scientists in the development of the treatment of burns and frostbite in WWII are studied in this article. The structure of thermal injuries among military personnel and the results of their treatment are shown. Treatment, classification and quantity frostbite in the structure of sanitary losses during the WWII are studied in this article.

  15. Physical and chemical properties of Red MSX Sources in the southern sky: H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Naiping; Wang, Jun-Jie; Li, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the physical and chemical properties of 18 southern Red Midcourse Space Experiment Sources (RMSs), using archival data taken from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy, the Australia Telescope Compact Array, and the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team Survey at 90 GHz. Most of our sources have simple cometary/unresolved radio emissions at 4.8 and/or 8.6GHz. The large number of Lyman continuum fluxes (NL) indicates they are probably massive O- or early B-type star formation regions. Archival IRAS infrared data are used to estimate the dust temperature, which is about 30 K of our sources. Then, the H2 column densities and the volume-averaged H2 number densities are estimated using the 870 μm dust emissions. Large-scale infall and ionized accretions may be occurring in G345.4881+00.3148. We also attempt to characterize the chemical properties of these RMSs through molecular line (N2H+ (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0)) observations. Most of the detected N2H+ and HCO+ emissions match well with the dust emission, implying a close link to their chemical evolution in the RMSs. We found that the abundance of N2H+ is one order of magnitude lower than that in other surveys of infrared dark clouds, and a positive correlation between the abundances of N2H+ and HCO+. The fractional abundance of N2H+ with respect to H2 seems to decrease as a function of NL. These observed trends could be interpreted as an indication of enhanced destruction of N2H+, either by CO or through dissociative recombination with electrons produced by central UV photons.

  16. Antimicrobial photodisinfection with Zn(II) phthalocyanine adsorbed on TiO2 upon UVA and red irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, Vanya; Eneva, Ivelina; Kussovski, Vesselin; Borisova, Ekaterina; Angelov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The light exposure on a daily basis has been well accepted as a competitive method for decontamination of wastewater. The catalytic properties of TiO2 offer a great potential to reduce the transmission of pathogens in the environment. Although the titanium dioxide shows high activity against pathogens, its general usage in water cleaning is limited due to the insufficient excitation natural light (about 3% of the solar spectrum). A hydrophobic dodecylpyridyloxy Zn(II)-phthalocyanine with four peripheral hydrocarbon chains of C12 (ZnPcDo) was immobilized on a photocatalyst TiO2 anatase (P25). The resulted greenish colored nanoparticles of phthalocyanine were characterized by the means of absorption, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the phthalocyanine dye by the red fluorescence emission (650 - 740 nm). The intensive Q-band in the far red visible spectral region (~ 690 nm) suggested a monomeric state of phthalocyanine on TiO2 nanoparticles. Two pathogenic bacterial strains (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA and Salmonella enteritidis) associated with wastewater were photoinactivated with the suspension of the particles. The effective photoinactivation was observed with 1 g.L-1 TiO2 anatase at irradiation with UVA 364 nm as with UVA 364 nm and LED 643 nm. The gram-negative Salmonella enteritidis was fully photoinactivated with ZnPcDo-TiO2 and TiO2 alone at UVA 346 nm and at irradiation with two light sources (364 nm + 643 nm). The proposed conjugate appears as an useful composite material for antibacterial disinfection.

  17. Spectroscopy of chromospheric lines of giants in the globular cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Hartmann, Lee; Smith, Graeme H.; Rodgers, A. W.; Roberts, W. H.; Zucker, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of chromospheric transitions (Mg II, H-alpha, and Ca II K) from two red giants (A31 and A59) in the globular cluster NGC 6572 were made with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and the coude spectrograph of the 1.9 m telescope at the Mount Stromlo Observatory. These measurements give evidence for chromospheric activity and outward motions within the atmospheres. The surface flux of the Mg II emission is comparable to that in disk population giants of similar (B-V) color. The Mg II profiles are asymmetric, which is most likely caused by absorption in an expanding stellar atmosphere and/or by possible interstellar features. Notches are found in the core of the H-alpha line of A59, which are similar to those found in Cepheids. This suggests that shocks are present in the atmosphere of A59 and indicates that hydrodynamic phenomena are influencing the levvel of chromospheric emission and producing upper atmospheric motions which may lead to mass loss.

  18. The magnetic fields at the surface of active single G-K giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Charbonnel, C.; Wade, G. A.; Tsvetkova, S.; Petit, P.; Dintrans, B.; Drake, N. A.; Decressin, T.; Lagarde, N.; Donati, J.-F.; Roudier, T.; Lignières, F.; Schröder, K.-P.; Landstreet, J. D.; Lèbre, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the magnetic field at the surface of 48 red giants selected as promising for detection of Stokes V Zeeman signatures in their spectral lines. In our sample, 24 stars are identified from the literature as presenting moderate to strong signs of magnetic activity. An additional 7 stars are identified as those in which thermohaline mixing appears not to have occured, which could be due to hosting a strong magnetic field. Finally, we observed 17 additional very bright stars which enable a sensitive search to be performed with the spectropolarimetric technique. Methods: We use the spectropolarimeters Narval and ESPaDOnS to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of our targets. We treat the spectropolarimetric data using the least-squares deconvolution method to create high signal-to-noise ratio mean Stokes V profiles. We also measure the classical S-index activity indicator for the Ca ii H&K lines, and the stellar radial velocity. To infer the evolutionary status of our giants and to interpret our results, we use state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary models with predictions of convective turnover times. Results: We unambiguously detect magnetic fields via Zeeman signatures in 29 of the 48 red giants in our sample. Zeeman signatures are found in all but one of the 24 red giants exhibiting signs of activity, as well as 6 out of 17 bright giant stars. However no detections were obtained in the 7 thermohaline deviant giants. The majority of the magnetically detected giants are either in the first dredge up phase or at the beginning of core He burning, i.e. phases when the convective turnover time is at a maximum: this corresponds to a "magnetic strip" for red giants in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. A close study of the 16 giants with known rotational periods shows that the measured magnetic field strength is tightly correlated with the rotational properties, namely to the rotational period and to the Rossby number Ro

  19. The Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distances to Typa Ia Supernova Host Galaxies. V. NGC 3021, NGC 3370, and NGC 1309 and the Value of the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-02-01

    We present final results of a program for the determination of the Hubble constant based on the calibration of the Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB). We report TRGB distances to three SN Ia host galaxies, NGC 3021, NGC 3370, and NGC 1309. We obtain F555W and F814W photometry of resolved stars from the archival Hubble Space Telescope data. Luminosity functions of red giant stars in the outer regions of these galaxies show the TRGB to be at F814W ≈ QT = 28.2 ∼ 28.5 mag. From these TRGB magnitudes and the revised TRGB calibration based on two distance anchors (NGC 4258 and the LMC) in Jang & Lee (2017; Paper IV), we derive the distances: {(m-M)}0=32.178+/- 0.033 for NGC 3021, 32.253 ± 0.041 for NGC 3370, and 32.471 ± 0.040 for NGC 1309. We update our previous results on the TRGB distances to five SN Ia host galaxies using the revised TRGB calibration. By combining the TRGB distance estimates to SN Ia host galaxies in this study with the SN Ia calibration provided by Riess et al. (2011), we obtain a value of the Hubble constant: H 0 = 71.66 ± 1.80(random) ± 1.88(systematic) km s‑1 Mpc‑1 (a 3.6% uncertainty including systematics) from all eight SNe, and H 0 = 73.72 ± 2.03 ± 1.94 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 (a 3.8% uncertainty) from six low-reddened SNe. We present our best estimate, H 0 = 71.17 ± 1.66 ± 1.87 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 (a 3.5% uncertainty) from six low-reddened SNe with the recent SN Ia calibration in Riess et al. (2016). This value is between those from the Cepheid calibrated SNe Ia and those from the Cosmic Microwave Background analysis, lowering the Hubble tension.

  20. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. IV. TYC 3667-1280-1: The most massive red giant star hosting a warm Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Nowak, G.; Adamów, M.; Maciejewski, G.; Kowalik, K.; Wolszczan, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We present the latest result of the TAPAS project that is devoted to intense monitoring of planetary candidates that are identified within the PennState-Toruń planet search. Aims: We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. Methods: The paper is based on precise radial velocity measurements: 13 epochs collected over 1920 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High-Resolution Spectrograph, and 22 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 961 days. Results: We present a warm-Jupiter (Teq = 1350 K, m2 sin i = 5.4 ± 0.4 MJ) companion with an orbital period of 26.468 days in a circular (e = 0.036) orbit around a giant evolved (log g = 3.11 ± 0.09, R = 6.26 ± 0.86 R⊙) star with M⋆ = 1.87 ± 0.17 M⊙. This is the most massive and oldest star found to be hosting a close-in giant planet. Its proximity to its host (a = 0.21 au) means that the planet has a 13.9 ± 2.0% probability of transits; this calls for photometric follow-up study. Conclusions: This massive warm Jupiter with a near circular orbit around an evolved massive star can help set constraints on general migration mechanisms for warm Jupiters and, given its high equilibrium temperature, can help test energy deposition models in hot Jupiters. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto

  1. NGC 6388: Chemical Composition of Its Eight Cool Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallerstein, G.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Andrievsky, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    Eight cool giants in the unusual globular cluster NGC 6388 have been investigated in order to derive their elemental abundances. Effective temperatures from 3500 to 3850 K were derived using the method of line-depth ratios. Surface gravities were derived in two ways. Spectroscopic gravities, derived by the requirement that the abundance of iron be the same from Fe I and Fe II lines, were rather low, ranging from -0.3 to 0.0. Photometric gravities, derived from the assumed stellar mass of 0.7 Modot and the luminosity and Teff of the stars, fell between +0.25 and +0.70. Mean [Fe/H] values were -0.8 for spectroscopic gravities and -0.6 for photometric gravities. A test using spectra of the same resolution of the two coolest red giants in the globular cluster M4 obtained at the Apache Point Observatory were analyzed for comparison with the definitive analysis of Ivans et al. (1999). The very cool metal-poor red giant HD 232078 was also analyzed for comparison with the analysis of Gonzalez & Wallerstein (1998). Both comparisons showed that our methods yield the same abundance scale as previous works. We have compared the composition of stars in NGC 6388 with those of K giants with similar [Fe/H] in 47 Tuc and the Galactic bulge. The observed value of [O/Fe] is near zero, which is less than in 47 Tuc and bulge stars of similar metallicity. The α-elements behave similarly to oxygen and show only small excesses at about the same level as do the α-elements in the globular clusters associated with the Sgr system. It is unclear whether these differences are responsible for the unusual color-magnitude diagram of NGC 6388.

  2. Origin of fluids and the evolution of the Atlantis II deep hydrothermal system, Red Sea: Strontium isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Blanc, Gérard; Stille, Peter

    1995-12-01

    Atlantis II is the largest and most mineralized of the deeps along the axis of the Red Sea spreading center. Its basaltic substratum is covered by recent layered metalliferous sediments, which precipitated from an overlying brine pool. The 87Sr /86Sr ratio and the strontium concentration of interstitial waters within these sediments range between 0.70708 and 0.70725 and between 43 and 53 ppm, respectively. They are close to what is found for the present-day deep brine pool (0.707105, 45.10 ppm). The strontium concentration and the 87Sr /86Sr ratio of the Atlantis II Deep brines can be derived from those of the interstitial waters of the surrounding Miocene evaporite by hydrothermal interaction with oceanic basaltic rocks at a maximal water/rock ratio of 2-3. This water/rock ratio is similar to that calculated for oceanic hydrothermal systems on sediment-free ridges. Interstitial waters show a linear trend on a plot of 87Sr /86Sr vs. 1/Sr. The highest strontium concentration and the most radiogenic interstitial waters correspond to sediment samples enriched in iron and manganese oxide minerals. These waters reflect the diagenetic release of strontium by oxide minerals that initially precipitated at the interface between the brine pool and more radiogenic seawater. The solid fraction of the sediment has 87Sr /86Sr isotopic compositions intermediate to those of the brines and seawater. The most radiogenic strontium values were observed in samples strongly enriched in marine microbiota. The gradual isotopic evolution in the lowest part of the western basin sediments testifies to the gradual influence of the hydrothermal activity in the deep in the beginning of the Atlantis II Deep sedimentary history. The strontium isotopic composition of solid samples from younger metalliferous facies is fairly uniform and close to that of the present-day brine. This isotopic homogeneity indicates that the isotopic composition of mineralizing fluids did not change during the time of

  3. Water scorpions (Heteroptera, Nepidae) and giant water bugs (Heteroptera, Belostomatidae): sources of new members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Simek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2007-07-01

    Two novel octapeptide members of the AKH/RPCH family have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of water bugs. The giant water bug Lethocerus indicus (family: Belostomatidae) contains a peptide code-named Letin-AKH with the sequence pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Tyr-Trp amide, and the water scorpion Nepa cinerea (family: Nepidae) has the peptide code-named Nepci-AKH with the sequence pGlu-Leu/Ile-Asn-Phe-Ser-Ser-Gly-Trp amide. The sequences were deduced from the multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data from crude CC extracts. Synthetic peptides were made and co-elution on reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with the natural peptide from crude gland extract confirmed the accuracy of the deduced sequence for Letin-AKH and demonstrated that Nepci-AKH contains a Leu residue at position 2 and not an Ile residue. A previously characterized member of the AKH/RPCH family was identified in the stick water scorpion Ranatra linearis by mass spectrometry: Grybi-AKH (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide) has the same mass (919 Da) as Nepci-AKH and differs in two positions from Nepci-AKH (residues 2 and 6). The apparent function of the peptides is to achieve lipid mobilization in the species under investigation; indications for this came from conspecific bioassays using the appropriate synthetic peptides for injecting into the insects. This function is very likely linked to dispersal flight metabolism of water bugs. Swimming activity in N. cinerea also results in an increase in lipid concentration in the hemolymph.

  4. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F. David; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M. Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Madroñero-Vuelta, Ana B.; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Magro, César; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, F. Javier; Martínez, Lina; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; García-Villanueva, M. Jesús; Fernández-Contreras, M. Encarnación; Sanchez-Pernaute, Olga; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José L.; Fanlo-Mateo, Patricia; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor M.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10−40, OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1∗04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10−43) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10−46), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10−45) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10−6, OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10−6, OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10−5, OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  5. AN IN-DEPTH VIEW OF THE MID-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF POINT SOURCES AND THE DIFFUSE ISM IN THE SMC GIANT H II REGION, N66

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Remy; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Brandl, Bernhard R. E-mail: kej7a@virginia.edu E-mail: vianney.lebouteiller@cea.fr E-mail: epeeters@uwo.ca E-mail: brandl@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2013-07-01

    The focus of this work is to study mid-infrared point sources and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the low-metallicity ({approx}0.2 Z{sub Sun }) giant H II region N66 in order to determine properties that may shed light on star formation in these conditions. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph, we study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), dust continuum, silicate, and ionic line emission from 14 targeted infrared point sources as well as spectra of the diffuse ISM that is representative of both the photodissociation regions (PDRs) and the H II regions. Among the point source spectra, we spectroscopically confirm that the brightest mid-infrared point source is a massive embedded young stellar object, we detect silicates in emission associated with two young stellar clusters, and we see spectral features of a known B[e] star that are commonly associated with Herbig Be stars. In the diffuse ISM, we provide additional evidence that the very small grain population is being photodestroyed in the hard radiation field. The 11.3 {mu}m PAH complex emission exhibits an unexplained centroid shift in both the point source and ISM spectra that should be investigated at higher signal-to-noise and resolution. Unlike studies of other regions, the 6.2 {mu}m and 7.7 {mu}m band fluxes are decoupled; the data points cover a large range of I{sub 7.7}/I{sub 11.3} PAH ratio values within a narrow band of I{sub 6.2}/I{sub 11.3} ratio values. Furthermore, there is a spread in PAH ionization, being more neutral in the dense PDR where the radiation field is relatively soft, but ionized in the diffuse ISM/PDR. By contrast, the PAH size distribution appears to be independent of local ionization state. Important to unresolved studies of extragalactic low-metallicity star-forming regions, we find that emission from the infrared-bright point sources accounts for only 20%-35% of the PAH emission from the entire region. These results make a comparative data set to

  6. DNA cleavage in red light promoted by copper(II) complexes of alpha-amino acids and photoactive phenanthroline bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2008-12-28

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(L-trp)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (1-3) and [Cu(L-phe)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (4-6) of L-tryptophan (L-trp) and L-phenylalanine (L-phe) having phenanthroline bases (B), viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1 and 4), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2 and 5) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3 and 6), were prepared and characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Complexes 3 and 6 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and show the presence of a square pyramidal (4 + 1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry in which the N,O-donor amino acid (L-trp or L-phe) and N,N-donor phenanthroline base bind at the equatorial plane with an aqua ligand coordinated at the elongated axial site. Complex 3 shows significant distortion from the square pyramidal geometry and a strong intramolecular pi-pi stacking interaction between the pendant indole ring of L-trp and the planar dppz aromatic moiety. All the complexes display good binding propensity to the calf thymus DNA giving an order: 3,6 (dppz) > 2,5 (dpq) > 1,4 (phen). The binding constant (K(b)) values are in the range of 2.1 x 10(4)-1.1 x 10(6) mol(-1) with the binding site size (s) values of 0.17-0.63. The phen and dpq complexes are minor groove binders while the dppz analogues bind at the DNA major groove. Theoretical DNA docking studies on 2 and 3 show the close proximity of two photosensitizers, viz. the indole moiety of L-trp and the quinoxaline/phenazine of the dpq/dppz bases, to the complementary DNA strands. Complexes 2 and 3 show oxidative DNA double strand breaks (dsb) of supercoiled (SC) DNA forming a significant quantity of linear DNA along with the nicked circular (NC) form on photoexposure to UV-A light of 365 nm and red light of 647.1 nm (Ar-Kr laser). Complexes 1,5 and 6 show only single strand breaks (ssb) forming NC DNA. The red light induced DNA cleavage involves metal-assisted photosensitization of L-trp and dpq/dppz base resulting in the formation of a reactive

  7. Absence or reduction of carbonic anhydrase II in the red cells of the beluga whale and llama: implications for adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Hewett-Emmett, D; Tashian, R E

    2000-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) expression was examined in the red cells of two mammals that have adapted to low oxygen stress: the llama, which has adapted to high altitudes, and the beluga (or white) whale, which routinely dives for extended periods. Immunodiffusion analyses of their Hb-free hemolysates and partial amino acid sequencing of their HPLC-separated nonheme proteins indicate that the low-activity CA I isozyme is the major nonheme protein in erythrocytes of both the beluga whale and the llama. The high-activity CA II isozyme was not detected in the whale red cells but was present at low levels in erythrocytes of the llama. These results suggest that the absence or decrease in the expression of the high-activity CA II isozyme may be advantageous under hypoxic conditions.

  8. Near infra-red emission from a mer-Ru(II) complex: consequences of strong σ-donation from a neutral, flexible ligand with dual binding modes.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amlan K; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Campagna, Sebastiano; Hanan, Garry S

    2014-07-04

    A rare example of dual coordination modes by a novel tridentate ligand gives rise to unique fac-and mer-Ru((II/III)) complexes. The mer-Ru(II)-complex displays the farthest red-shift of a triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) emission with a tridentate ligand for a mononuclear complex. This observation is a consequence of large bite angle and strong σ-donation by the ligand, the combined effect of which helps to separate the energy of the (3)MLCT and (3)MC states.

  9. Spot evolution on the red giant star XX Triangulum. A starspot-decay analysis based on time-series Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Solar spots appear to decay linearly proportional to their size. The decay rate of solar spots is directly related to magnetic diffusivity, which itself is a key quantity for the length of a magnetic-activity cycle. Is a linear spot decay also seen on other stars, and is this in agreement with the large range of solar and stellar activity cycle lengths? Aims: We investigate the evolution of starspots on the rapidly-rotating (Prot≈24 d) K0 giant XX Tri, using consecutive time-series Doppler images. Our aim is to obtain a well-sampled movie of the stellar surface over many years, and thereby detect and quantify a starspot decay law for further comparison with the Sun. Methods: We obtained continuous high-resolution and phase-resolved spectroscopy with the 1.2-m robotic STELLA telescope on Tenerife over six years, and these observations are ongoing. For each observing season, we obtained between 5 to 7 independent Doppler images, one per stellar rotation, making up a total of 36 maps. All images were reconstructed with our line-profile inversion code iMap. A wavelet analysis was implemented for denoising the line profiles. To quantify starspot area decay and growth, we match the observed images with simplified spot models based on a Monte Carlo approach. Results: It is shown that the surface of XX Tri is covered with large high-latitude and even polar spots and with occasional small equatorial spots. Just over the course of six years, we see a systematically changing spot distribution with various timescales and morphology, such as spot fragmentation and spot merging as well as spot decay and formation. An average linear decay of D = -0.022 ± 0.002 SH/day is inferred. We found evidence of an active longitude in phase toward the (unseen) companion star. Furthermore, we detect a weak solar-like differential rotation with a surface shear of α = 0.016 ± 0.003. From the decay rate, we determine a turbulent diffusivity of ηT = (6.3 ± 0.5) × 1014 cm2/s and

  10. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N . I. A multiple planetary system around the red giant star TYC 1422-614-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Adamów, M.; Kowalik, K.; Maciejewski, G.; Nowak, G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Deka, B.; Adamczyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Stars that have evolved off the main sequence are crucial for expanding the frontiers of knowledge on exoplanets toward higher stellar masses and for constraining star-planet interaction mechanisms. These stars have an intrinsic activity, however, which complicates the interpretation of precise radial velocity (RV) measurements, and therefore they are often avoided in planet searches. Over the past ten years, we have monitored about 1000 evolved stars for RV variations in search for low-mass companions under the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search program with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Selected prospective candidates that required higher RV precision measurements have been followed with HARPS-N at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Aims: We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars, to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. Methods: We obtained 69 epochs of precise RV measurements for TYC 1422-614-1 collected over 3651 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, and 17 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 408 days. We complemented these RV data with photometric time-series from the All Sky Automatic Survey archive. Results: We report the discovery of a multiple planetary system around the evolved K2 giant star TYC 1422-614-1. The system orbiting the 1.15 M⊙ star is composed of a planet with mass msini = 2.5 MJ in a 0.69 AU orbit, and a planet or brown dwarf with msini = 10 MJ in an orbit of 1.37 AU. The multiple planetary system orbiting TYC 1422-614-1 is the first finding of the TAPAS project, a HARPS-N monitoring of evolved planetary systems identified with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University

  11. Giant increase in the metal-enhanced fluorescence of organic molecules in nanoporous alumina templates and large molecule-specific red/blue-shift of the fluorescence peak.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Kanchibotla, B; Nelson, J D; Edwards, J D; Anderson, J; Tepper, G C; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2014-10-08

    The fluorescence of organic fluorophore molecules is enhanced when they are placed in contact with certain metals (Al, Ag, Cu, Au, etc.) whose surface plasmon waves couple into the radiative modes of the molecules and increase the radiative efficiency. Here, we report a hitherto unknown size dependence of this metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect in the nanoscale. When the molecules are deposited in nanoporous anodic alumina films with exposed aluminum at the bottom of the pores, they form organic nanowires standing on aluminum nanoparticles whose plasmon waves have much larger amplitudes. This increases the MEF strongly, resulting in several orders of magnitude increase in the fluorescence intensity of the organic fluorophores. The increase in intensity shows an inverse superlinear dependence on nanowire diameter because the nanowires also act as plasmonic "waveguides" that concentrate the plasmons and increase the coupling of the plasmons with the radiative modes of the molecules. Furthermore, if the nanoporous template housing the nanowires has built-in electric fields due to space charges, a strong molecule-specific red- or blue-shift is induced in the fluorescence peak owing to a renormalization of the dipole moment of the molecule. This can be exploited to detect minute amounts of target molecules in a mixture using their optical signature (fluorescence) despite the presence of confounding background signals. It can result in a unique new technology for biosensing and chemical sensing.

  12. SiO rotation-vibration bands in cool giants II. The behaviour of SiO bands in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aringer, B.; Höfner, S.; Wiedemann, G.; Hron, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Käufl, H. U.; Windsteig, W.

    1999-02-01

    The first overtone rotation-vibration transitions of SiO give rise to prominent bandheads in the wavelength range between 4.0 and 4.5 mu m. In order to study the behaviour of these features in AGB stars we observed the 3.94 to 4.12 mu m spectra for a sample of 23 oxygen-rich late-type variables. In contrast to the SRb objects, the Miras show a very large scatter of the equivalent widths of the SiO bands. Despite their cool temperatures some of them have only weak or no SiO absorption, which seems to be related to their strong pulsations producing a large variability of the features. When comparing the band intensities with photometric data, we found a general decrease with bluer IRAS (12-25) colors. However, this trend may only reflect the different behaviour of the Miras and SRb stars in our sample. We did not discover any correlation of the equivalent widths with the effective temperatures derived from (J-K), or with the (K-12) color and the IRAS-LRS class, both of which can be regarded as a rough measure for the thickness of the circumstellar shell. In Paper I of this series (Aringer et al. \\cite{siop}) we have shown that synthetic spectra calculated from hydrostatic MARCS atmospheres are successful in reproducing the observed band intensities of giants with spectral types earlier than about M5 III and M2 II\\@. However, they generally predict too strong features for very cool and extended objects, as they are discussed in this work. And they fail completely when it comes to Miras with weak or no SiO absorption. These stars are dominated by dynamical phenomena and, not surprisingly, they can therefore not be described by hydrostatic structures. Thus, we have also computed synthetic spectra based on experimental dynamical models. Although they still have some shortcomings, we demonstrate that, in principle, they are able to explain the whole range of equivalent widths of the observed SiO bandheads and their variations. Based on observations made at the European

  13. Effectively simultaneous naked-eye detection of Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) using cyanidin extracted from red cabbage as chelating agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaodee, Warangkhana; Aeungmaitrepirom, Wanlapa; Tuntulani, Thawatchai

    Simultaneous determination of Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) using cyanidin as a chelating agent was investigated in terms of both quantitative and qualitative detections. Cyanidin was extracted and purified from red cabbage which is a local plant in Thailand. The selectivity of this method was examined by regulating the pH of cyanidin solution operated together with masking agents. It was found that Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) simultaneously responded with the color change at pH 7, pH 6, pH 5 and pH 4, respectively. KF, DMG and the mixture of KF and DMG were used as masking agents for the determination of Fe(III), Al(III) and Pb(II), respectively. Results from naked-eye detection were evaluated by comparing with those of inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and there was no significant difference noticed. Cyanidin using as a multianalyte reagent could be employed for simultaneous determination of Cu(II), Pb(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) at the lowest concentration at 50, 80, 50 and 200 μM, respectively, by slightly varying pHs. Moreover, the proposed method could be potentially applied for real water samples with simplicity, rapidity, low cost and environmental safety.

  14. Effect of red cyst cell inoculation and iron(II) supplementation on autotrophic astaxanthin production by Haematococcus pluvialis under outdoor summer conditions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min-Eui; Choi, Yoon Young; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-01-20

    The negative effect of heat stress on the autotrophic astaxanthin production by Haematococcus pluvialis has been observed during outdoor culture in summer. Under the summer conditions, the proliferation of vegetative cells was highly halted in the green stage and the inducibility in the biosynthesis of astaxanthin was partly hindered in the red stage. Herein, under outdoor summer conditions in which variations of the diurnal temperature occur, heat-stress-driven inefficient vegetative growth of H. pluvialis was highly improved by inoculating the red cyst cells; thereby, maintaining relatively moderate intracellular carotenoid levels in the green stage. Subsequently, a remarkably enhanced astaxanthin titer was successfully obtained by supplementing 50 μM iron(II) to induce the heat stress-driven Haber-Weiss reaction in the red stage. As a result, the productivity of astaxanthin in the cells cultured under summer temperature conditions (23.4-33.5 °C) using the two methods of red cell (cyst) inoculation and the iron(Fe(2+)) supplementation was increased by 147% up to 5.53 mg/L day compared with that of the cells cultured under spring temperature conditions (17.5-27.3 °C). Our technical solutions will definitely improve the annual natural astaxanthin productivity in H. pluvialis in locations confronted by hot summer weather, particularly in large-scale closed photobioreactor systems.

  15. Binding of copper(II) ions to the polyproline II helices of PEVK modules of the giant elastic protein titin as revealed by ESI-MS, CD, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kan; Wang, Kuan

    2003-10-01

    Titin, a family of giant elastic proteins, constitutes an elastic sarcomere matrix in striated muscle. In the I-band region of the sarcomere, the titin PEVK segment acts as a molecular spring to generate elasticity as well as sites of adhesion with parallel thin filaments. Previously, we reported that PEVK consists of tandem repeats of 28 residue modules and that the "polyproline II-coil" motif is the fundamental conformational motif of the PEVK module. In order to characterize the factors that may affect and alter the PPII-coil conformational motifs, we have initiated a systematic study of the interaction with divalent cations (Cu2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+) and a conformational profile of PEVK peptides (a representative 28-mer peptide PR: PEPPKEVVPEKKAPVAPPKKPEVPPVKV and its subfragments PR1: kvPEPPKEVVPE, PR2: VPEKKAPVAPPK, PR3: KPEVPPVKV). UV-Vis absorption difference spectra and CD spectra showed that Cu2+ bound to PR1 with high affinity (20 microM), while its binding to PR2 and PR3 as well as the binding of other cations to all four peptides were of lower affinity (>100 microM). Conformational studies by CD revealed that Cu2+ binding to PR1 resulted in a polyproline II to turn transition up to a 1:2 PR1/Cu2+ ratio and a coil to turn transition at higher Cu2+ concentration. ESI-MS provided the stoichiometry of PEVK peptide-Cu2+ complexes at both low and high ion strength, confirming the specific high affinity binding of Cu2+ to PR1 and PR. Furthermore, NMR and ESI-MS/MS fragmentation analysis elucidated the binding sites of the PEVK peptide-Cu2+ complexes at (-2)KVPE2, 8VPE10, 13APV15, and 22EVP24. A potential application of Cu2+ binding in peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry was also revealed. We conclude that Cu2+ binds and bends PEVK peptides to a beta-turn-like structure at specific sites. The specific targeting of Cu2+ towards PPII is likely to be of significant value in elucidating the roles of PPII in titin elasticity as well as in interactions of

  16. Novel type of red-shifted chlorophyll a antenna complex from Chromera velia: II. Biochemistry and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bína, David; Gardian, Zdenko; Herbstová, Miroslava; Kotabová, Eva; Koník, Peter; Litvín, Radek; Prášil, Ondřej; Tichý, Josef; Vácha, František

    2014-06-01

    A novel chlorophyll a containing pigment-protein complex expressed by cells of Chromera velia adapted to growth under red/far-red illumination [1]. Purification of the complex was achieved by means of anion-exchange chromatography and gel-filtration. The antenna is shown to be an aggregate of ~20kDa proteins of the light-harvesting complex (LHC) family, unstable in the isolated form. The complex possesses an absorption maximum at 705nm at room temperature in addition to the main chlorophyll a maximum at 677nm producing the major emission band at 714nm at room temperature. The far-red absorption is shown to be the property of the isolated aggregate in the intact form and lost upon dissociation. The purified complex was further characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. This work thus identified the third different class of antenna complex in C. velia after the recently described FCP-like and LHCr-like antennas. Possible candidates for red antennas are identified in other taxonomic groups, such as eustigmatophytes and the relevance of the present results to other known examples of red-shifted antenna from other organisms is discussed. This work appears to be the first successful isolation of a chlorophyll a-based far-red antenna complex absorbing above 700nm unrelated to LHCI.

  17. A selective, long-lived deep-red emissive ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes for the detection of BSA.

    PubMed

    Babu, Eththilu; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Singaravadivel, Subramanian; Bhuvaneswari, Jayaraman; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2014-09-15

    A selective, label free luminescence sensor for bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated using ruthenium(II) complexes over the other proteins. Interaction between BSA and ruthenium(II) complexes has been studied using absorption, emission, excited state lifetime and circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques. The luminescence intensity of ruthenium(II) complexes (I and II), has enhanced at 602 and 613 nm with a large hypsochromic shift of 18 and 5 nm respectively upon addition of BSA. The mode of binding of ruthenium(II) complexes with BSA has analyzed using computational docking studies.

  18. Anoxia and possible export production spikes in the Red Sea during Termination II: evidence from U-decay series and organic C concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfstein, A.; Almogi-Labin, A.; McManus, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The late Quaternary history of the Red Sea is characterized by sharp increases in sea surface salinity during glacial maxima in response to global sea level drop. These imposed an extremely weak current exchange between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean through the Bab-el-Mandeb Straits that resulted in temporal changes in stratification, productivity and subsurface oxygenation of the Red Sea. The combined effect of these perturbations has been interpreted to impose extended aplanktonic zones in Red Sea sediments centered at glacial maxima. Yet the dynamics of the transition between glacial and interglacial stages in the Red Sea are still not well understood. Here, we present evidence for the occurrence of a strong anoxic episode during the penultimate transition from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS5 (Termination II) based on uranium concentrations, isotopic ratios, and organic carbon concentrations (Corg) studied in core KL23 taken by R/V Meteor from northern Red Sea (24o44.88'N 35o03.28'E) at 702 m water depth. (234U/238U) activity ratios and U concentrations start rising from their MIS6 levels (~1 and 1.9 ppm, respectively) ca. 140 ka, and peak at 135-132 ka (1.08 and 3.1 ppm). These patterns are matched by changes in Corg, and the onset of all slightly precedes sea level rise patterns. Thereafter, uranium and Corg decrease sharply, reaching minima that characterizes the rest of MIS5e, ca. 130 ka. Uranium activity ratios however, decrease gradually from their deglacial peak to a minimum value (~0.94) at 122 ka. In view of the redox sensitive behavior of U, the buildup of U concentrations would support anoxic conditions, rather than a rise in export production, as the most likely explanation for the preservation of Corg in the sediments. Yet, the high (234U/238U) values that imply a dominance of open seawater U in the samples, together with d13C values of foraminifera bracketing the studied interval that display a depletion trend indicating an increase in

  19. Mass loss from red giants - Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    A discussion is presented of IR spectroscopy, particularly high-resolution spectroscopy in the approximately 1-20 micron band, as it impacts the study of circumstellar envelopes. The molecular bands within this region contain an enormous amount of information, especially when observed with sufficient resolution to obtain kinematic information. In a single spectrum, it is possible to resolve lines from up to 50 different rotational/vibrational levels of a given molecule and to detect several different isotopic variants. When high resolution techniques are combined with mapping techniques and/or time sequence observations of variable stars, the resulting information can paint a very detailed picture of the mass-loss phenomenon. To date, near-IR observations have been made of 20 molecular species. CO is the most widely observed molecule and useful information has been gleaned from the observed rotational excitation, kinematics, time variability and spatial structure of its lines. Examples of different observing techniques are discussed in the following sections.

  20. Interferometric Studies of Red Giants with MAPPIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael J.

    2002-06-01

    Powerful new tools for the analysis of wavelength-dispersed aperture masking data are presented, as applied to the MAPPIT instrument of the 3.9 m Anglo-Australia Telescope. By using both baseline and wavelength bootstrapping simultaneously, solutions were found for the phase of wavefronts degraded by atmospheric and instrumental effects. This allowed coherent processing of many data sets, greatly improving signal-to-noise both at the longest baselines for well resolved objects, and at all baselines in for data in TiO absorption bands. Using this new techniques, as well as power spectrum-based techniques, wavelength-dependent diameters are found in the range 650-950 nm for the following stars: R Carinae, R Leonis, omicron Ceti, R Hydrae, W Hydrae, R Doradus, L2 Puppis, alpha Orionis, gamma Crucis, eta Carinae and VY Canis Majoris. All the Mira-like stars showed greater than 50% variation in diameter over the available wavelength range. L2 Puppis, a semi-regular variable resolved for the first time, showed a variation in diameter consistent with scattering by a recently ejected shell of dust.

  1. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: This enormity is a rarity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Silvia Victor; Mitra, Dipika Kalyan; Pawar, Sudarshana Devendrasing; Vijayakar, Harshad Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant cell epulis, osteoclastoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, or giant cell hyperplasia. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen. The lesions are painless, vary in size, and may cover several teeth. It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

  2. The use of fish metabolic, pathological and parasitological indices in pollution monitoring . II. The Red Sea and Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamant, A.; Banet, A.; Paperna, I.; Westernhagen, H. v.; Broeg, K.; Kruener, G.; Koerting, W.; Zander, S.

    1999-12-01

    The complex interactions between parasites, hosts and the environment are influenced by the stability of the ecosystem. Heteroxenous parasites, with complex, multiple-host life cycles, can persist only in habitats where the full range of their required hosts are present. Conversely, in impoverished environments such as those impacted by environmental stress, monoxenous species that have simple, single-host life cycles are likely to predominate. In the present study, we analyzed the ratio between heteroxenous and monoxenous (H/M) parasites as well as parasite species richness (SH/SM) and species diversity in rabbitfish (Siganus rivulatus) collected from several sites in the Red Sea. The rabbitfish is a Suez Canal immigrant, well established in the eastern Mediterranean, and fish were also collected from a site on the Mediterranean coast of Israel. Separate treatment of the micro- and macroparasite components of the rabbitfish parasite communities in the Red Sea suggested that macroparasites only - monogenea and gut parasites - were better indicators than the parasite community as a whole. Quantification of macroparasites is accurate, saves time and effort, produces more accurate data and better differentiates between sites. Higher H/M ratios and SH/SM ratios were found in the rabbitfish collected at the ecologically stable habitat of the coral reef compared to rabbitfish from sandy habitat or mariculture-impacted sandy habitat. The results of the study emphasized the negative impacts of cage mariculture on the environment. The rabbitfish collected near the mariculture farms supported the poorest and least diverse parasite communities of all sampled sites, with virtual depletion of heteroxenous species, and even reduction of gill monogenean infections on the hosts. When results from the Mediterranean sites were compared with those of the Red Sea, the data showed full representation of monoxenous parasites (all but one of Red Sea origin), while heteroxenous species

  3. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  4. Rheology of red blood cells under flow in highly confined microchannels. II. Effect of focusing and confinement.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Guillermo R; Hernández-Machado, Aurora; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2014-10-07

    We study the focusing of red blood cells and vesicles in pressure-driven flows in highly confined microchannels (10-30 μm), identifying the control parameters that dictate the cell distribution along the channel. Our results show that an increase in the flow velocity leads to a sharper cell distribution in a lateral position of the channel. This position depends on the channel width, with cells flowing at outer (closer to the walls) positions in thicker channels. We also study the relevance of the object shape, exploring the different behaviour of red blood cells and different vesicles. We also analyze the implications of these phenomena in the cell suspension rheology, highlighting the crucial role of the wall confinement in the rheological properties of the suspension.

  5. The Sampled Red List Index for Plants, phase II: ground-truthing specimen-based conservation assessments

    PubMed Central

    Brummitt, Neil; Bachman, Steven P.; Aletrari, Elina; Chadburn, Helen; Griffiths-Lee, Janine; Lutz, Maiko; Moat, Justin; Rivers, Malin C.; Syfert, Mindy M.; Nic Lughadha, Eimear M.

    2015-01-01

    The IUCN Sampled Red List Index (SRLI) is a policy response by biodiversity scientists to the need to estimate trends in extinction risk of the world's diminishing biological diversity. Assessments of plant species for the SRLI project rely predominantly on herbarium specimen data from natural history collections, in the overwhelming absence of accurate population data or detailed distribution maps for the vast majority of plant species. This creates difficulties in re-assessing these species so as to measure genuine changes in conservation status, which must be observed under the same Red List criteria in order to be distinguished from an increase in the knowledge available for that species, and thus re-calculate the SRLI. However, the same specimen data identify precise localities where threatened species have previously been collected and can be used to model species ranges and to target fieldwork in order to test specimen-based range estimates and collect population data for SRLI plant species. Here, we outline a strategy for prioritizing fieldwork efforts in order to apply a wider range of IUCN Red List criteria to assessments of plant species, or any taxa with detailed locality or natural history specimen data, to produce a more robust estimation of the SRLI. PMID:25561676

  6. The sampled Red List Index for plants, phase II: ground-truthing specimen-based conservation assessments.

    PubMed

    Brummitt, Neil; Bachman, Steven P; Aletrari, Elina; Chadburn, Helen; Griffiths-Lee, Janine; Lutz, Maiko; Moat, Justin; Rivers, Malin C; Syfert, Mindy M; Nic Lughadha, Eimear M

    2015-02-19

    The IUCN Sampled Red List Index (SRLI) is a policy response by biodiversity scientists to the need to estimate trends in extinction risk of the world's diminishing biological diversity. Assessments of plant species for the SRLI project rely predominantly on herbarium specimen data from natural history collections, in the overwhelming absence of accurate population data or detailed distribution maps for the vast majority of plant species. This creates difficulties in re-assessing these species so as to measure genuine changes in conservation status, which must be observed under the same Red List criteria in order to be distinguished from an increase in the knowledge available for that species, and thus re-calculate the SRLI. However, the same specimen data identify precise localities where threatened species have previously been collected and can be used to model species ranges and to target fieldwork in order to test specimen-based range estimates and collect population data for SRLI plant species. Here, we outline a strategy for prioritizing fieldwork efforts in order to apply a wider range of IUCN Red List criteria to assessments of plant species, or any taxa with detailed locality or natural history specimen data, to produce a more robust estimation of the SRLI.

  7. Abundances of disk and bulge giants from high-resolution optical spectra. II. O, Mg, Ca, and Ti in the bulge sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, H.; Ryde, N.; Schultheis, M.; Zoccali, M.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Determining elemental abundances of bulge stars can, via chemical evolution modeling, help to understand the formation and evolution of the bulge. Recently there have been claims both for and against the bulge having a different [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] trend as compared to the local thick disk. This could possibly indicate a faster, or at least different, formation timescale of the bulge as compared to the local thick disk. Aims: We aim to determine the abundances of oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium in a sample of 46 bulge K giants, 35 of which have been analyzed for oxygen and magnesium in previous works, and compare this sample to homogeneously determined elemental abundances of a local disk sample of 291 K giants. Methods: We used spectral synthesis to determine both the stellar parameters and elemental abundances of the bulge stars analyzed here. We used the exact same method that we used to analyze the comparison sample of 291 local K giants in Paper I of this series. Results: Compared to the previous analysis of the 35 stars in our sample, we find lower [Mg/Fe] for [Fe/H] >-0.5, and therefore contradict the conclusion about a declining [O/Mg] for increasing [Fe/H]. We instead see a constant [O/Mg] over all the observed [Fe/H] in the bulge. Furthermore, we find no evidence for a different behavior of the alpha-iron trends in the bulge as compared to the local thick disk from our two samples. Note to the reader: following the publication of the corrigendum, the subtitle of the article was corrected on April 6, 2017. "O, Mg, Co, and Ti" has been replaced by "O, Mg, Ca, and Ti".Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO programs 71.B-0617(A), 073.B-0074(A), and 085.B-0552(A)).

  8. Witnessing the Birth of the Red Sequence: ALMA High-resolution Imaging of [C II] and Dust in Two Interacting Ultra-red Starbursts at z = 4.425

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunne, L.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Lewis, A.; Maddox, S.; Riechers, D.; Serjeant, S.; Van der Werf, P.; Biggs, A. D.; Bremer, M.; Cigan, P.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Messias, H.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; van Kampen, E.

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have studied the morphology and the physical scale of the interstellar medium—both gas and dust—in SGP 38326, an unlensed pair of interacting starbursts at z = 4.425. SGP 38326 is the most luminous star bursting system known at z > 4, with a total IR luminosity of L IR ˜ 2.5 × 1013 L ⊙ and a star formation rate of ˜ 4500 M ⊙ yr-1. SGP 38326 also contains a molecular gas reservoir among the most massive yet found in the early universe, and it is the likely progenitor of a massive, red-and-dead elliptical galaxy at z ˜ 3. Probing scales of ˜0.″1 or ˜800 pc we find that the smooth distribution of the continuum emission from cool dust grains contrasts with the more irregular morphology of the gas, as traced by the [C ii] fine structure emission. The gas is also extended over larger physical scales than the dust. The velocity information provided by the resolved [C ii] emission reveals that the dynamics of the two interacting components of SGP 38326 are each compatible with disk-like, ordered rotation, but also reveals an ISM which is turbulent and unstable. Our observations support a scenario where at least a subset of the most distant extreme starbursts are highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies.

  9. Selective permeabilization of the host cell membrane of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells with streptolysin O and equinatoxin II

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Katherine E.; Spielmann, Tobias; Hanssen, Eric; Adisa, Akinola; Separovic, Frances; Dixon, Matthew W. A.; Trenholme, Katharine R.; Hawthorne, Paula L.; Gardiner, Don L.; Gilberger, Tim; Tilley, Leann

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum develops within the mature RBCs (red blood cells) of its human host in a PV (parasitophorous vacuole) that separates the host cell cytoplasm from the parasite surface. The pore-forming toxin, SLO (streptolysin O), binds to cholesterol-containing membranes and can be used to selectively permeabilize the host cell membrane while leaving the PV membrane intact. We found that in mixtures of infected and uninfected RBCs, SLO preferentially lyses uninfected RBCs rather than infected RBCs, presumably because of differences in cholesterol content of the limiting membrane. This provides a means of generating pure preparations of viable ring stage infected RBCs. As an alternative permeabilizing agent we have characterized EqtII (equinatoxin II), a eukaryotic pore-forming toxin that binds preferentially to sphingomyelin-containing membranes. EqtII lyses the limiting membrane of infected and uninfected RBCs with similar efficiency but does not disrupt the PV membrane. It generates pores of up to 100 nm, which allow entry of antibodies for immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling. The present study provides novel tools for the analysis of this important human pathogen and highlights differences between Plasmodium-infected and uninfected RBCs. PMID:17155936

  10. Spectral relationships for atmospheric correction. II. Improving NASA's standard and MUMM near infra-red modeling schemes.

    PubMed

    Goyens, C; Jamet, C; Ruddick, K G

    2013-09-09

    Spectral relationships, reflecting the spectral dependence of water-leaving reflectance, ρw(λ), can be easily implemented in current AC algorithms with the aim to improve ρw(λ) retrievals where the algorithms fail. The present study evaluates the potential of spectral relationships to improve the MUMM [Ruddick et al., 2006, Limnol. Oceanogr. 51, 1167-1179] and standard NASA [Bailey et al., 2010, Opt. Express 18, 7521-7527] near infra-red (NIR) modeling schemes included in the AC algorithm to account for non-zero ρw(λNIR), based on in situ coastal ρw(λ) and simulated Rayleigh corrected reflectance data. Two modified NIR-modeling schemes are investigated: (1) the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme is forced with bounding relationships in the red spectral domain and with a NIR polynomial relationship and, (2) the constant NIR ρw(λ) ratio used in the MUMM NIR-modeling scheme is replaced by a NIR polynomial spectral relationship. Results suggest that the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme performs better for all turbidity ranges and in particular in the blue spectral domain (percentage bias decreased by approximately 50%) when it is forced with the red and NIR spectral relationships. However, with these new constraints, more reflectance spectra are flagged due to non-physical Chlorophyll-a concentration estimations. The new polynomial-based MUMM NIR-modeling scheme yielded lower ρw(λ) retrieval errors and particularly in extremely turbid waters. However, including the polynomial NIR relationship significantly increased the sensitivity of the algorithm to errors on the selected aerosol model from nearby clear water pixels.

  11. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  12. The fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra study on the interactions of palladium (II)-Nootropic chelate with Congo red and their analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Jingdong; Liu, Shaopu; Peng, Huanjun; Pan, Ziyu; Bu, Lingli; Xiao, Huan; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2017-04-01

    A highly sensitive detection approach of resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS) is firstly applied to analyzing nootropic drugs including piracetam (PIR) and oxiracetam (OXI). In HCl-NaAc buffer solution (pH = 3.0), the OXI chelated with palladium (II) to form the chelate cation [Pd2·OXI]2 +, and then reacted with Congo red (CGR) by virtue of electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic force to form binary complex [Pd2·OXI]. CGR2, which could result in the great enhancement of RRS. The resonance Rayleigh scattering signal was recorded at λex = λem = 375 nm. This mixture complex not only has higher RRS, but also makes contribution to significant increase of fluorescence, and the same phenomena also were discovered in PIR. The enhanced RRS intensity is in proportion to the PIR and OXI concentration in the range of 0.03-3.0 μg mL- 1, and the detection limit (DL) of RRS method for PIR and OXI is 2.3 ng mL- 1 and 9.7 ng mL- 1. In addition, the DL of fluorescence method for PIR and OXI is 8.4 μg mL- 1 and 19.5 μg mL- 1. Obviously, the RRS is the highly sensitive method, and the recoveries of the two kinds of nootropic drugs were range from 100.4% to 101.8.0% with RSD (n = 5) from 1.1% to 3.1% by RRS method. This paper not only investigated the optimum conditions for detecting nootropics with using RRS method, but also focused on the reasons for enhancing RRS intensity and the reaction mechanism, which in order to firm and contract the resultant. Finally, The RRS method has been applied to detect nootropic drugs in human urine samples with satisfactory results. Fig. S2. The effect of ionic strength: Pd (II)-CGR system (curve a); Pd (II)-OXI-CGR system (curve b); Pd (II)-PIR- CGR system (curve c). Pd (II): 2.0 × 10- 4 mol L- 1; CGR: 1.0 × 10- 5 mol L- 1; OXI: 1.5 μg mL- 1; PIR: 2 μg mL- 1; NaCl: 1 mol L- 1. Fig. S3. The effect of time: Pd (II)-OXI-CGR system (curve a); Pd (II)-PIR-CGR system (curve b). Pd (II): 2.0 × 10- 4 mol L- 1; CGR: 1.0 × 10- 5 mol L- 1

  13. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  14. Poly(ε-caprolactone) decorated with one room-temperature red-emitting ruthenium(II) complex: synthesis, characterization, thermal and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Marcus; Jäger, Michael; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-04-13

    The incorporation of room-temperature red-emissive [Ru(II)(dqp)(dqp-CH(2) OH)](2+) (dqp is 2,6-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine) in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is explored following two routes. First, the ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone is investigated using the free ligand and the complex as initiators. Alternatively, the complexation strategy utilizing PCL-dqp as a macroligand is detailed. Both routes yield room-temperature emissive polymers centered at 400 nm (free ligand) and 680 nm (complex) in aerated solvent. DSC and TGA showed the typical properties of PCL, for example, the melting point (59 °C).

  15. Detailed Abundance Analysis of a Metal-poor Giant in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Fritz, T. K.; Rich, R. M.; Thorsbro, B.; Schultheis, M.; Origlia, L.; Chatzopoulos, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report the first results from our program to examine the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster connected to Sgr A*, with the goal of inferring the star formation and enrichment history of this system, as well as its connection and relationship with the central 100 pc of the bulge/bar system. We present the first high-resolution (R ˜ 24,000), detailed abundance analysis of a K = 10.2 metal-poor, alpha-enhanced red giant projected at 1.5 pc from the Galactic center, using NIRSPEC on Keck II. A careful analysis of the dynamics and color of the star locates it at about {26}-16+54 pc line-of-sight distance in front of the nuclear cluster. It probably belongs to one of the nuclear components (cluster or disk), not to the bar/bulge or classical disk. A detailed spectroscopic synthesis, using a new line list in the K band, finds [Fe/H] ˜ -1.0 and [α/Fe] ˜ +0.4, consistent with stars of similar metallicity in the bulge. As known giants with comparable [Fe/H] and alpha enhancement are old, we conclude that this star is most likely to be a representative of the ˜10 Gyr old population. This is also the most metal-poor-confirmed red giant yet discovered in the vicinity of the nuclear cluster of the Galactic center. We consider recent reports in the literature of a surprisingly large number of metal-poor giants in the Galactic center, but the reported gravity of {log}g˜ 4 for these stars calls into question their reported metallicities.

  16. Songbird genomics: analysis of 45 kb upstream of a polymorphic Mhc class II gene in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Gasper, J S; Shiina, T; Inoko, H; Edwards, S V

    2001-07-01

    Here we present the sequence of a 45 kb cosmid containing a previously characterized poly-morphic Mhc class II B gene (Agph-DAB1) from the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus). We compared it with a previously sequenced cosmid from this species, revealing two regions of 7.5 kb and 13.0 kb that averaged greater than 97% similarity to each another, indicating a very recent shared duplication. We found 12 retroelements, including two chicken repeat 1 (CR1) elements, constituting 6.4% of the sequence and indicating a lower frequency of retroelements than that found in mammalian genomic DNA. Agph-DAB3, a new class II B gene discovered in the cosmid, showed a low rate of polymorphism and may be functional. In addition, we found a Mhc class II B gene fragment and three genes likely to be functional (encoding activin receptor type II, a zinc finger, and a putative gamma-filamin). Phylogenetic analysis of exon 2 alleles of all three known blackbird Mhc genes indicated strong clustering of alleles by locus, implying that large amounts of interlocus gene conversion have not occurred since these genes have been diverging. Despite this, interspecific comparisons indicate that all three blackbird Mhc genes diverged from one another less than 35 million years ago and are subject to concerted evolution in the long term. Comparison of blackbird and chicken Mhc promoter regions revealed songbird promoter elements for the first time. The high gene density of this cosmid confirms similar findings for the chicken Mhc, but the segment duplications and diversity of retroelements resembles mammalian sequences.

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  19. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  20. Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the bioeffects of nitroglycerin on Hb-O II in single red blood cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Huihua Kenny; Ruan, Hung-Shiang; Cheng, Hung-You; Fang, Tung-Ting

    2007-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown to have the potential for providing oxygenated ability of erythrocytes. Raman line at 1638 cm-1 has also been reported as one significant oxygenic indicator for erythrocytes. In this research, we develop the Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the bioeffects of Nitroglycerin on hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a single red blood cell (RBC). Nitroglycerin has been frequently used in the management of angina pectoris. Nitroglycerin liberates nitric oxide (NO) to blood vessels. NO is an oxidizer that easily converts hemoglobin to methemoglobin. The conversion may cause the decrease of oxygenated ability of erythrocytes. In this study, we observed the oxidize state of erythrocytes caused by the over dosage of Nitroglycerin. When the dose of Nitroglycerin exceeds 2x10 -4 M, the oxygenic state of erythrocytes decreases significantly. The Raman spectroscopic results demonstrate the observation of the bioeffects of Nitroglycerin on hemoglobin.

  1. PDP1 regulates energy metabolism through the IIS-TOR pathway in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqian; Jiang, Jianhao; Chen, Yazhou; You, Lang; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang; Li, Zhiqian; Jiang, Jianhao; Niu, Baolong; Meng, Zhiqi

    2014-03-01

    The PAR-domain protein 1 (PDP1) is essential for locomotor activity of insects. However, its functions in insect growth and development have not been studied extensively, which prompted our hypothesis that PDP1 acts in energy metabolism. Here we report identification of TcPDP1 in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its functional analysis by RNAi. Treating larvae with dsTcPDP1 induced pupae developmental arrestment, accompanied by accelerated fat body degradation. dsTcPDP1 treatments in adults resulted in reduced female fecundity. Disruption of TcPDP1 expression affected the transcription of genes involved in insulin signaling transduction and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results support our hypothesis that TcPDP1 acts in energy metabolism in T. castaneum.

  2. CgNa, a type I toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea shows structural similarities to both type I and II toxins, as well as distinctive structural and functional properties(1).

    PubMed

    Salceda, Emilio; Pérez-Castells, Javier; López-Méndez, Blanca; Garateix, Anoland; Salazar, Hector; López, Omar; Aneiros, Abel; Ständker, Ludger; Béress, Lászlo; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Soto, Enrique; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2007-08-15

    CgNa (Condylactis gigantea neurotoxin) is a 47-amino-acid- residue toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea. The structure of CgNa, which was solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical and displays significant homology with both type I and II anemone toxins. CgNa also displays a considerable number of exceptions to the canonical structural elements that are thought to be essential for the activity of this group of toxins. Furthermore, unique residues in CgNa define a characteristic structure with strong negatively charged surface patches. These patches disrupt a surface-exposed cluster of hydrophobic residues present in all anemone-derived toxins described to date. A thorough characterization by patch-clamp analysis using rat DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons indicated that CgNa preferentially binds to TTX-S (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) voltage-gated sodium channels in the resting state. This association increased the inactivation time constant and the rate of recovery from inactivation, inducing a significant shift in the steady state of inactivation curve to the left. The specific structural features of CgNa may explain its weaker inhibitory capacity when compared with the other type I and II anemone toxins.

  3. CgNa, a type I toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea shows structural similarities to both type I and II toxins, as well as distinctive structural and functional properties1

    PubMed Central

    Salceda, Emilio; Pérez-Castells, Javier; López-Méndez, Blanca; Garateix, Anoland; Salazar, Hector; López, Omar; Aneiros, Abel; Ständker, Ludger; Béress, Lászlo; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Soto, Enrique; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    CgNa (Condylactis gigantea neurotoxin) is a 47-amino-acid- residue toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea. The structure of CgNa, which was solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical and displays significant homology with both type I and II anemone toxins. CgNa also displays a considerable number of exceptions to the canonical structural elements that are thought to be essential for the activity of this group of toxins. Furthermore, unique residues in CgNa define a characteristic structure with strong negatively charged surface patches. These patches disrupt a surface-exposed cluster of hydrophobic residues present in all anemone-derived toxins described to date. A thorough characterization by patch–clamp analysis using rat DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons indicated that CgNa preferentially binds to TTX-S (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) voltage-gated sodium channels in the resting state. This association increased the inactivation time constant and the rate of recovery from inactivation, inducing a significant shift in the steady state of inactivation curve to the left. The specific structural features of CgNa may explain its weaker inhibitory capacity when compared with the other type I and II anemone toxins. PMID:17506725

  4. The abundance spread in the giants of NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Freeman, K. C.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1981-02-01

    A spectroscopic survey has been performed of 69 stars on or near the giant branches of the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6752. Our basic results are: (i) There is a large range in the strength of the violet cyanogen bands on the red giant branch, with the available evidence strongly suggesting that the distribution is bimodal. (ii) The cyanogen variations on the giant branch appear to be accompanied by an anticorrelated variation in the abundance of the CH molecule. Spectrum synthesis analysis of a (CN strong)/(CN weak) pair of stars for which relatively high resolution data are available shows that there is a variation of Δ[N/A] ˜+0.9, and Δ[C/A] ˜-0.3, indicative of the CN cycle. (iii) On the red giant branch there are variations in the strength of the lines of Al I which correlate positively with the cyanogen variations. The size of the variations is consistent with the hypothesis that the same phenomenon has occurred in NGC 6752 and ω Centauri, but to a much smaller extent in the former. (iv) On the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), the features of CH are weaker than on the red giant branch at the same color or magnitude, and there are no examples of stars in the strong CN group. Spectrum synthesis suggests that the behavior of the CH features is consistent, on the average, with the effective temperature and gravities of the AGB stars, but that the absence of strong CN stars cannot be explained in this way. We set an upper limit of Δ[C/H] ˜0.3 to the possible range of carbon on the AGB at log L/L -- stars: individual: ˜2.3, and between this group and stars of similar color on the red giant branch. (v) Most of the stars on the anomalously low luminosity end of the AGB are not members of NGC 6752. Two stars, (CS 41 and CS 44), however, deserve further study, since they could be examples of partially mixed stars. No definitive statement can be made concerning the origin of the abundance anomalies. if mixing is responsible, the data require this process to

  5. Genomics and polymorphism of Agph-DAB1, an Mhc class II B gene in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Edwards, S V; Gasper, J; March, M

    1998-03-01

    To further our understanding of the evolution of avian Mhc genes at the genomic level, we screened a cosmid library made from a red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) with a blackbird cDNA probe and subcloned from one of the Mhc-containing cosmids a gene which we designate Agph-DAB1. The structure of the gene is similar to that found for chicken class II B genes, except that the introns are surprisingly large, ranging from 98 to over 600 bp, making this the longest avian class II B gene to date. Using primers targeted toward the introns flanking the peptide-binding region (PBR), we amplified the entirety of the second exon and determined nucleotide sequences of 41 PCR products from eight individual blackbirds. The 10 sequence types found, among which were two probable pseudogene sequences, exhibit the classic hallmarks for evolution of PBRs, namely, an excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions and evidence of gene conversion events in polymorphic subdomains. Despite these patterns and our use of intron primers, the distribution of sequences among individuals suggests that more than one locus was amplified in most individuals, and the bushlike tree of sequences provides little information as to locus-specific clusters. These results imply a complex history of gene conversion, recent duplication, or possibly, concerted evolution among multiple loci, although Agph-DAB1, the first genomic Mhc sequence from a bird other than chicken, provides important clues in the quest for locus-specific Mhc primers in birds.

  6. What spectroscopy reveals concerning the Mn oxidation levels in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II: X-ray to near infra-red.

    PubMed

    Pace, Ron J; Jin, Lu; Stranger, Rob

    2012-08-28

    Photosystem II (PS II), found in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, catalyses the most energetically demanding reaction in nature, the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen and protons. The water oxidase in PS II contains a Mn(4)Ca cluster (oxygen evolving complex, OEC), whose catalytic mechanism has been extensively investigated but is still unresolved. In particular the precise Mn oxidation levels through which the cluster cycles during functional turnover are still contentious. In this, the first of several planned parts, we examine a broad range of published data relating to this question, while considering the recent atomic resolution PS II crystal structure of Umena et al. (Nature, 2011, 473, 55). Results from X-ray, UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopies are considered, using an approach that is mainly empirical, by comparison with published data from known model systems, but with some reliance on computational or other theoretical considerations. The intention is to survey the extent to which these data yield a consistent picture of the Mn oxidation states in functional PS II - in particular, to test their consistency with two current proposals for the mean redox levels of the OEC during turnover; the so called 'high' and 'low' oxidation state paradigms. These systematically differ by two oxidation equivalents throughout the redox accumulating catalytic S state cycle (states S(0)···S(3)). In summary, we find that the data, in total, substantially favor the low oxidation proposal, particularly as a result of the new analyses we present. The low oxidation state scheme is able to resolve a number of previously 'anomalous' results in the observed UV-Visible S state turnover spectral differences and in the resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) of the Mn pre-edge region of the S(1) and S(2) states. Further, the low oxidation paradigm is able to provide a 'natural' explanation for the known sensitivity of the OEC Mn cluster to cryogenic near infra-red (NIR

  7. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Chemical Abundances of Stars in the Halo CASH Project II. The Li-, r- and s-Enhanced Metal-Poor Giant ligiant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, A.; Roederer, I. U.; Shetrone, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Rhee, J.; Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Sneden, C.; Beers, T. C.; Cowan, J. J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the first detailed abundance analysis of the metal-poor giant ligiant. This star was observed as part of the University of Texas Long-Term Chemical Abundances of Stars in the Halo (CASH) Project. We find that this metal-poor ([Fe/H] =-2.2) star has an unusually high lithium abundance (log ɛ (Li)= +2.1), mild carbon ([C/Fe] =+0.7) and sodium ([Na/Fe] =+0.6) enhancement, as well as enhancement of both spro ([Ba/Fe] =+0.8) and rpro ([Eu/Fe] =+0.5) material. The high Li abundance can be explained by self-enrichment through extra mixing mechanisms. If so, ligiant is the most metal-poor star in which this short-lived phase of Li enrichment has been observed. The r- and spro material was not produced in this star but was either present in the gas from which ligiant formed or was transferred to it from a more massive binary companion. Despite the current non-detection of radial velocity variations (over a time span of ˜180 days), it is possible that ligiant is in a long-period binary system, similar to other stars with both r and s enrichment.

  8. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  9. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Conductometric study of shear-dependent processes in red cell suspensions. II. Transient cross-stream hematocrit distribution.

    PubMed

    Pribush, A; Meyerstein, D; Meiselman, H J; Meyerstein, N

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental approach based on electrical properties of red blood cell (RBC) suspensions was applied to study the effects of the size and morphology of RBC aggregates on the transient cross-stream hematocrit distribution in suspensions flowing through a square cross-section flow channel. The information about the effective size of RBC aggregates and their morphology is extracted from the capacitance (C) and conductance (G) recorded during RBC aggregation, whereas a slower process of particle migration is manifested by delayed long-term changes in the conductance. Migration-induced changes in the conductance measured at low shear rates (< or =3.1 s(-1)) for suspensions of RBCs in a strongly aggregating medium reveal an increase to a maximum followed by a decrease to the stationary level. The ascending branch of G(t) curves reflects the aggregate migration in the direction of decreasing shear rate. A further RBC aggregation in the region of lower shear stresses leads to the formation of RBC networks and results in the transformation of the rheological behavior of suspensions from the thinning to the thickening. It is suggested that the descending branches of the G(t) curves recorded at low shear rates reflect an adjustment of the Hct distribution to a new state caused by a partial dispersion of RBC networks. For suspensions of non-aggregating RBCs it is found that depending on whether the shear rate is higher or lower compared with the prior value, individual RBCs migrate either toward the centerline of the flow or in the opposite direction.

  11. Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors: Analysis of Enrollment Data from the REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Glynn, Simone A.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Mast, Alan E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Murphy, Edward L.; Wright, David J.; Sacher, Ronald A.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Vij, Vibha; Simon, Toby L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Regular blood donors are at risk of iron deficiency, but characteristics which predispose to this condition are poorly defined. Methods 2425 red cell donors, either first time (FT) or reactivated donors (no donations for 2 years) or frequent donors were recruited for follow-up. At enrollment, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hemoglobin were determined. Donor variables included demographics, smoking, dietary intake, use of iron supplements, and menstrual/pregnancy history. Models to predict two measures of iron deficiency were developed: Absent iron stores (AIS) were indicated by ferritin < 12 ng/mL and iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE) by log (sTfR/ferritin) ≥ 2.07. Results 15.0% of donors had AIS, 41.7% IDE. In frequent donors, 16.4% and 48.7% of males had AIS and IDE, respectively, with corresponding proportions of 27.1% and 66.1% for females. Donation intensity was most closely associated with AIS/IDE (ORs from 5.3 to 52.2 for different donation intensity compared to FT donors). Being female, younger, and/or menstruating also increased the likelihood of having AIS/IDE, as did having a lower weight. Marginally significant variables for AIS and/or IDE were being a non-smoker, previous pregnancy and not taking iron supplements. Dietary variables were in general unrelated to AIS/IDE, as was race/ethnicity. Conclusion A large proportion of both female and male frequent blood donors have iron depletion. Donation intensity, gender/menstrual status, weight, and age are important independent predictors of AIS/IDE. Reducing the frequency of blood donation is likely to reduce the prevalence of iron deficiency among blood donors, as might implementing routine iron supplementation. PMID:20804527

  12. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  13. Facile luminescent tuning of Zn(II)/Hg(II) complexes based on flexible, semi-rigid and rigid polydentate Schiff bases from blue to green to red: structural, photophysics, electrochemistry and theoretical calculations studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Ming; Chen, Shuo; Fan, Rui-Qing; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Yang, Yu-Lin

    2015-05-07

    The photophysical properties of Zn(II)/Hg(II) Schiff base complexes could be fine and predictably tuned over a wide range of wavelengths by changing the ligand structures. A new series of polydentate Schiff base-type ligands, N,N'-bis(2-pyridinylethylidene)R(3)-1,2-diamine (), which contain a flexible, semi-rigid or rigid group (R(3) = butyl, cyclohexane, tolyl and phenylene), has been designed and employed for synthetizing new mononuclear or binuclear trans Zn(II)/Hg(II) complexes with a general formula of [M()Cl2] ( = N,N'-bis(2-pyridinylethylidene)phenylene-1,2-diamine, M = Zn, ; M = Hg, ), [M()Cl2] ( = N,N'-bis(2-pyridinylethylidene)toluene-3,4-diamine, M = Zn, ; M = Hg, ), [M2()Cl4]·nCH2Cl2 ( = N,N'-bis(2-pyridinylmethylene)cyclohexane-1,2-diamine, M = Zn, n = 0, ; M = Hg, n = 1, ), [M2()Cl4]·nCH3OH ( = N,N'-bis(2-pyridinylethylidene)cyclohexane-1,2-diamine, M = Zn, n = 1, ; M = Hg, n = 0, ), [M2()Cl4] ( = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-pyridinylmethylene)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine, M = Zn, ; M = Hg, ), [M2()Cl4]·nCH3CN ( = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-pyridinylmethylene)butane-1,4-diamine, M = Zn, n = 4, ; M = Hg, n = 0, ). All the ligands and complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and (1)H NMR spectra. Twelve structures of , , , , , and crystallized in three different conditions are further determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Their properties are fully characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence spectra both in solution and the solid state at room temperature. The luminescence color of these Zn(II)/Hg(II) Schiff base complexes could be tuned from blue to green to red (429-639 nm for , 434-627 nm for ) in solution by changing the ligand conjugated systems from flexibile () to semi-rigid () to rigid (). The spectra of the free Schiff bases are centered around 402-571 nm, which are perturbed upon the coordination to the Zn(II)/Hg(II) ion. Both the electrochemical data and TD-DFT calculations show that the HOMO-LUMO band gap from

  14. Optically active red-emitting Cu nanoclusters originating from complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and d/l-penicillamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tengfei; Guo, Yanjia; Lin, Min; Yuan, Mengke; Liu, Zhongde; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Despite a significant surge in the number of investigations into both optically active Au and Ag nanostructures, there is currently only limited knowledge about optically active Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs) and their potential applications. Here, we have succeeded in preparing a pair of optically active red-emitting CuNCs on the basis of complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and penicillamine (Pen) enantiomers, in which Pen serves as both a reducing agent and a stabilizing ligand. Significantly, the CuNCs feature unique aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics and therefore can serve as pH stimuli-responsive functional materials. Impressively, the ligand chirality plays a dramatic role for the creation of brightly emissive CuNCs, attributed to the conformation of racemic Pen being unfavorable for the electrostatic interaction, and thus suppressing the formation of cluster aggregates. In addition, the clusters display potential toward cytoplasmic staining and labelling due to the high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs) and remarkable cellular uptake, in spite that no chirality-dependent effects in autophagy and subcellular localization are observed in the application of chiral cluster enantiomer-based cell imaging.Despite a significant surge in the number of investigations into both optically active Au and Ag nanostructures, there is currently only limited knowledge about optically active Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs) and their potential applications. Here, we have succeeded in preparing a pair of optically active red-emitting CuNCs on the basis of complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and penicillamine (Pen) enantiomers, in which Pen serves as both a reducing agent and a stabilizing ligand. Significantly, the CuNCs feature unique aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics and therefore can serve as pH stimuli-responsive functional materials. Impressively, the ligand chirality plays a dramatic role for the creation of

  15. Giant Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a number of Herbig-Haro flows which extend over parsec-scale distances. The largest of these is the well known HH 111 jet complex, which is shown, through CCD images and a proper motion study, to have an angular extent of almost one degree on the sky, corresponding to 7.7 pc, making it the largest known HH flow. In our imaging survey we also found that T Tauri is at the center of a huge bipolar HH flow, HH 355, with a total extent of 38 arcmin, corresponding to 1.55 pc, and aligned with the axis of the tiny HH 255 flow surrounding the infrared companion T Tau S. We additionally have found a number of other giant HH flow candidates, including HH 315 at PV Cep, HH 41/295 at Haro 5a/6a, HH 300 in Bl8w, HH 354 in Li 165, HH 376 in Li 152, and HH 114/115 and HH 243/244/245/179 in the X Orionis molecular ring. It thus appears that it is common for HH flows to attain parsec-scale dimensions. The ubiquity of parsec-scale HH flows profoundly alters our view of the impact of young stars on their environment. Giant flows have dynamical ages comparable to the duration of the accretion phase of the sources, and provide a fossil record of their mass loss and accretion history. Multiple internal working surfaces and their S-shaped point symmetry provide evidence for variability of ejection velocity and orientation of the source jets. Giant HH flows are either longer or comparable in length to associated CO outflows, providing evidence for unified models in which HH flows power CO flows. Many giant flows have burst out of their source cloud cores and are dissociating molecules and injecting momentum and kinetic energy into the interclump medium of the host clouds. They contribute to the UV radiation field, and may produce C I and C ii in cloud interiors. Giant flows may contribute to the chemical rejuvenation of clouds, the generation of turbulent motions, and the self-regulation of star formation. The terminal working surfaces of giant flows may be

  16. Dissymmetric Bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) Complexes: Rich Variety and Bright Red to Near-Infrared Luminescence with a Large Pseudo-Stokes Shift.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Iwashima, Toshiki; Kögel, Julius F; Kusaka, Shinpei; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-05-04

    Bis(dipyrrinato)metal(II) and tris(dipyrrinato)metal(III) complexes have been regarded as much less useful luminophores than their boron difluoride counterparts (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacenes, BODIPYs), especially in polar solvent. We proposed previously that dissymmetry in such metal complexes (i.e., two different dipyrrinato ligands in one molecule) improves their fluorescence quantum efficiencies. In this work, we demonstrate the universality and utility of our methodology by synthesizing eight new dissymmetric bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes and comparing them with corresponding symmetric complexes. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and high-resolution mass spectrometry confirm the retention of dissymmetry in both solution and solid states. The dissymmetric complexes all show greater photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (ϕPL) than the corresponding symmetric complexes, allowing red to near-infrared emissions with large pseudo-Stokes shifts. The best performance achieves a maximum PL wavelength of 671 nm, a pseudo-Stokes shift of 5400 cm(-1), and ϕPL of 0.62-0.72 in toluene (dielectric constant εs = 2.4), dichloromethane (εs = 9.1), acetone (εs = 21.4), and ethanol (εs = 24.3). The large pseudo-Stokes shift is distinctive considering BODIPYs with small Stokes shifts (∼500 cm(-1)), and the ϕPL values are higher than or comparable to those of BODIPYs fluorescing at similar wavelengths. Electrochemistry and density functional theory calculations illustrate that frontier orbital ordering in the dissymmetric complexes meets the condition for efficient PL proposed in our theory.

  17. Giant Radio Sources in View of the Dynamical Evolution of FRII-Type Population. II. The Evolutionary Tracks on the P-D and u_c-E_tot Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machalski, J.; Chyzy, K. T.; Jamrozy, M.

    2004-12-01

    The time evolution of "fiducial" radio sources derived from fitting the dynamical model of Kaiser et al (1997) is compared with the observational data for the "clan" sources found in the sample of giant and normal-size FRII-type sources published in Paper I (Machalski et al 2004). Each "clan" comprises 3, 4 or 5 sample sources having similar values of the two basic physical parameters: the jet power Q_0 and central density of the galaxy nucleus rho_0 (determined in Paper I) but different ages, radio luminosities and axial ratios. These sources are considered as the "same" source observed at different epochs of its lifetime and used to fit the evolutionary luminosity--size (P-D) and energy density-total energy (u_c-E_tot) tracks derived from the model for a "fiducial" source with Q_0 and rho_0 equal to the averages of relevant values obtained for the "clan" members, as well as to constrain the evolutionary model of the source dynamics used. In the result we find that (i) the best fit is achieved when the Kaiser et al's model is modified by allowing an evolution of the sources' cocoon axial ratio with time as suggested by Blundell et al (1999), (ii) a slow acceleration of the average expansion speed of the cocoon along the jet axis is suggested by the "clan" sources. We argue that this acceleration, although minor, may be real and some supporting arguments come from the well known hydrodynamical considerations.

  18. CRIRES-POP: a library of high resolution spectra in the near-infrared. II. Data reduction and the spectrum of the K giant 10 Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, C. P.; Lebzelter, T.; Smette, A.; Wolff, B.; Hartman, H.; Käufl, H.-U.; Przybilla, N.; Ramsay, S.; Uttenthaler, S.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Bagnulo, S.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Nieva, M.-F.; Seemann, U.; Seifahrt, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. High resolution stellar spectral atlases are valuable resources to astronomy. They are rare in the 1-5 μm region for historical reasons, but once available, high resolution atlases in this part of the spectrum will aid the study of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena. Aims: The aim of the CRIRES-POP project is to produce a high resolution near-infrared spectral library of stars across the H-R diagram. The aim of this paper is to present the fully reduced spectrum of the K giant 10 Leo that will form the basis of the first atlas within the CRIRES-POP library, to provide a full description of the data reduction processes involved, and to provide an update on the CRIRES-POP project. Methods: All CRIRES-POP targets were observed with almost 200 different observational settings of CRIRES on the ESO Very Large Telescope, resulting in a basically complete coverage of its spectral range as accessible from the ground. We reduced the spectra of 10 Leo with the CRIRES pipeline, corrected the wavelength solution and removed telluric absorption with Molecfit, then resampled the spectra to a common wavelength scale, shifted them to rest wavelengths, flux normalised, and median combined them into one final data product. Results: We present the fully reduced, high resolution, near-infrared spectrum of 10 Leo. This is also the first complete spectrum from the CRIRES instrument. The spectrum is available online. Conclusions: The first CRIRES-POP spectrum has exceeded our quality expectations and will form the centre of a state-of-the-art stellar atlas. This first CRIRES-POP atlas will soon be available, and further atlases will follow. All CRIRES-POP data products will be freely and publicly available online. The spectrum is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/598/A79

  19. Long-lifetime and long-wavelength osmium (II) metal complexes containing polypyridine ligands: excellent red fluorescent dyes for biophysics and for sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Zakir; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1999-05-01

    Several luminescent complexes of osmium (II) containing polypyridine ligands have been prepared. The syntheses, photophysical and fluorescence polarization properties of [Os(phen)2(aphen)]2+, [Os(tpy)(mcbpy)(py)]2+, [Os(ttpy)2]2+, [Os(tpy)(triphos)]2+ and [Os(tppz)2]2+ are reported. Where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, aphen is 5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline, tpy is 2,2':6,2'-terpyridine, mcbpy is 4-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine-4'-carboxylic, py is pyridine, triphos is bis(2-diphenylphosphinoethyl)-phenyl phosphine, ttpy is 4- tolyl,2,2':6,2'-terpyridine, and tppz is 2,3,5,6- tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine. The complexes absorb light at above 550 nm, emit above 700 nm, and have emission lifetimes longer than 50 ns in water. The emission of all the complexes is polarized, so they can have applications as red light excitable dyes for biophysical studies of macromolecules and for polarization immunoassays. The complexes can also be used for lifetime-based oxygen sensing using low-cost phase fluorometry and a LED light source.

  20. Phase II-inducing, polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of corn (Zea mays L.) from phenotypes of white, blue, red and purple colors processed into masa and tortillas.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martinez, Leticia X; Parkin, Kirk L; Garcia, Hugo S

    2011-03-01

    White, blue, red and purple corns (Zea mays L.) were lime-cooked to obtain masa for tortillas. The total phenolics and anthocyanins content, antioxidant activity expressed as total reducing power (TRP), peroxyl radical bleaching (PRAC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) and quinone reductase (QR) induction in the murine hepatoma (Hepa 1 c1c7 cell line) as a biological marker for phase II detoxification enzymes were investigated. Among the extracts prepared from raw corn varieties the highest concentration of total phenolics, anthocyanins, antioxidant index and induction of QR-inducing activity were found in the Veracruz 42 (Ver 42) genotype. The nixtamalization process (masa) reduced total phenolics, anthocyanins and antioxidant activities and the ability for QR induction when was compared to raw grain. Processing masa into tortillas also negatively affected total phenolics, anthocyanin concentration, antioxidant activities, and QR induction in the colored corn varieties. The blue variety and its corresponding masa and tortillas did not induce QR. Ver 42 genotype and their products (masa and tortilla) showed the greatest antioxidant activity and capacity to induce QR.

  1. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  2. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. DUST PROPERTIES FOR OXYGEN-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Speck, A. K.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Hony, S.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-06-10

    We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHK{sub s} and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and Infrared Spectrograph spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spectroscopy observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer (RT) models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of RT models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population, we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al. and a power law with exponential decay grain size distribution like what Kim et al. used but with {gamma} of -3.5, a {sub min} of 0.01 {mu}m, and a {sub 0} of 0.1 {mu}m to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. Our models of the data require the luminosity of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 to be {approx}5100 L {sub sun} and {approx}36,000 L {sub sun}, respectively. This, combined with the stellar effective temperatures of 3700 K and 3500 K, respectively, that we find best fit the optical and near-infrared data, suggests stellar masses of {approx}3 M {sub sun} and {approx}7 M {sub sun}. This, in turn, suggests that HV 5715 is undergoing hot-bottom burning and that SSTSAGE052206 is not. Our models of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 require dust shells of inner radius {approx}17 and

  3. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  4. Surgical excision of the breast giant fibroadenoma under regional anesthesia by Pecs II and internal intercostal plane block: a case report and brief technical description: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Junho; Kim, Ikthae

    2017-01-01

    A 22-years-old female patient at 171 cm and 67 kg visited the Department of Breast Surgery of the hospital with a mass accompanied with pain on the left side breast as chief complaints. Since physical examination revealed a suspected huge mass, breast surgeon decided to perform surgical excision and requested anesthesia to our department. Surgery of breast tumor is often under local anesthesia. However, in case of big size tumor, surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. The patient feared general anesthesia. Unlike abdominal surgery, there is no need to control visceral pain for breast and anterior thoracic wall surgery. Therefore, we decided to perform resection under regional anesthesia. Herein, we report a successful anesthetic and pain management of the patient undergoing excision of a huge breast fibroadenoma under regional anesthesia using Pecs II and internal intercostal plane block. PMID:28184271

  5. Surgical excision of the breast giant fibroadenoma under regional anesthesia by Pecs II and internal intercostal plane block: a case report and brief technical description: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungtae; Shim, Junho; Kim, Ikthae

    2017-02-01

    A 22-years-old female patient at 171 cm and 67 kg visited the Department of Breast Surgery of the hospital with a mass accompanied with pain on the left side breast as chief complaints. Since physical examination revealed a suspected huge mass, breast surgeon decided to perform surgical excision and requested anesthesia to our department. Surgery of breast tumor is often under local anesthesia. However, in case of big size tumor, surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. The patient feared general anesthesia. Unlike abdominal surgery, there is no need to control visceral pain for breast and anterior thoracic wall surgery. Therefore, we decided to perform resection under regional anesthesia. Herein, we report a successful anesthetic and pain management of the patient undergoing excision of a huge breast fibroadenoma under regional anesthesia using Pecs II and internal intercostal plane block.

  6. DNA cleavage on photoexposure at the d-d band in ternary copper(II) complexes using red-light laser.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Shanta; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2006-12-25

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(L1)B](ClO4) (1, 2) and [Cu(L2)B](ClO4) (3, 4), where HL1 and HL2 are tridentate NSO- and ONO-donor Schiff bases and B is a heterocyclic base, viz. dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 1 and 3) or dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 2 and 4), were prepared and their DNA binding and photoinduced DNA cleavage activity studied. Complex 1, structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, shows an axially elongated square-pyramidal (4 + 1) coordination geometry in which the monoanionic L1 binds at the equatorial plane. The NN-donor dpq ligand exhibits an axial-equatorial binding mode. The complexes display good binding propensity to calf thymus DNA, giving a relative order 2 (NSO-dppz) > 4 (ONO-dppz) > 1 (NSO-dpq) > 3 (ONO-dpq). They cleave supercoiled pUC19 DNA to its nicked circular form when treated with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) by formation of hydroxyl radicals as the cleavage active species under dark reaction conditions. The photoinduced DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was investigated using UV radiation of 365 nm and red light of 633, 647.1, and 676.4 nm (CW He-Ne and Ar-Kr mixed gas ion laser sources) in the absence of MPA. Complexes 1 and 2, having photoactive NSO-donor Schiff base and dpq/dppz ligands, show dual photosensitizing effects involving both the photoactive ligands in the ternary structure with significantly better cleavage properties when compared to those of 3 and 4, having only photoactive dpq/dppz ligands. Involvement of singlet oxygen in the light-induced DNA cleavage reactions is proposed. A significant enhancement of the red-light-induced DNA cleavage activity is observed for the dpq and dppz complexes containing the sulfur ligand when compared to their earlier reported phen (1,10-phenanthroline) analogue. Enhancement of the cleavage activity on photoexposure at the d-d band indicates the occurrence of metal-assisted photosensitization processes involving the LMCT and d

  7. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES FOR 855 GIANTS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER OMEGA CENTAURI (NGC 5139)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Pilachowski, Catherine A. E-mail: catyp@astro.indiana.ed

    2010-10-20

    We present elemental abundances for 855 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri ({omega} Cen) from spectra obtained with the Blanco 4 m telescope and Hydra multifiber spectrograph. The sample includes nearly all RGB stars brighter than V = 13.5 and spans {omega} Cen's full metallicity range. The heavy {alpha} elements (Si, Ca, and Ti) are generally enhanced by {approx}+0.3 dex and exhibit a metallicity-dependent morphology that may be attributed to mass and metallicity-dependent Type II supernova (SN) yields. The heavy {alpha} and Fe-peak abundances suggest minimal contributions from Type Ia SNe. The light elements (O, Na, and Al) exhibit >0.5 dex abundance dispersions at all metallicities, and a majority of stars with [Fe/H]> - 1.6 have [O/Fe], [Na/Fe], and [Al/Fe] abundances similar to those in monometallic globular clusters, as well as O-Na, O-Al anticorrela